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Sample records for activities evaluation items

  1. Evaluation of Item Candidates: The PROMIS Qualitative Item Review

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, Darren A.; Rothrock, Nan; Yount, Susan; Stone, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    One of the PROMIS (Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System) network's primary goals is the development of a comprehensive item bank for patient-reported outcomes of chronic diseases. For its first set of item banks, PROMIS chose to focus on pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical function, and social function. An essential step for the development of an item pool is the identification, evaluation, and revision of extant questionnaire items for the core item pool. In this work, we also describe the systematic process wherein items are classified for subsequent statistical processing by the PROMIS investigators. Six phases of item development are documented: identification of extant items, item classification and selection, item review and revision, focus group input on domain coverage, cognitive interviews with individual items, and final revision before field testing. Identification of items refers to the systematic search for existing items in currently available scales. Expert item review and revision was conducted by trained professionals who reviewed the wording of each item and revised as appropriate for conventions adopted by the PROMIS network. Focus groups were used to confirm domain definitions and to identify new areas of item development for future PROMIS item banks. Cognitive interviews were used to examine individual items. Items successfully screened through this process were sent to field testing and will be subjected to innovative scale construction procedures. PMID:17443114

  2. Evaluating Item Fit for Multidimensional Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Bo; Stone, Clement A.

    2008-01-01

    This research examines the utility of the s-x[superscript 2] statistic proposed by Orlando and Thissen (2000) in evaluating item fit for multidimensional item response models. Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to investigate both the Type I error and statistical power of this fit statistic in analyzing two kinds of multidimensional test…

  3. Evaluating the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    1996-01-01

    Two possible standard error formulas for the polytomous differential item functioning index proposed by N. J. Dorans and A. P. Schmitt (1991) were derived. These standard errors, and associated hypothesis-testing procedures, were evaluated through simulated data. The standard error that performed better is based on N. Mantel's (1963)…

  4. Developing and evaluating innovative items for the NCLEX: Part 2, item characteristics and cognitive processing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Harmes, J Christine

    2009-01-01

    This article is a continuation of the research on the development and evaluation of innovative item formats for the NCLEX examinations that was published in the March/April 2009 edition of Nurse Educator. The authors discuss the innovative item templates and evaluate the statistical characteristics and level of cognitive processing required to answer the examination items.

  5. Evaluating Common Item Block Options When Faced with Practical Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolkowitz, Amanda; Davis-Becker, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of common item characteristics on the outcome of equating in credentialing examinations when traditionally recommended representation is not possible. This research used real data sets from several credentialing exams to test the impact of content representation, item statistics, and number of common items on…

  6. Assessing Scientific Reasoning: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Item Features That Affect Item Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiller, Jurik; Hartmann, Stefan; Mathesius, Sabrina; Straube, Philipp; Tiemann, Rüdiger; Nordmeier, Volkhard; Krüger, Dirk; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the criterion-related test score interpretation of a text-based assessment of scientific reasoning competencies in higher education by evaluating factors which systematically affect item difficulty. To provide evidence about the specific demands which test items of various difficulty make on pre-service…

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of the Values Tracker: A Two-Item Measure of Engagement in Valued Activities in Those With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Bailey, Robert W; McEntee, Mindy L; Ashworth, Julie; Levell, Jayne; Sowden, Gail; Vowles, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    Engagement in valued activities is an important outcome, particularly in treatments that aim to enhance quality of life in those with chronic conditions. The present study describes the initial evaluation of the Values Tracker (VT), a two-item measure of values engagement, in 302 treatment-seeking adults with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the utility of the VT in the statistical prediction of pain-related functioning, after controlling for demographic variables, pain intensity, and pain-related distress. Across analyses, pain intensity accounted for significant variance (range ΔR2 = .06-.09) with pain-related distress adding additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .07-.19). The VT accounted for additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .02-.17) for all variables with the exception of physical disability. These findings provide initial support for the utility of the VT in those with chronic pain. Given the VT's brevity, it may be particularly useful for tracking changes in engagement in values across sessions.

  8. Safety Evaluation for Packaging (onsite) T Plant Canyon Items

    SciTech Connect

    OBRIEN, J.H.

    2000-07-14

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability to safely ship mostly unique inventories of miscellaneous T Plant canyon waste items (T-P Items) encountered during the canyon deck clean off campaign. In addition, this SEP addresses contaminated items and material that may be shipped in a strong tight package (STP). The shipments meet the criteria for onsite shipments as specified by Fluor Hanford in HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments.

  9. 48 CFR 52.212-2 - Evaluation-Commercial Items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation-Commercial....212-2 Evaluation—Commercial Items. As prescribed in 12.301(c), the Contracting Officer may insert a provision substantially as follows: Evaluation—Commercial Items (JAN 1999) (a) The Government will award...

  10. Factor- and Item-Level Analyses of the 38-Item Activities Scale for Kids-Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Anita M.; Gorton, George E.; Bjornson, Kristie; Bevans, Katherine; Stout, Jean L.; Narayanan, Unni; Tucker, Carole A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Children and adolescents highly value their ability to participate in relevant daily life and recreational activities. The Activities Scale for Kids-performance (ASKp) instrument measures the frequency of performance of 30 common childhood activities, and has been shown to be valid and reliable. A revised and expanded 38-item ASKp (ASKp38)…

  11. 48 CFR 52.212-2 - Evaluation-Commercial Items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Evaluation-Commercial Items. 52.212-2 Section 52.212-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses...

  12. Building an Evaluation Scale using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, John P.; Wu, Hao; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of NLP methods requires testing against a previously vetted gold-standard test set and reporting standard metrics (accuracy/precision/recall/F1). The current assumption is that all items in a given test set are equal with regards to difficulty and discriminating power. We propose Item Response Theory (IRT) from psychometrics as an alternative means for gold-standard test-set generation and NLP system evaluation. IRT is able to describe characteristics of individual items - their difficulty and discriminating power - and can account for these characteristics in its estimation of human intelligence or ability for an NLP task. In this paper, we demonstrate IRT by generating a gold-standard test set for Recognizing Textual Entailment. By collecting a large number of human responses and fitting our IRT model, we show that our IRT model compares NLP systems with the performance in a human population and is able to provide more insight into system performance than standard evaluation metrics. We show that a high accuracy score does not always imply a high IRT score, which depends on the item characteristics and the response pattern.1 PMID:28004039

  13. Evaluating Item Discrimination Power of WHOQOL-BREF from an Item Response Model Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ting Hsiang; Yao, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) has become an important component of health. By using the methodology of psychometric theory, we examine the item properties of the WHOQOL-BRIEF. Samejima's graded response model with natural metrics of the logistic response function was fitted. The results showed items with negative natures were less discriminating. Items…

  14. Evaluating innovative items for the NCLEX, part I: usability and pilot testing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Harmes, J Christine

    2009-01-01

    National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) has recently conducted preliminary research on the feasibility of including various types of innovative test questions (items) on the NCLEX. This article focuses on the participants' reactions to and their strategies for interacting with various types of innovative items. Part 2 in the May/June issue will focus on the innovative item templates and evaluation of the statistical characteristics and the level of cognitive processing required to answer the examination items.

  15. Differential Item Functioning Analysis of the 2003-04 NHANES Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Yong; Zhu, Weimo

    2011-01-01

    Using differential item functioning (DIF) analyses, this study examined whether there were any DIF items in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) physical activity (PA) questionnaire. A subset of adult data from the 2003-04 NHANES study (n = 3,083) was used. PA items related to respondents' occupational, transportation,…

  16. 48 CFR 52.212-2 - Evaluation-Commercial Items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... offer, shall result in a binding contract without further action by either party. Before the offer's... (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.212-2 Evaluation—Commercial Items. As prescribed in 12.301(c), the Contracting Officer may insert...

  17. Evaluation of Item-Based Top-N Recommendation Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-15

    explosive growth of the world-wide-web and the emergence of e - commerce has led to the development of recommender systems—a personalized information...of e - commerce has led to the development of recom- mender systems [11]. Recommender systems is a personalized information filtering technology, used to...items, utilized by many e - commerce sites, cannot take advantage of pre-computed user-to-user similarities. Consequently, even though the throughput of

  18. International Assessment: A Rasch Model and Teachers' Evaluation of TIMSS Science Achievement Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is a comparative assessment of the achievement of students in many countries. In the present study, a rigorous independent evaluation was conducted of a representative sample of TIMSS science test items because item quality influences the validity of the scores used to inform…

  19. Evaluating the Operational Feasibility of Using Subsets of Items to Recommend Minimal Competency Cut Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kannan, Priya; Sgammato, Adrienne; Tannenbaum, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing cut scores using the Angoff method requires panelists to evaluate every item on a test and make a probability judgment. This can be time-consuming when there are large numbers of items on the test. Previous research using resampling studies suggest that it is possible to recommend stable Angoff-based cut score estimates using a…

  20. Meta-analytic guidelines for evaluating single-item reliabilities of personality instruments.

    PubMed

    Spörrle, Matthias; Bekk, Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    Personality is an important predictor of various outcomes in many social science disciplines. However, when personality traits are not the principal focus of research, for example, in global comparative surveys, it is often not possible to assess them extensively. In this article, we first provide an overview of the advantages and challenges of single-item measures of personality, a rationale for their construction, and a summary of alternative ways of assessing their reliability. Second, using seven diverse samples (Ntotal = 4,263) we develop the SIMP-G, the German adaptation of the Single-Item Measures of Personality, an instrument assessing the Big Five with one item per trait, and evaluate its validity and reliability. Third, we integrate previous research and our data into a first meta-analysis of single-item reliabilities of personality measures, and provide researchers with guidelines and recommendations for the evaluation of single-item reliabilities.

  1. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  2. Selection of Course Evaluation Items by High and Low Rated Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, John C.; Brandenburg, Dale C.

    CAFETERIA-type rating systems, modeled after the one developed at Purdue University, allow the instructors being evaluated to select those items which their students will use in evaluating the instructors. Such computer-assisted systems allow the instructor to tailor the evaluation to the particular instructional strategies used. This study…

  3. Item difficulty in the evaluation of computer-based instruction: an example from neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Chariker, Julia H; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R

    2012-01-01

    This article reports large item effects in a study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Outcome measures of the efficiency of learning, transfer of learning, and generalization of knowledge diverged by a wide margin across test items, with certain sets of items emerging as particularly difficult to master. In addition, the outcomes of comparisons between instructional methods changed with the difficulty of the items to be learned. More challenging items better differentiated between instructional methods. This set of results is important for two reasons. First, it suggests that instruction may be more efficient if sets of consistently difficult items are the targets of instructional methods particularly suited to them. Second, there is wide variation in the published literature regarding the outcomes of empirical evaluations of computer-based instruction. As a consequence, many questions arise as to the factors that may affect such evaluations. The present article demonstrates that the level of challenge in the material that is presented to learners is an important factor to consider in the evaluation of a computer-based instructional system.

  4. Students' Evaluation of Teaching: Concerns of Item Diagnosticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Thomas J.; Dillon, William R.; Leak, Roland L.

    2010-01-01

    The validity and reliability of students' evaluation of teaching effectiveness has been debated since the 1970s. One concern is the extent to which the ratings are influenced by halo, and if so, how does halo affect the interpretation of the ratings? This study seeks to assess the degree to which the halo affects the diagnosticity of individual…

  5. Linking Existing Instruments to Develop an Activity of Daily Living Item Bank.

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Ying; Romero, Sergio; Bonilha, Heather S; Simpson, Kit N; Simpson, Annie N; Hong, Ickpyo; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-11-16

    This study examined dimensionality and item-level psychometric properties of an item bank measuring activities of daily living (ADL) across inpatient rehabilitation facilities and community living centers. Common person equating method was used in the retrospective veterans data set. This study examined dimensionality, model fit, local independence, and monotonicity using factor analyses and fit statistics, principal component analysis (PCA), and differential item functioning (DIF) using Rasch analysis. Following the elimination of invalid data, 371 veterans who completed both the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and minimum data set (MDS) within 6 days were retained. The FIM-MDS item bank demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = .98) and met three rating scale diagnostic criteria and three of the four model fit statistics (comparative fit index/Tucker-Lewis index = 0.98, root mean square error of approximation = 0.14, and standardized root mean residual = 0.07). PCA of Rasch residuals showed the item bank explained 94.2% variance. The item bank covered the range of θ from -1.50 to 1.26 (item), -3.57 to 4.21 (person) with person strata of 6.3. The findings indicated the ADL physical function item bank constructed from FIM and MDS measured a single latent trait with overall acceptable item-level psychometric properties, suggesting that it is an appropriate source for developing efficient test forms such as short forms and computerized adaptive tests.

  6. [Criteria for evaluating difficulties in cleaning single-use items].

    PubMed

    Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Balsamo, Ana Cristina; Lopes, Cristiane de Lion Botero Couto; Zotelli, Maria Filomena Mourão; Couto, Andréa Tamancoldi; Paschoal, Maria Lúcia Habib

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we elaborated criteria to evaluate difficulties in cleaning single-use articles (SVA), which will be used for decision making about investments in the validation of reuse protocols. This methodological research was carried out at a University Hospital and aimed to: identify SVA used and reused at the institution; propose an instrument to measure risk levels of SVA for cleaning; classify SVA using 9 criteria established in the proposed instrument and evaluate its applicability. We identified 32 SVA, whose risks were classified using the colors used in traffic lights, with a view to supporting decision making about reuse. The proposed criteria make it possible to diagnose the risk of cleaning the SVA under analysis, as well as their implications for the safety of the sterilization process.

  7. Evaluation of the Magnitude of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items. Program Statistics Research Technical Report No. 94-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.

    Several recent studies have investigated the application of statistical inference procedures to the analysis of differential item functioning (DIF) in test items that are scored on an ordinal scale. Mantel's extension of the Mantel-Haenszel test is a possible hypothesis-testing method for this purpose. The development of descriptive statistics for…

  8. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2: item refinement and psychometric evaluation with college women and men.

    PubMed

    Tylka, Tracy L; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M

    2013-01-01

    The 21-item Intuitive Eating Scale (IES; Tylka, 2006) measures individuals' tendency to follow their physical hunger and satiety cues when determining when, what, and how much to eat. While its scores have demonstrated reliability and validity with college women, the IES-2 was developed to improve upon the original version. Specifically, we added 17 positively scored items to the original IES items (which were predominantly negatively scored), integrated an additional component of intuitive eating (Body-Food Choice Congruence), and evaluated its psychometric properties with 1,405 women and 1,195 men across three studies. After we deleted 15 items (due to low item-factor loadings, high cross-loadings, and redundant content), the results supported the psychometric properties of the IES-2 with women and men. The final 23-item IES-2 contained 11 original items and 12 added items. Exploratory and second-order confirmatory factor analyses upheld its hypothesized 4-factor structure (its original 3 factors, plus Body-Food Choice Congruence) and a higher order factor. The IES-2 was largely invariant across sex, although negligible differences on 1 factor loading and 2 item intercepts were detected. Demonstrating validity, the IES-2 total scores and most IES-2 subscale scores were (a) positively related to body appreciation, self-esteem, and satisfaction with life; (b) inversely related to eating disorder symptomatology, poor interoceptive awareness, body surveillance, body shame, body mass index, and internalization of media appearance ideals; and (c) negligibly related to social desirability. IES-2 scores also garnered incremental validity by predicting psychological well-being above and beyond eating disorder symptomatology. The IES-2's applications for empirical research and clinical work are discussed.

  9. Microbiological Evaluation of Suture Items Before Radiation Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Österberg, Bertil O.

    1973-01-01

    Microbiological contamination levels of suture samples taken at various stages of the manufacturing process in a new hygienically controlled plant were determined by employing a membrane filturation technique. Both raw material and materials handled manually in the production process were tested to assess the effect of manual handling on the product contamination level. Evaluation of the efficacy of contamination control, however, was directed primarily to the finished, packaged products, just prior to the processing with cobalt 60. The suture material for testing was divided into two groups, namely, wet and dry products, the wet being packaged in a special „tubing” fluid consisting mainly of isopropyl alcohol. Initial contamination results are reported as the average of values obtained on the test day and the preceding 9 consecutive production days. A total of 1,787 suture samples tested in the dry group showed daily averages varying between 2.1 and 14.8 contaminants per suture. The 2,980 wet-packaged suture samples tested gave daily averages varying from 0.7 to 4.2 contaminants per suture. The highest values obtained for an individual suture were 400 for the dry and 89 for the wet. Identification studies of the contaminants revealed that fungi predominated. Most of the bacterial contaminants proved to be spore-forming rods. PMID:4751791

  10. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable. PMID:28174459

  11. Preliminary reliability of the five item physical activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min-Haeng

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to design a physical activity questionnaire reflecting on the basic principles and recommendations of exercise and to examine its reliability. [Subjects and Methods] 342 males and 374 females from the community centers (senior center, residential culture center, sport center, and YWCA center) participated in this study. [Results] The test-retest reliability of the physical activity questionnaire, measured with an interval of three months, being between 0.61 and 0.91 signifies that the questionnaire was useful instrument for assessing physical activity levels. [Conclusion] This study found that the simple physical activity questionnaire containing the frequency, duration, intensity, overall length, and type of activities that the person performed during their leisure time was reliable.

  12. Differential Effects of Encoding Instructions on Brain Activity Patterns of Item and Associative Memory.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nina; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Persson, Jonas; Laukka, Erika J; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-03-01

    Evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests a critical role of hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in associative relative to item encoding. Here, we investigated similarities and differences in functional brain correlates for associative and item memory as a function of encoding instruction. Participants received either incidental (animacy judgments) or intentional encoding instructions while fMRI was employed during the encoding of associations and items. In a subsequent recognition task, memory performance of participants receiving intentional encoding instructions was higher compared with those receiving incidental encoding instructions. Furthermore, participants remembered more items than associations, regardless of encoding instruction. Greater brain activation in the left anterior hippocampus was observed for intentionally compared with incidentally encoded associations, although activity in this region was not modulated by the type of instruction for encoded items. Furthermore, greater activity in the left anterior hippocampus and left IFG was observed during intentional associative compared with item encoding. The same regions were related to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations and were thus task relevant. Similarly, connectivity of the anterior hippocampus to the right superior temporal lobe and IFG was uniquely linked to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations. Our study demonstrates the differential involvement of anterior hippocampus in intentional relative to incidental associative encoding. This finding likely reflects that the intent to remember triggers a specific binding process accomplished by this region.

  13. Evaluation of five guidelines for option development in multiple-choice item-writing.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rafael J; Moreno, Rafael; Martín, Irene; Trigo, M Eva

    2009-05-01

    This paper evaluates certain guidelines for writing multiple-choice test items. The analysis of the responses of 5013 subjects to 630 items from 21 university classroom achievement tests suggests that an option should not differ in terms of heterogeneous content because such error has a slight but harmful effect on item discrimination. This also occurs with the "None of the above" option when it is the correct one. In contrast, results do not show the supposedly negative effects of a different-length option, the use of specific determiners, or the use of the "All of the above" option, which not only decreases difficulty but also improves discrimination when it is the correct option.

  14. 17 CFR 229.1206 - (Item 1206) Present activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Disclosure by Registrants Engaged in Oil and..., the registrant's present activities, such as the number of wells in the process of being drilled (including wells temporarily suspended), waterfloods in process of being installed, pressure...

  15. Reliability and Convergent Validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey Physical Activity Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinger, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity of the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) vigorous physical activity (VPA), moderate physical activity (MPA), flexibility (FLEX), and muscular strength and/or endurance (MSE) questions. Twenty college students completed the four items twice during the same day. During the next 7…

  16. Rasch analysis of the Persian version of PedsQLTM Oral Health Scale: further psychometric evaluation on item validity including differential item functioning

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Ying; Kumar, Santhosh; Pakpour, Amir H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study aimed to further evaluate the psychometric properties of one recently developed oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) instrument (PedsQL Oral Health Scale), including student self-report and parent-proxy report. Specifically, we tested the item validity,threshold order, local dependency, and differential item functioning (DIF) across gender and rater. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, and study population was recruited in Qazvin, Iran using one-stage sampling with the unit of school. Students and their parents (1529 dyads) separately completed the Persian version of PedsQL Oral Health Scale. The psychometric properties were analyzed using Rasch rating scale model, including item validity, threshold order for response categories, and DIF across gender (boys vs. girls in student self-report) and rater (student self report vs. parent-proxy report). Results: All items had satisfactory in fit and outfit mean square error. One disordering category (the response of often) was found in parent-proxy report, while all categories were ordered in student self-report. All items were DIF-trivial across gender and rater. Conclusion: PedsQL Oral Health Scale is a valid instrument to measure OHRQoL. However, our results indicated that the parent-proxy report was inferior to the student self-report, and healthcare providers should primarily use the student self-report. PMID:27579258

  17. Classical Item Analysis Using Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Direct Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A directly applicable latent variable modeling procedure for classical item analysis is outlined. The method allows one to point and interval estimate item difficulty, item correlations, and item-total correlations for composites consisting of categorical items. The approach is readily employed in empirical research and as a by-product permits…

  18. Modeling of Word Translation: Activation Flow from Concepts to Lexical Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Ardi; Dijkstra, Ton; Gerakaki, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Whereas most theoretical and computational models assume a continuous flow of activation from concepts to lexical items in spoken word production, one prominent model assumes that the mapping of concepts onto words happens in a discrete fashion (Bloem & La Heij, 2003). Semantic facilitation of context pictures on word translation has been taken to…

  19. Evaluating the Psychometric Characteristics of Generated Multiple-Choice Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Pugh, Debra; Touchie, Claire; Boulais, André-Philippe; De Champlain, André

    2016-01-01

    Item development is a time- and resource-intensive process. Automatic item generation integrates cognitive modeling with computer technology to systematically generate test items. To date, however, items generated using cognitive modeling procedures have received limited use in operational testing situations. As a result, the psychometric…

  20. Evaluating the Robustness of Graded Response Model and Classical Test Theory Parameter Estimates to Deviant Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinar, Evan F.; Zickar, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the influence of deviant scale items on item parameter estimates of focal scale items and person parameter estimates through a comparison of item response theory (IRT) and classical test theory (CTT) models. Used Monte Carlo methods to explore results from a pilot investigation of job attitude data. Discusses implications for researchers…

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Releasing an Item Pool on a Test's Empirical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Buckendahl, Chad W; Gerrow, Jack D

    2016-10-01

    Protecting the security of examination questions is an important task for high-stakes examining boards/agencies and university programs. To maintain the security of questions, examining boards and university programs use a combination of prevention, detection, and enforcement strategies. A common prevention strategy is to establish a number of controls on access to questions; however, restricting access can motivate examinees to try harder to reconstruct questions that may appear on future versions of the test. Moreover, access to study materials by some groups and not others can present a challenge to the fairness of examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the empirical stability of test characteristics. Specifically, the primary research objective was to investigate the empirical stability of the items and test forms of a written examination before and after a specific policy decision was implemented. As a response to both of these concerns, this article describes a study that evaluated how psychometric (i.e., statistical) properties of test forms and individual questions might be affected by publicly releasing a larger number of questions from an item question pool. A series of analyses were conducted, including item drift to evaluate stability of the characteristics. The results suggest that empirical characteristics of the test forms and individual questions have remained relatively stable since the release policy was implemented. Specifically, statistical properties of the test forms have continued to perform similarly to test forms that were constructed prior to the release. Although the results of this study were promising, the context of this specific testing program may have offered additional protections such as a limited number of administrations that others may not. Therefore, testing/examining agencies and university programs may want to consider this strategy with appropriate caution.

  2. Construct Validity Evidence for Single-Response Items to Estimate Physical Activity Levels in Large Sample Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Allen W.; Morrow, James R., Jr.; Bowles, Heather R.; FitzGerald, Shannon J.; Blair, Steven N.

    2007-01-01

    Valid measurement of physical activity is important for studying the risks for morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine evidence of construct validity of two similar single-response items assessing physical activity via self-report. Both items are based on the stages of change model. The sample was 687 participants (men =…

  3. Further Evaluation of Leisure Items in the Attention Condition of Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Carreau, Abbey; MacDonald, Jackie; Pence, Sacha T

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that including leisure items in the attention condition of a functional analysis may produce engagement that masks sensitivity to attention. In this study, 4 individuals' initial functional analyses indicated that behavior was maintained by nonsocial variables (n  =  3) or by attention (n  =  1). A preference assessment was used to identify items for subsequent functional analyses. Four conditions were compared, attention with and without leisure items and control with and without leisure items. Following this, either high- or low-preference items were included in the attention condition. Problem behavior was more probable during the attention condition when no leisure items or low-preference items were included, and lower levels of problem behavior were observed during the attention condition when high-preference leisure items were included. These findings suggest how preferred items may hinder detection of behavioral function. PMID:18816974

  4. Measurement of Teen Dating Violence Attitudes: An Item Response Theory Evaluation of Differential Item Functioning According to Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Marshall, Grant N.; Jaycox, Lisa H.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate assessment of attitudes about intimate partner violence is important for evaluation of prevention and early intervention programs. Assessment of attitudes about cross-gender interactions is particularly susceptible to bias because it requires specifying the gender of the perpetrator and the victim. As it is likely that respondents will…

  5. Item Difficulty in the Evaluation of Computer-Based Instruction: An Example from Neuroanatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chariker, Julia H.; Naaz, Farah; Pani, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports large item effects in a study of computer-based learning of neuroanatomy. Outcome measures of the efficiency of learning, transfer of learning, and generalization of knowledge diverged by a wide margin across test items, with certain sets of items emerging as particularly difficult to master. In addition, the outcomes of…

  6. Materials identification and surveillance project item evaluation. Item: Impure mixture of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide (PUUOXBC05)

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.; Appert, Q.; Davis, C.

    1997-06-01

    In this report Los Alamos researchers characterize properties relevant to storage of an impure mixture of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide (impure mixed oxide (MOX) that is composed of 43.8 mass % plutonium and 17.8 mass % uranium) in accordance with the department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This is the first sample of an impure mixture of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide to be evaluated by the materials identification and surveillance project. Methods used to characterize the mixture include mass loss-on-calcination measurements, mass loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements, elemental analysis, plutonium and uranium isotopic analysis, particle analyses measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS), and surface-area analyses. LOI measurements show a steady decrease in magnitude as the calcining temperature is increased. In contrast, calcining at progressively increasing temperatures does not appear to significantly change the specific surface area of the impure MOX. The LOI value for the powder after final 950 C calcination is 0.4 mass %. Water and carbon dioxide are the major gaseous products formed at all temperatures.

  7. [Research about re-evaluation of screening of traditonal Chinese medicine symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Xie, Yanming; Wang, Yongyan

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of post-marketing Chinese medicine re-evaluation is to identify Chinese medicine clinical indications, while designing scientific and rational of Chinese medicine symptoms items are important to the result of symptoms re-evaluation. This study give screening of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) symptoms item of post-marketing medicine Xuezhikang re-evaluation as example that reference to principle dyslipidemia clinical research, academic dissertations, Xuezhikang directions, clinical expert practice experience etc. while standardization those symptom names and screening 41 dyslipidemia common symptoms. Furthermore, this paper discuss about the accoerdance and announcements when screening symptoms item, so as to providing a research thread to manufacture PRO chart for post-marketing medicine re-evaluation.

  8. Evaluation of the Plot Method for Identifying Potentially Biased Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambleton, Ronald K.; Rogers, H. Jane

    This report was designed to respond to two major methodological shortcomings in the item bias literature: (1) misfitting test models; and (2) the use of significance tests. Specifically, the goals of the research were to describe a newly developed method known as the "plot method" for identifying potentially biased test items and to…

  9. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  10. A core-item reviewer evaluation (CoRE) system for manuscript peer review.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Engel, Jessica M; Salzman-Scott, Sherry A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Doi, Suhail A R

    2014-01-01

    Manuscript peer review is essential for ensuring accountability to all involved in the publication process, including authors, journals, and readers. Lack of consensus regarding what constitutes an accountable manuscript peer review process has resulted in varying practices from one journal to the next. Currently, reviewers are asked to make global judgments about various aspects of a paper for review irrespective of whether guided by a review checklist or not, and several studies have documented gross disagreement between reviewers of the same manuscript. We have previously proposed that the solution may be to direct reviewers to concrete items that do not require global judgments but rather provide a specific choice, along with referee justification for such choices. This study evaluated use of such a system via an international survey of health care professionals who had recently reviewed a health care--related manuscript. Results suggest that use of such a peer review system by reviewers does indeed improve interreviewer agreement, and thus, has the potential to support more consistent and effective peer review, if introduced into journal processes for peer review.

  11. Development of a Postacute Hospital Item Bank for the New Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Helene M.

    2010-01-01

    The PEDI-CAT is a new computer adaptive test (CAT) version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Additional PEDI-CAT items specific to postacute pediatric hospital care were recently developed using expert reviews and cognitive interviewing techniques. Expert reviews established face and construct validity, providing positive…

  12. The Loneliness Questionnaire-Short Version: an evaluation of reverse-worded and non-reverse-worded items via item response theory.

    PubMed

    Ebesutani, Chad; Drescher, Christopher F; Reise, Steven P; Heiden, Laurie; Hight, Terry L; Damon, John D; Young, John

    2012-01-01

    Although reverse-worded items have often been incorporated in scale construction to minimize the effects of acquiescent reporting biases, some researchers have more recently begun questioning this approach and wondering whether the advantages associated with incorporating reverse-worded items is worth the complexities that they bring to measures (e.g., Brown, 2003 ; Marsh, 1996 ). In this study, we used item response theory (IRT) to determine whether there is statistical justification to eliminate the reverse-worded items (e.g., "I have lots of friends") from the Loneliness Questionnaire (LQ; Asher, Hymel, & Renshaw, 1984) and retain only the non-reverse-worded items (e.g., "I'm lonely") to inform the provision of a shortened LQ version. Using a large sample of children (Grades 2-7; n = 6,784) and adolescents (Grades 8-12; n = 4,941), we examined the psychometric properties of the 24-item LQ and found support for retaining the 9 non-reverse-worded LQ items to make up a shortened measure of loneliness in youth. We found that the non-reverse-worded items were associated with superior psychometric properties relative to the reverse-worded items with respect to reliability and IRT parameters (e.g., discrimination and item information). A 3-point Likert-type scale was also found to be more suitable for measuring loneliness across both children and adolescents compared to the original 5-point scale. The relative contributions of reverse-worded and non-reverse-worded items in scale development for youth instruments are also discussed.

  13. Dealing with Omitted and Not-Reached Items in Competence Tests: Evaluating Approaches Accounting for Missing Responses in Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi; Gräfe, Linda; Rose, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Data from competence tests usually show a number of missing responses on test items due to both omitted and not-reached items. Different approaches for dealing with missing responses exist, and there are no clear guidelines on which of those to use. While classical approaches rely on an ignorable missing data mechanism, the most recently developed…

  14. Development of new physical activity and sedentary behavior change self-efficacy questionnaires using item response modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theoretically, increased levels of physical activity self-efficacy (PASE) should lead to increased physical activity, but few studies have reported this effect among youth. This failure may be at least partially attributable to measurement limitations. In this study, Item Response Modeling (IRM) was...

  15. Controlling Type I Error Rate in Evaluating Differential Item Functioning for Four DIF Methods: Use of Three Procedures for Adjustment of Multiple Item Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye

    2010-01-01

    In DIF studies, a Type I error refers to the mistake of identifying non-DIF items as DIF items, and a Type I error rate refers to the proportion of Type I errors in a simulation study. The possibility of making a Type I error in DIF studies is always present and high possibility of making such an error can weaken the validity of the assessment.…

  16. Evaluation of Two Types of Differential Item Functioning in Factor Mixture Models with Binary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, HwaYoung; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Conventional differential item functioning (DIF) detection methods (e.g., the Mantel-Haenszel test) can be used to detect DIF only across observed groups, such as gender or ethnicity. However, research has found that DIF is not typically fully explained by an observed variable. True sources of DIF may include unobserved, latent variables, such as…

  17. An Evaluation of Item Response Theory Classification Accuracy and Consistency Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Hao, Shiqi

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces two new classification consistency indices that can be used when item response theory (IRT) models have been applied. The new indices are shown to be related to Rudner's classification accuracy index and Guo's classification accuracy index. The Rudner- and Guo-based classification accuracy and consistency indices are…

  18. Evaluation of Model Selection Strategies for Cross-Level Two-Way Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patarapichayatham, Chalie; Kamata, Akihito; Kanjanawasee, Sirichai

    2012-01-01

    Model specification issues on the cross-level two-way differential item functioning model were previously investigated by Patarapichayatham et al. (2009). Their study clarified that an incorrect model specification can easily lead to biased estimates of key parameters. The objective of this article is to provide further insights on the issue by…

  19. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2: Item Refinement and Psychometric Evaluation with College Women and Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tylka, Tracy L.; Kroon Van Diest, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    The 21-item Intuitive Eating Scale (IES; Tylka, 2006) measures individuals' tendency to follow their physical hunger and satiety cues when determining when, what, and how much to eat. While its scores have demonstrated reliability and validity with college women, the IES-2 was developed to improve upon the original version. Specifically, we added…

  20. Evaluating rivastigmine in mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease dementia using ADAS-cog items.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Frederick A; Aarsland, Dag; Brønnick, Kolbjørn S; Meng, Xiangyi; Tekin, Sibel; Olin, Jason T

    2010-08-01

    Rivastigmine has been shown to improve cognition in patients with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). To further explore the impact of anticholinesterase therapy on PDD, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-cog) items were assessed in a retrospective analysis of a 24-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rivastigmine. Mean changes from baseline at week 24 were calculated for ADAS-cog item scores and for 3 cognitive domain scores. A total of 362 patients were randomized to 3 to 12 mg/d rivastigmine capsules and 179 to placebo. Patients with PDD receiving rivastigmine improved versus placebo on items: word recall, following commands, ideational praxis, remembering test instructions, and comprehension of spoken language (P < .05), with standardized mean differences ranging from 0.04 to 0.30. Rivastigmine also showed significant effects versus placebo on all domains: memory, language, and praxis. The ADAS-cog is sensitive to broad cognitive changes in PDD. Overall, rivastigmine was associated with improvements on individual cognitive items and general cognitive domains.

  1. An Assessment of the Nonparametric Approach for Evaluating the Fit of Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Tie; Wells, Craig S.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2014-01-01

    As item response theory has been more widely applied, investigating the fit of a parametric model becomes an important part of the measurement process. There is a lack of promising solutions to the detection of model misfit in IRT. Douglas and Cohen introduced a general nonparametric approach, RISE (Root Integrated Squared Error), for detecting…

  2. Using a Single-Item Physical Activity Measure to Describe and Validate Parents' Physical Activity Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kyra; White, Katherine M.; Cuddihy, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The accurate measurement of health-related physical activity (PA), often interpreted as either 150 min/week of at least moderate-intensity PA (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2008) or at least 30 min of at least moderate-intensity PA on 5 or more days per week (Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing [AGDHA], 2005;…

  3. Effects of Delay and Number of Related List Items on Implicit Activation for DRM Critical Items in a Speeded Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Michelle L.; Hutchison, Keith A.; Rand, Kristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined decay and additivity of semantic priming produced by DRM false memory lists on a naming task. Subjects were presented with study lists containing 14 DRM items that were either all 14 related, the first 7 related, the second 7 related, or all 14 unrelated to the non-presented critical item. Priming was measured on a naming…

  4. Objective and subjective hardness of a test item used for evaluating food mixing ability.

    PubMed

    Salleh, N M; Fueki, K; Garrett, N R; Ohyama, T

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare objective and subjective hardness of selected common foods with a wax cube used as a test item in a mixing ability test. Objective hardness was determined for 11 foods (cream cheese, boiled fish paste, boiled beef, apple, raw carrot, peanut, soft/hard rice cracker, jelly, plain chocolate and chewing gum) and the wax cube. Peak force (N) to compress each item was obtained from force-time curves generated with the Tensipresser. Perceived hardness ratings of each item were made by 30 dentate subjects (mean age 26.9 years) using a visual analogue scale (100 mm). These subjective assessments were given twice with a 1 week interval. High intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for test-retest reliability were seen for all foods (ICC > 0.68; P < 0.001). One-way anova found a significant effect of food type on both the objective hardness score and the subjective hardness rating (P < 0.001). The wax cube showed significant lower objective hardness score (32.6 N) and subjective hardness rating (47.7) than peanut (45.3 N, 63.5) and raw carrot (82.5 N, 78.4) [P < 0.05; Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW)-F]. A significant semilogarithmic relationship was found between the logarithm of objective hardness scores and subjective hardness ratings across twelve test items (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). These results suggest the wax cube has a softer texture compared with test foods traditionally used for masticatory performance test, such as peanut and raw carrot. The hardness of the wax cube could be modified to simulate a range of test foods by changing mixture ratio of soft and hard paraffin wax.

  5. What is the Ability Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) good for? An evaluation using item response theory.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Marina; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mikolajczak, Moira; Luminet, Olivier; Hansenne, Michel; Rossier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The ability approach has been indicated as promising for advancing research in emotional intelligence (EI). However, there is scarcity of tests measuring EI as a form of intelligence. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT, is among the few available and the most widespread measure of EI as an ability. This implies that conclusions about the value of EI as a meaningful construct and about its utility in predicting various outcomes mainly rely on the properties of this test. We tested whether individuals who have the highest probability of choosing the most correct response on any item of the test are also those who have the strongest EI ability. Results showed that this is not the case for most items: The answer indicated by experts as the most correct in several cases was not associated with the highest ability; furthermore, items appeared too easy to challenge individuals high in EI. Overall results suggest that the MSCEIT is best suited to discriminate persons at the low end of the trait. Results are discussed in light of applied and theoretical considerations.

  6. What Is the Ability Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) Good for? An Evaluation Using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Marina; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Mikolajczak, Moira; Luminet, Olivier; Hansenne, Michel; Rossier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    The ability approach has been indicated as promising for advancing research in emotional intelligence (EI). However, there is scarcity of tests measuring EI as a form of intelligence. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT, is among the few available and the most widespread measure of EI as an ability. This implies that conclusions about the value of EI as a meaningful construct and about its utility in predicting various outcomes mainly rely on the properties of this test. We tested whether individuals who have the highest probability of choosing the most correct response on any item of the test are also those who have the strongest EI ability. Results showed that this is not the case for most items: The answer indicated by experts as the most correct in several cases was not associated with the highest ability; furthermore, items appeared too easy to challenge individuals high in EI. Overall results suggest that the MSCEIT is best suited to discriminate persons at the low end of the trait. Results are discussed in light of applied and theoretical considerations. PMID:24901541

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Domain Names and Definitions Revisions: Further Evaluation of Content Validity in IRT-derived Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Riley, William T.; Rothrock, Nan; Bruce, Bonnie; Christodolou, Christopher; Cook, Karon; Hahn, Elizabeth A.; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Content validity of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is evaluated primarily during item development, but subsequent psychometric analyses, particularly for item-response theory (IRT)-derived scales, often result in considerable item pruning and potential loss of content. After selecting items for the PROMIS banks based on psychometric and content considerations, we invited external content expert reviews of the degree to which the initial domain names and definitions represented the calibrated item bank content. Methods A minimum of four content experts reviewed each item bank and recommended a domain name and definition based on item content. Domain names and definitions then were revealed to the experts who rated how well these names and definitions fit the bank content and provided recommendations for definition revisions. Results These reviews indicated that the PROMIS domain names and definitions remained generally representative of bank content following item pruning, but modifications to two domain names and minor to moderate revisions of all domain definitions were needed to optimize fit with the item bank content. Conclusions This reevaluation of domain names and definitions following psychometric item pruning, although not previously documented in the literature, appears to be an important procedure for refining conceptual frameworks and further supporting content validity. PMID:20593306

  8. An Evaluation of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 Using Item Response Theory: Which Items Are Most Strongly Related to Psychological Distress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meijer, Rob R.; de Vries, Rivka M.; van Bruggen, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The psychometric structure of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18; Derogatis, 2001) was investigated using Mokken scaling and parametric item response theory. Data of 487 outpatients, 266 students, and 207 prisoners were analyzed. Results of the Mokken analysis indicated that the BSI-18 formed a strong Mokken scale for outpatients and…

  9. Influence of the wording of evaluation items on outcome-based evaluation results for large-group teaching in anatomy, biochemistry and legal medicine.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sven; Pyka, Katharina; Mueller, Tjark; von Streinbuechel, Nicole; Raupach, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    Student learning outcome is an important dimension of teaching quality in undergraduate medical education. Measuring an increase in knowledge during teaching requires repetitive objective testing which is usually not feasible. As an alternative, student learning outcome can be calculated from student self-ratings. Comparative self-assessment (CSA) gain reflects the performance difference before and after teaching, adjusted for initial knowledge. It has been shown to be a valid proxy measure of actual learning outcome derived from objective tests. However, student self-ratings are prone to a number of confounding factors. In the context of outcome-based evaluation, the wording of self-rating items is crucial to the validity of evaluation results. This randomized trial assessed whether including qualifiers in these statements impacts on student ratings and CSA gain. First-year medical students self-rated their initial (then-test) and final (post-test) knowledge for lectures in anatomy, biochemistry and legal medicine, respectively, and 659 questionnaires were retrieved. Six-point scales were used for self-ratings with 1 being the most positive option. Qualifier use did not affect then-test ratings but was associated with slightly less favorable post-test ratings. Consecutively, mean CSA gain was smaller for items containing qualifiers than for items lacking qualifiers (50.6±15.0% vs. 56.3±14.6%, p=0.079). The effect was more pronounced (Cohen's d=0.82) for items related to anatomy. In order to increase fairness of outcome-based evaluation and increase the comparability of CSA gain data across subjects, medical educators should agree on a consistent approach (qualifiers for all items or no qualifiers at all) when drafting self-rating statements for outcome-based evaluation.

  10. Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S): psychometric properties in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Pitarch, María José Gallego

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Brief version of the Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale - Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) in a non-clinical Spanish population. Rodebaugh et al. (2004) recommend the use of this scale composed of 8 straightforwardly-worded items, instead of the 12-item version of the BFNE. The sample consisted of 542 undergraduate students, 71.3% of whom were women and 28.7% were men; the mean age was 21.71 (4.78) years. Exploratory factor analysis produced one factor which accounted for 51.28% of variance. The internal consistency of the scale was alpha = .89. The BFNE-S correlated with the Social Avoidance and Distress Scale (r = .44), the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker Modified (r = .44), the Public Speaking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (r = -.38) and both subscales of the Self-Statements during Public Speaking (SSPS-P r = -.22; SSPS-N r = .53). ANOVAs revealed significant differences in the BFNE-S amongst a non-clinical population, persons suffering from specific social phobia, non-generalized social phobia and generalized social phobia.

  11. Enhanced Automatic Question Creator--EAQC: Concept, Development and Evaluation of an Automatic Test Item Creation Tool to Foster Modern e-Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutl, Christian; Lankmayr, Klaus; Weinhofer, Joachim; Hofler, Margit

    2011-01-01

    Research in automated creation of test items for assessment purposes became increasingly important during the recent years. Due to automatic question creation it is possible to support personalized and self-directed learning activities by preparing appropriate and individualized test items quite easily with relatively little effort or even fully…

  12. Using the Nominal Response Model to Evaluate Response Category Discrimination in the PROMIS Emotional Distress Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kathleen; Reise, Steven; Cai, Li; Hays, Ron D.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used a nominal response item response theory model to estimate category boundary discrimination (CBD) parameters for items drawn from the Emotional Distress item pools (Depression, Anxiety, and Anger) developed in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information Systems (PROMIS) project. For polytomous items with ordered response…

  13. Numerical Differentiation Methods for Computing Error Covariance Matrices in Item Response Theory Modeling: An Evaluation and a New Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Wei; Cai, Li; Thissen, David; Xin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    In item response theory (IRT) modeling, the item parameter error covariance matrix plays a critical role in statistical inference procedures. When item parameters are estimated using the EM algorithm, the parameter error covariance matrix is not an automatic by-product of item calibration. Cai proposed the use of Supplemented EM algorithm for…

  14. Item-Specific and Generalization Effects on Brain Activation when Learning Chinese Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Yuan; Booth, James R.; Chou, Tai-Li; Ding, Guo-Sheng; Peng, Dan-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Neural changes related to learning of the meaning of Chinese characters in English speakers were examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We examined item specific learning effects for trained characters, but also the generalization of semantic knowledge to novel transfer characters that shared a semantic radical (part of a…

  15. 17 CFR 229.1205 - (Item 1205) Drilling and other exploratory and development activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 AND ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT OF 1975-REGULATION S-K Disclosure by..., disclose: (1) The number of net productive and dry exploratory wells drilled; and (2) The number of net productive and dry development wells drilled. (b) Definitions. For purposes of this Item 1205, the...

  16. Psychometric Evaluation of Chinese-Language 44-Item and 10-Item Big Five Personality Inventories, Including Correlations with Chronotype, Mindfulness and Mind Wandering

    PubMed Central

    Carciofo, Richard; Yang, Jiaoyan; Song, Nan; Du, Feng; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    The 44-item and 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI) personality scales are widely used, but there is a lack of psychometric data for Chinese versions. Eight surveys (total N = 2,496, aged 18–82), assessed a Chinese-language BFI-44 and/or an independently translated Chinese-language BFI-10. Most BFI-44 items loaded strongly or predominantly on the expected dimension, and values of Cronbach's alpha ranged .698-.807. Test-retest coefficients ranged .694-.770 (BFI-44), and .515-.873 (BFI-10). The BFI-44 and BFI-10 showed good convergent and discriminant correlations, and expected associations with gender (females higher for agreeableness and neuroticism), and age (older age associated with more conscientiousness and agreeableness, and also less neuroticism and openness). Additionally, predicted correlations were found with chronotype (morningness positive with conscientiousness), mindfulness (negative with neuroticism, positive with conscientiousness), and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency (negative with conscientiousness, positive with neuroticism). Exploratory analysis found that the Self-discipline facet of conscientiousness positively correlated with morningness and mindfulness, and negatively correlated with mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Furthermore, Self-discipline was found to be a mediator in the relationships between chronotype and mindfulness, and chronotype and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Overall, the results support the utility of the BFI-44 and BFI-10 for Chinese-language big five personality research. PMID:26918618

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of Chinese-Language 44-Item and 10-Item Big Five Personality Inventories, Including Correlations with Chronotype, Mindfulness and Mind Wandering.

    PubMed

    Carciofo, Richard; Yang, Jiaoyan; Song, Nan; Du, Feng; Zhang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    The 44-item and 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI) personality scales are widely used, but there is a lack of psychometric data for Chinese versions. Eight surveys (total N = 2,496, aged 18-82), assessed a Chinese-language BFI-44 and/or an independently translated Chinese-language BFI-10. Most BFI-44 items loaded strongly or predominantly on the expected dimension, and values of Cronbach's alpha ranged .698-.807. Test-retest coefficients ranged .694-.770 (BFI-44), and .515-.873 (BFI-10). The BFI-44 and BFI-10 showed good convergent and discriminant correlations, and expected associations with gender (females higher for agreeableness and neuroticism), and age (older age associated with more conscientiousness and agreeableness, and also less neuroticism and openness). Additionally, predicted correlations were found with chronotype (morningness positive with conscientiousness), mindfulness (negative with neuroticism, positive with conscientiousness), and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency (negative with conscientiousness, positive with neuroticism). Exploratory analysis found that the Self-discipline facet of conscientiousness positively correlated with morningness and mindfulness, and negatively correlated with mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Furthermore, Self-discipline was found to be a mediator in the relationships between chronotype and mindfulness, and chronotype and mind wandering/daydreaming frequency. Overall, the results support the utility of the BFI-44 and BFI-10 for Chinese-language big five personality research.

  18. An Investigation of "Honesty Check" Items in Higher Education Course Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Kelly D.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Bradley, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The reliability and validity of course evaluations in higher education is often assumed. The typical Likert-type surveys utilized when students' evaluate the course and instructor often overlook measurement issues, or deal with them in an ineffective manner. Given the importance that is placed on higher education course evaluations, with results…

  19. Qualitative Evaluation of Pediatric Pain-Behavior, -Quality and -Intensity Item Candidates and the PROMIS Pain Domain Framework in Children with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, C. Jeffrey; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Farrell, Jennifer; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Ken; Dampier, Carlton; Cunningham, Natoshia; Crosby, Lori; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2015-01-01

    As initial steps in a broader effort to develop and test pediatric Pain Behavior and Pain Quality item banks for the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®), we employed qualitative interview and item review methods to 1) evaluate the overall conceptual scope and content validity of the PROMIS pain domain framework among children with chronic /recurrent pain conditions, and 2) develop item candidates for further psychometric testing. To elicit the experiential and conceptual scope of pain outcomes across a variety of pediatric recurrent/chronic pain conditions, we conducted semi-structured individual (32) and focus-group interviews (2) with children and adolescents (8–17 years), and parents of children with pain (individual (32) and focus group (2)). Interviews with pain experts (10) explored the operational limits of pain measurement in children. For item bank development, we identified existing items from measures in the literature, grouped them by concept, removed redundancies, and modified remaining items to match PROMIS formatting. New items were written as needed and cognitive debriefing was completed with children and their parents, resulting in 98 Pain Behavior (47 self, 51 proxy), 54 Quality and 4 Intensity items for further testing. Qualitative content analyses suggest that reportable pain outcomes that matter to children with pain are captured within and consistent with the pain domain framework in PROMIS. PMID:26335990

  20. Multiple Activities Program: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omaha Public Schools, NE.

    This is an evaluation report of the Multiple Activities Program, an ESEA Title I Program conducted in the Omaha Public Schools from September 1969 to September 1970. The report is designed as an adaptation of the C.I.P.P. evaluation model (context, input, process, and product). The needs, objectives, activities, and success of each strand within…

  1. An Evaluation of Forced-Choice and True-False Item Formats in Personality Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Douglas N.; And Others

    In a comparative evaluation of a standard true-false format for personality assessment and a forced-choice format, subjects from college residential units were assigned randomly to respond either to the forced-choice or standard true-false form of the Personality Research Form (PRF). All subjects also rated themselves and the members of their…

  2. Gathering Evidence for Validity during the Design, Development, and Qualitative Evaluation of Thermochemistry Concept Inventory Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wren, David; Barbera, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Assessment instruments developed specifically for chemistry classrooms have increased in number over the past decade. In the design, development, and evaluation of these instruments, the chemical education community has adopted many of the practices and standards used by the greater assessment communities. Methodologies for creating new assessment…

  3. Using Item Data for Evaluating Criterion Reference Measures with an Empirical Investigation of Index Consistency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meredith, Keith E.; Sabers, Darrell L.

    Data required for evaluating a Criterion Referenced Measurement (CRM) is described with a matrix. The information within the matrix consists of the "pass-fail" decisions of two CRMs. By differentially defining these two CRMs, different concepts of reliability and validity can be examined. Indices suggested for analyzing the matrix are listed with…

  4. Evaluating the Consistency of Angoff-Based Cut Scores Using Subsets of Items within a Generalizability Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kannan, Priya; Sgammato, Adrienne; Tannenbaum, Richard J.; Katz, Irvin R.

    2015-01-01

    The Angoff method requires experts to view every item on the test and make a probability judgment. This can be time consuming when there are large numbers of items on the test. In this study, a G-theory framework was used to determine if a subset of items can be used to make generalizable cut-score recommendations. Angoff ratings (i.e.,…

  5. Action Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark; Keane, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Maximizing school resources and managing a shrinking budget--these are two important items affected when a building's roofing system does not perform properly. Rather than acting in haste, school and university administrators should do what every teacher tells a student prior to answering any question: think through the research and studies to…

  6. Application of Group-Level Item Response Models in the Evaluation of Consumer Reports about Health Plan Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reise, Steven P.; Meijer, Rob R.; Ainsworth, Andrew T.; Morales, Leo S.; Hays, Ron D.

    2006-01-01

    Group-level parametric and non-parametric item response theory models were applied to the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS[R]) 2.0 core items in a sample of 35,572 Medicaid recipients nested within 131 health plans. Results indicated that CAHPS responses are dominated by within health plan variation, and only weakly…

  7. Taking an Item-Level Approach to Measuring Change with the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation: An Application of Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Robert M., III

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effectiveness of curricular or instructional innovations, researchers often attempt to measure change in students' conceptual understanding of the target subject matter. The measurement of change is therefore a critical endeavor. Often, this is accomplished through pre-post testing using an assessment such as a…

  8. [Functional capacity in the elderly: analyzing questions on mobility and basic and instrumental activities of daily living using Item Response Theory].

    PubMed

    César, Cibele Comini; Mambrini, Juliana Vaz de Melo; Ferreira, Fabiane Ribeiro; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2015-05-01

    This article aims to evaluate the items used to measure functional capacity in the 2010 Health Survey in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, using Item Response Theory. We analyzed the scale's dimensionality, the items' position and discriminatory power, and the precision of the functional capacity estimate. The study was based on a sample of 2,174 individuals aged 60 to 99 years, 61% of whom were women, with a median of 4 years of schooling. The instrument with 21 items (4 response options) showed a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.98. Factor analysis identified one factor that explained 92% of the variability between the items. The results indicated: (i) redundancy in items; (ii) precise estimation of functional capacity only for elderly below the median on the scale; and (iii) inability of the elderly to differentiate between response options. The analysis suggests the need to discuss items included in the instrument in order to cover a wider range of the scale and seek more appropriate response options.

  9. Psychometric Evaluation of 5- and 4-Item Versions of the LATCH Breastfeeding Assessment Tool during the Initial Postpartum Period among a Multiethnic Population

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal consistency, structural validity, sensitivity and specificity of the 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment tool among a multiethnic population in Singapore. Methods The study was a secondary analysis of a subset of data (n = 907) from our previous breastfeeding survey from 2013 to 2014. The internal consistency of the LATCH was examined using Cronbach’s alpha. The structural validity was assessed using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and the proposed factors were confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using separate samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the LATCH score thresholds for predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding. Results The Cronbach’s alpha values of the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments were 0.70 and 0.74, respectively. The EFA demonstrated a one-factor structure for the 5- and 4-item LATCH assessments among a randomized split of 334 vaginally delivered women. Two CFA of the 4-item LATCH demonstrated better fit indices of the models compared to the two CFA of the 5-item LATCH among another randomized split of 335 vaginally delivered women and 238 cesarean delivered women. Using cutoffs of 5.5 and 3.5 were recommended when predicting non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions of the LATCH assessment among vaginally delivered women (n = 669), with satisfactory sensitivities (94% and 95%), low specificities (0% and 2%), low positive predictive values (25%) and negative predictive values (20% and 47%). A cutoff of 5.5 was recommended to predict non-exclusive breastfeeding for 5- and 4-item versions among cesarean delivered women (n = 238) with satisfactory sensitivities (93% and 98%), low specificities (4% and 9%), low positive predictive values (41%) and negative predictive values (65% and 75%). Therefore, the tool has good sensitivity but poor specificity, positive and negative predictive

  10. GAMMA-PULSE-HEIGHT EVALUATION OF A USA SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BURIAL GROUND SPECIAL CONFIGURATION WASTE ITEM

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Sigg, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2009-03-23

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Burial Ground had a container labeled as Box 33 for which they had no reliable solid waste stream designation. The container consisted of an outer box of dimensions 48-inch x 46-inch x 66-inch and an inner box that contained high density and high radiation dose material. From the outer box Radiation Control measured an extremity dose rate of 22 mrem/h. With the lid removed from the outer box, the maximum dose rate measured from the inner box was 100 mrem/h extremity and 80 mrem/h whole body. From the outer box the material was sufficiently high in density that the Solid Waste Management operators were unable to obtain a Co-60 radiograph of the contents. Solid Waste Management requested that the Analytical Development Section of Savannah River National Laboratory perform a {gamma}-ray assay of the item to evaluate the radioactive content and possibly to designate a solid waste stream. This paper contains the results of three models used to analyze the measured {gamma}-ray data acquired in an unusual configuration.

  11. More Information From Fewer Questions: The Factor Structure and Item Properties of the Original and Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Woods, Carol M.; Thissen, David M.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Chambless, Dianne L.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2004-01-01

    Statistical methods designed for categorical data were used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and item response theory (IRT) analyses of the Fear of Negative Evaluation scale (FNE; D. Watson & R. Friend, 1969) and the Brief FNE (BFNE; M. R. Leary, 1983). Results suggested that a 2-factor model fit the data better for both the FNE and the…

  12. OEA Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) Division Activities. Info-Item Educators Digest/No. 5080.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Education Association, Columbus. Instruction and Professional Development Div.

    This document presents the Instruction and Professional Development (IPD) division activities of the Ohio Education Association. First, the purpose of the IPD division is explained. Next, the IPD is discussed in terms of the help it lends to the local associations in its role of improving instruction in the areas of professional development. This…

  13. Evaluation of the physical activity biography: sport and transport.

    PubMed

    Rogen, Sandra; Hofmann, Peter; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-05-01

    Beside the genetic disposition, physical activity (PA) is one of the major health factors and can play a large role in the prevention and therapy of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity-related diseases etc.). In contrast to the genetic disposition, PA can be deliberately influenced by lifestyle. Therefore, it is of high importance to assess PA patterns. In order to assess PA reliably and validly, a new questionnaire (Physical Activity Biography, PAB) was created. The PAB assesses recreational PA (sport and transport) and enables to distinguish between endurance intensity levels and considers strength and high speed activity patterns throughout life. This study aims to evaluate the PAB by means of item analysis, retest-reliability and validity (criteria were physical fitness assessed by the questionnaire FFB-mot and by exercise tests). 141 participants answered the PAB. For deriving retest-reliability, 81 participants completed the PAB after a retest-interval of one month again. 55 participated in exercise tests and answered the FFB-mot to determine construct validity. Retest-reliability (ICC) above 0.7 was found for most items. For the items assessing recent PA, the criteria of convergent and discriminant validity were given. Despite the complexity of the question under study, the results fulfilled the expectations concerning reliability and validity. The PAB enables to assess the amount of sport and locomotion a person has accomplished during different life time frames and, because of the protective effects of PA on various diseases, may become an important tool for risk assessment. Key pointsThe risk of chronic diseases depends largely on physical activity biography.A new questionnaire (PAB) assessing recent and lifetime physical activity was created.The PAB assesses physical activity during sports and transport.The results of the evaluation of the PAB fulfilled the expectations.The PAB enables to determine a person's amount of recreational

  14. Evaluation of the Physical Activity Biography: Sport and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Rogen, Sandra; Hofmann, Peter; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    Beside the genetic disposition, physical activity (PA) is one of the major health factors and can play a large role in the prevention and therapy of many diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer, obesity-related diseases etc.). In contrast to the genetic disposition, PA can be deliberately influenced by lifestyle. Therefore, it is of high importance to assess PA patterns. In order to assess PA reliably and validly, a new questionnaire (Physical Activity Biography, PAB) was created. The PAB assesses recreational PA (sport and transport) and enables to distinguish between endurance intensity levels and considers strength and high speed activity patterns throughout life. This study aims to evaluate the PAB by means of item analysis, retest-reliability and validity (criteria were physical fitness assessed by the questionnaire FFB-mot and by exercise tests). 141 participants answered the PAB. For deriving retest-reliability, 81 participants completed the PAB after a retest-interval of one month again. 55 participated in exercise tests and answered the FFB-mot to determine construct validity. Retest-reliability (ICC) above 0.7 was found for most items. For the items assessing recent PA, the criteria of convergent and discriminant validity were given. Despite the complexity of the question under study, the results fulfilled the expectations concerning reliability and validity. The PAB enables to assess the amount of sport and locomotion a person has accomplished during different life time frames and, because of the protective effects of PA on various diseases, may become an important tool for risk assessment. Key points The risk of chronic diseases depends largely on physical activity biography. A new questionnaire (PAB) assessing recent and lifetime physical activity was created. The PAB assesses physical activity during sports and transport. The results of the evaluation of the PAB fulfilled the expectations. The PAB enables to determine a person’s amount of

  15. Evaluation of doctoral nursing programs in Japan by faculty members and their educational and research activities.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Azusa; Gregg, Misuzu F; Nagata, Satoko; Miki, Yuko; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of doctoral programs in nursing is becoming more important with the rapid increase in the programs in Japan. This study aimed to evaluate doctoral nursing programs by faculty members and to analyze the relationship of the evaluation with educational and research activities of faculty members in Japan. Target settings were all 46 doctoral nursing programs. Eighty-five faculty members from 28 programs answered the questionnaire, which included 17 items for program evaluation, 12 items for faculty evaluation, 9 items for resource evaluation, 3 items for overall evaluations, and educational and research activities. A majority gave low evaluations for sources of funding, the number of faculty members and support staff, and administrative systems. Faculty members who financially supported a greater number of students gave a higher evaluation for extramural funding support, publication, provision of diverse learning experiences, time of supervision, and research infrastructure. The more time a faculty member spent on advising doctoral students, the higher were their evaluations on the supportive learning environment, administrative systems, time of supervision, and timely feedback on students' research. The findings of this study indicate a need for improvement in research infrastructure, funding sources, and human resources to achieve quality nursing doctoral education in Japan.

  16. Rehearsal of to-be-remembered items is unnecessary to perform directed forgetting within working memory: Support for an active control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Festini, Sara B; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A

    2017-01-01

    Directed forgetting tasks instruct people to forget targeted memoranda. In the context of working memory, people attempt to forget representations that are currently held in mind. Here, we evaluated candidate mechanisms of directed forgetting within working memory, by (a) testing the influence of articulatory suppression, a rehearsal-reducing and attention-demanding secondary task, on directed forgetting efficacy, and by (b) assessing the ability of people to perform forgetting in the absence of to-be-remembered competitors to rehearse. In Experiment 1, articulatory suppression interfered with directed forgetting, increasing the proportion of false alarms to to-be-forgotten probes in the working memory phase and decreasing the magnitude of the directed forgetting effect as assessed by an incidental long-term memory recognition test. Experiment 2 replicated the effects of articulatory suppression and tested whether the simultaneous requirement to retain, and presumably rehearse, to-be-remembered items was necessary for successful forgetting. The long-term directed forgetting effect was equivalent whether or not participants had to-be-remembered items to rehearse during the working memory phase. Experiment 3 included an additional comparison condition and confirmed that articulatory suppression interfered with directed forgetting and that participants were as efficient at directed forgetting with and without competitors to remember. In combination, these experiments suggest that directed forgetting in working memory requires an active control process that is limited by articulatory suppression, and that the demand to remember a concurrent memory set is unnecessary for this control process to operate. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Developing Parallel Career and Occupational Development Objectives and Exercise (Test) Items in Spanish for Assessment and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muratti, Jose E.; And Others

    A parallel Spanish edition was developed of released objectives and objective-referenced items used in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in the field of Career and Occupational Development (COD). The Spanish edition was designed to assess the identical skills, attitudes, concepts, and knowledge of Spanish-dominant students…

  18. Meta-Evaluation in Clinical Anatomy: A Practical Application of Item Response Theory in Multiple Choice Examinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severo, Milton; Tavares, Maria A. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    The nature of anatomy education has changed substantially in recent decades, though the traditional multiple-choice written examination remains the cornerstone of assessing students' knowledge. This study sought to measure the quality of a clinical anatomy multiple-choice final examination using item response theory (IRT) models. One hundred…

  19. Evaluation of a Lag Schedule of Reinforcement in a Group Contingency to Promote Varied Naming of Categories Items with Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiskow, Katie M.; Donaldson, Jeanne M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effects of Lag 0 and Lag 1 schedules of reinforcement on children's responses naming category items in a group context and subsequent responses emitted during individual testing in which the schedule of reinforcement remained Lag 0. Specifically, we measured response variability and novel responses to categories for 3 children who…

  20. Taking the Missing Propensity into Account When Estimating Competence Scores: Evaluation of Item Response Theory Models for Nonignorable Omissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köhler, Carmen; Pohl, Steffi; Carstensen, Claus H.

    2015-01-01

    When competence tests are administered, subjects frequently omit items. These missing responses pose a threat to correctly estimating the proficiency level. Newer model-based approaches aim to take nonignorable missing data processes into account by incorporating a latent missing propensity into the measurement model. Two assumptions are typically…

  1. Item Difficulty Modeling of Paragraph Comprehension Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorin, Joanna S.; Embretson, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Recent assessment research joining cognitive psychology and psychometric theory has introduced a new technology, item generation. In algorithmic item generation, items are systematically created based on specific combinations of features that underlie the processing required to correctly solve a problem. Reading comprehension items have been more…

  2. Examination of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Version 2 and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale-Straightforward Items Factor Structure in a Sample of U.S. College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liu; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the factor structure of the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Straightforward Items (BFNE-S) and the Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation-Version 2 (BFNE-II) among 151 college students from the United States. Results indicated that the BFNE-S and the BFNE-II scores demonstrated excellent internal consistency reliability.…

  3. Assessing the Item Response Theory with Covariate (IRT-C) Procedure for Ascertaining Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay, Louis; Vermunt, Jeroen K.; Wang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform and/or nonuniform DIF using the Wald statistic.…

  4. The use of the Rey 15-Item Test and recognition trial to evaluate noncredible effort after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Green, Cassie M; Kirk, John W; Connery, Amy K; Baker, David A; Kirkwood, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The Rey 15-Item Test (FIT) is a performance validity test commonly used in adult neuropsychological assessment. FIT classification statistics across studies have been variable, so a recognition trial was created to enhance the measure (Boone, K. B., Salazar, X., Lu, P., Warner-Chacon, K., & Razani, J. (2002). The Rey 15-Item recognition trial: A technique to enhance sensitivity of the Rey 15-Item Memorization Test. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 24(5), 561-573.). The current study assessed the utility of the FIT and recognition trial in a pediatric mild traumatic brain injury sample (N = 319, M = 14.57 years). All participants were administered the FIT and recognition trial as part of an abbreviated clinical neuropsychological evaluation. Failure on the Medical Symptom Validity Test was used as the criterion for noncredible effort. Fifteen percent of the sample met the criterion. The traditional adult cutoff score of <9 on the FIT recall trial yielded excellent specificity (98%), but very poor sensitivity (12%). When the recognition trial was utilized, a total score of <26 resulted in the best combined cutoff score (sensitivity = 55%, specificity = 91%). Results indicate that the FIT with recognition trial may be useful in the assessment of noncredible effort with children and adolescents, at least among relatively high-functioning populations.

  5. A Bifactor Multidimensional Item Response Theory Model for Differential Item Functioning Analysis on Testlet-Based Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Hirotaka; Kamata, Akihito

    2011-01-01

    A differential item functioning (DIF) detection method for testlet-based data was proposed and evaluated in this study. The proposed DIF model is an extension of a bifactor multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) model for testlets. Unlike traditional item response theory (IRT) DIF models, the proposed model takes testlet effects into…

  6. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  7. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  8. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  9. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  10. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign Trade... items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. (a) Introduction. As set forth in... have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya before the comprehensive embargo on Libya...

  11. DECOMMISSIONING OF SHIELDED FACILITIES AT WINFRITH USED FOR POST IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF NUCLEAR FUELS & OTHER ACTIVE ITEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.D.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes the approaches used in the clearing, cleaning, decontamination and decommissioning of a very large suite of seven concrete shielded caves and other facilities used by UKAEA at Winfrith Technology Centre, England over a period of about 30 years for the postirradiation examination (PIE) of a wide range of nuclear fuels and other very active components. The basic construction of the facilities will first be described, setting the scene for the major challenges that 1970s' thinking posed for decommissioning engineers. The tendency then to use large and heavy items of equipment supported upon massive steel bench structures produced a series of major problems that had to be overcome. The means of solving these problems by utilization of relatively simple and inexpensive equipment will be described. Later, a further set of challenges was experienced to decontaminate the interior surfaces to allow man entries to be undertaken at acceptable dose rates. The paper will describe the types of tooling used and the range of complementary techniques that were employed to steadily reduce the dose rates down to acceptable levels. Some explanations will also be given for the creation of realistic dose budgets and the methods of recording and continuously assessing the progress against these budgets throughout the project. Some final considerations are given to the commercial approaches to be adopted throughout this major project by the decommissioning engineers. Particular emphasis will be given to the selection of equipment and techniques that are effective so that the whole process can be carried out in a cost-effective and timely manner. The paper also provides brief complementary information obtained during the decommissioning of a plutonium-contaminated facility used for a range of semi-experimental purposes in the late 1970s. The main objective here was to remove the alpha contamination in such a manner that the volume of Plutonium Contaminated Materials (P

  12. Evaluation of a lag schedule of reinforcement in a group contingency to promote varied naming of categories items with children.

    PubMed

    Wiskow, Katie M; Donaldson, Jeanne M

    2016-09-01

    We compared the effects of Lag 0 and Lag 1 schedules of reinforcement on children's responses naming category items in a group context and subsequent responses emitted during individual testing in which the schedule of reinforcement remained Lag 0. Specifically, we measured response variability and novel responses to categories for 3 children who demonstrated the lowest level of variability during an initial individual Lag 0 testing session. An additional 3 children who emitted a high level of variability during initial individual Lag 0 testing sessions served as peers during group sessions. Results showed that participants conformed to the Lag 1 schedule and were more likely to repeat peer responses in the group and during individual testing in the Lag 1 condition. Furthermore, the reinforcement schedule in effect during group sessions affected participants' varied responses during individual testing, during which the reinforcement schedule remained unchanged.

  13. Psychometric Evaluation of the 6-item Version of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure with East Asian Adolescents in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Yuko; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Saewyc, Elizabeth M.; Wong, Sabrina T.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of scores on a 6-item version of the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) among East Asian adolescents in Canada. A series of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted for 4,190 East Asians who completed a provincial survey of students in grades 7 to 12. The MEIM measured highly correlated dimensions of ethnic identity (exploration and commitment). Further, multi-group CFA indicated that the scale measured the same constructs on the same metric across three age groups and across four groups with varying degrees of exposure to Canadian and East Asian cultures. The findings suggest the short version of the MEIM can be used to compare levels of ethnic identity across different age or acculturation groups. PMID:27833471

  14. How many and which items of activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are necessary for screening.

    PubMed

    Roehrig, Bernd; Hoeffken, Klaus; Pientka, Ludger; Wedding, Ulrich

    2007-05-01

    Geriatric assessment (GA) in elderly cancer patients serves as screening instrument to identify patients who are vulnerable or frail. To reduce the diagnostic burden for patients and caregivers, we asked how many and which items of ADL and IADL questionnaires are necessary to identify those patients with limitations in the sum score of ADL or IADL. Data of 327 elderly patients (age>or=60 years), of whom 27.9% had limitations in ADL and 36.0% in IADL score, were entered in a forward selection model. Four out of ten items of ADL identified 95.3% of patients with limitations in ADL. Two out of eight items of IADL identified 97.4% of patients with limitations in IADL. The combined use of these items recognised 98.5% of patients with limitations in ADL or IADL score. If ADL and IADL scores are used for screening, we recommend an abbreviated version with 6 instead of 18 items.

  15. Analogue evaluation of the effects of opportunities to respond and ratios of known items within drill rehearsal of Esperanto words.

    PubMed

    Szadokierski, Isadora; Burns, Matthew K

    2008-10-01

    Drill procedures have been used to increase the retention of various types of information, but little is known about the causal mechanisms of these techniques. The current study compared the effect of two key features of drill procedures, a large number of opportunities to respond (OTR) and a drill ratio that maintains a high percentage of known to unknown items (90% known). Using a factorial design, 27 4th graders were taught the pronunciation and meaning of Esperanto words using four versions of incremental rehearsal that varied on two factors, percentage of known words (high - 90% vs. moderate - 50%) and the number of OTR (high vs. low). A within-subject ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for OTR and non-significant effects for drill ratio and the interaction between the two variables. Moreover, it was found that increasing OTR from low to high yielded a large effect size (d=2.46), but increasing the percentage of known material from moderate (50%) to high (90%) yielded a small effect (d=0.16). These results suggest that a high number of OTR may be a key feature of flashcard drill techniques in promoting learning and retention.

  16. Pesticide residue evaluation in major staple food items of Ethiopia using the QuEChERS method: a case study from the Jimma Zone.

    PubMed

    Mekonen, Seblework; Ambelu, Argaw; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    Samples of maize, teff, red pepper, and coffee (green bean and coffee bean with pulp) were collected from a local market in the Jimma Zone, Ethiopia. Samples were analyzed for the occurrence of cypermethrin, permethrin, deltamethrin, chlorpyrifos ethyl, DTT and its metabolites, and endosulfan (α, β). In the analytical procedure, the QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) extraction methodology with dispersive solid phase extraction clean up (d-SPE) technique was applied. Validation of the QuEChERS method was satisfactory. Recovery percentages of most pesticides were in the range of 70% to 120%, with good repeatability (%relative standard deviation < 20). The limit of detection and limit of quantification varied between 0.001 µg/g and 0.092 µg/g and between 0.002 µg/g and 0.307 µg/g, respectively. The main pesticides detected were DDT, endosulfan, cypermethrin, and permethrin. All of the pesticides analyzed were detected in red pepper and green coffee bean. Residues of DDT in coffee pulp significantly differed (p < 0.01) from other food items except for red pepper. The concentration of pesticides in the food items varied from 0.011 mg/kg to 1.115 mg/kg. All food items contained 1 or more pesticides. Two-thirds of the samples had residues below corresponding maximum residue limits, and the remaining one-third of samples were above the maximum residue limits. These results indicate the need for a good pesticide monitoring program to evaluate consumer risk for the Ethiopian people.

  17. Improved statistical power of Alzheimer clinical trials by item-response theory: proof of concept by application to the activities of daily living scale.

    PubMed

    Ard, M Colin; Galasko, Douglas R; Edland, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of effective treatment for Alzheimer disease (AD) depends upon the availability of outcome measures that exhibit good sensitivity to rates of longitudinal decline on global functional performance. The Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living inventory (ADCS-ADL) is a frequently used functional endpoint in clinical trials for AD that assesses patient functional ability on the basis of informant ratings of patient performance on a variety of everyday tasks. Previous research has shown that the items comprising the ADCS-ADL are sensitive to characteristic longitudinal trajectories in AD. However, standard procedures for combining information from individual items into an overall test score may not make full use of the information provided by informant responses. The current study explored an application of item-response theory (IRT) techniques to the calculation of test scores on the ADCS-ADL. Using data from 2 ADCS clinical trials on mild-to-moderate AD patients we found that IRT based scoring increased sensitivity to change in functional ability and improved prospective statistical power of the ADCS-ADL as an outcome measure in clinical trials.

  18. A psychometric investigation of the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory among highly sexually active gay and bisexual men: An item response theory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Cook, Karon F.; Grov, Christian; Mustanski, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory (HDSI) was designed as an instrument for the screening of hypersexuality by the American Psychiatric Association’s DSM-5 taskforce. Aim Our study sought to conduct a psychometric analysis of the HDSI, including an investigation of its underlying structure and reliability utilizing Item Response Theory (IRT) modeling, and an examination of its polythetic scoring criteria in comparison to a standard dimensionally-based cutoff score. Methods We examined a diverse group of 202 highly sexually active gay and bisexual men in New York City. We conducted psychometric analyses of the HDSI, including both confirmatory factor analysis of its structure and item response theory analysis of the item and scale reliabilities. Main Outcome Measures We utilized the Hypersexual Disorder Screening Inventory. Results The HDSI adequately fit a single-factor solution, although there was evidence that two of the items may measure a second factor that taps into sex as a form of coping. The scale showed evidence of strong reliability across much of the continuum of hypersexuality and results suggested that, in addition to the proposed polythetic scoring criteria, a cutoff score of 20 on the severity index might be used for preliminary classification of HD. Conclusion The HDSI was found to be highly reliable and results suggested that a unidimensional, quantitative conception of hypersexuality with a clinically relevant cutoff score may be more appropriate than a qualitative syndrome comprised of multiple distinct clusters of problems. However, we also found preliminary evidence that three clusters of symptoms may constitute an HD syndrome as opposed to the two clusters initially proposed. Future research is needed to determine which of these issues are characteristic of the hypersexuality and HD constructs themselves and which are more likely to be methodological artifacts of the HDSI. PMID:23534845

  19. Screening Test Items for Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2014-01-01

    A method for medical screening is adapted to differential item functioning (DIF). Its essential elements are explicit declarations of the level of DIF that is acceptable and of the loss function that quantifies the consequences of the two kinds of inappropriate classification of an item. Instead of a single level and a single function, sets of…

  20. Evaluation of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) Spanish Version 4 in South America: Classic Psychometric and Item Response Theory Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dapueto, Juan J; Francolino, Carla; Servente, Liliana; Chang, Chih-Hung; Gotta, Irene; Levin, Roberto; Abreu, María del Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Background The FACT-G has gone through many validation studies. However, little research has been conducted in South American Spanish speaking patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the FACT-G Spanish Version 4 in Uruguayan cancer patients. Methods The data analyzed were collected from 309 patients, with various tumor sites, at different stages of disease and receiving different treatments. Results Reliability was evaluated using Cronbach's coefficient alpha and showed high internal consistency for each of the subscales and its total scale (range = .78 – .91) of the FACT-G. The FACT-G total score also showed significant mean differences among known groups (performance status, in vs. outpatients) when tested by ANOVA and t-test. When the tumor stage (Local and Regional vs. Metastatic disease) was used as a clinical anchor, the FACT-G total score, the Physical Well-being (PWB), and Functional Well-being (FWB) subscale scores showed mean differences, ranging from 5 to 10 points in a scale from 0–108 (effect sizes = 0.30–0.60). Item response theory (IRT)-based evaluation using mean square fit statistics (.60–1.4) criteria showed that only two items misfit: "Estoy satisfecho(a) con mi vida sexual" (I am satisfied with my sex life) and "Estoy satisfecho(a) de cómo estoy enfrentando mi enfermedad" (I am satisfied with how I am coping with my illness). Conclusion The results indicated that, using both traditional and IRT approaches, the Spanish FACT-G has good reliability and validity to be used as a QOL instrument among Uruguayan cancer patients. PMID:12969512

  1. RESTRICTED INTERESTS AND TEACHER PRESENTATION OF ITEMS

    PubMed Central

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items. PMID:21941381

  2. Restricted interests and teacher presentation of items.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Rodriguez, Nicole M

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning), the types of items or activities they select (e.g., preoccupation with a phone book), or the range of items or activities they select (i.e., narrow range of items). We sought to describe the relation between restricted interests and teacher presentation of items. Overall, we observed 5 teachers interacting with 2 pairs of students diagnosed with an ASD. Each pair included 1 student with restricted interests. During these observations, teachers were free to present any items from an array of 4 stimuli selected by experimenters. We recorded student responses to teacher presentation of items and analyzed the data to determine the relation between teacher presentation of items and the consequences for presentation provided by the students. Teacher presentation of items corresponded with differential responses provided by students with ASD, and those with restricted preferences experienced a narrower array of items.

  3. Ramsay-Curve Item Response Theory for the Three-Parameter Logistic Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters of a unidimensional item response model using marginal maximum likelihood estimation. This study evaluates RC-IRT for the three-parameter logistic (3PL) model with comparisons to the normal model and to the empirical…

  4. Descriptive and Inferential Procedures for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Thayer, Dorothy T.; Mazzeo, John

    1997-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment procedures for items with more than two ordered score categories, referred to as polytomous items, were evaluated. Three descriptive statistics (standardized mean difference and two procedures based on the SIBTEST computer program) and five inferential procedures were used. Conditions under which the…

  5. Alternate item types: continuing the quest for authentic testing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Anne; Kenny, Lorraine E

    2009-03-01

    Many test developers suggest that multiple-choice items can be used to evaluate critical thinking if the items are focused on measuring higher order thinking ability. The literature supports the use of alternate item types to assess additional competencies, such as higher level cognitive processing and critical thinking, as well as ways to allow examinees to demonstrate their competencies differently. This research study surveyed nurses after taking a test composed of alternate item types paired with multiple-choice items. The participants were asked to provide opinions regarding the items and the item formats. Demographic information was asked. In addition, information was collected as the participants responded to the items. The results of this study reveal that the participants thought that, in general, the items were more authentic and allowed them to demonstrate their competence better than multiple-choice items did. Further investigation into the optimal blend of alternate items and multiple-choice items is needed.

  6. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Four: Practical Testing Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test items collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, the guide gives a wide range of questions and activities for the manipulation of scientific equipment to allow assessment of students' practical laboratory skills. Instructions are given to make norm-referenced or…

  7. Instructional Tools in Educational Measurement and Statistics (ITEMS) for School Personnel: Evaluation of Three Web-Based Training Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Sklar, Jeffrey C.; Wakefield, Graham; Hamilton, Cris; Norman, Alex; Folsom, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    In the current No Child Left Behind era, K-12 teachers and principals are expected to have a sophisticated understanding of standardized test results, use them to improve instruction, and communicate them to others. The goal of our project, funded by the National Science Foundation, was to develop and evaluate three Web-based instructional modules…

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale in Adults with Functional Limitations.

    PubMed

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation, and it has not been examined in adults with functional limitations. This secondary analysis reported the reliability and validity of the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in a convenience sample of 40 adults with functional limitations. The participants completed the PACES, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI) prior to beginning a 12-week feasibility dance intervention study. Results indicated reliability as Cronbach's alpha was .95 and mean inter-item correlation was .52. To further support reliability, homogeneity of the instrument was evaluated using item-to-total scale correlations. Homogeneity was supported as all items had corrected item-to-total correlations greater than .30. For validity, the PACES was significantly related to only the Physical Function component of the LLFDI (r = .38, p = .02), but not the CES-D. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 3-factor structure that accounted for 73.76% of the variance. This feasibility intervention dance study represented the first attempt to examine the psychometric properties of the PACES in adults with functional limitations. The findings demonstrate support for the scale's reliability and validity among adults with functional limitations. Results are informative as further psychometric testing of the PACES is recommended using randomized clinical trials with larger sample sizes. Enjoyment for physical activity is an important construct for understanding physical activity participation in adults with functional limitations.

  9. Factors Associated with Evaluating Public Relations Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElreath, Mark P.

    More than 150 public relations practitioners responded to a survey designed to identify and clarify factors associated with evaluative research in public relations. Responses indicated that (1) no more than half the practitioners formally evaluate their public relations activities on a regular basis; (2) the majority of evaluation is done…

  10. The Human Activity of Evaluation Theorizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Ellett, Frederick, Jr.

    Theorizing about evaluation should be conceptualized as a human activity governed by certain strategies and principles. The theories advanced by various evaluators have changed over the years, thus illustrating ten principles of evaluation. The starting point for theory development or modification is self-reflection and review of one's own…

  11. Evaluating Metacognitive Scaffolding in Guided Invention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Ido; Holmes, Natasha G.; Day, James; Bonn, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Invention and Productive Failure activities ask students to generate methods that capture the important properties of some given data (e.g., uncertainty) before being taught the expert solution. Invention and Productive Failure activities are a class of scientific inquiry activities in that students create, implement, and evaluate mathematical…

  12. Using Rasch Analysis to Evaluate Accuracy of Individual Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) for Disability Measurement.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Bruce; Li, Yanen

    2015-01-01

    Our study objectives were to examine the accuracy of individual activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental ADLs (IADLs) for disability measurement, and determine whether dependence or difficulty is more useful for disability measurement. We analyzed data from 499 patients with 2+ ADLs or 3+ IADLs who participated in a home visiting nurse intervention study, and whose function had been assessed at study baseline and 22 months. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate accuracy of 24 individual ADL and IADL items. The individual items differed in the amount of information provided in measuring functional disability along the range of disability, providing much more information in (usually) one part of the range. While nearly all of the Item Information Curves (IICs) for the ADL dependence, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence items were unimodal with one information peak each, the IICs for ADL difficulty exhibited a bimodal pattern with two peaks. Which of the individual items performed better in disability measurement varied by the extent of functional disability (i.e., by how disabled the patients were). The information peaks of most ADLs and many IADLs rise or drop steeply in a relatively short distance. Thus, whether dependence or difficulty is superior often changes very quickly along the disability continuum. There was considerable heterogeneity in which individual items provided the most and the least information at the three points of interest examined across the disability range (-2 SD units, mean, +2 SD units). While the disability region (low, medium, and high disability) for which each individual item provided the most information remained quite stable between baseline and 22 months for ADL difficulty, IADL difficulty, and IADL dependence, relatively large shifts occurred for ADL dependence items. At the disability mean dependence items offered more information for assessment than difficulty. While ADLs also provided more information at -2 and +2 SD

  13. An Investigation of Different Treatment Strategies for Item Category Collapsing in Calibration: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay-lim, Brenda Siok-Hoon; Zhang, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the statistical result validity, model-data fit must be evaluated for each item. In practice, certain actions or treatments are needed for misfit items. If all misfit items are treated, much item information would be lost during calibration. On the other hand, if only severely misfit items are treated, the inclusion of misfit items may…

  14. Evaluating SPP/APR Improvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to assist State Education Agency (SEA) and Lead Agency (LA) staff and technical assistance providers in designing a meaningful evaluation for the State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR) improvement activities. It provides: (1) information about the relevance of evaluation in the context of improvement…

  15. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  16. An Evaluation of the Single-Group Growth Model as an Alternative to Common-Item Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-16-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Youhua; Morgan, Rick

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to common-item equating when common items do not function as expected, the single-group growth model (SGGM) scaling uses common examinees or repeaters to link test scores on different forms. The SGGM scaling assumes that, for repeaters taking adjacent administrations, the conditional distribution of scale scores in later…

  17. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part III. Evaluating Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys: An Item Response Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    This is the third of five papers detailing our national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we use item response theory to analyze students' responses to three out of the four conceptual cosmology surveys we developed. The specific item response theory model we use is…

  18. Writing better test items.

    PubMed

    Aucoin, Julia W

    2005-01-01

    Professional development specialists have had little opportunity to learn how to write test items to meet the expectations of today's graduate nurse. Schools of nursing have moved away from knowledge-level test items and have had to develop more application and analysis items to prepare graduates for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This same type of question can be used effectively to support a competence assessment system and document critical thinking skills.

  19. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  20. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  1. Geography Library of Test Items. Volume Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  2. Geography: Library of Test Items. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  3. Evaluation of compost activators for yard waste

    SciTech Connect

    Razvi, A.S.; Kramer, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The evaluation of the efficiency of yard waste composting (grass clippm`gs/wood chip mixture) was studied for seven commercially available activators, two naturally occurring activators, and one control (absence of activator). The overall decomposition response for each activator was evaluated by comparing four indices of composting efficiency. These were weight loss, change in volume, loss of volatile solids, and oxygen uptake rate. Four experimental blocks were set up in the field, and two experimental blocks were set up in the laboratory. The physical/chemical characteristics were monitored for all samples as a function of time, and individual activators were evaluated so interrelationships between indices could be studied. Based on the four indices, grass clippings can be efficiently composted with natural activators such as Surface Soil or Mature Compost. Commercially available compost activators performed similar to the Control. The cost of commercially available activators was $1.37 to $9.36 per cubic yard of grass clippings to be composted. Naturally occurring activators such as Surface Soil and Mature Compost may be available at no cost to the backyard composter.

  4. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

  5. Raloxifene treatment enhances brain activation during recognition of familiar items: a pharmacological fMRI study in healthy elderly males.

    PubMed

    Goekoop, Rutger; Barkhof, Frederik; Duschek, Erik J J; Netelenbos, Coen; Knol, Dirk L; Scheltens, Philip; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2006-07-01

    Raloxifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that may delay the onset of mild cognitive impairment in elderly women. Effects of raloxifene treatment on mental performance in males remain to be investigated. In a previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we showed that raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in elderly males during encoding of new information (faces) into memory. The current study used fMRI in the same group of subjects to screen for effects of raloxifene treatment on brain function during face recognition. Healthy elderly males (n=28; mean age 63.6 years, SD 2.4) were scanned at baseline and after 3 months of treatment with either raloxifene 120 mg (n=14) or placebo (n=14) in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. Functional data were analyzed in an event-related fashion with respect to correct hits and correct rejections using FSL software. Performance data were analyzed with respect to recognition accuracy, latency, and response bias. Functional effects of treatment were found on brain activation related to correct hits only. When compared to placebo treatment, raloxifene treatment enhanced brain activation in the left posterior parahippocampal area (Z=3.9) and right inferior prefrontal cortex (Z=3.5). Recognition accuracy scores remained stable in the raloxifene group, whereas the placebo group showed a small but significant decrease in accuracy scores (p=0.02). No significant effects were found on response bias or latency. In conclusion, raloxifene treatment affects brain function during memory performance in a way that may reflect increased arousal during initial encoding, with downstream effects on brain function during retrieval of information. Behaviorally, such neurofunctional effects may actively block decreased memory performance as a result of context-dependency. The validity of these predictions can be tested in large-scale clinical trials.

  6. Restricted Interests and Teacher Presentation of Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocco, Corey S.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rodriguez, Nicole M.

    2011-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behavior (RRB) is more pervasive, prevalent, frequent, and severe in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than in their typical peers. One subtype of RRB is restricted interests in items or activities, which is evident in the manner in which individuals engage with items (e.g., repetitious wheel spinning),…

  7. Evaluation of sexuality in a Paraguayan mid-aged female urban population using the six-item Female Sexual Function Index.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, S C; Chedraui, P; Pérez-López, F R; Ortiz-Benegas, M E; Palacios-De Franco, Y

    2016-06-01

    Background There are scant data related to sexuality assessed among mid-aged women from Paraguay. Objective To assess sexual function in a sample of mid-aged Paraguayan women. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which 265 urban-living women from Asunción (Paraguay) aged 40-65 years were surveyed with the six-item version of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI-6) and a questionnaire containing personal and partner data. Results The median age of the sample was 48 years, 48.2% were postmenopausal (median/interquartile range age at menopause 46/13 years), 11.3% used hormone therapy, 37.0% used psychotropic drugs, 44.5% had hypertension, 7.2% diabetes, 46.1% abdominal obesity and 89.4% had a partner (n = 237). Overall, 84.1% (223/265) of surveyed women were sexually active, presenting a median total FSFI-6 score of 23.0, and 25.6% obtained a total score of 19 or less, suggestive of sexual dysfunction (lower sexual function). Upon bivariate analysis, several factors were associated with lower total FSFI-6 scores; however, multiple linear regression analysis found that lower total FSFI-6 scores (worse sexual function) were significantly correlated to the postmenopausal status and having an older partner, whereas coital frequency was positively correlated to higher scores (better sexual function). Conclusion In this pilot sample of urban-living, mid-aged Paraguayan women, as determined with the FSFI-6, lower sexual function was related to menopausal status, coital frequency and partner age. There is a need for more research in this regard in this population.

  8. Evolution of a Test Item

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaan, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This article follows the development of test items (see "Language Assessment Quarterly", Volume 3 Issue 1, pp. 71-79 for the article "Test and Item Specifications Development"), beginning with a review of test and item specifications, then proceeding to writing and editing of items, pretesting and analysis, and finally selection of an item for a…

  9. Item Banking. Basic Testing Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Roy

    This pamphlet describes the exciting potential of item banking--a new approach to testing which combines both comparability of scores with flexibility of test format. Item banks are collections of items where the characteristics of each item is known and these characteristics can be summated to described a test made from such items. The principle…

  10. Novelty and Promotional Items

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small novelty or promotional products, primarily used for outreach and educational purposes, must effectively convey a message, and their purchase will only be allowed if the item will contribute to the accomplishment of the Agency's mission.

  11. Assessment of visiting activities for young children using the UNAWE Evaluation Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    When the target is young children and the activity type is play, the assessment of the activity is not easy. The table of domains of active learning shown in the EU Universe Awareness Programme Evaluation Guide is useful for the assessment; the Guide shows the four domains; motivation, scientific skills, universe knowledge, and intercultural attitudes, and many items of objectives in each domains. The Guide can be a basic format and the items can be modified so as to fit each activity. Taking my activity as an example, I will present an assessment using the Guide. The activity I will present is "Uchu no O-hanashi," a visiting activity which includeds slide show, story telling, and enjoying pictures on large sheets for children at nursery, kindergarten, preschool and other sites. In order to obtain the data, I have recorded the voice of children. The analysis method is a kind of qualitative one. I picked up "motivation" and "scientific skills" words from the record when they muttered about and asked each other what they felt, what they found, and what they got excited about. Among the items in the "scientific skills domain," looking at carefully, asking, exchanging opinions, interpreting or trying to interpret, and trying were frequently appeared. Other skills such as devising and confirming were not frequently appeared but they would sometimes appear later at home or at school after the activity. I also picked up the words of children obtaining scientific way of view and attitude through the activity. One example is "It seems that stars float in the sky and do not move. Do they really set like the Sun, our nearest star? I never saw stars set!" A boy was trying to make a new framework for his understanding. This kind of thinking will enrich his or her future "universe knowledge" and "intercultural attitudes."

  12. Using a Linear Regression Method to Detect Outliers in IRT Common Item Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Yong; Cui, Zhongmin; Fang, Yu; Chen, Hanwei

    2013-01-01

    Common test items play an important role in equating alternate test forms under the common item nonequivalent groups design. When the item response theory (IRT) method is applied in equating, inconsistent item parameter estimates among common items can lead to large bias in equated scores. It is prudent to evaluate inconsistency in parameter…

  13. Pattern Activity Clustering and Evaluation (PACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Banas, Christopher; Paul, Michael; Bussjager, Becky; Seetharaman, Guna

    2012-06-01

    With the vast amount of network information available on activities of people (i.e. motions, transportation routes, and site visits) there is a need to explore the salient properties of data that detect and discriminate the behavior of individuals. Recent machine learning approaches include methods of data mining, statistical analysis, clustering, and estimation that support activity-based intelligence. We seek to explore contemporary methods in activity analysis using machine learning techniques that discover and characterize behaviors that enable grouping, anomaly detection, and adversarial intent prediction. To evaluate these methods, we describe the mathematics and potential information theory metrics to characterize behavior. A scenario is presented to demonstrate the concept and metrics that could be useful for layered sensing behavior pattern learning and analysis. We leverage work on group tracking, learning and clustering approaches; as well as utilize information theoretical metrics for classification, behavioral and event pattern recognition, and activity and entity analysis. The performance evaluation of activity analysis supports high-level information fusion of user alerts, data queries and sensor management for data extraction, relations discovery, and situation analysis of existing data.

  14. Investigating the Impact of Item Parameter Drift for Item Response Theory Models with Mixture Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon Soo; Lee, Young-Sun; Xing, Kuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of item parameter drift (IPD) on parameter and ability estimation when the underlying measurement model fits a mixture distribution, thereby violating the item invariance property of unidimensional item response theory (IRT) models. An empirical study was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of both IPD and an underlying mixture distribution using real-world data. Twenty-one trended anchor items from the 1999, 2003, and 2007 administrations of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) were analyzed using unidimensional and mixture IRT models. TIMSS treats trended anchor items as invariant over testing administrations and uses pre-calibrated item parameters based on unidimensional IRT. However, empirical results showed evidence of two latent subgroups with IPD. Results also showed changes in the distribution of examinee ability between latent classes over the three administrations. A simulation study was conducted to examine the impact of IPD on the estimation of ability and item parameters, when data have underlying mixture distributions. Simulations used data generated from a mixture IRT model and estimated using unidimensional IRT. Results showed that data reflecting IPD using mixture IRT model led to IPD in the unidimensional IRT model. Changes in the distribution of examinee ability also affected item parameters. Moreover, drift with respect to item discrimination and distribution of examinee ability affected estimates of examinee ability. These findings demonstrate the need to caution and evaluate IPD using a mixture IRT framework to understand its effects on item parameters and examinee ability. PMID:26941699

  15. Preference and reinforcer efficacy of high- and low-tech items: A comparison of item type and duration of access.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Audrey N; Samaha, Andrew L; Bloom, Sarah E; Boyle, Megan A

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the interactions of stimulus type (high- vs. low-tech) and magnitude (duration of access) on preference and reinforcer efficacy. Two preference assessments were conducted to identify highly preferred high-tech and low-tech items for each participant. A subsequent assessment examined preference for those items when provided at 30-s and 600-s durations. We then evaluated reinforcer efficacy for those same items when provided for a range of durations using progressive-ratio schedules. Results suggested item type and access duration interacted to influence preference and reinforcer efficacy. Participants preferred high-tech items at longer durations of access and engaged in more responding when the high-tech item was provided for long durations, but these patterns were reversed for the low-tech item. In addition, participants engaged in less responding when the high-tech item was provided for short durations and when the low-tech item was provided for long durations.

  16. A Mixture Rasch Model with Item Response Time Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, J. Patrick

    2010-01-01

    An examinee faced with a test item will engage in solution behavior or rapid-guessing behavior. These qualitatively different test-taking behaviors bias parameter estimates for item response models that do not control for such behavior. A mixture Rasch model with item response time components was proposed and evaluated through application to real…

  17. Vegetable parenting practices scale: Item response modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a vegetable parenting practices scale using multidimensional polytomous item response modeling which enables assessing item fit to latent variables and the distributional characteristics of the items in comparison to the respondents. We al...

  18. An Evaluation of the Effect of Establishing a Minimum Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) on the Air Force EOQ Item Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    experienced on the last buy of the item. A formula developed by Presutti and Trepp (22) determines the safety level. The safety level formula in- cludes...Force, Washington, 28 September 1983. 78 . . . . ." 22. Presutti, Victor J. Jr., and Richard C. Trepp . "More Ado About EOQ" Unpublished Operations

  19. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Nineteen. A Collection of Multiple Choice Test Items Relating Mainly to Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests or term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test items meet syllabus…

  20. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Eighteen. A Collection of Multiple Choice Test Items Relating Mainly to Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests or term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test items meet syllabus…

  1. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Twenty. A Collection of Multiple Choice Test Items Relating Mainly to Physics, 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests or term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test items meet syllabus…

  2. Investigating an Invariant Item Ordering for Polytomously Scored Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligtvoet, Rudy; van der Ark, L. Andries; te Marvelde, Janneke M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of an invariant item ordering (IIO) for polytomously scored items and proposes methods for investigating an IIO in real test data. Method manifest IIO is proposed for assessing whether item response functions intersect. Coefficient H[superscript T] is defined for polytomously scored items. Given that an IIO…

  3. The Role of Item Models in Automatic Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2012-01-01

    Automatic item generation represents a relatively new but rapidly evolving research area where cognitive and psychometric theories are used to produce tests that include items generated using computer technology. Automatic item generation requires two steps. First, test development specialists create item models, which are comparable to templates…

  4. 41 CFR 101-28.306-6 - Sensitive items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for embarrassment of GSA and customer agencies, the level of customer complaints, and control as an accountable item of personal property. Each customer activity shall take all appropriate measures necessary to... 28.3-Customer Supply Centers § 101-28.306-6 Sensitive items. Many items stocked by the CSCs may...

  5. Examining the Impact of Drifted Polytomous Anchor Items on Test Characteristic Curve (TCC) Linking and IRT True Score Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-12-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yanmei

    2012-01-01

    In a common-item (anchor) equating design, the common items should be evaluated for item parameter drift. Drifted items are often removed. For a test that contains mostly dichotomous items and only a small number of polytomous items, removing some drifted polytomous anchor items may result in anchor sets that no longer resemble mini-versions of…

  6. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIS) and are not evaluated in this DIE. This DIE focuses on integrating and compiling the evaluations of previous DIES which were prepared for various ESF subsurface testing activities, including the use of temporary items currently located or being developed for these testing activities, and to provide a bounding evaluation for potential future ESF subsurface testing activities that are sufficiently similar to the generic testing activities addressed herein. Subsurface testing activities items/facilities evaluated herein include: ongoing and planned testing in the TS Loop, alcoves, and niches, planned testing in the ECRB Starter Tunnel, borehole drilling and workover, and tracers, fluids, and materials (TFM) usage. Detailed identification of individual testing items/facilities and generic descriptions for subsurface-testing-related activities are provided in Section 6. The conclusions and requirements of this DIE conservatively bound the conclusions and requirements of previously approved DIES for the ESF subsurface testing activities addressed herein, based on conservative engineering judgment and on concurrence with this DIE (via a formal review process) by the originating and reviewing organizations of the previously approved evaluations. Hence, this DIE supersedes the following DIES listed in Table 1.1.

  7. Global SOFC activities and evaluation programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Noboru

    1994-04-01

    Perhaps there are a few hundred organizations worldwide at present such as universities, research institutes or companies where the research and development of SOFC is carried out, including basic research on materials for SOFCs. This paper, will not refer to the status of basic R&D materials similarities or on a single cell, but will observe developmental activities in Europe, USA and Japan, focusing on the development which has already the stage of fabrication and operation of a SOFC cell stack. Information will also include detailed operation and evaluation of the 25 kW class systems of Westinghouse.

  8. Development and assessment of floor and ceiling items for the PROMIS physical function item bank

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Disability and Physical Function (PF) outcome assessment has had limited ability to measure functional status at the floor (very poor functional abilities) or the ceiling (very high functional abilities). We sought to identify, develop and evaluate new floor and ceiling items to enable broader and more precise assessment of PF outcomes for the NIH Patient-Reported-Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Methods We conducted two cross-sectional studies using NIH PROMIS item improvement protocols with expert review, participant survey and focus group methods. In Study 1, respondents with low PF abilities evaluated new floor items, and those with high PF abilities evaluated new ceiling items for clarity, importance and relevance. In Study 2, we compared difficulty ratings of new floor items by low functioning respondents and ceiling items by high functioning respondents to reference PROMIS PF-10 items. We used frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations to analyze the data. Results In Study 1, low (n = 84) and high (n = 90) functioning respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and disability scores of 0.62 and 0.30. More than 90% of the 31 new floor and 31 new ceiling items were rated as clear, important and relevant, leaving 26 ceiling and 30 floor items for Study 2. Low (n = 246) and high (n = 637) functioning Study 2 respondents were mostly White, women, 70 years old, with some college, and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) scores of 1.62 and 0.003. Compared to difficulty ratings of reference items, ceiling items were rated to be 10% more to greater than 40% more difficult to do, and floor items were rated to be about 12% to nearly 90% less difficult to do. Conclusions These new floor and ceiling items considerably extend the measurable range of physical function at either extreme. They will help improve instrument performance in populations with broad functional ranges and those concentrated at

  9. Assessment of differential item functioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This study addresses several important issues in assessment of differential item functioning (DIF). It starts with the definition of DIF, effectiveness of using item fit statistics to detect DIF, and linear modeling of DIF in dichotomous items, polytomous items, facets, and testlet-based items. Because a common metric over groups of test-takers is a prerequisite in DIF assessment, this study reviews three such methods of establishing a common metric: the equal-mean-difficulty method, the all-other-item method, and the constant-item (CI) method. A small simulation demonstrates the superiority of the CI method over the others. As the CI method relies on a correct specification of DIF-free items to serve as anchors, a method of identifying such items is recommended and its effectiveness is illustrated through a simulation. Finally, this study discusses how to assess practical significance of DIF at both item and test levels.

  10. Limited life item management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eaglen, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Plans are available for age-sensitive hardware management. Control plan identifies shelf life or age control requirements for materials considered age sensitive, use sensitive, or time service or shelf life controlled items, and describes methods of arriving at age controls through adherence to detailed specifications.

  11. Reading Current Events Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    People who live in a democracy should be well informed of local, state, national, and international happenings. Students should become curious about news items and relate current happenings to the personal self. They must possess skills in word recognition and in diverse kinds of comprehension since reading is an important way to glean current…

  12. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    2002-07-22

    tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIS) and are not evaluated in this DIE. This DIE focuses on integrating and compiling the evaluations of previous DIEs which were prepared for various ESF subsurface testing activities, including the use of temporary items currently located or being developed for these testing activities (see Table 1. l), and to provide a bounding evaluation for potential future ESF subsurface testing activities that are sufficiently similar to the generic testing activities addressed herein. Subsurface testing activities items/facilities evaluated herein include: ongoing and planned testing in the TS Loop, alcoves, and niches, planned testing in the ECRB Starter Tunnel, borehole drilling and workover, and tracers, fluids, and materials (TFM) usage. Detailed identification of individual testing items/facilities and generic descriptions for subsurface-testing-related activities are provided in Section 6.

  13. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  14. Examining Differential Item Functions of Different Item Ordered Test Forms According to Item Difficulty Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çokluk, Ömay; Gül, Emrah; Dogan-Gül, Çilem

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to examine whether differential item function is displayed in three different test forms that have item orders of random and sequential versions (easy-to-hard and hard-to-easy), based on Classical Test Theory (CTT) and Item Response Theory (IRT) methods and bearing item difficulty levels in mind. In the correlational research, the…

  15. Prevention of retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David L

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in retained surgical items is an important part of any operating room patient-safety effort. Any item used in an operation can result in a retained surgical item, but sponges are the most frequent and the abdomen is the most common location. Retained sponges can cause significant morbidity, and the costs associated with both prevention and treatment of retained surgical items, including legal costs, can be considerable. This review will examine counting, teamwork, radiography, and new technology as methods used to prevent retained surgical items. Even though none of these techniques individually is likely to completely prevent retained surgical items, when used together the numbers can be reduced.

  16. Development of a novel questionnaire evaluating disability in activities of daily living in the upper extremities of patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Toshiki; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Takagi, Yutaka; Motohashi, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ishii, Akira; Takahira, Naonobu; Yoshida, Atsushi; Masuda, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel questionnaire evaluating disability in the activities of daily living in the upper extremities of hemodialysis (HD) patients (QDUE-HD). We recruited 83 patients (40 males and 43 females) aged 66 ± 8 years, and measured their muscle strength and range of motion in the upper extremities. Moreover, 14 patients performed a six-week exercise training regimen (the exercise group) and were compared with 15 patients not performing such training (the control group). In an initial questionnaire consisting of 37 items, 30 were taken from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire and the Activities of Daily Living Test, and the remaining seven were selected from activities that HD patients perceived as impossible or extremely difficult to perform. The principal factor analysis focused on 11 items, as 26 showing floor and ceiling effects were excluded. These 11 items were divided into two categories consisting of six items termed "light work" and five termed "holding activities". The scores for light work and holding activities correlated significantly and positively with both muscle strength and range of motion in the upper extremities. These scores increased significantly after the six-week exercise training as compared with those before training in the exercise group. We conclude that the QDUE-HD is clinically useful for evaluating disability in activities of daily living in the upper extremities of HD patients because of its high reliability, validity and responsiveness.

  17. The Impact of Item Characteristics on Item and Scale Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the relation between personality items' validities, defined as the items' correlations with acquaintance ratings on the Big 5 personality factors, and other itemmetric properties including ambiguity, syntactic complexity, social desirability, content, and trait indicativity. Five external validity coefficients for each item on…

  18. IRT Item Parameter Scaling for Developing New Item Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyeon-Ah; Lu, Ying; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of item pools in large-scale educational assessments calls for an appropriate scaling procedure to achieve a common metric among field-tested items. The present study examines scaling procedures for developing a new item pool under a spiraled block linking design. The three scaling procedures are considered: (a) concurrent…

  19. Component Identification and Item Difficulty of Raven's Matrices Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kathy E.; Kluever, Raymond C.

    Item components that might contribute to the difficulty of items on the Raven Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) and the Standard Progressive Matrices (SPM) were studied. Subjects providing responses to CPM items were 269 children aged 2 years 9 months to 11 years 8 months, most of whom were referred for testing as potentially gifted. A second…

  20. Item Context Factors Affecting Students' Performance on Mathematics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Felipe Almuna; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports how the context in which a mathematics item is embedded impacts on students' performance. The performance of Year 10 students on four PISA items was compared with performance on variants with more familiar contexts. Performance was not better when they solved items with more familiar contexts but there was some evidence that…

  1. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2015-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) for an item between two groups is present if, for the same person location on a variable, persons from different groups have different expected values for their responses. Applying only to dichotomously scored items in the popular Mantel-Haenszel (MH) method for detecting DIF in which persons are classified by…

  2. Use of an Aquarium as a Novel Enrichment Item for Singly Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Meade, Theresa M; Hutchinson, Eric; Krall, Caroline; Watson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Locomotor stereotypies are behaviors often seen in singly housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and are considered to represent a maladaptive response to captive environments. Active and passive enrichment items are commonly used to mitigate these and other abnormal behaviors. Active enrichment items allow physical manipulation and may be temporarily successful in reducing stereotypies, but their beneficial effects usually are confined to relatively short periods of active use. Passive enrichment items that do not involve physical manipulation are less well studied, and the results are mixed. This study evaluated an aquarium with live fish for use as a novel passive enrichment item in a common facility setting as a means to decrease locomotor stereotypy. We hypothesized that the introduction of the aquarium would decrease the frequency of locomotor stereotypy in a group of singly housed rhesus macaques (n = 11) with a known history of abnormal behaviors. Unexpectedly, locomotor stereotypy increased with the introduction of the aquarium and then decreased over time. Furthermore, when the aquarium was removed, the frequency of stereotypy decreased to below baseline levels. These unexpected results are best explained by neophobia, a common phenomenon documented in many animal species. The increase in abnormal behavior is likely to result from the addition of a novel object within the environment. This study demonstrates that, in the context of reducing abnormal behavior, presumably innocuous enrichment items may have unexpected effects and should be evaluated critically after their introduction to a captive population. PMID:25255069

  3. The Influence of Negatively Worded Scale Items on Overall Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ory, John C.; Valois, Robert F.

    Two studies investigate whether the placement and/or wording (either positively or negatively) of diagnostic rating scale items influenced student responses to the global items in the evaluation of a course of instruction. The Instructor and Course Evaluation System (ICES) developed at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign was used to…

  4. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees AW; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations. PMID:16381611

  5. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  6. [Phenotype of frailty: the influence of each item in determining frailty in community-dwelling elderly - The Fibra Study].

    PubMed

    Silva, Silvia Lanziotti Azevedo da; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Ferrioli, Eduardo; Lourenço, Roberto Alves; Dias, Rosângela Corrêa

    2016-11-01

    The phenotype of frailty is used to assess frailty among the elderly by examining the following items: weight loss; exhaustion; low level of physical activity; weakness; and slow gait speed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the contribution of each item to determine the frailty syndrome among elderly Brazilians. The analysis was done using Multinomial Logistic Regression. The total sample of 5532 randomly selected elderly people in many cities in Brazil between December 2008 and September 2009 was assessed using the phenotype of frailty. The most frequent items were level of physical activity, followed by muscular weakness and slow gait speed. Items that were more likely to develop frailty, when positive, were slow gait speed (OR = 10.50, 95%CI 8.55 - 12.90, p <0.001) and muscular weakness (OR = 7.31, 95%CI 6,02 - 8,86, p <0.001). The final model with five items explained 99.6% of frailty in the sample. These results suggested that the level of physical activity, weakness and slow gait speed were the items that most influence the determination of frailty, however the application of all items of the phenotype of frailty is the best way to assess frailty.

  7. Development of the PROMIS® Health Expectancies of Smoking Item Banks

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joan S.; Shadel, William G.; Stucky, Brian D.; Cerully, Jennifer; Li, Zhen; Hansen, Mark; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Smokers’ health-related outcome expectancies are associated with a number of important constructs in smoking research, yet there are no measures currently available that focus exclusively on this domain. This paper describes the development and evaluation of item banks for assessing the health expectancies of smoking. Methods: Using data from a sample of daily (N = 4,201) and nondaily (N = 1,183) smokers, we conducted a series of item factor analyses, item response theory analyses, and differential item functioning analyses (according to gender, age, and race/ethnicity) to arrive at a unidimensional set of health expectancies items for daily and nondaily smokers. We also evaluated the performance of short forms (SFs) and computer adaptive tests (CATs) to efficiently assess health expectancies. Results: A total of 24 items were included in the Health Expectancies item banks; 13 items are common across daily and nondaily smokers, 6 are unique to daily, and 5 are unique to nondaily. For both daily and nondaily smokers, the Health Expectancies item banks are unidimensional, reliable (reliability = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively), and perform similarly across gender, age, and race/ethnicity groups. A SF common to daily and nondaily smokers consists of 6 items (reliability = 0.87). Results from simulated CATs showed that health expectancies can be assessed with good precision with an average of 5–6 items adaptively selected from the item banks. Conclusions: Health expectancies of smoking can be assessed on the basis of these item banks via SFs, CATs, or through a tailored set of items selected for a specific research purpose. PMID:25118229

  8. Data Sparseness and Online Pretest Item Calibration/Scaling Methods in CAT. ACT Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ban, Jae-Chun; Hanson, Bradley A.; Yi, Qing; Harris, Deborah J.

    The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate three online pretest item calibration/scaling methods in terms of item parameter recovery when the item responses to the pretest items in the pool would be sparse. The three methods considered were the marginal maximum likelihood estimate with one EM cycle (OEM) method, the marginal maximum…

  9. Weighted Maximum-a-Posteriori Estimation in Tests Composed of Dichotomous and Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shan-Shan; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua; Shi, Ning-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    For mixed-type tests composed of dichotomous and polytomous items, polytomous items often yield more information than dichotomous items. To reflect the difference between the two types of items and to improve the precision of ability estimation, an adaptive weighted maximum-a-posteriori (WMAP) estimation is proposed. To evaluate the performance of…

  10. How to Activate Teachers through Teacher Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    There is a general doubt on whether teacher evaluation can contribute to teachers' professional development. Recently, standards-based teacher evaluation has been introduced in many countries to improve teaching practice. This study wants to investigate which teacher evaluation procedural, leadership, and teacher characteristics can stimulate…

  11. Effects of Ignoring Item Interaction on Item Parameter Estimation and Detection of Interacting Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Cheng-Te; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the effects of ignoring item interaction on item parameter estimation and the efficiency of using the local dependence index Q[subscript 3] and the SAS NLMIXED procedure to detect item interaction under the three-parameter logistic model and the generalized partial credit model. Through simulations, it was found that ignoring…

  12. 38 CFR 1.489 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit and evaluation... GENERAL PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.489 Audit and evaluation activities. Subject to... part may be disclosed outside VA for the purposes of conducting audit and evaluation activities....

  13. Never Seem to Find the Time: Evaluating the Physiological Time Course of Visual Word Recognition with Regression Analysis of Single Item ERPs.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Sarah; Federmeier, Kara D

    2014-01-01

    Visual word recognition is a process that, both hierarchically and in parallel, draws on different types of information ranging from perceptual to orthographic to semantic. A central question concerns when and how these different types of information come online and interact after a word form is initially perceived. Numerous studies addressing aspects of this question have been conducted with a variety of techniques (e.g., behavior, eye-tracking, ERPs), and divergent theoretical models, suggesting different overall speeds of word processing, have coalesced around clusters of mostly method-specific results. Here, we examine the time course of influence of variables ranging from relatively perceptual (e.g., bigram frequency) to relatively semantic (e.g., number of lexical associates) on ERP responses, analyzed at the single item level. Our results, in combination with a critical review of the literature, suggest methodological, analytic, and theoretical factors that may have led to inconsistency in results of past studies; we will argue that consideration of these factors may lead to a reconciliation between divergent views of the speed of word recognition.

  14. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  15. Development of A Promis Item Bank to Measure Pain Interference

    PubMed Central

    Amtmann, Dagmar; Cook, Karon F.; Jensen, Mark P.; Chen, Wen-Hung; Choi, Seung; Revicki, Dennis; Cella, David; Rothrock, Nan; Keefe, Francis; Callahan, Leigh

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the psychometric properties of the PROMIS Pain Interference (PROMIS-PI) bank. An initial candidate item pool (n=644) was developed and evaluated based on review of existing instruments, interviews with patients, and consultation with pain experts. From this pool, a candidate item bank of 56 items was selected and responses to the items were collected from large community and clinical samples. A total of 14,848 participants responded to all or a subset of candidate items. The responses were calibrated using an item response theory (IRT) model. A final 41-item bank was evaluated with respect to IRT assumptions, model fit, differential item function (DIF), precision, and construct and concurrent validity. Items of the revised bank had good fit to the IRT model (CFI and NNFI/TLI ranged from 0.974 to 0.997), and the data were strongly unidimensional (e.g., ratio of first and second eigenvalue = 35). Nine items exhibited statistically significant DIF. However, adjusting for DIF had little practical impact on score estimates and the items were retained without modifying scoring. Scores provided substantial information across levels of pain; for scores in the T-score range 50-80, the reliability was equivalent to 0.96 to 0.99. Patterns of correlations with other health outcomes supported the construct validity of the item bank. The scores discriminated among persons with different numbers of chronic conditions, disabling conditions, levels of self-reported health, and pain intensity (p< 0.0001). The results indicated that the PROMIS-PI items constitute a psychometrically sound bank. Computerized adaptive testing and short forms are available. PMID:20554116

  16. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  17. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  18. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  19. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  20. 10 CFR 74.55 - Item monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... days for Category IA items and 60 calendar days for Category IB items contained in a vault or in a... days for Category IA items and seven calendar days for Category BI items located elsewhere in the...

  1. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  2. Comparison of Methods for Varying Item Presentation during Noncontingent Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosales, Rocio; Worsdell, April; Trahan, Maranda

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the relative effectiveness of three item presentation methods during noncontingent reinforcement (NCR). Four individuals with developmental disabilities and problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement were recruited for the study. Single-item stimulus preference assessments were…

  3. Distributed Item Review: Administrator User Guide. Technical Report #1603

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvin, P. Shawn

    2016-01-01

    The Distributed Item Review (DIR) is a secure and flexible, web-based system designed to present test items to expert reviewers across a broad geographic area for evaluation of important dimensions of quality (e.g., alignment with standards, bias, sensitivity, and student accessibility). The DIR is comprised of essential features that allow system…

  4. Practical Guide to Conducting an Item Response Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toland, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) is a psychometric technique used in the development, evaluation, improvement, and scoring of multi-item scales. This pedagogical article provides the necessary information needed to understand how to conduct, interpret, and report results from two commonly used ordered polytomous IRT models (Samejima's graded…

  5. A Comparison Study of Item Exposure Control Strategies in MCAT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Xiuzhen; Ozdemir, Burhanettin; Wang, Yating; Xiu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Four item selection indexes with and without exposure control are evaluated and compared in multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The four item selection indices are D-optimality, Posterior expectation Kullback-Leibler information (KLP), the minimized error variance of the linear combination score with equal weight (V1), and the…

  6. Differential functioning of Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test items.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Fermino Fernandes; Dos Santos, Acácia Aparecida Angeli; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2010-02-01

    Differential Item Functioning (DIF) refers to items that do not function the same way for comparable members of different groups. The present study focuses on analyzing and classifying sex-related differential item functioning in the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 1,052 children attending public schools (513 boys, 539 girls, ages 6-10 years). The protocols were scored using the Bender Graduated Scoring System, which evaluates only the distortion criterion using the Rasch logistic response model. The scoring system fit the Rasch model, although two items were found to be biased by sex. When analyzing differential functioning of items for boys and girls separately, the number of differentially functioning items was equal.

  7. MIMIC Methods for Assessing Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Shih, Ching-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Three multiple indicators-multiple causes (MIMIC) methods, namely, the standard MIMIC method (M-ST), the MIMIC method with scale purification (M-SP), and the MIMIC method with a pure anchor (M-PA), were developed to assess differential item functioning (DIF) in polytomous items. In a series of simulations, it appeared that all three methods…

  8. 48 CFR 852.214-72 - Alternate item(s).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternate item(s). 852.214-72 Section 852.214-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  9. Differential Item Functioning Analysis Using Rasch Item Information Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Mapuranga, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a statistical technique used for ensuring the equity and fairness of educational assessments. This study formulates a new DIF analysis method using the information similarity index (ISI). ISI compares item information functions when data fits the Rasch model. Through simulations and an international…

  10. A Mixed Effects Randomized Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, J.-P.; Wyrick, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    The randomized response technique ensures that individual item responses, denoted as true item responses, are randomized before observing them and so-called randomized item responses are observed. A relationship is specified between randomized item response data and true item response data. True item response data are modeled with a (non)linear…

  11. Aware and (Dis)Liking: Item-Based Analyses Reveal that Valence Acquisition via Evaluative Conditioning Emerges Only when There Is Contingency Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleyers, Gordy; Corneille, Olivier; Luminet, Olivier; Yzerbyt, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Evaluative conditioning (EC) refers to changes in the liking of an affectively neutral stimulus (the conditioned stimulus, or CS) following the pairing of that stimulus with another stimulus of affective value (the unconditioned stimulus, or US). In 3 experiments, the authors assessed contingency awareness, that is, awareness of the CS-US…

  12. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-04-11

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed. This report summarizes and evaluates the closure activities performed in support of partial closure of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF). This evaluation will be used in assessing the condition of the 105-DR LSFF for the purpose of meeting the partial clean closure conditions described in the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995). Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, it is has been determined that the partial clean closure conditions for the 105-DR LSFF have been met.

  13. Career and Occupational Development Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    The career and occupational development items contained in this document are part of a kit consisting of four documents which bring together different types of items that measure a number of career and occupational development (COD) objectives developed by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). (NAEP--which completed a national…

  14. Generalizability in Item Response Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Derek C.; Wilson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An approach called generalizability in item response modeling (GIRM) is introduced in this article. The GIRM approach essentially incorporates the sampling model of generalizability theory (GT) into the scaling model of item response theory (IRT) by making distributional assumptions about the relevant measurement facets. By specifying a random…

  15. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Twenty-One. A Collection of Multiple Choice Test Items Relating Mainly to Physics, 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests or term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The test items meet syllabus…

  16. Impact of Local Item Dependence on Item Response Theory Scoring in CAT. Law School Admission Council Computerized Testing Report. LSAC Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Lynda M.

    This study represented a first attempt to evaluate the impact of local item dependence (LID) for Item Response Theory (IRT) scoring in computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The most basic CAT design and a simplified design for simulating CAT item pools with varying degrees of LID were applied. A data generation method that allows the LID among…

  17. 17 CFR 229.1207 - (Item 1207) Delivery commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false (Item 1207) Delivery... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1207 (Item 1207) Delivery commitments. (a) If the registrant is... delivery commitments; and (3) The steps that the registrant has taken to ensure that available reserves...

  18. [Alexithymia and automatic activation of emotional-evaluative information].

    PubMed

    Suslow, T; Arolt, V; Junghanns, K

    1998-05-01

    The emotional valence of stimuli seems to be stored in the associative network and is automatically activated on the mere observation of a stimulus. A principal characteristic of alexithymia represents the difficulty to symbolize emotions verbally. The present study examines the relationship between the dimensions of the alexithymia construct and emotional priming effects in a word-word paradigma. The 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale was administered to 32 subjects along with two word reading tasks as measures of emotional and semantic priming effects. The subscale "difficulty describing feelings" correlated as expected negatively with the negative inhibition effect. The subscale "externally oriented thinking" tended to correlate negatively with the negative facilitation effect. Thus, these dimensions of alexithymia are inversely related to the degree of automatic emotional priming. In summary, there is evidence for an impaired structural integration of emotion and language in persons with difficulties in describing feelings. Poor "symbolization" of emotions in alexithymia is discussed from a cognitive perspective.

  19. Processes and Metrics to Evaluate Faculty Practice Activities at US Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Brigitte L.; Haines, Seena L.; MacLaughlin, Eric J.; Van Amburgh, Jenny A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine what processes and metrics are employed to measure and evaluate pharmacy practice faculty members at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States. Methods. A 23-item web-based questionnaire was distributed to pharmacy practice department chairs at schools of pharmacy fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) (n=114). Results. Ninety-three pharmacy practice chairs or designees from 92 institutions responded. Seventy-six percent reported that more than 60% of the department’s faculty members were engaged in practice-related activities at least eight hours per week. Fewer than half (47%) had written policies and procedures for conducting practice evaluations. Institutions commonly collected data regarding committee service at practice sites, community service events, educational programs, and number of hours engaged in practice-related activities; however, only 24% used a tool to longitudinally collect practice-related data. Publicly funded institutions were more likely than private schools to have written procedures. Conclusion. Data collection tools and best practice recommendations for conducting faculty practice evaluations are needed. PMID:27293227

  20. Conditional recall and the frequency effect in the serial recall task: an examination of item-to-item associativity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leonie M; Roodenrys, Steven

    2012-11-01

    The frequency effect in short-term serial recall is influenced by the composition of lists. In pure lists, a robust advantage in the recall of high-frequency (HF) words is observed, yet in alternating mixed lists, HF and low-frequency (LF) words are recalled equally well. It has been argued that the preexisting associations between all list items determine a single, global level of supportive activation that assists item recall. Preexisting associations between items are assumed to be a function of language co-occurrence; HF-HF associations are high, LF-LF associations are low, and mixed associations are intermediate in activation strength. This account, however, is based on results when alternating lists with equal numbers of HF and LF words were used. It is possible that directional association between adjacent list items is responsible for the recall patterns reported. In the present experiment, the recall of three forms of mixed lists-those with equal numbers of HF and LF items and pure lists-was examined to test the extent to which item-to-item associations are present in serial recall. Furthermore, conditional probabilities were used to examine more closely the evidence for a contribution, since correct-in-position scoring may mask recall that is dependent on the recall of prior items. The results suggest that an item-to-item effect is clearly present for early but not late list items, and they implicate an additional factor, perhaps the availability of resources at output, in the recall of late list items.

  1. Assessing item fit for unidimensional item response theory models using residuals from estimated item response functions.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Shelby J; Sinharay, Sandip; Chon, Kyong Hee

    2013-07-01

    Residual analysis (e.g. Hambleton & Swaminathan, Item response theory: principles and applications, Kluwer Academic, Boston, 1985; Hambleton, Swaminathan, & Rogers, Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) is a popular method to assess fit of item response theory (IRT) models. We suggest a form of residual analysis that may be applied to assess item fit for unidimensional IRT models. The residual analysis consists of a comparison of the maximum-likelihood estimate of the item characteristic curve with an alternative ratio estimate of the item characteristic curve. The large sample distribution of the residual is proved to be standardized normal when the IRT model fits the data. We compare the performance of our suggested residual to the standardized residual of Hambleton et al. (Fundamentals of item response theory, Sage, Newbury Park, 1991) in a detailed simulation study. We then calculate our suggested residuals using data from an operational test. The residuals appear to be useful in assessing the item fit for unidimensional IRT models.

  2. Evaluation of pharmacological activity of Hibiscus tiliaceus.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Awal, S M; Nazmir, Sonia; Nasrin, Sonia; Nurunnabi, Tauhidur Rahman; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Hibiscus tiliaceus, locally known as Bhola was examined for phytochemical properties and its cytotoxic, antibacterial, analgesic and neuropharmacological activities using the ethanol extract of leaf and bark. The phytochemical analysis of the leaf extract indicated the presence of tannins, whereas bark extract indicated the presence of alkaloid, reducing sugar and tannins. A preliminary cytotoxicity of these extracts was determined by a simple and low cost assay using brine shrimp lethality. The leaf extract of the plant exhibited moderate cytotoxic effect (LC50: 20 µg/ml, LC90: 40 µg/ml) whereas the bark extract exhibited low cytotoxic effect (LC50: 50 µg/ml). In the analgesic test, the leaf extract showed comparatively high analgesic action than bark extract. There was no activity found in the leaf extract against the test bacterial strains, however bark extract exhibited a very little inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In the neuropharmacological test, the leaf and bark extract produced a decrease in both the time of onset of sleeping and the total sleeping time. The present study showed evidence that both leaf and bark extract of H. tiliaceus contain medicinally important bioactive compounds, thereby used as traditional medicine.

  3. An NCME Instructional Module on Item-Fit Statistics for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Penfield, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing valid inferences from item response theory (IRT) models is contingent upon a good fit of the data to the model. Violations of model-data fit have numerous consequences, limiting the usefulness and applicability of the model. This instructional module provides an overview of methods used for evaluating the fit of IRT models. Upon completing…

  4. [Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of indol alkaloids].

    PubMed

    Rojas Hernández, N M

    1979-01-01

    In pursuing the study of the antimicrobial properties of alkaloids prepared from Cuban plants the activity of 10 indol alkaloids and 4 semisynthetic variables obtained from three plants--Catharanthus roseus G. Don., Vallesia antillana Wood and Ervatamia coronaria Staph, of the family Apocynaceae--growing in Cuba was assessed in vitro. The alkaloids and the variables used were catharantine, vindoline, vindolinine, perivine, reserpine, tabernaemontanine, tetrahydroalstonine, aparicine, vindolinic acid, reserpic acid and vindolininol. These were faced to 40 bacterial strains from the genera Salmonella, Shigella, Proteus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium as well as to fungi and yeasts from the genera Aspergillus, kCunnighamella, kCandida and Saccharomyces. The method involving cylindric sections in a double agar layer was applied and lectures were obtained at 24-48 hours of incubation at 25 degrees C for fungi and yeasts and 37 degrees C for bacteria. Inhibition zones are reported in millimeters.

  5. Modeling the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II using non-parametric item response models.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Garre, Francisca; Hidalgo, María Dolores; Guilera, Georgina; Pino, Oscar; Rojo, J Emilio; Gómez-Benito, Juana

    2015-03-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS II) is a multidimensional instrument developed for measuring disability. It comprises six domains (getting around, self-care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in society). The main purpose of this paper is the evaluation of the psychometric properties for each domain of the WHO-DAS II with parametric and non-parametric Item Response Theory (IRT) models. A secondary objective is to assess whether the WHO-DAS II items within each domain form a hierarchy of invariantly ordered severity indicators of disability. A sample of 352 patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder is used in this study. The 36 items WHO-DAS II was administered during the consultation. Partial Credit and Mokken scale models are used to study the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the WHO-DAS II scale are satisfactory for all the domains. However, we identify a few items that do not discriminate satisfactorily between different levels of disability and cannot be invariantly ordered in the scale. In conclusion the WHO-DAS II can be used to assess overall disability in patients with schizophrenia, but some domains are too general to assess functionality in these patients because they contain items that are not applicable to this pathology.

  6. Evaluation of Radiation Doses Due to Consumption of Contaminated Food Items and Calculation of Food Class-Specific Derived Intervention Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzelman, K M; Mansfield, W G

    2010-04-27

    This document evaluates the expected radiation dose due to the consumption of several specific food classes (dairy, meat, produce, etc.) contaminated with specific radionuclides, and relates concentration levels in food to the detection abilities of typical aboratory analysis/measurement methods. The attached charts present the limiting organ dose as a function of the radionuclide concentration in a particular food class, and allow the user to compare these concentrations and doses to typical analytical detection apabilities. The expected radiation dose depends on several factors: the age of the individual; the radionuclide present in the food; the concentration of the radionuclide in the food; and the amount of food consumed. Food consumption rates for individuals of various ges were taken from the 1998 United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) document, Accidental Radioactive Contamination of HUman Food and Animal Feeds: Recommendations for State and Local Agencies. In that document, the FDA defines the erived Intervention Level (DIL), which is the concentration of a particular radionuclide in food that if consumed could result in an individual receiving a radiation dose exceeding the Protection Action Guide (PAG) thresholds for intervention. This document also resents odified, food class specific DIL, which is calculated using a somewhat modified version of the FDA's procedure. This document begins with an overview of the FDA's DIL calculation, followed by a description of the food class specific DIL calculations, and finally charts of the radiation dose per radioactivity concentration for several food class/radionuclide combinations.

  7. 76 FR 14641 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Identification of Critical Safety Items (DFARS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... any items being purchased that are critical safety items so that the proper risk-based surveillance... This DFARS case was initiated at the request of the Defense Contract Management Agency so that when DoD requiring activities identify procurements involving critical safety items, the buying activities...

  8. Evaluation of the sporicidal activity of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Rickloff, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of sterilizing surfaces with ozone-saturated water by the methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). Initially, it was determined that there was no apparent difference in ozone resistance between spores of Bacillus subtilis and Clostridium sporogenes when they are suspended in water. Both species were inactivated by a 10-min exposure at ambient temperature. Resistance was increased when the spores were dried on AOAC carriers. Viable organisms were recovered after an exposure of 40 min at ambient temperature. An increase in the reactor water temperature to 60/sup 0/C did not improve the effectiveness of the ozone in sterilizing AOAC carriers. Dried spores of C. sporogenes were more resistant than B. subtilis spores because of a greater accumulation of organic matter on the carriers. No significant sporicidal activity was demonstrated after 40 min for spores of either species when they were inoculated on silk suture loops. The data suggest that organic loading and poor ozone penetrability are key factors in effecting the ability of ozone to sterilize surfaces rapidly.

  9. Multilevel Modeling of Item Position Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albano, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    In many testing programs it is assumed that the context or position in which an item is administered does not have a differential effect on examinee responses to the item. Violations of this assumption may bias item response theory estimates of item and person parameters. This study examines the potentially biasing effects of item position. A…

  10. Item Banking. ERIC/AE Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence

    This digest discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using item banks, and it provides useful information for those who are considering implementing an item banking project in their school districts. The primary advantage of item banking is in test development. Using an item response theory method, such as the Rasch model, items from multiple…

  11. Effects of Incorporating Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Two matched forms of a 50 item grammar test were developed. Twenty items designed to be humorous were included in one form. Inclusion of humorous items did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items, nor on commmon post-treatment items. Inclusion did not affect results of anxiety measures. (Author/DWH)

  12. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  13. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate that product information to the item level for consideration in designating items. In considering these...

  14. Measurement Assurance for End-Item Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to assure the end product meets specifications and customer requirements. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipments (MTE), provide the evidence of product conformity to the prescribed requirements. Therefore the processes which employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to development and execution of these processes. Traditionally, calibration of MTE is given more focus in industry standards and process control efforts than the equally important proper usage of the same equipment. It is a common complaint of calibration laboratory personnel that MTE users are only interested in "a sticker." If the QMS requires the MTE "to demonstrate conformity of the product," then the quality of the measurement process must be adequate for the task. This leads to an ad hoc definition; measurement assurance is a discipline that assures that all processes, activities, environments, standards, and procedures involved in making a measurement produce a result that can be rigorously evaluated for validity and accuracy. To evaluate that the existing measurement processes are providing an adequate level of quality to support the decisions based upon this measurement data, an understanding of measurement assurance basics is essential. This topic is complimentary to the calibration standard, ANSI/NCSL Z540.3-2006, which targets the calibration of MTE at the organizational level. This paper will discuss general measurement assurance when MTE is used to provide evidence of product conformity, therefore the target audience of this paper is end item users of MTE. A central focus of the paper will be the verification of tolerances and the associated risks, so calibration professionals may find the paper useful in communication with their customers, MTE users.

  15. Monitoring and evaluating school nutrition and physical activity policies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer P; McKenna, Mary L; Butler, Gregory P

    2010-01-01

    Given the increase in the number of Canadian jurisdictions with school nutrition and/or physical activity policies, there is a need to assess the effectiveness of such policies. The objectives of this paper are to 1) provide an overview of key issues in monitoring and evaluating school nutrition and physical activity policies in Canada and 2) identify areas for further research needed to strengthen the evidence base and inform the development of effective approaches to monitoring and evaluation. Evaluation indicators, data sources and existing tools for evaluating nutrition and physical activity are reviewed. This paper has underscored the importance of identifying common indicators and approaches, using a comprehensive approach based on the WHO framework and ensuring that research capacity and funding is in place to facilitate high-quality evaluation efforts in the future.

  16. USE OF AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO EVALUATE YOUNG CHILDREN'S ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking a young child's activity pattern data with the environmental, biological, and personal samples that are collected during an exposure assessment is important in evaluating potential exposures and dose associated with environmental contaminants. A number of different appro...

  17. Evaluation of Control Parameters for the Activated Sludge Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, T. Ray; Sherrard, Josephy H.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of the parameters currently being used to design and operate the activated sludge process is presented. The advantages and disadvantages for the use of each parameter are discussed. (MR)

  18. Printed Comments With Item Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, J. Christopher

    1970-01-01

    The author suggests that a computer program be designed which not only computes item statistics, but also provides a running commetary in English to assist teachers in their analysis of test results. (PR)

  19. Performance in Physiology Evaluation: Possible Improvement by Active Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrezor, Luís H.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages…

  20. Hidden item variance in multiple mini-interview scores.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Nikki L Bibler; Swoboda, Christopher M; Kelcey, Benjamin M; Manuel, R Stephen

    2017-05-01

    The extant literature has largely ignored a potentially significant source of variance in multiple mini-interview (MMI) scores by "hiding" the variance attributable to the sample of attributes used on an evaluation form. This potential source of hidden variance can be defined as rating items, which typically comprise an MMI evaluation form. Due to its multi-faceted, repeated measures format, reliability for the MMI has been primarily evaluated using generalizability (G) theory. A key assumption of G theory is that G studies model the most important sources of variance to which a researcher plans to generalize. Because G studies can only attribute variance to the facets that are modeled in a G study, failure to model potentially substantial sources of variation in MMI scores can result in biased estimates of variance components. This study demonstrates the implications of hiding the item facet in MMI studies when true item-level effects exist. An extensive Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to examine whether a commonly used hidden item, person-by-station (p × s|i) G study design results in biased estimated variance components. Estimates from this hidden item model were compared with estimates from a more complete person-by-station-by-item (p × s × i) model. Results suggest that when true item-level effects exist, the hidden item model (p × s|i) will result in biased variance components which can bias reliability estimates; therefore, researchers should consider using the more complete person-by-station-by-item model (p × s × i) when evaluating generalizability of MMI scores.

  1. Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-09-01

    This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

  2. Rehearsal of To-Be-Remembered Items Is Unnecessary to Perform Directed Forgetting within Working Memory: Support for an Active Control Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Festini, Sara B.; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    Directed forgetting tasks instruct people to forget targeted memoranda. In the context of working memory, people attempt to forget representations that are currently held in mind. Here, we evaluated candidate mechanisms of directed forgetting within working memory, by (a) testing the influence of articulatory suppression, a rehearsal-reducing and…

  3. Binding agent for molding ceramic items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshentsev, B. D.; Vityuk, N. P.; Volkov, A. V.; Yevdokimov, A. I.; Novikov, M. N.; Piskunov, Y. G.; Pobortsev, E. P.; Sadovnichaya, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The invention refers to the fabrication of ceramic items by the molding method. It can be used to produce items of complicated configuration, in particular composition of binding agent for electroceramic items.

  4. 76 FR 9849 - Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Article 3 of Annex I to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty requires the preparation of a CEE for any proposed Antarctic activity likely to have more than a... Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities SUMMARY: The Department of State gives...

  5. Evaluation of Emotional Literacy Activities: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksuz, Yucel

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate impact of the emotional literacy activities through participant student's experiences. Emotional literacy activities, including social-emotional skills Goleman's emotional intelligence and Fapuel's emotional literacy model designed and conducted for 2 months on primary school students, who study in 4th grade. The…

  6. Consequences of Ignoring Guessing when Estimating the Latent Density in Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2008-01-01

    In Ramsay-curve item response theory (RC-IRT), the latent variable distribution is estimated simultaneously with the item parameters. In extant Monte Carlo evaluations of RC-IRT, the item response function (IRF) used to fit the data is the same one used to generate the data. The present simulation study examines RC-IRT when the IRF is imperfectly…

  7. Stratified and Maximum Information Item Selection Procedures in Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Hui; Ansley, Timothy; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2010-01-01

    In this study we evaluated and compared three item selection procedures: the maximum Fisher information procedure (F), the a-stratified multistage computer adaptive testing (CAT) (STR), and a refined stratification procedure that allows more items to be selected from the high a strata and fewer items from the low a strata (USTR), along with…

  8. The Single-Item Math Anxiety Scale: An Alternative Way of Measuring Mathematical Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez-Peña, M. Isabel; Guilera, Georgina; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether the Single-Item Math Anxiety Scale (SIMA), based on the item suggested by Ashcraft, provided valid and reliable scores of mathematical anxiety. A large sample of university students (n = 279) was administered the SIMA and the 25-item Shortened Math Anxiety Rating Scale (sMARS) to evaluate the relation between the scores…

  9. An Empirical Investigation of Methods for Assessing Item Fit for Mixed Format Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, Kyong Hee; Lee, Won-Chan; Ansley, Timothy N.

    2013-01-01

    Empirical information regarding performance of model-fit procedures has been a persistent need in measurement practice. Statistical procedures for evaluating item fit were applied to real test examples that consist of both dichotomously and polytomously scored items. The item fit statistics used in this study included the PARSCALE's G[squared],…

  10. Identifying Differential Item Functioning in Multi-Stage Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis; Li, Johnson

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of CATSIB (Computer Adaptive Testing-Simultaneous Item Bias Test) for detecting differential item functioning (DIF) when items in the matching and studied subtest are administered adaptively in the context of a realistic multi-stage adaptive test (MST). MST was simulated using a 4-item…

  11. A Comparison of Two Student Instructional Rating Forms Utilizing High-Inference Versus Moderate Inference Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Pamela W.

    Two types of items used in student evaluations of college teaching were compared: high-inference items, which require considerable inferring from what is seen or heard in the classroom to labelling of teacher behavior; and moderate-inference items, such as "teacher listens carefully." Two instruments were administered to random halves of…

  12. A Latent Trait Look at Pretest-Posttest Validation of Criterion-referenced Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    1981-01-01

    Using criterion-referenced test item data collected in an empirical study, differences in item selection between Cox and Vargas' pretest-posttest validity index and a latent trait approach (evaluation of the item information function for the mastery score) are analyzed. (Author/GK)

  13. Using a Model of Analysts' Judgments to Augment an Item Calibration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Carl; Thum, Yeow Meng; He, Wei; Ma, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    When conducting item reviews, analysts evaluate an array of statistical and graphical information to assess the fit of a field test (FT) item to an item response theory model. The process can be tedious, particularly when the number of human reviews (HR) to be completed is large. Furthermore, such a process leads to decisions that are susceptible…

  14. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  15. Multivariate Associations Among Health-Related Fitness, Physical Activity, and TGMD-3 Test Items in Disadvantaged Children From Low-Income Families.

    PubMed

    Burns, Ryan; Brusseau, Tim; Hannon, James

    2016-10-04

    Motor skills are needed for physical development and may be linked to health-related fitness and physical activity levels. No studies have examined the relationships among these constructs in large samples of disadvantaged children from low-income families using the Test for Gross Motor Development-3rd Edition (TGMD-3). The purpose of this study was to examine the multivariate associations among health-related fitness, physical activity, and motor skills assessed using the TGMD-3. Participants included 1460 school-aged children (730 boys, 730 girls; M age = 8.4 years, SD = 1.8 years) recruited from the K to sixth grades from three low-income schools. Health-related fitness was assessed using the FITNESSGRAM battery, physical activity was assessed using accelerometers and pedometers, and motor skills were assessed using the TGMD-3. Canonical correlations revealed statistically significant correlations between the Ball Skills and health-related fitness variates (Rc = 0.43, Rc(2 )= 17%, p < 0.001). Significant canonical coefficients in the Ball Skills variate included two-handed striking, dribbling, and catching, and significant canonical coefficients in the health-related fitness variate included body mass index and the progressive aerobic cardiovascular endurance run (p < 0.01). Locomotor skills did not significantly correlate with health-related fitness or physical activity. Ball skills are related to health-related fitness in disadvantaged children from low-income families.

  16. A Study of the Homogeneity of Items Produced From Item Forms Across Different Taxonomic Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Margaret B.; Argo, Jana K.

    This study determined whether item forms ( rules for constructing items related to a domain or set of tasks) would enable naive item writers to generate multiple-choice items at three taxonomic levels--knowledge, comprehension, and application. Students wrote 120 multiple-choice items from 20 item forms, corresponding to educational objectives…

  17. Thermal response based item identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. K.; Hypes, P. A.; Bracken, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems in NDA of nuclear materials is identifying the chemical form of the nuclear material and the surrounding matrix. Recent work analyzing the calorimeter response of sources embedded in a variety of matrices has led to a possible solution to this problem. The wide range of thermal time constants exhibited by typical matrix materials lends itself to permitting the differentiation between materials, based on time constants extracted from the measured response. Potential applications include simple item identification, item fingerprinting as part of shipper-receiver measurements, and distinguishing between Pu metal and Pu oxide as required under certain proposed attribute measurements. The results of applying this technique to a variety of items will be presented and discussed.

  18. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

  19. Australian Item Bank Program: Science Item Bank. Book 3: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The Australian Science Item Bank consists of three volumes of multiple-choice questions. Book 3 contains questions on the biological sciences. The questions are designed to be suitable for high school students (year 8 to year 12 in Australian schools). The questions are classified by the subject content of the question, the cognitive skills…

  20. Performance in physiology evaluation: possible improvement by active learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Montrezor, Luís H

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation process is complex and extremely important in the teaching/learning process. Evaluations are constantly employed in the classroom to assist students in the learning process and to help teachers improve the teaching process. The use of active methodologies encourages students to participate in the learning process, encourages interaction with their peers, and stimulates thinking about physiological mechanisms. This study examined the performance of medical students on physiology over four semesters with and without active engagement methodologies. Four activities were used: a puzzle, a board game, a debate, and a video. The results show that engaging in activities with active methodologies before a physiology cognitive monitoring test significantly improved student performance compared with not performing the activities. We integrate the use of these methodologies with classic lectures, and this integration appears to improve the teaching/learning process in the discipline of physiology and improves the integration of physiology with cardiology and neurology. In addition, students enjoy the activities and perform better on their evaluations when they use them.

  1. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  2. Psychometric Consequences of Subpopulation Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins-Manley, Anne Corinne

    2017-01-01

    This study defines subpopulation item parameter drift (SIPD) as a change in item parameters over time that is dependent on subpopulations of examinees, and hypothesizes that the presence of SIPD in anchor items is associated with bias and/or lack of invariance in three psychometric outcomes. Results show that SIPD in anchor items is associated…

  3. A Monte Carlo Study Investigating the Influence of Item Discrimination, Category Intersection Parameters, and Differential Item Functioning Patterns on the Detection of Differential Item Functioning in Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The increased use of polytomous item formats has led assessment developers to pay greater attention to the detection of differential item functioning (DIF) in these items. DIF occurs when an item performs differently for two contrasting groups of respondents (e.g., males versus females) after controlling for differences in the abilities of the…

  4. Adaptable Learning Assistant for Item Bank Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuntiyagul, Atorn; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick; Wongsawang, Damras

    2008-01-01

    We present PKIP, an adaptable learning assistant tool for managing question items in item banks. PKIP is not only able to automatically assist educational users to categorize the question items into predefined categories by their contents but also to correctly retrieve the items by specifying the category and/or the difficulty level. PKIP adapts…

  5. Item-Writing Guidelines for Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Tom

    2015-01-01

    A teacher learning how to write test questions (test items) will almost certainly encounter item-writing guidelines--lists of item-writing do's and don'ts. Item-writing guidelines usually are presented as applicable across all assessment settings. Table I shows some guidelines that I believe to be generally applicable and two will be briefly…

  6. Completeness assessment of type II active pharmaceutical ingredient drug master files under generic drug user fee amendment: review metrics and common incomplete items.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huyi; Li, Haitao; Song, Wei; Shen, Diandian; Skanchy, David; Shen, Kun; Lionberger, Robert A; Rosencrance, Susan M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2014-09-01

    Under the Generic Drug User Fee Amendments (GDUFA) of 2012, Type II active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) drug master files (DMFs) must pay a user fee and pass a Completeness Assessment (CA) before they can be referenced in an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA), ANDA amendment, or ANDA prior approval supplement (PAS). During the first year of GDUFA implementation, from October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013, approximately 1,500 Type II API DMFs received at least one cycle of CA review and more than 1,100 Type II DMFs were deemed complete and published on FDA's "Available for Reference List". The data from CA reviews were analyzed for factors that influenced the CA review process and metrics, as well as the areas of DMF submissions which most frequently led to an incomplete CA status. The metrics analysis revealed that electronic DMFs appear to improve the completeness of submission and shorten both the review and response times. Utilizing the CA checklist to compile and proactively update the DMFs improves the chance for the DMFs to pass the CA in the first cycle. However, given that the majority of DMFs require at least two cycles of CA before being deemed complete, it is recommended that DMF fees are paid 6 months in advance of the ANDA submissions in order to avoid negatively impacting the filling status of the ANDAs.

  7. Evaluation of Pulsed Power Architectures for Active Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    strongest responses of the fissile material, prompt and delayed neutrons and delayed gammas . Based on a notional detection scenario, the...EVALUATION OF PULSED POWER ARCHITECTURES FOR ACTIVE DETECTION* I.D. Smith, P.A. Corcoran, R. Altes, D. Morton, R. Stevens and B. Whitney L-3...Abstract: Intense pulsed active detection (IPAD, [1]; also see presentations at this conference by B.V. Weber, et al., D.P Murphy et al

  8. Evaluation of the genetic activity of industrially produced carbon black.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, C J; LeBlanc, J V; Thomas, W C; Haworth, S R; Kirby, P E; Thilagar, A; Bowman, J T; Brusick, D J

    1981-06-01

    Commercially produced oil furnace carbon black (Chemical Abstract Service Registry No. 1333-86-4) has been evaluated by five different assay for genetic activity. These were the Ames Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test, sister chromatid exchange test in CHO cells, mouse lymphoma test, cell transformation assay in C3H/10T1/2 cells, and assay for genetic effects in Drosophila melanogaster. Limited cellular toxicity was exhibited but no significant genetic activity was noted.

  9. Mediate gamma radiation effects on some packaged food items

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Uehara, Vanessa B.; Teixeira, Christian A. H. M.; del Mastro, Nelida L.

    2012-08-01

    For most of prepackaged foods a 10 kGy radiation dose is considered the maximum dose needed; however, the commercially available and practically accepted packaging materials must be suitable for such application. This work describes the application of ionizing radiation on several packaged food items, using 5 dehydrated food items, 5 ready-to-eat meals and 5 ready-to-eat food items irradiated in a 60Co gamma source with a 3 kGy dose. The quality evaluation of the irradiated samples was performed 2 and 8 months after irradiation. Microbiological analysis (bacteria, fungus and yeast load) was performed. The sensory characteristics were established for appearance, aroma, texture and flavor attributes were also established. From these data, the acceptability of all irradiated items was obtained. All ready-to-eat food items assayed like manioc flour, some pâtés and blocks of raw brown sugar and most of ready-to-eat meals like sausages and chicken with legumes were considered acceptable for microbial and sensory characteristics. On the other hand, the dehydrated food items chosen for this study, such as dehydrated bacon potatoes or pea soups were not accepted by the sensory analysis. A careful dose choice and special irradiation conditions must be used in order to achieve sensory acceptability needed for the commercialization of specific irradiated food items.

  10. Application of Optimal Designs to Item Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-Yi

    2014-01-01

    In computerized adaptive testing (CAT), examinees are presented with various sets of items chosen from a precalibrated item pool. Consequently, the attrition speed of the items is extremely fast, and replenishing the item pool is essential. Therefore, item calibration has become a crucial concern in maintaining item banks. In this study, a two-parameter logistic model is used. We applied optimal designs and adaptive sequential analysis to solve this item calibration problem. The results indicated that the proposed optimal designs are cost effective and time efficient. PMID:25188318

  11. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  12. Evaluation of active appearance models in varying background conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Marek; Naruniec, Jacek

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present an evaluation of the chosen versions of Active Appearance Models (AAM) in varying background conditions. Algorithms were tested on a subset of the CMU PIE database and chosen background im- ages. Our experiments prove, that the accuracy of those methods is strictly correlated with the used background, where the differences in the success rate differ even up to 50%.

  13. Evaluation of HIV Prevention and Comprehensive Health Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Gloria; And Others

    This study was undertaken to evaluate Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention and comprehensive health activities in public secondary schools in Mississippi. The Comprehensive School Health Curriculum (CSHC), for implementation in junior, middle, and senior high schools, was designed to promote improved knowledge and behaviors related to the…

  14. 42 CFR 2.53 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Audit and evaluation activities. 2.53 Section 2.53 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.53 Audit...

  15. 42 CFR 2.53 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audit and evaluation activities. 2.53 Section 2.53 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.53 Audit...

  16. 42 CFR 2.53 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.53 Audit and evaluation activities. (a) Records not copied or removed. If patient records are not copied or removed, patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on program...

  17. 42 CFR 2.53 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.53 Audit and evaluation activities. (a) Records not copied or removed. If patient records are not copied or removed, patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on program...

  18. 42 CFR 2.53 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 2.53 Audit and evaluation activities. (a) Records not copied or removed. If patient records are not copied or removed, patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on program...

  19. Developing and investigating the use of single-item measures in organizational research.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Gwenith G; Matthews, Russell A; Gibbons, Alyssa Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    The validity of organizational research relies on strong research methods, which include effective measurement of psychological constructs. The general consensus is that multiple item measures have better psychometric properties than single-item measures. However, due to practical constraints (e.g., survey length, respondent burden) there are situations in which certain single items may be useful for capturing information about constructs that might otherwise go unmeasured. We evaluated 37 items, including 18 newly developed items as well as 19 single items selected from existing multiple-item scales based on psychometric characteristics, to assess 18 constructs frequently measured in organizational and occupational health psychology research. We examined evidence of reliability; convergent, discriminant, and content validity assessments; and test-retest reliabilities at 1- and 3-month time lags for single-item measures using a multistage and multisource validation strategy across 3 studies, including data from N = 17 occupational health subject matter experts and N = 1,634 survey respondents across 2 samples. Items selected from existing scales generally demonstrated better internal consistency reliability and convergent validity, whereas these particular new items generally had higher levels of content validity. We offer recommendations regarding when use of single items may be more or less appropriate, as well as 11 items that seem acceptable, 14 items with mixed results that might be used with caution due to mixed results, and 12 items we do not recommend using as single-item measures. Although multiple-item measures are preferable from a psychometric standpoint, in some circumstances single-item measures can provide useful information.

  20. A New Item Selection Procedure for Mixed Item Type in Computerized Classification Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, C. Allen; Wang, Tianyou

    This paper proposes a new Information-Time index as the basis for item selection in computerized classification testing (CCT) and investigates how this new item selection algorithm can help improve test efficiency for item pools with mixed item types. It also investigates how practical constraints such as item exposure rate control, test…

  1. Target Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenden, Dan

    The Instructor and Course Evaluation System (ICES) is a computer-based system for obtaining student ratings of instructors and courses. To use ICES, an instructor will choose 23 evaluative items from an item catalog. These items are then printed on a standard form. Students respond to these items using a five position scale. On the back of the…

  2. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Evaluate Current Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marszalek, Jolanta; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Rutkowska, Izabela; Kosmol, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of ecological momentary assessment in evaluating physical activity among children, adolescents, and adults. It also determines whether ecological momentary assessment fulfills the criteria of validity, reliability, objectivity, norms, and standardization applied to the tools used for the evaluation of physical activity. Methods. The EBSCO-CINHAL, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SPORTDiscuss databases were reviewed in December 2012 for articles associated with EMA. Results. Of the 20 articles examined, half (10) used electronic methods for data collection, although various methods were used, ranging from pen and paper to smartphone applications. Ten studies used objective monitoring equipment. Nineteen studies were performed over 4 days. While the validity of the EMA method was discussed in 18 studies, only four found it to be objective. In all cases, the EMA procedures were precisely documented and confirmed to be feasible. Conclusions. Ecological momentary assessment is a valid, reliable, and feasible approach to evaluate activity and sedentary behavior. Researchers should be aware that while ecological momentary assessment offers many benefits, it simultaneously imposes many limitations which should be considered when studying physical activity. PMID:25126580

  3. Active thermography in qualitative evaluation of protective materials.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Wiecek, Bogusław

    2009-01-01

    This is a study of the possibilities of a qualitative evaluation of protective materials with active thermography. It presents a simulation of a periodic excitation of a multilayer composite material. Tests were conducted with lock-in thermography on Kevlar composite consisting of 16 layers of Kevlar fabric reinforced with formaldehyde resin with implanted delamination defects. Lock-in thermography is a versatile tool for nondestructive evaluation. It is a fast, remote and nondestructive procedure. Hence, it was used to detect delaminations in the composite structure of materials used in the production of components designed for personal protection. This method directly contributes to an improvement in safety.

  4. Promoting cold-start items in recommender systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs.

  5. Promoting Cold-Start Items in Recommender Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs. PMID:25479013

  6. 77 FR 26279 - Scheduled Change and Deletion of Agenda Item From April 27, 2012, Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    .... Item No. Bureau Subject 2 MEDIA TITLE: Noncommercial Educational Station Fundraising for Third- Party... fundraising activities that interrupt regular programming for the benefit of third- party...

  7. An in vitro method for evaluating vascular endothelial ADPase activity.

    PubMed

    Caprino, L; Togna, A R; Stella, C; Togna, G

    1996-06-01

    Some xenobiotics, known to promote the development of thrombotic phenomena, affect vascular endothelium ADPase, a regulatory enzyme that inactivates vaso- and platelet-active adenine nucleotides. This proposed new experimental approach represents an improved method of evaluation of vascular endothelial ADPase activity which is assessed by measuring, at pre-established times, the degradation rate of exogenous ADP incubated with aortic bovine patches. The ADP dosage was performed by using a spectrophotometric enzymatic assay. Statistical analyses showed that the method is capable of highlighting the linearity of the ADPase activity time-course, thus indicating that the slopes of time-degradation curves of ADP are a valid index for this endothelial ectoenzyme activity. Results obtained with ADPase inhibiting or stimulating agent confirm that this in vitro method is an efficient tool for estimating the ability of xenobiotics or drugs to modify the nonthrombogenic properties of vascular endothelium.

  8. The reliability and validity of the English version of the Evaluation of Daily Activity Questionnaire for people with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Alan; Tyson, Sarah F.; Nordenskiöld, Ulla; Hawkins, Ruth; Prior, Yeliz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The Evaluation of Daily Activity Questionnaire (EDAQ) includes 138 items in 14 domains identified as important by people with RA. The aim of this study was to test the validity and reliability of the English EDAQ. Methods. A total of 502 participants completed two questionnaires 3 weeks apart. The first consisted of the EDAQ, HAQ, RA Quality of Life (RAQoL) and the Medical Outcomes Scale (MOS) 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36v2), and the second consisted of the EDAQ only. The 14 EDAQ domains were tested for: unidimensionality—using confirmatory factor analysis; fit, response dependency, invariance across groups (differential item functioning)—using Rasch analysis; internal consistency [Person Separation Index (PSI)]; concurrent validity—by correlations with the HAQ, SF-36v2 and RAQoL; and test–retest reliability (Spearman’s correlations). Results. Confirmatory factor analysis of the 14 EDAQ domains indicated unidimensionality, after adjustment for local dependency in each domain. All domains achieved a root mean square error of approximation <0.10 and satisfied Rasch model expectations for local dependency. DIF by age, gender and employment status was largely absent. The PSI was consistent with individual use (PSI = 0.94 for all 14 domains). For all domains, except Caring, concurrent validity was good: HAQ (rs = 0.72–0.91), RAQoL (rs = 0.67–0.82) and SF36v2 Physical Function scale (rs = −0.60 to −0.84) and test–retest reliability was good (rs = 0.70–0.89). Conclusion. Analysis supported a 14-domain, two-component structure (Self care and Mobility) of the EDAQ, where each domain, and both components, satisfied Rasch model requirements, and have robust reliability and validity. PMID:25863045

  9. Detecting Gender Bias Through Test Item Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Espada, Wilson J.

    2009-03-01

    Many physical science and physics instructors might not be trained in pedagogically appropriate test construction methods. This could lead to test items that do not measure what they are intended to measure. A subgroup of these items might show bias against some groups of students. This paper describes how the author became aware of potentially biased items against females in his examinations, which led to the exploration of fundamental issues related to item validity, gender bias, and differential item functioning, or DIF. A brief discussion of DIF in the context of university courses, as well as practical suggestions to detect possible gender-biased items, follows.

  10. Evaluation of pozzolanic activity by the electric resistance measurement method

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Chuichi; Ikeda, Ko . Dept. of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering); Inoue, Yoshihiro )

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of electric resistance and amount of consumption of portlandite were carried out in accelerated curing conditions by preparing pastes of Fine Ceraments, fly ash, silica fume, kaolin, acid clay, zeolite and quartz activated with portlandite. Electric resistances of reactive pozzolans showed sharp rises except that of kaolin, whereas that of inactive material, quartz, showed no sharp rise. Electric resistances are proportional to the consumptions of portlandite except for fly ashes. The electric resistance measurement method combined with portlandite consumption measurement is useful to the rapid evaluation of pozzolanic activity.

  11. Ultrasonic manipulation of locomotive microorganisms and evaluation of their activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mitsunori; Kitamura, Norio; Terauchi, Masaki

    2002-12-01

    Acoustic manipulation of locomotive microorganisms, i.e., euglena and paramecia, was conducted by using ultrasonic standing waves of ˜3 MHz. Microorganisms were trapped at the intersections of the nodes in the two orthogonal standing waves and were transferred horizontally and vertically by the suitable ultrasonic frequency change. Aggregation of microorganisms was also observed in the process of the cyclic frequency change. The trapping efficiency depended on both ultrasonic power density and the activity of microorganisms. The effects of water temperature and illumination on their activity were evaluated by measuring the ultrasonic trapping efficiency.

  12. Metaproteomics: Evaluation of protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susan Hove; Stensballe, Allan; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Herbst, Florian-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Metaproteomic studies of full-scale activated sludge systems require reproducible protein extraction methods. A systematic evaluation of three different extractions protocols, each in combination with three different methods of cell lysis, and a commercial kit were evaluated. Criteria used for comparison of each method included the extracted protein concentration and the number of identified proteins and peptides as well as their phylogenetic, cell localization and functional distribution and quantitative reproducibility. Furthermore, the advantage of using specific metagenomes and a 2-step database approach was illustrated. The results recommend a protocol for protein extraction from activated sludge based on the protein extraction reagent B-Per and bead beating. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000862 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000862).

  13. In vitro Evaluation of Anthelmintic Activity of Nauclea orientalis Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Raghavamma, S. T. V.; Rao, N. Rama

    2010-01-01

    Antianthelmintic activity of successive extracts (chloroform, acetone, ethanol and aqueous) of Nauclea orientalis leaves were evaluated separately on adult Indian earthworm (Pheretima posthuma) and compared with that of albendazole. It was found that the extracts exhibited, respectively dose-dependent action and inhibition of spontaneous motility (paralysis) and death of earthworms. The results indicated that the chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts were more potent. PMID:21218070

  14. 38 CFR 1.489 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 5701, 38 CFR 1.500-1.527, the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a), 38 CFR 1.575-1..., patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on VA facility... evaluation activities. (c) Congressional oversight. Records subject to §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this...

  15. 38 CFR 1.489 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 5701, 38 CFR 1.500-1.527, the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a), 38 CFR 1.575-1..., patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on VA facility... evaluation activities. (c) Congressional oversight. Records subject to §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this...

  16. 38 CFR 1.489 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 5701, 38 CFR 1.500-1.527, the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a), 38 CFR 1.575-1..., patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on VA facility... evaluation activities. (c) Congressional oversight. Records subject to §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this...

  17. 38 CFR 1.489 - Audit and evaluation activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 5701, 38 CFR 1.500-1.527, the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a), 38 CFR 1.575-1..., patient identifying information may be disclosed in the course of a review of records on VA facility... evaluation activities. (c) Congressional oversight. Records subject to §§ 1.460 through 1.499 of this...

  18. New methodology for evaluating osteoclastic activity induced by orthodontic load

    PubMed Central

    ARAÚJO, Adriele Silveira; FERNANDES, Alline Birra Nolasco; MACIEL, José Vinicius Bolognesi; NETTO, Juliana de Noronha Santos; BOLOGNESE, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is a dynamic process of bone modeling involving osteoclast-driven resorption on the compression side. Consequently, to estimate the influence of various situations on tooth movement, experimental studies need to analyze this cell. Objectives The aim of this study was to test and validate a new method for evaluating osteoclastic activity stimulated by mechanical loading based on the fractal analysis of the periodontal ligament (PDL)-bone interface. Material and Methods The mandibular right first molars of 14 rabbits were tipped mesially by a coil spring exerting a constant force of 85 cN. To evaluate the actual influence of osteoclasts on fractal dimension of bone surface, alendronate (3 mg/Kg) was injected weekly in seven of those rabbits. After 21 days, the animals were killed and their jaws were processed for histological evaluation. Osteoclast counts and fractal analysis (by the box counting method) of the PDL-bone interface were performed in histological sections of the right and left sides of the mandible. Results An increase in the number of osteoclasts and in fractal dimension after OTM only happened when alendronate was not administered. Strong correlation was found between the number of osteoclasts and fractal dimension. Conclusions Our results suggest that osteoclastic activity leads to an increase in bone surface irregularity, which can be quantified by its fractal dimension. This makes fractal analysis by the box counting method a potential tool for the assessment of osteoclastic activity on bone surfaces in microscopic examination. PMID:25760264

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Differences in Group Abilities on the Tucker and the Levine Observed-Score Methods for Common-Item Nonequivalent Groups Equating. ACT Research Report Series 2010-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hanwei; Cui, Zhongmin; Zhu, Rongchun; Gao, Xiaohong

    2010-01-01

    The most critical feature of a common-item nonequivalent groups equating design is that the average score difference between the new and old groups can be accurately decomposed into a group ability difference and a form difficulty difference. Two widely used observed-score linear equating methods, the Tucker and the Levine observed-score methods,…

  20. Evaluation of activity monitors in manual wheelchair users with paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Shivayogi V.; Ding, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of SenseWear® (SW) and RT3 activity monitors (AMs) in estimating energy expenditure (EE) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with paraplegia for a variety of physical activities. Methods Twenty-four subjects completed four activities including resting, wheelchair propulsion, arm-ergometry exercise, and deskwork. The criterion EE was measured by a K4b2 portable metabolic cart. The EE estimated by the SW and RT3 were compared with the criterion EE by the absolute differences and absolute percentage errors. Intraclass correlations and the Bland and Altman plots were also used to assess the agreements between the two AMs and the metabolic cart. Correlations between the criterion EE and the estimated EE and sensors data from the AMs were evaluated. Results The EE estimation errors for the AMs varied from 24.4 to 125.8% for the SW and from 22.0 to 52.8% for the RT3. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the criterion EE and the EE estimated by the two AMs for each activity and all activities as a whole were considered poor with all the ICCs smaller than 0.75. Except for deskwork, the EE from the SW was more correlated to the criterion EE than the EE from the RT3. Conclusion The results indicate that neither of the AMs is an appropriate tool for quantifying physical activity in MWUs with paraplegia. However, the accuracy of EE estimation could be potentially improved by building new regression models based on wheelchair-related activities. PMID:21528634

  1. Application of Item Response Theory to Tests of Substance-related Associative Memory

    PubMed Central

    Shono, Yusuke; Grenard, Jerry L.; Ames, Susan L.; Stacy, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    A substance-related word association test (WAT) is one of the commonly used indirect tests of substance-related implicit associative memory and has been shown to predict substance use. This study applied an item response theory (IRT) modeling approach to evaluate psychometric properties of the alcohol- and marijuana-related WATs and their items among 775 ethnically diverse at-risk adolescents. After examining the IRT assumptions, item fit, and differential item functioning (DIF) across gender and age groups, the original 18 WAT items were reduced to 14- and 15-items in the alcohol- and marijuana-related WAT, respectively. Thereafter, unidimensional one- and two-parameter logistic models (1PL and 2PL models) were fitted to the revised WAT items. The results demonstrated that both alcohol- and marijuana-related WATs have good psychometric properties. These results were discussed in light of the framework of a unified concept of construct validity (Messick, 1975, 1989, 1995). PMID:25134051

  2. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of environmental plants: activity of the leaf extracts from seashore plants.

    PubMed

    Masuda, T; Yonemori, S; Oyama, Y; Takeda, Y; Tanaka, T; Andoh, T; Shinohara, A; Nakata, M

    1999-04-01

    The antioxidant activity of the methanolic extracts of the leaves of 39 plant species was examined. These leaves were collected from the plants growing on subtropical seashores. The activity was evaluated by three kinds of assay methods, which included the DPPH radical scavenging assay, linoleic acid oxidation assay, and oxidative cell death assay. Two extracts from Excoecaria agallocha and Terminalia catappa showed remarkably potent activity in all assay systems. The HPLC analysis of the extracts indicated the presence of the same antioxidant and isolation work for the compound identified ellagic acid. The isolated ellagic acid showed strong antioxidant activity in the assay systems used.

  3. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of Syzygium cumini leaves.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zhi Ping; Zhang, Liang Liang; Lin, Yi Ming

    2008-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of Syzygium cumini leaf extracts was investigated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. The methanolic extract and its four water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, and n-hexane fractions were prepared and subjected to antioxidant evaluation. The results showed that the ethyl acetate fraction had stronger antioxidant activity than the other ones. HPLC data indicated that S. cumini leaf extracts contained phenolic compounds, such as ferulic acid and catechin, responsible for their antioxidant activity. A significant linear relationship between antioxidant potency, free radical-scavenging ability and the content of phenolic compounds of leaf extracts supported this observation.

  4. [Activities of Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The final report of NASA funded activities at Iowa State University (ISU) for the period between 1/96 and 1/99 includes two main areas of activity. The first is the development and delivery of an x-ray simulation package suitable for evaluating the impact of parameters affects the inspectability of an assembly of parts. The second area was the development of images processing tools to remove reconstruction artifacts in x-ray laminagraphy images. The x-ray simulation portion of this work was done by J. Gray and the x-ray laminagraphy work was done by J. Basart. The report is divided into two sections covering the two activities respectively. In addition to this work reported the funding also covered NASA's membership in the NSF University/Industrial Cooperative Research Center.

  5. Geography, Years 7-10, Library of Test Items. Volume Eight. Junior Secondary Items To Be Used With 1976 to 1980 H.S.C. Geography Exam. Broadsheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouimanos, John, Ed.

    As one in a series of test item collections developed by the Assessment and Evaluation Unit of the Directorate of Studies, items of value from past tests are made available to teachers for the construction of unit tests, term examinations or as a basis for class discussion. Each collection was reviewed for content validity and reliability. The…

  6. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  8. Combining users' activity survey and simulators to evaluate human activity recognition systems.

    PubMed

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-04-08

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  9. Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang

    2004-11-18

    ''Evaluation of Potential Impacts of Microbial Activity on Drift Chemistry'' focuses on the potential for microbial communities that could be active in repository emplacement drifts to influence the in-drift bulk chemical environment. This report feeds analyses to support the inclusion or exclusion of features, events, and processes (FEPs) in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), but this work is not expected to generate direct feeds to the TSPA-LA. The purpose was specified by, and the evaluation was performed and is documented in accordance with, ''Technical Work Plan For: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Analyses'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172402], Section 2.1). This report addresses all of the FEPs assigned by the technical work plan (TWP), including the development of exclusion arguments for FEPs that are not carried forward to the TSPA-LA. Except for an editorial correction noted in Section 6.2, there were no other deviations from the TWP. This report documents the completion of all assigned tasks, as follows (BSC 2004 DIRS 172402, Section 1.2.1): (1) Perform analyses to evaluate the potential for microbial activity in the waste emplacement drift under the constraints of anticipated physical and chemical conditions. (2) Evaluate uncertainties associated with these analyses. (3) Determine whether the potential for microbes warrants a feed to TSPA-LA to account for predicted effects on repository performance. (4) Provide information to address the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NUREG-1804) (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]) and Key Technical Issues and agreements, as appropriate. (5) Develop information for inclusion or exclusion of FEPs.

  10. 7 CFR 2902.5 - Item designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., USDA will use life cycle cost information only from tests using the BEES analytical method. (c... availability of such items and the economic and technological feasibility of using such items, including life cycle costs. USDA will gather information on individual products within an item and extrapolate...

  11. Using Multimedia Technology To Create Innovative Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Ann; Godwin, Janet

    The development of innovative test item types that use multimedia technology to improve item authenticity and interaction and allow for objective scoring through partial-credit scoring methodologies was studied. Science test items were developed for community college developmental students using "Authorware 3.0," an instructional compact disc. The…

  12. On the Relationship between Differential Item Functioning and Item Difficulty: An Issue of Methods? Item Response Theory Approach to Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between differential item functioning (DIF) and item difficulty on the SAT is such that more difficult items tended to exhibit DIF in favor of the focal group (usually minority groups). These results were reported by Kulick and Hu, and Freedle and have been enthusiastically discussed by more recent literature. Examining the…

  13. Effects of Assigning Raters to Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Robert C.; Ito, Kyoko; Wang, Zhen

    2008-01-01

    Student responses to a large number of constructed response items in three Math and three Reading tests were scored on two occasions using three ways of assigning raters: single reader scoring, a different reader for each response (item-specific), and three readers each scoring a rater item block (RIB) containing approximately one-third of a…

  14. Item Response Methods for Educational Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; Rieser, Mark R.

    Multiple matrix sampling (MMS) theory indicates how data may be gathered to most efficiently convey information about levels of attainment in a population, but standard analyses of these data require random sampling of items from a fixed pool of items. This assumption proscribes the retirement of flawed or obsolete items from the pool as well as…

  15. Effects of Including Humor in Test Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorris, Robert F.; And Others

    Two 50-item multiple-choice forms of a grammar test were developed differing only in humor being included in 20 items of one form. One hundred twenty-six (126) eighth graders received the test plus alternate forms of a questionnaire. Humor inclusion did not affect grammar scores on matched humorous/nonhumorous items nor on common post-treatment…

  16. Automatic Item Generation of Probability Word Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holling, Heinz; Bertling, Jonas P.; Zeuch, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical word problems represent a common item format for assessing student competencies. Automatic item generation (AIG) is an effective way of constructing many items with predictable difficulties, based on a set of predefined task parameters. The current study presents a framework for the automatic generation of probability word problems…

  17. Binomial Test Models and Item Difficulty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    1979-01-01

    The restrictions on item difficulties that must be met when binomial models are applied to domain-referenced testing are examined. Both a deterministic and a stochastic conception of item responses are discussed with respect to difficulty and Guttman-type items. (Author/BH)

  18. Are All Item Response Functions Monotonically Increasing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wenhao

    2012-01-01

    Item response functions of the parametric logistic IRT models follow the logistic form which is monotonically increasing. However, item response functions of some real items are nonmonotonic which might lead to examinees with lower proficiency levels receiving higher scores. This study compared three nonparametric IRF estimation methods--the…

  19. Computer Equipment Repair Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 321 test items for use in teaching a course in repairing computer equipment. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in the following skill areas (with selected skills mentioned in brackets): performing…

  20. 76 FR 60474 - Commercial Item Handbook

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Commercial Item Handbook AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations... Commercial Item Handbook. The purpose of the Handbook is to help acquisition personnel develop sound business strategies for procuring commercial items. DoD is seeking industry input on the contents before...

  1. A Balance Sheet for Educational Item Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiscox, Michael D.

    Educational item banking presents observers with a considerable paradox. The development of test items from scratch is viewed as wasteful, a luxury in times of declining resources. On the other hand, item banking has failed to become a mature technology despite large amounts of money and the efforts of talented professionals. The question of which…

  2. Processing Polarity Items: Contrastive Licensing Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saddy, Douglas; Drenhaus, Heiner; Frisch, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    We describe an experiment that investigated the failure to license polarity items in German using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). The results reveal distinct processing reflexes associated with failure to license positive polarity items in comparison to failure to license negative polarity items. Failure to license both negative and…

  3. Criterion-Referenced Test Items for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane, Ed.

    This test item bank on welding contains test questions based upon competencies found in the Missouri Welding Competency Profile. Some test items are keyed for multiple competencies. These criterion-referenced test items are designed to work with the Vocational Instructional Management System. Questions have been statistically sampled and validated…

  4. Differential Item Functioning from a Multilevel Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bergh, Huub; And Others

    The term differential item functioning (DIF) refers to whether or not the same psychological constructs are measured across different groups. If an item does not measure the same skills or subskills in different populations, it is said to function differentially or to display item bias. A multilevel approach to DIF is proposed. In such a model,…

  5. Identification of a Semiparametric Item Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peress, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We consider the identification of a semiparametric multidimensional fixed effects item response model. Item response models are typically estimated under parametric assumptions about the shape of the item characteristic curves (ICCs), and existing results suggest difficulties in recovering the distribution of individual characteristics under…

  6. The Multidimensionality of Verbal Analogy Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullstadius, Eva; Carlstedt, Berit; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2008-01-01

    The influence of general and verbal ability on each of 72 verbal analogy test items were investigated with new factor analytical techniques. The analogy items together with the Computerized Swedish Enlistment Battery (CAT-SEB) were given randomly to two samples of 18-year-old male conscripts (n = 8566 and n = 5289). Thirty-two of the 72 items had…

  7. Ramsay-Curve Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test, questionnaire, or interview has different measurement properties for one group of people versus another, irrespective of true group-mean differences on the constructs being measured. This article is focused on item response theory based likelihood ratio testing for DIF (IRT-LR or…

  8. Real and Artificial Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrich, David; Hagquist, Curt

    2012-01-01

    The literature in modern test theory on procedures for identifying items with differential item functioning (DIF) among two groups of persons includes the Mantel-Haenszel (MH) procedure. Generally, it is not recognized explicitly that if there is real DIF in some items which favor one group, then as an artifact of this procedure, artificial DIF…

  9. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  10. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  11. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under 5A002.a.1, .a.2, .a.5, .a.6, .a.9, and .b; 5D002.a, .c.1 or .d for... items and terms. Most encryption items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC...

  12. Generalized Full-Information Item Bifactor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Yang, Ji Seung; Hansen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full-information item bifactor analysis is an important statistical method in psychological and educational measurement. Current methods are limited to single-group analysis and inflexible in the types of item response models supported. We propose a flexible multiple-group item bifactor analysis framework that supports a variety of…

  13. Computerized Numerical Control Test Item Bank.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This guide contains 285 test items for use in teaching a course in computerized numerical control. All test items were reviewed, revised, and validated by incumbent workers and subject matter instructors. Items are provided for assessing student achievement in such aspects of programming and planning, setting up, and operating machines with…

  14. Item Selection in Computerized Classification Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Several alternatives for item selection algorithms based on item response theory in computerized classification testing (CCT) have been suggested, with no conclusive evidence on the substantial superiority of a single method. It is argued that the lack of sizable effect is because some of the methods actually assess items very similarly through…

  15. Linking Item Parameters to a Base Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Taehoon; Petersen, Nancy S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares three methods of item calibration--concurrent calibration, separate calibration with linking, and fixed item parameter calibration--that are frequently used for linking item parameters to a base scale. Concurrent and separate calibrations were implemented using BILOG-MG. The Stocking and Lord in "Appl Psychol Measure"…

  16. [National evaluation of the diagnosis of activated protein C resistance].

    PubMed

    Montiel-Manzano, Guadalupe; de la Peña-Díaz, Aurora; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Corona-de la Peña, Norma; Cruz-Cruz, Donají; Gaminio, Elizabeth; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Mayagoitia, Teresa; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Poblete, Teresita; Quintana-Martínez, Sandra; Ramírez, Raúl; Razo, Daniel; Ruiz de Chávez-Ochoa, Adriana; Reyes-Núñez, Virginia Adriana; Salazar, Rosario; Vicencio-Santiago, Guadalupe Virginia; Villa, Rosario; Reyes-Núñez, Aurelia Virginia

    2003-01-01

    test evaluates the partially activated thromboplastin time (aPTT) in a plasma sample before and after adding activated PC. The result is reported as a standardized sensibility index: aPTT post-activated PC/aPTT pre-activated PC. The conclusions of this national reunion pretend to optimize the available resources in our country in order to allow a wide and less-expensive diagnosis of patients with thrombosis.

  17. Approximation Preserving Reductions among Item Pricing Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamane, Ryoso; Itoh, Toshiya; Tomita, Kouhei

    When a store sells items to customers, the store wishes to determine the prices of the items to maximize its profit. Intuitively, if the store sells the items with low (resp. high) prices, the customers buy more (resp. less) items, which provides less profit to the store. So it would be hard for the store to decide the prices of items. Assume that the store has a set V of n items and there is a set E of m customers who wish to buy those items, and also assume that each item i ∈ V has the production cost di and each customer ej ∈ E has the valuation vj on the bundle ej ⊆ V of items. When the store sells an item i ∈ V at the price ri, the profit for the item i is pi = ri - di. The goal of the store is to decide the price of each item to maximize its total profit. We refer to this maximization problem as the item pricing problem. In most of the previous works, the item pricing problem was considered under the assumption that pi ≥ 0 for each i ∈ V, however, Balcan, et al. [In Proc. of WINE, LNCS 4858, 2007] introduced the notion of “loss-leader, ” and showed that the seller can get more total profit in the case that pi < 0 is allowed than in the case that pi < 0 is not allowed. In this paper, we derive approximation preserving reductions among several item pricing problems and show that all of them have algorithms with good approximation ratio.

  18. Evaluating the effect of stressors on thiaminase activity in alewife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lepak, J.M.; Kraft, C.E.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Brown, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    No consistent explanation has been found for the variability in the thiaminase activity of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus despite the role of alewife thiaminase in large-scale salmonine mortality in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We conducted experiments to evaluate the effect of two stressors, reduced salt content in the water and food limitation, on alewife thiaminase activity. Alewives were subjected to treatments in replicated tanks in which conductivity was lowered (<100 ??S/cm) for 8 d and feeding was limited for 39 d. Circulating white blood cells, plasma cortisol, plasma glucose, and whole-body thiaminase were measured in individual alewives to assess their response to these experimental treatments. Alewives from the controls had significantly larger numbers of circulating white blood cells than those in the salt-reduced and food-limited treatments (24,000 and 19,000 cells/??L and 11,000 and 9,000 cells/??L for alewives from the two control and salt-reduced treatment tanks, respectively, and 34,000 and 30,000 cells/??L and 21,000 and 16,000 cells/??L for alewives from the two control and food-limited treatment tanks). No significant differences in alewife thiaminase activity were found between treatment fish and their controls. The mean thiaminase activity in the alewives studied increased from 6,900 to 16,000 pmol??g -1??min-1 from the time of their collection in Cayuga Lake to the start of laboratory experiments 1.5-2.5 years later; the latter value was more than twice that of previously reported levels of thiaminase activity from alewives collected in the wild. These data suggest that the variability in alewife thiaminase is not related to stress from salt reduction or food limitation, but laboratory holding conditions significantly increased thiaminase through a mechanism not evaluated by our experimental treatments. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  19. Kinetic approach for evaluation of total antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Karyakina, Elena E; Vokhmyanina, Darya V; Sizova, Natalya V; Sabitov, Aytugan N; Borisova, Anastasiya V; Sazontova, Tatyana G; Arkhipenko, Yury V; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A; Zolotov, Yury A; Karyakin, Arkady A

    2009-12-15

    We propose a novel approach for assessment of total antioxidant activity by monitoring kinetics of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) scavenging after its injection into liquid sample under study. H(2)O(2) is known to be the strongest oxidant, really presented in human body in contrast to the majority of the model oxidative systems used for evaluation of antioxidant activity. In addition, kinetic approach, being more informative than the commonly used determination of the final product, obviously provides better discrimination of potential antioxidants. Prussian Blue based sensor due to its high sensitivity and operational stability allowed to monitor kinetics of hydrogen peroxide consumption in turbid and colored samples. The pseudo-first order kinetic constants of hydrogen peroxide scavenging in the presence of different food additives correlated with total antioxidant activity of these samples evaluated via standard procedure based on lipid peroxidation. However, in contrast to the standard method, the proposed kinetic approach is expressed and does not require fresh biological tissues.

  20. Emergency Power For Critical Items

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William R.

    2009-07-01

    Natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, tornados, and tsunami, are becoming a greater problem as climate change impacts our environment. Disasters, whether natural or man made, destroy lives, homes, businesses and the natural environment. Such disasters can happen with little or no warning, leaving hundreds or even thousands of people without medical services, potable water, sanitation, communications and electrical services for up to several weeks. In our modern world, the need for electricity has become a necessity. Modern building codes and new disaster resistant building practices are reducing the damage to homes and businesses. Emergency gasoline and diesel generators are becoming common place for power outages. Generators need fuel, which may not be available after a disaster, but Photovoltaic (solar-electric) systems supply electricity without petroleum fuel as they are powered by the sun. Photovoltaic (PV) systems can provide electrical power for a home or business. PV systems can operate as utility interactive or stand-alone with battery backup. Determining your critical load items and sizing the photovoltaic system for those critical items, guarantees their operation in a disaster.

  1. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Clones. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    To reduce the cost of item writing and to enhance the flexibility of item presentation, items can be generated by item-cloning techniques. An important consequence of cloning is that it may cause variability on the item parameters. Therefore, a multilevel item response model is presented in which it is assumed that the item parameters of a…

  2. Evaluation of Quinazoline analogues as Glucocerebrosidase Inhibitors with Chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Marugan, Juan J.; Zheng, Wei; Motabar, Omid; Southall, Noel; Goldin, Ehud; Westbroek, Wendy; K.Stubblefield, Barbara; Sidransky, Ellen; Aungst, Ronald A.; Lea, Wendy A.; Simeonov, Anton; Leister, William; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a Lysosomal Storage Disorder (LSD) caused by deficiency in the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GC). Small molecule chaperones of protein folding and translocation have been proposed as a promising therapeutic approach to this LSD. Most small molecule chaperones described in the literature contain an iminosugar scaffold. Here we present the discovery and evaluation of a new series of GC inhibitors with a quinazoline core. We demonstrate that this series can improve the translocation of GC to the lysosome in patient-derived cells. To optimize this chemical series, systematic synthetic modifications were performed and the SAR was evaluated and compared using three different readouts of compound activity – enzymatic inhibition, enzyme thermostabilization, and lysosomal translocation of GC. PMID:21250698

  3. Optimal Calibration Designs for Tests of Polytomously Scored Items Described by Item Response Theory Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holman, Rebecca; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2001-01-01

    Studied calibration designs that maximize the determinants of Fisher's information matrix on the item parameters for sets of polytomously scored items. Analyzed these items using a number of item response theory models. Results show that for the data and models used, a D-optimal calibration design for an answer or set of answers can reduce the…

  4. Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement (ITEMS) Module: Using Automated Processes to Generate Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierl, Mark J.; Lai, Hollis

    2013-01-01

    Changes to the design and development of our educational assessments are resulting in the unprecedented demand for a large and continuous supply of content-specific test items. One way to address this growing demand is with automatic item generation (AIG). AIG is the process of using item models to generate test items with the aid of computer…

  5. When Do Item Response Function and Mantel-Haenszel Definitions of Differential Item Functioning Coincide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    1990-01-01

    Use of the Mantel-Haenszel procedure as a test for differential item functioning under the Rasch model of item-response theory is examined. Results of the procedure cannot be generalized to the class of items for which item-response functions are monotonic and local independence holds. (TJH)

  6. An Item Response Theory Model for Incorporating Response Time Data in Binary Personality Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a general item response theory model for personality items that allows the information provided by the item response times to be used to estimate the individual trait levels. The submodel describing the item response times is a modification of Thissen's log-linear model and is based on the distance-difficulty hypothesis in…

  7. An Investigation of Item Fit Statistics for Mixed IRT Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, Kyong Hee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate procedures for assessing model fit of IRT models for mixed format data. In this study, various IRT model combinations were fitted to data containing both dichotomous and polytomous item responses, and the suitability of the chosen model mixtures was evaluated based on a number of model fit procedures.…

  8. Scores Based on Dangerous Responses to Multiple-Choice Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Martin E.

    1986-01-01

    Scores based on the number of correct answers were compared with scores based on dangerous responses to items in the same multiple choice test developed by American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery. Results showed construct validity for both sets of scores. However, both scores were redundant when evaluated by correlation coefficient. (Author/JAZ)

  9. Three Approaches to Determining the Dimensionality of Binary Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roznowski, Mary; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three heuristic methods of assessing the dimensionality of binary item pools were evaluated in a Monte Carlo investigation. The indices were based on (1) the local independence of unidimensional tests; (2) patterns of second-factor loadings derived from simplex theory; and (3) the shape of the curve of successive eigenvalues. (SLD)

  10. The Disgust Scale: Item Analysis, Factor Structure, and Suggestions for Refinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Williams, Nathan L.; Tolin, David F.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Lohr, Jeffrey M.; Elwood, Lisa S.

    2007-01-01

    In the 4 studies presented (N = 1,939), a converging set of analyses was conducted to evaluate the item adequacy, factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Disgust Scale (DS; J. Haidt, C. McCauley, & P. Rozin, 1994). The results suggest that 7 items (i.e., Items 2, 7, 8, 21, 23, 24, and 25) should be considered for removal from the DS.…

  11. Assessment of item-writing flaws in multiple-choice questions.

    PubMed

    Nedeau-Cayo, Rosemarie; Laughlin, Deborah; Rus, Linda; Hall, John

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the quality of multiple-choice questions used in a hospital's e-learning system. Constructing well-written questions is fraught with difficulty, and item-writing flaws are common. Study results revealed that most items contained flaws and were written at the knowledge/comprehension level. Few items had linked objectives, and no association was found between the presence of objectives and flaws. Recommendations include education for writing test questions.

  12. Evaluation of hair growth promoting activity of Phyllanthus niruri

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Sharma, Vikas; S. Chauhan, Nagendra; Thakur, Mayank; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the potential Phyllanthus niruri (P. niruri ) extracts in promotion of hair growth. Materials and Methods: Here, we studied the hair growth promoting activity of petroleum ether extract of P. niruri following its topical administration. Alopecia was induced in albino rats by subcutaneous administration of testosterone for 21 days. Evaluation of hair loss inhibition was done by concurrent administration of extract and monitoring parameters like follicular density, anagen/telogen (A/T) ratio and histological observation of animal skin sections. Finasteride solution was applied topically as standard. In vitro experiments were also performed to study the effect of extract on the activity of 5α-reductase enzyme Results: Groups treated with petroleum ether extract of plant showed hair re-growth as reflected by follicular density, A/T ratio and skin sections. Histopathology and morphologic observations of hair re-growth at shaved sites showed active follicular proliferation. In vitro experiments results showed inhibitory activity of petroleum ether extract on type-2 5α-reductase enzyme and an increase in the amount of testosterone with increasing concentrations. Conclusion: It could be concluded that petroleum ether extracts of P. niruri might be useful in the treatment of testosterone-induced alopecia in the experimental animal by inhibiting 5α-reductase enzyme. PMID:26693408

  13. Transfer Student Success: Educationally Purposeful Activities Predictive of Undergraduate GPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauria, Renee M.; Fuller, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of Educationally Purposeful Activities (EPAs) on transfer and nontransfer students' cumulative GPAs. Hierarchical, linear, and multiple regression models yielded seven statistically significant educationally purposeful items that influenced undergraduate student GPAs. Statistically significant positive EPAs for…

  14. Quantitative evaluation of activation state in functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenghui; Ni, Pengyu; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Xiaohu; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-10-01

    Neuronal activity can evoke the hemodynamic change that gives rise to the observed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal. These increases are also regulated by the resting blood volume fraction (V (0)) associated with regional vasculature. The activation locus detected by means of the change in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity thereby may deviate from the actual active site due to varied vascular density in the cortex. Furthermore, conventional detection techniques evaluate the statistical significance of the hemodynamic observations. In this sense, the significance level relies not only upon the intensity of the BOLD signal change, but also upon the spatially inhomogeneous fMRI noise distribution that complicates the expression of the results. In this paper, we propose a quantitative strategy for the calibration of activation states to address these challenging problems. The quantitative assessment is based on the estimated neuronal efficacy parameter [Formula: see text] of the hemodynamic model in a voxel-by-voxel way. It is partly immune to the inhomogeneous fMRI noise by virtue of the strength of the optimization strategy. Moreover, it is easy to incorporate regional vascular information into the activation detection procedure. By combining MR angiography images, this approach can remove large vessel contamination in fMRI signals, and provide more accurate functional localization than classical statistical techniques for clinical applications. It is also helpful to investigate the nonlinear nature of the coupling between synaptic activity and the evoked BOLD response. The proposed method might be considered as a potentially useful complement to existing statistical approaches.

  15. An item response theory analysis of the narcissistic personality inventory.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Robert A; Donnellan, M Brent; Robins, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    This research uses item response theory methods to evaluate the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI; Raskin & Terry, 1988). Analyses using the 2-parameter logistic model were conducted on the total score and the Corry, Merritt, Mrug, and Pamp (2008) and Ackerman et al. (2011) subscales for the NPI. In addition to offering precise information about the psychometric properties of the NPI item pool, these analyses generated insights that can be used to develop new measures of the personality constructs embedded within this frequently used inventory.

  16. A survey of anatomical items relevant to the practice of rheumatology: upper extremity, head, neck, spine, and general concepts.

    PubMed

    Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Navarro-Zarza, José Eduardo; Saavedra, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Canoso, Juan J; Biundo, Joseph J; Kalish, Robert A; de Toro Santos, Francisco Javier; McGonagle, Dennis; Carette, Simon; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify the anatomical items of the upper extremity and spine that are potentially relevant to the practice of rheumatology. Ten rheumatologists interested in clinical anatomy who published, taught, and/or participated as active members of Clinical Anatomy Interest groups (six seniors, four juniors), participated in a one-round relevance Delphi exercise. An initial, 560-item list that included 45 (8.0 %) general concepts items; 138 (24.8 %) hand items; 100 (17.8 %) forearm and elbow items; 147 (26.2 %) shoulder items; and 130 (23.2 %) head, neck, and spine items was compiled by 5 of the participants. Each item was graded for importance with a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 5 (very important). Thus, scores could range from 10 (1 × 10) to 50 (5 × 10). An item score of ≥40 was considered most relevant to competent practice as a rheumatologist. Mean item Likert scores ranged from 2.2 ± 0.5 to 4.6 ± 0.7. A total of 115 (20.5 %) of the 560 initial items reached relevance. Broken down by categories, this final relevant item list was composed by 7 (6.1 %) general concepts items; 32 (27.8 %) hand items; 20 (17.4 %) forearm and elbow items; 33 (28.7 %) shoulder items; and 23 (17.6 %) head, neck, and spine items. In this Delphi exercise, a group of practicing academic rheumatologists with an interest in clinical anatomy compiled a list of anatomical items that were deemed important to the practice of rheumatology. We suggest these items be considered curricular priorities when training rheumatology fellows in clinical anatomy skills and in programs of continuing rheumatology education.

  17. Development of Elderly Quality of Life Index – Eqoli: Item Reduction and Distribution into Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Paschoal, Sérgio Márcio Pacheco; Filho, Wilson Jacob; Litvoc, Júlio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe item reduction and its distribution into dimensions in the construction process of a quality of life evaluation instrument for the elderly. METHODS The sampling method was chosen by convenience through quotas, with selection of elderly subjects from four programs to achieve heterogeneity in the “health status”, “functional capacity”, “gender”, and “age” variables. The Clinical Impact Method was used, consisting of the spontaneous and elicited selection by the respondents of relevant items to the construct Quality of Life in Old Age from a previously elaborated item pool. The respondents rated each item’s importance using a 5-point Likert scale. The product of the proportion of elderly selecting the item as relevant (frequency) and the mean importance score they attributed to it (importance) represented the overall impact of that item in their quality of life (impact). The items were ordered according to their impact scores and the top 46 scoring items were grouped in dimensions by three experts. A review of the negative items was performed. RESULTS One hundred and ninety three people (122 women and 71 men) were interviewed. Experts distributed the 46 items into eight dimensions. Closely related items were grouped and dimensions not reaching the minimum expected number of items received additional items resulting in eight dimensions and 43 items. DISCUSSION The sample was heterogeneous and similar to what was expected. The dimensions and items demonstrated the multidimensionality of the construct. The Clinical Impact Method was appropriate to construct the instrument, which was named Elderly Quality of Life Index - EQoLI. An accuracy process will be examined in the future. PMID:18438571

  18. Measuring Student Ability, Classifying Schools, and Detecting Item Bias at School Level, Based on Student-Level Dichotomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennink, Margot; Croon, Marcel A.; Keuning, Jos; Vermunt, Jeroen K.

    2014-01-01

    In educational measurement, responses of students on items are used not only to measure the ability of students, but also to evaluate and compare the performance of schools. Analysis should ideally account for the multilevel structure of the data, and school-level processes not related to ability, such as working climate and administration…

  19. Impact of Eliminating Anchor Items Flagged from Statistical Criteria on Test Score Classifications in Common Item Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karkee, Thakur; Choi, Seung

    2005-01-01

    Proper maintenance of a scale established in the baseline year would assure the accurate estimation of growth in subsequent years. Scale maintenance is especially important when the state performance standards must be preserved for future administrations. To ensure proper maintenance of a scale, the selection of anchor items and evaluation of…

  20. Exploring Alternative Conceptions from Newtonian Dynamics and Simple DC Circuits: Links between Item Difficulty and Item Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinic, Maja; Boone, William J.; Krsnik, Rudolf; Beilfuss, Meredith L.

    2006-01-01

    Croatian 1st-year and 3rd-year high-school students (N = 170) completed a conceptual physics test. Students were evaluated with regard to two physics topics: Newtonian dynamics and simple DC circuits. Students answered test items and also indicated their confidence in each answer. Rasch analysis facilitated the calculation of three linear…

  1. Readability evaluation of an active matrix electrophoric ink display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Frederick M.; Trissell, Terry L.; Aleva, Denise L.; Longo, Sam J.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    2006-05-01

    A low-power, yet sunlight readable, display is needed for dismounted applications where the user must carry the power source. Such a display could potentially replace paper checklists and maps with electronic counterparts. A reflective active matrix electrophoretic ink display (AMEPID) was evaluated as a candidate technology for such applications. This display technology uses ambient illumination, rather than competing with it, and requires power only when rewriting the display. The device was tested for viewability under a variety of lighting conditions. Readability of displayed text, as compared to standard print on white paper, was evaluated in an indoor office environment and in outdoor lighting conditions. Viewability of the display with night vision goggles (NVGs) was evaluated under simulated full moon, starlight, and overcast illumination conditions. Objective measurements of luminance, contrast ratio and reflectance were conducted under corresponding irradiance conditions and viewing angles using state-of-the-art photometric and radiometric measurement equipment. In addition to visible spectrum measurements, infrared (IR) reflectance and contrast were measured for the extended spectrum of 720-1700 nm. Results are discussed in terms of performance criteria for military displays, which are often much more demanding than for civil applications.

  2. New technologies for item monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, J.A.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1993-12-01

    This report responds to the Department of Energy`s request that Sandia National Laboratories compare existing technologies against several advanced technologies as they apply to DOE needs to monitor the movement of material, weapons, or personnel for safety and security programs. The authors describe several material control systems, discuss their technologies, suggest possible applications, discuss assets and limitations, and project costs for each system. The following systems are described: WATCH system (Wireless Alarm Transmission of Container Handling); Tag system (an electrostatic proximity sensor); PANTRAK system (Personnel And Material Tracking); VRIS (Vault Remote Inventory System); VSIS (Vault Safety and Inventory System); AIMS (Authenticated Item Monitoring System); EIVS (Experimental Inventory Verification System); Metrox system (canister monitoring system); TCATS (Target Cueing And Tracking System); LGVSS (Light Grid Vault Surveillance System); CSS (Container Safeguards System); SAMMS (Security Alarm and Material Monitoring System); FOIDS (Fiber Optic Intelligence & Detection System); GRADS (Graded Radiation Detection System); and PINPAL (Physical Inventory Pallet).

  3. Exploratory factor analysis: its role in item analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, R L

    1997-06-01

    The special characteristics of items-low reliability, confounds by minor, unwanted covariance, and the likelihood of a general factor-and better understanding of factor analysis means that the default procedure of many statistical packages (Little Jiffy) is no longer adequate for exploratory item factor analysis. It produces too many factors and precludes a general factor even when that means the factors extracted are nonreplicable. More appropriate procedures that reduce these problems are presented, along with how to select the sample, sample size required, and how to select items for scales. Proposed scales can be evaluated by their correlations with the factors; a new procedure for doing so eliminates the biased values produced by correlating them with either total or factor scores. The role of exploratory factor analysis relative to cluster analysis and confirmatory factor analysis is noted.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of the antiplasmodial activity of tryptanthrin derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Onambele, Liliane Abodo; Riepl, Herbert; Fischer, Rainer; Pradel, Gabriele; Prokop, Aram; Aminake, Makoah Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the most deadly diseases threatening humankind and is still affecting a significant proportion of the world population, especially in Africa. Chemotherapy is a vital component of the fight against the disease and new antimalarial agents are urgently needed to curb the spread of malaria parasites that are resistant to existing drugs. The natural product tryptanthrin is known for its wide range of activities, including antiplasmodial activity, but its poor solubility has undermined its development as potent antimicrobial and antiprotozoan agent. The aim of this work was to synthesize analogues of tryptanthrin and to evaluate their antiplasmodial activity against the asexual and sexual blood stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Our results suggest that most tryptanthrin analogues retained their antiplasmodial activity against chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (30–100 nM). The antiplasmodial activity of the most active compound NT1 (IC50: 30 nM; SI: 155.9) was similar in both strains and close to that of chloroquine (IC50: 20 nM) on the sensitive strain. The antiplasmodial activity was improved with derivatization, thus pointing out the necessity to explore tryptanthrin using medicinal chemistry approaches. Ten (10) of the tested derivatives met the criteria, allowing for advancement to animal testing, i.e., SI > 100 and IC50 < 100 nM. In addition to their activity on the asexual stages, tryptanthrin and two selected derivatives (NT1 and T8) prevented the maturation of gametocytes at their IC90 concentrations, indicating a transmission-blocking potential. Moreover, NT1 was able to impair gametogenesis by reducing the exflagellation of microgametes by 20% at IC90, while tryptanthrin and T8 had no influence on exflagellation. The results of this study confirm that tryptanthrin and its derivatives are potential antimalarial candidates with abilities to kill the intraerythrocytic

  5. Validation of 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in Chinese version of Dizziness Handicap Inventory for screening objective benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Shu, Liang; Wang, Qian; Pan, Hui; Wu, Jing; Fang, Jie; Sun, Xu-Hong; Zhai, Yu; Dong, You-Rong; Liu, Jian-Ren

    2016-08-01

    As possible candidate screening instruments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), studies to validate the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) sub-scale (5-item and 2-item) and total scores are rare in China. From May 2014 to December 2014, 108(55 with and 53 without BPPV) patients complaining of episodic vertigo in the past week from a vertigo outpatient clinic were enrolled for DHI evaluation, as well as demographic and other clinical data. Objective BPPV was subsequently determined by positional evoking maneuvers under the record of optical Frenzel glasses. Cronbach's coefficient α was used to evaluate the reliability of psychometric scales. The validity of DHI total, 5-item and 2-item questionnaires to screen for BPPV was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. It revealed that the DHI 5-item questionnaire had good internal consistency (Cronbach's coefficient α = 0.72). Area under the curve of total DHI, 5-item and 2-item scores for discriminating BPPV from those without was 0.678 (95 % CI 0.578-0.778), 0.873(95 % CI 0.807-0.940) and 0.895(95 % CI 0.836-0.953), respectively. It revealed 74.5 % sensitivity and 88.7 % specificity in separating BPPV and those without, with a cutoff value of 12 in the 5-item questionnaire. The corresponding rate of sensitivity and specificity was 78.2 and 88.7 %, respectively, with a cutoff value of 6 in 2-item questionnaire. The present study indicated that both 5-item and 2-item questionnaires in the Chinese version of DHI may be more valid than DHI total score for screening objective BPPV and merit further application in clinical practice in China.

  6. Data sharing report characterization of the surveillance and maintenance project miscellaneous process inventory waste items Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2013-12-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign to target certain items associated with URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing for final disposal. This waste was generated during processing, surveillance, and maintenance activities associated with the facilities identified in the process knowledge (PK) provided in Appendix A. A list of items for sampling and analysis were generated from a subset of materials identified in the WHP populations (POPs) 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8, plus a small number of items not explicitly addressed by the WHP. Specifically, UCOR S&M project personnel identified 62 miscellaneous waste items that would require some level of evaluation to identify the appropriate pathway for disposal. These items are highly diverse, relative to origin; composition; physical description; contamination level; data requirements; and the presumed treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF). Because of this diversity, ORAU developed a structured approach to address item-specific data requirements necessary for acceptance in a presumed TSDF that includes the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF)—using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile—the Y-12 Sanitary Landfill (SLF) if appropriate; Energy

  7. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  8. Evaluation of Hemagglutination Activity of Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L−1. The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH. PMID:25759815

  9. Evaluating Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Activity of Marrubium crassidens

    PubMed Central

    Hamedeyazdan, Sanaz; Sharifi, Simin; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Naturally occurring substances as novel drugs in cancer therapy, at all times, represent a challenge to science since medicinal plants are proving to be brilliant sources of new chemopreventive agents. Methods: In the present study, methanol extract from aerial parts of Marrubium crassidens was assessed for its antiproliferative activity in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 through MTT bioassay using cell viability and cytotoxicity indices. The antioxidant property of M. crassidens extract together with its phenolic and flavonoids content were evaluated, as well. Results: According to data obtained in the study, M. crassidens exhibited antiproliferative activity with a gradual rise in cytotoxicty effect setting out on 240µg/mL concentration of the extract. Moreover, the RC50 value for antioxidant activity of the extract was determined as 40µg/mL and values for the total phenolic and flavonoids were calculated as 512.64mg gallic acid equivalent and 212.73mg quercetin equivalent per 100g of dry plant material. Conclusion: Generally, the observed antiproliferative and antioxidant properties of M. crassidens could be certified to the high amounts of phenolic and flavonoid content detected in the extract. PMID:25364663

  10. Experimental evaluation of starch utilization mechanism by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Ozlem; Martins, António; Orhon, Derin; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2006-04-05

    The study aimed to explore the conversion processes of hydrolysable substrates by activated sludge. Experimental data were collected from a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and from batch tests using activated sludge acclimated to native potato starch (NPS). Parallel batch tests were run with NPS (particulate), soluble starch (SolS), maltose, and glucose for comparative evaluation. The fate of organic carbon in the reactor was followed directly by measuring substrate, poly-glucose, and oxygen uptake rate. Results indicated that adsorption was the dominant mechanism for starch removal with subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis inside the flocs. The role of bulk liquid enzyme activity was minimal. Starch was observed to hydrolyze to maltose rather than glucose. The behavior of NPS and SolS was quite similar to maltose in terms of poly-glucose formation and oxygen uptake. Since the simplest hydrolysis product was maltose, the biomass was not acclimated to glucose and thus, glucose exhibited a significantly different removal and storage pattern. The study also showed that differentiation of readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable COD should better be based on the kinetics of their utilization rather than simple physical characterization.

  11. Evaluation of hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L(-1). The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH.

  12. 17 CFR 229.1202 - (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1202 (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves. (a) Summary of oil and gas... tabular format as provided below: Summary of Oil and Gas Reserves as of Fiscal-Year End Based on Average Fiscal-Year Prices Reserves category Reserves Oil(mbbls) Natural gas(mmcf) Synthetic oil(mbbls)...

  13. 17 CFR 229.1202 - (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Gas Producing Activities § 229.1202 (Item 1202) Disclosure of reserves. (a) Summary of oil and gas... tabular format as provided below: Summary of Oil and Gas Reserves as of Fiscal-Year End Based on Average Fiscal-Year Prices Reserves category Reserves Oil(mbbls) Natural gas(mmcf) Synthetic oil(mbbls)...

  14. Word Processing for Item Banking and Test Production. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Joseph L.

    This report describes the sequence of activities that took place as the Examination Division of the New Jersey Department of Civil Service introduced a word processing system for a test item bank and for production of camera-ready test copy. The equipment selection, installation and orientation procedures are discussed. Keyboard and CRT terminals,…

  15. Nonrestricted multiple-choice examination items.

    PubMed

    Kolstad, R; Goaz, P; Kolstad, R

    1982-08-01

    Multiple-choice items are frequently used in objective examinations. The format chosen should conform to the nature of the instruction. Knowledge about cumulative information, such as lists of attributes, can be tested efficiently by means of multiple-choice items that include a variable number of correct answers. In contrast to conventional, single-answer questions, nonrestricted multiple-choice items are capable of including more facts and fewer incorrect responses. In addition, the nonrestricted format is not burdened with the repetitious pattern of one correct answer coupled with several incorrect responses, a cue that may promote successful guessing. Item analyses can be performed on examinations that include both conventional and nonrestricted items. The reliability of one examination constructed totally with nonrestricted items was analyzed by means of the Kuder-Richardson Formula No. 20. The value 0.72 proved this examination to be both discriminating and consistent.

  16. Anxiolytic activity evaluation of four medicinal plants from Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Bum, E Ngo; Soudi, S; Ayissi, E R; Dong, C; Lakoulo, N H; Maidawa, F; Seke, P F E; Nanga, L D; Taiwe, G S; Dimo, T; Njikam, Njifutie; Rakotonirina, A; Rakotonirina, S V; Kamanyi, A

    2011-01-01

    Afrormosia laxiflora (A. laxiflora), Chenopodium ambrosioides (C. ambrosioides), Microglossa pyrifolia (M. pyrifolia) and Mimosa pudica (M. pudica) are plants used in traditional medicine in Cameroon to treat insomnia, epilepsy, anxiety, and agitation. They were evaluated for their anxiolytic like activity in mice. Animal models (elevated plus maze and stress-induced hyperthermia tests) were used. The four plants showed anxiolytic activity. In stress-induced hyperthermia test, A. laxiflora, C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica significantly antagonised the increase of temperature. ΔT° decreased from 0.75°C in the control group to 0.36°C at the dose of 110 mg/kg for A. laxiflora; from 1°C in the control group to -1.1°C at the dose of 120 mg/kg for C. ambrosioides; from 1.7°C in the control group to 0.2°C at the dose of 128 mg/kg for M. pyrifolia and from 1.3°C in the control group to 0.5°C at the dose of 180 mg/kg for M. pudica. In the elevated plus maze test, the four plants increased the number of entries into, percentage of entries into, and percentage of time in open arms. A. laxiflora, C. ambrosioides and M. pudica also reduced the percentage of entries and time in closed arms. In addition, C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica showed antipyretic activity by reducing the body temperature. The results suggested that C. ambrosioides, M. pyrifolia and M. pudica posses anxiolytic-like and antipyretic activities while A. laxiflora possesses only anxiolytic-like properties. These plants could be helpful in the treatment of anxiety and fever in traditional medicine in Cameroon.

  17. [Investigation of the process of personal hygiene items biodegradation by cellulose-fermenting microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Il'in, V K; Starkov, L V; Kostrov, S V; Belikodvorskaia, G A; Chuvil'skaia, N A; Mukhamedieva, L N; Mikos, K N

    2004-01-01

    Cellulose-containing wastes are one of the heaviest and biggest ingredients of solid domestic wastes piling up during spaceflight. For the most part these are disposable personal hygiene items used in large quantities in the absence of shower. These wastes contain human body products which are very dangerous from the sanitary-epidemiological standpoint. The purpose was to explore potentiality of microbial biodegradation of cellulose-containing hygiene items anaerobically with dry mass transformation into liquid and biogas. Among specific objectives were test cultivation of active strains of reference cultures of cellulose-fermenting anaerobic thermophilic bacteria on hygiene items as the only source of carbon, evaluation of ways and need of pretreatment of gauze pads to stimulate biodegradation, and chemical analysis of resulting biogas. From the investigation it was concluded that gauze pads are susceptible to biodegradation by anaerobic bacteria producing a low toxicity gas fraction. Therefore, the proposed technology can be considered as a candidate for integration into the spacecrew life support system.

  18. High Temperature Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Oswald, Jay J.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanically actuated blade tip clearance control concept was evaluated in a nonrotating test rig to quantify secondary seal leakage at elevated temperatures. These tests were conducted to further investigate the feasibility of actively controlling the clearance between the rotor blade tips and the surrounding shroud seal in the high pressure turbine (HPT) section of a turbine engine. The test environment simulates the state of the back side of the HPT shroud seal with pressure differentials as high as 120 psig and temperatures up to 1000 F. As expected, static secondary seal leakage decreased with increasing temperature. At 1000 F, the test rig's calculated effective clearance (at 120 psig test pressure) was 0.0003 in., well within the industry specified effective clearance goal.

  19. Evaluation of diverse antioxidant activities of Galium aparine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhari, Jasia; Khan, Muhammad R.; Shabbir, Maria; Rashid, Umbreen; Jan, Shumaila; Zai, Jawaid A.

    2013-02-01

    Methanol extract and its n-hexane, ethyl acetate, butanol and aqueous fraction of Galium aparine L. (Rubiacea) were evaluated in vitro for their antioxidant capacity (DPPH, superoxide radical, phosphomolybdate assay); reducing power (ABTS, hydroxyl, hydrogen peroxide, to reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ ions) and to estimate total flavonoid and phenolic contents. All the free radical generating assay models depicted differential positive scavenging activity but considerable magnitude for all the fractions. The results showed that aqueous fraction strongly scavenge the DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radicals. A significantly high correlation coefficient existed between IC50 values of DPPH and superoxide radical with total phenolic content and phosphomolybdate assay with total flavonoid contents, respectively. These results suggested that aqueous fraction can be a good source of antioxidant therapeutic in oxidative stress damages.

  20. A model of hippocampal spiking responses to items during learning of a context-dependent task

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Single unit recordings in the rat hippocampus have demonstrated shifts in the specificity of spiking activity during learning of a contextual item-reward association task. In this task, rats received reward for responding to different items dependent upon the context an item appeared in, but not dependent upon the location an item appears at. Initially, neurons in the rat hippocampus primarily show firing based on place, but as the rat learns the task this firing became more selective for items. We simulated this effect using a simple circuit model with discrete inputs driving spiking activity representing place and item followed sequentially by a discrete representation of the motor actions involving a response to an item (digging for food) or the movement to a different item (movement to a different pot for food). We implemented spiking replay in the network representing neural activity observed during sharp-wave ripple events, and modified synaptic connections based on a simple representation of spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity. This simple network was able to consistently learn the context-dependent responses, and transitioned from dominant coding of place to a gradual increase in specificity to items consistent with analysis of the experimental data. In addition, the model showed an increase in specificity toward context. The increase of selectivity in the model is accompanied by an increase in binariness of the synaptic weights for cells that are part of the functional network. PMID:25294991

  1. Results of Item Parameter Estimation Using LOGIST 5 on Simulated Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    In order to evaluate our methods and approaches of estimating the operating characteristics of discrete item responses, it is necessary to try other comparable methods on similar sets of data. LOGIST 5 was taken up for this reason, and was tried upon the hypothetical test items, which follow the normal ogive model and were used frequently in…

  2. Are Faculty Predictions or Item Taxonomies Useful for Estimating the Outcome of Multiple-Choice Examinations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibble, Jonathan D.; Johnson, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether multiple-choice item difficulty could be predicted either by a subjective judgment by the question author or by applying a learning taxonomy to the items. Eight physiology faculty members teaching an upper-level undergraduate human physiology course consented to participate in the study. The…

  3. A Review of Methods for Detection of Test and Item Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Nancy A.

    Few issues have provoked as much controversy as the methods for detecting item and test bias. A recent illustration of the controversy surrounding this issue could be seen in the emotional reactions to the publication of "The Bell Curve." This paper reviews methods of evaluating both item and test bias. Small heuristic data sets are…

  4. A Comparison of Latent Growth Models for Constructs Measured by Multiple Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.

    2007-01-01

    Univariate latent growth modeling (LGM) of composites of multiple items (e.g., item means or sums) has been frequently used to analyze the growth of latent constructs. This study evaluated whether LGM of composites yields unbiased parameter estimates, standard errors, chi-square statistics, and adequate fit indexes. Furthermore, LGM was compared…

  5. An NCME Instructional Module on Estimating Item Response Theory Models Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jee-Seon; Bolt, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an introduction to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation for item response models. A brief description of Bayesian inference is followed by an overview of the various facets of MCMC algorithms, including discussion of prior specification, sampling procedures, and methods for evaluating chain…

  6. Studying Differential Item Functioning via Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Multiple-Testing Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.; Lee, Chun-Lung; Chang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    This note is concerned with a latent variable modeling approach for the study of differential item functioning in a multigroup setting. A multiple-testing procedure that can be used to evaluate group differences in response probabilities on individual items is discussed. The method is readily employed when the aim is also to locate possible…

  7. Using Multiple DIF Statistics with the Same Items Appearing in Different Test Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiak, Anna T.; Cowell, William R.

    A procedure used to average several Mantel-Haenszel delta difference values for an item is described and evaluated. The differential item functioning (DIF) procedure used by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) is based on the Mantel-Haenszel statistical technique for studying matched groups. It is standard procedure at ETS to analyze test items…

  8. Key Items to Get Right When Conducting a Randomized Controlled Trial in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This is a checklist of key items to get right when conducting a randomized controlled trial to evaluate an educational program or practice ("intervention"). It is intended as a practical resource for researchers and sponsors of research, describing items that are often critical to the success of a randomized controlled trial. A significant…

  9. An Explanatory Item Response Theory Approach for a Computer-Based Case Simulation Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahraman, Nilüfer

    2014-01-01

    Problem: Practitioners working with multiple-choice tests have long utilized Item Response Theory (IRT) models to evaluate the performance of test items for quality assurance. The use of similar applications for performance tests, however, is often encumbered due to the challenges encountered in working with complicated data sets in which local…

  10. Introduction to Multilevel Item Response Theory Analysis: Descriptive and Explanatory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulis, Isabella; Toland, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) models are the main psychometric approach for the development, evaluation, and refinement of multi-item instruments and scaling of latent traits, whereas multilevel models are the primary statistical method when considering the dependence between person responses when primary units (e.g., students) are nested within…

  11. Sample Size and Item Parameter Estimation Precision When Utilizing the One-Parameter "Rasch" Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between sample size and item parameter estimation precision when utilizing the one-parameter model. Item parameter estimates are examined relative to "true" values by evaluating the decline in root mean squared deviation (RMSD) and the number of outliers as sample size increases. This occurs across…

  12. An Examination of Two Procedures for Identifying Consequential Item Parameter Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Craig S.; Hambleton, Ronald K.; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Meng, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop and evaluate two procedures flagging consequential item parameter drift (IPD) in an operational testing program. The first procedure was based on flagging items that exhibit a meaningful magnitude of IPD using a critical value that was defined to represent barely tolerable IPD. The second procedure…

  13. Expected Values and Reliability of Number-Right Scores for IRT Calibrated Items.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.

    This paper provides analytic evaluations of expected (marginal) true-score measures for binary items given their item response theory (IRT) calibration. Under the assumption of normal trait distributions, marginalized true scores, error variance, true score variance, and reliability for norm-referenced and criterion-references interpretations are…

  14. An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist--Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, David J.; Michie, Christine

    1997-01-01

    An item-response-theory approach was used to evaluate test and item functioning for the Hare Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (R. D. Hare, 1991) using data from 2,067 North American patients and prisoners. Analyses support the use of the test for diagnosis of psychopathic personality disorder and measures of trait strength. (SLD)

  15. Item Pool Construction Using Mixed Integer Quadratic Programming (MIQP). GMAC® Research Report RR-14-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.; Rudner, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to construct multiple highly equivalent item pools simultaneously, and compares the results from mixed integer programming (MIP). Three different MIP/MIQP models were implemented and evaluated using real CAT item pool data with 23 different content areas and a goal of equal information…

  16. The SWAL-QOL outcomes tool for oropharyngeal dysphagia in adults: II. Item reduction and preliminary scaling.

    PubMed

    McHorney, C A; Bricker, D E; Robbins, J; Kramer, A E; Rosenbek, J C; Chignell, K A

    2000-01-01

    The SWAL-QOL outcomes tool was constructed for use in clinical research for patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia. The SWAL-QOL was constructed a priori to enable preliminary psychometric analyses of items and scales before its final validation. This article describes data analysis from a pretest of the SWAL-QOL. We evaluated the different domains of the SWAL-QOL for respondent burden, data quality, item variability, item convergent validity, internal consistency reliability as measured by Cronbach's alpha, and range and skewness of scale scores upon aggregation and floor and ceiling effects. The item reduction techniques outlined reduced the SWAL-QOL from 185 to 93 items. The pretest of the SWAL-QOL afforded us the opportunity to select items for the ongoing validation study which optimally met our a priori psychometric criteria of high data quality, normal item distributions, and robust evidence of item convergent validity.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  18. Structural integrity evaluation of high activity moderator system evaporator

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1994-05-01

    The High Activity Moderator (HAM) system is wanted in a batch mode in which the evaporator tank is filled with 70{degrees}F cold moderator (D{sub 2}O) every 4 hours. This operation induces thermal shock to the wall of the tank. Thermal and structural analyses are performed to evaluate the impact of this thermal shock on the 220{degrees}F hot evaporator tank walls. Conservative thermal models are analyzed. Case 1 analyzes a 4 in. wide strip of D{sub 2}O running down the tank walls during the filling process and Case 2 analyzes the tank being filled instantly with 70{degrees}F D{sub 2}O. It is found that Case 1 results in larger temperature gradients are then input into the structural model for calculating the thermal stresses. The structural analysis shows that the maximum stress intensity due to combined pressure and thermal loading is about 17240 psi which is well below the yield stress (21000 psi) of the evaporator tank wall material, stainless steel 304L. The fatigue life is evaluated in accordance with the criteria given in ASME Code, Section VIII. It is found that at the stress level of 17240 psi plus any residual stresses that might be present at the welded attachments to the tank wall, the fatigue life is about 4{times}10{sup 6} cycles. If the evaporator tank is filled every 4 hours, the tank fatigue life is well above the anticipated batch operation period of 2 years.

  19. Lithium Iron Phosphate Cell Performance Evaluations for Lunar Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2007-01-01

    Lithium-ion battery cells are being evaluated for their ability to provide primary power and energy storage for NASA s future Exploration missions. These missions include the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, the Ares Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage, Extravehicular Activities (EVA, the advanced space suit), the Lunar Surface Ascent Module (LSAM), and the Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program (LPRP), among others. Each of these missions will have different battery requirements. Some missions may require high specific energy and high energy density, while others may require high specific power, wide operating temperature ranges, or a combination of several of these attributes. EVA is one type of mission that presents particular challenges for today s existing power sources. The Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for the advanced Lunar surface suit will be carried on an astronaut s back during eight hour long sorties, requiring a lightweight power source. Lunar sorties are also expected to occur during varying environmental conditions, requiring a power source that can operate over a wide range of temperatures. Concepts for Lunar EVAs include a primary power source for the PLSS that can recharge rapidly. A power source that can charge quickly could enable a lighter weight system that can be recharged while an astronaut is taking a short break. Preliminary results of Al23 Ml 26650 lithium iron phosphate cell performance evaluations for an advanced Lunar surface space suit application are discussed in this paper. These cells exhibit excellent recharge rate capability, however, their specific energy and energy density is lower than typical lithium-ion cell chemistries. The cells were evaluated for their ability to provide primary power in a lightweight battery system while operating at multiple temperatures.

  20. Are faculty predictions or item taxonomies useful for estimating the outcome of multiple-choice examinations?

    PubMed

    Kibble, Jonathan D; Johnson, Teresa

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether multiple-choice item difficulty could be predicted either by a subjective judgment by the question author or by applying a learning taxonomy to the items. Eight physiology faculty members teaching an upper-level undergraduate human physiology course consented to participate in the study. The faculty members annotated questions before exams with the descriptors "easy," "moderate," or "hard" and classified them according to whether they tested knowledge, comprehension, or application. Overall analysis showed a statistically significant, but relatively low, correlation between the intended item difficulty and actual student scores (ρ = -0.19, P < 0.01), indicating that, as intended item difficulty increased, the resulting student scores on items tended to decrease. Although this expected inverse relationship was detected, faculty members were correct only 48% of the time when estimating difficulty. There was also significant individual variation among faculty members in the ability to predict item difficulty (χ(2) = 16.84, P = 0.02). With regard to the cognitive level of items, no significant correlation was found between the item cognitive level and either actual student scores (ρ = -0.09, P = 0.14) or item discrimination (ρ = 0.05, P = 0.42). Despite the inability of faculty members to accurately predict item difficulty, the examinations were of high quality, as evidenced by reliability coefficients (Cronbach's α) of 0.70-0.92, the rejection of only 4 of 300 items in the postexamination review, and a mean item discrimination (point biserial) of 0.37. In conclusion, the effort of assigning annotations describing intended difficulty and cognitive levels to multiple-choice items is of doubtful value in terms of controlling examination difficulty. However, we also report that the process of annotating questions may enhance examination validity and can reveal aspects of the hidden curriculum.

  1. Medial temporal lobe contributions to cued retrieval of items and contexts.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Deborah E; Libby, Laura A; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ranganath, Charan

    2013-10-01

    Several models have proposed that different regions of the medial temporal lobes contribute to different aspects of episodic memory. For instance, according to one view, the perirhinal cortex represents specific items, parahippocampal cortex represents information regarding the context in which these items were encountered, and the hippocampus represents item-context bindings. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test a specific prediction of this model-namely, that successful retrieval of items from context cues will elicit perirhinal recruitment and that successful retrieval of contexts from item cues will elicit parahippocampal cortex recruitment. Retrieval of the bound representation in either case was expected to elicit hippocampal engagement. To test these predictions, we had participants study several item-context pairs (i.e., pictures of objects and scenes, respectively), and then had them attempt to recall items from associated context cues and contexts from associated item cues during a scanned retrieval session. Results based on both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed a role for hippocampus in content-general relational memory retrieval, and a role for parahippocampal cortex in successful retrieval of contexts from item cues. However, we also found that activity differences in perirhinal cortex were correlated with successful cued recall for both items and contexts. These findings provide partial support for the above predictions and are discussed with respect to several models of medial temporal lobe function.

  2. Medial Temporal Lobe Contributions to Cued Retrieval of Items and Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Deborah E.; Libby, Laura A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2013-01-01

    Several models have proposed that different regions of the medial temporal lobes contribute to different aspects of episodic memory. For instance, according to one view, the perirhinal cortex represents specific items, parahippocampal cortex represents information regarding the context in which these items were encountered, and the hippocampus represents item-context bindings. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test a specific prediction of this model – namely, that successful retrieval of items from context cues will elicit perirhinal recruitment and that successful retrieval of contexts from item cues will elicit parahippocampal cortex recruitment. Retrieval of the bound representation in either case was expected to elicit hippocampal engagement. To test these predictions, we had participants study several item-context pairs (i.e., pictures of objects and scenes, respectively), and then had them attempt to recall items from associated context cues and contexts from associated item cues during a scanned retrieval session. Results based on both univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed a role for hippocampus in content-general relational memory retrieval, and a role for parahippocampal cortex in successful retrieval of contexts from item cues. However, we also found that activity differences in perirhinal cortex were correlated with successful cued recall for both items and contexts. These findings provide partial support for the above predictions and are discussed with respect to several models of medial temporal lobe function. PMID:23466350

  3. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Item reduction study....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  4. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  5. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  6. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  7. 41 CFR 101-30.701-1 - Item reduction study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Item reduction study. 101....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-1 Item reduction study. Item reduction study means the study... so identified, a replacement item shall be proposed. The result of item reduction studies...

  8. 41 CFR 101-30.701-2 - Item standardization code.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Item standardization code....7-Item Reduction Program § 101-30.701-2 Item standardization code. Item standardization code (ISC) means a code assigned an item in the supply system which identifies the item as authorized...

  9. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  10. Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using the Lasso Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magis, David; Tuerlinckx, Francis; De Boeck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a novel approach to detect differential item functioning (DIF) among dichotomously scored items. Unlike standard DIF methods that perform an item-by-item analysis, we propose the "LR lasso DIF method": logistic regression (LR) model is formulated for all item responses. The model contains item-specific intercepts,…

  11. Evaluation of hepatoprotective activity of vasicinone in mice.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Chaitali; Bose, Sankhadip; Banerjee, Sugato

    2014-07-01

    Justicia adhatoda (vasaka) leaves have long been used in Indian Ayurvedic system of medicine as antitussive. Its crude extract has been previously reported to have hepatoprotective activity. Vasicinone was isolated from leaves of J. adhatoda, column purified and characterized using, TLC UV, FT-IR and 1H NMR. The isolated vasicinone was evaluated for hepatoprotective activity using (CCl4)-induced acute hepatotoxicity model in mice. CCl4 treatments lead to significant increase in SGOT, SGPT, ALP levels. Pre-treatment with vasicinone and silymarin (25 mg/kg/day for 7 days) significantly decreased these enzyme levels. Histopathology of the livers from vasicinone and silymarin pre-treated animals showed normal hepatic cords and absence of necrotic changes suggesting pronounced recovery from CCl4 induced liver damage. Both vasicinone and silymarin significantly decrease the CCl4 mediated increase in pentobarbital indiced sleeping time in experimental animals, thus indicating recovery of liver function. Based on the above results it can be concluded that vasicinone may act as hepatoprotective in mice and warrants further investigation on human volunteers.

  12. Developing and evaluating effective bioscience learning activities for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Salvage-Jones, Judith; Hamill, Jessie; Todorovic, Michael; Barton, Matthew J; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-07-01

    Effective engagement of nursing students in the study of biosciences remains a challenge for many tertiary institutes. In this study we attempted to implement and then evaluate a simple hands-on intervention, consisting of a series of hands-on games and puzzles, to increase nursing student engagement with core concepts and anatomical learning involved in clinical anatomy and physiology. The study used a quazi-experimental longitudinal before and after design, to explore the effect of a learning intervention on student performance. Set across three different campuses of the same University, it included 1320 first year undergraduate nursing students from 2013 to 2014 who were studying Anatomy and Physiology. Students were exposed to the interventions or not, and concomitant academic performance, weekly quiz scores, performance in fortnightly worksheets and, across the semester, exam performance were compared. The results show that while the intervention appeared to increase academic performance in students on one campus (2013) compared to the other two, this difference was not sustained into 2014 when a bigger cohort was examined. Despite significant subjective student satisfaction and enthusiasm about these learning and teaching interventions, the data does not support the capacity of these activities to enhance student academic performance. Tertiary entrance scores, being a non-native English speakers and socio-economic status all had a bigger impact on student performance than engagement with fun anatomy and physiology activities.

  13. Design, structure activity relationship, cytotoxicity and evaluation of antioxidant activity of curcumin derivatives/analogues.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pramod K

    2016-10-04

    New fourteen 3,4-dihydropyrimidine derivatives/analogues of curcumin (2a-2n) were designed, synthesized and biologically evaluated for their cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity. Cytotoxicity effect has been evaluated against three cell lines HeLa, HCT-116 and QG-56 by MTT assay method. From SAR study, it has been revealed that particularly, compound 2e and 2j (IC50 value 12.5 μM) have shown better cytotoxicity effect against three cell lines. According to results of SAR study, it was found that 3,4-dihydropyrimidines of curcumin, 2c, 2d, 2j and 2n exhibited better antioxidant activity than curcumin. A correlation of structure and activities relationship of these compounds with respect to drug score profiles and other physico-chemical properties of drugs are described and verified experimentally. Therefore, we conclude that physico-chemical analyses may prove structural features of curcumin analogues with their promising combined cytotoxicity/antioxidant activity and it is also concluded from virtual and practical screening that the compounds were varied to possess a broad range of lipophilic character, revealed by Log P values.

  14. Evaluating the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eunbi; Oh, Cheol

    2017-03-01

    Advanced vehicle safety systems have been widely introduced in transportation systems and are expected to enhance traffic safety. However, these technologies mainly focus on assisting individual vehicles that are equipped with them, and less effort has been made to identify the effect of vehicular technologies on the traffic stream. This study proposed a methodology to assess the effectiveness of active vehicle safety systems (AVSSs), which represent a promising technology to prevent traffic crashes and mitigate injury severity. The proposed AVSS consists of longitudinal and lateral vehicle control systems, which corresponds to the Level 2 vehicle automation presented by the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA). The effectiveness evaluation for the proposed technology was conducted in terms of crash potential reduction and congestion mitigation. A microscopic traffic simulator, VISSIM, was used to simulate freeway traffic stream and collect vehicle-maneuvering data. In addition, an external application program interface, VISSIM's COM-interface, was used to implement the AVSS. A surrogate safety assessment model (SSAM) was used to derive indirect safety measures to evaluate the effectiveness of the AVSS. A 16.7-km freeway stretch between the Nakdong and Seonsan interchanges on Korean freeway 45 was selected for the simulation experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of AVSS. A total of five simulation runs for each evaluation scenario were conducted. For the non-incident conditions, the rear-end and lane-change conflicts were reduced by 78.8% and 17.3%, respectively, under the level of service (LOS) D traffic conditions. In addition, the average delay was reduced by 55.5%. However, the system's effectiveness was weakened in the LOS A-C categories. Under incident traffic conditions, the number of rear-end conflicts was reduced by approximately 9.7%. Vehicle delays were reduced by approximately 43.9% with 100% of market penetration rate (MPR). These results

  15. An Item Analysis and Validity Investigation of Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test Score Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Nadine M.

    1971-01-01

    This investigation attempted to demonstrate the utility of standard item analysis procedures for selecting the most reliable and valid items for scoring Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test test records. (Author)

  16. The PROMIS Physical Function Item Bank Was Calibrated to a Standardized Metric and Shown to Improve Measurement Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Matthias; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Gandek, Barbara; Bruce, Bonnie; Fries, James F.; Ware, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To document the development and psychometric evaluation of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function (PF) item bank and static instruments. Study Design and Setting Items were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative methods. 16,065 adults answered item subsets (n>2,200/item) on the Internet, with over-sampling of the chronically ill. Classical test and item response theory (IRT) methods were used to evaluate 149 PROMIS PF items plus 10 SF-36 and 20 HAQ-DI items. A graded response model was used to estimate item parameters, which were normed to a mean of 50 (SD=10) in a US general population sample. Results The final bank consists of 124 PROMIS items covering upper, central, and lower extremity functions and IADL. In simulations, a 10-item Computerized Adaptive Test (CAT) eliminated floor and decreased ceiling effects, achieving higher measurement precision than any comparable-length static tool across four standard deviations of the measurement range. Improved psychometric properties transferred to the CAT’s superior ability to identify differences between age and disease groups. Conclusion The item bank provides a common metric and can improve the measurement of PF by facilitating the standardization of PRO measures and implementation of CATs for more efficient PF assessments over a larger range. PMID:24698295

  17. The short- and long-term fates of memory items retained outside the focus of attention

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Adam S.; Starrett, Michael J.; Rose, Nathan S.; Emrich, Stephen M.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    When a test of working memory (WM) requires the retention of multiple items, a subset of them can be prioritized. Recent studies have shown that, although prioritized (i.e., attended) items are associated with active neural representations, unprioritized (i.e., unattended) memory items can be retained in WM despite the absence of such active representations, and with no decrement in their recognition if they are cued later in the trial. These findings raise two intriguing questions about the nature of the short-term retention of information outside the focus of attention. First, when the focus of attention shifts from items in WM, is there a loss of fidelity for those unattended memory items? Second, could the retention of unattended memory items be accomplished by long-term memory mechanisms? We addressed the first question by comparing the precision of recall of attended versus unattended memory items, and found a significant decrease in precision for unattended memory items, reflecting a degradation in the quality of those representations. We addressed the second question by asking subjects to perform a WM task, followed by a surprise memory test for the items that they had seen in the WM task. Long-term memory for unattended memory items from the WM task was not better than memory for items that had remained selected by the focus of attention in the WM task. These results show that unattended WM representations are degraded in quality and are not preferentially represented in long-term memory, as compared to attended memory items. PMID:25472902

  18. The short- and long-term fates of memory items retained outside the focus of attention.

    PubMed

    LaRocque, Joshua J; Eichenbaum, Adam S; Starrett, Michael J; Rose, Nathan S; Emrich, Stephen M; Postle, Bradley R

    2015-04-01

    When a test of working memory (WM) requires the retention of multiple items, a subset of them can be prioritized. Recent studies have shown that, although prioritized (i.e., attended) items are associated with active neural representations, unprioritized (i.e., unattended) memory items can be retained in WM despite the absence of such active representations, and with no decrement in their recognition if they are cued later in the trial. These findings raise two intriguing questions about the nature of the short-term retention of information outside the focus of attention. First, when the focus of attention shifts from items in WM, is there a loss of fidelity for those unattended memory items? Second, could the retention of unattended memory items be accomplished by long-term memory mechanisms? We addressed the first question by comparing the precision of recall of attended versus unattended memory items, and found a significant decrease in precision for unattended memory items, reflecting a degradation in the quality of those representations. We addressed the second question by asking subjects to perform a WM task, followed by a surprise memory test for the items that they had seen in the WM task. Long-term memory for unattended memory items from the WM task was not better than memory for items that had remained selected by the focus of attention in the WM task. These results show that unattended WM representations are degraded in quality and are not preferentially represented in long-term memory, as compared to attended memory items.

  19. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  20. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  1. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  2. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  3. 38 CFR 3.1606 - Transportation items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Burial Benefits § 3.1606 Transportation items. The transportation costs of those persons who come within... case. In any such instance any excess amount would be an acceptable item to be included in the burial...) is used as a shipping case and also for burial, an allowance of $30 may be made thereon in lieu of...

  4. Modeling Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    An application of a hierarchical IRT model for items in families generated through the application of different combinations of design rules is discussed. Within the families, the items are assumed to differ only in surface features. The parameters of the model are estimated in a Bayesian framework, using a data-augmented Gibbs sampler. An obvious…

  5. Invariant Ordering of Item-Total Regressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tijmstra, Jesper; Hessen, David J.; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    A new observable consequence of the property of invariant item ordering is presented, which holds under Mokken's double monotonicity model for dichotomous data. The observable consequence is an invariant ordering of the item-total regressions. Kendall's measure of concordance "W" and a weighted version of this measure are proposed as measures for…

  6. Factoring handedness data: I. Item analysis.

    PubMed

    Messinger, H B; Messinger, M I

    1995-12-01

    Recently in this journal Peters and Murphy challenged the validity of factor analyses done on bimodal handedness data, suggesting instead that right- and left-handers be studied separately. But bimodality may be avoidable if attention is paid to Oldfield's questionnaire format and instructions for the subjects. Two characteristics appear crucial: a two-column LEFT-RIGHT format for the body of the instrument and what we call Oldfield's Admonition: not to indicate strong preference for handedness item, such as write, unless "... the preference is so strong that you would never try to use the other hand unless absolutely forced to...". Attaining unimodality of an item distribution would seem to overcome the objections of Peters and Murphy. In a 1984 survey in Boston we used Oldfield's ten-item questionnaire exactly as published. This produced unimodal item distributions. With reflection of the five-point item scale and a logarithmic transformation, we achieved a degree of normalization for the items. Two surveys elsewhere based on Oldfield's 20-item list but with changes in the questionnaire format and the instructions, yielded markedly different item distributions with peaks at each extreme and sometimes in the middle as well.

  7. 47 CFR 65.830 - Deducted items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deducted items. 65.830 Section 65.830 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Rate Base § 65.830 Deducted items. (a)...

  8. Effects of Item Disclosure on TOEFL Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Gordon A.; And Others

    To ascertain how the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) would be affected if candidates had access to some of the items before administration of a test containing those items, a number of specially constructed TOEFL forms were made available to 945 foreign students in intensive English language programs. The students were later…

  9. Similarity of Various Item Discrimination Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oosterhof, Albert C.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which various selected test item discrimination indices reflect a common factor. The indices used include the point-biserial, biserial, phi and tetrachoric coefficients, Flanagan's approximation of the product-moment correlation, Gulliksen's item reliability index, and Findley's difference…

  10. Item Calibration in Incomplete Testing Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Theo J. H. M.; Verhelst, Norman D.

    2011-01-01

    This study discusses the justifiability of item parameter estimation in incomplete testing designs in item response theory. Marginal maximum likelihood (MML) as well as conditional maximum likelihood (CML) procedures are considered in three commonly used incomplete designs: random incomplete, multistage testing and targeted testing designs.…

  11. 78 FR 76067 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Item Unique Identifier Update (DFARS Case 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...); and (v) High risk item identified by the requiring activity as vulnerable to supply chain threat, a target of cyber threats, or counterfeiting. (b) Exceptions. The contractor will not be required to...) Ensures item level traceability throughout lifecycle to strengthen supply chain integrity, enhance...

  12. 17 CFR 229.1208 - (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells, operations, and acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false (Item 1208) Oil and gas... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1208 (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells..., the total gross and net productive wells, expressed separately for oil and gas (including...

  13. 17 CFR 229.1208 - (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells, operations, and acreage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false (Item 1208) Oil and gas... Registrants Engaged in Oil and Gas Producing Activities § 229.1208 (Item 1208) Oil and gas properties, wells..., the total gross and net productive wells, expressed separately for oil and gas (including...

  14. The Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ): development and evaluation of an instrument to assess diabetes self-care activities associated with glycaemic control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though several questionnaires on self-care and regimen adherence have been introduced, the evaluations do not always report consistent and substantial correlations with measures of glycaemic control. Small ability to explain variance in HbA1c constitutes a significant limitation of an instrument’s use for scientific purposes as well as clinical practice. In order to assess self-care activities which can predict glycaemic control, the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) was designed. Methods A 16 item questionnaire to assess self-care activities associated with glycaemic control was developed, based on theoretical considerations and a process of empirical improvements. Four subscales, ‘Glucose Management’ (GM), ‘Dietary Control’ (DC), ‘Physical Activity’ (PA), and ‘Health-Care Use’ (HU), as well as a ‘Sum Scale’ (SS) as a global measure of self-care were derived. To evaluate its psychometric quality, 261 patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes were assessed with the DSMQ and an established analogous scale, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). The DSMQ’s item and scale characteristics as well as factorial and convergent validity were analysed, and its convergence with HbA1c was compared to the SDSCA. Results The items showed appropriate characteristics (mean item-total-correlation: 0.46 ± 0.12; mean correlation with HbA1c: -0.23 ± 0.09). Overall internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) was good (0.84), consistencies of the subscales were acceptable (GM: 0.77; DC: 0.77; PA: 0.76; HU: 0.60). Principal component analysis indicated a four factor structure and confirmed the designed scale structure. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated appropriate fit of the four factor model. The DSMQ scales showed significant convergent correlations with their parallel SDSCA scales (GM: 0.57; DC: 0.52; PA: 0.58; HU: n/a; SS: 0.57) and HbA1c (GM: -0.39; DC: -0.30; PA: -0.15; HU: -0.22; SS: -0.40). All correlations with

  15. Comparing Methods for Item Analysis: The Impact of Different Item-Selection Statistics on Test Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    Practitioners often depend on item analysis to select items for exam forms and have a variety of options available to them. These include the point-biserial correlation, the agreement statistic, the B index, and the phi coefficient. Although research has demonstrated that these statistics can be useful for item selection, no research as of yet has…

  16. Investigating Separate and Concurrent Approaches for Item Parameter Drift in 3PL Item Response Theory Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Bulut, Okan

    2017-01-01

    This study examines separate and concurrent approaches to combine the detection of item parameter drift (IPD) and the estimation of scale transformation coefficients in the context of the common item nonequivalent groups design with the three-parameter item response theory equating. The study uses real and synthetic data sets to compare the two…

  17. Item Purification in Differential Item Functioning Using Generalized Linear Mixed Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    For this dissertation, four item purification procedures were implemented onto the generalized linear mixed model for differential item functioning (DIF) analysis, and the performance of these item purification procedures was investigated through a series of simulations. Among the four procedures, forward and generalized linear mixed model (GLMM)…

  18. Psychometric Changes on Item Difficulty Due to Item Review by Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    2015-01-01

    If good measurement depends in part on the estimation of accurate item characteristics, it is essential that test developers become aware of discrepancies that may exist on the item parameters before and after item review. The purpose of this study was to examine the answer changing patterns of students while taking paper-and-pencil multiple…

  19. Designing P-Optimal Item Pools in Computerized Adaptive Tests with Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xuechun

    2012-01-01

    Current CAT applications consist of predominantly dichotomous items, and CATs with polytomously scored items are limited. To ascertain the best approach to polytomous CAT, a significant amount of research has been conducted on item selection, ability estimation, and impact of termination rules based on polytomous IRT models. Few studies…

  20. Asymptotic Standard Errors for Item Response Theory True Score Equating of Polytomous Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cher Wong, Cheow

    2015-01-01

    Building on previous works by Lord and Ogasawara for dichotomous items, this article proposes an approach to derive the asymptotic standard errors of item response theory true score equating involving polytomous items, for equivalent and nonequivalent groups of examinees. This analytical approach could be used in place of empirical methods like…

  1. Improvement in Detection of Differential Item Functioning Using a Mixture Item Response Theory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maij-de Meij, Annette M.; Kelderman, Henk; van der Flier, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Usually, methods for detection of differential item functioning (DIF) compare the functioning of items across manifest groups. However, the manifest groups with respect to which the items function differentially may not necessarily coincide with the true source of the bias. It is expected that DIF detection under a model that includes a latent DIF…

  2. Calibration and Validation of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference Item Bank in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Crins, Martine H P; Roorda, Leo D; Smits, Niels; de Vet, Henrica C W; Westhovens, Rene; Cella, David; Cook, Karon F; Revicki, Dennis; van Leeuwen, Jaap; Boers, Maarten; Dekker, Joost; Terwee, Caroline B

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Group translated the adult PROMIS Pain Interference item bank into Dutch-Flemish. The aims of the current study were to calibrate the parameters of these items using an item response theory (IRT) model, to evaluate the cross-cultural validity of the Dutch-Flemish translations compared to the original English items, and to evaluate their reliability and construct validity. The 40 items in the bank were completed by 1085 Dutch chronic pain patients. Before calibrating the items, IRT model assumptions were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Items were calibrated using the graded response model (GRM), an IRT model appropriate for items with more than two response options. To evaluate cross-cultural validity, differential item functioning (DIF) for language (Dutch vs. English) was examined. Reliability was evaluated based on standard errors and Cronbach's alpha. To evaluate construct validity correlations with scores on legacy instruments (e.g., the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire) were calculated. Unidimensionality of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank was supported by CFA tests of model fit (CFI = 0.986, TLI = 0.986). Furthermore, the data fit the GRM and showed good coverage across the pain interference continuum (threshold-parameters range: -3.04 to 3.44). The Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank has good cross-cultural validity (only two out of 40 items showing DIF), good reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.98), and good construct validity (Pearson correlations between 0.62 and 0.75). A computer adaptive test (CAT) and Dutch-Flemish PROMIS short forms of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank can now be developed.

  3. Synthesis and antibacterial activity evaluation of two androgen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2015-01-01

    In this study two androgen derivatives were synthesized using several strategies; the first stage an aza-steroid derivative (3) was developed by the reaction of a testosterone derivative (1) with thiourea (2) in presence of hydrogen chloride. The second step, involves the synthesis of an amino-steroid derivative (4) by the reaction of 1 with 2 using boric acid as catalyst. The third stage was achieved by the preparation of an aminoaza-androgen derivative (6) by the reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine using boric acid as catalyst. In addition, the compound 6 was made reacting with dihydrotestosterone to form a new androgen derivative (7) in presence of boric acid. The following step was achieved by the reaction of 7 with chloroacetyl chloride to synthesize an azetidinone-androgen derivative (8) using triethylamine as catalyst. Additionally, a thiourea-androgen derivative (9) was synthetized by the reaction of 4 with dihydrotestosterone using boric acid as catalyst. Finally, the compound 9 was made reacting with chloroacetyl chloride in presence of triethylamine to synthesize a new azetidinone-androgen derivative (10). On the other hand, antibacterial activity of compounds synthesized was evaluated on Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae) and Gram positive (Staphylococos aureus) bacteria. The results indicate that only the compound 3 and 8 decrease the growth bacterial of E. coli and V. cholerae. Nevertheless, growth bacterial of S. aureus was not inhibited by these compounds. These data indicate that antibacterial activity exerted by the compounds 3 and 8 depend of their structure chemical in comparison with the controls and other androgen derivatives that are involved in this study.

  4. A multicenter evaluation of linezolid antimicrobial activity in North America.

    PubMed

    Ballow, Charles H; Jones, Ronald N; Biedenbach, Douglas J

    2002-05-01

    Overall, 141 centers in North America enrolled in this international surveillance study designed to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity and spectrum of linezolid, a new oxazolidinone. Each participant tested the susceptibility of clinical isolates of staphylococcal species (n = 85) against 12 drugs, and enterococcal species (n = 40) against 6 drugs using reference broth microdilution trays; and of streptococcal species (n = 25) against 6 drugs using Etests (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden). Quality control testing was conducted using recommended strains, and verification of resistance to linezolid and select other agents was performed by a regional monitor. Of the 20,161 isolates collected from sites across the United States (US; n = 132) and Canada (n = 9), 18,307 were included in this analysis. Oxacillin resistance occurred in 38.7 and 70.6% of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CoNS) isolates, respectively. Vancomycin resistance was reported in 65.9 and 2.6% of Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis, respectively. Penicillin resistance occurred in 37.2% of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 17.5% constituting high-level resistance (MIC, > or =2 microg/ml). The MIC(90) for linezolid was 1 microg/ml for streptococci, 2 microg/ml for enterococci and CoNS isolates, and 4 microg/ml for S. aureus. Using the US FDA-recommended susceptible breakpoints for linezolid, there were no confirmed reports of linezolid resistance (i.e., MIC > or =8 microg/ml). The occurrence of linezolid MICs was unimodal and generally varied between, 1-4 microg/ml for staphylococci (94% of recorded results), 1-2 microg/ml for enterococci (93%), and 0.5-1 microg/ml for streptococci (85%). Susceptibility to linezolid was not influenced by susceptibility to other antiicrobials such as vancomycin, beta-lactams or macrolides. Only linezolid was universally active against essentially all tested Gram-positive specimens. The unimodal susceptibility pattern is indicative of excellent

  5. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Cell Extracts from Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, A. Catarina; Gião, Maria S.; Seabra, Rui; Ferreira, A. C. Silva; Tamagnini, Paula; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Malcata, F. Xavier

    2013-01-01

    A growing market for novel antioxidants obtained from non-expensive sources justifies educated screening of microalgae for their potential antioxidant features. Characterization of the antioxidant profile of 18 species of cyanobacteria (prokaryotic microalgae) and 23 species of (eukaryotic) microalgae is accordingly reported in this paper. The total antioxidant capacity, accounted for by both water- and lipid-soluble antioxidants, was evaluated by the (radical cation) ABTS method. For complementary characterization of cell extracts, a deoxyribose assay was carried out, as well as a bacteriophage P22/Salmonella-mediated approach. The microalga Scenedesmus obliquus strain M2-1 exhibited the highest (p > 0.05) total antioxidant capacity (149 ± 47 AAU) of intracellular extracts. Its scavenger activity correlated well with its protective effects against DNA oxidative damage induced by copper(II)-ascorbic acid; and against decay in bacteriophage infection capacity induced by H2O2. Finally, performance of an Ames test revealed no mutagenic effects of the said extract. PMID:23595054

  6. Evaluation of Tectona grandis leaves for wound healing activity.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Mrityunjoy; Nayeem, Naira; Kamath, Jagadish V; Asad, Mohammed

    2007-04-01

    The frontal leaves of Tectona grandis (Verabinaceae) are widely used in the folklore for the treatment of various kinds of wounds, especially burn wound. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of hydrochloric extract of Tectona grandis on experimentally induced wounds in rats and compare the effects observed with a known wound healing agent, Aloe vera. The models selected were excision wound, incision wound, burn wound and dead space wound. A suitable gel formulation was selected for the application using cellophane membrane penetration. In the excision wound and burn wound models, animals treated with Tectona grandis leaf extract showed significant reduction in period of epithelisation and wound contraction 50%. In the incision wound model, a significant increase in the breaking strength was observed. Tectona grandis leaf extract treatment orally produced a significant increase in the breaking strength, dry weight and hydroxyproline content of the granulation tissue in dead space wound. It was concluded that Tectona grandis leaf extract applied topically (5% and 10% gel formulation) or administered orally (250 mg and 500 mg/kg body weight) possesses wound healing activity.

  7. A human factors evaluation of Extravehicular Activity gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

    1989-01-01

    One of the major problems faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human-hand capabilities. NASA has sponsored a program to develop a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six performance domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based upon an assessment of general human-hand functioning and EVA task requirements, several tests within each performance domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand, an EVA glove without pressure, an EVA glove at operation pressure. Thus, the differential effect on performance of the glove with and without pressure was tested. Bare hand performance was used to 'calibrate' the effects. Ten subjects participated in the test setup as a repeated-measures experimental design. The paper will report the results of the test program.

  8. Development and Psychometric Analysis of the PROMIS Pain Behavior Item Bank

    PubMed Central

    Revicki, Dennis A.; Chen, Wen-Hung; Harnam, Neesha; Cook, Karon F.; Amtmann, Dagmar; Callahan, Leigh F.; Jensen, Mark P.; Keefe, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    The measurement of pain behavior is a key component of the assessment of persons with chronic pain; however few self-reported pain behavior instruments have been developed. We developed a pain behavior item bank as part of the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS). For the Wave I testing, because of the large number of PROMIS items, a complex sampling approach was used where participants were randomly assigned to either respond to two full item banks or to multiple 7-item blocks of items. A web-based survey was designed and completed by 15,528 members of the general population and 967 individuals with different types of chronic pain. Item response theory (IRT) analysis models were used to evaluate item characteristics and to scale both items and individuals on the pain behavior domain. The pain behavior item bank demonstrated good fit to a unidimensional model (Comparative Fit Index = 0.94). Several iterations of IRT analyses resulted in a final 39 item pain behavior bank, and different IRT models were fit to the total sample and to those participants who experienced some pain. The results indicated that these items demonstrated good coverage of the pain behavior construct. Pain behavior scores were strongly related to pain intensity and moderately related to self-reported general health status. Mean pain behavior scores varied significantly by groups based on pain severity and general health status. The PROMIS pain behavior item bank can be used to develop static short-form and dynamic measures of pain behavior for clinical studies. PMID:19683873

  9. Fighting bias with statistics: Detecting gender differences in responses to items on a preschool science assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Ariela Caren

    Differential item functioning (DIF) and differential distractor functioning (DDF) are methods used to screen for item bias (Camilli & Shepard, 1994; Penfield, 2008). Using an applied empirical example, this mixed-methods study examined the congruency and relationship of DIF and DDF methods in screening multiple-choice items. Data for Study I were drawn from item responses of 271 female and 236 male low-income children on a preschool science assessment. Item analyses employed a common statistical approach of the Mantel-Haenszel log-odds ratio (MH-LOR) to detect DIF in dichotomously scored items (Holland & Thayer, 1988), and extended the approach to identify DDF (Penfield, 2008). Findings demonstrated that the using MH-LOR to detect DIF and DDF supported the theoretical relationship that the magnitude and form of DIF and are dependent on the DDF effects, and demonstrated the advantages of studying DIF and DDF in multiple-choice items. A total of 4 items with DIF and DDF and 5 items with only DDF were detected. Study II incorporated an item content review, an important but often overlooked and under-published step of DIF and DDF studies (Camilli & Shepard). Interviews with 25 female and 22 male low-income preschool children and an expert review helped to interpret the DIF and DDF results and their comparison, and determined that a content review process of studied items can reveal reasons for potential item bias that are often congruent with the statistical results. Patterns emerged and are discussed in detail. The quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted in an applied framework of examining the validity of the preschool science assessment scores for evaluating science programs serving low-income children, however, the techniques can be generalized for use with measures across various disciplines of research.

  10. Bioprotective properties of Dragon's blood resin: In vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food preservation is basically done to preserve the natural characteristics and appearance of the food and to increase the shelf life of food. Food preservatives in use are natural, chemical and artificial. Keeping in mind the adverse effects of synthetic food preservatives, there is a need to identify natural food preservatives. The aims of this study were to evaluate in vitro antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Dragon's blood resin obtained from Dracaena cinnabari Balf f., with a view to develop safer food preservatives. Methods In this study, three solvents of varying polarity were used to extract and separate the medium and high polarity compounds from the non-polar compounds of the Dragon's blood resin. The extracts were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against the food borne pathogens. The antioxidant activities of the extracts were assessed using DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging, FRAP, metal chelating and reducing power assays. Total phenolics, flavonoids and flavonols of extracts were also estimated using the standard methods. Results Phytochemical analysis of extracts revealed high phenolic content in CH2Cl2 extract of resin. Free radical scavenging of CH2Cl2 extract was found to be highest which is in good correlation with its total phenolic content. All test microorganisms were also inhibited by CH2Cl2 extract. Conclusions Our result provide evidence that CH2Cl2 extract is a potential source of natural antioxidant compounds and exhibited good inhibitory activity against various food borne pathogens. Thus, CH2Cl2 extract of Dragon's blood resin could be considered as possible source of food preservative. PMID:21329518

  11. Item difficulty scaling for WAIS-III picture arrangement.

    PubMed

    Costello, Raymond M; Connolly, Sean G

    2005-06-01

    Only one study regarding the sequencing of items of the WAIS-III Picture Arrangement subtest was located in a search of published literature. That study of 50 alcohol abusers failed to demonstrate that the items are sequenced in the perfect order of difficulty as suggested by the test publisher. The current study was accomplished to replicate or refute the prior study and to extend findings into related matters. Two laboratories provided four archival samples of 100 cases. Only five items appear properly placed, with one (OPENS) especially misplaced. A new sequence is recommended so that clinicians can administer the test more efficiently and examine errors from a process approach to evaluation. Difficult items were not passed as often as expected by Hispanic respondents. This finding was considered an artifact related to archival convenience sampling and may not be representative as a general finding regarding Hispanic performance until experimental sampling techniques or proper statistical controls can be applied. Statistically controlling for IQ, through analysis of covariance, eliminated ethnicity effects on total score for the PA subtest.

  12. A National Perspective on the Current Evaluation Activities in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Alexa J.; Israel, Glenn D.; Diehl, David

    2013-01-01

    In order to enhance Extension evaluation efforts it is important to understand current practices. The study reported here researched the evaluation behaviors of county-based Extension professionals. Extension professionals from eight states (n = 1,173) responded to a survey regarding their evaluation data collection, analysis, and reporting…

  13. Evaluation of photocatalytic activities of supported catalysts on NaX zeolite or activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    de Brites-Nóbrega, Fernanda F; Polo, Aldino N B; Benedetti, Angélica M; Leão, Mônica M D; Slusarski-Santana, Veronice; Fernandes-Machado, Nádia R C

    2013-12-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of ZnO and Nb2O5 catalysts, both supported on NaX zeolite and activated charcoal (AC). The synergistic effect between oxide and support and the influence of solution pH (3, 7 and 9) on photocatalytic degradation of reactive blue 5G (C.I. 222) were analyzed. The catalysts Nb2O5/NaX, Nb2O5/AC and ZnO/NaX, ZnO/AC with 5 and 10% (wt%) were prepared by wet impregnation. The results showed that the catalysts exhibit quite different structural and textural properties. The synergic effect between ZnO and NaX support was higher than that with the activated charcoal, showing that these catalysts were more efficient. The most photoactive catalyst was 10% ZnO/NaX which showed 100% discoloration of the dye solution at pH 3, 7 and 9 after 0.5, 5 and 2h of irradiation, respectively. The hydrolytic nature of zeolite favored the formation of surface hydroxyl radicals, which increased the activity of the photocatalyst. Thus, catalysts supported on NaX zeolite are promising for use in photocatalysis.

  14. Producing Learning Activities Packages. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Holly; Cannon, Glenn

    This teachers' manual outlines the design, development, and evaluation processes for Learning Activities Packages (LAPS), including mediated learning activities. A lesson plan for the first day's instruction is provided, as well as a 20-item pre-post test. Each LAP has five components: concept, rationale, objectives, preassessment, activities, and…

  15. Benchmarking Evaluation Results for Prototype Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; McFarland, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of four prototype gloves developed by Flagsuit LLC, Final Frontier Designs, LLC Dover, and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. All of the companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test

  16. Statistical evaluation of the simulated convective activity over Central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsios, Stergios; Kotsopoulos, Stylianos; Karacostas, Theodore S.; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Pytharoulis, Ioannis; Bampzelis, Dimitrios

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the project DAPHNE (www.daphne-meteo.gr), the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting model with the Advanced Research dynamic solver (WRF-ARW, version 3.5.1) is used to produce very high spatiotemporal resolution simulations of the convective activity over Thessaly plain and hence, enhancing our knowledge on the impact of high resolution elevation and land use data in the moist convection. The expecting results act as a precursor for the potential applicability of a planned precipitation enhancement program. The three model domains, covering Europe, the Mediterranean Sea and northern Africa (d01), the wider area of Greece (d02) and Thessaly region-central Greece (d03), are used at horizontal grid-spacings of 15km, 5km and 1km respectively. ECMWF operational analyses at 6-hourly intervals (0.25ox0.25o lat.-long.) are imported as initial and boundary conditions of the coarse domain, while in the vertical, 39 sigma levels (up to 50 hPa) are used, with increased resolution in the boundary layer. Microphysical processes are represented by WSM6 scheme, sub-grid scale convection by Kain-Fritsch scheme, longwave and shortwave radiation by RRTMG scheme, surface layer by Monin-Obukhov (MM5), boundary layer by Yonsei University and soil physics by NOAH Unified model. Six representative days with different upper-air synoptic circulation types are selected, while high resolution (3'') elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM - version 4) are inserted in the innermost domain (d03), along with the Corine Land Cover 2000 raster data (3''x3''). The aforementioned data sets are used in different configurations, in order to evaluate the impact of each one on the simulated convective activity in the vicinity of Thessaly region, using a grid of available meteorological stations in the area. For each selected day, four (4) sensitivity simulations are performed, setting a total number of 24 runs. Finally, the best configuration provides

  17. Evaluation of the antidiarrhoeal activity of Byrsocarpus coccineus.

    PubMed

    Akindele, A J; Adeyemi, O O

    2006-11-03

    Based on its use in traditional African medicine, the antidiarrhoeal activity of the aqueous leaf extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus, Connaraceae, was evaluated on normal and castor oil-induced intestinal transit, castor oil-induced diarrhoea, enteropooling and gastric emptying. The extract (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) produced a significant (P<0.05) dose dependent decrease in propulsion in the castor oil-induced intestinal transit in mice. The mean peristaltic index (%) for these doses of extract, control (distilled water; 10 ml/kg, p.o.) and morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) were 55.27+/-1.86, 53.12+/-3.73, 38.60+/-3.79, 30.25+/-1.27, 89.33+/-5.62 and 20.29+/-3.38, respectively. The effect of the extract at the highest dose was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of the standard drug. This effect was antagonised by yohimbine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) but not by isosorbide dinitrate (IDN, 150 mg/kg, p.o.). At 200 mg/kg, the extract produced a significant decrease in propulsion in normal intestinal transit. In a dose dependent manner, it delayed the onset of diarrhoea, produced a significant decrease in the frequency of defaecation, severity of diarrhoea and protected the mice treated with castor oil. Mean diarrhoea scores were 30.83+/-1.72, 22.40+/-1.71, 21.43+/-1.32, 13.80+/-0.33, 18.00+/-3.94 and 7.67+/-2.41 for control, extract (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) and morphine, respectively. This effect was not antagonized by IDN. The extract (400 mg/kg) significantly decreased the volume (ml) of intestinal fluid secretion induced by castor oil (0.60+/-0.23) compared with 1.27+/-0.12 for control. However, there was no significant effect on gastric emptying. The results obtained suggest that Byrsocarpus coccineus possesses antidiarrhoeal activity due to its inhibitory effect on gastrointestinal propulsion, mediated through alpha(2) adrenoceptors, and also inhibition of fluid secretion. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, saponins

  18. Identifying Items to Assess Methodological Quality in Physical Therapy Trials: A Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Greta G.; Fuentes, Jorge; Saltaji, Humam; Ha, Christine; Chisholm, Annabritt; Pasichnyk, Dion; Rogers, Todd

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous tools and individual items have been proposed to assess the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The frequency of use of these items varies according to health area, which suggests a lack of agreement regarding their relevance to trial quality or risk of bias. Objective The objectives of this study were: (1) to identify the underlying component structure of items and (2) to determine relevant items to evaluate the quality and risk of bias of trials in physical therapy by using an exploratory factor analysis (EFA). Design A methodological research design was used, and an EFA was performed. Methods Randomized controlled trials used for this study were randomly selected from searches of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Two reviewers used 45 items gathered from 7 different quality tools to assess the methodological quality of the RCTs. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted using the principal axis factoring (PAF) method followed by varimax rotation. Results Principal axis factoring identified 34 items loaded on 9 common factors: (1) selection bias; (2) performance and detection bias; (3) eligibility, intervention details, and description of outcome measures; (4) psychometric properties of the main outcome; (5) contamination and adherence to treatment; (6) attrition bias; (7) data analysis; (8) sample size; and (9) control and placebo adequacy. Limitation Because of the exploratory nature of the results, a confirmatory factor analysis is needed to validate this model. Conclusions To the authors' knowledge, this is the first factor analysis to explore the underlying component items used to evaluate the methodological quality or risk of bias of RCTs in physical therapy. The items and factors represent a starting point for evaluating the methodological quality and risk of bias in physical therapy trials. Empirical evidence of the association among these items with treatment effects and a confirmatory factor

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol nanosuspension.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuzhang; Zhu, Ling; Du, Bin; Shi, Xiufang; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Chaofeng

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and antitumor activity of 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) nanosuspension relative to 2-ME solution both in vitro and in vivo. The pharmacokinetics of 2-ME administered either as a nanosuspension or as a solution were compared after I.V. administration to rats. In plasma, 2-ME nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (p < 0.01) reduced C(max) (1022.8 ± 467.4 ng/mL versus 2559.2 ± 775.8 ng/mL) and AUC(0-240min) (41566.8 ± 965.5 ng/mL min versus 79557.7 ± 256.2 ng/mL min), and a significantly (p < 0.01) greater volume of distribution (3.18-fold), clearance (1.85-fold), and elimination half-life (156.6 ± 33.5 min versus 70.0 ± 22.6 min) compared to the 2-ME solution. Methyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay showed that nanosuspension could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of 2-ME on EC9706 cells in vitro. After 72 h exposure, the IC(50) value of 2-ME nanosuspension was much lower than that of 2-ME solution (1.81 ± 0.15 μmol/L versus 4.14 ± 0.30 μmol/L). Studies on BALB/c mice with EC9706 solid tumors demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with 2-ME nanosuspension than 2-ME solution at the same dosage. These results suggest that the delivery of 2-ME nanosuspension is a promising approach for the treatment of tumors.

  20. Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit Intravehicular Activity Suit for Extravehicular Activity Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an intravehicular activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) environment at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit was modified to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will not have mass available to carry an EVA-specific suit; therefore, any EVA required will have to be performed by the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES). Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or whether a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects, including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, tool carrying, body stabilization, equipment handling, and tool usage. Hardware configurations included with and without Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on International Space Station mock-ups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstrating the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determining critical sizing factors, and need for adjusting suit work envelope. Early testing demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight-like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission-specific modifications for umbilical management or Primary Life Support System integration

  1. Investigating Item Exposure Control Methods in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozturk, Nagihan Boztunc; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of item exposure control methods on measurement precision and on test security under various item selection methods and item pool characteristics. In this study, the Randomesque (with item group sizes of 5 and 10), Sympson-Hetter, and Fade-Away methods were used as item exposure control methods. Moreover,…

  2. A Strategy for Optimizing Item-Pool Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Adelaide; van der Linden, Wim J.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Item-pool management requires a balancing act between the input of new items into the pool and the output of tests assembled from it. A strategy for optimizing item-pool management is presented that is based on the idea of a periodic update of an optimal blueprint for the item pool to tune item production to test assembly. A simulation study with…

  3. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  4. Extending item response theory to online homework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    Item response theory (IRT) becomes an increasingly important tool when analyzing "big data" gathered from online educational venues. However, the mechanism was originally developed in traditional exam settings, and several of its assumptions are infringed upon when deployed in the online realm. For a large-enrollment physics course for scientists and engineers, the study compares outcomes from IRT analyses of exam and homework data, and then proceeds to investigate the effects of each confounding factor introduced in the online realm. It is found that IRT yields the correct trends for learner ability and meaningful item parameters, yet overall agreement with exam data is moderate. It is also found that learner ability and item discrimination is robust over a wide range with respect to model assumptions and introduced noise. Item difficulty is also robust, but over a narrower range.

  5. Experiments in materials science from household items

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1993-01-01

    Everyday household items are used to demonstrate some unique properties of materials. A coat hanger, rubber band, balloon, and corn starch have typical properties which we often take for granted but can be truly amazing.

  6. Item Response Theory and Health Outcomes Measurement in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Ron D.; Morales, Leo S.; Reise, Steve P.

    2006-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) has a number of potential advantages over classical test theory in assessing self-reported health outcomes. IRT models yield invariant item and latent trait estimates (within a linear transformation), standard errors conditional on trait level, and trait estimates anchored to item content. IRT also facilitates evaluation of differential item functioning, inclusion of items with different response formats in the same scale, and assessment of person fit and is ideally suited for implementing computer adaptive testing. Finally, IRT methods can be helpful in developing better health outcome measures and in assessing change over time. These issues are reviewed, along with a discussion of some of the methodological and practical challenges in applying IRT methods. PMID:10982088

  7. The effects of linguistic modification on ESL students' comprehension of nursing course test items.

    PubMed

    Bosher, Susan; Bowles, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that language may be a source of construct-irrelevant variance for non-native speakers of English, or English as a second language (ESL) students, when they take exams. As a result, exams may not accurately measure knowledge of nursing content. One accommodation often used to level the playing field for ESL students is linguistic modification, a process by which the reading load of test items is reduced while the content and integrity of the item are maintained. Research on the effects of linguistic modification has been conducted on examinees in the K-12 population, but is just beginning in other areas. This study describes the collaborative process by which items from a pathophysiology exam were linguistically modified and subsequently evaluated for comprehensibility by ESL students. Findings indicate that in a majority of cases, modification improved examinees' comprehension of test items. Implications for test item writing and future research are discussed.

  8. Identification of Commercial Items Risk Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    profitable ) commercial customer-base. This means that the commercial vendors have several customers and their products are manufactured to meet more...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited IDENTIFICATION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS...of Commercial Items Risk Factors 6. AUTHOR(S) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School

  9. Calorimetry of low mass Pu239 items

    SciTech Connect

    Cremers, Teresa L; Sampson, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetric assay has the reputation of providing the highest precision and accuracy of all nondestructive assay measurements. Unfortunately, non-destructive assay practitioners and measurement consumers often extend, inappropriately, the high precision and accuracy of calorimetric assay to very low mass items. One purpose of this document is to present more realistic expectations for the random uncertainties associated with calorimetric assay for weapons grade plutonium items with masses of 200 grams or less.

  10. NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-25

    NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items) SAE Paper #2006-01-3192 25 September 2006, Grapevine Version R4 (Final) Report...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project (Secondary Items) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 NAC Aftermarket Brake Components Project By: Leo Miller, USA

  11. 15 CFR 742.15 - Encryption items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... encryption software are distinguished from controls on other software regulated under the EAR. (a) Licensing... items (“EI”) classified under ECCN 5A002.a.1, a.2, a.5, a.6 and a.9; 5D002.a or c.1 for equipment... items may be exported under the provisions of License Exception ENC set forth in § 740.17 of the...

  12. 78 FR 2379 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional... of Collection: Impact Evaluation of Math Professional Development. OMB Control Number: 1850-NEW. Type..., and teachers for a study of math professional development. The study will provide...

  13. 76 FR 44086 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity.... 2900-0052.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation... submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)...

  14. A model for statistical forecasting of menu item demand.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D

    1977-03-01

    Foodservice planning necessarily begins with a forecast of demand. Menu item demand forecasts are needed to make food item production decisions, work force and facility acquisition plans, and resource allocation and scheduling decisions. As these forecasts become more accurate, the tasks of adjusting original plans are minimized. Forecasting menu item demand need no longer be the tedious and inaccurate chore which is so prevalent in hospital food management systems today. In most instances, data may be easily collected as a by-product of existing activities to support accurate statistical time series predictions. Forecasts of meal tray count, based on a rather sophisticated model, multiplied by average menu item preference percentages can provide accurate predictions of demand. Once the forecasting models for tray count have been developed, simple worksheets can be prepared to facilitate manual generation of the forecasts on a continuing basis. These forecasts can then be recorded on a worksheet that reflects average patient preference percentages (of tray count), so that the product of the percentages with the tray count prediction produces menu item predictions on the same worksheet. As the patient preference percentages stabilize, data collection can be reduced to the daily recording of tray count and one-step-ahead forecase errors for each meal with a periodic gathering of patient preference percentages to update and/or verify the existing date. The author is more thoroughly investigating the cost/benefit relationship of such a system through the analysis of new empirical data. It is clear that the system offers potential for reducing costs at the diet category or total tray count levels. It is felt that these benefits transfer down to the meal item level as well as offer ways of generating more accurate predictions, with perhaps only minor (if any) labor time increments. Research in progress will delineate expected savings more explicitly. The approach

  15. Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove evaluation test protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman-Sweeney, E. M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most critical components of a space suit is the gloves, yet gloves have traditionally presented significant design challenges. With continued efforts at glove development, a method for evaluating glove performance is needed. This paper presents a pressure-glove evaluation protocol. A description of this evaluation protocol, and its development is provided. The protocol allows comparison of one glove design to another, or any one design to bare-handed performance. Gloves for higher pressure suits may be evaluated at current and future design pressures to drive out differences in performance due to pressure effects. Using this protocol, gloves may be evaluated during design to drive out design problems and determine areas for improvement, or fully mature designs may be evaluated with respect to mission requirements. Several different test configurations are presented to handle these cases. This protocol was run on a prototype glove. The prototype was evaluated at two operating pressures and in the unpressurized state, with results compared to bare-handed performance. Results and analysis from this test series are provided, as is a description of the configuration used for this test.

  16. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  17. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  18. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  19. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  20. 17 CFR 229.1115 - (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AB) § 229.1115 (Item 1115) Certain derivatives instruments. This item relates to derivative.... Instructions 2, 3 and 5 to Item 1114 of this Regulation AB apply to the information contemplated by...

  1. Synthesis, antiarrhythmic activity, and toxicological evaluation of mexiletine analogues.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mariagrazia; Carocci, Alessia; Budriesi, Roberta; Micucci, Matteo; Toma, Maddalena; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Lovece, Angelo; Catalano, Alessia; Cavalluzzi, Maria Maddalena; Bruno, Claudio; De Palma, Annalisa; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria Grazia; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Chiarini, Alberto; Franchini, Carlo; Ghelardini, Carla; Habtemariam, Solomon; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-10-04

    Four mexiletine analogues have been tested for their antiarrhythmic, inotropic, and chronotropic effects on isolated guinea pig heart tissues and to assess calcium antagonist activity, in comparison with the parent compound mexiletine. All analogues showed from moderate to high antiarrhythmic activity. In particular, three of them (1b,c,e) were more active and potent than the reference drug, while exhibiting only modest or no negative inotropic and chronotropic effects and vasorelaxant activity, thus showing high selectivity of action. All compounds showed no cytotoxicity and 1b,c,d did not impair motor coordination. All in, these new analogues exhibit an interesting cardiovascular profile and deserve further investigation.

  2. Evaluation of the antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of Terminalia catappa.

    PubMed

    Lin, C C; Chen, Y L; Lin, J M; Ujiie, T

    1997-01-01

    The free radical scavenging and antihepatotoxic activity from Terminalia catappa was studied. Treatment with T. catappa water extracts showed antihepatotoxic activity against CCl4-induced toxicity in the rat liver that was tested. The crude drug also exhibited anti-oxidant effects in FeCl2-Ascorbic acid induced lipid peroxidation in the rat liver homogenate. Moreover, the superoxide radical scavenger effect of T. catappa was demonstrated using electron spin resonance (ESR) and spintrapping technique. The results indicate that T. catappa possesses good antihepatotoxic activity and superoxide radical scavenger activity.

  3. Gender and Ethnicity Differences on the Abridged Big Five Circumplex (AB5C) of Personality Traits: A Differential Item Functioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelson, Jacqueline K.; Wicher, Eliza W.; LeBreton, James M.; Craig, S. Bartholomew

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluates the measurement precision of the Abridged Big Five Circumplex (AB5C) of personality traits by identifying those items that demonstrate differential item functioning by gender and ethnicity. Differential item functioning is found in 33 of 45 (73%) of the AB5C scales, across gender and ethnic groups (Caucasian vs. African…

  4. Psychometric and Cognitive Analysis as a Basis for the Design and Revision of Quantitative Item Models. Research Report. ETS RR-05-25

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Edith Aurora; Peterson, Stephen; Steffen, Manfred; Lawless, René

    2005-01-01

    We describe the item modeling development and evaluation process as applied to a quantitative assessment with high-stakes outcomes. In addition to expediting the item-creation process, a model-based approach may reduce pretesting costs, if the difficulty and discrimination of model-generated items may be predicted to a predefined level of…

  5. Food item use by coyote sex and age classes

    SciTech Connect

    Cypher, B.L.; Spencer, K.A.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    Food item use by coyotes was compared between sexes and among age classes at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California. Item use did not differ significantly between males and females. Although leporid was the item most frequently used by all age classes, item use differed significantly between pups (< 1 year), yearlings (1 year), and adults (> 1 year), probably due to differential use of secondary items. Variation in item use among age classes could potentially bias results of coyote food habit studies.

  6. Evaluation of Antileishmanial Activity of Selected Brazilian Plants and Identification of the Active Principles

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Meyre-Silva, Christiane; Niero, Rivaldo; Bolda Mariano, Luisa Nathália; Gomes do Nascimento, Fabiana; Vicente Farias, Ingrid; Gazoni, Vanessa Fátima; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Giménez, Alberto; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Salamanca, Efrain; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds from some selected Brazilian medicinal plants against strains of promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and L. brasiliensis in vitro. The cell viability was determined, comparing the results with reference standards. The dichloromethane fractions of the roots, stems, and leaves of Allamanda schottii showed IC50 values between 14.0 and 2.0 μg/mL. Plumericin was the main active compound, with IC50 of 0.3 and 0.04 μg/mL against the two species of Leishmania analyzed. The hexane extract of Eugenia umbelliflora fruits showed IC50 of 14.3 and 5.7 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. The methanolic extracts of the seeds of Garcinia achachairu and guttiferone A presented IC50 values of 35.9 and 10.4 μg/mL, against L. amazonensis, respectively. The ethanolic extracts of the stem barks of Rapanea ferruginea and the isolated compound, myrsinoic acid B, presented activity against L. brasiliensis with IC50 of 24.1 and 6.1 μg/mL. Chloroform fraction of Solanum sisymbriifolium exhibited IC50 of 33.8 and 20.5 μg/mL, and cilistol A was the main active principle, with IC50 of 6.6 and 3.1 μg/mL against L. amazonensis and L. brasiliensis, respectively. It is concluded that the analyzed plants are promising as new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23840252

  7. Perceptions and Evaluation of a Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gene A.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative case study, conducted in the Midwestern United States, explored the perceptions of teachers at two different elementary schools as they implemented a physical activity program during the school day. The program engaged students in daily physical activity through brief, organized, structured physical exercise. Interviews and…

  8. Evaluation of scheduling techniques for payload activity planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullington, Stanley F.

    1991-01-01

    Two tasks related to payload activity planning and scheduling were performed. The first task involved making a comparison of space mission activity scheduling problems with production scheduling problems. The second task consisted of a statistical analysis of the output of runs of the Experiment Scheduling Program (ESP). Details of the work which was performed on these two tasks are presented.

  9. Design, synthesis and cytotoxic activity evaluation of new aminosubstituted benzofurans.

    PubMed

    Daniilides, Konstantinos; Lougiakis, Nikolaos; Pouli, Nicole; Marakos, Panagiotis; Samara, Pinelopi; Tsitsilonis, Ourania

    2014-01-01

    A number of new aminosubstituted benzofuran analogues have been prepared and their cytotoxic/cytostatic activity was investigated against five human tumor cell lines (MCF-7, SKBR3, SKOV3, HCT-116 and HeLa). Certain compounds showed noticeable tumor cell growth inhibition, indicative of possible structure-activity relationships.

  10. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  11. The Impact of Non-attempted and Dually-Attempted Items on Person Abilities Using Item Response Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sideridis, Georgios D.; Tsaousis, Ioannis; Al Harbi, Khaleel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate response strategy with person ability estimates. Two behavioral strategies were examined: (a) the strategy to skip items in order to save time on timed tests, and, (b) the strategy to select two responses on an item, with the hope that one of them may be considered correct. Participants were 4,422 individuals who were administered a standardized achievement measure related to math, biology, chemistry, and physics. In the present evaluation, only the physics subscale was employed. Two analyses were conducted: (a) a person-based one to identify differences between groups and potential correlates of those differences, and, (b) a measure-based analysis in order to identify the parts of the measure that were responsible for potential group differentiation. For (a) person abilities the 2-PL model was employed and later the 3-PL and 4-PL models in order to estimate upper and lower asymptotes of person abilities. For (b) differential item functioning, differential test functioning, and differential distractor functioning were investigated. Results indicated that there were significant differences between groups with completers having the highest ability compared to both non-attempters and dual responders. There were no significant differences between no-attempters and dual responders. The present findings have implications for response strategy efficacy and measure evaluation, revision, and construction. PMID:27790174

  12. Reconciling findings of emotion-induced memory enhancement and impairment of preceding items

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Marisa; Mather, Mara

    2009-01-01

    A large body of work reveals that people remember emotionally arousing information better than neutral information. However, previous research reveals contradictory effects of emotional events on memory for neutral events that precede or follow them: in some studies emotionally arousing items impair memory for immediately preceding or following items and in others arousing items enhance memory for preceding items. By demonstrating both emotion-induced enhancement and impairment, Experiments 1 and 2 clarified the conditions under which these effects are likely to occur. The results suggest that emotion-induced enhancement is most likely to occur for neutral items that: (1) precede (and so are poised to predict the onset of) emotionally arousing items, (2) have high attentional weights at encoding, and (3) are tested after a delay period of a week rather than within the same experiment session. In contrast, emotion-induced impairment is most likely to occur for neutral items near the onset of emotional arousal that are overshadowed by highly activated competing items during encoding. PMID:20001121

  13. Evaluation of proteolytic activity to differentiate some dematiaceous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Espinel-Ingroff, A; Goldson, P R; McGinnis, M R; Kerkering, T M

    1988-01-01

    A total of 123 isolates of Cladosporium spp., Exophiala spp., Fonsecaea spp., Lecythophora hoffmannii, Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, Phialophora spp., Wangiella dermatitidis, and Xylohypha bantiana were tested for proteolytic activity by using 26 different formulations of gelatin, milk, casein, and Loeffler media. Other physiological properties examined included hydrolysis of tyrosine and xanthine, sodium nitrate utilization in Czapek Dox agar, and thermotolerance. Isolates of Exophiala jeanselmei, Fonsecaea compacta, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, W. dermatitidis, and X. bantiana lacked proteolytic activity. Proteolytic activity was variable among the remaining species, depending on the type of medium used. Thermotolerance had value in distinguishing some taxa. PMID:3343325

  14. Quality and antitumour activity evaluation of extract of Hypericum ascyron.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Mei; Luo, Xue-Gang; Ma, Ning; Li, Kun; Li, Wen; Ma, De-Yun; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Similarity assessment of complex chromatographic profiles is a potential tool for the identification and quality control of herbal medicinal products to guarantee the expected biological activity. In this paper, a high-performance liquid chromatography method was established for controlling the quality of extract of Hypericum ascyron for the first time. With this method, the correlation coefficients of similarity of 10 batches extract of H. ascyron were >0.97. The extract of H. ascyron displayed steadily inhibitorty activities on the growth of human cervical cancer Hela cell lines. Therefore, the present study successfully set up a sensitive efficient method which might confirm stable biological activity of the extract of H. ascyron.

  15. Liposomal squalenoyl-gemcitabine: formulation, characterization and anticancer activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pili, Barbara; ReddyCurrent Address: Sanofi-Aventis, 13 Quai Jules-Guesdes, 94403, Vitry-Sur-Seine, France., L. Harivardhan; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    A new prodrug of gemcitabine, based on the covalent coupling of squalene to gemcitabine (GemSQ), has been designed to enhance the anticancer activity of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue active against a wide variety of tumors. In the present study, the feasibility of encapsulating GemSQ into liposomes either PEGylated or non-PEGylated has been investigated. The in vivo anticancer activity of these formulations has been tested on subcutaneous grafted L1210wt leukemia model and compared to that of free gemcitabine. The liposomal GemSQ appears to be a potential delivery system for the effective treatment of tumors.

  16. Liposomal squalenoyl-gemcitabine: formulation, characterization and anticancer activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pili, Barbara; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    A new prodrug of gemcitabine, based on the covalent coupling of squalene to gemcitabine (GemSQ), has been designed to enhance the anticancer activity of gemcitabine, a nucleoside analogue active against a wide variety of tumors. In the present study, the feasibility of encapsulating GemSQ into liposomes either PEGylated or non-PEGylated has been investigated. The in vivo anticancer activity of these formulations has been tested on subcutaneous grafted L1210wt leukemia model and compared to that of free gemcitabine. The liposomal GemSQ appears to be a potential delivery system for the effective treatment of tumors.

  17. A comprehensive evaluation of catalase-like activity of different classes of redox-active therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Maia, Clarissa G C; Weitner, Tin; Carballal, Sebastián; Sampaio, Romulo S; Lieb, Dominik; Ghazaryan, Robert; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Reboucas, Julio S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-09-01

    (-1). The analogous Fe(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins showed ~10-fold higher activity than the corresponding MnPs, but the values of kcat(H2O2) are still ~4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the enzyme. While the kcat(H2O2) values for Fe ethyl and n-octyl analogs were 803.5 and 368.4M(-1) s(-1), respectively, the FePs are more prone to H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, therefore allowing for similar yields in H2O2 dismutation as analogous MnPs. The kcat(H2O2) values are dependent on the electron deficiency of the metal site as it controls the peroxide binding in the first step of the dismutation process. SOD-like activities depend on electron deficiency of the metal site also, as it controls the first step of O2(●-) dismutation. In turn, the kcat(O2(●-)) parallels the kcat(H2O2). Therefore, the electron-rich anionic non-SOD mimic MnTBAP(3-) has essentially very low catalase-like activity, kcat(H2O2)=5.8M(-1) s(-1). The catalase-like activities of Mn(III) and Fe(III) porphyrins are at most, 0.0004 and 0.05% of the enzyme activity, respectively. The kcat(H2O2) values of 8.2 and 6.5M(-1) s(-1) were determined for electron-rich Mn(II) cyclic polyamine-based compounds, M40403 and M40404, respectively. The EUK-8, with modest SOD-like activity, has only slightly higher kcat(H2O2)=13.5M(-1) s(-1). The biological relevance of kcat(H2O2) of MnTE-2-PyP(5+), MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), MnTBAP(3-), FeTE-2-PyP(5+), M40403, M40404, and Mn salen was evaluated in wild-type and peroxidase/catalase-deficient E. coli.

  18. Evaluation of Parmotrema reticulatum Taylor for Antibacterial and Antiinflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A. P.; Bhandarkar, S.; Rai, G.; Yadav, A. K.; Lodhi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Lichens produce variety of secondary metabolites including depsides, depsidones and dibenzofurans having multifunctional activity in response to external environmental condition. Present study provides evidence for in vitro antibacterial and in vivo antiinflammatory activity of acetone and ethanol extracts of Parmotrema reticulatum. In vitro antibacterial activity was investigated against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Cotton pellet-induced granuloma, xylene-induced ear swelling, carragennan-induced edema, histamine-induced and carboxymethylcellulose sodium-induced leukocyte emigration in mice models were used to quantify the antiinflammatory activity. Acetone and ethanol extracts were showed antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis (minimal inhibitory concentration: 100 and 150 μg/ml) and Staphylococcus aureus (minimal inhibitory concentration: 100 and 200 μg/ml), Escherichia coli (minimal inhibitory concentration: 200 and 250 μg/ml), and Pseudomonasa eruginosa (minimal inhibitory concentration: 200 and 300 μg/ml). Acetone extract was inhibited edema significantly at 200 mg/kg with xylene, cotton pellet, carragennan and histamine induced edema in vivo models. Ethanol extract was found effective at dose of 300 mg/kg with all in vivo antiinflammatory models. The results showed significant (P<0.01) antiinflammatory effects at 200 and 300 mg/kg dose of acetone and ethanol extracts, respectively, which can be concluded that significant activity may be due to presence of flavanoids in ethanol extract and usnic acid in acetone extract. PMID:27168687

  19. Evaluation of Hypertext in an Activity Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherly, D.; Roux, L.; Dillenbourg, P.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the use and efficiency of two computer learning tools for basic virology. "VIROLAB" is a simulation of a biology laboratory which also includes a hypertext providing learners with some knowledge on virology. The Hypertext is a version of the hypertext in VIROLAB. The study examined which of the two was most efficient for knowledge…

  20. Criteria for the Evaluation of Career Education Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Octave V.

    1979-01-01

    This article presents the criteria developed by the American Institutes for Research to select evaluated exemplary career education projects across the nation for submission to the Joint Dissemination and Review Panel (JDRP) of the Office of Education (USOE) and the National Institute of Education (NIE). (Author)