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Sample records for activities impart important

  1. Can exergames impart health messages? Game play, framing, and drivers of physical activity among children.

    PubMed

    Lwin, May O; Malik, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of incorporating exergaming into physical education lessons as a platform for imparting health education messages and influencing children's beliefs about and attitudes toward physical activity. The authors launched a 6-week intervention program using Nintendo Wii games coupled with protection motivation theory-based health messaging among 5th-grade school children in Singapore. Results indicated that when children who were exposed to threat-framed messages played Wii exergames during physical education lessons, they reported more positive physical activity attitude, self-efficacy, and perceived behavioral control than did those who underwent regular physical education lessons and were exposed to the same message. In addition, among children playing Wii, the threat and coping frames had similar effects on the degree of message influence on physical activity attitudes and beliefs. The implications for schools, parents, and health policy are discussed. PMID:24191779

  2. Modular activation of Rho1 by GPCR signalling imparts polarized myosin II activation during morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kerridge, Stephen; Munjal, Akankshi; Philippe, Jean-Marc; Jha, Ankita; de las Bayonas, Alain Garcia; Saurin, Andrew J; Lecuit, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Polarized cell shape changes during tissue morphogenesis arise by controlling the subcellular distribution of myosin II. For instance, during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation, apical constriction and cell intercalation are mediated by medial-apical myosin II pulses that power deformations, and polarized accumulation of myosin II that stabilizes these deformations. It remains unclear how tissue-specific factors control different patterns of myosin II activation and the ratchet-like myosin II dynamics. Here we report the function of a common pathway comprising the heterotrimeric G proteins Gα12/13, Gβ13F and Gγ1 in activating and polarizing myosin II during Drosophila gastrulation. Gα12/13 and the Gβ13F/γ1 complex constitute distinct signalling modules, which regulate myosin II dynamics medial-apically and/or junctionally in a tissue-dependent manner. We identify a ubiquitously expressed GPCR called Smog required for cell intercalation and apical constriction. Smog functions with other GPCRs to quantitatively control G proteins, resulting in stepwise activation of myosin II and irreversible cell shape changes. We propose that GPCR and G proteins constitute a general pathway for controlling actomyosin contractility in epithelia and that the activity of this pathway is polarized by tissue-specific regulators. PMID:26780298

  3. A novel exon in the human Ca2+-activated Cl- channel Ano1 imparts greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca2.

    PubMed

    Strege, Peter R; Bernard, Cheryl E; Mazzone, Amelia; Linden, David R; Beyder, Arthur; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-11-01

    Anoctamin 1 (Ano1; TMEM16A) is a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CACC) expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal. The mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates Ano1 are incompletely understood. In the gastrointestinal tract, Ano1 is required for normal slow wave activity and is involved in regulating cell proliferation. Splice variants of Ano1 have varying electrophysiological properties and altered expression in disease states. Recently, we identified a transcript for human Ano1 containing a novel exon-"exon 0" upstream of and in frame with exon 1. The electrophysiological properties of this longer Ano1 isoform are unknown. Our aim was to determine the functional contribution of the newly identified exon to the Ca(2+) sensitivity and electrophysiological properties of Ano1. Constructs with [Ano1(+0)] or without [Ano1(-0)] the newly identified exon were transfected into human embryonic kidney-293 cells. Voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to determine voltage- and time-dependent parameters of whole cell Cl(-) currents between isoforms with varying concentrations of intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular anions, or Cl(-) channel inhibitors. We found that exon 0 did not change voltage sensitivity and had no impact on the relative permeability of Ano1 to most anions. Ano1(+0) exhibited greater changes in current density but lesser changes in kinetics than Ano1(-0) in response to varying intracellular Ca(2+). The CACC inhibitor niflumic acid inhibited current with greater efficacy and higher potency against Ano1(+0) compared with Ano1(-0). Likewise, the Ano1 inhibitor T16Ainh-A01 reduced Ano1(+0) more than Ano1(-0). In conclusion, human Ano1 containing exon 0 imparts its Cl(-) current with greater sensitivity to intracellular Ca(2+) and CACC inhibitors. PMID:26359375

  4. Chemically Diverse Group I p21-Activated Kinase (PAK) Inhibitors Impart Acute Cardiovascular Toxicity with a Narrow Therapeutic Window.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Joachim; Murray, Lesley J; Ndubaku, Chudi O; O'Brien, Thomas; Blackwood, Elizabeth; Wang, Weiru; Aliagas, Ignacio; Gazzard, Lewis; Crawford, James J; Drobnick, Joy; Lee, Wendy; Zhao, Xianrui; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Favor, David A; Dong, Ping; Zhang, Haiming; Heise, Christopher E; Oh, Angela; Ong, Christy C; La, Hank; Chakravarty, Paroma; Chan, Connie; Jakubiak, Diana; Epler, Jennifer; Ramaswamy, Sreemathy; Vega, Roxanne; Cain, Gary; Diaz, Dolores; Zhong, Yu

    2016-06-01

    p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) has an important role in transducing signals in several oncogenic pathways. The concept of inhibiting this kinase has garnered significant interest over the past decade, particularly for targeting cancers associated with PAK1 amplification. Animal studies with the selective group I PAK (pan-PAK1, 2, 3) inhibitor G-5555 from the pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one class uncovered acute toxicity with a narrow therapeutic window. To attempt mitigating the toxicity, we introduced significant structural changes, culminating in the discovery of the potent pyridone side chain analogue G-9791. Mouse tolerability studies with this compound, other members of this series, and compounds from two structurally distinct classes revealed persistent toxicity and a correlation of minimum toxic concentrations and PAK1/2 mediated cellular potencies. Broad screening of selected PAK inhibitors revealed PAK1, 2, and 3 as the only overlapping targets. Our data suggest acute cardiovascular toxicity resulting from the inhibition of PAK2, which may be enhanced by PAK1 inhibition, and cautions against continued pursuit of pan-group I PAK inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:27167326

  5. A peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligand MCC-555 imparts anti-proliferative response in pancreatic cancer cells by PPARgamma-independent up-regulation of KLF4

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Kyung-Won; Zhang, Xiaobo; Imchen, Temjenmongla; Baek, Seung Joon

    2012-09-01

    MCC-555 is a novel PPARα/γ dual ligand of the thiazolidinedione class and was recently developed as an anti-diabetic drug with unique properties. MCC-555 also has anti-proliferative activity through growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in several cancer cell types. Our group has shown that MCC-555 targets several proteins in colorectal tumorigenesis including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene (NAG-1) which plays an important role in chemoprevention responsible for chemopreventive compounds. NAG-1 is a member of the TGF-β superfamily and is involved in tumor progression and development; however, NAG-1's roles in pancreatic cancer have not been studied. In this report, we found that MCC-555 alters not only NAG-1 expression, but also p21 and cyclin D1 expression. NAG-1 and p21 expression was not blocked by PPARγ-specific antagonist GW9662, suggesting that MCC-555-induced NAG-1 and p21 expression is independent of PPARγ activation. However, decreasing cyclin D1 by MCC-555 seems to be affected by PPARγ activation. Further, we found that the GC box located in the NAG-1 promoter play an important role in NAG-1 transactivation by MCC-555. Subsequently, we screened several transcription factors that may bind to the GC box region in the NAG-1 promoter and found that KLF4 potentially binds to this region. Expression of KLF4 precedes NAG-1 and p21 expression in the presence of MCC-555, whereas blocking KLF4 expression using specific KLF4 siRNA showed that both NAG-1 and p21 expression by MCC-555 was blocked. In conclusion, MCC-555's actions on anti-proliferation involve both PPARγ-dependent and -independent pathways, thereby enhancing anti-tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► PPARα/γ ligand MCC-555 exhibits anti-proliferative activity in pancreatic cancer cells. ► MCC-555 affects KLF4 expression following by NAG-1 and p21 expression in a PPARγ independent manner. ► MCC-555 also affects cyclin D1 down

  6. Preparation of silver nano-particles immobilized onto chitin nano-crystals and their application to cellulose paper for imparting antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihan; Zhang, Ming; Cheng, Dong; Yang, Rendang

    2016-10-20

    Immobilized silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) possess excellent antimicrobial properties due to their unique surface characteristics. In this paper, immobilized silver nano-particles were synthesized in the presence of chitin nano-crystals (CNC) based on the Tollens mechanism (reduction of silver ion by aldehydes in the chitosan oligosaccharides (COS)) under microwave-assisted conditions. The prepared Ag NPs-loaded CNC nano-composites were then applied onto the paper surface via coating for the preparation of antibacterial paper. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed that the Ag NPs were immobilized onto the CNC. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results further revealed that the spherical Ag NPs (5-12nm) were well dispersed on the surface of CNC. The coated paper made from the Ag NPs-loaded CNC nano-composites exhibited a high effectiveness of the antibacterial activity against E. coli or S. aureus. PMID:27474631

  7. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  8. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  9. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  10. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  11. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  12. Physical activity - an important preanalytical variable

    PubMed Central

    Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of several biochemical and hematological biomarkers is strongly influenced by a number of preanalytical variables. Several lines of evidence attest that short, middle, and long-term exercise, as well as the relative intensity of physical effort (from mild to strenuous), may influence a broad array of laboratory variables. The amount of extracellular release and clearance from blood of most of these biomarkers is markedly influenced by the biological characteristics of the molecule(s), level of training, type, intensity and duration of exercise, and time of recovery after training. It is hence noteworthy that test results that fall outside the conventional reference ranges in athletes not only may reflect the presence of a given disease, but may frequently mirror an adaptation to regular training or changes that have occurred during and/or following strenuous exercise, and which should be clearly acknowledged to prevent misinterpretation of laboratory data. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an update about the most significant changes of some biochemical and hematological biomarkers in response to physical exercise, for appropriate interpretation of these changes in the context of physically active subjects. PMID:24627716

  13. Polyelectrolyte multilayers impart healability to highly electrically conductive films.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chen, Shanshan; Wu, Mengchun; Sun, Junqi

    2012-08-28

    Healable, electrically conductive films are fabricated by depositing Ag nanowires on water-enabled healable polyelectrolyte multilayers. The easily achieved healability of the polyelectrolyte multilayers is successfully imparted to the Ag nanowire layer. These films conveniently restore electrical conductivity lost as a result of damage by cuts several tens of micrometers wide when water is dropped on the cuts. PMID:22807199

  14. An RNA Domain Imparts Specificity and Selectivity to a Viral DNA Packaging Motor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Jardine, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During assembly, double-stranded DNA viruses, including bacteriophages and herpesviruses, utilize a powerful molecular motor to package their genomic DNA into a preformed viral capsid. An integral component of the packaging motor in the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage ϕ29 is a viral genome-encoded pentameric ring of RNA (prohead RNA [pRNA]). pRNA is a 174-base transcript comprised of two domains, domains I and II. Early studies initially isolated a 120-base form (domain I only) that retains high biological activity in vitro; hence, no function could be assigned to domain II. Here we define a role for this domain in the packaging process. DNA packaging using restriction digests of ϕ29 DNA showed that motors with the 174-base pRNA supported the correct polarity of DNA packaging, selectively packaging the DNA left end. In contrast, motors containing the 120-base pRNA had compromised specificity, packaging both left- and right-end fragments. The presence of domain II also provides selectivity in competition assays with genomes from related phages. Furthermore, motors with the 174-base pRNA were restrictive, in that they packaged only one DNA fragment into the head, whereas motors with the 120-base pRNA packaged several fragments into the head, indicating multiple initiation events. These results show that domain II imparts specificity and stringency to the motor during the packaging initiation events that precede DNA translocation. Heteromeric rings of pRNA demonstrated that one or two copies of domain II were sufficient to impart this selectivity/stringency. Although ϕ29 differs from other double-stranded DNA phages in having an RNA motor component, the function provided by pRNA is carried on the motor protein components in other phages. IMPORTANCE During virus assembly, genome packaging involves the delivery of newly synthesized viral nucleic acid into a protein shell. In the double-stranded DNA phages and herpesviruses, this is accomplished by a powerful

  15. Zonal drifts of irregularities imparted by meridional winds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldman, H.; Da Rosa, A. V.

    1973-01-01

    In a uniform ionosphere, meridional winds cause only meridional motions of irregularities. It is shown, however, that, if F-region irregularities are considered in a real ionosphere in which there is a highly conductive E-layer, zonal motions occur. During the day a substantial westward drift takes place, while at night the drift is eastward but smaller, owing to the much smaller E-layer conductivity. Thus, the effect of meridional winds is to impart a net westward drift to small irregularities in the ionization, provided such irregularities persist long enough.

  16. INDIVIDUALISED CALCULATION OF TISSUE IMPARTED ENERGY IN BREAST TOMOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Geeraert, N; Klausz, R; Muller, S; Bloch, I; Bosmans, H

    2016-06-01

    The imparted energy to the glandular tissue in the breast (glandular imparted energy, GIE) is proposed for an improved assessment of the individual radiation-induced risk resulting from X-ray breast imaging. GIE is computed from an estimation of the quantity and localisation of glandular tissue in the breast. After a digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisition, the volumetric glandular content (volumetric breast density, VBD) is computed from the central X-ray projection. The glandular tissue distribution is determined by labelling the DBT voxels to ensure the conservation of the VBD. Finally, the GIE is calculated by Monte Carlo computation on the resulting tissue-labelled DBT volume. For verification, the method was applied to 10 breast-shaped digital phantoms made of different glandular spheres in an adipose background, and to a digital anthropomorphic phantom. Results were compared to direct GIE computations on the phantoms considered as 'ground-truth'. The major limitations in accuracy are those of DBT, in particular the limited z-resolution. However, for most phantoms, the results can be considered as acceptable. PMID:27127209

  17. Cytomagnetometric study of interactions between microfilaments and microtubules by measuring the energy imparted to magnetic particles within the cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, Iku; Kawamura, Kazuhisa

    2005-05-01

    Cytomagnetometric measurements of the energy imparted to intracellular organelles were made to study the relationship between microtubules and microfilaments. Depolymerization of microtubules by colchicine resulted in an increase in the energy suggesting that microtubules in control condition suppress the activity of microfilaments.

  18. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer.

    PubMed

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1-6) and at the end of a season (round 29-34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  19. Seasonal Pacing - Match Importance Affects Activity in Professional Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Link, Daniel; de Lorenzo, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the influence of match importance on player activity in professional soccer. Therefore, we used an observational approach and analyzed 1,211 matches of German Bundesliga and 2nd Bundesliga. The importance measurement employed is based on post season consequences of teams involved in a match. This means, if a match result could potentially influence the final rank, and this rank would lead to different consequences for a team, such as qualification for Champions League opposed to qualification for Europe League, then this match is classified as important; otherwise not. Activity was quantified by TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED, SPRINTS, FAST RUNS, DUELS, FOULS and ATTEMPTS. Running parameters were recorded using a semi-automatic optical tracking system, while technical variables were collected by professional data loggers. Based on our importance classification, low important matches occurred at the beginning of round 29. A two-way ANOVA indicates significantly increased FAST RUNS (+4%, d = 0.3), DUELS (+16%, d = 1.0) and FOULS (+36%, d = 1.2) in important matches compared to low important ones. For FAST RUNS and FOULS, this effect only exists in Bundesliga. A comparison of the two leagues show that TOTAL DISTANCE COVERED (+3%, d = 0.9), SPRINTS (+25%, d = 1.4) and FAST RUNS (+15%, d = 1.4) are higher compared to 2nd Bundesliga, whilst FOULS is less in Bundesliga (-7%, d = 0.3). No difference in player activity was found between matches at the beginning of a season (round 1–6) and at the end of a season (round 29–34). We conclude that match importance influences player activity in German professional soccer. The most reasonable explanation is a conscious or unconscious pacing strategy, motivated by preserving abilities or preventing injury. Since this tendency mainly exists in Bundesliga, this may suggest that more skilled players show a higher awareness for the need of pacing. PMID:27281051

  20. A facile method for imparting superoleophobicity to polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guina; Zhang, Zhaozhu; Zhu, Xiaotao; Ge, Bo; Wang, Kun; Xu, Xianghui; Men, Xuehu; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2014-03-01

    A new method was presented to impart polymer substrate with superoleophobic properties. Aluminum/polymer composite was created by a hot-pressing process, and rough surface textures needed to establish superoleophobicity were created by HCl etching and boiling water treatment. After surface fluorination, the surface became super-repellent towards water and several organic liquids, such as hexadecane. The effect of geometrical structure on hydrophobicity and oleophobicity was investigated, and the result showed that the synergistic action of microterraces and nanoflakes played a key role in establishing oleophobicity. A waterfall/jet test demonstrated that the obtained surface can keep its superoleophobicity after a long time exposure to water. Moreover, the obtained surface did not lose the superoleophobicity after placing it under cold condition for 7 days.

  1. Amino acids flanking the central core of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase are important in retaining enzyme activity after autoclaving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Randhawa, Vinay; Acharya, Vishal; Singh, Kashmir; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to be denatured upon boiling, although Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Potentilla atrosanguinea (Pot-SOD) retains significant catalytic activity even after autoclaving (heating at 121 °C at a pressure of 1.1 kg per square cm for 20 min). The polypeptide backbone of Pot-SOD consists of 152 amino acids with a central core spanning His45 to Cys145 that is involved in coordination of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions. While the central core is essential for imparting catalytic activity and structural stability to the enzyme, the role of sequences flanking the central core was not understood. Experiments with deletion mutants showed that the amino acid sequences flanking the central core were important in retaining activity of Pot-SOD after autoclaving. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated the unfavorable structure of mutants due to increased size of binding pocket and enhanced negative charge on the electrostatic surface, resulting in unavailability of the substrate superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]) to the catalytic pocket. Deletion caused destabilization of structural elements and reduced solvent accessibility that further produced unfavorable structural geometry of the protein. PMID:25990646

  2. Genes Important for Catalase Activity in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Baureder, Michael; Hederstedt, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Little in general is known about how heme proteins are assembled from their constituents in cells. The Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme and does not depend on it for growth. However, when supplied with heme in the growth medium the cells can synthesize two heme proteins; catalase (KatA) and cytochrome bd (CydAB). To identify novel factors important for catalase biogenesis libraries of E. faecalis gene insertion mutants were generated using two different types of transposons. The libraries of mutants were screened for clones deficient in catalase activity using a colony zymogram staining procedure. Analysis of obtained clones identified, in addition to katA (encoding the catalase enzyme protein), nine genes distributed over five different chromosomal loci. No factors with a dedicated essential role in catalase biogenesis or heme trafficking were revealed, but the results indicate the RNA degradosome (srmB, rnjA), an ABC-type oligopeptide transporter (oppBC), a two-component signal transducer (etaR), and NADH peroxidase (npr) as being important for expression of catalase activity in E. faecalis. It is demonstrated that catalase biogenesis in E. faecalis is independent of the CydABCD proteins and that a conserved proline residue in the N-terminal region of KatA is important for catalase assembly. PMID:22590595

  3. Apparatus for imparting seismic signals into the earth

    SciTech Connect

    Airhart, T.P.

    1991-03-19

    This patent describes an apparatus for imparting a seismic signal into the earth. It comprises seismic generator means for generating a seismic signal, comprising: an impact mass; and propulsion means for driving the impact mass to produce the seismic signal; coupling means, in engagement with the earth and engagable with the generator means, for transferring, into the earth, signals generated by the propulsion means driving the impact mass into engagement with the coupling means; lift frame means located above the coupling means and resiliently connected thereto; hollow housing means encompassing at least a portion of the generator means for inhibiting the entrance of water into the apparatus when used in an underwater environment and for confining noise produced by the apparatus when used in an atmospheric environment, comprising: a first end portion connected to the generator means; and a second generally annular end portion, the second end portion extending toward the coupling means; an annular connector member flexibly connecting the second end of the housing means to the lift frame means; and pivot means pivotally connecting the seismic generator means to the lift frame means.

  4. Parent participation plays an important part in promoting physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin; Kostenius, Catrine; Gard, Gunvor; Rutberg, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Although physical activity (PA) is an important and modifiable determinant of health, in Sweden only 15% of boys and 10% of girls aged 15 years old achieve the recommended levels of PA 7 days per week. Adolescents’ PA levels are associated with social influence exerted by parents, friends, and teachers. The purpose of this study was to describe parents’ experiences of being a part of their adolescents’ empowerment-inspired PA intervention. A qualitative interview study was performed at a school in the northern part of Sweden. A total of 10 parents were interviewed, and the collected data were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Three subthemes were combined into one main theme, demonstrating that parents are one important part of a successful PA intervention. The life of an adolescent has many options and demands that make it difficult to prioritize PA. Although parents felt that they were important in supporting their adolescent, a successful PA intervention must have multiple components. Moreover, the parents noted that the intervention had a positive effect upon not only their adolescents’, but also their own PA. Interventions aimed at promoting PA among adolescents should include measures to stimulate parent participation, have an empowerment approach, and preferably be school-based. PMID:26282870

  5. Stellar Activity and CMEs: Important Factors of Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, Maxim L.

    CME activity of the Sun is known to be an important impacting factor for the magnetospheres, atmospheres, and surfaces of solar system planets. Following an idea of a solar-stellar analogy, CME phenomena are expected on other stars as well. The main planetary impact factors of the stellar CMEs include the associated interplanetary shocks, plasma density and velocity disturbances, energetic particles accelerated in the shock regions, as well as distortions of the magnetic field direction and modulus. All these factors should be properly taken into account during the study of evolutionary processes on exoplanets and their atmospheric and plasma environments. The planetary impact of the stellar CME activity may vary depending on stellar age, stellar spectral type and the orbital distance of a planet. Because of the relatively short range of propagation of the majority of CMEs, they affect most strongly the magnetospheres and atmospheres of close-orbit ( < 0.1 AU) exoplanets. In this chapter we discuss an issue of the stellar CME activity in the context of several actual problems of modern exoplanetology, including planetary atmosphere mass loss, planet survival at close orbits, and definition of a criterion for habitability.

  6. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control. PMID:27219064

  7. Important biological activities induced by Thalassophryne maculosa fish venom.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Rosales, Josefina Ines; Piran-Soares, Ana Amélia; Farsky, Sandra H P; Takehara, Harumi Ando; Lima, Carla; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2005-02-01

    The accidents caused by Thalassophryne maculosa fish venoms are frequent and represent a public health problem in some regions of Venezuela. Most accidents occur in the fishing communities and tourists. The clinical picture is characterized by severe pain, dizziness, fever, edema, and necrosis. Due to the lack of efficient therapy it may take weeks, or even months for complete recovery of the victims. The investigations presented here were undertaken to assess the eletrophoretical profile and principal biological properties of the T. maculosa venom. Venom obtained from fresh captured specimens of this fish was tested in vitro or in animal models for a better characterization of its toxic activities. In contrast to other fish venoms, T. maculosa venom showed relative low LD50. The injection of venom in the footpad of mice reproduced a local inflammatory lesion similar to that described in humans. Significant increase of the nociceptive and edematogenic responses was observed followed within 48 h by necrosis. Pronounced alterations on microvascular hemodynamics were visualized after venom application. These alterations were represented by fibrin depots and thrombus formation followed by complete venular stasis and transient arteriolar contraction. T. maculosa venom is devoid of phospholipase A2 activity, but the venom showed proteolytic and myotoxic activities. SDS-Page analysis of the crude venom showed important bands: one band located above 97 M(w), one band between 68 and 97 M(w), one major band between 29 and 43 M(w) and the last one located below 18.4 M(w) Then, the results presented here support that T. maculosa venom present a mixture of bioactive toxins involved in a local inflammatory lesion. PMID:15626364

  8. LOV-based optogenetic devices: light-driven modules to impart photoregulated control of cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pudasaini, Ashutosh; El-Arab, Kaley K.; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The Light-Oxygen-Voltage domain family of proteins is widespread in biology where they impart sensory responses to signal transduction domains. The small, light responsive LOV modules offer a novel platform for the construction of optogenetic tools. Currently, the design and implementation of these devices is partially hindered by a lack of understanding of how light drives allosteric changes in protein conformation to activate diverse signal transduction domains. Further, divergent photocycle properties amongst LOV family members complicate construction of highly sensitive devices with fast on/off kinetics. In the present review we discuss the history of LOV domain research with primary emphasis on tuning LOV domain chemistry and signal transduction to allow for improved optogenetic tools. PMID:25988185

  9. Structural modifications in polymeric micelles to impart multifunctionality for improved drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anupama; Chitkara, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are macromolecular nanoconstructs which are formed by self-assembly of synthetic amphiphilic block copolymers. These copolymers could be chemically modified to expand their functionality and hence obtain a multifunctional micelle which could serve several functions simultaneously, for example, long circulation time along with active targeting, smart polymeric micelles providing on-demand drug release for example, pH responsive micelles, redox- and light-sensitive micelles, charge-conversion micelles and core/shell cross-linked micelles. Additionally, micelles could be tailored to carry a contrast agent or siRNA/miRNA along with the drug for greater clinical benefit. The focus of the current commentary would be to highlight such chemical modifications which impart multifunctionality to a single carrier and discuss challenges involved in clinical translation of these multifunctional micelles. PMID:26769002

  10. Dike propagation in active volcanoes: importance, evidence, models and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.

    2011-12-01

    Most eruptions are fed by dikes; therefore, better knowledge of dike propagation is crucial to improve our understanding of how magma is transferred and extruded at volcanoes. Dike pattern data from a few tens of active volcanic edifices show how dike propagation in a volcano is not a random process; rather, it depends from the following factors (listed in order of importance): the presence of relief, the shape of the edifice, the proximity to the surface, and regional tectonic control. Relief enhances the development of radial dikes, which may also cluster following volcano elongation or regional patterns. Dikes approaching the surface of volcanic edifices, regardless of their initial orientation, reorient to become radial (parallel to the maximum gravitational stress); in presence of scarps, dikes reorient subparallel to the scarp (perpendicular to the minimum gravitational stress). These relationships have been also observed or inferred during eruptions at Etna, Stromboli, Vesuvio (Italy), Erta Ale (Afar) and Faial (Azores). While numerical modelling of dike propagation remains challenging, analogue models of dike emplacement have been performed over a few decades, also supporting part of the above-described evidence. Analogue models have been mostly conducted injecting air or water within gelatine and, recently, injecting vegetable oil within sand. More sophisticated analogue modelling is foreseen for the future, using a more appropriate scaling, a larger sensitivity and providing a more quantitative approach in capturing relationships. More in general, future research on dikes should be devoted towards identifying dike propagation paths, dike arrest mechanisms, and likely locations of vent formation at specific volcanoes, to better aid hazards assessment.

  11. Active Learning: The Importance of Developing a Comprehensive Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Rodney; Palmer, Stuart; Hagel, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the validity of a widely used scale for measuring the extent to which higher education students employ active learning strategies. The scale is the active learning scale in the Australasian Survey of Student Engagement. This scale is based on the Active and Collaborative Learning scale of the National…

  12. The Importance of Purkinje Activation in Long Duration Ventricular Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Dosdall, Derek J.; Cheng, Kang‐An; Li, Li; Rogers, Jack M.; Ideker, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that maintain long duration ventricular fibrillation (LDVF) are unclear. The difference in distribution of the Purkinje system in dogs and pigs was explored to determine if Purkinje activation propagates to stimulate working myocardium (WM) during LDVF and WM pacing. Methods and Results In‐vivo extracellular recordings were made from 1044 intramural plunge and epicardial plaque electrodes in 6 pig and 6 dog hearts. Sinus activation propagated sequentially from the endocardium to the epicardium in dogs but not pigs. During epicardial pacing, activation propagated along the endocardium and traversed the LV wall almost parallel to the epicardium in dogs, but in pigs propagated away from the pacing site approximately perpendicular to the epicardium. After 1 minute of VF, activation rate near the endocardium was significantly faster than near the epicardium in dogs (P<0.01) but not pigs (P>0.05). From 2 to 10 minutes of LDVF, recordings exhibiting Purkinje activations were near the endocardium in dogs (P<0.01) but were scattered transmurally in pigs, and the WM activation rate in recordings in which Purkinje activations were present was significantly faster than the WM activation rate in recordings in which Purkinje activations were absent (P<0.01). In 10 isolated perfused dog hearts, the LV endocardium was exposed and 2 microelectrodes were inserted into Purkinje and adjacent myocardial cells. After 5 minutes of LDVF, mean Purkinje activation rate was significantly faster than mean WM activation rate (P<0.01). Conclusion These extracellular and intracellular findings about activation support the hypothesis that Purkinje activation propagates to stimulate WM during sinus rhythm, pacing, and LDVF. PMID:24584738

  13. 75 FR 50772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ] ACTION: 60-Day... concerning the: Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork...: Title: Importation Bond Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Numbers: 301 and 5297. Abstract:...

  14. Awareness and Habit: Important Factors in Physical Activity in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremers, Stef P. J.; Dijkman, Marieke A. M.; de Meij, Judith S. B.; Jurg, Merlin E.; Brug, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the extent to which Dutch children are aware of their own physical activity level, and to what extent children's physical activity is habitual. Special attention was paid to the potential moderating effect of "awareness" and "habit strength" on the association between psychosocial factors…

  15. 75 FR 68809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 50772) on August 17, 2010... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-day notice... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importation Bond Structure. This is...

  16. 78 FR 75576 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importation Bond Structure

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... Structure AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 60-day... Importation Bond Structure. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of... Structure. OMB Number: 1651-0050. Form Number: CBP Forms 301 and 5297. Abstract: Bonds are used to...

  17. The Importance of Engaging Pupils Actively in Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomela, Liisa; Juuti, Kalle; Ahtee, Maija

    2013-01-01

    Demonstrating is a traditional method in teaching science that can raise interest and encourage pupils to think about a topic. While demonstrating, the teacher can focus the pupils' attention on the relevant facts and introduce scientific principles and concepts. Through discussion and actively making observations and inferences, rather than…

  18. [Current views on the importance of physical activity].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Deibert, P; Berg, A; König, D; Dickhuth, H H

    2004-07-01

    To improve the individual health profile and to solve the growing overweight problem, a long-term change in the lifestyle to one which includes an energetically balanced combination of diet and activity is essential. Physical activity and the muscles involved are the primary means by which body composition and energy turnover are regulated. A state of imbalance has decisive consequences on the development of atherogenic and inflammatory risk factors. Additionally, the aging process is significantly influenced by the long-term retention or loss of muscle mass. The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Sportmedizin und Prävention (German Society for Sports Medicine and Prevention, a registered association) offers within the concept of a therapeutic lifestyle change, an educational program for overweight adults (M.O.B.I.L.I.S.). PMID:15526658

  19. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  20. The Importance of TA Training in an Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, W. H.

    2000-05-01

    We are now in our fourth year of teaching a 1000+ student per year introductory physics course in an active-learning format. Students meet for five hours per week in what we call discussion/lab sections. They work in groups of five, with twenty five students in each section. The discussion/lab is truly the heart of the course, rather than the once-a-week lecture section. During a typical two and one-half hour discussion/lab, students typically complete three activity cycles. Each cycle consists of individual and small group work in response to written prompts, sometimes involving the carrying out of a measurement or lab-type activity. Then each small group arrives at their own consensus, presents and/or defends their work to the entire class, which often leads to animated whole-class discussion. The majority of these sections are taught by first and second year graduate student teaching assistants. The role of the instructor in these sections is much more as facilitator than presenter of information and/or lab procedures, the role a typical beginning graduate student is familiar with. However, we have found that the vast majority of our TAs quickly become effective instructors in their new role, if they participate in our first-quarter instructor professional development and training program. Our program begins with an intense three day workshop just prior to the start of classes and then continues with an approximately five/hour per week component during the first quarter. In this talk I will emphasize the interrelated and connected nature of the training program with the active-learning teaching experience of the TAs, and why we believe it achieves the success it does. Data on how the beliefs and practices of the new graduate students change and evolve will be presented. We gratefully acknowledge the support of a FIPSE grant #P116B70958

  1. Cereulide and valinomycin, two important natural dodecadepsipeptides with ionophoretic activities.

    PubMed

    Kroteń, Magdalena Anna; Bartoszewicz, Marek; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    Cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus sensu stricto and valinomycin synthesized mainly by Streptomyces spp. are natural dodecadepsipeptide ionophores that act as potassium transporters. Moreover, they comprise three repetitions of similar tetrapeptide motifs synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthesis complexes. Resemblances in their structure find their reflections in the same way of action. The toxicity of valinomycin and cereulide is an effect of the disturbance of ionic equilibrium and transmembrane potential that may influence the whole organism and then cause fatal consequences. The vlm and ces operons encoding valinomycin and cereulide are both composed of two large, similar synthetase genes, one thioestrase gene and four other ORFs with unknown activities. In spite of the characterization of valinomycin and cereulide, genetic determinants encoding their biosynthesis have not yet been clarified. PMID:20568524

  2. A novel method to control hydrolytic degradation of nanocomposite biocompatible materials via imparting superhydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakbaz, Mobina; Hejazi, Iman; Seyfi, Javad; Jafari, Seyed-Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Davachi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Acceleration of hydrolytic degradation of biomedical materials is not always desirable. For instance, terpolymers based on L-lactide, glycolide and trimethylene carbonate exhibit very fast hydrolytic degradation due to their amorphous structure, hydrophilicity, and high water absorption capability. Therefore, an attempt was made in the current study to impede the hydrolytic degradation for these materials through imparting superhydrophobicity to their surfaces. The used terpolymer has been shown to have promising potential applications as bio-absorbable surgical sutures and other biomedical materials, and thus, its applicability could be further extended upon impeding its hydrolytic degradation. Moreover, a novel method including combined use of non-solvent and nanoparticles was utilized to achieve superhydrophobicity. Very diverse wettability results were obtained which were attributed to the obtained various morphologies according to scanning electron microscopy results. More importantly, a unique hierarchical morphology was found to be responsible for the observed water repellent behavior. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed co-existence of nanosilica particles and terpolymer chains on the surface's top layer. Finally, it was found that the superhydrophobic sample exhibited a significantly impeded hydrolytic degradation as compared with the hydrophilic pure terpolymer which was attributed to the formation of air pockets on the surface's top layer.

  3. Imparting Desired Attributes by Optimization in Structural Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Venter, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    Commonly available optimization methods typically produce a single optimal design as a Constrained minimum of a particular objective function. However, in engineering design practice it is quite often important to explore as much of the design space as possible with respect to many attributes to find out what behaviors are possible and not possible within the initially adopted design concept. The paper shows that the very simple method of the sum of objectives is useful for such exploration. By geometrical argument it is demonstrated that if every weighting coefficient is allowed to change its magnitude and its sign then the method returns a set of designs that are all feasible, diverse in their attributes, and include the Pareto and non-Pareto solutions, at least for convex cases. Numerical examples in the paper include a case of an aircraft wing structural box with thousands of degrees of freedom and constraints, and over 100 design variables, whose attributes are structural mass, volume, displacement, and frequency. The method is inherently suitable for parallel, coarse-grained implementation that enables exploration of the design space in the elapsed time of a single structural optimization.

  4. The active liquid Earth - importance of temporal and spatial variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    The Planet Earth is indeed liquid and active - 71 percent of its surface is water-covered and this water never rests. Thanks to the water cycle, our planet's water supply is constantly moving from one place to another and from one form to another. Only 2.5% of the water is freshwater and it exists in the air as water vapor; it hits the ground as rain and snow; it flows on the surface from higher to lower altitudes in rivers, lakes, and glaciers; and it flows in the ground in soil, aquifers, and in all living organisms until it reaches the sea. On its way over the Earth's crust, some returns quickly to vapor again, while some is trapped and exposed to many "fill and spill" situations for a long journey. The variability in the water balance is crucial for hydrological understanding and modelling. The water cycle may appear simple, but magnitudes and rates in fluxes are very different from one place to another, resulting from variable drivers such as solar energy, precipitation and gravity in co-evolution with geology, soil, vegetation and fauna. The historical evolution, the temporal fluxes and diversity in space continue to fascinate hydrological scientists. Specific physical processes may be well known, but their boundary conditions, interactions and rate often remain unknown at a specific site and are difficult to monitor in nature. This results in mysterious features where trends in drivers do not match runoff, like the Sahelian Paradox or discharge to the Arctic Ocean. Humans have always interfered with the water cycle and engineering is fundamental for water regulation and re-allocation. Some 80% of the river flow from the northern part of the Earth is affected by fragmentation of the river channels by dams. In water management, there is always a tradeoff between upstream and downstream activities, not only regarding total water quantities but also for temporal patterns and water quality aspects. Sharing a water resource can generate conflicts but geopolitical

  5. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, T.A.; Yetter, H.H.

    1985-01-30

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  6. Machine imparting complex rotary motion for lapping a spherical inner diameter

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, Thomas A.; Yetter, Harold H.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for imparting complex rotary motion is used to lap an inner spherical diameter surface of a workpiece. A lapping tool consists of a dome and rod mounted along the dome's vertical axis. The workpiece containing the lapping tool is held in a gimbal which uses power derived from a secondary takeoff means to impart rotary motion about a horizontal axis. The gimbal is rotated about a vertical axis by a take means while mounted at a radially outward position on a rotating arm.

  7. Education and Cultural Hybridity: What Cultural Values Should Be Imparted to Students in Kenya?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Mitsuko

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses what cultural values should be imparted to Kenyan students in the post-colonial era. Traditionalists had argued that an education based on Western culture, i.e. colonial culture, was the root cause of the present social and political problems, and therefore it should be de-emphasised. Such an argument, however, is criticised…

  8. Imparting Barely Visible Impact Damage to a Stitched Composite Large-Scale Pressure Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) is a concept that was developed by The Boeing Company to address the complex structural design aspects associated with a pressurized hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft configuration, which has been a focus of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project. The NASA-Boeing structural development for the HWB aircraft culminated in testing of the multi-bay box, which is an 80%-scale representation of the pressurized center-body section. This structure was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Combined Loads Test System facility. As part of this testing, barely visible impact damage was imparted to the interior and exterior of the test article to demonstrate compliance with a condition representative of the requirements for Category 1 damaged composite structure as defined by the Federal Aviation Regulations. Interior impacts were imparted using an existing spring-loaded impactor, while the exterior impacts were imparted using a newly designed, gravity-driven impactor. This paper describes the impacts to the test article, and the design of the gravitydriven guided-weight impactor. The guided-weight impactor proved to be a very reliable method to impart barely visible impact damage in locations which are not easily accessible for a traditional drop-weight impactor, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structures.

  9. Imparting small vorticity to a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batakis, Nikos A.

    1981-04-01

    We present and briefly discuss a Bianchi type-VIh empty spacetime. The field equations have been solved after being linearized with respect to a parameter which imparts vorticity to the model. The limit of zero vorticity is an already known solution.

  10. 76 FR 40749 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Records and Supporting Data: Importation, Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Agency Information Collection Activities: Records and Supporting Data: Importation, Receipt, Storage, and Disposition by Explosives Importers, Manufacturers..., Firearms and Explosives (ATF), will be submitting the following information collection request to...

  11. Imparting Catalyst-Control upon Classical Palladium-Catalyzed Alkenyl C–H Bond Functionalization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sigman, Matthew S.; Werner, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus The functional group transformations carried out by the palladium-catalyzed Wacker and Heck reactions are radically different, but they are both alkenyl C-H bond functionalization reactions that have found extensive use in organic synthesis. The synthetic community depends heavily on these important reactions, but selectivity issues arising from control by the substrate, rather than control by the catalyst, have prevented the realization of their full potential. Because of important similarities in the respective selectivity-determining nucleopalladation and β-hydride elimination steps of these processes, we posit that the mechanistic insight garnered through the development of one of these catalytic reactions may be applied to the other. In this Account, we detail our efforts to develop catalyst-controlled variants of both the Wacker oxidation and the Heck reaction to address synthetic limitations and provide mechanistic insight into the underlying organometallic processes of these reactions. In contrast to previous reports, we discovered that electrophilic palladium catalysts with non-coordinating counterions allowed for the use of a Lewis basic ligand to efficiently promote TBHP-mediated Wacker oxidation reactions of styrenes. This discovery led to the mechanistically guided development of a Wacker reaction catalyzed by a palladium complex with a bidentate ligand. This ligation may prohibit coordination of allylic heteroatoms, thereby allowing for the application of the Wacker oxidation to substrates that were poorly behaved under classical conditions. Likewise, we unexpectedly discovered that electrophilic Pd-σ-alkyl intermediates are capable of distinguishing between electronically inequivalent C–H bonds during β-hydride elimination. As a result, we have developed E-styrenyl selective oxidative Heck reactions of previously unsuccessful electronically non-biased alkene substrates using arylboronic acid derivatives. The mechanistic insight gained

  12. AtCYP710A1 gene-mediated stigmasterol production plays a role in imparting temperature stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Wang, Keri; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Stigmasterol and sitosterol, important sterols present in plants, are known to influence permeability and fluidity characteristics of the plasma membrane and other organellar membranes. We had previously demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Atcyp710A1 gene, which catalyzes conversion of sitosterol into stigmasterol, plays a role in plasma membrane permeability, thus influencing leakage of cellular nutrients and ions into apoplast. In this study, we investigated the role of this gene in imparting various abiotic stress tolerances in Arabidopsis. By analyzing Atcyp710a1 mutant and AtCYP710A1 overexpressor lines, we found that the AtCYP710A1 gene plays a role in imparting low and high temperature tolerance. PMID:23299431

  13. Imparting Motion to a Test Object Such as a Motor Vehicle in a Controlled Fashion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southward, Stephen C. (Inventor); Reubush, Chandler (Inventor); Pittman, Bryan (Inventor); Roehrig, Kurt (Inventor); Gerard, Doug (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus imparts motion to a test object such as a motor vehicle in a controlled fashion. A base has mounted on it a linear electromagnetic motor having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the base. A pneumatic cylinder and piston combination have a first end and a second end, the first end connected to the base so that the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination is generally parallel with the linear electromagnetic motor. The second ends of the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination being commonly linked to a mount for the test object. A control system for the linear electromagnetic motor and pneumatic cylinder and piston combination drives the pneumatic cylinder and piston combination to support a substantial static load of the test object and the linear electromagnetic motor to impart controlled motion to the test object.

  14. 77 FR 37696 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input... other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Importer ID... concerning the following information collection: Title: Importer ID Input Record. OMB Number: 1651-0064....

  15. 78 FR 67383 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Importer ID Input... other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the Importer ID... concerning the following information collection: Title: Importer ID Input Record. OMB Number: 1651-0064....

  16. Design and Use of a Guided Weight Impactor to Impart Barely Visible Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Przekop, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aircraft structure is required to demonstrate satisfaction of the FAR requirements for Category 1, such as barely visible impact damage (BVID). Typical aircraft structure is impacted using a dropped weight impactor, which can impart BVID to the top surface of the structure. A recent test of a multi-bay box (MBB) composite test article, that represents an 80% scale center section of a hybrid wing body aircraft, required impact to be in a direction other than vertical from above, but still in an direction that is normal to the surface. This requirement eliminated the use of the conventional dropped weight impactor. Therefore, a design study was undertaken to determine the most effective way to efficiently and reliably impact the MBB. The chosen design was a guided weight impactor that is gravity driven. This paper describes the design of the guided weight impactor, and presents the results of its use for imparting BVID to the MBB. The guided weight impactor was seen to be a very reliable method to impart BVID, while at the same time having the capability to be highly configurable for use on other aircraft structure that is impacted at a variety of impact energies and from a variety of directions.

  17. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D. T.; Decillo, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method.

  18. Drought Stress Acclimation Imparts Tolerance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Pseudomonas syringae in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Ramegowda, Venkategowda; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Kaundal, Amita; Udayakumar, Makarla; Mysore, Kirankumar S.

    2013-01-01

    Acclimation of plants with an abiotic stress can impart tolerance to some biotic stresses. Such a priming response has not been widely studied. In particular, little is known about enhanced defense capacity of drought stress acclimated plants to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Here we show that prior drought acclimation in Nicotiana benthamiana plants imparts tolerance to necrotrophic fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and also to hemi-biotrophic bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. S. sclerotiorum inoculation on N. benthamiana plants acclimated with drought stress lead to less disease-induced cell death compared to non-acclimated plants. Furthermore, inoculation of P. syringae pv. tabaci on N. benthamiana plants acclimated to moderate drought stress showed reduced disease symptoms. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in drought acclimated plants were highly correlated with disease resistance. Further, in planta growth of GFPuv expressing P. syringae pv. tabaci on plants pre-treated with methyl viologen showed complete inhibition of bacterial growth. Taken together, these experimental results suggested a role for ROS generated during drought acclimation in imparting tolerance against S. sclerotiorum and P. syringae pv. tabaci. We speculate that the generation of ROS during drought acclimation primed a defense response in plants that subsequently caused the tolerance against the pathogens tested. PMID:23644883

  19. Model for radial dependence of frequency distributions for energy imparted in nanometer volumes from HZE particles.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, F A; Nikjoo, H; Goodhead, D T

    2000-04-01

    This paper develops a deterministic model of frequency distributions for energy imparted (total energy deposition) in small volumes similar to DNA molecules from high-energy ions of interest for space radiation protection and cancer therapy. Frequency distributions for energy imparted are useful for considering radiation quality and for modeling biological damage produced by ionizing radiation. For high-energy ions, secondary electron (delta-ray) tracks originating from a primary ion track make dominant contributions to energy deposition events in small volumes. Our method uses the distribution of electrons produced about an ion's path and incorporates results from Monte Carlo simulation of electron tracks to predict frequency distributions for ions, including their dependence on radial distance. The contribution from primary ion events is treated using an impact parameter formalism of spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET) and energy-transfer straggling. We validate our model by comparing it directly to results from Monte Carlo simulations for proton and alpha-particle tracks. We show for the first time frequency distributions of energy imparted in DNA structures by several high-energy ions such as cosmic-ray iron ions. Our comparison with results from Monte Carlo simulations at low energies indicates the accuracy of the method. PMID:10761008

  20. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  1. Physical Activity in the Heat: Important Considerations to Keep Your Students Safe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roetert, E. Paul; Richardson, Cheryl L.; Bergeron, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Although July and August tend to be the warmest months of the year, the months leading up to summer as well as the months just following summer can also be quite warm or even very hot. In this article, the authors share some important information to help prepare physical educators for overseeing activities in the heat and, just as importantly, to…

  2. 77 FR 55486 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input Record

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Federal Register (76 FR 37696) on June 22, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Importer ID Input... accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Importer ID Input Record (CBP Form 5106). This is a...

  3. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  4. Axial force imparted by a conical radiofrequency magneto-plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C.; Takahashi, K.; Boswell, R. W.

    2012-03-12

    Direct thrust measurements of a low pressure ({approx}0.133 Pa) conical radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma source show a total axial force of about 5 mN for an effective rf power of 650 W and a maximum magnetic field of 0.018 T, of which a measured value of 2.5 mN is imparted by the magnetic nozzle. A simplified model of thrust including contributions from the electron pressure and from the magnetic field pressure is developed. The magnetic nozzle is modelled as a ''physical'' nozzle of increasing cross-sectional area.

  5. Imparting the unique properties of DNA into complex material architectures and functions

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Phyllis F.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W.; Nakatsuka, Matthew A.; Goodwin, Andrew P.; Cha, Jennifer N.

    2014-01-01

    While the remarkable chemical and biological properties of DNA have been known for decades, these properties have only been imparted into materials with unprecedented function much more recently. The inimitable ability of DNA to form programmable, complex assemblies through stable, specific, and reversible molecular recognition has allowed the creation of new materials through DNA’s ability to control a material’s architecture and properties. In this review we discuss recent progress in how DNA has brought unmatched function to materials, focusing specifically on new advances in delivery agents, devices, and sensors. PMID:25525408

  6. A galactomannan polysaccharide from Punica granatum imparts in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Manu M; Aravind, S R; George, Suraj K; Varghese, Sheeja; Sreelekha, T T

    2013-11-01

    Galactomannan polysaccharide (PSP001) was isolated from the fruit rind of Punica granatum and was previously reported to have excellent antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. The cytotoxicity of PSP001 was evaluated in the human cancer cell lines A375, HCT116, and HepG2 as well as the murine cancer cell lines DLA and EAC over a wide range of concentrations. PSP001 exhibited significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis with no in vivo toxicity up to a concentration of 2000 mg/kg body weight when assessed in BALB/c mice. The antitumor efficacy of PSP001 was tested in DLA and EAC murine ascites and EAC solid tumor mouse models. PSP001 alone and in combination with doxorubicin produced a significant reduction in the tumor burden and increased life span in both models compared to the controls. The results suggest that PSP001 has the potential to be developed as an anticancer agent either alone or as an adjuvant to chemotherapy. PMID:24053828

  7. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  8. Physical Activity: An Important Adaptative Mechanism for Body-Weight Control

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, Carmine; Gioia, Saverio; La Sala, Nicolina

    2012-01-01

    We review the current concepts about energy expenditure and evaluate the physical activity (PhA) in the context of this knowledge and the available literature. Regular PhA is correlated with low body weight and low body fat mass. The negative fat balance is probably secondary to this negative energy balance. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity, that is crucial for weight control, may be important in the physiology of weight change. An intriguing doubt that remains unresolved is whether changes in nutrient intake or body composition secondarily affect the spontaneous physical activity. PMID:24533208

  9. Physical activity: an important adaptative mechanism for body-weight control.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Carmine; Gioia, Saverio; La Sala, Nicolina

    2012-01-01

    We review the current concepts about energy expenditure and evaluate the physical activity (PhA) in the context of this knowledge and the available literature. Regular PhA is correlated with low body weight and low body fat mass. The negative fat balance is probably secondary to this negative energy balance. Nonexercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) and physical activity, that is crucial for weight control, may be important in the physiology of weight change. An intriguing doubt that remains unresolved is whether changes in nutrient intake or body composition secondarily affect the spontaneous physical activity. PMID:24533208

  10. III. The importance of physical activity and aerobic fitness for cognitive control and memory in children.

    PubMed

    Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Hillman, Charles H; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F

    2014-12-01

    In this chapter, we review literature that examines the association among physical activity, aerobic fitness, cognition, and the brain in elementary school children (ages 7-10 years). Specifically, physical activity and higher levels of aerobic fitness in children have been found to benefit brain structure, brain function, cognition, and school achievement. For example, higher fit children have larger brain volumes in the basal ganglia and hippocampus, which relate to superior performance on tasks of cognitive control and memory, respectively, when compared to their lower fit peers. Higher fit children also show superior brain function during tasks of cognitive control, better scores on tests of academic achievement, and higher performance on a real-world street crossing task, compared to lower fit and less active children. The cross-sectional findings are strengthened by a few randomized, controlled trials, which demonstrate that children randomly assigned to a physical activity intervention group show greater brain and cognitive benefits compared to a control group. Because these findings suggest that the developing brain is plastic and sensitive to lifestyle factors, we also discuss typical structural and functional brain maturation in children to provide context in which to interpret the effects of physical activity and aerobic fitness on the developing brain. This research is important because children are becoming increasingly sedentary, physically inactive, and unfit. An important goal of this review is to emphasize the importance of physical activity and aerobic fitness for the cognitive and brain health of today's youth. PMID:25387414

  11. How My Daughter Taught Me to Teach: The Importance of Active Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt-Gierut, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how her daughter, who was diagnosed with a profound hearing loss when she was a year old, taught her to teach, and demonstrates the importance of active communication. Teaching her daughter English as her second language has posed many challenges, but has also revealed successful strategies that the author has…

  12. Simple treatment of cotton textile to impart high water repellent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, N. A.; Zaretskaya, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We describe two methods to impart the water repellency for the surface of cotton fabric, using a commercially available and a laboratory synthesized fluoroalkylsiloxanes. To characterize the wettability and the durability of water repellent properties of hydrophobic coating produced, we have studied the advancing water contact angles, rolling angles and the evolution of water contact angle in time during a continuous contact of the surface with the water drop. The quality of the coatings was also assessed after the washing procedure. The analysis of the wettability of hydrophobized fabrics indicated that a better effect, leading to the superhydrophobic state of the surface, was observed when the surface relief of the fabric with the coating is determined by not only the structure and braiding of the fabric, but also the additional elements of texture created by the aggregates of molecules of hydrophobic agent.

  13. The importance of work or productive activity in life care planning and case management

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Christine; Riddick-Grisham, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract INTRODUCTION: The importance of work or productive activity for the well-being, community integration, and quality of life of people living with disabilities is addressed, with implications for life care planning and case management. BACKGROUND: The role of work or productive activity in our society, and consequences of deprivation if rehabilitation services do not address vocational effects of disabilities, is explored. A continuum of productivity options is introduced; types of vocational rehabilitation assessment processes and interventions are described. PURPOSE: The role of vocational rehabilitation services in life care planning and case management is discussed, focusing on quality of life for people living with disabilities. CONCLUSION: Rehabilitation and health care professionals should understand the importance of work or other productive activity, and support the development of appropriate plans to address those needs among people who have disabilities. PMID:26409330

  14. The importance of challenge for the enjoyment of intrinsically motivated, goal-directed activities.

    PubMed

    Abuhamdeh, Sami; Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly

    2012-03-01

    Although early interview-based analyses of the enjoyment of intrinsically motivated, goal-directed activities (e.g., chess, rock climbing, art making) suggested the importance of relatively difficult, "optimal" challenges, subsequent findings derived from a wider range of activities have not provided consistent support for this proposition. Two studies were conducted to clarify the relation between challenge and enjoyment. Study 1 focused on a single activity-Internet chess. The importance of challenge was evident at the subjective level (perceived challenge strongly predicted enjoyment) as well as the objective level (games against superior opponents were more enjoyable than games against inferior opponents, and close games were more enjoyable than blowouts). In Study 2, the experience sampling method was used to examine the enjoyment of challenge across a wide range of everyday activities. Activity motivation (intrinsically motivated, non-intrinsically motivated) and activity type (goal directed, non-goal directed) moderated the relation. Implications for theories of intrinsic motivation are discussed. PMID:22067510

  15. Importance of Endosomal Cathelicidin Degradation To Enhance DNA-Induced Chicken Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Bikker, Floris; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2015-10-15

    Cathelicidins are essential in the protection against invading pathogens through both their direct antimicrobial activity and their immunomodulatory functions. Although cathelicidins are known to modulate activation by several TLR ligands, little is known about their influence on DNA-induced macrophage activation. In this study, we explored the effects of cathelicidins on DNA-induced activation of chicken macrophages and elucidated the intracellular processes underlying these effects. Our results show that chicken cathelicidin (CATH)-2 strongly enhances DNA-induced activation of both chicken and mammalian macrophages because of enhanced endocytosis of DNA-CATH-2 complexes. After endocytosis, DNA is liberated from the complex because of proteolytic breakdown of CATH-2, after which TLR21 is activated. This leads to increased cytokine expression and NO production. Through the interaction with DNA, CATH-2 can play an important role in modulating the immune response at sites of infection. These observations underline the importance of cathelicidins in sensing bacterial products and regulating immune responses. PMID:26378074

  16. Peroxisomal Import Reduces the Proapoptotic Activity of Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP2

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Katharina; Keil, Marina; Altendorf, Sabrina; Waithe, Dominic; Eggeling, Christian; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) regulates multiple cellular pathways, including cell proliferation and apoptosis. As a result of alternative splicing four USP2 isoenzymes are expressed in human cells of which all contain a weak peroxisome targeting signal of type 1 (PTS1) at their C-termini. Here, we systematically analyzed apoptotic effects induced by overexpression and intracellular localization for each isoform. All isoforms exhibit proapoptotic activity and are post-translationally imported into the matrix of peroxisomes in a PEX5-dependent manner. However, a significant fraction of the USP2 pool resides in the cytosol due to a weaker PTS1 and thus low affinity to the PTS receptor PEX5. Blocking of peroxisomal import did not interfere with the proapoptotic activity of USP2, suggesting that the enzyme performs its critical function outside of this compartment. Instead, increase of the efficiency of USP2 import into peroxisomes either by optimization of its peroxisomal targeting signal or by overexpression of the PTS1 receptor did result in a reduction of the apoptotic rate of transfected cells. Our studies suggest that peroxisomal import of USP2 provides additional control over the proapoptotic activity of cytosolic USP2 by spatial separation of the deubiquitinating enzymes from their interaction partners in the cytosol and nucleus. PMID:26484888

  17. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  18. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  19. The importance of domain closure for the auto-activation of ERK2

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Daniel; Oashi, Taiji; Burkhard, Kimberly; Lucius, Sarah; Samadani, Ramin; Zhang, Jun; Shapiro, Paul; MacKerell, Alexander D.; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and 2 (ERK1/2) play a critical role in regulating cell division and have been implicated in cancer. In addition to activation by the MAPK/ERK kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2), certain mutants of ERK2 can be activated by auto-phosphorylation. To identify the mechanism of auto-activation, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of ERK1/2 in various stages of activation as well as the constitutively active Q103A, I84A, L73P and R65S ERK2 mutants. Our simulations indicate the importance of domain closure for auto-activation and activity regulation, with that event occurring prior to folding of the activation lip and of loop L16. Results indicate that the second phosphorylation event to T183 disrupts hydrogen bonding involving D334 thereby allowing the kinase to lock into the active conformation. Based on the simulations, three predictions were made: G83A was suggested to impede activation, K162M was suggested to perturb the interface between the N and C-domain leading to activation, and Q64C was hypothesized to stop folding of loop L16 thereby perturbing the homodimerization interface. Functional analysis of the mutants validated the predictions concerning the G83A and Q64C mutants. The K162M mutant did not autoactivate as predicted however, which may be due to the location of the residue on the protein surface near the ED substrate docking domain. PMID:21842857

  20. Importance of aspartate-70 in organophosphate inhibition, oxime re-activation and aging of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Masson, P; Froment, M T; Bartels, C F; Lockridge, O

    1997-01-01

    Asp-70 is the defining amino acid in the peripheral anionic site of human butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), whereas acetylcholinesterase has several additional amino acids, the most important one being Trp-277 (Trp-279 in Torpedo AChE). We studied mutants D70G, D70K and A277W to evaluate the role of Asp-70 and Trp-277 in reactions with organophosphates. We found that Asp-70 was important for binding positively charged echothiophate, but not neutral paraoxon and iso-OMPA. Asp-70 was also important for binding of positively charged pralidoxime (2-PAM) and for activation of re-activation by excess 2-PAM. Excess 2-PAM had an effect similar to substrate activation, suggesting the binding of 2 mol of 2-PAM to wild-type but not to the D70G mutant. A surprising result was that Asp-70 was important for irreversible aging, the D70G mutant having a 3- and 8-fold lower rate of aging for paraoxon-inhibited and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate-inhibited BuChE. Mutants of Asp-70 had the same rate constants for phosphorylation and re-activation by 2-PAM as wild-type. The A277W mutant behaved like wild-type in all assays. Our results predict that people with the atypical (D70G) variant of BuChE will be more sensitive to the toxic effects of echothiophate, but will be equally sensitive to paraoxon and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate. People with the D70G mutation will be resistant to re-activation of their inhibited BuChE by 2-PAM, but this will be offset by the lower rate of irreversible aging of inhibited BuChE, allowing some regeneration by spontaneous hydrolysis. PMID:9224629

  1. Radiation-absorbed doses and energy imparted from panoramic tomography, cephalometric radiography, and occlusal film radiography in children

    SciTech Connect

    Bankvall, G.; Hakansson, H.A.

    1982-05-01

    The absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examinations of children, using panoramic tomography (PTG), cephalometric radiography (CPR), and maxillary frontal occlusal overview (FOO), were examined. The absorbed dose at various sites of the head were measured with TL dosimeters in a phantom and in patients. The energy imparted was calculated from measurements of areal exposure using a planparallel ionization chamber. The maximum absorbed doses for panoramic tomography were located around the lateral rotation center, for cephalometric radiography in the left (tube side) parotid region, and for frontal occlusal radiography in the nose. The absorbed doses in the eyes, thyroid gland, and skin are discussed and compared with previous reports and, for the most part, are found to be in agreement. The mean energy imparted from all three examination methods is 5 mJ with about 57 percent from panoramic, 33 percent from cephalometric, and 10 percent from frontal occlusal examinations. The energy imparted from cephalometric radiography can be reduced to about 10 percent with the use of an improved examination technique, leaving panoramic tomography responsible for contributing about 80 percent of the total energy imparted.

  2. Esterase in imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): activity, kinetics and variation.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Rashid, T; Feng, G

    2014-01-01

    Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri are two closely related invasive ants native to South America. Despite their similarity in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a more successful invasive species. Toxic tolerance has been found to be important to the success of some invasive species. Esterases play a crucial role in toxic tolerance of insects. Hence, we hypothesized that the more invasive S. invicta would have a higher esterase activity than S. richteri. Esterase activities were measured for workers and male and female alates of both ant species using α-naphthyl acetate and β-naphthyl acetate as substrates. Esterase activities in S. invicta were always significantly higher than those in S. richteri supporting our hypothesis. In S. invicta, male alates had the highest esterase activities followed by workers then female alates for both substrates. In S. richetri, for α-naphthyl acetate, male alates had the highest activity followed by female alates then workers, while for β-naphthyl acetate, female alates had the highest activity followed by male alates then workers. For workers, S. richteri showed significantly higher levels of variation about the mean esterase activity than S. invicta. However, S. invicta showed significantly higher levels of variation in both female and male alates. PMID:25408118

  3. RNA Helicase Important for Listeria monocytogenes Hemolytic Activity and Virulence Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Netterling, Sakura; Bäreclev, Caroline; Vaitkevicius, Karolis

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases have been shown to be important for the function of RNA molecules at several levels, although their putative involvement in microbial pathogenesis has remained elusive. We have previously shown that Listeria monocytogenes DExD-box RNA helicases are important for bacterial growth, motility, ribosomal maturation, and rRNA processing. We assessed the importance of the RNA helicase Lmo0866 (here named CshA) for expression of virulence traits. We observed a reduction in hemolytic activity in a strain lacking CshA compared to the wild type. This phenomenon was less evident in strains lacking other RNA helicases. The reduced hemolysis was accompanied by lower expression of major listerial virulence factors in the ΔcshA strain, mainly listeriolysin O, but also to some degree the actin polymerizing factor ActA. Reduced expression of these virulence factors in the strain lacking CshA did not, however, correlate with a decreased level of the virulence regulator PrfA. When combining the ΔcshA knockout with a mutation creating a constitutively active PrfA protein (PrfA*), the effect of the ΔcshA knockout on LLO expression was negated. These data suggest a role for the RNA helicase CshA in posttranslational activation of PrfA. Surprisingly, although the expression of several virulence factors was reduced, the ΔcshA strain did not demonstrate any reduced ability to infect nonphagocytic cells compared to the wild-type strain. PMID:26483402

  4. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas.

    PubMed

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  5. The Importance of Landscape Elements for Bat Activity and Species Richness in Agricultural Areas

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Olga; Treitler, Julia T.; Tschapka, Marco; Knörnschild, Mirjam; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity is regarded as a key factor for maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function in production landscapes. We investigated whether grassland sites at close vicinity to forested areas are more frequently used by bats. Considering that bats are important consumers of herbivorous insects, including agricultural pest, this is important for sustainable land management. Bat activity and species richness were assessed using repeated monitoring from May to September in 2010 with acoustic monitoring surveys on 50 grassland sites in the Biosphere Reserve Schorfheide-Chorin (North-East Germany). Using spatial analysis (GIS), we measured the closest distance of each grassland site to potentially connecting landscape elements (e.g., trees, linear vegetation, groves, running and standing water). In addition, we assessed the distance to and the percent land cover of forest remnants and urban areas in a 200 m buffer around the recording sites to address differences in the local landscape setting. Species richness and bat activity increased significantly with higher forest land cover in the 200 m buffer and at smaller distance to forested areas. Moreover, species richness increased in proximity to tree groves. Larger amount of forest land cover and smaller distance to forest also resulted in a higher activity of bats on grassland sites in the beginning of the year during May, June and July. Landscape elements near grassland sites also influenced species composition of bats and species richness of functional groups (open, edge and narrow space foragers). Our results highlight the importance of forested areas, and suggest that agricultural grasslands that are closer to forest remnants might be better buffered against outbreaks of agricultural pest insects due to higher species richness and higher bat activity. Furthermore, our data reveals that even for highly mobile species such as bats, a very dense network of connecting elements within the landscape is

  6. The relative importance of climatic, environmental, and anthropogenic factors on fire activity in Africa using the MODIS active fire product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Eckmann, T. C.; Still, C. J.

    2006-12-01

    Wildland fires are local-scale phenomena that have global-scale impacts due to emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols. Fires are also thought to fundamentally influence ecosystem structure and function, particularly in grasslands and savannas. Satellite observations of fire events facilitate studies of the spatial distribution and frequency of fire activity, even on continental scales, and yet few studies have explored in detail the controls on such fire events. In a preliminary effort to contribute to these broad scientific issues, we integrate several sources of satellite and other spatially explicit datasets to investigate the relative importance of climate and ecosystem controls on fire activity in woody- and herbaceous-dominated biomes. Specifically, for a single year, we analyze fire occurrence in Africa--as detected by the MODIS active fire product--as a function of latitude, time of year, land-cover type, vegetation growth form, climate, and percentage C4 vegetation cover. Additionally, we integrate satellite-observed lightning activity and a spatially explicit dataset of human population density to categorize fire regimes as either human dominated (i.e., majority of ignitions are related to anthropogenic activity) or 'natural' fire ecosystems (i.e., majority of ignitions are related to lightning activity). This work will be the basis of future modeling efforts to assess the relationships among climate, fire activity, and vegetation structure, particularly in C4 grass-dominated biomes, which are thought to be dependent on regular fires for their maintenance and growth.

  7. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  8. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  9. Activity of compound G2 isolated from alfalfa roots against medically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Polacheck, I; Zehavi, U; Naim, M; Levy, M; Evron, R

    1986-01-01

    An antimycotic agent was isolated from roots of alfalfa and further purified to yield a nonhemolytic, homogeneous compound (G2). This compound contained considerable activity against 10 medically important yeasts. MICs obtained by both agar and broth dilution methods ranged from 3 to 15 micrograms/ml. Compound G2 was fungicidal at a relatively low concentration for nine different species of yeasts tested (minimum fungicidal concentrations ranged between 6 and 24 micrograms/ml). The considerable stability of compound G2 and its strong inhibitory and fungicidal activity against a broad range of yeasts suggest that after further development it might be useful as an active agent in the treatment of mycotic infections. PMID:3767342

  10. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth. PMID:27285815

  11. Active transporters as enzymes: an energetic framework applied to major facilitator superfamily and ABC importer systems.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Brian H

    2015-04-15

    Active membrane transporters are dynamic molecular machines that catalyse transport across a membrane by coupling solute movement to a source of energy such as ATP or a secondary ion gradient. A central question for many active transporters concerns the mechanism by which transport is coupled to a source of energy. The transport process and associated energetic coupling involve conformational changes in the transporter. For efficient transport, the conformational changes must be tightly regulated and they must link energy use to movement of the substrate across the membrane. The present review discusses active transport using the well-established energetic framework for enzyme-mediated catalysis. In particular, membrane transport systems can be viewed as ensembles consisting of low-energy and high-energy conformations. The transport process involves binding interactions that selectively stabilize the higher energy conformations, and in this way promote conformational changes in the system that are coupled to decreases in free energy and substrate translocation. The major facilitator superfamily of secondary active transporters is used to illustrate these ideas, which are then be expanded to primary active transport mediated by ABC (ATP-binding cassette) import systems, with a focus on the well-studied maltose transporter. PMID:25837849

  12. Mitochondrial import receptors Tom20 and Tom22 have chaperone-like activity.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masato; Terada, Kazutoyo; Mori, Masataka

    2004-03-12

    Mitochondrial preproteins are synthesized in the cytosol with N-terminal signal sequences (presequences) or internal targeting signals. Generally, preproteins with presequences are initially recognized by Tom20 (translocase of the outer membrane) and, subsequently, by Tom22, whereas hydrophobic preproteins with internal targeting signals are first recognized by Tom70. Recent studies suggest that Tom70 associates with molecular chaperones, thereby maintaining their substrate preproteins in an import-competent state. However, such a function has not been reported for other Tom component(s). Here, we investigated a role for Tom20 in preventing substrate preproteins from aggregating. In vitro binding assays showed that Tom20 binds to guanidinium chloride unfolded substrate proteins regardless of the presence or absence of presequences. This suggests that Tom20 functions as a receptor not only for presequences but also for mature portions exposed in unfolded preproteins. Aggregation suppression assays on citrate synthase showed that the cytosolic domain of Tom20 has a chaperone-like activity to prevent this protein from aggregating. This activity was inhibited by a presequence peptide, suggesting that the binding site of Tom20 for presequence is identical or close to the active site for the chaperone-like activity. The cytosolic domain of Tom22 also showed a similar activity for citrate synthase, whereas Tom70 did not. These results suggest that the cytosolic domains of Tom20 and Tom22 function to maintain their substrate preproteins unfolded and prevent them from aggregating on the mitochondrial surface. PMID:14699115

  13. Covalent layer-by-layer assembly of hyperbranched polymers on alginate microcapsulesto impart stability and permselectivity.

    PubMed

    Gattás-Asfura, Km; Valdes, M; Celik, E; Stabler, Cl

    2014-12-14

    The microencapsulation of cells has shown promise as a therapeutic vehicle for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. While alginate microcapsules provide an ideal cell encapsulation material, polycations coatings are commonly employed to enhance stability and impart permselectivity. In this study, functionalized hyperbranched alginate and dendrimer polymers were used to generate discreet nanoscale coatings onto alginate microbeads via covalent layer-by-layer assembly. The bioorthogonal Staudinger ligation scheme was used to chemoselectively crosslink azide functionalized hyperbranched alginate (alginate-hN3) to methyl-2-diphenylphosphino-terephthalate (MDT) linked PAMAM dendrimer (PAMAM-MDT). Covalent layer-by-layer deposition of PAMAM-MDT/alginate-hN3 coatings onto alginate microbeads resulted in highly stable coatings, even after the inner alginate gel was liquefied to form microcapsules. The permselectivity of the coated microcapsules could be manipulated via the charge density of the PAMAM, the number of layers deposited, and the length of the functional arms. The cytocompatibility of the resulting PAMAM-MDT/alginate-hN3 coating was evaluated using a beta cell line, with no significant detrimental response observed. The biocompatibility of the coatings in vivo was also found comparable to uncoated alginate beads. The remarkable stability and versatile nature of these coatings provides an appealing option for bioencapsulation and the release of therapeutic agents. PMID:25478165

  14. PEGylated ofloxacin nanoparticles render strong antibacterial activity against many clinically important human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Revina, Ann Mary; Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Sheeba, Caroline J; Franklin, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance against important drugs threatens their clinical utility. Fluoroquinones, one of the most important classes of contemporary antibiotics has also reported to suffer bacterial resistance. Since the general mechanism of bacterial resistance against fluoroquinone antibiotics (e.g. ofloxacin) consists of target mutations resulting in reduced membrane permeability and increased efflux by the bacteria, strategies that could increase bacterial uptake and reduce efflux of the drug would provide effective treatment. In the present study, we have compared the efficiencies of ofloxacin delivered in the form of free drug (OFX) and as nanoparticles on bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity. Although both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-mPEG-PLGA) nanoformulations presented improved bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, OFX-mPEG-PLGA showed significantly higher bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity compared to OFX-PLGA. We have also found that mPEG-PLGA nanoencapsulation could significantly inhibit Bacillus subtilis resistance development against OFX. PMID:26005932

  15. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  16. Ovarian hormones, but not fluoxetine, impart resilience within a chronic unpredictable stress model in middle-aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Rand; Wainwright, Steven R; Chaiton, Jessica A; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Galea, Liisa A M

    2016-08-01

    Depression is more prevalent in women than in men, and women are at a heightened risk for depression during the postpartum and perimenopause. There is also evidence to suggest that the ovarian hormone milieu may dictate antidepressant efficacy. Thus, it is important to investigate the role of ovarian hormones in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanisms that may underlie antidepressant efficacy. In the present study, we used 10-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats to examine the effects of long-term ovarian hormone deprivation on the development of depressive-like endophenotypes after chronic stress, and on antidepressant efficacy. Four months following ovariectomy (OVX) or sham surgery, all rats were subjected to 6 weeks of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). During the last 3 weeks of CUS, rats received daily injections of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or vehicle. All rats were assessed on measures of anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) negative feedback inhibition, and on markers of neurogenesis and microglia in the dentate gyrus. Our findings demonstrate that long-term ovarian hormone deprivation increased anxiety and depressive-like behavior, as seen by increased immobility in the forced swim test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test, and decreased sucrose preference. Further, long-term OVX resulted in impaired HPA negative feedback inhibition, as seen in the dexamethasone suppression test. Fluoxetine treatment showed limited behavioral and neuroendocrine efficacy, however it reduced microglial (Iba-1) expression, and increased cell proliferation, neurogenesis (via cell survival), and the expression of the polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) in the dentate gyrus, although these effects varied by region (dorsal, ventral) and ovarian status. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that ovarian hormones may impart resilience against the behavioral and neuroendocrine

  17. Genome sequence of Wickerhamomyces anomalus DSM 6766 reveals genetic basis of biotechnologically important antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jessica; Rupp, Oliver; Trost, Eva; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Passoth, Volkmar; Goesmann, Alexander; Tauch, Andreas; Brinkrolf, Karina

    2012-05-01

    The ascomycetous yeast Wickerhamomyces anomalus (formerly Pichia anomala and Hansenula anomala) exhibits antimicrobial activities and flavoring features that are responsible for its frequent association with food, beverage and feed products. However, limited information on the genetic background of this yeast and its multiple capabilities are currently available. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of the neotype strain W. anomalus DSM 6766. On the basis of pyrosequencing, a de novo assembly of this strain resulted in a draft genome sequence with a total size of 25.47 Mbp. An automatic annotation using RAPYD generated 11 512 protein-coding sequences. This annotation provided the basis to analyse metabolic capabilities, phylogenetic relationships, as well as biotechnologically important features and yielded novel candidate genes of W. anomalus DSM 6766 coding for proteins participating in antimicrobial activities. PMID:22292503

  18. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Goodin

    2002-07-22

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  19. Activity and biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Mulla, M S; Su, T

    1999-06-01

    Botanical insecticides are relatively safe and degradable, and are readily available sources of biopesticides. The most prominent phytochemical pesticides in recent years are those derived from neem trees, which have been studied extensively in the fields of entomology and phytochemistry, and have uses for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The neem products have been obtained from several species of neem trees in the family Meliaceae. Six species in this family have been the subject of botanical pesticide research. They are Azadirachta indica A. Juss, Azadirachta excelsa Jack, Azadirachta siamens Valeton, Melia azedarach L., Melia toosendan Sieb. and Zucc., and Melia volkensii Gürke. The Meliaceae, especially A. indica (Indian neem tree), contains at least 35 biologically active principles. Azadirachtin is the predominant insecticidal active ingredient in the seed, leaves, and other parts of the neem tree. Azadirachtin and other compounds in neem products exhibit various modes of action against insects such as antifeedancy, growth regulation, fecundity suppression and sterilization, oviposition repellency or attractancy, changes in biological fitness, and blocking development of vector-borne pathogens. Some of these bioactivity parameters of neem products have been investigated at least in some species of insects of medical and veterinary importance, such as mosquitoes, flies, triatomines, cockroaches, fleas, lice, and others. Here we review, synthesize, and analyze published information on the activity, modes of action, and other biological effects of neem products against arthropods of medical and veterinary importance. The amount of information on the activity, use, and application of neem products for the control of disease vectors and human and animal pests is limited. Additional research is needed to determine the potential usefulness of neem products in vector control programs. PMID:10412110

  20. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  1. Importance of PIKKs in NF-κB activation by genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Sabatel, Hélène; Pirlot, Céline; Piette, Jacques; Habraken, Yvette

    2011-11-15

    Alteration of the genome integrity leads to the activation of a vast network of cellular responses named "DNA damage response". Three kinases from the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-like protein kinase family regulate this network; ATM and DNA-PK both activated by DNA double-strand breaks and ATR activated by replication blocks. "DNA damage response" pathway coordinates cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and the activation of transcription factors such as p53 and NF-κB. It controls senescence/apoptosis/survival of the damaged cells. Cell death or survival result from a tightly regulated balance between antagonist pro- and anti-apoptotic signals. NF-κB is a key transcription factor involved in immunity, inflammation and cell transformation. When activated by DNA double-strand breaks, NF-κB has most often a pro-survival effect and thereof interferes with chemotherapy treatments that often rely on DNA damage to induce tumor cell death (i.e. topoisomerase inhibitors and ionizing radiation). NF-κB is thus an important pharmaceutical target. Agents leading to replication stress induce a pro-apoptotic NF-κB. The molecular mechanisms initiated by DNA lesions leading to NF-κB nuclear translocation have been extensively studied these last years. In this review, we will focus on ATM, ATR and DNA-PK functions both in the IKKα/IKKβ/NEMO-dependent or -independent signaling pathways and on the regulation they can exercise at the promoter level of NF-κB regulated genes. PMID:21872579

  2. The Minimal Important Difference in Physical Activity in Patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Demeyer, Heleen; Burtin, Chris; Hornikx, Miek; Camillo, Carlos Augusto; Van Remoortel, Hans; Langer, Daniel; Janssens, Wim; Troosters, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in physical activity (PA) are difficult to interpret because no framework of minimal important difference (MID) exists. We aimed to determine the minimal important difference (MID) in physical activity (PA) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and to clinically validate this MID by evaluating its impact on time to first COPD-related hospitalization. Methods PA was objectively measured for one week in 74 patients before and after three months of rehabilitation (rehabilitation sample). In addition the intraclass correlation coefficient was measured in 30 patients (test-retest sample), by measuring PA for two consecutive weeks. Daily number of steps was chosen as outcome measurement. Different distribution and anchor based methods were chosen to calculate the MID. Time to first hospitalization due to an exacerbation was compared between patients exceeding the MID and those who did not. Results Calculation of the MID resulted in 599 (Standard Error of Measurement), 1029 (empirical rule effect size), 1072 (Cohen's effect size) and 1131 (0.5SD) steps.day-1. An anchor based estimation could not be obtained because of the lack of a sufficiently related anchor. The time to the first hospital admission was significantly different between patients exceeding the MID and patients who did not, using the Standard Error of Measurement as cutoff. Conclusions The MID after pulmonary rehabilitation lies between 600 and 1100 steps.day-1. The clinical importance of this change is supported by a reduced risk for hospital admission in those patients with more than 600 steps improvement. PMID:27124297

  3. Structural features important for the biological activity of the potassium channel blocking dendrotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Hollecker, M.; Marshall, D. L.; Harvey, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    1. Dendrotoxins from mamba snake venoms are small proteins that block neuronal K+ channels. In order to investigate structural features associated with their biological activity, partially folded versions of dendrotoxins I and K from black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) were prepared by selectively reducing one or more of their three S-S bonds. 2. The modified toxins were tested for ability to compete with 125I-labelled native toxin I to high affinity binding sites on rat brain synaptosomal membranes and for the ability to increase acetylcholine release in a neuromuscular preparation. 3. Binding affinity increased progressively as the toxins folded to the native conformation and the most biologically active of the modified species were those in which only the disulphide bond between residues 14 and 38 was not formed. These intermediates had native-like conformations as determined by circular dichroism but still had about 5-10 times lower affinity than native toxins. 4. Addition of negatively charged groups to block the free sulthydryls at positions 14 and 38 caused a further, marked loss of activity. 5. The results are consistent with the existence of two important regions in the dendrotoxin molecules. The region containing two of the disulphide bonds (around Cys5-Cys55 and Cys30-Cys51) and much of the secondary structure is essential for the binding affinity of the toxins, while the region around Cys14 and Cys38, equivalent to part of the antiprotease site of the homologous protease inhibitor from bovine pancreas (BPTI), plays an important role in the potency of dendrotoxins. PMID:7694758

  4. Structural features important for the biological activity of the potassium channel blocking dendrotoxins.

    PubMed

    Hollecker, M; Marshall, D L; Harvey, A L

    1993-10-01

    1. Dendrotoxins from mamba snake venoms are small proteins that block neuronal K+ channels. In order to investigate structural features associated with their biological activity, partially folded versions of dendrotoxins I and K from black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) were prepared by selectively reducing one or more of their three S-S bonds. 2. The modified toxins were tested for ability to compete with 125I-labelled native toxin I to high affinity binding sites on rat brain synaptosomal membranes and for the ability to increase acetylcholine release in a neuromuscular preparation. 3. Binding affinity increased progressively as the toxins folded to the native conformation and the most biologically active of the modified species were those in which only the disulphide bond between residues 14 and 38 was not formed. These intermediates had native-like conformations as determined by circular dichroism but still had about 5-10 times lower affinity than native toxins. 4. Addition of negatively charged groups to block the free sulthydryls at positions 14 and 38 caused a further, marked loss of activity. 5. The results are consistent with the existence of two important regions in the dendrotoxin molecules. The region containing two of the disulphide bonds (around Cys5-Cys55 and Cys30-Cys51) and much of the secondary structure is essential for the binding affinity of the toxins, while the region around Cys14 and Cys38, equivalent to part of the antiprotease site of the homologous protease inhibitor from bovine pancreas (BPTI), plays an important role in the potency of dendrotoxins. PMID:7694758

  5. Transglutaminase activity in the hematopoietic tissue of a crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus, importance in hemocyte homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xionghui; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Background Transglutaminases (TGases) form a group of enzymes that have many different substrates and among the most well known are fibrin for Factor XIIIa and the clotting protein in crustaceans. We also found that TGase is an abundant protein in the hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells of crayfish and hence we have studied the possible function of this enzyme in hematopoiesis. Results TGase is one of the most abundant proteins in the Hpt and its mRNA expression as well as enzyme activity is very high in the Hpt cells, lesser in the semi-granular hemocytes and very low in the granular cells. In cultured hematopoietic tissues, high activity was present in cells in the centre of the tissue, whereas cells migrating out of the tissue had very low TGase activity. RNAi experiments using dsRNA for TGase completely knocked down the transcript and as a result the cell morphology was changed and the cells started to spread intensely. If astakine, a cytokine directly involved in hematopoiesis, was added the cells started to spread and adopt a morphology similar to that observed after RNAi of TGase. Astakine had no effect on TGase expression, but after a prolonged incubation for one week with this invertebrate cytokine, TGase activity inside and outside the cells was completely lost. Thus it seems as if astakine addition to the Hpt cells and RNAi of TGase in the cell culture will lead to the same results, i.e. loss of TGase activity in the cells and they start to differentiate and spread. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that TGase is important for keeping the Hpt cells in an undifferentiated stage inside the hematopoietic tissue and if expression of TGase mRNA is blocked the cells start to differentiate and spread. This shows a new function for transglutaminase in preventing hematopoietic stem cells from starting to differentiate and migrate into the hemolymph, whereas their proliferation is unaffected. Astakine is also important for the hematopoiesis, since it

  6. The importance of perceived stress management skills for patients with prostate cancer in active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Yanez, Betina; Bustillo, Natalie E; Antoni, Michael H; Lechner, Suzanne C; Dahn, Jason; Kava, Bruce; Penedo, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about whether and how stress management skills may improve adjustment for men diagnosed with prostate cancer who opt for active surveillance. This study examined whether two types of perceived stress management skills, specifically the ability to relax and confidence in coping, moderated the relationship between prostate cancer (PC) concerns and psychological distress. Participants were 71 ethnically diverse men in active surveillance. Coping confidence moderated the relationship between PC concerns and intrusive thoughts (p < .01). At low levels of coping confidence, PC concerns was positively related to intrusive thoughts, β = .95, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, β = .19, p > .05. Coping confidence also moderated the relationship between PC treatment concerns (a subscale of PC concerns) and intrusive thoughts. At low levels of coping confidence, PC treatment concerns was positively associated with intrusive thoughts, β = .73, p < .001, but not when coping confidence was high, β = .20, p > .05. Findings underscore the importance of interventions aimed at improving coping in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:25234859

  7. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  8. Leishmania parasites possess a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase important for virulence

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowic, Mattie C.; Zhang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are intracellular protozoans capable of salvaging and remodeling lipids from the host. To understand the role of lipid metabolism in Leishmania virulence, it is necessary to characterize the enzymes involved in the uptake and turnover of phospholipids. This study focuses on a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2)/platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in L. major. In mammals, PAF-AH is a subgroup of PLA2 catalyzing the hydrolysis/inactivation of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent mediator of many leukocyte functions. By immunofluorescence microscopy, L. major PLA2/PAF-AH is predominantly localized in the ER. While wild type L. major parasites are able to hydrolyze PAF, this activity is completely absent in the PLA2/PAF-AH-null mutants. Meanwhile, deletion of PLA2/PAF-AH had no significant effect on the turnover of common glycerophospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol. PLA2/PAF-AH is not required for the growth of L. major parasites in culture, or the production of GPI-anchored virulence factors. Nonetheless, it does play a key role in the mammalian host as the PLA2/PAF-AH null mutants exhibit attenuated virulence in BALB/c mice. In conclusion, these data suggest that Leishmania parasites possess a functional PAF-AH and the degradation of PAF or PAF-like lipids is an important step in infection. PMID:22954769

  9. Identification of an important motif that controls the activity and specificity of sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yu, Chenzhao; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-07-01

    Efficient glucose-xylose co-utilization is critical for economical biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. To enable glucose-xylose co-utilization, a highly active xylose specific transporter without glucose inhibition is desirable. However, our understanding of the structure-activity/specificity relationship of sugar transporters in general is limited, which hinders our ability to engineer xylose-specific transporters. In this study, via homology modeling and analysis of hexose sugar transporter HXT14 mutants, we identified a highly conserved YYX(T/P) motif that plays an important role in controlling the activity and specificity of sugar transporters. We demonstrated that mutating the two tyrosine residues of the motif to phenylalanine, respectively, improved glucose transport capacity across several different sugar transporters. Furthermore, we illustrated that by engineering the fourth position in the YYX(T/P) motif, the sugar specificity of transporters was significantly altered or even reversed towards xylose. Finally, using the engineered sugar transporter, genuine glucose-xylose co-fermentation was achieved. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1460-1467. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724683

  10. Comparison of Antioxidant Activities of Hydrolysates of Domestic and Imported Skim Milk Powders Treated with Papain

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Han, Gi Sung; Ham, Jun Sang; Park, Beom-Young; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins have many potential sequences within their primary structure, each with a specific biological activity. In this study, we compared and investigated the bioactivities of hydrolysates of the domestic (A, B) and imported (C, D) skim milk powders generated using papain digestion. MALDI-TOF analysis revealed that all milk powder proteins were intact, indicating no autolysis. Electrophoretic analysis of hydrolysates showed papain treatment caused degradation of milk proteins into peptides of various size. The antioxidant activity of the hydrolysates, determined using 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and total phenolic contents (TPC) assays, increased with incubation times. In all skim milk powders, the antioxidant activities of hydrolysates were highest following 24 h papain treatment (TPC: A, 196.48 μM GE/L; B, 194.52 μM GE/L; C, 194.76 μM GE/L; D, 163.75 μM GE/L; ABTS: A, 75%; B, 72%; C, 72%; D, 57%). The number of peptide derived from skim milk powders, as determined by LC-MS/MS, was 308 for A, 283 for B, 208 for C, and 135 for D. Hydrolysate A had the highest antioxidant activity and the most potential antioxidant peptides amongst the four skim milk powder hydrolysates. A total of 4 β-lactoglobulin, 4 αs1-casein, and 56 β-casein peptide fragments were identified as potential antioxidant peptides in hydrolysate A by LC-MS/MS. These results suggest that domestic skim milk could have applications in various industries, i.e., in the development of functional foods. PMID:26761850

  11. Diet composition and feeding activity of larval spring-spawning herring: Importance of environmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arula, T.; Kotta, J.; Lankov, A.; Simm, M.; Põlme, S.

    2012-02-01

    Availability of suitable prey in sufficient quantities during the shift to exogenous feeding is an important factor determining survival and growth of larval fish. The question of what factors regulate prey consumption in larval fish has remained a focus of fisheries oceanography. In this paper feeding ecology of the larval spring-spawning herring Clupea harengus membras was studied in relation to selected environmental abiotic and biotic parameters in the shallow sheltered Pärnu Bay during the 1970s and 2000s. The copepod Eurytemora affinis was the strongly dominating dietary item during all the years while other prey items were ingested only sporadically. Feeding activity of herring larvae was governed by different environmental variables and the relationships varied amongst the size classes of herring larvae. The studied abiotic (i.e., wind speed, water temperature, water transparency) or biotic variables (i.e., density of copepod nauplii, copepodite stages I-V and adults of E. affinis, mean developmental stage of copepods and density of fish larvae) had no significant effects on the feeding activity of small larvae. The feeding activity of medium larvae was only affected by water transparency and that of large larvae by a combination of water temperature, wind speed and the structure of local copepod community, respectively. On the other hand, the diet composition of all herring larvae was best described by the density of copepod nauplii. In addition, the density of fish larvae improved the model of small larvae and the density of adult copepods that of medium larvae, respectively. Time was significant for the feeding activity of medium larvae indicating some unexplained variability that was not taken into account by the studied abiotic and biotic variables.

  12. Comparison of Antioxidant Activities of Hydrolysates of Domestic and Imported Skim Milk Powders Treated with Papain.

    PubMed

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Han, Gi Sung; Ham, Jun Sang; Park, Beom-Young; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Milk proteins have many potential sequences within their primary structure, each with a specific biological activity. In this study, we compared and investigated the bioactivities of hydrolysates of the domestic (A, B) and imported (C, D) skim milk powders generated using papain digestion. MALDI-TOF analysis revealed that all milk powder proteins were intact, indicating no autolysis. Electrophoretic analysis of hydrolysates showed papain treatment caused degradation of milk proteins into peptides of various size. The antioxidant activity of the hydrolysates, determined using 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and total phenolic contents (TPC) assays, increased with incubation times. In all skim milk powders, the antioxidant activities of hydrolysates were highest following 24 h papain treatment (TPC: A, 196.48 μM GE/L; B, 194.52 μM GE/L; C, 194.76 μM GE/L; D, 163.75 μM GE/L; ABTS: A, 75%; B, 72%; C, 72%; D, 57%). The number of peptide derived from skim milk powders, as determined by LC-MS/MS, was 308 for A, 283 for B, 208 for C, and 135 for D. Hydrolysate A had the highest antioxidant activity and the most potential antioxidant peptides amongst the four skim milk powder hydrolysates. A total of 4 β-lactoglobulin, 4 αs1-casein, and 56 β-casein peptide fragments were identified as potential antioxidant peptides in hydrolysate A by LC-MS/MS. These results suggest that domestic skim milk could have applications in various industries, i.e., in the development of functional foods. PMID:26761850

  13. Hemodynamic importance of preserving the normal sequence of ventricular activation in permanent cardiac pacing.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, C; Gras, D; Le Helloco, A; Nicol, L; Mabo, P; Daubert, C

    1995-06-01

    Pacing the right ventricle in the apex profoundly modifies the sequence of activation and thus the sequence of contraction and relaxation of the left ventricle. To evaluate the relative importance of preserving normal ventricular activation sequence and optimal atrioventricular (AV) synchrony in permanent pacing, we compared the effects of three pacing modes: AAI, preserving both normal AV synchrony and normal activation sequence; DDD, with complete ventricular capture that preserves only AV synchrony; and VVI, disrupting both, at rest and during exercise. Hemodynamic and radionuclide studies were performed in 11 patients who had normal intrinsic conduction and who were implanted on a long-term basis with a DDDR pacemaker for isolated sinus node dysfunction. AAI versus DDD and VVI significantly increased cardiac output at rest (6.6 +/- 1.3 L/min vs 6 +/- 0.9 L/min vs 5 +/- 1 L/min; p < 0.01) and during exercise (13.5 +/- 2 L/min vs 12.1 +/- 2.2 L/min vs 14.4 +/- 2.1 L/min; p < 0.01). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was lowest with AAI (15.4 +/- 4.5 mm Hg), with an average reduction of 17% compared with DDD (19.6 +/- 5 mm Hg; p < 0.01) and of 30% compared with VVI (25.8 +/- 7 mm Hg; p < 0.01) during exercise. Identical benefits were observed for all other hemodynamic parameters: right atrial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, left ventricular (LV) stroke work index, and systemic vascular resistances. LV ejection fraction was significantly higher in AAI than in DDD at rest (61% vs 58%, respectively; p < 0.05) and during exercise (65% vs 60%, respectively; p < 0.05). This improvement in LV systolic function resulted principally from the increase in septal ejection fraction. LV filling also was improved in AAI as demonstrated by a significant increase in peak filling rate at rest and during exercise. These data show the importance of preserving, whenever possible, not only normal AV synchrony but also normal ventricular activation sequence in permanent cardiac

  14. Importance of neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis in relatively dry, low-porosity rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.; Philbin, P.W.; Boynton, G.R.; Wager, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of variations in the neutron energy distribution in borehole activation analysis, capture gamma-ray measurements were made in relatively dry, low-porosity gabbro of the Duluth Complex. Although sections of over a meter of solid rock were encountered in the borehole, there was significant fracturing with interstitial water leading to a substantial variation of water with depth in the borehole. The linear-correlation coefficients calculated for the peak intensities of several elements compared to the chemical core analyses were generally poor throughout the depth investigated. The data suggest and arguments are given which indicate that the variation of the thermal-to-intermediate-to-fast neutron flux density as a function of borehole depth is a serious source of error and is a major cause of the changes observed in the capture gamma-ray peak intensities. These variations in neutron energy may also cause a shift in the observed capture gamma-ray energy.

  15. Hydrothermal activity at slow-spreading ridges: variability and importance of magmatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Javier

    2016-04-01

    less studied, similar hydrothermal systems are found elsewhere associated to other central volcanoes along the ridge axis (e.g., Menez Gwenn at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Soria Mornia or Troll Wall at the Arctic Ridges). Long-lived hydrothermal activity plays an important role in controlling the thermal structure of the lithosphere and its accretion at and near-axis, and also determining the distribution and biogeography of vent communities. Along slow-spreading segments, long-lived hydrothermal activity can be provided both by volcanic systems (e.g., Lucky Strike) and tectonic systems (oceanic detachment faults). While magmatic and hydrothermal activity is relatively well understood now in volcanic systems (e.g., Lucky Strike), tectonic systems (oceanic detachment faults) require further integrated studies to constrain the links between long-lived localization of deformation along oceanic detachment faults, hydrothermal activity, and origin and nature of off-axis heat sources animating hydrothermal circulation.

  16. Mineralization of naphtenic acids with thermally-activated persulfate: The important role of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiyan; Pliego, Gema; Zazo, Juan A; Casas, Jose A; Rodriguez, Juan J

    2016-11-15

    This study reports on the mineralization of model naphtenic acids (NAs) in aqueous solution by catalyst-free thermally-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation. These species are found to be pollutants in oil sands process-affected waters. The NAs tested include saturated-ring (cyclohexanecarboxylic and cyclohexanebutyric acids) and aromatic (2-naphthoic and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-naphthoic acids) structures, at 50mgL(-1)starting concentration. The effect of PS dose within a wide range (10-100% of the theoretical stoichiometric) and working temperature (40-97°C) was investigated. At 80°C and intitial pH=8 complete mineralization of the four NAs was achieved with 40-60% of the stoichiometric PS dose. This is explained because of the important contribution of oxygen, which was experimentally verified and was found to be more effective toward the NAs with a single cyclohexane ring than for the bicyclic aromatic-ring-bearing ones. The effect of chloride and bicarbonate was also checked. The former showed negative effect on the degradation rate of NAs whereas it was negligible or even positive for bicarbonate. The rate of mineralization was well described by simple pseudo-first order kinetics with values of the rate constants normalized to the PS dose within the range of 0.062-0.099h(-1). Apparent activation energy values between 93.7-105.3kJmol(-1) were obtained. PMID:27442986

  17. Determining importance and grading of items and activities for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeKlever, R.; Verna, B.

    1993-12-31

    Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN), in support of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project, has been responsible for the Title 2 designs of the initial structures, systems, and components for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and the creation of the design output documents for the Surface-Based Testing (SBT) programs. The ESF and SBT programs are major scientific contributors to the overall site characterization program which will determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain to contain a proposed High Level Nuclear Waste (HLNW) repository. Accurate, traceable and objective characterization and testing documentation that is germane to the protection of public health and safety, and the environment, and that satisfies all the requirements of 10 CFR Part 60(1), must be established, evaluated and accepted. To assure that these requirements are satisfied, specific design functions and products, including items and activities depicted within respective design output documents, are subjected to the requirements of an NRC and DOE-approved Quality Assurance (QA) program. An evaluation (classification) is applied to these items and activities to determine their importance to radiological safety (ITS) and waste isolation (ITWI). Subsequently, QA program controls are selected (grading) for the items and activities. RSN has developed a DOE-approved classification process that is based on probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and that uses accident/impact scenarios. Results from respective performance assessment and test interference evaluations are also integrated into the classification analyses for various items. The methodology and results of the RSN classification and grading processes, presented herein, relative to ESF and SBT design products, demonstrates a solid, defensible methodological basis for classification and grading.

  18. Resistance to Degradation and Cellular Distribution are Important Features for the Antitumor Activity of Gomesin

    PubMed Central

    Buri, Marcus V.; Domingues, Tatiana M.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J.; Casaes-Rodrigues, Rafael L.; Rodrigues, Elaine Guadelupe; Miranda, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Many reports have shown that antimicrobial peptides exhibit anticancer abilities. Gomesin (Gm) exhibits potent cytotoxic activity against cancer cells by a membrane pore formation induced after well-orchestrated intracellular mechanisms. In this report, the replacements of the Cys by Ser or Thr, and the use D-amino acids in the Gm structure were done to investigate the importance of the resistance to degradation of the molecule with its cytotoxicity. [Thr2,6,11,15]-Gm, and [Ser2,6,11,15]-Gm exhibits low cytotoxicity, and low resistance to degradation, and after 24 h are present in localized area near to the membrane. Conversely, the use of D-amino acids in the analogue [D-Thr2,6,11,15]-D-Gm confers resistance to degradation, increases its potency, and maintained this peptide spread in the cytosol similarly to what happens with Gm. Replacements of Cys by Thr and Gln by L- or D-Pro ([D-Thr2,6,11,15, Pro9]-D-Gm, and [Thr2,6,11,15, D-Pro9]-Gm), which induced a similar β-hairpin conformation, also increase their resistance to degradation, and cytotoxicity, but after 24 h they are not present spread in the cytosol, exhibiting lower cytotoxicity in comparison to Gm. Additionally, chloroquine, a lysosomal enzyme inhibitor potentiated the effect of the peptides. Furthermore, the binding and internalization of peptides was determined, but a direct correlation among these factors was not observed. However, cholesterol ablation, which increase fluidity of cellular membrane, also increase cytotoxicity and internalization of peptides. β-hairpin spatial conformation, and intracellular localization/target, and the capability of entry are important properties of gomesin cytotoxicity. PMID:24312251

  19. Test-Retest Reliability and descriptive analyses of the Modified Important People and Activities (MIPA) Interview

    PubMed Central

    Zywiak, William H.; Stout, Robert L.; Braciszewski, Jordan M.; Wray, Tyler B.; Longabaugh, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background The Important People and Activities (IPA) instrument assesses network characteristics and social support for drinking and abstinence. The IPA has garnered widespread use in the alcohol treatment field. We modified the IPA to assess HIV status, drug of choice, and IV drug use among social network members. Further, we queried frequency of unprotected sex, between the participant and network members. Aim Since this measure was modified, and the test-retest reliability of the IPA has only rarely been examined, we conducted a small substudy (n=26) to examine 1-week test-retest reliability of this measure. Methods Participants were individuals in a day treatment program with an SUD and/or AUD diagnosis. Results Drug of choice for the participants represented roughly equal thirds of heroin, cocaine, and alcohol. The sample was 62% female and 39% Latino/a. At pretest 198 persons were named on the MIPA (M=7.6 network members per subject). It was determined that 152 of the people were overlapping between the test and retest. Conclusions Percent agreement, ICCs, and kappas for the items ranged from acceptable to excellent across the two time periods. Classification of network members as positive, negative, or neutral influences on sobriety also demonstrated good to excellent kappas. PMID:27429606

  20. 78 FR 44572 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pre-Launch Activities Importation Requests; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... regarding requests for the importation of unapproved finished dosage form drug products by applicants... Requests (PLAIR).'' Historically, when applicants sought to import unapproved finished dosage form drug... importation of the unapproved finished dosage form drug product that is the subject of the application...

  1. 77 FR 60133 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department of Homeland... concerning Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This request for comment is being made... Large Yachts Imported for Sale. OMB Number: 1651-0080. Form Number: None. Abstract: This collection...

  2. Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Is an Important Component of CXCL10-Mediated Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, Kirsten M.; Fisher, Debra J.; Burdick, Marie D.; Mehrad, Borna; Mathers, Amy J.; Mann, Barbara J.; Nakamoto, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are best recognized for their role within the innate immune system as chemotactic cytokines, signaling and recruiting host immune cells to sites of infection. Certain chemokines, such as CXCL10, have been found to play an additional role in innate immunity, mediating CXCR3-independent killing of a diverse array of pathogenic microorganisms. While this is still not clearly understood, elucidating the mechanisms underlying chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies effective against antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Here, we show that CXCL10 exerts antibacterial effects on clinical and laboratory strains of Escherichia coli and report that disruption of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHc), which converts pyruvate to acetyl coenzyme A, enables E. coli to resist these antimicrobial effects. Through generation and screening of a transposon mutant library, we identified two mutants with increased resistance to CXCL10, both with unique disruptions of the gene encoding the E1 subunit of PDHc, aceE. Resistance to CXCL10 also occurred following deletion of either aceF or lpdA, genes that encode the remaining two subunits of PDHc. Although PDHc resides within the bacterial cytosol, electron microscopy revealed localization of immunogold-labeled CXCL10 to the bacterial cell surface in both the E. coli parent and aceE deletion mutant strains. Taken together, our findings suggest that while CXCL10 interacts with an as-yet-unidentified component on the cell surface, PDHc is an important mediator of killing by CXCL10. To our knowledge, this is the first description of PDHc as a key bacterial component involved in the antibacterial effect of a chemokine. PMID:26553462

  3. 76 FR 48172 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Use of PKM2 Activators for the Treatment of Cancer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... PKM2, is expressed in all cancer cells and imparts an important metabolic change on cancer cells which allows them to grow and divide rapidly. That is, PKM2 is normally inactive, which allows cancer cells to... Activators for the Treatment of Cancer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service,...

  4. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, V. M.; Strom, A. L.

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of seismic strong motion hazard produced by earthquakes originating within causative fault zones allows rather low accuracy of localisation of these structures that can be provided by indirect evidence of fault activity. In contrast, the relevant accuracy of localisation and characterisation of active faults, capable of surface rupturing, can be achieved solely by the use of direct evidence of fault activity. This differentiation requires strict definition of what can be classified as "active fault" and the normalisation of methods used for identification and localisation of active faults crossing oil and natural gas trunk pipelines.

  5. GlpC gene is responsible for biofilm formation and defense against phagocytes and imparts tolerance to pH and organic solvents in Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y L; Liu, K S; Yin, X T; Fei, R M

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria are highly resistant to antibiotics, host immune defenses, and other external conditions. The formation of biofilms plays a key role in colonization and infection. To explore the mechanism of biofilm formation, mutant strains of Proteus vulgaris XC 2 were generated by Tn5 random transposon insertion. Only one biofilm defective bacterial species was identified from among 500 mutants. Inactivation of the glpC gene coding an anaerobic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase subunit C was identified by sequence analysis of the biofilm defective strain. Differences were detected in the growth phenotypes of the wild-type and mutant strains under pH, antibiotic, and organic solvent stress conditions. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the phagocytosis of the biofilm defective strain by the mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cell line compared to the wild-type strain. This study shows that the glpC gene plays an important role in biofilm formation, in addition to imparting pH, organic solvent, and antibiotic tolerance, and defense against phagocytosis to Proteus sp. The results further clarified the mechanism of biofilm formation at the genomic level, and indicated the importance of the glpC gene in this process. This data may provide innovative therapeutic measures against P. vulgaris infections; furthermore, as an important crocodile pathogen, this study also has important significance in the protection of Chinese alligators. PMID:26400293

  6. 77 FR 73671 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Deferral of Duty on Large Yachts Imported for Sale

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 60133) on October 2, 2012, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice... Large Yachts Imported for Sale AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland... Large Yachts Imported for Sale. This is a proposed extension of an information collection that...

  7. Esterase in imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicata and S. richteri (Hymenoptera: Formicidae): activity, kinetics and variation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black imported fire ant, Solenopsis richteri, is closely related to the notorious red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Despite being very similar in biology and behavior, S. invicta is a much more successful invader. In contrast to S. invicta that has invaded numberous countries and regions,...

  8. The 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is functionally important for direct activation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yoshie; Nakata, Rieko; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kubodera, Hideo; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term moderate consumption of red wine is associated with a reduced risk of developing lifestyle-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, resveratrol, a constituent of grapes and various other plants, has attracted substantial interest. This study focused on one molecular target of resveratrol, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Our previous study in mice showed that resveratrol-mediated protection of the brain against stroke requires activation of PPARα; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the chemical basis of the resveratrol-mediated activation of PPARα by performing a docking mode simulation and examining the structure-activity relationships of various polyphenols. The results of experiments using the crystal structure of the PPARα ligand-binding domain and an analysis of the activation of PPARα by a resveratrol analog 4-phenylazophenol (4-PAP) in vivo indicate that the 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is critical for the direct activation of PPARα. Activation of PPARα by 5 μM resveratrol was enhanced by rolipram, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. We also found that resveratrol has a higher PDE inhibitory activity (IC50 = 19 μM) than resveratrol analogs trans-4-hydroxystilbene and 4-PAP (IC50 = 27-28 μM), both of which has only 4'-hydroxyl group, indicating that this 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is not sufficient for the inhibition of PDE. This result is consistent with that 10 μM resveratrol has a higher agonistic activity of PPARα than these analogs, suggesting that there is a feedforward activation loop of PPARα by resveratrol, which may be involved in the long-term effects of resveratrol in vivo. PMID:25798826

  9. 75 FR 45527 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research, Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... activity, which was published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2009 (74 FR 53796). This information... incidental take authorization. The description contained in the proposed rule has not changed (74 FR 53795... descriptions have not changed (74 FR 53795, pages 53797-53798). Description of Specified Activities...

  10. The Importance of Pre and Postoperative Physical Activity Counseling in Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that physical activity (PA) can enhance weight loss and other outcomes after bariatric surgery. However, most preoperative patients are insufficiently active, and without support, fail to make substantial increases in their PA postoperatively. This review provides the rationale for PA counseling in bariatric surgery and describes how to appropriately tailor strategies to pre- and postoperative patients. PMID:22710705

  11. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  12. Latino Adolescents' Participation in Extracurricular Activities: How Important Are Family Resources and Cultural Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpkins, Sandra D.; O'Donnell, Megan; Delgado, Melissa Y.; Becnel, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Latino adolescents often are less likely to participate in extracurricular activities compared to youth from other ethnic groups. This descriptive study examined the differences in activity participation by family resources and markers of cultural orientation for the four largest Latino ethnic groups in the U.S. Findings were based on secondary…

  13. 31 CFR 560.505 - Importation of certain Iranian-origin services authorized; activities related to certain visa...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... services authorized; activities related to certain visa categories authorized. 560.505 Section 560.505...; activities related to certain visa categories authorized. (a) The importation of Iranian-origin services into... with that purpose. (b) Persons otherwise qualified for a non-immigrant visa under categories A-3 and...

  14. 78 FR 36580 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... previously published in the Federal Register at Volume 78 FR 19312, March 29, 2013, allowing for a 60 day... 75 Acetone, 2-Butanone, and Toluene Total 802 18,382 4,220 * DEA assumes 10% of all imports will...

  15. In vitro antifungal activity of pneumocandin L-743,872 against a variety of clinically important molds.

    PubMed Central

    Del Poeta, M; Schell, W A; Perfect, J R

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the new antifungal drug pneumocandin L-743,872 against 55 isolates of clinically important molds was examined by an adapted macrobroth dilution method for yeasts. Pneumocandin L-743,872 exhibited in vitro antifungal activity against Alternaria sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Curvularia lunata, Exophiala jeanselmei, Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Paecilomyces variotii, and Scedosporium apiospermum. The drug appeared to lack significant in vitro inhibitory activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Rhizopus arrhizus, Paecilomyces lilacinus, and Scedosporium prolificans. PMID:9257774

  16. Inflammasome activation has an important role in the development of spontaneous colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Fu, S; Sun, S; Li, Z; Guo, B

    2014-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized for dysregulated intestinal inflammation. Conflicting reports have shown that activation of inflammasome could promote or decrease intestinal inflammation in an acute colitis model, whereas the involvement of inflammasome activation in chronic colitis is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammasome activation in the development of chronic intestinal inflammation by utilizing interleukin-10 (IL-10) knockout (KO) mouse as an animal model, which develops chronic colitis resembling human IBD. We demonstrate the causative link between inflammasome activation and the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. Our results show that mature IL-1β protein levels were significantly increased in all colon sections from IL-10-deficient mice compared with that of wild-type mice. We found that inhibition of inflammasome activities with IL-1 receptor antagonist or caspase-1 inhibitors suppressed IL-1β and IL-17 production from inflamed colon explants. Furthermore, blocking inflammasome activation with caspase-1 inhibitor in vivo significantly ameliorated the spontaneous colitis in IL-10 KO mice. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that inflammasome activation promotes the development of chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:24472848

  17. Importance of viability and attachment to an ascites tumor in the release of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.; Zhou, M.; Subbarao, V.; Ts'ao, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor plasminogen activator (PA) has been alleged to play a role in the growth and metastasis of tumors. Before such a role can be realized, PA first must be released from tumor cells. Having determined intra- and extracellular PA and PA-inhibitor activities in an experimental pancreatic ascites tumor grown in hamsters, the release of PA from these cells was investigated. No PA activity was detected in the suspension medium of freshly isolated tumor cells; inclusion of plasminogen, fibrinogen, or collagen in the medium yielded similar negative results. On the other hand, PA activity was demonstrated to be released in a time-dependent manner from these tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots. Plasminogen activator activity also was not found in the suspension medium of frozen-thawed tumor cells, despite the fact that most of them had breaks on their cell membrane. Unlike freshly isolated tumor cells, PA was not released from frozen-thawed cells embedded in fibrin clots. Full PA activity was demonstrated in frozen-thawed cells treated with Triton X-100, however. Frozen-thawed cells exhibited signs of severe damage, and more than 80% of them failed to exclude trypan blue. Obviously PA is released from viable tumor cells embedded in fibrin clots but not suspended in artificial medium. The PA-release mechanism, not PA itself, is destroyed in cells rendered nonviable by freeze thawing. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1902626

  18. [Importance of estrogens and estrogen-active compounds for udder health in cattle. A review].

    PubMed

    Zdunczyk, S; Zerbe, H; Hoedemaker, M

    2003-11-01

    High oestrogen concentrations in blood or high intake of oestrogen-active compounds with forage can be associated with an enhanced occurrence of udder diseases. Mean somatic cell count (MSCC) can increase and milk yield can decrease. Subclinically infected udder quarters can develop clinical mastitis and the rate of new infections can be high. This review describes concentrations of oestrogens in peripheral blood plasma in cattle and occurrence of oestrogen-active compounds in forage. Relationships between oestrogens or oestrogen-active compounds and udder health are presented. The possible mechanisms of enhanced susceptibility of the udder to infection under the influence of oestrogens are discussed. PMID:14679840

  19. Transgenic expression of Lactoferrin imparts resistance to a soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi) and Arabidopsis (A. thaliana) plants expressing an antimicrobial bovine lactoferrin (BLF) gene were developed and evaluated for resistance against an economically important fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of damping off diseases....

  20. Structural transitions during prothrombin activation: On the importance of fragment 2

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Ty E.; Huntington, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Prothrombin is activated to thrombin by the prothrombinase complex through sequential cleavage at two distinct sites. This occurs at sites of vascular injury in a highly regulated cascade of serine protease and cofactor activation, where activated platelets provide a suitable surface for protease/cofactor/substrate assembly. The precise structural and conformational changes undergone during the transition from prothrombin to thrombin have been studied for decades, and several structures of prothrombin fragments along the activation pathway have been solved. Here we present a new structure analyzed in context of other recent structures and biochemical studies. What emerges is an unexpected mechanism that involves a change in the mode of binding of the F2 domain (fragment 2) on the catalytic domain after cleavage at Arg320, and a subsequent reorientation of the linker between the F2 and catalytic domain to present the Arg271 site for cleavage. PMID:26365066

  1. The importance of behavior theory in control system modeling of physical activity sensor data.

    PubMed

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Among health behaviors, physical activity has the most extensive record of research using passive sensors. Control systems and other system dynamic approaches have long been considered applicable for understanding human behavior, but only recently has the technology provided the precise and intensive longitudinal data required for these analytic approaches. Although sensors provide intensive data on the patterns and variations of physical activity over time, the influences of these variations are often unmeasured. Health behavior theories provide an explanatory framework of the putative mediators of physical activity changes. Incorporating the intensive longitudinal measurement of these theoretical constructs is critical to improving the fit of control system model of physical activity and for advancing behavioral theory. Theory-based control models also provide guidance on the nature of the controllers which serve as the basis for just-in-time adaptive interventions based on these control system models. PMID:25571577

  2. [The importance of using biological test objects in studying the toxicity of surface-active substances].

    PubMed

    Mudryĭ, I V; Debrivnaia, I E

    1996-01-01

    The Azotobacter agilis [correction of azobacter agile] culture appeared to be the most sensitive one among the studied test objects. Buckwheat as a test plant can be recommended in studying the toxicity of surface-active substances. PMID:9035856

  3. Activity of Bifenthrin, Chlorfenapyr, Fipronil, and Thiamethoxam against Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bifenthrin, chlorfenapyr, fipronil, and thiamethoxam were evaluated for activity against the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr). Mobility impairment and lethal times were determined following topical treatments. Ants were immobilized most quickly by bifenthrin, followed by chlorfenapyr and thi...

  4. Chemical and biological mechanisms of phytochemical activation of Nrf2 and importance in disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Eggler, Aimee L.; Savinov, Sergey N.

    2016-01-01

    Plants are an incredibly rich source of compounds that activate the Nrf2 transcription factor, leading to upregulation of a battery of cytoprotective genes. This perspective surveys established and proposed molecular mechanisms of Nrf2 activation by phytochemicals with a special emphasis on a common chemical property of Nrf2 activators: the ability as “soft” electrophiles to modify cellular thiols, either directly or as oxidized biotransformants. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species as secondary messengers in Nrf2 activation is discussed. While the uniquely reactive C151 of Keap1, an Nrf2 repressor protein, is highlighted as a key target of cytoprotective phytochemicals, also reviewed are other stress-responsive proteins, including kinases, which play non-redundant roles in the activation of Nrf2 by plant-derived agents. Finally, the perspective presents two key factors accounting for the enhanced therapeutic windows of effective phytochemical activators of the Keap1–Nrf2 axis: enhanced selectivity toward sensor cysteines and reversibility of addition to thiolate molecules. PMID:26855455

  5. Active faults crossing trunk pipeline routes: some important steps to avoid the disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besstrashnov, Vladimir; Strom, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    Trunk pipelines that pass through tectonically active areas connecting oil and gas reservoirs with terminals and refineries cross active faults that can produce large earthquakes. Besides strong motion affecting vast areas, these earthquakes are often associated with surface faulting that provides additional hazard to pipelines. To avoid significant economic losses and environmental pollution, pipelines should be designed to sustain both effects (shaking and direct rupturing) without pipe damage and spill. Special studies aimed to provide necessary input data for the designers should be performed in the course of engineering survey. However, our experience on conducting and review of such studies for several oil and gas trunk pipelines in Russia show urgent need of more strict definition of basic conceptions and approaches used for identification and localization of these potentially hazardous tectonic features. Identification of active faults (fault zones) considered as causative faults - sources of strong motion caused by seismic waves that affect dozens kilometers of pipeline route can be done by use of both direct and indirect evidence of Late Pleistocene - Holocene activity of faults and fault zones. Since strong motion parameters can be considered as constant within the near-field zone, which width in case of large earthquake is up to dozens kilometers, accuracy of active fault location is not so critical and ±1-2 km precision provided by use of indirect evidence is acceptable. In contrast, if one have to identify and characterize zones of potential surface rupturing that require special design of the endangered pipeline section, only direct evidence of such activity can provide reliable input data for crossing design with relevant accuracy of fault location, amount and direction of displacement. Only traces of surface faults displacing Late Pleistocene - Holocene sediments and/or geomorphic features are considered as direct evidence of fault activity. Just

  6. The Forgotten Lactogenic Activity of Growth Hormone: Important Implications for Rodent Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kopchick, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the effects of GH and the mechanisms of its actions frequently use rats or mice and various recombinant human GH preparations. Authors of many of these studies appear unaware of the fact that, in rodents, human GH signals through both GH and prolactin (PRL) receptors; thus, treatment with human GH is equivalent to a combined treatment with GH and PRL. GH receptors and PRL receptors are present in multiple cell types. Importantly, PRL exerts major effects on brain neuroendocrine action, female and male reproduction, metabolism, body composition, immune responses, and a host of other functions; thus, treatment of rodents with recombinant human GH could affect these important physiological parameters. PMID:25730109

  7. High Sulfation and a High Molecular Weight Are Important for Anti-hepcidin Activity of Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Asperti, Michela; Naggi, Annamaria; Esposito, Emiliano; Ruzzenenti, Paola; Di Somma, Margherita; Gryzik, Magdalena; Arosio, Paolo; Poli, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Heparins are efficient inhibitors of hepcidin expression even in vivo, where they induce an increase of systemic iron availability. Heparins seem to act by interfering with BMP6 signaling pathways that control the expression of liver hepcidin, causing the suppression of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. The anti-hepcidin activity persists also when the heparin anticoagulant property is abolished or reduced by chemical reactions of oxidation/reduction (glycol-split, Gs-Heparins) or by high sulfation (SS-Heparins), but the structural characteristics needed to optimize this inhibitory activity have not been studied in detail. To this aim we analyzed three different heparins (Mucosal Heparin, the Glycol split RO-82, the partially desulfated glycol-split RO-68 and the oversulfated SSLMWH) and separated them in fractions of molecular weight in the range 4–16 kD. Since the distribution of the negative charges in heparins contributes to the activity, we produced 2-O- and 6-O-desulfated heparins. These derivatives were analyzed for the capacity to inhibit hepcidin expression in hepatic HepG2 cells and in mice. The two approaches produced consistent results and showed that the anti-hepcidin activity strongly decreases with molecular weight below 7 kD, with high N-acetylation and after 2-O and 6-O desulfation. The high sulfation and high molecular weight properties for efficient anti-hepcidin activity suggest that heparin is involved in multiple binding sites. PMID:26955355

  8. High Sulfation and a High Molecular Weight Are Important for Anti-hepcidin Activity of Heparin.

    PubMed

    Asperti, Michela; Naggi, Annamaria; Esposito, Emiliano; Ruzzenenti, Paola; Di Somma, Margherita; Gryzik, Magdalena; Arosio, Paolo; Poli, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Heparins are efficient inhibitors of hepcidin expression even in vivo, where they induce an increase of systemic iron availability. Heparins seem to act by interfering with BMP6 signaling pathways that control the expression of liver hepcidin, causing the suppression of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. The anti-hepcidin activity persists also when the heparin anticoagulant property is abolished or reduced by chemical reactions of oxidation/reduction (glycol-split, Gs-Heparins) or by high sulfation (SS-Heparins), but the structural characteristics needed to optimize this inhibitory activity have not been studied in detail. To this aim we analyzed three different heparins (Mucosal Heparin, the Glycol split RO-82, the partially desulfated glycol-split RO-68 and the oversulfated SSLMWH) and separated them in fractions of molecular weight in the range 4-16 kD. Since the distribution of the negative charges in heparins contributes to the activity, we produced 2-O- and 6-O-desulfated heparins. These derivatives were analyzed for the capacity to inhibit hepcidin expression in hepatic HepG2 cells and in mice. The two approaches produced consistent results and showed that the anti-hepcidin activity strongly decreases with molecular weight below 7 kD, with high N-acetylation and after 2-O and 6-O desulfation. The high sulfation and high molecular weight properties for efficient anti-hepcidin activity suggest that heparin is involved in multiple binding sites. PMID:26955355

  9. A Qualitative Study of Environmental Factors Important for Physical Activity in Rural Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Verity; Hughes, Clarissa; Thornton, Lukar; Venn, Alison; Squibb, Kathryn; Ball, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite increasing evidence that the physical environment impacts on physical activity among urban-dwellers, little attention has been devoted to understanding this relationship in rural populations. Work in this area is further hindered by a lack of environmental measures specifically designed for rural settings. This qualitative study aimed to explore the salience of urban physical activity environment constructs among rural adults. Methods In 2011, 49 rural men and women from three distinct areas (coastal, animal-based farming, forestry/plant-based farming) of rural Tasmania, Australia, were purposively recruited to participate in semi-structured interviews. Interviews explored features of the built and social environment commonly examined in studies of urban adults, including functional characteristics (eg, lighting, footpaths, roads/verges), road and personal safety, availability and accessibility of places to be active, destinations, and aesthetics. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a content-thematic approach using QSR NVivo software. Findings While some urban environmental constructs were salient to these rural adults, such as availability of and accessibility to places to be active, some constructs were operationalised differently, such as road safety (where large trucks and winding roads rather than traffic density was of concern), or were not considered relevant (eg, personal safety related to crime, availability of walkable destinations, aesthetics). Conclusions The measurement of the physical environment in rural populations may require reconsideration and/or modification to ensure salience and appropriate quantification of associations with physical activity in future studies. PMID:26554376

  10. Antimicrobial activity of different solvent extracted samples from the flowers of medicinally important Plumeria obstusa.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasir; Ahmad, Dawood; Bakht, Jehan

    2015-01-01

    The present research work was carried out to investigate the antimicrobial (eight bacteria and one fungus) activities of different solvent (ethanol, petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and isobutanol) extracted samples from flowers of P. obstusa by disc diffusion method. Analysis of the data revealed that all the five extracts from flowers of P. obstusa showed different ranges of antimicrobial activities. Petroleum ether fractions showed inhibitory activities against all the nine microbial species except Klebsiella pneumonia. Ethyl acetate and isobutanol fractions showed inhibitory effects against all the tested microbial species except Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Chloroform and ethanol extracts had varying levels of inhibitions against all of the tested microorganisms. The most susceptible gram positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis which was inhibited by all the five extracts while the most resistant gram positive bacterium was Staphylococcus aureus. Erwinia carotovora was the most susceptible gram negative bacterium while Pseudomonas aeruginosa was highly resistant among the gram negative bacteria. PMID:25553696

  11. 75 FR 67981 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Importer's Entry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... including tobacco products to the list of FDA-regulated products under the Family Smoking Prevention and... origin FDA regulated foods, drugs, cosmetics, medical devices, radiological health, and tobacco products..., landport, and airport) where foreign-origin FDA-regulated products are offered for import, FDA is...

  12. The Relative Importance of Academic Activities: Autonomous Values from the Canadian Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Carlton; Keavey, Kalen; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Fedoruk, Alan; Osuji, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report findings on the contemporary idea of a university as defined by the relative importance of teaching, research, service, and collegiality in teaching-intensive universities. We also investigate Boyer's model of scholarship relative to the research--teaching--service nexus. Our findings show that while research is embraced…

  13. Alpha-Tocopheryl phosphate – an activated form of vitamin E important for angiogenesis and vasculogenesis?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E was originally discovered as a dietary factor essential for reproduction in rats. Since then, vitamin E has revealed many important molecular properties, such as the scavenging of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, or the modulation of signal transduction and gene expression in antioxid...

  14. 78 FR 70951 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Importer's Entry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... of the FD&C Act as do domestic products, and for preventing products from entering the country if... importer and USCS of its decision. A single entry frequently contains multiple lines of different products... entry. These data elements include the FDA Product Code, FDA country of production,...

  15. Importance of Health-Related Fitness Knowledge to Increasing Physical Activity and Physical Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferkel, Rick C.; Judge, Lawrence W.; Stodden, David F.; Griffin, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity is expanding across all ages in the United States. Research has documented a deficiency in health-related fitness knowledge (HRFK) among elementary- through college-aged students. The need for a credible and reliable resource that provides research-based information regarding the importance of HRFK is significant. The purpose…

  16. 78 FR 19312 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Business or other for-profit. Other: Not-for-profit; State, local, and tribal government. Abstract: Persons importing... the chemical will be transferred and the quantity to be transferred. Persons must also provide...

  17. 77 FR 47666 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Import/Export...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... public who will be asked or required to respond, as well as a brief abstract: Primary: Business or other for-profit. Other: Not-for-profit; State, local, and tribal government. Abstract: Persons importing... the chemical will be transferred and the quantity to be transferred. Persons must also provide...

  18. In simple synthetic promoters YY1-induced DNA bending is important in transcription activation and repression.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Shapiro, D J

    1996-01-01

    Depending on promoter context, YY1 can activate or repress transcription, or provide a site for transcription initiation. To investigate whether the ability of YY1 to induce DNA bending influenced its ability to activate and repress transcription, simple synthetic promoters were constructed in which the YY1 binding site was inserted between the TATA box and either the NF1 or AP1 recognition sequences. In transient transfections of COS cells, the NF1YY1TATA and NF1RYY1TATA promoters exhibited a dramatic 15-20-fold increase in correctly initiated transcription. These promoters exhibited even larger 60-80-fold increases in transcription in HeLa cells. Neither multiple copies of the YY1 binding site alone, nor placement of a YY1 site upstream of the NF1 site activated transcription. Deletion of 4 bp between the NF1 and YY1 sites, which changes the phase of the DNA bends, abolished the 16-fold activation of transcription by NF1YY1TATA. Insertion of the YY1 site between the AP1 site and the TATA box decreased transcription approximately 3-fold. Replacing the YY1 binding site with an intrinsic DNA bending sequence mimicked this transcription repression. Sequences of similar length which do not bend DNA fail to repress AP1-mediated transcription. Gel mobility shift assays were used to show that binding of YY1 to its recognition sequence did not repress binding of AP1 to its recognition sequences. Our data indicate that YY1-induced DNA bending may activate and repress transcription by changing the spatial relationships between transcription activators and components of the basal transcription apparatus. PMID:8932392

  19. Physiological community ecology: variation in metabolic activity of ecologically important rocky intertidal invertebrates along environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Elizabeth P; Stillman, Jonathon H; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    Rocky intertidal invertebrates live in heterogeneous habitats characterized by steep gradients in wave activity, tidal flux, temperature, food quality and food availability. These environmental factors impact metabolic activity via changes in energy input and stress-induced alteration of energetic demands. For keystone species, small environmentally induced shifts in metabolic activity may lead to disproportionately large impacts on community structure via changes in growth or survival of these key species. Here we use biochemical indicators to assess how natural differences in wave exposure, temperature and food availability may affect metabolic activity of mussels, barnacles, whelks and sea stars living at rocky intertidal sites with different physical and oceanographic characteristics. We show that oxygen consumption rate is correlated with the activity of key metabolic enzymes (e.g., citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase) for some intertidal species, and concentrations of these enzymes in certain tissues are lower for starved individuals than for those that are well fed. We also show that the ratio of RNA to DNA (an index of protein synthetic capacity) is highly variable in nature and correlates with short-term changes in food availability. We also observed striking patterns in enzyme activity and RNA/DNA in nature, which are related to differences in rocky intertidal community structure. Differences among species and habitats are most pronounced in summer and are linked to high nearshore productivity at sites favored by suspension feeders and to exposure to stressful low-tide air temperatures in areas of low wave splash. These studies illustrate the great promise of using biochemical indicators to test ecological models, which predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients. Our results also suggest that biochemical indices must be carefully validated with laboratory studies, so that the indicator selected is likely to respond to the

  20. Biological and chemical study of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues with important antiparasitic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Urrutia, Christian A.; Olea-Azar, Claudio A.; Zapata, Gerald A.; Lapier, Michel; Mura, Francisco; Aguilera-Venegas, Benjamín; Arán, Vicente J.; López-Múñoz, Rodrigo A.; Maya, Juan D.

    A series of fused tri- and tetracyclic indazoles and analogues compounds (NID) with potential antiparasitic effects were studied using voltamperometric and spectroscopic techniques. Nitroanion radicals generated by cyclic voltammetry were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR) and their spectral lines were explained and analyzed using simulated spectra. In addition, we examined the interaction between radical species generated from nitroindazole derivatives and glutathione (GSH). Biological assays such as activity against Trypanosoma cruzi and cytotoxicity against macrophages were carried out. Finally, spin trapping and molecular modeling studies were also done in order to elucidate the potentials action mechanisms involved in the trypanocidal activity.

  1. Bling My Research! A Mock Grant Panel Activity Illustrating the Importance of Basic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leander, Celeste A.; Whitton, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students have misconceptions about the source and dynamics of publicly funded research money. We designed an activity in which students take part in a mock grant panel. The results indicated a strong tendency toward student funding of applied medical research at the expense of basic research. Exposure to a few examples of…

  2. Importance of Quality Recreation Activities for Older Adults Residing in Nursing Homes: Considerations for Gerontologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberkost, Michael; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Based on a needs assessment survey (66 responses from 101 nursing home activity coordinators), a recreation manual and training program was developed and tested with 25 coordinators/recreation staff. The 14 who completed evaluations increased their understanding of such topics as depression; goals of nursing home recreation programs; motivation of…

  3. Antiausterity activity of arctigenin enantiomers: importance of (2R,3R)-absolute configuration.

    PubMed

    Awale, Suresh; Kato, Mamoru; Dibwe, Dya Fita; Li, Feng; Miyoshi, Chika; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Kadota, Shigetoshi; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    From a MeOH extract of powdered roots of Wikstroemia indica, six dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration [(+)-arctigenin (1), (+)-matairesinol (2), (+)-trachelogenin (3), (+)-nortrachelogenin (4), (+)-hinokinin (5), and (+)-kusunokinin (6)] were isolated, whereas three dibenzyl-gamma-butyrolactone-type lignans with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration [(-)-arctigenin (1*), (-)-matairesinol (2*), (-)-trachelogenin (3*)] were isolated from Trachelospermum asiaticum. The in vitro preferential cytotoxic activity of the nine compounds was evaluated against human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM), but none of the six lignans (1-6) with (2S,3S)-absolute configuration showed preferential cytotoxicity. On the other hand, three lignans (1*-3*) with (2R,3R)-absolute configuration exhibited preferential cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner with PC50 values of 0.54, 6.82, and 5.85 microM, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of (-)- and (+)-arctigenin was evaluated against the activation of Akt, which is a key process in the tolerance to nutrition starvation. Interestingly, only (-)-arctigenin (1*) strongly suppressed the activation of Akt. These results indicate that the (2R,3R)-absolute configuration of (-)-enantiomers should be required for the preferential cytotoxicity through the inhibition of Akt activation. PMID:24660468

  4. Apoptosome activation, an important molecular instigator in 6-mercaptopurine induced Leydig cell death

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica A.; Lynch, John; Panetta, John C.; Wang, Yao; Frase, Sharon; Bao, Ju; Zheng, Jie; Opferman, Joseph T.; Janke, Laura; Green, Daniel M.; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Schuetz, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cells are crucial to the production of testosterone in males. It is unknown if the cancer chemotherapeutic drug, 6-mercaptopurine (6 MP), produces Leydig cell failure among adult survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Moreover, it is not known whether Leydig cell failure is due to either a loss of cells or an impairment in their function. Herein, we show, in a subset of childhood cancer survivors, that Leydig cell failure is related to the dose of 6 MP. This was extended, in a murine model, to demonstrate that 6 MP exposure induced caspase 3 activation, and the loss of Leydig cells was independent of Bak and Bax activation. The death of these non-proliferating cells was triggered by 6 MP metabolism, requiring formation of both cytosolic reactive oxygen species and thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates. The thiopurine nucleotide triphosphates (with physiological amounts of dATP) uniquely activated the apoptosome. An ABC transporter (Abcc4/Mrp4) reduced the amount of thiopurines, thereby providing protection for Leydig cells. The studies reported here demonstrate that the apoptosome is uniquely activated by thiopurine nucleotides and suggest that 6 MP induced Leydig cell death is likely a cause of Leydig cell failure in some survivors of childhood cancer. PMID:26576726

  5. The importance of physical activity and sleep for affect on stressful days: Two intensive longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Flueckiger, Lavinia; Lieb, Roselind; Meyer, Andrea H; Witthauer, Cornelia; Mata, Jutta

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the potential stress-buffering effect of 3 health behaviors-physical activity, sleep quality, and snacking-on affect in the context of everyday life in young adults. In 2 intensive longitudinal studies with up to 65 assessment days over an entire academic year, students (Study 1, N = 292; Study 2, N = 304) reported stress intensity, sleep quality, physical activity, snacking, and positive and negative affect. Data were analyzed using multilevel regression analyses. Stress and positive affect were negatively associated; stress and negative affect were positively associated. The more physically active than usual a person was on a given day, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Study 1) and negative affect (Studies 1 and 2). The better than usual a person's sleep quality had been during the previous night, the weaker the association between stress and positive affect (Studies 1 and 2) and negative affect (Study 2). The association between daily stress and positive or negative affect did not differ as a function of daily snacking (Studies 1 and 2). On stressful days, increasing physical activity or ensuring high sleep quality may buffer adverse effects of stress on affect in young adults. These findings suggest potential targets for health-promotion and stress-prevention programs, which could help reduce the negative impact of stress in young adults. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26709860

  6. Important Physiological Parameters and Physical Activity Data for Evaluating Exposure Modeling Performance: a Synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this report is to develop a database of physiological parameters needed for understanding and evaluating performance of the APEX and SHEDS exposure/intake dose rate model used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its regulatory activities. The A...

  7. 75 FR 79342 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... preamble to the final rule (75 FR 69296, November 10, 2010), that the taking resulting from the activities... findings, described in the preamble to the final rule (75 FR 45527, August 3, 2010), that the taking... detonations at levels that NMFS associates with the take of marine mammals. The Navy's model, which did...

  8. Student Perceptions of Information Literacy Instruction: The Importance of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detlor, Brian; Booker, Lorne; Serenko, Alexander; Julien, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the merits of employing active learning strategies in the delivery of information literacy instruction (ILI). Traditional approaches to the teaching of information literacy skills--where students are passive recipients of the information they receive--are challenged. Rather, methods that encourage students to actively…

  9. Ambulatory Activity of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Which Characteristics Are Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wely, Leontien; Becher, Jules G.; Balemans, Astrid C. J.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess ambulatory activity of children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 7 to 13 years, and identify associated characteristics. Method: Sixty-two children with spastic CP (39 males, 23 females; mean age 10y 1mo, SD 1y 8mo; age range 7-13y), classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I to III, participated.…

  10. The Motivational Importance of Extracurricular Activities for Adolescent Development: Cultivating Undivided Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathunde, Kevin

    Activities that engaged the full attention of adolescents at school were explored using the Experience Sampling Method, in which subjects were interrupted by a pager to record their experience at the moment the pager signaled. Two variables indicating optimal subjective experience and undivided attention were operationalized: interest and flow…

  11. Adolescents Online: The Importance of Internet Activity Choices to Salient Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blais, Julie J.; Craig, Wendy M.; Pepler, Debra; Connolly, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether using the Internet for different activities affects the quality of close adolescent relationships (i.e., best friendships and romantic relationships). In a one-year longitudinal study of 884 adolescents (Mean age = 15, 46% male), we examined whether visiting chat rooms, using ICQ, using the…

  12. Resisting Rote: The Importance of Active Learning for All Course Learning Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fata-Hartley, Cori

    2011-01-01

    Many college science educators have moved away from the traditional lecture format and toward learner-centered classroom environments. Yet many of us struggle to cover large content loads, reverting at times to rote memorization. This paper suggests rote memorization simply does not work and students must be actively engaged to learn. (Contains 1…

  13. C-Terminus of the B-Chain of Relaxin-3 Is Important for Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Human relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is structurally similar to human insulin with two chains (A and B) connected by three disulfide bonds. It is expressed primarily in the brain and has modulatory roles in stress and anxiety, feeding and metabolism, and arousal and behavioural activation. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that relaxin-3 interacts with its cognate receptor RXFP3 primarily through its B-chain and that its A-chain does not have any functional role. In this study, we have investigated the effect of modification of the B-chain C-terminus on the binding and activity of the peptide. We have chemically synthesised and characterized H3 relaxin as C-termini acid (both A and B chains having free C-termini; native form) and amide forms (both chains’ C-termini were amidated). We have confirmed that the acid form of the peptide is more potent than its amide form at both RXFP3 and RXFP4 receptors. We further investigated the effects of amidation at the C-terminus of individual chains. We report here for the first time that amidation at the C-terminus of the B-chain of H3 relaxin leads to significant drop in the binding and activity of the peptide at RXFP3/RXFP4 receptors. However, modification of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the activity. We have confirmed using circular dichroism spectroscopy that there is no secondary structural change between the acid and amide form of the peptide, and it is likely that it is the local C-terminal carboxyl group orientation that is crucial for interacting with the receptors. PMID:24349312

  14. Importance of activity data for improving the residential wood combustion emission inventory at regional level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Cinzia; Caserini, Stefano; Galante, Silvia; Dilara, Panagiota; Galletti, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    The contribution of residential wood combustion (RWC) to emission inventory at local level was estimated using a bottom-up approach for the Lombardy Region of North Italy. A survey, based on the CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing) method, has been undertaken through 18,000 interviews. The interviews had the objective to characterize the RWC use in this region, in term of both total and municipal wood consumption. Details on the type of appliances used in RWC were also gathered. The results of the survey were then statistically analyzed in order to allow an estimate of RWC with high spatial resolution (i.e., at municipal level) in relation to the size and altitude of the territory. The work provides new evidence of the importance of wood combustion as a key source for PM and NMVOC emissions at local level, and thus highlights the importance of technological improvements and new policies aimed at emission reduction in this sector. Considering the great differences in average PM emission factors between low efficiency appliances (fireplaces, old stoves) and high efficiency ones (new stoves, pellet burners), this work emphasizes the importance of obtaining more detailed information on the types of wood appliances used for arriving at a reliable PM emission inventory for RWC.

  15. Colonic Angioectasia Related Hemorrhage: The Importance of Evaluation During Active Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Laczek, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Colonic angioectasia is a common source of lower gastrointestinal bleeding and can be challenging to identify when active bleeding is not present. We present a case that illustrates the utility of evaluating patients with suspected angioectasia-related hemorrhage during episodes of active bleeding. Case Report A 79-year-old woman on chronic anticoagulation secondary to mitral valve replacement presented with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding over the past three years. She had recurrent episodes of hematochezia in 2009 during which no source was identified despite multiple upper and lower endoscopies. A tagged red blood scan showed active hemorrhage in the ascending colon. Angiography showed non-bleeding angiodysplasia in the cecum and ascending colon and the ascending branch of the right colic artery was prophylactically embolized. She had a recurrent episode of hematochezia in 2010 and no source was identified on EGD, colonoscopy or wireless capsule endoscopy. In 2012, she developed recurrent hematochezia associated with a drop in her hemoglobin level from 10.8g/dL to 6.2g/dL over a two-week period. Her hemodynamics remained normal and she was admitted to our facility. She received a blood transfusion and then underwent colonoscopy while still actively bleeding. Active bleeding was seen in the ascending colon adjacent to which was a very subtle angioectasia which was treated with argon plasma coagulation. She had no further bleeding during her hospital stay. Discussion Direct visualization during colonoscopy is the preferred method to diagnose colonic angioectasia and these lesions often have a distinctive “coral reef” appearance. However, as the images in this case show, the appearance of colonic angioectasia can be subtle with the aberrant vasculature almost indistinguishable from normal vascular patter of the colonic mucosa. Performing colonoscopy during active angioectasia-related bleeding greatly helps to identify and treat

  16. The Importance of Odorant Conformation to the Binding and Activation of a Representative Olfactory Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Peterlin, Zita; Li, Yadi; Sun, Guangxing; Shah, Rohan; Firestein, Stuart; Ryan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Olfactory receptors (ORs) form a large family of G-protein coupled receptor proteins (GPCRs) responsible for sensing the ambient chemical environment. The molecular recognition strategies used by ORs to detect and distinguish odorant molecules are unclear. Here, we investigated the variable of odorant carbon chain conformation for an established odorant-OR pair: n-octanal and rat OR-I7. A series of conformationally restricted octanal mimics were tested on live olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Our results support a model in which unactivated OR-I7 binds aliphatic aldehydes indiscriminately, and then applies conformational and length filters to distinguish agonists from antagonists. Specific conformers are proposed to activate OR-I7 by steric buttressing of an OR activation pocket. Probing endogenously expressed rat OSNs with octanal and constrained mimics furnished evidence that odorant conformation contributes to an odorant’s unique olfactory code signature. PMID:19101476

  17. Soft skills: an important asset acquired from organizing regional student group activities.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Meysman, Pieter; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Abeel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Contributing to a student organization, such as the International Society for Computational Biology Student Council (ISCB-SC) and its Regional Student Group (RSG) program, takes time and energy. Both are scarce commodities, especially when you are trying to find your place in the world of computational biology as a graduate student. It comes as no surprise that organizing ISCB-SC-related activities sometimes interferes with day-to-day research and shakes up your priority list. However, we unanimously agree that the rewards, both in the short as well as the long term, make the time spent on these extracurricular activities more than worth it. In this article, we will explain what makes this so worthwhile: soft skills. PMID:24992198

  18. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A2 treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and phospholipid

  19. In silico approach to screen compounds active against parasitic nematodes of major socio-economic importance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infections due to parasitic nematodes are common causes of morbidity and fatality around the world especially in developing nations. At present however, there are only three major classes of drugs for treating human nematode infections. Additionally the scientific knowledge on the mechanism of action and the reason for the resistance to these drugs is poorly understood. Commercial incentives to design drugs that are endemic to developing countries are limited therefore, virtual screening in academic settings can play a vital role is discovering novel drugs useful against neglected diseases. In this study we propose to build robust machine learning model to classify and screen compounds active against parasitic nematodes. Results A set of compounds active against parasitic nematodes were collated from various literature sources including PubChem while the inactive set was derived from DrugBank database. The support vector machine (SVM) algorithm was used for model development, and stratified ten-fold cross validation was used to evaluate the performance of each classifier. The best results were obtained using the radial basis function kernel. The SVM method achieved an accuracy of 81.79% on an independent test set. Using the model developed above, we were able to indentify novel compounds with potential anthelmintic activity. Conclusion In this study, we successfully present the SVM approach for predicting compounds active against parasitic nematodes which suggests the effectiveness of computational approaches for antiparasitic drug discovery. Although, the accuracy obtained is lower than the previously reported in a similar study but we believe that our model is more robust because we intentionally employed stringent criteria to select inactive dataset thus making it difficult for the model to classify compounds. The method presents an alternative approach to the existing traditional methods and may be useful for predicting hitherto novel anthelmintic

  20. Importance of the Maintenance Pathway in the Regulation of the Activity of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase†

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. The Escherichia coli class Ia RNR is composed of α and β subunits that form an α2β2 active complex. β contains the diferric tyrosyl radical (Y•) cofactor that is essential for the reduction process that occurs on α. [Y•] in vitro is proportional to RNR activity, and its regulation in vivo potentially represents a mechanism for controlling RNR activity. To examine this thesis, N- and C-terminal StrepII-tagged β under the control of an l-arabinose promoter were constructed. Using these constructs and with [l-arabinose] varying from 0 to 0.5 mM in the growth medium, [β] could be varied from 4 to 3300 µM. [Y•] in vivo and on affinity-purified Strep-β in vitro was determined by EPR spectroscopy and Western analysis. In both cases, there was 0.1–0.3 Y• radical per β. To determine if the substoichiometric Y• level was associated with apo β or diferric β, titrations of crude cell extracts from these growths were carried out with reduced YfaE, a 2Fe2S ferredoxin involved in cofactor maintenance and assembly. Each titration, followed by addition of O2 to assemble the cofactor and EPR analysis to quantitate Y•, revealed that β is completely loaded with a diferric cluster even when its concentration in vivo is 244 µM. These titrations, furthermore, resulted in 1 Y• radical per β, the highest levels reported. Whole cell Mössbauer analysis on cells induced with 0.5 mM arabinose supports high iron loading in β. These results suggest that modulation of the level of Y• in vivo in E. coli is a mechanism of regulating RNR activity. PMID:18314964

  1. Importance of Membrane Structural Integrity for RPE65 Retinoid Isomerization Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Golczak, Marcin; Kiser, Philip D.; Lodowski, David T.; Maeda, Akiko; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2010-04-05

    Regeneration of visual chromophore in the vertebrate visual cycle involves the retinal pigment epithelium-specific protein RPE65, the key enzyme catalyzing the cleavage and isomerization of all-trans-retinyl fatty acid esters to 11-cis-retinol. Although RPE65 has no predicted membrane spanning domains, this protein predominantly associates with microsomal fractions isolated from bovine retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). We have re-examined the nature of RPE65 interactions with native microsomal membranes by using extraction and phase separation experiments. We observe that hydrophobic interactions are the dominant forces that promote RPE65 association with these membranes. These results are consistent with the crystallographic model of RPE65, which features a large lipophilic surface that surrounds the entrance to the catalytic site of this enzyme and likely interacts with the hydrophobic core of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Moreover, we report a critical role for phospholipid membranes in preserving the retinoid isomerization activity and physical properties of RPE65. Isomerase activity measured in bovine RPE was highly sensitive to phospholipase A{sup 2} treatment, but the observed decline in 11-cis-retinol production did not directly reflect inhibition by products of lipid hydrolysis. Instead, a direct correlation between the kinetics of phospholipid hydrolysis and retinoid isomerization suggests that the lipid membrane structure is critical for RPE65 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that RPE65 operates in a multiprotein complex with retinol dehydrogenase 5 and retinal G protein-coupled receptor in RPE microsomes. Modifications in the phospholipid environment affecting interactions with these protein components may be responsible for the alterations in retinoid metabolism observed in phospholipid-depleted RPE microsomes. Thus, our results indicate that the enzymatic activity of native RPE65 strongly depends on its membrane binding and

  2. Antifungal activity of different neem leaf extracts and the nimonol against some important human pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, D.A.; Hassanein, N.M.; Youssef, K.A.; Abou Zeid, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous, ethanolic and ethyl acetate extracts from neem leaves on growth of some human pathogens (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus terreus, Candida albicans and Microsporum gypseum) in vitro. Different concentrations (5, 10, 15 and 20%) prepared from these extracts inhibited the growth of the test pathogens and the effect gradually increased with concentration. The 20% ethyl acetate extract gave the strongest inhibition compared with the activity obtained by the same concentration of the other extracts. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis of ethyl acetate extract showed the presence of a main component (nimonol) which was purified and chemically confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis. The 20% ethyl acetate extract lost a part of its antifungal effect after pooling out the nimonol and this loss in activity was variable on test pathogens. The purified nimonol as a separate compound did not show any antifungal activity when assayed against all the six fungal pathogens. PMID:24031718

  3. Imparting Nonfouling Properties to Chemically Distinct Surfaces with a Single Adsorbing Polymer: A Multimodal Binding Approach.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Ângela; Zürcher, Stefan; Tosatti, Samuele; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2016-04-01

    Surface-active polymers that display nonfouling properties and carry binding groups that can adsorb onto different substrates are highly desirable. We present a postmodification protocol of an active-ester-containing polymer that allows the creation of such a versatile platform. Poly(pentafluorophenyl acrylate) has been postmodified with a fixed grafting ratio of a nonfouling function (mPEG) and various combinations of functional groups, such as amine, silane and catechol, which can provide strong affinity to two model substrates: SiO2 and TiO2 . Adsorption, stability and resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption of the polymer films were studied. A polymer was obtained that maintained its surface functionality under a variety of harsh conditions. EG surface-density calculations show that this strategy generates a denser packing when both negatively and positively charged groups are present within the backbone, and readily allows the fabrication of a broad combinatorial matrix. PMID:26858017

  4. The importance of diet and physical activity in the treatment of conditions managed in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Little, P; Margetts, B

    1996-01-01

    Evidence from meta-analyses, physiological data and individual studies suggests that diet and exercise are important in the aetiology and treatment of many of the conditions that are managed predominantly in primary care (hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and excess alcohol intake). However, much of the evidence comes from outside primary care, and it is doubtful whether those studies done in primary care used optimal intervention strategies. A priority for future research should be to demonstrate the feasibility, efficacy and efficiency of lifestyle interventions in a general practice setting. PMID:8731628

  5. Are Parental Perceptions of Child Activity Levels and Overall Health More Important than Perceptions of Weight?

    PubMed Central

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Ramos, Michelle A.; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Kleinman, Lawrence C.; Galvez, Maida P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine relationships between parental perceptions of child weight and overall health, reported lifestyle behaviors and measured body mass index (BMI). Methods Using community-partnered methods, we surveyed families residing in a two census tract area identified for targeted interventions to decrease diabetes related disparities. The survey included demographics, child dietary and physical activity behaviors, and parental perception of child’s health and weight. We measured child BMI using a standardized protocol. Results We surveyed parents of 116 children with a mean age of 7 years (range 3–15) with 51 % boys, 74 % Hispanic, and 26 % Black. Over half of the children (55 %) were overweight or obese. Half (50 %) of the parents underestimated their children’s weight. Reported daily hours of walking and/or running trended higher (3.6 vs. 2.6 h, p = 0.08) for children perceived to be of normal weight. Parents who correctly estimated their child’s weight status reported more hours of daily walking/running than parents who underestimated child weight status, 4.5 versus 2.4 h, p = 0.0002. Parents of healthy weight children were more likely to report that children were in excellent or very good health compared to parents of overweight/obese children, 75 versus 56 % respectively (p = 0.04). We found significant racial/ethnic differences in reported diet and physical activity behaviors and perception of overall health. Conclusions for Practice Parental perceptions of child health and physical activity level may be related to perceptions of their child’s weight status. Study findings informed community-based initiatives for reducing diabetes risk among children. PMID:27010551

  6. Are Parental Perceptions of Child Activity Levels and Overall Health More Important than Perceptions of Weight?

    PubMed

    Vangeepuram, Nita; Ramos, Michelle A; Fei, Kezhen; Fox, Ashley M; Horowitz, Carol R; Kleinman, Lawrence C; Galvez, Maida P

    2016-07-01

    Objectives To examine relationships between parental perceptions of child weight and overall health, reported lifestyle behaviors and measured body mass index (BMI). Methods Using community-partnered methods, we surveyed families residing in a two census tract area identified for targeted interventions to decrease diabetes related disparities. The survey included demographics, child dietary and physical activity behaviors, and parental perception of child's health and weight. We measured child BMI using a standardized protocol. Results We surveyed parents of 116 children with a mean age of 7 years (range 3-15) with 51 % boys, 74 % Hispanic, and 26 % Black. Over half of the children (55 %) were overweight or obese. Half (50 %) of the parents underestimated their children's weight. Reported daily hours of walking and/or running trended higher (3.6 vs. 2.6 h, p = 0.08) for children perceived to be of normal weight. Parents who correctly estimated their child's weight status reported more hours of daily walking/running than parents who underestimated child weight status, 4.5 versus 2.4 h, p = 0.0002. Parents of healthy weight children were more likely to report that children were in excellent or very good health compared to parents of overweight/obese children, 75 versus 56 % respectively (p = 0.04). We found significant racial/ethnic differences in reported diet and physical activity behaviors and perception of overall health. Conclusions for Practice Parental perceptions of child health and physical activity level may be related to perceptions of their child's weight status. Study findings informed community-based initiatives for reducing diabetes risk among children. PMID:27010551

  7. Identification of catalytically important residues in the active site of Escherichia coli transaldolase.

    PubMed

    Schörken, U; Thorell, S; Schürmann, M; Jia, J; Sprenger, G A; Schneider, G

    2001-04-01

    The roles of invariant residues at the active site of transaldolase B from Escherichia coli have been probed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant enzymes D17A, N35A, E96A, T156A, and S176A were purified from a talB-deficient host and analyzed with respect to their 3D structure and kinetic behavior. X-ray analysis showed that side chain replacement did not induce unanticipated structural changes in the mutant enzymes. Three mutations, N35A, E96A, and T156A resulted mainly in an effect on apparent kcat, with little changes in apparent Km values for the substrates. Residues N35 and T156 are involved in the positioning of a catalytic water molecule at the active site and the side chain of E96 participates in concert with this water molecule in proton transfer during catalysis. Substitution of Ser176 by alanine resulted in a mutant enzyme with 2.5% residual activity. The apparent Km value for the donor substrate, fructose 6-phosphate, was increased nearly fivefold while the apparent Km value for the acceptor substrate, erythrose 4-phosphate remained unchanged, consistent with a function for S176 in the binding of the C1 hydroxyl group of the donor substrate. The mutant D17A showed a 300-fold decrease in kcat, and a fivefold increase in the apparent Km value for the acceptor substrate erythrose 4-phosphate, suggesting a role of this residue in carbon-carbon bond cleavage and stabilization of the carbanion/enamine intermediate. PMID:11298760

  8. Importance of the Protein Framework for Catalytic Activity of [FeFe]-Hydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Knörzer, Philipp; Silakov, Alexey; Foster, Carina E.; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Happe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The active center (H-cluster) of [FeFe]-hydrogenases is embedded into a hydrophobic pocket within the protein. We analyzed several amino acids, located in the vicinity of this niche, by site-directed mutagenesis of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1). These amino acids are highly conserved and predicted to be involved in H-cluster coordination. Characterization of two hydrogenase variants confirmed this hypothesis. The exchange of residues CrHydA1Met415 and CrHydA1Lys228 resulted in inactive proteins, which, according to EPR and FTIR analyses, contain no intact H-cluster. However, [FeFe]-hydrogenases in which CpIMet353 (CrHydA1Met223) and CpICys299 (CrHydA1Cys169) were exchanged to leucine and serine, respectively, showed a structurally intact H-cluster with catalytic activity either absent (CpIC299S) or strongly diminished (CpIM353L). In the case of CrHydA1C169S, the H-cluster was trapped in an inactive state exhibiting g values and vibrational frequencies that resembled the Htrans state of DdH from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. This cysteine residue, interacting with the bridge head nitrogen of the di(methyl)amine ligand, seems therefore to represent an essential contribution of the immediate protein environment to the reaction mechanism. Exchanging methionine CpIM353 (CrHydA1M223) to leucine led to a strong decrease in turnover without affecting the Km value of the electron donor. We suggest that this methionine constitutes a “fine-tuning” element of hydrogenase activity. PMID:22110126

  9. Stable Expression of mtlD Gene Imparts Multiple Stress Tolerance in Finger Millet

    PubMed Central

    Hema, Ramanna; Vemanna, Ramu S.; Sreeramulu, Shivakumar; Reddy, Chandrasekhara P.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Udayakumar, Makarla

    2014-01-01

    Finger millet is susceptible to abiotic stresses, especially drought and salinity stress, in the field during seed germination and early stages of seedling development. Therefore developing stress tolerant finger millet plants combating drought, salinity and associated oxidative stress in these two growth stages is important. Cellular protection through osmotic adjustment and efficient free radical scavenging ability during abiotic stress are important components of stress tolerance mechanisms in plants. Mannitol, an osmolyte, is known to scavenge hydroxyl radicals generated during various abiotic stresses and thereby minimize stress damage in several plant species. In this study transgenic finger millet plants expressing the mannitol biosynthetic pathway gene from bacteria, mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (mtlD), were developed through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. mtlD gene integration in the putative transgenic plants was confirmed by Southern blot. Further, performance of transgenic finger millet under drought, salinity and oxidative stress was studied at plant level in T1 generation and in T1 and T2 generation seedlings. Results from these experiments showed that transgenic finger millet had better growth under drought and salinity stress compared to wild-type. At plant level, transgenic plants showed better osmotic adjustment and chlorophyll retention under drought stress compared to the wild-type. However, the overall increase in stress tolerance of transgenics for the three stresses, especially for oxidative stress, was only marginal compared to other mtlD gene expressing plant species reported in the literature. Moreover, the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation protocol developed for finger millet in this study can be used to introduce diverse traits of agronomic importance in finger millet. PMID:24922513

  10. Estimation of effective doses to adult and pediatric patients from multislice computed tomography: A method based on energy imparted

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Tzedakis, Antonis; Karantanas, Apostolos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to provide a method and required data for the estimation of effective dose (E) values to adult and pediatric patients from computed tomography (CT) scans of the head, chest abdomen, and pelvis, performed on multi-slice scanners. Mean section radiation dose (d{sub m}) to cylindrical water phantoms of varying radius normalized over CT dose index free-in-air (CTDI{sub F}) were calculated for the head and body scanning modes of a multislice scanner with use of Monte Carlo techniques. Patients were modeled as equivalent water phantoms and the energy imparted ({epsilon}) to simulated pediatric and adult patients was calculated on the basis of measured CTDI{sub F} values. Body region specific energy imparted to effective dose conversion coefficients (E/{epsilon}) for adult male and female patients were generated from previous data. Effective doses to patients aged newborn to adult were derived for all available helical and axial beam collimations, taking into account age specific patient mass and scanning length. Depending on high voltage, body region, and patient sex, E/{epsilon} values ranged from 0.008 mSv/mJ for head scans to 0.024 mSv/mJ for chest scans. When scanned with the same technique factors as the adults, pediatric patients absorb as little as 5% of the energy imparted to adults, but corresponding effective dose values are up to a factor of 1.6 higher. On average, pediatric patients absorb 44% less energy per examination but have a 24% higher effective dose, compared with adults. In clinical practice, effective dose values to pediatric patients are 2.5 to 10 times lower than in adults due to the adaptation of tube current. A method is provided for the calculation of effective dose to adult and pediatric patients on the basis of individual patient characteristics such as sex, mass, dimensions, and density of imaged anatomy, and the technical features of modern multislice scanners. It allows the optimum selection of scanning

  11. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Curtis D.; Edwards, Ross A.; Markin, Craig J.; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S. Y.; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J.; Glover, J.N. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  12. Covalent Inhibition of Ubc13 Affects Ubiquitin Signaling and Reveals Active Site Elements Important for Targeting.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Curtis D; Edwards, Ross A; Markin, Craig J; McDonald, Darin; Pulvino, Mary; Huen, Michael S Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Hendzel, Michael J; Glover, J N Mark

    2015-07-17

    Ubc13 is an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme that functions in nuclear DNA damage signaling and cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling. Here, we present the structures of complexes of Ubc13 with two inhibitors, NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082, which inhibit DNA damage and NF-κB signaling in human cells. NSC697923 and BAY 11-7082 both inhibit Ubc13 by covalent adduct formation through a Michael addition at the Ubc13 active site cysteine. The resulting adducts of both compounds exploit a binding groove unique to Ubc13. We developed a Ubc13 mutant which resists NSC697923 inhibition and, using this mutant, we show that the inhibition of cellular DNA damage and NF-κB signaling by NSC697923 is largely due to specific Ubc13 inhibition. We propose that unique structural features near the Ubc13 active site could provide a basis for the rational development and design of specific Ubc13 inhibitors. PMID:25909880

  13. Activity of leucine aminopeptidase of Telchin licus licus: an important insect pest of sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Jorge W Arboleda; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi; Jiménez, Arnubio Valencia

    2014-06-01

    The enzymatic activity of leucine aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.1) from the intestinal tract of sugarcane giant borer (Telchin licus licus) was assayed by using a simple and sensitive spectrophotometric assay that uses L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide as substrate. In this assay, L-leucyl-2-naphthylamide is hydrolyzed to produce 2-naphthylamine and Lleucine. The product 2-naphthylamine reacts with Fast Black K and can be monitored using a continuous spectrophotometric measurement at 590 nm. The data on the kinetic parameters indicates that the Km for the L-leucyl-2- naphthylamide at pH 7.0 was found to be lower than those found for other LAP substrates. The Km and Vmax for the LAP were determined to be 84.03 µM and 357.14 enzymatic units mg(-1), respectively. A noticeable difference of LAP activity between the two insect orders tested was observed. This method could be used to screen for natural LAP inhibitors. PMID:24410745

  14. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  15. Functionalization of cotton fabrics by radiation induced grafting of quaternary salt to impart antibacterial property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, N. K.; Kumar, Virendra; Rao, M. S.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Sabharwal, S.

    2011-11-01

    High energy gamma radiation has been used to covalently link polymer chains of a quaternary ammonium salt containing monomer, viz. [2-(Acryloyloxyethyl)]trimethylammonium chloride (AETC) to cotton fabric by mutual radiation grafting using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) monomer as the grafting facilitator. Grafting yield was found to increase with the radiation dose and monomer concentration. The grafted samples have been characterized for water uptake, surface morphology and thermal stability and for their antibacterial efficacy against various bacteria and were found to possess significant antibacterial activity particularly against gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Loss of DNA mismatch repair imparts a selective advantage in planarian adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbach, Jessica P; Resch, Alissa M; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi; Graveley, Brenton R; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) leads to an increased risk of early-onset colorectal and other types of cancer and is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Loss of MMR function results in a mutator phenotype that likely underlies its role in tumorigenesis. However, loss of MMR also results in the elimination of a DNA damage-induced checkpoint/apoptosis activation barrier that may allow damaged cells to grow unchecked. A fundamental question is whether loss of MMR provides pre-cancerous stem cells an immediate selective advantage in addition to establishing a mutator phenotype. To test this hypothesis in an in vivo system, we utilized the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea which contains a significant population of identifiable adult stem cells. We identified a planarian homolog of human MSH2, a MMR gene which is mutated in 38% of LS cases. The planarian Smed-msh2 is expressed in stem cells and some progeny. We depleted Smed-msh2 mRNA levels by RNA-interference and found a striking survival advantage in these animals treated with a cytotoxic DNA alkylating agent compared to control animals. We demonstrated that this tolerance to DNA damage is due to the survival of mitotically active, MMR-deficient stem cells. Our results suggest that loss of MMR provides an in vivo survival advantage to the stem cell population in the presence of DNA damage that may have implications for tumorigenesis. PMID:21747960

  17. Importance of excipient wettability on tablet characteristics prepared by moisture activated dry granulation (MADG).

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Hiroshi; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Messerschmid, Roman; Ito, Masanori; Wada, Koichi; Terada, Katsuhide

    2013-11-01

    For moisture activated dry granulation (MADG), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) or silicon dioxide is recommended for the moisture absorption stage. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of alternative excipients as moisture absorbents with regard to the disintegration mechanism of resulting lactose based placebo formulations. Beside high and low moisture MCC grades, the additions of magnesium aluminometasilicate (MAMS), pregelatinized starch (S1500), crospovidone (Kollidon CL) and carmellose calcium (ECG 505) were evaluated. High shear granulation (HSG) was conducted as a reference process. The overall disintegration time of all tablets produced by MADG was significantly faster whereas hardness yield and mass-variability were equal or superior compared to the HSG process. Powder wettability of the different moisture absorbents was identified to be a key driver for rapid disintegration, whereas tablet porosity had only a minor influence on the target hardness of the tablets. PMID:23994013

  18. The Early Time Properties of GRBs - Canonical Afterglows and the Importance of Prolonged Central Engine Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Melandri, A.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Bersier, D.; Steele, I. A.; Smith, R. J.; Carter, D.; Bode, M. F.; Guidorzi, C.; Gomboc, A.

    2009-05-25

    Using a new, comprehensive multiwavelength survey of 63 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) with unprecedented temporal coverage, we classify the observed afterglows into four main classes and discuss the underlying physics that can explain them. The presence or absence of temporal breaks in X-ray and optical bands is used to examine the emission in the context of the standard model; a number of GRBs are shown to deviate from the forward shock model even with the inclusion of energy injection or ambient density gradients. We show that additional emission in the early-time X-ray afterglow due to late-time central engine activity is key and may explain both GRBs whose afterglows do not fit the standard model and those GRBs that appear to be optically dark even at early times.

  19. Is anterior cruciate ligament surgery technique important in rehabilitation and activity scores?

    PubMed Central

    Kilinc, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Celik, Haluk; Oc, Yunus; Camur, Savas

    2016-01-01

    To compare the two different anterior cruciate ligament surgery techniques’ effect in rehabilitation and activity performance. Fifty-five patients were evaluated. Twenty-seven patients with transtibial technique (TT), 28 with anatomic single-bundle technique (AT) included. Tegner Activity Scale (TAS) was performed at preoperation and follow-up. The returning time of the sport and work was evaluated at follow-up. Single-leg hop test was performed at follow-up. Outcomes were compared between the two groups. The determined length difference between the operated knee and the intact knee was compared between the two groups. Average age of TT and AT was 27.9±6.4 yr, 28.3±6 yr, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups in duration of returning to sport. TT group had higher duration to return to sport (P<0.01). No difference between the two groups in duration of returning to work (P>0.05). There was a significant difference between the two groups. TT group had significantly higher values than AT group (P<0.01). No difference in TAS between the two techniques at preoperation and at last follow-up (P>0.05). The increase of TAS in patients who had AT was higher than the patients who had TT (P>0.05). No difference in single-leg hop test at 55%–65%, 65%–75%, and 85%–95% level (P>0.05). In this test at 75%–85% TT group had higher values than AT group (P<0.05), AT group had higher values at 95%–105% level (P<0.05). Good short and long-term knee outcome scores depend on rehabilitation protocol after surgery. Surgery technique should provide the adequate stability in rehabilitation period. AT obtains better outcomes in rehabilitation. PMID:27419120

  20. The Effects of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Activities Important to Independent School Participation of Children with Hemiparesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of constraint-induced movement therapy (CI therapy) on activities important to school participation in children with hemiparesis. Four children, ages 4-0 to 7-10 participated in an intensive CI therapy program in a clinical setting. Constraining casts were worn 24 hours daily. Therapy was delivered 6 hours…

  1. Imparting super hydro/oleophobic properties to cotton fabric by means of molecular and nanoparticles vapor deposition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminayi, Payam; Abidi, Noureddine

    2013-12-01

    Super hydro/oleophobic cotton fabrics were prepared using nanoparticle vapor deposition and molecular vapor deposition techniques. The surface was roughened by trimethylaluminum/water nanoparticles followed by functionalization with (tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl)trichlorosilane. This process imparted unique hydro/oleophobic properties (contact angle >160°). In contrast to wet chemistry processes, the chemicals used and the thickness of the coatings produced by this method could be controlled precisely, which allowed for the minimization of waste generation while preserving the original properties of the fabric. Dynamic contact angles were measured and the fabrics that were coated using this technique showed low-contact-angle hysteresis properties. Scanning electron microscopy and universal attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a nanostructure-roughened surface. Drop dynamics such as the force of droplet movement, work of adhesion, and surface free energy were also calculated.

  2. The importance of hinge sequence for loop function and catalytic activity in the reaction catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Xiang, J; Sun, J; Sampson, N S

    2001-04-01

    We have determined the sequence requirements for the N-terminal protein hinge of the active-site lid of triosephosphate isomerase. The codons for the hinge (PVW) were replaced with a genetic library of all possible 8000 amino acid combinations. The most active of these 8000 mutants were selected using in vivo complementation of a triosephosphate isomerase-deficient strain of Escherichia coli, DF502. Approximately 0.3 % of the mutants complement DF502 with an activity that is between 10 and 70 % of wild-type activity. They all contain Pro at the first position. Furthermore, the sequences of these hinge mutants reveal that hydrophobic packing is very important for efficient formation of the enediol intermediate. However, the reduced catalytic activities observed are not due to increased rates of loop opening. To explore the relationship between the N-terminal and C-terminal hinges, three semi-active mutants from the N-terminal hinge selection experiment (PLH, PHS and PTF), and six active C-terminal hinge mutants from previous work (NSS, LWA, YSL, KTK, NPN, KVA) were combined to form 18 "double-hinge" mutants. The activities of these mutants suggest that the N-terminal and C-terminal hinge structures affect one another. It appears that specific side-chain interactions are important for forming a catalytically active enzyme, but not for preventing release of the unstable enediol intermediate from the active site of the enzyme. The independence of intermediate release on amino acid sequence is consistent with the absence of a "universal" hinge sequence in structurally related enzymes. PMID:11286559

  3. The killing activity of microwaves on some non-sporogenic and sporogenic medically important bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Najdovski, L; Dragas, A Z; Kotnik, V

    1991-12-01

    The killing activity of microwaves of 2450 MHz frequency and 325 W, 650 W and 1400 W power on some bacterial strains was investigated. Vegetative strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes Group A, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis and spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillis stearothermophilus in aqueous suspensions were exposed to 325 W and 650 W waves for different lengths of time. Enterococcus faecalis and spores of B. subtilis and B. stearothermophilus were exposed additionally to 1400 W waves in aqueous and 'dried' suspensions. Vegetative bacteria were promptly killed in 5 min or less, E. faecalis being slightly more resistant. Bacterial spores were only killed in aqueous suspension when a 1400 W setting was used for 10 to 20 min. Bacterial spores adhering to the tube walls after the aqueous suspension was poured out were reduced in number. We assume that the conventional microwave ovens available on the market may be used for a high level of disinfection but not for sterilization, and only then if sufficient water is present. PMID:1686036

  4. Active processes on a mixed clastic carbonate Brazilian shelf margin: Importance for hydrocarbon exploration in turbidites

    SciTech Connect

    Cainelli, C. )

    1991-03-01

    The search for subtle hydrocarbon accumulations in turbidite systems requires additional approaches for more successful exploration, particularly when direct recognition on seismic lines is difficult. This includes the determination and understanding of processes controlling sand distribution on the shelf and the mapping of sand pathways from the shelf to the slop/basin that can guide efforts to look for more favorable sites for turbidite sandstone deposition. The approach can be exemplified in the Sergipe-Alagoas basin, on the Brazillian Atlantic passive margin. The section analyzed is the Piacabucu Formation, a thick seaward prograding wedge composed of coastal sandstones and shelf edge carbonates on a narrow shelf and slope-basin shales with turbidite lenses. Waves and currents control the redistribution of sediments transported to the shelf by rivers. More wave energy is expended in ten hours in the San Francisco delta than in an entire year in the Mississippi delta. Such environment precludes deposition of mud on the shelf, but it stimulates the development of shelf edge carbonates. Rimed carbonates along the shelf break serve as a barrier for downslope movements of coarse-grained sediment, where turbidites are oil targets. The search for gaps in the carbonate barrier which can tap the behind-barrier sands is critical for sand-rich turbidite development. It is believed that canyons create these gaps and act as active turbidity current routes.

  5. Comparison of the composition and opsonic activities of imported and South African-manufactured intravenous and intramuscular immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Theron, A J; Jooné, G K; Anderson, R

    1994-11-01

    We compared the composition and opsonic activities for two common microbial pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) of various imported intravenous (IV) (Sandoglobulin, Octagam and Gammagard) and intramuscular (IM) (Beriglobin and Globuman Berna) immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations with those of the corresponding locally manufactured products, Polygam (IV) and Intragam (IM). When tested at equivalent concentrations (1 g/100 ml) the total IgG and IgG subclass concentrations of the various IV and IM preparations were similar. All the test preparations (IV and IM) possessed similar opsonic activity for S. aureus and S. pyogenes. These findings demonstrate that, in respect of IgG content and protective biological activity, Intragam and Polygam, the locally manufactured IM and IV Ig preparations, respectively, compared extremely favourably with the corresponding imported products. PMID:7495010

  6. Structure-Activity Relationship of Oligomeric Flavan-3-ols: Importance of the Upper-Unit B-ring Hydroxyl Groups in the Dimeric Structure for Strong Activities.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshitomo; Takano, Syota; Ayano, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Masahiro; Koashi, Takahiro; Okamoto, Syuhei; Doi, Syoma; Ishida, Masahiko; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hamada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Saito, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins, which are composed of oligomeric flavan-3-ol units, are contained in various foodstuffs (e.g., fruits, vegetables, and drinks) and are strongly biologically active compounds. We investigated which element of the proanthocyanidin structure is primarily responsible for this functionality. In this study, we elucidate the importance of the upper-unit of 4-8 condensed dimeric flavan-3-ols for antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) and cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line HeLa S3 proliferation inhibitory activity. To clarify the important constituent unit of proanthocyanidin, we synthesized four dimeric compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and (+)-catechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin and performed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. In addition to antimicrobial activity against S. cerevisiae and proliferation inhibitory activity on HeLa S3 cells, the correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups was low. On the basis of the results of our SAR studies, we concluded that B-ring hydroxyl groups of the upper-unit of the dimer are crucially important for strong and effective activity. PMID:26501251

  7. The importance of methanotrophic activity in geothermal soils of Pantelleria island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Methane is a major contributor to the greenhouse effect, its atmospheric concentration being more than doubled since the XIX century. Every year 22 Tg of methane are released to the atmosphere from several natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include geothermal/volcanic areas but the estimation of the total methane emission from these areas is currently not well defined since the balance between emission through degassing and microbial oxidation within the soils is not well known. Microbial oxidation in soils contributes globally for about 3-9% to the removal of methane from the atmosphere and recent studies evidenced methanotrophic activity also in soils of volcanic/geothermal areas despite their harsh environmental conditions (high temperatures, low pH and high concentrations of H2S and NH3). Methanotrophs are a diverse group of bacteria that are able to metabolize methane as their only source of carbon and energy and are found within the Alpha and Gamma classes of Proteobacteria and within the phylum Verrucomicrobia. Our purpose was to study the interaction between methanotrophic communities and the methane emitted from the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission has been previously estimated in about 2.5 t/a. Laboratory incubation experiments with soil samples from Favara Grande showed methane consumption values of up to 9500 ng g-1 dry soil per hour while soils collected outside the geothermal area consume less than 6 ng g-1 h-1. The maximum consumption was measured in the shallowest part of the soil profile (1-3 cm) and high values (>100 ng g-1 h-1) were maintained up to a depht of 15 cm. Furthermore, the highest consumption was measured at 37°C, and a still recognizable consumption (>20 ng g-1 h-1) at 80°C, with positive correlation with the methane concentration in the incubation atmosphere. These results can be considered a clear evidence of the presence of methanotrophs that

  8. Imparting functionality to a metal-organic framework material by controlled nanoparticle encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guang; Li, Shaozhou; Guo, Zhen; Farha, Omar K; Hauser, Brad G; Qi, Xiaoying; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xin; Han, Sanyang; Liu, Xiaogang; DuChene, Joseph S; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Qichun; Chen, Xiaodong; Ma, Jan; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Wei, Wei D; Yang, Yanhui; Hupp, Joseph T; Huo, Fengwei

    2012-04-01

    Microporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that display permanent porosity show great promise for a myriad of purposes. The potential applications of MOFs can be developed further and extended by encapsulating various functional species (for example, nanoparticles) within the frameworks. However, despite increasing numbers of reports of nanoparticle/MOF composites, simultaneously to control the size, composition, dispersed nature, spatial distribution and confinement of the incorporated nanoparticles within MOF matrices remains a significant challenge. Here, we report a controlled encapsulation strategy that enables surfactant-capped nanostructured objects of various sizes, shapes and compositions to be enshrouded by a zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8). The incorporated nanoparticles are well dispersed and fully confined within the ZIF-8 crystals. This strategy also allows the controlled incorporation of multiple nanoparticles within each ZIF-8 crystallite. The as-prepared nanoparticle/ZIF-8 composites exhibit active (catalytic, magnetic and optical) properties that derive from the nanoparticles as well as molecular sieving and orientation effects that originate from the framework material. PMID:22437717

  9. Importance of Baseline Prognostic Factors With Increasing Time Since Initiation of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The extent to which the prognosis for AIDS and death of patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) continues to be affected by their characteristics at the time of initiation (baseline) is unclear. Methods We analyzed data on 20,379 treatment-naive HIV-1–infected adults who started HAART in 1 of 12 cohort studies in Europe and North America (61,798 person-years of follow-up, 1844 AIDS events, and 1005 deaths). Results Although baseline CD4 cell count became less prognostic with time, individuals with a baseline CD4 count <25 cells/µL had persistently higher progression rates than individuals with a baseline CD4 count >350 cells/µL (hazard ratio for AIDS = 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0 to 2.3; mortality hazard ratio = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Rates of AIDS were persistently higher in individuals who had experienced an AIDS event before starting HAART. Individuals with presumed transmission by means of injection drug use experienced substantially higher rates of AIDS and death than other individuals throughout follow-up (AIDS hazard ratio = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.8 to 3.0; mortality hazard ratio = 3.5, 95% CI: 2.2 to 5.5, 4 to 6 years after starting HAART). Conclusions Compared with other patient groups, injection drug users and patients with advanced immunodeficiency at baseline experience substantially increased rates of AIDS and death up to 6 years after starting HAART. PMID:18043315

  10. Dissipation of the energy imparted by mid-latitude storms in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanno, Julien; Capet, Xavier; Madec, Gurvan; Roullet, Guillaume; Klein, Patrice

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the role of the Southern Ocean storms on interior mixing and meridional overturning circulation. A periodic and idealized numerical model has been designed to represent the key physical processes of a zonal portion of the Southern Ocean located between 70 and 40° S. It incorporates physical ingredients deemed essential for Southern Ocean functioning: rough topography, seasonally varying air-sea fluxes, and high-latitude storms with analytical form. The forcing strategy ensures that the time mean wind stress is the same between the different simulations, so the effect of the storms on the mean wind stress and resulting impacts on the Southern Ocean dynamics are not considered in this study. Level and distribution of mixing attributable to high-frequency winds are quantified and compared to those generated by eddy-topography interactions and dissipation of the balanced flow. Results suggest that (1) the synoptic atmospheric variability alone can generate the levels of mid-depth dissipation frequently observed in the Southern Ocean (10-10-10-9 W kg-1) and (2) the storms strengthen the overturning, primarily through enhanced mixing in the upper 300 m, whereas deeper mixing has a minor effect. The sensitivity of the results to horizontal resolution (20, 5, 2 and 1 km), vertical resolution and numerical choices is evaluated. Challenging issues concerning how numerical models are able to represent interior mixing forced by high-frequency winds are exposed and discussed, particularly in the context of the overturning circulation. Overall, submesoscale-permitting ocean modeling exhibits important delicacies owing to a lack of convergence of key components of its energetics even when reaching Δx = 1 km.

  11. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Hale, Laura P; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-09-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  12. Recombinant BCG Expressing Mycobacterium ulcerans Ag85A Imparts Enhanced Protection against Experimental Buruli ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Hale, Laura P.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, an emerging tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), is characterized by disfiguring skin necrosis and high morbidity. Relatively little is understood about the mode of transmission, pathogenesis, or host immune responses to MU infection. Due to significant reduction in quality of life for patients with extensive tissue scarring, and that a disproportionately high percentage of those affected are disadvantaged children, a Buruli ulcer vaccine would be greatly beneficial to the worldwide community. Previous studies have shown that mice inoculated with either M. bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) or a DNA vaccine encoding the M. ulcerans mycolyl transferase, Ag85A (MU-Ag85A), are transiently protected against pathology caused by intradermal challenge with MU. Building upon this principle, we have generated quality-controlled, live-recombinant strains of BCG and M. smegmatis which express the immunodominant MU Ag85A. Priming with rBCG MU-Ag85A followed by an M. smegmatis MU-Ag85A boost strongly induced murine antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and elicited functional IFNγ-producing splenocytes which recognized MU-Ag85A peptide and whole M. ulcerans better than a BCG prime-boost vaccination. Strikingly, mice vaccinated with a single subcutaneous dose of BCG MU-Ag85A or prime-boost displayed significantly enhanced survival, reduced tissue pathology, and lower bacterial load compared to mice vaccinated with BCG. Importantly, this level of superior protection against experimental Buruli ulcer compared to BCG has not previously been achieved. These results suggest that use of BCG as a recombinant vehicle expressing MU antigens represents an effective Buruli ulcer vaccine strategy and warrants further antigen discovery to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:26393347

  13. Separate Elements within a Single IQ-like Motif in Adenylyl Cyclase Type 8 Impart Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding and Autoinhibition*

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, David A.; Wachten, Sebastian; Ciruela, Antonio; Sinz, Andrea; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) fulfills its numerous signaling functions through a wide range of modular binding and activation mechanisms. By activating adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 1 and 8, Ca2+ acting via calmodulin impacts on the signaling of the other major cellular second messenger cAMP. In possessing two CaM-binding domains, a 1-5-8-14 motif at the N terminus and an IQ-like motif (IQlm) at the C terminus, AC8 offers particularly sophisticated regulatory possibilities. The IQlm has remained unexplored beyond the suggestion that it bound CaM, and the larger C2b region of which it is part was involved in the relief of autoinhibition of AC8. Here we attempt to distinguish the function of individual residues of the IQlm. From a complementary approach of in vitro and cell population AC activity assays, as well as CaM binding, we propose that the IQlm alone, and not the majority of the C2b, imparts CaM binding and autoinhibitory functions. Moreover, this duality of function is spatially separated and depends on amino acid side-chain character. Accordingly, residues critical for CaM binding are positively charged and clustered toward the C terminus, and those essential for the maintenance of autoinhibition are hydrophobic and more N-terminal. Secondary structure prediction of the IQlm supports this separation, with an ideally placed break in the α-helical nature of the sequence. We additionally find that the N and C termini of AC8 interact, which is an association specifically abrogated by fully Ca2+-bound, but not Ca2+-free, CaM. These data support a sophisticated activation mechanism of AC8 by CaM, in which the duality of the IQlm function is critical. PMID:19305019

  14. Imparting commercial antimicrobial dressings with low-adherence to burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Sogol; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Liu, Song

    2016-06-01

    The objective of our study was to decrease the wound adherence of commercial silver based wound dressings by depositing a non-adherent layer. Our hypothesis was that this non-adherent layer will lower the dressing's adherence to burn wounds without compromising the antimicrobial activity or increasing the cytotoxicity. A polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel layer was grafted on two commercial silver antimicrobial dressings (silver nanocrystal dressing (NC) and silver plated dressing (SP)) using a proprietary technique. The grafted PAM served as the non-adherent layer. Dressing adherence was measured with a previously published in vitro gelatin model using an Instron mechanical force testing instrument. The dressings were challenged with two clinically retrieved bacterial strains (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa) with both a disk diffusion test, and a suspension antibacterial test. The cytotoxicity of samples to human neonatal fibroblast cells was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Both untreated dressings showed high peeling energy: 2070±453J/m(2) (NC) and 669±68J/m(2) (SP), that decreased to 158±119J/m(2) (NC) and 155±138J/m(2) (SP) with the PAM deposition. Addition of the PAM caused no significant difference in zone of inhibition (ZOI) (disk diffusion test) or antibacterial kinetics (suspension test) against both bacteria (p>0.05, n=6) in either dressing. Survival of fibroblasts was improved by the PAM grafting from 48±5% to 60±3% viable cells in the case of NC and from 55±8% to 61±4% viable cells in SP (p<0.05, n=12). It was concluded that PAM as a non-adherent layer significantly decreases the adherence of these two commercial antimicrobial dressings in an in vitro gelatin model while preserving their antimicrobial efficacy, and reducing their cytotoxicity. PMID:26847614

  15. Features of Modularly Assembled Compounds That Impart Bioactivity Against an RNA Target

    PubMed Central

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G.; Gao, Yu; Tang, Zhen-Zhi; Thornton, Charles A.; Kodadek, Thomas; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptomes provide a myriad of potential RNAs that could be the targets of therapeutics or chemical genetic probes of function. Cell permeable small molecules, however, generally do not exploit these targets, owing to the difficulty in the design of high affinity, specific small molecules targeting RNA. As part of a general program to study RNA function using small molecules, we designed bioactive, modularly assembled small molecules that target the non-coding expanded RNA repeat that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), r(CUG)exp. Herein, we present a rigorous study to elucidate features in modularly assembled compounds that afford bioactivity. Different modular assembly scaffolds were investigated including polyamines, α-peptides, β-peptides, and peptide tertiary amides (PTAs). Based on activity as assessed by improvement of DM1-associated defects, stability against proteases, cellular permeability, and toxicity, we discovered that constrained backbones, namely PTAs, are optimal. Notably, we determined that r(CUG)exp is the target of the optimal PTA in cellular models and that the optimal PTA improves DM1-associated defects in a mouse model. Biophysical analyses were employed to investigate potential sources of bioactivity. These investigations show that modularly assembled compounds have increased residence times on their targets and faster on rates than the RNA-binding modules from which they were derived and faster on rates than the protein that binds r(CUG)exp, the inactivation of which gives rise to DM1-associated defects. These studies provide information about features of small molecules that are programmable for targeting RNA, allowing for the facile optimization of therapeutics or chemical probes against other cellular RNA targets. PMID:24032410

  16. Features of modularly assembled compounds that impart bioactivity against an RNA target.

    PubMed

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Gao, Yu; Tang, Zhen-Zhi; Thornton, Charles A; Kodadek, Thomas; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-18

    Transcriptomes provide a myriad of potential RNAs that could be the targets of therapeutics or chemical genetic probes of function. Cell-permeable small molecules, however, generally do not exploit these targets, owing to the difficulty in the design of high affinity, specific small molecules targeting RNA. As part of a general program to study RNA function using small molecules, we designed bioactive, modularly assembled small molecules that target the noncoding expanded RNA repeat that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), r(CUG)(exp). Herein, we present a rigorous study to elucidate features in modularly assembled compounds that afford bioactivity. Different modular assembly scaffolds were investigated, including polyamines, α-peptides, β-peptides, and peptide tertiary amides (PTAs). On the basis of activity as assessed by improvement of DM1-associated defects, stability against proteases, cellular permeability, and toxicity, we discovered that constrained backbones, namely, PTAs, are optimal. Notably, we determined that r(CUG)(exp) is the target of the optimal PTA in cellular models and that the optimal PTA improves DM1-associated defects in a mouse model. Biophysical analyses were employed to investigate potential sources of bioactivity. These investigations show that modularly assembled compounds have increased residence times on their targets and faster on rates than the RNA-binding modules from which they were derived. Moreover, they have faster on rates than the protein that binds r(CUG)(exp), the inactivation of which gives rise to DM1-associated defects. These studies provide information about features of small molecules that are programmable for targeting RNA, allowing for the facile optimization of therapeutics or chemical probes against other cellular RNA targets. PMID:24032410

  17. {beta}-Catenin stabilization imparts crypt progenitor phenotype to hyperproliferating colonic epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, Joseph H.; Wang Yu; Singh, Pomila; Umar, Shahid

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing the Citrobacter rodentium (CR)-induced transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia (TMCH) model, we provide mechanistic basis of changes in {beta}-catenin/APC/CKI{epsilon} leading to progression and/or regression of hyperplasia in vivo. In response to CR-induced TMCH, crypt lengths increased significantly between days 6-27 post-infection, followed by a steep decline by day 34. {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/total {beta}-catenin were elevated on day 1 post-infection, preceding changes in crypt length, and persisted for 27 days before declining by day 34. Importantly, cellular CKI{epsilon} and {beta}-catenin co-immunoprecipitated and exhibited remarkable parallel changes in kinetics during hyperplasia/regression phases. {beta}-catenin, phosphorylated at Ser33,37 and Thr41 ({beta}-cat{sup 33,37/41}), was low till day 12, followed by gradual increase until day 27 before declining by day 34. GSK-3{beta} exhibited significant Ser{sup 9}-phosphorylation/inactivation at days 6-12 with partial recovery at days 27-34. Wild type (wt) APC (p312) levels increased at day 6 with transient proteolysis/truncation to p130 form between days 12 and 15; p312 reappeared by day 19 and returned to baseline by day 34. The kinetics of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin nuclear accumulation and acetylation (Ac-{beta}-Cat{sup Lys49}) from days 6 to 27, followed by loss of phosphorylation/acetylation by day 34 was almost identical; Tcf-4 co-immunoprecipitated with {beta}-Cat{sup 45}/{beta}-catenin and localized immunohistochemically to {beta}-Cat{sup 41/45}-positive regions leading to elevated cyclin D1 expression, during the hyperproliferative, but not regression phases of TMCH. CKI{epsilon} mediated phosphorylation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45}, resulting in stabilization/nuclear translocation of {beta}-Cat{sup 45} may be critical for maintaining proliferation at days 6-27. Reversal of GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation and APC changes may be equally critical during the regression phase from days 27 to 34.

  18. Arginine kinase: differentiation of gene expression and protein activity in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haichuan; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Lee; Lin, Qin; Liu, Nannan

    2009-02-01

    Arginine kinase (AK), a primary enzyme in cell metabolism and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-consuming processes, plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and maintaining constant ATP levels in invertebrate cells. In order to identify genes that are differentially expressed between larvae and adults, queens and workers, and female alates (winged) and queens (wingless), AK cDNA was obtained from the red imported fire ant. The cDNA sequence of the gene has open reading frames of 1065 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 355 amino acid residues that includes the substrate recognition region, the signature sequence pattern of ATP:guanidino kinases, and an "actinin-type" actin binding domain. Northern blot analysis and protein activity analysis demonstrated that the expression of the AK gene and its protein activity were developmentally, caste specifically, and tissue specifically regulated in red imported fire ants with a descending order of worker> alate (winged adult) female> alate (winged adult) male> larvae> worker pupae approximately alate pupae. These results suggest a different demand for energy-consumption and production in the different castes of the red imported fire ant, which may be linked to their different missions and physiological activities in the colonies. The highest level of the AK gene expression and activity was identified in head tissue of both female alates and workers and thorax tissue of workers, followed by thorax tissue of female alates and abdomen tissue of male alates, suggesting the main tissues or cells in these body parts, such as brain, neurons and muscles, which have been identified as the major tissues and/or cells that display high and variable rates of energy turnover in other organisms, play a key role in energy production and its utilization in the fire ant. In contrast, in the male alate, the highest AK expression and activity were found in the abdomen, suggesting that here energy demand may relate to sperm formation

  19. The p21-activated kinase, PAK2, is important in the activation of numerous pancreatic acinar cell signaling cascades and in the onset of early pancreatitis events.

    PubMed

    Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Jensen, R T

    2016-06-01

    In a recent study we explored Group-1-p21-activated kinases (GP.1-PAKs) in rat pancreatic acini. Only PAK2 was present; it was activated by gastrointestinal-hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors in a PKC-, Src- and small-GTPase-mediated manner. PAK2 was required for enzyme-secretion and ERK/1-2-activation. In the present study we examined PAK2's role in CCK and TPA-activation of important distal signaling cascades mediating their physiological/pathophysiological effects and analyzed its role in pathophysiological processes important in early pancreatitis. In rat pancreatic acini, PAK2-inhibition by the specific, GP.1.PAK-inhibitor, IPA-3-suppressed cholecystokinin (CCK)/TPA-stimulated activation of focal-adhesion kinases and mitogen-activated protein-kinases. PAK2-inhibition reversed the dual stimulatory/inhibitory effect of CCK/TPA on the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. However, its inhibition did not affect PKC activation. PAK2-inhibition protected acini from CCK-induced ROS-generation; caspase/trypsin-activation, important in early pancreatitis; as well as from cell-necrosis. Furthermore, PAK2-inhibition reduced proteolytic-activation of PAK-2p34, which is involved in programmed-cell-death. To ensure that the study did not only rely in the specificity of IPA-3 as a PAK inhibitor, we used two other approaches for PAK inhibition, FRAX597 a ATP-competitive-GP.1-PAKs-inhibitor and infection with a PAK2-dominant negative(DN)-Advirus. Those two approaches confirmed the results obtained with IPA-3. This study demonstrates that PAK2 is important in mediating CCK's effect on the activation of signaling-pathways known to mediate its physiological/pathophysiological responses including several cellular processes linked to the onset of pancreatitis. Our results suggest that PAK2 could be a new, important therapeutic target to consider for the treatment of diseases involving deregulation of pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:26912410

  20. Importance of P450 reductase activity in determining sensitivity of breast tumour cells to the bioreductive drug, tirapazamine (SR 4233).

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. V.; Barham, H. M.; Chinje, E. C.; Adams, G. E.; Harris, A. L.; Stratford, I. J.

    1995-01-01

    P450 reductase (NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase, EC 1.6.2.4) is known to be important in the reductive activation of the benzotriazene-di-N-oxide tirapazamine (SR 4233). Using a panel of six human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines we have examined the relationship between P450 reductase activity and sensitivity to tirapazamine. The toxicity of tirapazamine was found to correlate strongly with P450 reductase activity following an acute (3 h) exposure under hypoxic conditions, the drug being most toxic in the cell lines with the highest P450 reductase activity. A similar correlation was also observed following a chronic (96 h) exposure to the drug in air but not following acute (3 h) exposure in air. We have also determined the ability of lysates prepared from the cell lines to metabolise tirapazamine to its two-electron reduced product, SR 4317, under hypoxic conditions using NADPH as an electron donor. The rate of SR 4317 formation was found to correlate both with P450 reductase activity and with sensitivity to tirapazamine, the highest rates of SR 4317 formation being associated with the highest levels of P450 reductase activity and the greatest sensitivity to the drug. These findings indicate a major role for P450 reductase in determining the hypoxic toxicity of tirapazamine in breast tumour cell lines. Images Figure 4 PMID:7577460

  1. Using fluvial channel morphology to obtain the neotectonic characteristics of the Liuchia fault, an important active structure in southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, J. H.; Du, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Liuchia fault in southwestern Taiwan has been considered as one of the major active faults in the active Taiwan orogen. It is identified by its clear geomorphic features, and forms a major geologic boundary of Taiwan's Western Foothills. No unanimous historical evidence for seismic activity of the Liuchia fault exists, thus the fault poses large earthquake hazard potentials for the populous southwestern Taiwan. Here we attempted to analyze the characteristics of the fault from fluvial channel morphology of the Kueichung River that flows across the fault. We also calculated actual river incision rates from the age of river terraces along the river to obtain the rock uplift rates of the hanging-wall block of the fault. We have obtained a detailed river long profile of the Kueichung River from surveys using RTK-GPS, and a channel width profile from actual field measurements using a Laser Rangefinder. The fluvial channel morphology of the Kueichung River appears to have been affected by active folding in the hanging-wall block of the Liuchia fault. Such active deformation pattern is also evident from river incision rate patterns. Combining these different datasets, we constructed a realistic model of the subsurface geometry of the Liuchia fault in southwestern Taiwan, and calculated the long-term slip rates of this important active structure in southwestern Taiwan.

  2. On the importance of anandamide structural features for its interactions with DPPC bilayers: effects on PLA2 activity.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, S; Ragni, L; Ambrosini, A; Paccamiccio, L; Mariani, P; Fiorini, R; Bertoli, E; Zolese, G

    2005-09-01

    The acylethanolamide anandamide (AEA) occurs in a variety of mammalian tissues and, as a result of its action on cannabinoid receptors, exhibits several cannabimimetic activities. Moreover, some of its effects are mediated through interaction with an ion channel-type vanilloid receptor. However, the chemical features of AEA suggest that some of its biological effects could be related to physical interactions with the lipidic part of the membrane. The present work studies the effect of AEA-induced structural modifications of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer on phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity, which is strictly dependent on lipid bilayer features. This study, performed by 2-dimethylamino-(6-lauroyl)-naphthalene fluorescence, demonstrates that the effect of AEA on PLA2 activity is concentration-dependent. In fact, at low AEA/DPPC molar ratios (from R = 0.001 to R = 0.04), there is an increase of the enzymatic activity, which is completely inhibited for R = 0.1. X-ray diffraction data indicate that the AEA affects DPPC membrane structural properties in a concentration-dependent manner. Because the biphasic effect of increasing AEA concentrations on PLA2 activity is related to the induced modifications of membrane bilayer structural properties, we suggest that AEA-phospholipid interactions may be important to produce, at least in part, some of the similarly biphasic responses of some physiological activities to increasing concentrations of AEA. PMID:15961786

  3. Importance of Ca2+-dependent transamidation activity in the protection afforded by tissue transglutaminase against doxorubicin-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sunando; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase II (TGase-II), which is capable of both GTP-binding and transamidation activities, has been implicated in a variety of biological disorders ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have suggested that the transamidation activity of TGase-II is necessary for the survival of cancer cells confronted with different stresses and cellular insults. When assayed in vitro, the transamidation activity of TGase-II is Ca2+-dependent. However, at present little is known regarding how the regulation by Ca2+ is manifested or if in fact it is important for the cellular functions of TGase-II. Here, we have set out to further examine the Ca2+-mediated regulation of TGase-II's transamidation activity, with our goals being to identify the Ca2+-regulatory sites on the protein and determine whether they are essential for TGase-II to confer survival to human breast cancer cells. Based on comparisons between the X-ray crystal structures for TGase-II and TGase-III, we identified three putative Ca2+-regulatory sites on TGase-II. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to individually alter key residues at each of the sites. These substitutions did not affect the ability of TGase-II to bind guanine nucleotides, nor did they cause any obvious changes in its cellular localization. While substitutions at the different Ca2+-regulatory sites could either slightly enhance or markedly reduce the GTP hydrolytic activity of TGase-II, mutations at each of the three sites inhibited the Ca2+-responsive transamidation activity. We further showed that the same substitutions inhibited the ability of TGase-II to protect human breast cancer cells against the apoptotic activity of doxorubicin. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the Ca2+-mediated regulation of transamidation activity is essential for the ability of TGase-II to confer cell survival. PMID:17073438

  4. Sphingosine kinase 1 dependent protein kinase C-δ activation plays an important role in acute liver failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-δ activation in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF) in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALF. METHODS: BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to five groups, and ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multiparameteric analyzer. Serum levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after ALF induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of PKC-δ in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: The expression and activation of PKC-δ were up-regulated in liver tissue and PBMCs of mice with D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Inhibition of PKC-δ activation with rottlerin significantly increased the survival rates and decreased serum ALT/AST levels at 6, 12 and 24 h compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Rottlerin treatment also significantly decreased serum levels of HMGB1 at 6, 12, and 24 h, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1 β at 12 h compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in liver tissue were also decreased in the rottlerin treatment group. Furthermore, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) dependent PKC-δ activation played an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production in ALF. CONCLUSION: SphK1 dependent PKC-δ activation plays an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in ALF, and inhibition of PKC-δ activation might be

  5. Synergistic Behavior of Tubes, Junctions, and Sheets Imparts Mechano-Mutable Functionality in 3D Porous Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and 2D hexagonal BN (h-BN) are attractive for demonstrating fundamental physics and promising applications in nano-/microscale devices. However, there is a high anisotropy associated with these BN allotropes as their excellent properties are either along the tube axis or in-plane directions, posing an obstacle in their widespread use in technological and industrial applications. Herein, we report a series of 3D BN prototypes, namely, pillared boron nitride (PBN), by fusing single-wall BNNT and monolayer h-BN aimed at filling this gap. We use density functional theory and molecular dynamics simulations to probe the diverse mechano-mutable properties of PBN prototypes. Our results demonstrate that the synergistic effect of the tubes, junctions, and sheets imparts cooperative deformation mechanisms, which overcome the intrinsic limitations of the PBN constituents and provide a number of superior characteristics including 3D balance of strength and toughness, emergence of negative Poisson’s ratio, and elimination of strain softening along the armchair orientation. These features, combined with the ultrahigh surface area and lightweight structure, render PBN as a 3D multifunctional template for applications in graphene-based nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, gas storage, and functional composites with fascinating in-plane and out-of-plane tailorable properties. PMID:25289114

  6. The importance of delineating networks by activity type in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Gazda, Stefanie; Iyer, Swami; Killingback, Timothy; Connor, Richard; Brault, Solange

    2015-01-01

    Network analysis has proved to be a valuable tool for studying the behavioural patterns of complex social animals. Often such studies either do not distinguish between different behavioural states of the organisms or simply focus attention on a single behavioural state to the exclusion of all others. In either of these approaches it is impossible to ascertain how the behavioural patterns of individuals depend on the type of activity they are engaged in. Here we report on a network-based analysis of the behavioural associations in a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida. We consider three distinct behavioural states—socializing, travelling and foraging—and analyse the association networks corresponding to each activity. Moreover, in constructing the different activity networks we do not simply record a spatial association between two individuals as being either present or absent, but rather quantify the degree of any association, thus allowing us to construct weighted networks describing each activity. The results of these weighted activity networks indicate that networks can reveal detailed patterns of bottlenose dolphins at the population level; dolphins socialize in large groups with preferential associations; travel in small groups with preferential associates; and spread out to forage in very small, weakly connected groups. There is some overlap in the socialize and travel networks but little overlap between the forage and other networks. This indicates that the social bonds maintained in other activities are less important as they forage on dispersed, solitary prey. The overall network, not sorted by activity, does not accurately represent any of these patterns. PMID:26064611

  7. Increased aerobic glycolysis is important for the motility of activated VSMC and inhibited by indirubin-3′-monoxime

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Elke H.; Schachner, Daniel; Donati, Maddalena; Grojer, Christoph S.; Dirsch, Verena M.

    2016-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis is a recognized feature of multiple cellular phenotypes and offers a potential point for drug interference, as pursued by anti-tumor agents targeting the Warburg effect. This study aimed at examining the role of aerobic glycolysis for migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and its susceptibility to the small molecule indirubin-3′-monoxime (I3MO). Activation of VSMC with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) resulted in migration and increased glycolytic activity which was accompanied by an increased glucose uptake and hexokinase (HK) 2 expression. Inhibition of glycolysis or hexokinase by pharmacological agents or siRNA-mediated knockdown significantly reduced the migratory behavior in VSMC without affecting cell viability or early actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. I3MO, previously recognized as inhibitor of VSMC migration, was able to counteract the PDGF-activated increase in glycolysis and HK2 abundance. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 could be identified as crucial event in upregulation of HK2 and glycolytic activity in PDGF-stimulated VSMC and as point of interference for I3MO. I3MO did not inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α-dependent transcription nor influence miRNA 143 levels, other potential regulators of HK2 levels. Overall, we demonstrate that increased aerobic glycolysis is an important factor for the motility of activated VSMC and that the anti-migratory property of I3MO may partly depend on impairment of glycolysis via a compromised STAT3/HK2 signaling axis. PMID:27185663

  8. The importance of delineating networks by activity type in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida.

    PubMed

    Gazda, Stefanie; Iyer, Swami; Killingback, Timothy; Connor, Richard; Brault, Solange

    2015-03-01

    Network analysis has proved to be a valuable tool for studying the behavioural patterns of complex social animals. Often such studies either do not distinguish between different behavioural states of the organisms or simply focus attention on a single behavioural state to the exclusion of all others. In either of these approaches it is impossible to ascertain how the behavioural patterns of individuals depend on the type of activity they are engaged in. Here we report on a network-based analysis of the behavioural associations in a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Cedar Key, Florida. We consider three distinct behavioural states-socializing, travelling and foraging-and analyse the association networks corresponding to each activity. Moreover, in constructing the different activity networks we do not simply record a spatial association between two individuals as being either present or absent, but rather quantify the degree of any association, thus allowing us to construct weighted networks describing each activity. The results of these weighted activity networks indicate that networks can reveal detailed patterns of bottlenose dolphins at the population level; dolphins socialize in large groups with preferential associations; travel in small groups with preferential associates; and spread out to forage in very small, weakly connected groups. There is some overlap in the socialize and travel networks but little overlap between the forage and other networks. This indicates that the social bonds maintained in other activities are less important as they forage on dispersed, solitary prey. The overall network, not sorted by activity, does not accurately represent any of these patterns. PMID:26064611

  9. Pupicidal and repellent activities of Pogostemon cablin essential oil chemical compounds against medically important human vector mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Gokulakrishnan, J; Kuppusamy, Elumalai; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Appavu, Anandan; Kaliyamoorthi, Krishnappa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the repellent and pupicidal activities of Pogostemon cablin (P. cablin) chemical compositions were assayed for their toxicity against selected important vector mosquitoes, viz., Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti), Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi) and Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus) (Diptera: Culicidae). Methods The plants dry aerial parts were subjected to hydrodistillation using a modified Clevenger-type apparatus. The composition of the essential oil was analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC) and GC mass spectrophotometry. Evaluation was carried out in a net cage (45 cm×30 cm×45 cm) containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes and were assayed in the laboratory condition by using the protocol of WHO 2010. The repellent activity of P. cablin chemical compositions at concentration of 2mg/cm2were applied on skin of fore arm in man and exposed against adult female mosquitoes. The pupicidal activity was determined against selected important vector mosquitoes to concentration of 100 mg/L and mortality of each pupa was recorded after 24 h of exposure to the compounds. Results Chemical constituents of 15 compounds were identified in the oil of P.cablin compounds representing to 98.96%. The major components in essential oil were â-patchoulene, á-guaiene, ã-patchoulene, á-bulnesene and patchouli alcohol. The repellent activity of patchouli alcohol compound was found to be most effective for repellent activity and 2 mg/cm2 concentration provided 100% protection up to 280 min against Ae. aegypti, An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. Similarly, pupae exposed to 100 mg/L concentrations of P. cablin chemical compositions. Among five compounds tested patchouli alcoholwas found to be most effective for pupicidal activity provided 28.44, 26.28 and 25.36 against Ae.aegypti, An.stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus, respectively. The percent adult emergence was inversely proportional to the concentration of compounds and directly

  10. Overexpression of Crocus carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, CsCCD4b, in Arabidopsis imparts tolerance to dehydration, salt and oxidative stresses by modulating ROS machinery.

    PubMed

    Baba, Shoib Ahmad; Jain, Deepti; Abbas, Nazia; Ashraf, Nasheeman

    2015-09-15

    Apocarotenoids modulate vital physiological and developmental processes in plants. These molecules are formed by the cleavage of carotenoids, a reaction catalyzed by a family of enzymes called carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). Apocarotenoids like β-ionone and β-cyclocitral have been reported to act as stress signal molecules during high light stress in many plant species. In Crocus sativus, these two apocarotenoids are formed by enzymatic cleavage of β-carotene at 9, 10 and 7, 8 bonds by CsCCD4 enzymes. In the present study three isoforms of CsCCD4 were subjected to molecular modeling and docking analysis to determine their substrate specificity and all the three isoforms displayed high substrate specificity for β-carotene. Further, expression of these three CsCCD4 isoforms investigated in response to various stresses revealed that CsCCD4a and CsCCD4b exhibit enhanced expression in response to dehydration, salt and methylviologen, providing a clue towards their role in mediating plant defense response. This was confirmed by overexpressing CsCCD4b in Arabidopsis. The transgenic plants developed longer roots and possessed higher number of lateral roots. Further, overexpression of CsCCD4b imparted enhanced tolerance to salt, dehydration and oxidative stresses as was evidenced by higher survival rate, increased relative root length and biomass in transgenic plants as compared to wild type. Transgenic plants also displayed higher activity and expression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolizing enzymes. This indicates that β-ionone and β-cyclocitral which are enzymatic products of CsCCD4b may act as stress signals and mediate reprogramming of stress responsive genes which ultimately leads to plant defense. PMID:26595090

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of Copaiba (Copaifera officinalis) and Pracaxi (Pentaclethra macroloba) Oils against Staphylococcus Aureus: Importance in Compounding for Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Anna Luísa Aguijar; Cunha, Elisa Alves; Matias, Fernanda Oliveira; Garcia, Patrícia Guedes; Danopoulos, Panagiota; Swikidisa, Rosita; Pinheiro, Vanessa Alves; Nogueira, Rodrigo José Lupatini

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is the largest reserve of natural products in the world. Its rich biodiversity of medicinal plants has been utilized by local populations for hundreds of years for the prevention and treatment of various diseases and ailments. Oil extracts from plant species such as Copaifera officinalis and Pentaclethra macroloba are used in compounded formulations for their antiinflammatory, antimicrobial, emollient, moisturizing, and wound-healing activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro bacteriostatic effect of two Amazonian oils, Copaiba and Pracaxi, against Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important microorganism responsible for wound infection, to support the use of these oils as novel natural products for compounded wound-treatment modalities. The antibacterial activity of Copaiba and Pracaxi oils against a standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus was assessed using broth microdilution to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of the oil extracts. Copaiba oil demonstrated antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL and a Minimum Bactericidal Concentration of 0.3125 mg/mL. Conversely, Pracaxi oil failed to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus growth. While additional studies are required to further evaluate the antimicrobial activity of Pracaxi oil, even low concentrations of Copaiba oil effectively inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth, supporting its potential use as a promising adjuvant in compounded topical formulations for wound and scar healing. PMID:27125055

  12. The importance of gradients in particle activity during sediment transport: Insights from a probabilistic description of particle motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furbish, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment particles transported by rainsplash, by bioturbation, and as bedload in turbulent flows, undergo motions that are quasi-random in magnitude and direction. Moreover, these motions characteristically are intermittent, in that particles are mostly at rest most of the time, and heterogeneous, in that the volumetric or areal concentration of particles in motion at any instant is spatially patchy. These particle motions can be formulated as a stochastic processes involving both advective and dispersive parts. By taking into account the intermittent activity of particles, and separating this activity from the physics of motion in the parametric description of transport, the formulation indicates that gradients in particle activity can have a key role in transport. The formulation illustrates, for example, how the growth of soil mounds beneath desert shrubs involves differential rainsplash that initially causes more grains to be splashed inward beneath protective shrub canopies than outward. This ‘harvesting' of nearby soil material, including nutrients, means that shrubs locally participate in regulating the rate sediment transport down a hillslope. With soil bioturbation, spatial variations in the disturbance frequency strongly influence the mixing of soil constituents, including distinct particle fractions (such as specific size or mineral fractions, seeds, or debitage), or elements and compounds adsorbed to particles. The formulation also provides a probabilistic version of the Exner equation. During bedload transport, gradients in particle activity, through both advective and dispersive effects, may contribute importantly to the local divergence of the particle flux, thereby influencing initial bedform growth.

  13. Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway play important roles in activating liver cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghua; Sun, Qian; Wang, Peng; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Luo, Jing; Huang, Hai; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A; Cheng, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is driven and maintained by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that display stem cell properties. These LCSCs are promoted by the intersecting of Notch and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that LCSCs with markers CD90, CD24, CD13, and CD133 possess stem properties of self-renewal and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice. The increased expression of these markers was correlated with advanced disease stage, larger tumors, and worse overall survival in 61 HCC cases. We also found that both Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways played important roles in increasing the stem-ness characteristics of LCSCs. Our data suggested that Notch1 was downstream of Wnt/β-catenin. The active form of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) expression depended on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Moreover, Notch1 negatively contributed to Wnt/β-catenin signaling modulation. Knock down of Notch1 with lentivirus N1ShRNA up-regulated the active form of β-catenin. Ectopic expression of NICD with LV-Notch1 in LCSCs attenuated β-catenin/TCF dependent luciferase activity significantly. In addition, there was a non-proteasome mediated feedback loop between Notch1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LCSCs. The central role of Notch and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in LCSCs may provide an attractive therapeutic strategy against HCC. PMID:26735577

  14. Characterization of RNA binding and chaperoning activities of HIV-1 Vif protein. Importance of the C-terminal unstructured tail.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Dona; Bernacchi, Serena; Xavier Guerrero, Santiago; Brachet, Franck; Larue, Valéry; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; Tisne, Carine

    2014-01-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells, containing the cellular anti-HIV defense cytosine deaminases APOBEC3 (A3G and A3F). Vif neutralizes the antiviral activities of the APOBEC3G/F by diverse mechanisms including their degradation through the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and their translational inhibition. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by interacting with Pr55(Gag), reverse transcriptase and genomic RNA. Here, we expressed and purified full-length and truncated Vif proteins, and analyzed their RNA binding and chaperone properties. First, we showed by CD and NMR spectroscopies that the N-terminal domain of Vif is highly structured in solution, whereas the C-terminal domain remains mainly unfolded. Both domains exhibited substantial RNA binding capacities with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range, whereas the basic unfolded C-terminal domain of Vif was responsible in part for its RNA chaperone activity. Second, we showed by NMR chemical shift mapping that Vif and NCp7 share the same binding sites on tRNA(Lys) 3, the primer of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Finally, our results indicate that Vif has potent RNA chaperone activity and provide direct evidence for an important role of the unstructured C-terminal domain of Vif in this capacity. PMID:25144404

  15. Nucleoporin 62-Like Protein Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling through Facilitating the Nuclear Import of β-Catenin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojie; Gu, Qilin; Lin, Li; Li, Shaoyang; Zhong, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporin p62 (Nup62) localizes in the central channel of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and regulates nuclear pore permeability and nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the developmental roles of Nup62 in vertebrates remain largely unclear. Zebrafish Nup62-like protein (Nup62l) is a homolog of mammalian Nup62. The nup62l gene is maternally expressed, but its transcripts are ubiquitously distributed during early embryogenesis and enriched in the head, pharynx, and intestine of developing embryos. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway positively modulates nup62l transcription, while Bmp signaling acts downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to negatively regulate nup62l expression. Overexpression of nup62l dorsalized embryos and enhanced gastrula convergence and extension (CE) movements. In contrast, knockdown of Nup62l led to ventralized embryos, an impediment to CE movements, and defects in specification of midline organ progenitors. Mechanistically, Nup62l acts as an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through interaction with and facilitation of nuclear import of β-catenin-1/2 in zebrafish. Thus, Nup62l regulates dorsoventral patterning, gastrula CE movements, and proper specification of midline organ precursors through mediating the nuclear import of β-catenins in zebrafish. PMID:25605329

  16. Phenylalanine-24 in the N-terminal region of ammodytoxins is important for both enzymic activity and presynaptic toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Petan, Toni; Krizaj, Igor; Gubensek, Franc; Pungercar, Joze

    2002-01-01

    Ammodytoxins (Atxs) are group II phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)s) with presynaptic toxicity from venom of the snake Vipera ammodytes ammodytes. The molecular basis of their neurotoxicity, and that of similar PLA(2) toxins, is still to be explained. To address this problem, a surface-exposed aromatic residue, Phe(24), in the N-terminal region of the most potent Atx, AtxA, was replaced by other aromatic (tyrosine, tryptophan), hydrophobic (alanine) and polar uncharged (serine, asparagine) residues. The mutants were produced in the bacterial expression system, refolded in vitro and purified to homogeneity. All but the Trp(24) mutant, whose activity was similar to that of the wild type, showed a considerable decrease (40-80%) in enzymic activity on a micellar phosphatidylcholine substrate. This result indicates an important role for the aromatic side chains of phenylalanine or tryptophan, but not tyrosine, in PLA(2) activity, very likely at a stage of interfacial adsorption of the enzyme to zwitterionic aggregated substrates. The substitutions of Phe(24) also significantly decreased toxicity in mice, with the most prominent decrease, of 130-fold, observed in the case of the Asn(24) mutant. The results with the mutants show that there is no correlation between enzymic activity, lethality and binding affinity for three AtxA neuronal receptors (R180, R25 and calmodulin). Our results suggest a critical involvement of Phe(24) in the neurotoxicity of AtxA, apparently at a stage which does not involve the interaction with the known Atx-binding neuronal proteins and catalytic activity. PMID:11931665

  17. Importance of the tuning of band position in optimizing the electronic coupling and photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Mok, Eun Kyung; Baek, Ji-Won; Park, Sang-Hyun; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2015-10-15

    The electronic coupling and photocatalytic activity of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite can be optimized by the fine-tuning of the band position of titanium oxide with nitrogen doping. The increase of the valence band energy of TiO{sub 2} by N-doping leads not only to the enhanced absorption of visible light but also to the promoted hole transfer from Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to TiO{sub 2}, resulting in the efficient spatial separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. While the undoped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite shows an inferior photocatalytic activity to the pure Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, the photocatalyst performance of N-doped nanocomposite is better than those of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and undoped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. This observation underscores a significant enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of nanocomposite upon N-doping, a result of enhanced electronic coupling between the hybridized species. The present results clearly demonstrate the importance of the fine-tuning of band position in optimizing the photocatalytic activity of hybrid-type photocatalysts. - Highlights: • The band position of Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} can be effectively tailored by nitrogen doping. • The N-doping leads to the improvement of charge separation. • The N-doped Ag{sub 2}CO{sub 3}–TiO{sub 2} shows high photocatalytic activity.

  18. Fear of Movement and Low Self-Efficacy Are Important Barriers in Physical Activity after Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Klaassen, Gerald; Schutte, Elise; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) and exercise are commonly used as preventive measures for cardiovascular disease in the general population, and could be effective in the management of post-transplantation cardiovascular risk. PA levels are low after renal transplantation and very few renal transplant recipients (RTR) meet the PA guidelines. Identification of barriers to regular PA is important to identify targets for intervention to improve PA levels after renal transplantation. We investigated fear of movement and physical self-efficacy as barriers to PA in RTR. Methods RTR were investigated between 2001–2003. The Tampa Score of Kinesiophobia–Dutch Version (TSK-11) was used to assess fear of movement. Physical self-efficacy was measured with the LIVAS-scale. PA was assessed using validated questionnaires (Tecumseh Occupational Activity Questionnaire and the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire). Results A total of 487 RTR (age 51±12 years, 55% men) were studied. Median score [interquartile range] on TSK-11 was 22 [17–26]. Low physical self-efficacy (Exp B:0.41[0.31–0.54], p<0.001) and history of myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (Exp B:1.30[1.03–1.63],p = 0.03) were independent determinants for fear of movement. Fear of movement was associated with lower daily PA, occupational, sports and leisure time PA. Mediation-analysis showed that a large part (73%) of the effect of fear of movement on PA was explained by low physical self-efficacy. Conclusions This study was the first to examine fear of movement and self-efficacy in relation to PA in RTR. Fear of movement was associated with a low PA level, and the larger part of this relation was mediated by low physical self-efficacy. Both fear of movement and physical self-efficacy level are important targets for intervention during rehabilitation after renal transplantation. PMID:26844883

  19. Importance of nuclear localization for the apoptosis-induced activity of a fungal galectin AAL (Agrocybe aegerita lectin)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yi; Feng, Lei; Tong, Xin; Wang, Kun; Li, De Feng; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tang, Zi Jian; Liu, Hong Hong; Jiang, Shuai; Guo, Lin; Wang, Da Cheng; Sun, Hui

    2009-08-28

    Agrocybe aegerita lectin (AAL) was identified previously in our group as a novel galectin from medicinal fungi Agrocybe aegerita, and has been shown to effectively induce cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. Here, AAL was observed to translocate into the HeLa cell nucleus and induce cell apoptosis when it was predominantly in the nucleus. The N-terminus and C-terminus of AAL were required for nuclear localization. Site mutated proteins were generated based on AAL structure. Dimer interface mutant I25G, carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) mutant R63H, and loop region mutant L33A could not enter the nucleus and lost the ability to induce apoptosis. CRD mutant H59Q and loop region mutant I144G maintained nuclear localization activity, and H59Q retained residual bioability but I144G had no activity, indicating that nuclear localization is important but not sufficient for AAL to become apoptotically active. Our findings provide a novel antitumor mechanism of fungal galectin.

  20. Towards Pro-active Embodied Agents: On the Importance of Neural Mechanisms Suitable to Process Time Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Croon, G.; Nolfi, S.; Postma, E. O.

    In Embodied Cognitive Science, many studies have focused on reactive agents, i.e. agents that have no internal state and always respond in the same way to the same stimulus. However, this particular focus is not due to a rejection of the importance of internal states. Rather, it is due to the difficulty of developing pro-active embodied and situated agents, that is agents able to: (a) extract internal states by integrating sensorymotor information through time and, (b) later use these internal states to modulate their motor behaviour according to the current environmental circumstances. In this chapter we will focus on how pro-active agents can be developed and, more specifically, on which are the neural mechanisms that might favour the development of pro-active agents. By comparing the results of five sets of evolutionary experiments in which simulated robots are provided with different types of recurrent neural networks, we gain insight into the relation between the robots` capabilities and the characteristics of their neural controllers. We show how special mechanisms for processing information in time facilitate the exploitation of internal states.

  1. Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) contains a multifunctional transcriptional activation domain important for inter- and intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Bieker, J J

    1996-01-01

    Erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) is a red cell-restricted transcriptional activator that plays a dominant role in establishing high levels of beta-globin gene expression during erythroid ontogeny. Although its DNA binding domain belongs to the well-studied class of Krüppel-like zinc fingers, its proline-rich activation region has not been thoroughly examined. We have analyzed this region by monitoring the functional effects of its mutagenesis upon EKLF activity in vivo and in vitro. First, using co-transfection assays, we find that the transactivation region contains discrete stimulatory and inhibitory subdomains. Second, in vitro binding assays indicate that the inhibitory domain exerts its effect in cis by interfering with DNA binding. Third, in vivo competition assays demonstrate that EKLF interacts with a positive-acting cellular factor, and that the domain responsible for this trans interaction lies within a 40 amino acid sequence that is coincident with the EKLF minimal transactivation domain. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of this domain implies that conformation and/or phosphorylation status of its central core may be critical for such interactions. These results point towards post-translational steric and/or allosteric control of EKLF function that may be important not just for its DNA binding ability, but also for its potential to interact with other proteins that fully establish the correct stereospecific array leading to efficient switching of beta-globin transcription during development. Images PMID:8918466

  2. Thioredoxin reductase activity may be more important than GSH level in protecting human lens epithelial cells against UVA light.

    PubMed

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A; Leverenz, Victor R; Bhat, Aparna V; Pelliccia, Sara E; Giblin, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2 , 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 h exposure of the cells to 25 J cm(-2) of UVA radiation (338-400 nm wavelength, peak at 365 nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  3. Thioredoxin Reductase Activity may be More Important than GSH Level in Protecting Human Lens Epithelial Cells Against UVA Light

    PubMed Central

    Padgaonkar, Vanita A.; Leverenz, Victor R.; Bhat, Aparna V.; Pelliccia, Sara E.; Giblin, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This study compares the abilities of the glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx) antioxidant systems in defending cultured human lens epithelial cells (LECs) against UVA light. Levels of GSH were depleted with either L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). CDNB treatment also inhibited the activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Two levels of O2, 3% and 20%, were employed during a 1 hr exposure of the cells to 25 J/cm2 of UVA radiation (338-400nm wavelength, peak at 365nm). Inhibition of TrxR activity by CDNB, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced a substantial loss of LECs and cell damage, with the effects being considerably more severe at 20% O2 compared to 3%. In contrast, depletion of GSH by BSO, combined with exposure to UVA light, produced only a slight cell loss, with no apparent morphological effects. Catalase was highly sensitive to UVA-induced inactivation, but was not essential for protection. Although UVA light presented a challenge for the lens epithelium, it was well-tolerated under normal conditions. The results demonstrate an important role for TrxR activity in defending the lens epithelium against UVA light, possibly related to the ability of the Trx system to assist DNA synthesis following UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:25495870

  4. Gingerols and shogaols: Important nutraceutical principles from ginger.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Ruchi Badoni; Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Combrinck, Sandra; Viljoen, Alvaro M

    2015-09-01

    Gingerols are the major pungent compounds present in the rhizomes of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and are renowned for their contribution to human health and nutrition. Medicinal properties of ginger, including the alleviation of nausea, arthritis and pain, have been associated with the gingerols. Gingerol analogues are thermally labile and easily undergo dehydration reactions to form the corresponding shogaols, which impart the characteristic pungent taste to dried ginger. Both gingerols and shogaols exhibit a host of biological activities, ranging from anticancer, anti-oxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic to various central nervous system activities. Shogaols are important biomarkers used for the quality control of many ginger-containing products, due to their diverse biological activities. In this review, a large body of available knowledge on the biosynthesis, chemical synthesis and pharmacological activities, as well as on the structure-activity relationships of various gingerols and shogaols, have been collated, coherently summarised and discussed. The manuscript highlights convincing evidence indicating that these phenolic compounds could serve as important lead molecules for the development of therapeutic agents to treat various life-threatening human diseases, particularly cancer. Inclusion of ginger or ginger extracts in nutraceutical formulations could provide valuable protection against diabetes, cardiac and hepatic disorders. PMID:26228533

  5. The relative importance of respiratory water loss in scorpions is correlated with species habitat type and activity pattern.

    PubMed

    Gefen, Eran

    2011-01-01

    Scorpions exhibit some of the lowest recorded water loss rates compared with those of other terrestrial arthropods of similar body size. Evaporative water loss (EWL) includes cuticular transpiration and respiratory water loss (RWL) from gas exchange surfaces, that is, book lung lamellae. Estimated fractions of cuticular and respiratory losses currently available from the literature show considerable variation, at least partly as a result of differences in methodology. This study reports RWL rates and their relative importance in scorpions from two families (Buthidae and Scorpionidae), including both xeric and mesic species (or subspecies). Two of the included Buthidae were surface-dwelling species, and another inhabits empty burrows of other terrestrial arthropods. This experimental design enabled correlating RWL importance with scorpion phylogeny, habitat type, and/or homing behavior. Buthidae species exhibited significantly lower EWL rates compared with those of Scorpionidae, whereas effects of habitat type and homing behavior were not significant. Resting RWL rates were not significantly affected by scorpion phylogeny, but rates for the xeric species (totaling ~10% of EWL rates at 30°C) were significantly lower compared with those of mesic species. These lower RWL values were correlated with significantly lower H(2)O/CO(2) emission rates in xeric species. The experimental setup and ~24-h duration of each individual recording allowed estimating the effect of interspecific variation in activity on RWL proportions. The high respiratory losses in active hydrated Scorpio maurus fuscus, totaling 30% of EWL, suggest that behavioral discretion in this species is a more likely mechanism for body water conservation under stressful conditions when compared with the responses of other studied species. PMID:21133796

  6. Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an Abundant and Active Forest Soil Acidobacterium Important in Organic Matter Transformation

    PubMed Central

    García-Fraile, Paula; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the activity of bacteria in coniferous forests is highly important, due to the role of these environments as a global carbon sink. In a study of the microbial biodiversity of montane coniferous forest soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we succeeded in isolating bacterial strain S55T, which belongs to one of the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in active bacterial populations, according to the analysis of RNA-derived 16S rRNA amplicons. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the species most closely related to strain S55T include Bryocella elongata SN10T (95.4% identity), Acidicapsa ligni WH120T (95.2% identity), and Telmatobacter bradus TPB6017T (95.0% identity), revealing that strain S55T should be classified within the phylum Acidobacteria, subdivision 1. Strain S55T is a rod-like bacterium that grows at acidic pH (3 to 6). Its phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicate that strain S55T corresponds to a new genus within the phylum Acidobacteria; thus, we propose the name Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (strain S55T = NBRC 111238T = CECT 8791T). This strain produces extracellular enzymes implicated in the degradation of plant-derived biopolymers. Moreover, analysis of the genome sequence of strain S55T also reveals the presence of enzymatic machinery required for organic matter decomposition. Soil metatranscriptomic analyses found 132 genes from strain S55T being expressed in the forest soil, especially during winter. Our results suggest an important contribution of T. gabretensis S55T in the carbon cycle in the Picea abies coniferous forest. PMID:26546425

  7. Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an Abundant and Active Forest Soil Acidobacterium Important in Organic Matter Transformation.

    PubMed

    García-Fraile, Paula; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr; Lladó, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the activity of bacteria in coniferous forests is highly important, due to the role of these environments as a global carbon sink. In a study of the microbial biodiversity of montane coniferous forest soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we succeeded in isolating bacterial strain S55(T), which belongs to one of the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in active bacterial populations, according to the analysis of RNA-derived 16S rRNA amplicons. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the species most closely related to strain S55(T) include Bryocella elongata SN10(T) (95.4% identity), Acidicapsa ligni WH120(T) (95.2% identity), and Telmatobacter bradus TPB6017(T) (95.0% identity), revealing that strain S55(T) should be classified within the phylum Acidobacteria, subdivision 1. Strain S55(T) is a rod-like bacterium that grows at acidic pH (3 to 6). Its phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicate that strain S55(T) corresponds to a new genus within the phylum Acidobacteria; thus, we propose the name Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (strain S55(T) = NBRC 111238(T) = CECT 8791(T)). This strain produces extracellular enzymes implicated in the degradation of plant-derived biopolymers. Moreover, analysis of the genome sequence of strain S55(T) also reveals the presence of enzymatic machinery required for organic matter decomposition. Soil metatranscriptomic analyses found 132 genes from strain S55(T) being expressed in the forest soil, especially during winter. Our results suggest an important contribution of T. gabretensis S55(T) in the carbon cycle in the Picea abies coniferous forest. PMID:26546425

  8. [Microbiological contamination and antimicrobial activity of cristalised cane sugar on some medically important microorganisms in Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Pujol, Verónica; Diaz, Jendry; Rodríguez, Evelyn; Arias, María Laura

    2008-06-01

    Microbiological contamination and antimicrobial activity of cristalised cane sugar on some medically important microorganisms in Costa Rica. Unrefined cristalised cane sugar, obtained after the filtration and evaporation of sugar cane juice, is a nutritional product of traditional consumption in Costa Rica and other Neotropical countries. It has been used in the topic treatment of infected wounds, with satisfactory results even with some antibiotic-ressistant bacteria. We studied the microbiological quality of 50 commercial samples. The analyses included total aerobic and anaerobic bacteria plate count; aerobic and anaerobic spore count; mold and yeast count; total and fecal coliforms; and presence of Clostridium botulinum. The antimicrobial effect was tested for Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), S. epidermidis (UCR 2902), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 9027), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Salmonella enteritidis (ATCC 13076), Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19116) and Aspergillus niger (Asni 06). Most of the samples (76%) presented counts lower than 100 CFU/g especially for sporulated forms (90% lower than 20 CFU/g), the mold and yeast count was higher (38% higher than 10(2) CFU/g), demonstrating the importance of these microorganisms in the spoilage of the product; 76% of the samples presented fecal contamination; C. botulinum was not isolated with the methodology employed. No inhibitory effect was observed for A. niger, but all samples han an inhibitory effect over the other species, especially for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. PMID:19256417

  9. Sterol-dependent nuclear import of ORP1S promotes LXR regulated trans-activation of apoE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungsoo; Wang, Ping-Yuan; Jeong, Yangsik; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9041 ; Anderson, Richard G.W.; Michaely, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Oxysterol binding protein related protein 1S (ORP1S) is a member of a family of sterol transport proteins. Here we present evidence that ORP1S translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S also activate the liver X receptor (LXR) transcription factors and we show that ORP1S binds to LXRs, promotes binding of LXRs to LXR response elements (LXREs) and specifically enhances LXR-dependent transcription via the ME.1 and ME.2 enhancer elements of the apoE gene. We propose that ORP1S is a cytoplasmic sterol sensor, which transports sterols to the nucleus and promotes LXR-dependent gene transcription through select enhancer elements. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S translocates to the nucleus in response to sterol binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sterols that best promote nuclear import of ORP1S are LXR agonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ORP1S binds to LXRs, enhances binding of LXRs to LXREs and promotes LXR-dependent transcription of apoE.

  10. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27315566

  11. Cooperative effects of hepatitis B virus and TNF may play important roles in the activation of metabolic pathways through the activation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Jiang, Xia; Nakamura, Masato; Sasaki, Reina; Haga, Yuki; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-1β are often observed in the sera of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients. It is well known that these cytokines activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-signaling, and are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We investigated whether HBV or HBV X protein (HBx) enhanced the activation of NF-κB in the presence of TNF and/or IL-1β, and their effects on the expression of metabolic pathway‑associated genes. We examined whether HBV or HBx enhanced cytokine-induced activation of NF-κB in hepatocytes, using a reporter assay, in the presence or absence of TNF and/or IL-1β. The expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1), one of the NF-κB target genes was also examined. The expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in HepG2 and HepG2.2.15 cells in the presence or absence of TNF was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Human hepatocytes expressed TNF receptors and IL-1 receptors. NF-κB was activated by cooperation between HBx and TNF in human hepatocytes. We observed IGFBP1 expression in HBV infection and that a number of metabolic pathway-associated genes were upregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells, compared with HepG2 cells with or without TNF treatment. We observed the cooperative effects of HBV and TNF which enhanced the activation of NF-κB as well as upregulated the expression of metabolic pathway-associated genes in hepatocytes. These effects may be important in the development of HBV-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27315566

  12. Natural Killer T Cells Activated by a Lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica Are Critically Important To Control Amebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J.; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jα18-/- mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d−/− mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-γ but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28∶0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-γ production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to α-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  13. Natural killer T cells activated by a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from Entamoeba histolytica are critically important to control amebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; González-Roldán, Nestor; Lindner, Buko; Winau, Florian; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Lafont, Martha; Ulmer, Artur J; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert; Jacobs, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The innate immune response is supposed to play an essential role in the control of amebic liver abscess (ALA), a severe form of invasive amoebiasis due to infection with the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In a mouse model for the disease, we previously demonstrated that Jalpha18(-/-) mice, lacking invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, suffer from more severe abscess development. Here we show that the specific activation of iNKT cells using alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) induces a significant reduction in the sizes of ALA lesions, whereas CD1d(-/-) mice develop more severe abscesses. We identified a lipopeptidophosphoglycan from E. histolytica membranes (EhLPPG) as a possible natural NKT cell ligand and show that the purified phosphoinositol (PI) moiety of this molecule induces protective IFN-gamma but not IL-4 production in NKT cells. The main component of EhLPPG responsible for NKT cell activation is a diacylated PI, (1-O-[(28:0)-lyso-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-]2-O-(C16:0)-Ins). IFN-gamma production by NKT cells requires the presence of CD1d and simultaneously TLR receptor signalling through MyD88 and secretion of IL-12. Similar to alpha-GalCer application, EhLPPG treatment significantly reduces the severity of ALA in ameba-infected mice. Our results suggest that EhLPPG is an amebic molecule that is important for the limitation of ALA development and may explain why the majority of E. histolytica-infected individuals do not develop amebic liver abscess. PMID:19436711

  14. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is an important modulator of hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Fialla, Annette Dam; Schierwagen, Robert; Biagini, Matteo; Liedtke, Christian; Laleman, Wim; Klein, Sabine; Reul, Winfried; Koch Hansen, Lars; Rabjerg, Maj; Singh, Vikrant; Surra, Joaquin; Osada, Jesus; Reinehr, Roland; de Muckadell, Ove B Schaffalitzky; Köhler, Ralf; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 controls different cellular processes such as proliferation and volume homeostasis. We investigated the role of KCa3.1 in experimental and human liver fibrosis. KCa3.1 gene expression was investigated in healthy and injured human and rodent liver. Effect of genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 was evaluated in mice during carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic fibrogenesis. Transcription, protein expression and localisation of KCa3.1 was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Hemodynamic effects of KCa3.1 inhibition were investigated in bile duct-ligated and carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats. In vitro experiments were performed in rat hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. KCa3.1 expression was increased in rodent and human liver fibrosis and was predominantly observed in the hepatocytes. Inhibition of KCa3.1 aggravated liver fibrosis during carbon tetrachloride challenge but did not change hemodynamic parameters in portal hypertensive rats. In vitro, KCa3.1 inhibition leads to increased hepatocyte apoptosis and DNA damage, whereas proliferation of hepatic stellate cells was stimulated by KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data identifies KCa3.1 channels as important modulators in hepatocellular homeostasis. In contrast to previous studies in vitro and other tissues this channel appears to be anti-fibrotic and protective during liver injury. PMID:27354175

  15. The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is an important modulator of hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sevelsted Møller, Linda; Fialla, Annette Dam; Schierwagen, Robert; Biagini, Matteo; Liedtke, Christian; Laleman, Wim; Klein, Sabine; Reul, Winfried; Koch Hansen, Lars; Rabjerg, Maj; Singh, Vikrant; Surra, Joaquin; Osada, Jesus; Reinehr, Roland; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Köhler, Ralf; Trebicka, Jonel

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 controls different cellular processes such as proliferation and volume homeostasis. We investigated the role of KCa3.1 in experimental and human liver fibrosis. KCa3.1 gene expression was investigated in healthy and injured human and rodent liver. Effect of genetic depletion and pharmacological inhibition of KCa3.1 was evaluated in mice during carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic fibrogenesis. Transcription, protein expression and localisation of KCa3.1 was analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Hemodynamic effects of KCa3.1 inhibition were investigated in bile duct-ligated and carbon tetrachloride intoxicated rats. In vitro experiments were performed in rat hepatic stellate cells and hepatocytes. KCa3.1 expression was increased in rodent and human liver fibrosis and was predominantly observed in the hepatocytes. Inhibition of KCa3.1 aggravated liver fibrosis during carbon tetrachloride challenge but did not change hemodynamic parameters in portal hypertensive rats. In vitro, KCa3.1 inhibition leads to increased hepatocyte apoptosis and DNA damage, whereas proliferation of hepatic stellate cells was stimulated by KCa3.1 inhibition. Our data identifies KCa3.1 channels as important modulators in hepatocellular homeostasis. In contrast to previous studies in vitro and other tissues this channel appears to be anti-fibrotic and protective during liver injury. PMID:27354175

  16. Alumoxane/ferroxane nanoparticles for the removal of viral pathogens: the importance of surface functionality to nanoparticle activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maguire-Boyle, Samuel J.; Liga, Michael V.; Li, Qilin; Barron, Andrew R.

    2012-08-01

    A bi-functional nano-composite coating has been created on a porous Nomex® fabric support as a trap for aspirated virus contaminated water. Nomex® fabric was successively dip-coated in solutions containing cysteic acid functionalized alumina (alumoxane) nanoparticles and cysteic acid functionalized iron oxide (ferroxane) nanoparticles to form a nanoparticle coated Nomex® (NPN) fabric. From SEM and EDX the nanoparticle coating of the Nomex® fibers is uniform, continuous, and conformal. The NPN was used as a filter for aspirated bacteriophage MS2 viruses using end-on filtration. All measurements were repeated to give statistical reliability. The NPN fabrics show a large decrease as compared to Nomex® alone or alumoxane coated Nomex®. An increase in the ferroxane content results in an equivalent increase in virus retention. This suggests that it is the ferroxane that has an active role in deactivating and/or binding the virus. Heating the NPN to 160 °C results in the loss of cysteic acid functional groups (without loss of the iron nanoparticle's core structure) and the resulting fabric behaves similar to that of untreated Nomex®, showing that the surface functionalization of the nanoparticles is vital for the surface collapse of aspirated water droplets and the absorption and immobilization of the MS2 viruses. Thus, for virus immobilization, it is not sufficient to have iron oxide nanoparticles per se, but the surface functionality of a nanoparticle is vitally important in ensuring efficacy.A bi-functional nano-composite coating has been created on a porous Nomex® fabric support as a trap for aspirated virus contaminated water. Nomex® fabric was successively dip-coated in solutions containing cysteic acid functionalized alumina (alumoxane) nanoparticles and cysteic acid functionalized iron oxide (ferroxane) nanoparticles to form a nanoparticle coated Nomex® (NPN) fabric. From SEM and EDX the nanoparticle coating of the Nomex® fibers is uniform, continuous

  17. An Important Natural Genetic Resource of Oreochromis niloticus (Linnaeus, 1758) Threatened by Aquaculture Activities in Loboi Drainage, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ndiwa, Titus Chemandwa; Nyingi, Dorothy Wanja; Agnese, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The need to improve food security in Africa through culture of tilapias has led to transfer of different species from their natural ranges causing negative impacts on wild fish genetic resources. Loboi swamp in Kenya is fed by three hot springs: Lake Bogoria Hotel, Chelaba and Turtle Springs, hosting natural populations of Oreochromis niloticus. The present study aimed at better genetic characterization of these threatened populations. Partial mtDNA sequences of the D-loop region and variations at 16 microsatellite loci were assessed in the three hot spring populations and compared with three other natural populations of O. niloticus in the region. Results obtained indicated that the hot spring populations had mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variability similar to or higher than the large closely related populations. This may be attributed to the perennial nature of the hot springs, which do not depend on rainfall but rather receive permanent water supply from deep aquifers. The study also revealed that gene flow between the three different hot spring populations was sufficiently low thus allowing their differentiation. This differentiation was unexpected considering the very close proximity of the springs to each other. It is possible that the swamp creates a barrier to free movement of fish from one spring to the other thereby diminishing gene flow. Finally, the most surprising and worrying results were that the three hot spring populations are introgressed by mtDNA genes of O. leucostictus, while microsatellite analysis suggested that some nuclear genes may also have crossed the species barrier. It is very likely that the recent intensification of aquaculture activities in the Loboi drainage may be responsible for these introgressions. Taking into account the importance of these new genetic resources, protection and management actions of the Loboi swamp should be accorded top priority to prevent the loss of these spring populations. PMID:25222491

  18. The importance of activities of daily living and social contact for loneliness: a survey among residents in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Drageset, Jorunn

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine associations between functional ability to perform basic activities of daily living (ADL) functions (feeding, continence, going to the toilet, transferring from bed to chair, dressing and bathing), social contacts with family and friends/neighbours and emotional and social loneliness. A quantitative research approach, using a survey design, was performed. The sample comprised 113 subjects aged 65-101 years, living in nursing homes. Data were gathered through structured interviews by using the following measures: the modified Katz Index of ADL, the Revised Social Provisions Scale (SPS), and Family and Friendship Contacts Scale. Descriptive statistics, factor analyses, multiple correlation analyses and multiple regression analyses were used. Data showed a statistically significant relationship between dependence on the environment in carrying out ADL and low level of social loneliness. Likewise, high frequencies of social contact with sons, daughters and grandchildren had a statistically significant effect on low level of social loneliness. A confirmatory factor analysis (varimax rotation, eigenvalue 1.0) was employed to explore the two predefined dimensions (attachment and social integration) of the SPS. The results confirmed, to a very high degree, the two dimensions of the Weiss Model. Reliability (internal consistency), measured by Cronbach alpha, was 0.85 and 0.92, for attachment and social integration respectively. Based on this analysis, dependence in ADL function is important for a low level of social loneliness. From the present study it is concluded that ADL (feeding, continence, going to the toilet, transferring from bed to chair, dressing and bathing) and contact with a social network have a statistical effect on a low level of social loneliness. Hence, such associations may be of significance in nursing intervention and may influence the well-being of residents in nursing homes in different stages of life. PMID

  19. Alumoxane/ferroxane nanoparticles for the removal of viral pathogens: the importance of surface functionality to nanoparticle activity.

    PubMed

    Maguire-Boyle, Samuel J; Liga, Michael V; Li, Qilin; Barron, Andrew R

    2012-09-21

    A bi-functional nano-composite coating has been created on a porous Nomex® fabric support as a trap for aspirated virus contaminated water. Nomex® fabric was successively dip-coated in solutions containing cysteic acid functionalized alumina (alumoxane) nanoparticles and cysteic acid functionalized iron oxide (ferroxane) nanoparticles to form a nanoparticle coated Nomex® (NPN) fabric. From SEM and EDX the nanoparticle coating of the Nomex® fibers is uniform, continuous, and conformal. The NPN was used as a filter for aspirated bacteriophage MS2 viruses using end-on filtration. All measurements were repeated to give statistical reliability. The NPN fabrics show a large decrease as compared to Nomex® alone or alumoxane coated Nomex®. An increase in the ferroxane content results in an equivalent increase in virus retention. This suggests that it is the ferroxane that has an active role in deactivating and/or binding the virus. Heating the NPN to 160 °C results in the loss of cysteic acid functional groups (without loss of the iron nanoparticle's core structure) and the resulting fabric behaves similar to that of untreated Nomex®, showing that the surface functionalization of the nanoparticles is vital for the surface collapse of aspirated water droplets and the absorption and immobilization of the MS2 viruses. Thus, for virus immobilization, it is not sufficient to have iron oxide nanoparticles per se, but the surface functionality of a nanoparticle is vitally important in ensuring efficacy. PMID:22864822

  20. Studies on glutathione S-transferases important for sperm function: evidence of catalytic activity-independent functions.

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, B; Aravinda, S; Pawshe, C H; Totey, S M; Nagpal, S; Salunke, D M; Shaha, C

    1998-01-01

    Our earlier studies reported the identification of a rat testicular protein of 24 kDa with significant similarity at the N-terminus with Mu class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Treatment of goat sperm with antisera against this protein identified immunoreactive sites on the spermatozoa and inhibited in vitro fertilization of goat oocytes by the antibody-treated sperm. The above observations indicated the presence of GST-like molecule(s) important for fertility related events on goat spermatozoa. In this study, we report the purification of goat sperm GSTs (GSP1) which were purified by glutathione affinity chromatography and were enzymically active towards 1-chloro-2,4,-dinitrobenzene, a general GST substrate, and ethacrynic acid, a substrate for Pi class GSTs. GSP1 resolved into three major components on reverse-phase HPLC: peaks 1 and 2 with molecular masses of 26.5 kDa and peak 3 with a molecular mass of 25.5 kDa, as determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple attempts to obtain N-terminal sequences of the first two peaks failed, indicating N-terminal block; however, they reacted to specific anti-Mu-GST antisera on Western blots and ELISA, and not to anti-Pi-GST antisera, which provides evidence for the presence of Mu-GST-reactive sites on peaks 1 and 2. The third component showed 80% N-terminal similarity with human and rat GSTP1-1 over an overlap of 15 amino acids, and reacted to anti-Pi-specific antisera in ELISA. Sperm labelled with antibodies against a 10-mer and an 11-mer peptide, designed from the N-terminal sequences of Mu and Pi class GSTs respectively, showed the presence of both Mu- and Pi-GST on goat sperm surface at distinct cellular domains. Selective inhibition of Pi class GST by the Pi-specific antisera, either at 0 h or at 3 h after initiation of sperm capacitation, leads to a reduction in fertilization rates. In contrast, the inhibition of Mu class GST by specific antisera at 0 h does not inhibit fertilization, although such treatment at 3 h after the

  1. The Importance of Physical Fitness versus Physical Activity for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Deborah Rohm; Steinhardt, Mary A.

    1993-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relationships among physical fitness, physical activity, and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) in male police officers. Data from screenings and physical fitness assessments indicated physical activity must be sufficient to influence fitness before obtaining statistically significant risk-reducing…

  2. Developmental Experiences during Extracurricular Activities and Australian Adolescents' Self-Concept: Particularly Important for Youth from Disadvantaged Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomfield, Corey J.; Barber, Bonnie L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activities provide adolescents with a number of positive personal and interpersonal developmental experiences. This study investigated whether developmental experiences that occurred during extracurricular activities were linked to a more positive self-concept for Australian adolescents, and whether this link was particularly…

  3. The Seeds of Learning: Young Children Develop Important Skills through Their Gardening Activities at a Midwestern Early Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Dana L.

    2007-01-01

    Using teachers as co-researchers to collect and analyze data, this case study explored preschool and kindergarteners' learning when they were engaged in hands-on activities in the garden and greenhouse areas of a model outdoor classroom. Key findings suggest that when young children are participating in garden and greenhouse activities they are:…

  4. 77 FR 6080 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), as amended, and implementing regulations, notice is hereby given that NMFS has issued a letter of authorization (LOA) to the U.S. Navy (Navy) to take marine mammals incidental to Navy training, maintenance, and research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) activities to be conducted within the Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar......

  5. Assessing the Importance of Social and Environmental Supports for Leisure-Time Physical Activity in a Unique Socio-Cultural and Geographical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Alain P.; Lariviere, Michel; Pong, Raymond; Snelling, Susan J.; Young, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have found important differences among population sub-groups when considering their "determinants of physical activity". The health of Francophones and Northern Ontario residents in Canada has been assessed as relatively poorer than the general population. Understanding the determinants of physical activity in these populations holds…

  6. NADPH Oxidase Dependent NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Plays an Important Role in Lung Fibrosis by Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Ji, Zhaoxia; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Chang, Chong Hyun; Li, Ruibin; Zhang, Haiyuan; Nel, André E.; Xia, Tian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this communication is to elucidate the key role of NADPH oxidase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation and generation of pulmonary fibrosis by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Although it is known that oxidative stress plays a role in pulmonary fibrosis by single-walled CNTs, the role of specific sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including NADPH oxidase, in inflammasome activation remains to be clarified. In this study, three long aspect ratio (LAR) materials (MWCNTs, SWCNTs, and silver nanowires) are used to compare with spherical carbon black and silver nanoparticles for their ability to trigger oxygen burst activity and NLRP3 assembly. All LAR materials but not spherical nanoparticles induce robust NADPH oxidase activation and respiratory burst activity in THP-1 cells, which are blunted in p22phox deficient cells. NADPH oxidase is directly involved in lysosome damage by LAR materials, as demonstrated by decreased cathepsin B release and IL-1β production in p22phox deficient cells. Reduced respiratory burst activity and inflammasome activation are also observed in bone marrow-derived macrophages from p47phox deficient mice. Moreover, p47phox deficient mice have reduced IL-1β production and lung collagen deposition in response to MWCNTs. Lung fibrosis is also suppressed by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in wild type animals exposed to MWCNTs. PMID:25581126

  7. Nematicidal and antimicrobial activities of methanol extracts of 17 plants, of importance in ethnopharmacology, obtained from the Arabian Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marby, Adel; Ejike, Chukwunonso ECC; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Awadh-Ali, Nasser A; Al-badani, Rwaida A; Alghamdi, Ghanem MA; Jacob, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The development of resistance to synthetic drugs by target organisms is a major challenge facing medicine, yet locked within plants are phytochemicals used in herbal medicine (especially in the Arabian Peninsula) that may find application in this regard. In pursuit of unlocking these “hidden treasures,” the methanol extracts of leaves, aerial parts, fruits, and resins of 17 plants used in the Arabian Peninsula were screened for antimicrobial activities. Materials and Methods: The nematicidal, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined using appropriate assays. Steinernema feltiae, Staphylococcus carnosus, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as test organisms. Concentrations of the extracts ranging from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml were tested and appropriate statistical tests performed on the data generated. Results: The results show that extracts from Solanum incanum, Chenopodium murale, Commiphora myrrha, Anthemis nobilis, and Achillea biebersteinii were the most active and had very high activities against two or more of the test organisms at low concentrations. Extracts of the leaves of S. incanum and resins of Ferula asafoetida were the most active nematicides, with significant activity at 0.5 mg/ml. Extracts of C. myrrha and C. murale had the most active antibacterial activity with inhibition zones of 12-15 mm and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 2.5 mg/ml for both bacteria. Extracts of the leaves of A. biebersteinii were the most active fungicide, giving an MIC of 1.5 mg/ml. Conclusion: The results validate the use of these plants in ethnopharmacology, and open new vistas of opportunities for the development of cheap but effective agents that may be useful against infectious diseases. PMID:27104031

  8. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, May; Han, Areum; Chin, Seungtae

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants’ health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a) improved psychological well-being, (b) enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c) social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities. PMID:26084272

  9. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, May; Han, Areum; Chin, Seungtae

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants' health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a) improved psychological well-being, (b) enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c) social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities. PMID:26084272

  10. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John; Begg, John; Townsend, Dougal; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this study we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ∼50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  11. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John J.; Begg, John G.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2012-03-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this article we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ≤50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  12. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  13. Overexpression of two stress-responsive, small, non-coding RNAs, 6S and tmRNA, imparts butanol tolerance in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander J; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Papoutsakis, Terry

    2016-04-01

    While extensively studied in several model organisms, the role of small, non-coding RNAs in the stress response remains largely unexplored in Clostridium organisms. About 100 years after the first industrial Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation process, based on the Weizmann Clostridium acetobutylicum strain, strain tolerance to butanol remains a crucial factor limiting the economics of the process. Several studies have examined the response of this organism to metabolite stress, and several genes have been engaged to impart enhanced tolerance, but no sRNAs have yet been directly engaged in this task. We show that the two stress-responsive sRNAs, 6S and tmRNA, upon overexpression impart tolerance to butanol as assessed by viability assays under process-relevant conditions. 6S overexpression enhances cell densities as well as butanol titres. We discuss the likely mechanisms that these two sRNAs might engage in this tolerance phenotype. Our data support the continued exploration of sRNAs as a basis for engineering enhanced tolerance and enhanced solvent production, especially because sRNA-based strategies impose a minimal metabolic burden on the cells. PMID:26989157

  14. 75 FR 5575 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted in the Gulf of Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU14 Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy...), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; receipt of application... pressure from underwater detonations. The Navy requests authorization to take individuals of 20 species...

  15. Molecular characterization of protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and its importance in cytotoxicity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lauren M; Tisa, Louis S

    2014-11-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  16. Molecular Characterization of Protease Activity in Serratia sp. Strain SCBI and Its Importance in Cytotoxicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lauren M.

    2014-01-01

    A newly recognized Serratia species, termed South African Caenorhabditis briggsae isolate (SCBI), is both a mutualist of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae KT0001 and a pathogen of lepidopteran insects. Serratia sp. strain SCBI displays high proteolytic activity, and because secreted proteases are known virulence factors for many pathogens, the purpose of this study was to identify genes essential for extracellular protease activity in Serratia sp. strain SCBI and to determine what role proteases play in insect pathogenesis and cytotoxicity. A bank of 2,100 transposon mutants was generated, and six SCBI mutants with defective proteolytic activity were identified. These mutants were also defective in cytotoxicity. The mutants were found defective in genes encoding the following proteins: alkaline metalloprotease secretion protein AprE, a BglB family transcriptional antiterminator, an inosine/xanthosine triphosphatase, GidA, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, and a PIN domain protein. Gene expression analysis on these six mutants showed significant downregulation in mRNA levels of several different types of predicted protease genes. In addition, transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis provided insight into how inactivation of AprE, GidA, and a PIN domain protein influences motility and virulence, as well as protease activity. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) to further characterize expression of predicted protease genes in wild-type Serratia sp. SCBI, the highest mRNA levels for the alkaline metalloprotease genes (termed prtA1 to prtA4) occurred following the death of an insect host, while two serine protease and two metalloprotease genes had their highest mRNA levels during active infection. Overall, these results indicate that proteolytic activity is essential for cytotoxicity in Serratia sp. SCBI and that its regulation appears to be highly complex. PMID:25182493

  17. Disruption of the immune-checkpoint VISTA gene imparts a proinflammatory phenotype with predisposition to the development of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Le Mercier, Isabelle; Putra, Juan; Chen, Wenna; Liu, Jun; Schenk, Austin D; Nowak, Elizabeth C; Suriawinata, Arief A; Li, Jiannan; Noelle, Randolph J

    2014-10-14

    V domain-containing Ig suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA) is a negative checkpoint regulator that suppresses T cell-mediated immune responses. Previous studies using a VISTA-neutralizing monoclonal antibody show that VISTA blockade enhances T-cell activation. The current study describes a comprehensive characterization of mice in which the gene for VISTA has been deleted. Despite the apparent normal hematopoietic development in young mice, VISTA genetic deficiency leads to a gradual accumulation of spontaneously activated T cells, accompanied by the production of a spectrum of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Enhanced T-cell responsiveness was also observed upon immunization with neoantigen. Despite the presence of multiorgan chronic inflammation, aged VISTA-deficient mice did not develop systemic or organ-specific autoimmune disease. Interbreeding of the VISTA-deficient mice with 2D2 T-cell receptor transgenic mice, which are predisposed to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, drastically enhanced disease incidence and intensity. Disease development is correlated with the increase in the activation of encephalitogenic T cells in the periphery and enhanced infiltration into the CNS. Taken together, our data suggest that VISTA is a negative checkpoint regulator whose loss of function lowers the threshold for T-cell activation, allowing for an enhanced proinflammatory phenotype and an increase in the frequency and intensity of autoimmunity under susceptible conditions. PMID:25267631

  18. Implementing Policies to Enhance Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Kenneth H; Greenberg, Jayne D; Castelli, Darla M; Barton, Mitch; Martin, Scott B; Morrow, James R

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to provide an overview of national physical activity recommendations and policies (e.g., from the Institute of Medicine, National Physical Activity Plan, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and to discuss how these important initiatives can be implemented in local schools. Successful policies are illustrated. Specific strategies and ideas are shared regarding how physical educators can assert themselves and impart their knowledge in an effort to build support for policy implementations that enhance the delivery of physical education and physical activity in their schools and communities. PMID:27100264

  19. Cyclooxygenase activity is important for efficient replication of mouse hepatitis virus at an early stage of infection

    PubMed Central

    Raaben, Matthijs; Einerhand, Alexandra WC; Taminiau, Lucas JA; van Houdt, Michel; Bouma, Janneke; Raatgeep, Rolien H; Büller, Hans A; de Haan, Cornelis AM; Rossen, John WA

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) play a significant role in many different viral infections with respect to replication and pathogenesis. Here we investigated the role of COXs in the mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) infection cycle. Blocking COX activity by different inhibitors or by RNA interference affected MHV infection in different cells. The COX inhibitors reduced MHV infection at a post-binding step, but early in the replication cycle. Both viral RNA and viral protein synthesis were affected with subsequent loss of progeny virus production. Thus, COX activity appears to be required for efficient MHV replication, providing a potential target for anti-coronaviral therapy. PMID:17555580

  20. Identification of amino acids important for the catalytic activity of the collagen glucosyltransferase associated with the multifunctional lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunguang; Risteli, Maija; Heikkinen, Jari; Hussa, Anna-Kaisa; Uitto, Lahja; Myllyla, Raili

    2002-05-24

    Collagen glucosyltransferase (GGT) activity has recently been shown to be associated with human lysyl hydroxylase (LH) isoform 3 (LH3) (Heikkinen, J., Risteli, M., Wang, C., Latvala, J., Rossi, M., Valtavaara, M., Myllylä, R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 36158-36163). The LH and GGT activities of the multifunctional LH3 protein modify lysyl residues in collagens posttranslationally to form hydroxylysyl and glucosylgalactosyl hydroxylysyl residues respectively. We now report that in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, where only one ortholog is found for lysyl hydroxylase, the LH and GGT activities are also associated with the same gene product. The aim of the present studies is the identification of amino acids important for the catalytic activity of GGT. Our data indicate that the GGT active site is separate from the carboxyl-terminal LH active site of human LH3, the amino acids important for the GGT activity being located at the amino-terminal part of the molecule. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved cysteine at position 144 to isoleucine and a leucine at position 208 to isoleucine caused a marked reduction in GGT activity. These amino acids were conserved in C. elegans LH and mammalian LH3, but not in LH1 or LH2, which lack GGT activity. The data also reveal a DXD-like motif in LH3 characteristic of many glycosyltransferases and the mutagenesis of aspartates of this motif eliminated the GGT activity. Reduction in GGT activity was not accompanied by a change in the LH activity of the molecule. Thus GGT activity can be manipulated independently of LH activity in LH3. These data provide the information needed to design knock-out studies for investigation of the function of glucosylgalactosyl hydroxylysyl residues of collagens in vivo. PMID:11896059

  1. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation.

    PubMed

    Agger, Jane W; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G T; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-04-29

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  2. Temporal variability of glucocorticoid receptor activity is functionally important for the therapeutic action of fluoxetine in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-S; Kim, Y-H; Park, W-S; Park, O-K; Kwon, S-H; Hong, K S; Rhim, H; Shim, I; Morita, K; Wong, D L; Patel, P D; Lyons, D M; Schatzberg, A F; Her, S

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown inconsistent results regarding the actions of antidepressants on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signalling. To resolve these inconsistencies, we used a lentiviral-based reporter system to directly monitor rat hippocampal GR activity during stress adaptation. Temporal GR activation was induced significantly by acute stress, as demonstrated by an increase in the intra-individual variability of the acute stress group compared with the variability of the non-stress group. However, the increased intra-individual variability was dampened by exposure to chronic stress, which was partly restored by fluoxetine treatment without affecting glucocorticoid secretion. Immobility in the forced-swim test was negatively correlated with the intra-individual variability, but was not correlated with the quantitative GR activity during fluoxetine therapy; this highlights the temporal variability in the neurobiological links between GR signalling and the therapeutic action of fluoxetine. Furthermore, we demonstrated sequential phosphorylation between GR (S224) and (S232) following fluoxetine treatment, showing a molecular basis for hormone-independent nuclear translocation and transcriptional enhancement. Collectively, these results suggest a neurobiological mechanism by which fluoxetine treatment confers resilience to the chronic stress-mediated attenuation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. PMID:25330740

  3. Welfare Reform: Work-Site-Based Activities Can Play an Important Role in TANF Programs. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia M.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined worksite-based activities currently in place to help recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) develop the skills required for successful transition to unsubsidized employment. Data were collected from the following sources: (1) data reported by states to the Department of Health and…

  4. The Serum Complement System: A Simplified Laboratory Exercise to Measure the Activity of an Important Component of the Immune System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglis, Jordan E.; Radziwon, Kimberly A.; Maniero, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be…

  5. 75 FR 5055 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... to AFAST training, maintenance, and RDT&E became effective on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January... conducted within the AFAST Study Area under regulations issued on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January 27.... Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST) AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  6. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    PubMed Central

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Willats, William G. T.; Ludwig, Roland; Horn, Svein J.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Westereng, Bjørge

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are known to carry out oxidative cleavage of glycoside bonds in chitin and cellulose, thus boosting the activity of well-known hydrolytic depolymerizing enzymes. Because biomass-degrading microorganisms tend to produce a plethora of LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell walls. Products generated by NcLPMO9C were analyzed using high performance anion exchange chromatography and multidimensional mass spectrometry. We show that NcLPMO9C generates oxidized products from a variety of substrates and that its product profile differs from those of hydrolytic enzymes acting on the same substrates. The enzyme particularly acts on the glucose backbone of xyloglucan, accepting various substitutions (xylose, galactose) in almost all positions. Because the attachment of xyloglucan to cellulose hampers depolymerization of the latter, it is possible that the beneficial effect of the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures. PMID:24733907

  7. The Importance of Motor Functional Levels from the Activity Limitation Perspective of ICF in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Akmer

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose in this study was to evaluate performance and capacity as defined by Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) and Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) from the "activity limitation" perspective of International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and to investigate the relationship between the…

  8. STAT5 Activation in the Dermal Papilla Is Important for Hair Follicle Growth Phase Induction.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Julien M D; Roy, Edwige; Ellis, Jonathan J; Francois, Mathias; Brooks, Andrew J; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-09-01

    Hair follicles are skin appendages that undergo periods of growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and rest (telogen) regulated by their mesenchymal component, the dermal papilla (DP). On the basis of the reports of its specific expression in the DP, we investigated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT5) activation during hair development and cycling. STAT5 activation in the DP began in late catagen, reaching a peak in early anagen before disappearing for the rest of the cycle. This was confirmed by the expression profile of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2, a STAT5 target in the DP. This pattern of expression starts after the first postnatal hair cycle. Quantification of hair cycling using the Flash canonical Wnt signaling in vivo bioluminescence reporter found that conditional knockout of STAT5A/B in the DP targeted through Cre-recombinase under the control of the Sox18 promoter resulted in delayed anagen entry compared with control. Microarray analysis of STAT5 deletion versus control revealed key changes in tumor necrosis factor-α, Wnt, and fibroblast growth factor ligands, known for their role in inducing anagen entry. We conclude that STAT5 activation acts as a mesenchymal switch to trigger natural anagen entry in postdevelopmental hair follicle cycling. PMID:27131881

  9. Activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway plays an important role in autophagy during prion infection

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xue-Yu; Tian, Chan; Wang, Hui; Xu, Yin; Ren, Ke; Zhang, Bao-Yun; Gao, Chen; Shi, Qi; Meng, Ge; Zhang, Lu-Bin; Zhao, Yang-Jing; Shao, Qi-Xiang; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    AMPK is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as a positive regulator of autophagy, by phosphorylating ULK1 at specific sites. A previous study demonstrated activation of the macroautophagic system in scrapie-infected experimental rodents and in certain human prion diseases, in which the essential negative regulator mTOR is severely inhibited. In this study, AMPK and ULK1 in the brains of hamsters infected with scrapie strain 263 K and in the scrapie-infected cell line SMB-S15 were analysed. The results showed an up-regulated trend of AMPK and AMPK-Thr172, ULK1 and ULK1-Ser555. Increases in brain AMPK and ULK1 occurred at an early stage of agent 263 K infection. The level of phosphorylated ULK1-Ser757 decreased during mid-infection and was only negligibly present at the terminal stage, a pattern that suggested a close relationship of the phosphorylated protein with altered endogenous mTOR. In addition, the level of LKB1 associated with AMPK activation was selectively increased at the early and middle stages of infection. Knockdown of endogenous ULK1 in SMB-S15 cells inhibited LC3 lipidation. These results showed that, in addition to the abolishment of the mTOR regulatory pathway, activation of the AMPK-ULK1 pathway during prion infection contributes to autophagy activation in prion-infected brain tissues. PMID:26423766

  10. IMPORTANCE OF GLUTATHIONE IN THE ACQUISITION AND MAINTENANCE OF SPERM NUCLEAR DECONDENSING ACTIVITY IN MATURING HAMSTER OOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sperm nuclear decondensing activity in mammalian oocytes is dependent upon the maturational state of the oocyte. It is maximal in mature, metaphase II oocytes and minimal or absent in immature germinal vesicle (GV) and fertilized pronuclear oocytes. Previous studies suggested tha...

  11. A review on medicinal importance, pharmacological activity and bioanalytical aspects of beta-carboline alkaloid ‘‘Harmine’’

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K; Gadewar, M; Tripathi, R; Prasad, SK; Patel, Dinesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Harmine, a beta-carboline alkaloid, is widely distributed in the plants, marine creatures, insects, mammalians as well as in human tissues and body fluids. Harmine was originally isolated from seeds of Peganum harmal in 1847 having a core indole structure and a pyridine ring. Harmine has various types of pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antitumor, cytotoxic, antiplasmodial, antioxidaant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic and hallucinogenic properties. It acts on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and monoamine oxidase A or B receptor, enhances insulin sensitivity and also produces vasorelaxant effect. Harmine prevents bone loss by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. The current review gives an overview on pharmacological activity and analytical techniques of harmine, which may be useful for researcheres to explore the hidden potential of harmine and and will also help in developing new drugs for the treatment of various diseases. PMID:23569990

  12. [Correlation between clinical parameters and quantitative analysis of inflammatory infiltrate. Importance in the diagnosis of active periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Mendieta Fiter, C

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the destruction in chronic periodontal disease occurs in relatively short periods of time which are followed of prolonged periods of inactivity. These bursts of activity are characterized by an increase in the inflammatory reaction. It has been the purpose of this paper to study the correlation between the clinical measurements of periodontal disease and the histomorphometric quantification of areas of dense inflammatory infiltrate. The results of this study show that the clinical parameters that measure gingival inflammation or loss of periodontal attachment are useful to distinguish pathology from normal (p less than 0.003), but lack sensitivity to detect burst of periodontal disease activity (p greater than 0.05). PMID:2489938

  13. Metabolism of hydroxypyruvate in a mutant of barley lacking NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase, an important photorespiratory enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.J.S.; Blackwell, R.D.; Lea, P.J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), LaPr 88/29, deficient in NADH-dependent hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) activity has been isolated. The activities of both NADH (5%) and NADPH-dependent (19%) HPR were severely reduced in this mutant compared to the wild type. Although lacking an enzyme in the main carbon pathway of photorespiration, this mutant was capable of CO{sub 2} fixation rates equivalent to 75% of that of the wild type, in normal atmospheres and 50% O{sub 2}. There also appeared to be little disruption to the photorespiratory metabolism as ammonia release, CO{sub 2} efflux and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} release from L-(U-{sup 14}C)serine feeding were similar in both mutant and wild-type leaves. When leaves of LaPr 88/29 were fed either ({sup 14}C)serine or {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, the accumulation of radioactivity was in serine and not in hydroxypyruvate, although the mutant was still able to metabolize over 25% of the supplied ({sup 14}C)serine into sucrose. After 3 hours in air the soluble amino acid pool was almost totally dominated by serine and glycine. LaPr 88/29 has also been used to show that NADH-glyoxylate reductase and NADH-HPR are probably not catalyzed by the same enzyme in barley and that over 80% of the NADPH-dependent HPR activity is due to the NADH-dependent enzyme. We also suggest that the alternative NADPH activity can metabolize a proportion, but not all, of the hydroxypyruvate produced during photorespiration and may thus form a useful backup to the NADH-dependent enzyme under conditions of maximal photorespiration.

  14. Metals content of Glossoscolex paulistus extracellular hemoglobin: Its peroxidase activity and the importance of these ions in the protein stability.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Celia S; Biazin, Ezer; Carvalho, Francisco A O; Tabak, Marcel; Bachega, José F R

    2016-08-01

    In this work we investigate the presence of divalent cations bound to the Glossoscolex paulistus (HbGp) hemoglobin and their effect over the protein stability and the peroxidase (POD) activity. Atomic absorption studies show that the HbGp iron content is consistent with the presence of 144 ions per protein. Moreover, using iron as a reference, the content of calcium was estimated as 30±4 ions per protein, independently of the EDTA pre-treatment or not prior to the acidic treatment performed in the protein digestion. The zinc content was 14±2 ions in the absence of EDTA pre-treatment, and 3±1 ions per protein in the presence of EDTA pre-treatment, implying the presence of one zinc ion per protomer (1/12 of the whole molecule). Finally, the copper concentration is negligible. Different from the vertebrate hemoglobins, where the effectors are usually organic anions, the hexagonal bilayer hemoglobins have as effectors inorganic cations that increase the oxygen affinity and stabilize the structure. Previous studies have suggested that the presence of divalent cations, such as copper and zinc, is related to the different types of antioxidant enzymatic activities as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity shown by giant hemoglobin from Lumbricus terrestris (HbLt). Recently, studies on HbGp crystal structure have confirmed the presence of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) binding sites. The Ca(2+) sites are similar as observed in the HbLt crystal structure. Otherwise, the Zn(2+) sites have no relation with those observed in Cu/Zn SODs. Our peroxidase assays with guaiacol confirm the POD activity and the effect of the zinc ions for HbGp. Our present results on HbGp metal content and their stability effects is the first step to understand the role of these cations in HbGp function in the future. PMID:27221949

  15. Importance of surface carbide formation on the activity and selectivity of Pd surfaces in the selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Burch, Robbie; Hardacre, Christopher; Hu, P.; Hughes, Philip

    2016-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation (Kim et al. J. Catal. 306 (2013) 146-154) on the selective hydrogenation of acetylene over Pd nanoparticles with different shapes concluded that Pd(100) showed higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) for acetylene hydrogenation. However, our recent density functional calculations (Yang et al. J. Catal. 305 (2013) 264-276) observed that the clean Pd(111) surface should result in higher activity and ethylene selectivity compared with the clean Pd(100) surface for acetylene hydrogenation. In the current work, using density functional theory calculations, we find that Pd(100) in the carbide form gives rise to higher activity and selectivity than Pd(111) carbide. These results indicate that the catalyst surface is most likely in the carbide form under the experimental reaction conditions. Furthermore, the adsorption energies of hydrogen atoms as a function of the hydrogen coverage at the surface and subsurface sites over Pd(100) are compared with those over Pd(111), and it is found that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms is always less favoured on Pd(100) over the whole coverage range. This suggests that the Pd(100) hydride surface will be less stable than the Pd(111) hydride surface, which is also in accordance with the experimental results reported.

  16. The relative importance of relief, hydroclimate and human activity as drivers of environmental change in mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaymaker, O.

    2009-04-01

    At longer, geological time scales relief is the dominant driver of environmental change and is a function of the rate of movement of global tectonic plates. At shorter, anthropocene time scales, hydroclimate and human activity vie for the role of dominant driver. It is anticipated that at future time scales human activity will become progressively more dominant. Mountain regions, representing about 20% of the terrestrial surface area of the globe, are by definition steep, high elevation regions which differ spatially in their absolute rates of change as a function of relief, hydroclimate and human activity. Global relief variations are characterized in terms of elevation and local elevation range. Superimposed on relief variations are global climate variations which are often closely correlated with relief. The question which engages greatest attention today is the extent to which environmental disturbances, whether hydroclimatic or anthropogenic, are indexed by sediment flux. In order to answer this question at global scale it is necessary to invoke a typology of mountain regions which is equally sensitive to both hydroclimatic and anthropogenic disturbances. Examples are drawn from tropical, temperate and polar mountain environments.

  17. Understanding the Importance of Context: A Qualitative Study of a Location-Based Exergame to Enhance School Childrens Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Judy; Jepson, Ruth; Macvean, Andrew; Gray, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Many public health interventions are less effective than expected in 'real life settings', yet little work is undertaken to understand the reasons why. The effectiveness of complex public health interventions can often be traced back to a robust programme theory (how and why an intervention brings about a change in outcome(s)) and assumptions that are made about the context in which it is implemented. Understanding whether effectiveness (or lack thereof) is due to the intervention or the context is hugely helpful in decisions about whether to a) modify the intervention; b) modify the context; c) stop providing the intervention. Exergames-also known as Active Video Games or AVGS-are video games which use the player's bodily movements as input and have potential to increase physical activity in children. However, the results of a recent pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a location-based exergame (FitQuest) in a school setting were inconclusive; no significant effect was detected for any of the outcome measures. The aim of this study was to explore whether the programme theory for FitQuest was correct with respect to how and why it would change children's perceptions of physical activity (PA) and exercise self-efficacy in the school setting. A further aim was to investigate the features of the school setting (context) that may impact on FitQuest's implementation and effectiveness. Qualitative data (gathered during the RCT) were gathered from interviews with teachers and children, and observation of sessions using FitQuest. Thematic analysis indicated that whilst children enjoyed playing the game, engaged with goal setting within the game context and undertook low to vigorous physical activity, there were significant contextual factors that prevented it from being played as often as intended. These included environmental factors (e.g. size of the playground), school factors (cancellations due to other activities), school technology policy (rules relating to

  18. Encouraging walking for transport and physical activity in children and adolescents: how important is the built environment?

    PubMed

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Kelty, Sally F; Zubrick, Stephen R; Villanueva, Karen P

    2009-01-01

    In the post-World War II era, there have been dramatic changes to the environment that appear to be having a detrimental impact on the lifestyles and incidental physical activities of young people. These changes are not trivial and have the potential to influence not only physical health, but also mental health and child development. However, the evidence of the impact of the built environment on physical activity to date is inconsistent. This review examines the evidence on the association between the built environment and walking for transport as well as physical activity generally, with a focus on methodological issues that may explain inconsistencies in the literature to date. It appears that many studies fail to measure behaviour-specific environmental correlates, and insufficient attention is being given to differences according to the age of study participants. Higher levels of out-of-school-hours physical activity and walking appear to be significantly associated with higher levels of urban density and neighbourhoods with mixed-use planning, especially for older children and adolescents. Proximate recreational facilities also appear to predict young people's level of physical activity. However, there are inconsistencies in the literature involving studies with younger children. Independent mobility increases with age. For younger children, the impact of the built environment is influenced by the decision-making of parents as the gatekeepers of their behaviour. Cross-cultural differences may also be present and are worthy of greater exploration. As children develop and are given more independent mobility, it appears that the way neighbourhoods are designed - particularly in terms of proximity and connectivity to local destinations, including schools and shopping centres, and the presence of footpaths - becomes a determinant of whether children are able, and are permitted by their parents, to walk and use destinations locally. If older children and

  19. Understanding the Importance of Context: A Qualitative Study of a Location-Based Exergame to Enhance School Childrens Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Ruth; Macvean, Andrew; Gray, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Many public health interventions are less effective than expected in ‘real life settings’, yet little work is undertaken to understand the reasons why. The effectiveness of complex public health interventions can often be traced back to a robust programme theory (how and why an intervention brings about a change in outcome(s)) and assumptions that are made about the context in which it is implemented. Understanding whether effectiveness (or lack thereof) is due to the intervention or the context is hugely helpful in decisions about whether to a) modify the intervention; b) modify the context; c) stop providing the intervention. Exergames–also known as Active Video Games or AVGS–are video games which use the player's bodily movements as input and have potential to increase physical activity in children. However, the results of a recent pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a location-based exergame (FitQuest) in a school setting were inconclusive; no significant effect was detected for any of the outcome measures. The aim of this study was to explore whether the programme theory for FitQuest was correct with respect to how and why it would change children’s perceptions of physical activity (PA) and exercise self-efficacy in the school setting. A further aim was to investigate the features of the school setting (context) that may impact on FitQuest’s implementation and effectiveness. Qualitative data (gathered during the RCT) were gathered from interviews with teachers and children, and observation of sessions using FitQuest. Thematic analysis indicated that whilst children enjoyed playing the game, engaged with goal setting within the game context and undertook low to vigorous physical activity, there were significant contextual factors that prevented it from being played as often as intended. These included environmental factors (e.g. size of the playground), school factors (cancellations due to other activities), school technology policy (rules

  20. An important role for type III interferon (IFN-lambda/IL-28) in TLR-induced antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Ank, Nina; Iversen, Marie B; Bartholdy, Christina; Staeheli, Peter; Hartmann, Rune; Jensen, Uffe B; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik; Thomsen, Allan R; Chen, Zhi; Haugen, Harald; Klucher, Kevin; Paludan, Søren R

    2008-02-15

    Type III IFNs (IFN-lambda/IL-28/29) are cytokines with type I IFN-like antiviral activities, which remain poorly characterized. We herein show that most cell types expressed both types I and III IFNs after TLR stimulation or virus infection, whereas the ability of cells to respond to IFN-lambda was restricted to a narrow subset of cells, including plasmacytoid dendritic cells and epithelial cells. To examine the role of type III IFN in antiviral defense, we generated IL-28Ralpha-deficient mice. These mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice with respect to clearance of a panel of different viruses, whereas mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR(-/-)) were significantly impaired. However, the strong antiviral activity evoked by treatment of mice with TLR3 or TLR9 agonists was significantly reduced in both IL-28RA(-/-) and IFNAR(-/-) mice. The type I IFN receptor system has been shown to mediate positive feedback on IFN-alphabeta expression, and we found that the type I IFN receptor system also mediates positive feedback on IFN-lambda expression, whereas IL-28Ralpha signaling does not provide feedback on either type I or type III IFN expression in vivo. Finally, using bone-marrow chimeric mice we showed that TLR-activated antiviral defense requires expression of IL-28Ralpha only on nonhemopoietic cells. In this compartment, epithelial cells responded to IFN-lambda and directly restricted virus replication. Our data suggest type III IFN to target a specific subset of cells and to contribute to the antiviral response evoked by TLRs. PMID:18250457

  1. An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects human brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control and reward in response to food images.

    PubMed

    Wiemerslage, Lyle; Nilsson, Emil K; Solstrand Dahlberg, Linda; Ence-Eriksson, Fia; Castillo, Sandra; Larsen, Anna L; Bylund, Simon B A; Hogenkamp, Pleunie S; Olivo, Gaia; Bandstein, Marcus; Titova, Olga E; Larsson, Elna-Marie; Benedict, Christian; Brooks, Samantha J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity and eating behaviour will add important insight for developing strategies for weight-loss treatment, as obesity may stem from different causes and as individual feeding behaviour may depend on genetic differences. To this end, we examined how an obesity risk allele for the FTO gene affects brain activity in response to food images of different caloric content via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thirty participants homozygous for the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism were shown images of low- or high-calorie food while brain activity was measured via fMRI. In a whole-brain analysis, we found that people with the FTO risk allele genotype (AA) had increased activity compared with the non-risk (TT) genotype in the posterior cingulate, cuneus, precuneus and putamen. Moreover, higher body mass index in the AA genotype was associated with reduced activity to food images in areas important for emotion (cingulate cortex), but also in areas important for impulse control (frontal gyri and lentiform nucleus). Lastly, we corroborate our findings with behavioural scales for the behavioural inhibition and activation systems. Our results suggest that the two genotypes are associated with differential neural processing of food images, which may influence weight status through diminished impulse control and reward processing. PMID:26797854

  2. The possibly important role played by Ga2O3 during the activation of GaN photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoqian; Wang, Honggang; Zhang, Junju; Li, Zhiming; Cui, Shiyao; Zhang, Lejuan

    2015-08-01

    Three different chemical solutions are used to remove the possible contamination on GaN surface, while Ga2O3 is still found at the surface. After thermal annealing at 710 °C in the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber and activated with Cs/O, all the GaN samples are successfully activated to the effective negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathodes. Among all samples, the GaN sample with the highest content of Ga2O3 after chemical cleaning obtains the highest quantum efficiency. By analyzing the property of Ga2O3, the surface processing results, and electron affinity variations during Cs and Cs/O2 deposition on GaN of other groups, it is suggested that before the adsorption of Cs, Ga2O3 is not completely removed from GaN surface in our samples, which will combine with Cs and lead to a large decrease in electron affinity. Furthermore, the effective NEA is formed for GaN photocathode, along with the surface downward band bending. Based on this assumption, a new dipole model Ga2O3-Cs is suggested, and the experimental effects are explained and discussed.

  3. Raman spectroscopy-an innovative and versatile tool to follow the respirational activity and carbonate biomineralization of important cave bacteria.

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Frosch, Torsten; Hanf, Stefan; Rusznyak, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Küsel, Kirsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-09-17

    Raman gas spectrometry is introduced as a unique tool for the investigation of the respiratory activity that is indicative for growth of bacteria involved in biomineralization. Growth of these bacteria cannot be monitored using conventional turbidity-based optical density measurements due to concomitant mineral formation in the medium. The respiratory activity of carbonate-precipitating Arthrobacter sulfonivorans , isolated from the recently discovered Herrenberg Cave, was investigated during its lifecycle by means of innovative cavity-enhanced Raman gas analysis. This method allowed rapid and nonconsumptive online quantification of CO2 and O2 in situ in the headspace of the bacterial culture. Carbon dioxide production rates of A. sulfonivorans showed two maxima due to its pleomorphic growth lifecycle. In contrast, only one maximum was observed in control organism Pseudomonas fluorescens with a one-stage lifecycle. Further insight into the biomineralization process over time was provided by a combination of Raman macro- and microspectroscopy. With the help of this spatially resolved chemical imaging of the different types of calcium carbonate minerals, it was elucidated that the surface of the A. sulfonivorans bacterial cells served as nuclei for biomineralization of initially spherical vaterite precipitates. These vaterite biominerals continued growing as chemically stable rock-forming calcite crystals with rough edges. Thus, the utilization of innovative Raman multigas spectroscopy, combined with Raman mineral analysis, provided novel insights into microbial-mediated biomineralization and, therefore, provides a powerful methodology in the field of environmental sciences. PMID:23972095

  4. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults' Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45-65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants' (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA. PMID:26959041

  5. The Importance of Establishing and Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge during 21st Century Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Chris A; Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Wishard, Bernard; Bean, Robert; Blair, Dianna; Lawson, Ray; Weeks, George; Tolk, Keith

    2012-01-01

    During this century, the entire nuclear fuel cycle will expand and become increasingly more global, taxing both the resources and capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to maintain an effective Continuity of Knowledge (CoK) and its ability to provide timely detection of diversion. Uranium that currently is mined and milled in one country will be converted, enriched, and fabricated into fuel for reactors in an expanding set of new countries. This expansion will make it harder to guarantee that regional activities stay regional and that diversion detection is timely unless new and sustainable tools are developed to improve inspector effectiveness. To deal with this emerging reality, the IAEA must increase its use of unattended monitoring and employ new tools and methods that enhance CoK during all phases of the fuel cycle. This approach will help provide useful information to aid in detecting undeclared activities and create opportunities for timely and appropriate responses to events well before they enter phases of greater concern (e.g., enrichment). The systems that maintain CoK of safeguarded assets rely on containment and surveillance (C/S) technologies. The 21st century fuel cycle will require increased use of these technologies and systems, plus greater implementation of unattended systems that can securely collect data when inspectors are not present.

  6. Sports Facilities, Shopping Centers or Homes: What Locations are Important for Adults’ Physical Activity? A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marijke; Ettema, Dick; Pierik, Frank; Dijst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is influenced by the built environment. However, little is known about the types of built environment where adults spend their time, and at what levels of PA they engage in those environments. Understanding the effect of the built environment on PA requires insight into PA behavior at different types of locations (e.g., home, work, shopping centers, and sports facilities). Therefore, this study describes where adults aged 45–65 years were active with moderate-to-vigorous intensity (MVPA), and examines associations of socio-demographic factors and neighborhood with MVPA at these locations. Participants’ (N = 308) PA was measured for seven days using accelerometers and GPS-devices. Adults spent most minutes of MVPA at home and work. Highest MVPA-ratios of total time spent at a location were achieved in sports facilities and during transport. Neighborhood characteristics and socio-demographic factors such as work status, health status and household structure, had significant effects on MVPA at various locations and on total MVPA. Understanding PA behavior at various locations may provide insights that allow professionals in different domains (e.g., health, landscaping, urban planning) to develop strategies to stimulate PA. PMID:26959041

  7. A putative Rab-GTPase activation protein from Nicotiana benthamiana is important for Bamboo mosaic virus intercellular movement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Ping; Chen, Jao-Shien; Hsu, Yau-Huei; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu

    2013-12-01

    The cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique was applied to isolate the differentially expressed genes during Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) infection on Nicotiana benthamiana plants. One of the upregulated genes was cloned and predicted to contain a TBC domain designated as NbRabGAP1 (Rab GTPase activation protein 1). No significant difference was observed in BaMV accumulation in the NbRabGAP1-knockdown and the control protoplasts. However, BaMV accumulation was 50% and 2% in the inoculated and systemic leaves, respectively, of the knockdown plants to those of the control plants. By measuring the spreading area of BaMV infection foci in the inoculated leaves, we found that BaMV moved less efficiently in the NbRabGAP1-knockdown plants than in the control plants. Transient expression of the wild type NbRabGAP1 significantly increases BaMV accumulation in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that NbRabGAP1 with a functional Rab-GAP activity is involved in virus movement. PMID:24210126

  8. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Raab, Lindsay N.; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N.

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semi-annual records of anthropometry, maturity and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year pre-menarche [predictor] and ~5 years post-menarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent inter-scan PA and PA over 3 maturity sub-phases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry and strength indices at non-dominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) sub-head BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or post-menarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and inter-scan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p<0.07). Pre-menarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semi-partial r2 = 0.21-0.59, p≤0.001). Adult 1/3 radius and sub-head BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years post-menarche (p<0.03). PA 3-5 years post-menarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter and buckling ratio (p<0.05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  9. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (Including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Kanaley, Jill A; Raab, Lindsay N; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N

    2015-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semiannual records of anthropometry, maturity, and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year premenarche [predictor] and ~5 years postmenarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent interscan PA and PA over 3 maturity subphases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry, and strength indices at nondominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) subhead BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or postmenarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and interscan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p > .07). Premenarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semipartial r2 = .21-0.59, p ≤ .001). Adult 1/3 radius and subhead BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years postmenarche (p < .03). PA 3-5 years postmenarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter, and buckling ratio (p < .05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  10. Evidence that Highly Conserved Residues of Transmembrane Segment 6 of Escherichia coli MntH Are Important for Transport Activity

    PubMed Central

    Haemig, Heather A.H.; Moen, Patrick J.; Brooker, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nramp (natural resistance-associated macrophage protein) family members have been characterized in mammals, yeast, and bacteria as divalent metal ion/H+ symporters. In previous work, a bioinformatic approach was used for the identification of residues that are conserved within the Nramp family [ref.1. Haemig, H.A. and R.J. Brooker, (2004) J Membr. Biol, 201(2): 97-107]. Based on site-directed mutagenesis of highly conserved negatively charged residues, a model was proposed for the metal binding site of the E.coli homolog, MntH. In this study, we have focused on the highly conserved residues, including two histidines, of transmembrane segment 6 (TMS-6). Multiple mutants were made at the eight conserved sites (i.e., Gly-205, Ala-206, Met-209, Pro-210, His-211, Leu-215, His-216, and Ser-217) in TMS-6 of E. coli MntH. Double mutants involving His-211 and His-216 were also made. The results indicate the side chain volume of these residues is critically important for function. In most cases, only substitutions that are closest in side chain volume still permit transport. In addition, the Km for metal binding is largely unaffected by mutations in TMS-6, whereas Vmax values were decreased in all mutants characterized kinetically. Thus, these residues do not appear to play a role in metal binding. Instead, they may comprise an important face on TMS-6 that is critical for protein conformational changes during transport. Also, in contrast to other studies, our data do not strongly indicate that the conserved histidine residues play a role in pH regulation of metal transport. PMID:20441230

  11. A trustful relationship—the importance for relatives to actively participate in the meeting with the physician

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In previous research, no uniform picture emerged of the role of relatives in the meeting between an elderly patient and a physician. Knowledge about relatives’ experiences of the meeting between an elderly patient and a physician will help healthcare practitioners better understand the role of relatives during the meeting and how practitioners can assist relatives in assuming their supporting role more efficiently. The purpose of this study is to explore experiences of relatives of meeting with the physician in a hospital setting when an elderly patient is discharged from hospital care to home care, in order to identify aspects that may facilitate relatives in taking up their role in a more efficient manner. This descriptive and exploratory study is based on 20 interviews with relatives. The result shows that the physician's communication style influences the meeting between the relative, the elderly patient, and the physician, and that this style is the result of power and interaction. A trustful relationship during the meeting between the relative and the physician can increase the relative's feeling of confidence with the healthcare organization and treatment of the elderly patient. The relative has an important supporting role in the care for the elderly family member, both in the hospital and the home setting. It is likely that the relative's value as a resource, for both the patient and the physician, increases as the relative experiences feelings of confidence in the meeting with the physician. It is therefore of value to increase our knowledge about the conditions and circumstances facilitating and/or hampering the meeting between the relative and the physician. The result stresses the importance of encouraging relatives to participate in the meeting. Physicians need more guidance and training in communication skills, respectful demeanor, and collaboration while meeting the relatives. PMID:23694680

  12. Structure-activity predictions of properties of organophosphorus pesticides and chemical agents important for optical detection. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Porte, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an investigation for estimating various physicochemical properties of chemical warfare agents and organophosphorus pesticides. The determination of aqueous solubility, - octanol/water partition coefficients, and alkaline hydrolysis rate constants will be used in the development of a chemical sensor using fiber optic spectroscopy. These three parameters will effect the limit of detection for each compound by limiting the concentration in the detector. The parameters were estimated by linear free energy relationships and quantitative structure activity relationships using experimental data for compounds of similar chemical structure. The results of this thesis showed that the hydrophobic medium represented by 1-octanol did concentrate the OP pesticides but did not significantly concentrate CWA, CWA simulants, or CWA hydrolysis products. Correlations were evaluated for six classes of organophosphorus compounds. The limitation of this approach to predicting physicochemical parameters is not in the molecular descriptors used in the regression equations but in the availability of existing experimental data.

  13. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%. PMID:27165502

  14. Increase of electrodermal activity of heart meridian during physical exercise: the significance of electrical values in acupuncture and diagnostic importance.

    PubMed

    Pontarollo, Francesco; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Bellavite, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Electric field measurements of skin potential and electrical currents are physiological indicators of electrodermal activity (EDA) and have been associated with a variety of sensory, cognitive and emotional stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the EDA at some hand acupoints before, during and after a physical exercise. EDA of eight points located at the corner of fingernails of hands was measured in 10 healthy young volunteers before, during and after a 14-min acute exercise in a bicycle ergometer. In pre-exercise resting state the parameters were stable and similar between the 8 different tested points, while during exercise a significant increase of current (from 1000-2000 to 4000-8000 nA) was observed, with the maximal values related to the point located on the ulnar side of the little finger, at the base of the nail, corresponding to the Shao chong (HT9) of heart meridian. PMID:20621275

  15. Lignin Peroxidase Activity Is Not Important in Biological Bleaching and Delignification of Unbleached Kraft Pulp by Trametes versicolor

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, Frederick S.

    1992-01-01

    The discovery in 1983 of fungal lignin peroxidases able to catalyze the oxidation of nonphenolic aromatic lignin model compounds and release some CO2 from lignin has been seen as a major advance in understanding how fungi degrade lignin. Recently, the fungus Trametes versicolor was shown to be capable of substantial decolorization and delignification of unbleached industrial kraft pulps over 2 to 5 days. The role, if any, of lignin peroxidase in this biobleaching was therefore examined. Several different assays indicated that T. versicolor can produce and secrete peroxidase proteins, but only under certain culture conditions. However, work employing a new lignin peroxidase inhibitor (metavanadate ions) and a new lignin peroxidase assay using the dye azure B indicated that secreted lignin peroxidases do not play a role in the T. versicolor pulp-bleaching system. Oxidative activity capable of degrading 2-keto-4-methiolbutyric acid (KMB) appeared unique to ligninolytic fungi and always accompanied pulp biobleaching. PMID:16348775

  16. Prediction of prognosis of ALS: Importance of active denervation findings of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Nakashima, Kenji; Kannagi, Mari; Kanatani, Yasuhiro; Mizushima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by serious muscle atrophy and weakness. The purpose of this study was to find prognostic factors in patients with mild ALS using application forms for the Specified Disease Treatment Research Program in Japan. We classified ALS as mild, moderate and severe. The subjects consisted of 363 patients with mild ALS who underwent needle electromyography at registration and were followed for more than one year. Time to progression to severe ALS and time to deterioration of activities of daily living such as speech dysfunction, upper limb dysfunction, and walking disability were used as outcomes. Cox proportional hazards model analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors. Of the patients with initially mild ALS, 38.3% (139/363) had progressed severe ALS at the last follow-up. In multivariate analysis of time to progression to severe ALS, bulbar onset (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.68 [1.13–2.49], p = 0.010), tongue atrophy (1.69 [1.14–2.51], p = 0.009), dyspnea (1.57 [1.02–2.41], p = 0.042) and active denervation findings (ADFs) of the cervical-upper limb area (1.81 [1.25–2.63], p = 0.002) emerged as prognostic factors. Furthermore ADFs in the trunk area were prognostic factors for upper limb dysfunction and walking disability (1.72 [1.05–2.81], p = 0.031, and 1.97 [1.09–3.59], p = 0.026). In conclusion ADFs of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area were prognostic factors in ALS patients. PMID:26668778

  17. Heterologous Expression of Two Jatropha Aquaporins Imparts Drought and Salt Tolerance and Improves Seed Viability in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kasim; Agarwal, Pallavi; Shanware, Arti; Sane, Vidhu Aniruddha

    2015-01-01

    Drought and high salinity are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth and productivity of crops. Aquaporins are small integral membrane proteins that belong to the family of the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), with members in animals, plants and microbes, where they facilitate the transport of water and/or small neutral solutes thereby affecting water balance. In this study we characterized two aquaporin genes namely, plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP2;7) and tonoplast intrinsic protein TIP1;3 from Jatropha curcas that are localised to the plasma membrane and vacuole respectively. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines over-expressing JcPIP2;7 and JcTIP1;3 under a constitutive promoter show improved germination under high salt and mannitol compared to control seeds. These transgenic plants also show increased root length under abiotic stress conditions compared to wild type Col-0 plants. Transgenic lines exposed to drought conditions by withholding water for 20 days, were able to withstand water stress and attained normal growth after re-watering unlike control plants which could not survive. Transgenic lines also had better seed yield than control under salt stress. Importantly, seed viability of transgenic plants grown under high salt concentration was 35%-45% compared to less than 5% for control seeds obtained from plants growing under salt stress. The effect of JcPIP2;7 and JcTIP1;3 on improving germination and seed viability in drought and salinity make these important candidates for genetic manipulation of plants for growth in saline soils. PMID:26067295

  18. Heterologous Expression of Two Jatropha Aquaporins Imparts Drought and Salt Tolerance and Improves Seed Viability in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kasim; Agarwal, Pallavi; Shanware, Arti; Sane, Vidhu Aniruddha

    2015-01-01

    Drought and high salinity are environmental conditions that cause adverse effects on the growth and productivity of crops. Aquaporins are small integral membrane proteins that belong to the family of the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), with members in animals, plants and microbes, where they facilitate the transport of water and/or small neutral solutes thereby affecting water balance. In this study we characterized two aquaporin genes namely, plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP2;7) and tonoplast intrinsic protein TIP1;3 from Jatropha curcas that are localised to the plasma membrane and vacuole respectively. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines over-expressing JcPIP2;7 and JcTIP1;3 under a constitutive promoter show improved germination under high salt and mannitol compared to control seeds. These transgenic plants also show increased root length under abiotic stress conditions compared to wild type Col-0 plants. Transgenic lines exposed to drought conditions by withholding water for 20 days, were able to withstand water stress and attained normal growth after re-watering unlike control plants which could not survive. Transgenic lines also had better seed yield than control under salt stress. Importantly, seed viability of transgenic plants grown under high salt concentration was 35%-45% compared to less than 5% for control seeds obtained from plants growing under salt stress. The effect of JcPIP2;7 and JcTIP1;3 on improving germination and seed viability in drought and salinity make these important candidates for genetic manipulation of plants for growth in saline soils. PMID:26067295

  19. Identification of functionally important residues in the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor, an insect ortholog of the vertebrate Neuromedin U Receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by interactions between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class-A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). To identify functionally important amino acid residues in t...

  20. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor RNA and Protein Impart Distinct Functions on T-cell Proliferation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Furuta, Rie; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Infection of T cells with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces clonal proliferation and is closely associated with the onset of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and inflammatory diseases. Although Tax expression is frequently suppressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, the accessory gene, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), is continuously expressed and has been implicated in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Here, we report that transduction of mouse T cells with specific mutants of HBZ that distinguish between its RNA and protein activity results in differential effects on T-cell proliferation and survival. HBZ RNA increased cell number by attenuating apoptosis, whereas HBZ protein induced apoptosis. However, both HBZ RNA and protein promoted S-phase entry of T cells. We further identified that the first 50 bp of the HBZ coding sequence are required for RNA-mediated cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of T cells expressing wild-type HBZ, RNA, or protein revealed that HBZ RNA is associated with genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and survival, while HBZ protein is more closely related to immunological properties of T cells. Specifically, HBZ RNA enhances the promoter activity of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, to upregulate its expression. Inhibition of survivin using YM155 resulted in impaired proliferation of several ATL cell lines as well as a T-cell line expressing HBZ RNA. The distinct functions of HBZ RNA and protein may have several implications for the development of strategies to control the proliferation and survival mechanisms associated with HTLV-1 infection and ATL. PMID:26383166

  1. Application of the Collision-Imparted Velocity Method for Analyzing the Responses of Containment and Deflector Structures to Engine Rotor Fragment Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, T. P.; Witmer, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    An approximate analysis, termed the Collision Imparted Velocity Method (CIVM), was employed for predicting the transient structural responses of containment rings or deflector rings which are subjected to impact from turbojet-engine rotor burst fragments. These 2-d structural rings may be initially circular or arbitrarily curved and may have either uniform or variable thickness; elastic, strain hardening, and strain rate material properties are accommodated. This approximate analysis utilizes kinetic energy and momentum conservation relations in order to predict the after-impact velocities of the fragment and the impacted ring segment. This information is then used in conjunction with a finite element structural response computation code to predict the transient, large deflection responses of the ring. Similarly, the equations of motion for each fragment are solved in small steps in time. Also, some comparisons of predictions with experimental data for fragment-impacted free containment rings are presented.

  2. Fatty Amines from Little Black Ants, Monomorium minimum, and Their Biological Activities Against Red Imported Fire Ants, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, are significant invasive pests. Certain native ant species can compete with S. invicta, such as the little black ant, Monomorium minimum. Defensive secretions may contribute to the competition capacity of native ants. The chemistry of ant defensive secretions in the genus Monomorium has been subjected to extensive research. The insecticidal alkaloids, 2,5-dialkyl-pyrrolidines and 2,5-dialkyl-pyrrolines have been reported to dominate the venom of M. minimum. In this study, analysis of defensive secretions of workers and queens of M. minimum revealed two primary amines, decylamine and dodecylamine. Neither amine has been reported previously from natural sources. Toxicity and digging suppression by these two amines against S. invicta were examined. Decylamine had higher toxicity to S. invicta workers than dodecylamine, a quicker knockdown effect, and suppressed the digging behavior of S. invicta workers at lower concentration. However, the amount of fatty amines in an individual ant was not enough to knockdown a fire ant or suppress its digging behavior. These amines most likely work in concert with other components in the chemical defense of M. minimum. PMID:26254063

  3. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human DNA repair enzyme HAP1: identification of residues important for AP endonuclease and RNase H activity.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, G; Walker, L J; Robson, C N; Hickson, I D

    1995-05-11

    HAP1 protein, the major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease in human cells, is a member of a homologous family of multifunctional DNA repair enzymes including the Escherichia coli exonuclease III and Drosophila Rrp1 proteins. The most extensively characterised member of this family, exonuclease III, exhibits both DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities. Here, we show that the RNase H activity characteristic of exonuclease III has been conserved in the human homologue, although the products resulting from RNA cleavage are dissimilar. To identify residues important for enzymatic activity, five mutant HAP1 proteins containing single amino acid substitutions were purified and analysed in vitro. The substitutions were made at sites of conserved amino acids and targeted either acidic or histidine residues because of their known participation in the active sites of hydrolytic nucleases. One of the mutant proteins (replacement of Asp-219 by alanine) showed a markedly reduced enzymatic activity, consistent with a greatly diminished capacity to bind DNA and RNA. In contrast, replacement of Asp-90, Asp-308 or Glu-96 by alanine led to a reduction in enzymatic activity without significantly compromising nucleic acid binding. Replacement of His-255 by alanine led to only a very small reduction in enzymatic activity. Our data are consistent with the presence of a single catalytic active site for the DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities of the HAP1 protein. PMID:7784208

  4. Importance of active tectonics during karst formation. A Middle Eocene to Pleistocene example of the Lina Moutains (Irian Jaya, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thery, J.-M.; Pubellier, M.; Thery, B.; Butterlin, J.; Blondeau, A.; Adams, C. G.

    1999-05-01

    The Lina Moutains show a typical example of karst formation associated to recent and active tectonics. The limestone samples were collected from giant potholes present beneath the heavy rainforest, during speleological expeditions to the Bird's Head of Irian-Jaya. Micropalaeontological data allow us to give a Middle Pleistocene age for the most recent karst formation. A detailed stratigraphy between the Upper Lutetian and the Middle Pleistocene was recorded, with tectonic events during the Oligocene and Pleistocene. The edge of the resurgence layer was also dated. We also conclude the probable existence of a subterraneous network downhill of the karst within the most recent levels of the Kais Limestone formation. We replace this formation within the tectonic evolution of this area between the Eocene and the Middle Pleistocene, in conjunction with the oblique convergence of the Pacific plate carrying volcanic arc fragments and the Australian margin, which resulted in folding, normal faulting associated with local extension, and wrench motion, which are settings capable of creating uplift of the carbonated platform.

  5. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness as major markers of cardiovascular risk: their independent and interwoven importance to health status.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; McAuley, Paul; Lavie, Carl J; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Arena, Ross; Kokkinos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The evolution from hunting and gathering to agriculture, followed by industrialization, has had a profound effect on human physical activity (PA) patterns. Current PA patterns are undoubtedly the lowest they have been in human history, with particularly marked declines in recent generations, and future projections indicate further declines around the globe. Non-communicable health problems that afflict current societies are fundamentally attributable to the fact that PA patterns are markedly different than those for which humans were genetically adapted. The advent of modern statistics and epidemiological methods has made it possible to quantify the independent effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and PA on health outcomes. Based on more than five decades of epidemiological studies, it is now widely accepted that higher PA patterns and levels of CRF are associated with better health outcomes. This review will discuss the evidence supporting the premise that PA and CRF are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as the interplay between both PA and CRF and other CVD risk factors. A particular focus will be given to the interplay between CRF, metabolic risk and obesity. PMID:25269064

  6. Stereochemical Assignment and Biological Evaluation of BE-14106 Unveils the Importance of One Acetate Unit for the Antifungal Activity of Polyene Macrolactams.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Naoki; Arai, Midori A; Ishibashi, Masami; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2016-07-22

    Heronamides are a class of potent antifungal metabolites produced by marine-derived actinomycetes. The number of hydroxy groups and the stereochemistry of the two hydroxylated methine carbons are important for the activity of heronamide C, whereas the effect of the hydrocarbon chains is not known. In this study, the stereochemistry and the biological activity of BE-14106, another member of the heronamide class of antibiotics, isolated from an actinomycete Actinoalloteichus cyanogriseus IFM 11549 was investigated. Spectroscopic analysis coupled with photo- and O2-induced conversion revealed that BE-14106 and the heronamides had the same stereochemistry. BE-14106 showed potent growth inhibition against fission yeast cells with an MIC value of 0.50 μM (0.21 μg/mL), being 4 times less potent than heronamide C, which revealed the importance of the structure of the hydrocarbon tail for the activity. PMID:27331864

  7. A stress-responsive late embryogenesis abundant protein 7 (CsLEA7) of tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze] encodes for a chaperone that imparts tolerance to Escherichia coli against stresses.

    PubMed

    Paul, Asosii; Singh, Sewa; Sharma, Shweta; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-11-01

    The present study characterized CsLEA7, a group 7 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) gene, from tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. The gene had an open reading frame of 462 base pairs encoding 153 amino acids with calculated molecular weight of 16.63 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.93. Analysis revealed CsLEA7 to be an intrinsically ordered protein consisting of nine β-strands and two α-helices. CsLEA7 expressed ubiquitously in all the tissues analyzed with highest level of transcripts in mature leaf as compared to in flower bud, younger leaves, stem and fruit. Expression was the least in root tissue. CsLEA7 exhibited up-regulation in response to low temperature, polyethylene glycol-8000, sodium chloride and hydrogen peroxide in tea. Analysis of the promoter of CsLEA7 revealed a core promoter element and distinct cis-acting regulatory elements regulating gene expression under abiotic stresses. CsLEA7 exhibited chaperonic activity as evinced by protection to malate dehydrogenase against heat denaturation assay. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells producing CsLEA7 exhibited improved tolerance against diverse cues: polyethylene glycol-8000, sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and low temperature signifying its role in imparting stress tolerance. PMID:25052187

  8. Increased Long Chain acyl-Coa Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Import Is Linked to Membrane Synthesis for Development of Picornavirus Replication Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Alison J.; Ford, Lauren A.; Pei, Zhengtong; Watkins, Paul A.; Ernst, Robert K.; Belov, George A.

    2013-01-01

    All positive strand (+RNA) viruses of eukaryotes replicate their genomes in association with membranes. The mechanisms of membrane remodeling in infected cells represent attractive targets for designing future therapeutics, but our understanding of this process is very limited. Elements of autophagy and/or the secretory pathway were proposed to be hijacked for building of picornavirus replication organelles. However, even closely related viruses differ significantly in their requirements for components of these pathways. We demonstrate here that infection with diverse picornaviruses rapidly activates import of long chain fatty acids. While in non-infected cells the imported fatty acids are channeled to lipid droplets, in infected cells the synthesis of neutral lipids is shut down and the fatty acids are utilized in highly up-regulated phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Thus the replication organelles are likely built from de novo synthesized membrane material, rather than from the remodeled pre-existing membranes. We show that activation of fatty acid import is linked to the up-regulation of cellular long chain acyl-CoA synthetase activity and identify the long chain acyl-CoA syntheatse3 (Acsl3) as a novel host factor required for polio replication. Poliovirus protein 2A is required to trigger the activation of import of fatty acids independent of its protease activity. Shift in fatty acid import preferences by infected cells results in synthesis of phosphatidylcholines different from those in uninfected cells, arguing that the viral replication organelles possess unique properties compared to the pre-existing membranes. Our data show how poliovirus can change the overall cellular membrane homeostasis by targeting one critical process. They explain earlier observations of increased phospholipid synthesis in infected cells and suggest a simple model of the structural development of the membranous scaffold of replication complexes of picorna-like viruses, that may be

  9. Self-assembly with orthogonal-imposed stimuli to impart structure and confer magnetic function to electrodeposited hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Yi; Gao, Tieren; Zhang, Boce; Song, Yingying; Terrell, Jessica L; Barber, Nathan; Bentley, William E; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Payne, Gregory F; Wang, Qin

    2015-05-20

    A magnetic nanocomposite film with the capability of reversibly collecting functionalized magnetic particles was fabricated by simultaneously imposing two orthogonal stimuli (electrical and magnetic). We demonstrate that cathodic codeposition of chitosan and Fe3O4 nanoparticles while simultaneously applying a magnetic field during codeposition can (i) organize structure, (ii) confer magnetic properties, and (iii) yield magnetic films that can perform reversible collection/assembly functions. The magnetic field triggered the self-assembly of Fe3O4 nanoparticles into hierarchical "chains" and "fibers" in the chitosan film. For controlled magnetic properties, the Fe3O4-chitosan film was electrodeposited in the presence of various strength magnetic fields and different deposition times. The magnetic properties of the resulting films should enable broad applications in complex devices. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the reversible capture and release of green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-conjugated magnetic microparticles by the magnetic chitosan film. Moreover, antibody-functionalized magnetic microparticles were applied to capture cells from a sample, and these cells were collected, analyzed, and released by the magnetic chitosan film, paving the way for applications such as reusable biosensor interfaces (e.g., for pathogen detection). To our knowledge, this is the first report to apply a magnetic field during the electrodeposition of a hydrogel to generate magnetic soft matter. Importantly, the simple, rapid, and reagentless fabrication methodologies demonstrated here are valuable features for creating a magnetic device interface. PMID:25923335

  10. Importance of biologically active aurora-like ultraviolet emission: stochastic irradiation of Earth and Mars by flares and explosions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David S; Scalo, John; Wheeler, J Craig

    2004-10-01

    Habitable planets will be subject to intense sources of ionizing radiation and fast particles from a variety of sources--from the host star to distant explosions--on a variety of timescales. Monte Carlo calculations of high-energy irradiation suggest that the surfaces of terrestrial-like planets with thick atmospheres (column densities greater than about 100 g cm(-2)) are well protected from directly incident X-rays and gamma-rays, but we find that sizeable fractions of incident ionizing radiation from astrophysical sources can be redistributed to biologically and chemically important ultraviolet wavelengths, a significant fraction of which can reach the surface. This redistribution is mediated by secondary electrons, resulting from Compton scattering and X-ray photoabsorption, the energies of which are low enough to excite and ionize atmospheric molecules and atoms, resulting in a rich aurora-like spectrum. We calculate the fraction of energy redistributed into biologically and chemically important wavelength regions for spectra characteristic of stellar flares and supernovae using a Monte-Carlo transport code and then estimate the fraction of this energy that is transmitted from the atmospheric altitudes of redistribution to the surface for a few illustrative cases. For atmospheric models corresponding to the Archean Earth, we assume no significant ultraviolet absorbers, only Rayleigh scattering, and find that the fraction of incident ionizing radiation that is received at the surface in the form of redistributed ultraviolet in the biologically relevant 200-320 nm region (UV-C and UV-B bands) can be up to 4%. On the present-day Earth with its ultraviolet ozone shield, this fraction is found to be 0.2%. Both values are many orders of magnitude higher than the fraction of direct ionizing radiation reaching the surface. This result implies that planetary organisms will be subject to mutationally significant, if intermittent, fluences of UV-B and harder radiation

  11. Gene knockout of the KCNJ8-encoded Kir6.1 K(ATP) channel imparts fatal susceptibility to endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kane, Garvan C; Lam, Chen-Fuh; O'Cochlain, Fearghas; Hodgson, Denice M; Reyes, Santiago; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Katusic, Zvonimir S; Terzic, Andre

    2006-11-01

    Sepsis, the systemic inflammatory response to infection, imposes a high demand for bodily adaptation, with the cardiovascular response a key determinant of outcome. The homeostatic elements that secure cardiac tolerance in the setting of the sepsis syndrome are poorly understood. Here, in a model of acute septic shock induced by endotoxin challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), knockout of the KCNJ8 gene encoding the vascular Kir6.1 K(ATP) channel pore predisposed to an early and profound survival disadvantage. The exaggerated susceptibility provoked by disruption of this stress-responsive sensor of cellular metabolism was linked to progressive deterioration in cardiac activity, ischemic myocardial damage, and contractile dysfunction. Deletion of KCNJ8 blunted the responsiveness of coronary vessels to cytokine- or metabolic-mediated vasodilation necessary to support myocardial perfusion in the wild-type (WT), creating a deficit in adaptive response in the Kir6.1 knockout. Application of a K(ATP) channel opener drug improved survival in the endotoxic WT but had no effect in the Kir6.1 knockout. Restoration of the dilatory capacity of coronary vessels was required to rescue the Kir6.1 knockout phenotype and reverse survival disadvantage in lethal endotoxemia. Thus, the Kir6.1-containing K(ATP) channel, by coupling vasoreactivity with metabolic demand, provides a vital feedback element for cardiovascular tolerance in endotoxic shock. PMID:17077304

  12. A Superhelical Spiral in the Escherichia coli DNA Gyrase A C-terminal Domain Imparts Unidirectional Supercoiling Bias

    SciTech Connect

    Ruthenburg,A.; Graybosch, D.; Huetsch, J.; Verdine, G.

    2005-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among type II topoisomerases in that its DNA supercoiling activity is unidirectional. The C-terminal domain of the gyrase A subunit (GyrA-CTD) is required for this supercoiling bias. We report here the x-ray structure of the Escherichia coli GyrA-CTD (Protein Data Bank code 1ZI0). The E. coli GyrA-CTD adopts a circular-shaped {beta}-pinwheel fold first seen in the Borrelia burgdorferi GyrA-CTD. However, whereas the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD is flat, the E. coli GyrA-CTD is spiral. DNA relaxation assays reveal that the E. coli GyrA-CTD wraps DNA inducing substantial (+) superhelicity, while the B. burgdorferi GyrA-CTD introduces a more modest (+) superhelicity. The observation of a superhelical spiral in the present structure and that of the Bacillus stearothermophilus ParC-CTD structure suggests unexpected similarities in substrate selectivity between gyrase and Topo IV enzymes. We propose a model wherein the right-handed ((+) solenoidal) wrapping of DNA around the E. coli GyrA-CTD enforces unidirectional (-) DNA supercoiling.

  13. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Wheat B2 Protein Imparting Adverse Temperature Tolerance and Influencing Plant Growth.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Genomic attempts were undertaken to elucidate the plant developmental responses to heat stress, and to characterize the roles of B2 protein in mediating those responses. A wheat expressed sequence tag for B2 protein was identified which was cloned and characterized to assess its functional relevance causing plant growth and development during stress adaptation. Here, we show that wheat B2 protein is highly expressed in root and shoot tissues as well as in developing seed tissues under high temperature stress conditions. Morphological studies of transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing gene encoding wheat B2 protein and Δb2 mutant plants were studied at major developmental stages. The stunted growth phenotype of mutant plants, together with hypocotyl and root elongation analysis of transgenic plants showed that B2 protein exhibits a crucial role in plant growth and development. Additional physiological analyses highlights the role of B2 protein in increased tolerance to heat and cold stresses by maintaining high chlorophyll content, strong activity of photosystem II and less membrane damage of overexpression transgenics as compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, the constitutive overexpression of TaB2 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, these studies suggest a novel perspectives of B2 protein in plant development and in mediating the thermal stress tolerance. PMID:27242843

  14. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Wheat B2 Protein Imparting Adverse Temperature Tolerance and Influencing Plant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Akanksha; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-01-01

    Genomic attempts were undertaken to elucidate the plant developmental responses to heat stress, and to characterize the roles of B2 protein in mediating those responses. A wheat expressed sequence tag for B2 protein was identified which was cloned and characterized to assess its functional relevance causing plant growth and development during stress adaptation. Here, we show that wheat B2 protein is highly expressed in root and shoot tissues as well as in developing seed tissues under high temperature stress conditions. Morphological studies of transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing gene encoding wheat B2 protein and Δb2 mutant plants were studied at major developmental stages. The stunted growth phenotype of mutant plants, together with hypocotyl and root elongation analysis of transgenic plants showed that B2 protein exhibits a crucial role in plant growth and development. Additional physiological analyses highlights the role of B2 protein in increased tolerance to heat and cold stresses by maintaining high chlorophyll content, strong activity of photosystem II and less membrane damage of overexpression transgenics as compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, the constitutive overexpression of TaB2 in Arabidopsis resulted in ABA hypersensitivity. Taken together, these studies suggest a novel perspectives of B2 protein in plant development and in mediating the thermal stress tolerance. PMID:27242843

  15. Rice OsiSAP7 negatively regulates ABA stress signalling and imparts sensitivity to water-deficit stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gunjan; Giri, Jitender; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-01

    Stress associated protein (SAP) genes in plants regulate abiotic stress responses. SAP gene family consists of 18 members in rice. Although their abiotic stress responsiveness is well established, the mechanism of their action is poorly understood. OsiSAP7 was chosen to investigate the mechanism of its action based on the dual nature of its sub-cellular localization preferentially in the nucleus or sub-nuclear speckles upon transient expression in onion epidermal cells. Its expression was down-regulated in rice seedlings under abiotic stresses. OsiSAP7 was localized evenly in the nucleus under unstressed conditions and in sub-nuclear speckles on MG132 treatment. OsiSAP7 exhibits E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Abiotic stress responses of OsiSAP7 were assessed by its overexpression in Arabidopsis under the control of a stress inducible promoter rd29A. Stress response assessment was done at seed germination and advanced stages of development. Transgenics were ABA insensitive at seed germination stage and sensitive to water-deficit stress at advanced stage as compared to wild type (WT). They were also impaired in ABA and stress-responsive gene expression. Our study suggests that OsiSAP7 acts as a negative regulator of ABA and water-deficit stress signalling by acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. PMID:26089154

  16. Importance of enzyme purity and activity in the measurement of total dietary fiber and dietary fiber components.

    PubMed

    McCleary, B V; McCleary, B V

    2000-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of the activity and purity of enzymes in the assay of total dietary fiber (AOAC Method 985.29) and specific dietary fiber components: resistant starch, fructan, and beta-glucan. In the measurement of total dietary fiber content of resistant starch samples, the concentration of alpha-amylase is critical; however, variations in the level of amyloglucosidase have little effect. Contamination of amyloglucosidase preparations with cellulase can result in significant underestimation of dietary fiber values for samples containing beta-glucan. Pure beta-glucan and cellulase purified from Aspergillus niger amyloglucosidase preparations were used to determine acceptable critical levels of contamination. Sucrose, which interferes with the measurement of inulin and fructooligosaccharides in plant materials and food products, must be removed by hydrolysis of the sucrose to glucose and fructose with a specific enzyme (sucrase) followed by borohydride reduction of the free sugars. Unlike invertase, sucrase has no action on low degree of polymerization (DP) fructooligosaccharides, such as kestose or kestotetraose. Fructan is hydrolyzed to fructose and glucose by the combined action of highly purified exo- and endo-inulinases, and these sugars are measured by the p-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide reducing sugar method. Specific measurement of beta-glucan in cereal flour and food extracts requires the use of highly purified endo-1,3:1,4 beta-glucanase and A. niger beta-glucosidase. Beta-glucosidase from almonds does not completely hydrolyze mixed linkage beta-glucooligosaccharides from barley or oat beta-glucan. Contamination of these enzymes with starch, maltosaccharide, or sucrose-hydrolyzing enzymes results in production of free glucose from a source other than beta-glucan, and thus an overestimation of beta-glucan content. The glucose oxidase and peroxidase used in the glucose determination reagent must be essentially devoid of catalase and alpha

  17. Line-driven disk winds in active galactic nuclei: The critical importance of ionization and radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbottom, Nick; Knigge, Christian; Matthews, James H.; Proga, Daniel; Long, Knox S.; Sim, Stuart A.

    2014-07-01

    Accretion disk winds are thought to produce many of the characteristic features seen in the spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasi-stellar objects (QSOs). These outflows also represent a natural form of feedback between the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy. The mechanism for driving this mass loss remains unknown, although radiation pressure mediated by spectral lines is a leading candidate. Here, we calculate the ionization state of, and emergent spectra for, the hydrodynamic simulation of a line-driven disk wind previously presented by Proga and Kallman. To achieve this, we carry out a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation of the radiative transfer through, and energy exchange within, the predicted outflow. We find that the wind is much more ionized than originally estimated. This is in part because it is much more difficult to shield any wind regions effectively when the outflow itself is allowed to reprocess and redirect ionizing photons. As a result, the calculated spectrum that would be observed from this particular outflow solution would not contain the ultraviolet spectral lines that are observed in many AGN/QSOs. Furthermore, the wind is so highly ionized that line driving would not actually be efficient. This does not necessarily mean that line-driven winds are not viable. However, our work does illustrate that in order to arrive at a self-consistent model of line-driven disk winds in AGN/QSO, it will be critical to include a more detailed treatment of radiative transfer and ionization in the next generation of hydrodynamic simulations.

  18. The effect of three different head-neck positions on the average EMG activity of three important neck muscles in the horse.

    PubMed

    Kienapfel, K

    2015-02-01

    The Knowledge of muscle activity in common head-neck positions (HNPs) is a necessary precondition for making judgements on HNPs. The aim of the study was to record the surface electromyography activities of important muscles of the horse's neck in various HNPs. The electrical activities of the m. splenius, brachiocephalicus and trapezius were recorded on both sides. Five horses, both with and without a rider, were examined in all three gaits on both hands in three different HNPs: a 'free' position, a 'gathered' (head higher, neck more flexed) position with the noseline in front of the vertical and a 'hyperflexed' position. Averages of ten consecutive gait cycles in each HNP were evaluated and compared by standard statistical methods. No difference between ridden and unridden horses could be detected. The m. brachiocephalicus was in the hyperflexed position in all gaits significantly (p < 0.01) more active than in the gathered and free position, which were not significantly different. By contrast, the m. splenius was in the hyperflexed position less active than in the free position (p < 0.02), in which it always showed the highest activity. In walking, the muscle activities in the free and gathered positions deviated significantly (p < 0.01). The m. trapezius was in the hyperflexed posture during walking significantly less active than in the free (p < 0.01) and gathered (p < 0.01) positions with the strongest activities in the free position. Again, the free and gathered positions differed significantly (p < 0.01). In trot, the same pattern occured, although the gathered and hyperflexed positions did not differ significantly. In the canter, the activities of the m. trapezius showed no differences between HNPs. In HNPs with the noseline in front of the vertical, the muscles of the topline (m. splenius, m. trapezius) are activated and trained. In the hyperflexed position, however, a major muscle of the lower topline (m. brachiocephalicus) is activated and trained. PMID

  19. Functionalised nanoscale coatings using layer-by-layer assembly for imparting antibacterial properties to polylactide-co-glycolide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Piergiorgio; Frongia, Maria E; Cardellach, Mar; Miller, Cheryl A; Stafford, Graham P; Leggett, Graham J; Hatton, Paul V

    2015-07-01

    In order to achieve high local biological activity and reduce the risk of side effects of antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal and bone infections, a localised and temporally controlled delivery system is desirable. The aim of this research was to develop a functionalised and resorbable surface to contact soft tissues to improve the antibacterial behaviour during the first week after its implantation in the treatment of periodontal and bone infections. Solvent-cast poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) films were aminolysed and then modified by Layer-by-Layer technique to obtain a nano-layered coating using poly(sodium4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) as polyelectrolytes. The water-soluble antibiotic, metronidazole (MET), was incorporated from the ninth layer. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the PSS and PAH absorption bands increased with the layer number. The contact angle values had a regular alternate behaviour from the ninth layer. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy evidenced two distinct peaks, N1s and S2p, indicating PAH and PSS had been introduced. Atomic Force Microscopy showed the presence of polyelectrolytes on the surface with a measured roughness about 10nm after 20 layers' deposition. The drug release was monitored by Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy showing 80% loaded-drug delivery in 14 days. Finally, the biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro with L929 mouse fibroblasts and the antibacterial properties were demonstrated successfully against the keystone periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, which has an influence on implant failure, without compromising in vitro biocompatibility. In this study, PLGA was successfully modified to obtain a localised and temporally controlled drug delivery system, demonstrating the potential value of LbL as a coating technology for the manufacture of medical devices with advanced functional properties. PMID:25871538

  20. FgPrp4 Kinase Is Important for Spliceosome B-Complex Activation and Splicing Efficiency in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Li, Chaohui; Liu, Huiquan; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    PRP4 encodes the only kinase among the spliceosome components. Although it is an essential gene in the fission yeast and other eukaryotic organisms, the Fgprp4 mutant was viable in the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgPRP4 did not block intron splicing but affected intron splicing efficiency in over 60% of the F. graminearum genes. The Fgprp4 mutant had severe growth defects and produced spontaneous suppressors that were recovered in growth rate. Suppressor mutations were identified in the PRP6, PRP31, BRR2, and PRP8 orthologs in nine suppressor strains by sequencing analysis with candidate tri-snRNP component genes. The Q86K mutation in FgMSL1 was identified by whole genome sequencing in suppressor mutant S3. Whereas two of the suppressor mutations in FgBrr2 and FgPrp8 were similar to those characterized in their orthologs in yeasts, suppressor mutations in Prp6 and Prp31 orthologs or FgMSL1 have not been reported. Interestingly, four and two suppressor mutations identified in FgPrp6 and FgPrp31, respectively, all are near the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites, suggesting that these mutations may have similar effects with phosphorylation by Prp4 kinase. In FgPrp31, the non-sense mutation at R464 resulted in the truncation of the C-terminal 130 aa region that contains all the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 310-aa rich in SR residues plays a critical role in the localization and functions of FgPrp4. We also conducted phosphoproteomics analysis with FgPrp4 and identified S289 as the phosphorylation site that is essential for its functions. These results indicated that FgPrp4 is critical for splicing efficiency but not essential for intron splicing, and FgPrp4 may regulate pre-mRNA splicing by phosphorylation of other components of the tri-snRNP although itself may be activated by phosphorylation at S289. PMID:27058959

  1. FgPrp4 Kinase Is Important for Spliceosome B-Complex Activation and Splicing Efficiency in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuli; Jin, Qiaojun; Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Li, Chaohui; Liu, Huiquan; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-04-01

    PRP4 encodes the only kinase among the spliceosome components. Although it is an essential gene in the fission yeast and other eukaryotic organisms, the Fgprp4 mutant was viable in the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgPRP4 did not block intron splicing but affected intron splicing efficiency in over 60% of the F. graminearum genes. The Fgprp4 mutant had severe growth defects and produced spontaneous suppressors that were recovered in growth rate. Suppressor mutations were identified in the PRP6, PRP31, BRR2, and PRP8 orthologs in nine suppressor strains by sequencing analysis with candidate tri-snRNP component genes. The Q86K mutation in FgMSL1 was identified by whole genome sequencing in suppressor mutant S3. Whereas two of the suppressor mutations in FgBrr2 and FgPrp8 were similar to those characterized in their orthologs in yeasts, suppressor mutations in Prp6 and Prp31 orthologs or FgMSL1 have not been reported. Interestingly, four and two suppressor mutations identified in FgPrp6 and FgPrp31, respectively, all are near the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites, suggesting that these mutations may have similar effects with phosphorylation by Prp4 kinase. In FgPrp31, the non-sense mutation at R464 resulted in the truncation of the C-terminal 130 aa region that contains all the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 310-aa rich in SR residues plays a critical role in the localization and functions of FgPrp4. We also conducted phosphoproteomics analysis with FgPrp4 and identified S289 as the phosphorylation site that is essential for its functions. These results indicated that FgPrp4 is critical for splicing efficiency but not essential for intron splicing, and FgPrp4 may regulate pre-mRNA splicing by phosphorylation of other components of the tri-snRNP although itself may be activated by phosphorylation at S289. PMID:27058959

  2. Slow Climate Velocities in Mountain Streams Impart Thermal Resistance to Cold-Water Refugia Across the West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaak, D.; Young, M.; Luce, C.; Hostetler, S.; Wenger, S. J.; Peterson, E.; Ver Hoef, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain streams provide important headwater refugia for native fish, amphibians, and other cold-water fauna globally. Although the well documented existence of such refugia indicates some level of resistance to ongoing environmental change, stream warming associated with climate change raises questions about their future persistence. Moreover, evidence exists that air temperatures are warming faster at higher elevations, and some stream temperature models predict that cold streams associated with snowmelt hydrologies will be most sensitive to air temperature increases (i.e. high ratio of stream Δ˚C:air Δ˚C). Here, we estimate stream sensitivities to climate forcing using long-term monitoring records from 927 sites across the topographically complex northwestern U.S. Sensitivity values are combined with high-resolution NorWeST stream temperature scenarios (website: http://www.fs.fed.us/rm/boise/AWAE/projects/NorWeST.html) to map climate velocities at 1 kilometer resolution throughout the 450,000 stream kilometers in the regional network. Our results suggest that cold mountain streams are often 'double buffered' against the thermal effects of climate change due to low sensitivities (0.3ºC/ºC) and steep gradients, which translated to very slow climate velocities (<0.35 km/decade for streams >3% slope) from 1968-2011 when air temperatures warmed at the rate of 0.2ºC/decade. Alternative scenarios based on aggressive air temperature warming rates (2x historical rates) and higher sensitivity values of cold streams suggests velocities will remain low in mountain streams due to the dominant effects of steep channel slope and strong local temperature gradients. These results reinforce earlier predictions from high-resolution species distribution models that show which watersheds are most likely to host resilient native trout populations across the West later this century (Climate Shield project website: http://www.fs

  3. Uncovering an Important Role for YopJ in the Inhibition of Caspase-1 in Activated Macrophages and Promoting Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Virulence.

    PubMed

    Schoberle, Taylor J; Chung, Lawton K; McPhee, Joseph B; Bogin, Ben; Bliska, James B

    2016-04-01

    PathogenicYersiniaspecies utilize a type III secretion system to translocate Yop effectors into infected host cells. Yop effectors inhibit innate immune responses in infected macrophages to promoteYersiniapathogenesis. In turn,Yersinia-infected macrophages respond to translocation of Yops by activating caspase-1, but different mechanisms of caspase-1 activation occur, depending on the bacterial genotype and the state of phagocyte activation. In macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior toYersinia pseudotuberculosisinfection, caspase-1 is activated by a rapid inflammasome-dependent mechanism that is inhibited by translocated YopM. The possibility that other effectors cooperate with YopM to inhibit caspase-1 activation in LPS-activated macrophages has not been investigated. Toward this aim, epistasis analysis was carried out in which the phenotype of aY. pseudotuberculosisyopMmutant was compared to that of ayopJ yopM,yopE yopM,yopH yopM,yopT yopM, orypkA yopMmutant. Activation of caspase-1 was measured by cleavage of the enzyme, release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and pyroptosis in LPS-activated macrophages infected with wild-type or mutantY. pseudotuberculosisstrains. Results show enhanced activation of caspase-1 after infection with theyopJ yopMmutant relative to infection by any other single or double mutant. Similar results were obtained with theyopJ,yopM, andyopJ yopMmutants ofYersinia pestis Following intravenous infection of mice, theY. pseudotuberculosisyopJmutant was as virulent as the wild type, while theyopJ yopMmutant was significantly more attenuated than theyopMmutant. In summary, through epistasis analysis this work uncovered an important role for YopJ in inhibiting caspase-1 in activated macrophages and in promotingYersiniavirulence. PMID:26810037

  4. The second-sphere residue T263 is important for the function and catalytic activity of PTP1B via interaction with the WPD-loop.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Xiao-Lei; Cui, Fu-ai; Yu, Xiao; Wen, Shi-shuai; Bi, Wen-Xiang; Sun, Jin-Peng

    2014-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases have diverse substrate specificities and intrinsic activities that lay the foundations for the fine-tuning of a phosphorylation network to precisely regulate cellular signal transduction. All classical PTPs share common catalytic mechanisms, and the important catalytic residues in the first sphere of their active sites have been well characterized. However, little attention has been paid to the second-sphere residues that are potentially important in defining the intrinsic activity and substrate specificity of PTPs. Here, we find that a conserved second-sphere residue, Thr263, located in the surface Q-loop is important for both the function and activity of PTPs. Using PTP1B as a study model, we found that mutations of Thr263 impaired the negative regulation role of PTP1B in insulin signaling. A detailed mechanistic study utilizing steady-state kinetics, Brønsted analysis and pH dependence in the presence of pNPP or phosphopeptide substrates revealed that Thr263 is required for the stabilization of the leaving group during catalysis. Further crystallographic studies and structural comparison revealed that Thr263 regulates the general acid function through modulation of the WPD-loop by the T263:F182/Y/H interaction pair, which is conserved in 26 out of 32 classical PTPs. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction between Thr263 and Arg1159 of the insulin receptor contributes to the substrate specificity of PTP1B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the general role of the second-sphere residue Thr263 in PTP catalysis. Our findings suggest that the second sphere residues of PTP active site may play important roles in PTP-mediated function in both normal and diseased states. PMID:25450460

  5. Testing the impact of virus importation rates and future climate change on dengue activity in Malaysia using a mechanistic entomology and disease model.

    PubMed

    Williams, C R; Gill, B S; Mincham, G; Mohd Zaki, A H; Abdullah, N; Mahiyuddin, W R W; Ahmad, R; Shahar, M K; Harley, D; Viennet, E; Azil, A; Kamaluddin, A

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to reparameterize and validate an existing dengue model, comprising an entomological component (CIMSiM) and a disease component (DENSiM) for application in Malaysia. With the model we aimed to measure the effect of importation rate on dengue incidence, and to determine the potential impact of moderate climate change (a 1 °C temperature increase) on dengue activity. Dengue models (comprising CIMSiM and DENSiM) were reparameterized for a simulated Malaysian village of 10 000 people, and validated against monthly dengue case data from the district of Petaling Jaya in the state of Selangor. Simulations were also performed for 2008-2012 for variable virus importation rates (ranging from 1 to 25 per week) and dengue incidence determined. Dengue incidence in the period 2010-2012 was modelled, twice, with observed daily weather and with a 1 °C increase, the latter to simulate moderate climate change. Strong concordance between simulated and observed monthly dengue cases was observed (up to r = 0·72). There was a linear relationship between importation and incidence. However, a doubling of dengue importation did not equate to a doubling of dengue activity. The largest individual dengue outbreak was observed with the lowest dengue importation rate. Moderate climate change resulted in an overall decrease in dengue activity over a 3-year period, linked to high human seroprevalence early on in the simulation. Our results suggest that moderate reductions in importation with control programmes may not reduce the frequency of large outbreaks. Moderate increases in temperature do not necessarily lead to greater dengue incidence. PMID:25591942

  6. Improving Hiroshima Air-Over-Ground Thermal/Epithermal Activation Calculations Using a MUSH Model to Show the Importance of Local Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V.

    2002-02-14

    Achieving agreement between measured and calculated neutron activation data resulting from Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb detonations has been a major problem since the early 1980's. This has been particularly true for the materials that are activated by thermal and epithermal neutrons. Since thermal and epithermal neutrons are not transported very far from the weapon, the local shielding environment around the measurement location can be very important. A set of calculations incorporating an average density local-environment material (mush) has been made to demonstrate that the local environment plays an important role in the calculation-measurement agreement process. The optimum solution would be to include the local environment in all thermal neutron response calculations.

  7. Leptin signalling and leptin-mediated activation of human platelets: importance of JAK2 and the phospholipases Cgamma2 and A2.

    PubMed

    Dellas, Claudia; Schäfer, Katrin; Rohm, Ilonka K; Lankeit, Mareike; Leifheit, Maren; Loskutoff, David J; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Konstantinides, Stavros V

    2007-11-01

    Leptin enhances agonist-induced platelet aggregation, and human platelets have been reported to express the leptin receptor. However, the pathways and mediators lying downstream of leptin binding to platelets remain, with few exceptions, unknown. In the present study, we sought to gain further insight into the possible role of leptin as a platelet agonist. Stimulation of platelets with leptin promoted thromboxane generation and activation of alpha(IIb)beta(3), as demonstrated by PAC-1 binding. Furthermore, it increased the adhesion to immobilised fibrinogen (p<0.001) and induced cytoskeletal rearrangement of both platelets and Meg01 cells. Leptin time- and dose-dependently phosphorylated the intracellular signalling molecules JAK2 and STAT3, although the importance of STAT3 for leptin-induced platelet activation remains to be determined. Important intracellular mediators and pathways activated by leptin downstream of JAK2 were found to include phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, phospholipase Cgamma2 and protein kinase C, as well as the p38 MAP kinase-phospholipase A(2) axis. Accordingly, incubation with the specific inhibitors AG490, Ly294002, U73122, and SB203580 prevented leptin-mediated platelet activation. These results help delineate biologically relevant leptin signalling pathways in platelets and may improve our understanding of the mechanisms linking hyperleptinaemia to the increased thrombosis risk in human obesity. PMID:18000612

  8. Stress imparted by the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake shut down transforms and activated rifts up to 400 km away in the Andaman Sea.

    PubMed

    Sevilgen, Volkan; Stein, Ross S; Pollitz, Fred F

    2012-09-18

    The origin and prevalence of triggered seismicity and remote aftershocks are under debate. As a result, they have been excluded from probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and aftershock hazard notices. The 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake altered seismicity in the Andaman backarc rift-transform system. Here we show that over a 300-km-long largely transform section of the backarc, M≥4.5 earthquakes stopped for five years, and over a 750-km-long backarc section, the rate of transform events dropped by two-thirds, while the rate of rift events increased eightfold. We compute the propagating dynamic stress wavefield and find the peak dynamic Coulomb stress is similar on the rifts and transforms. Long-period dynamic stress amplitudes, which are thought to promote dynamic failure, are higher on the transforms than on the rifts, opposite to the observations. In contrast to the dynamic stress, we calculate that the mainshock brought the transform segments approximately 0.2 bar (0.02 MPa) farther from static Coulomb failure and the rift segments approximately 0.2 bar closer to static failure, consistent with the seismic observations. This accord means that changes in seismicity rate are sufficiently predictable to be included in post-mainshock hazard evaluations. PMID:22949694

  9. Stress imparted by the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake shut down transforms and activated rifts up to 400 km away in the Andaman Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sevilgen, Volkan; Stein, Ross S.; Pollitz, Fred F.

    2012-01-01

    The origin and prevalence of triggered seismicity and remote aftershocks are under debate. As a result, they have been excluded from probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and aftershock hazard notices. The 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake altered seismicity in the Andaman backarc rift-transform system. Here we show that over a 300-km-long largely transform section of the backarc, M ≥ 4.5 earthquakes stopped for five years, and over a 750-km-long backarc section, the rate of transform events dropped by two-thirds, while the rate of rift events increased eightfold. We compute the propagating dynamic stress wavefield and find the peak dynamic Coulomb stress is similar on the rifts and transforms. Long-period dynamic stress amplitudes, which are thought to promote dynamic failure, are higher on the transforms than on the rifts, opposite to the observations. In contrast to the dynamic stress, we calculate that the mainshock brought the transform segments approximately 0.2 bar (0.02 MPa) farther from static Coulomb failure and the rift segments approximately 0.2 bar closer to static failure, consistent with the seismic observations. This accord means that changes in seismicity rate are sufficiently predictable to be included in post-mainshock hazard evaluations.

  10. Stress imparted by the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake shut down transforms and activated rifts up to 400 km away in the Andaman Sea

    PubMed Central

    Sevilgen, Volkan; Stein, Ross S.; Pollitz, Fred F.

    2012-01-01

    The origin and prevalence of triggered seismicity and remote aftershocks are under debate. As a result, they have been excluded from probabilistic seismic hazard assessment and aftershock hazard notices. The 2004 M = 9.2 Sumatra earthquake altered seismicity in the Andaman backarc rift-transform system. Here we show that over a 300-km-long largely transform section of the backarc, M≥4.5 earthquakes stopped for five years, and over a 750-km-long backarc section, the rate of transform events dropped by two-thirds, while the rate of rift events increased eightfold. We compute the propagating dynamic stress wavefield and find the peak dynamic Coulomb stress is similar on the rifts and transforms. Long-period dynamic stress amplitudes, which are thought to promote dynamic failure, are higher on the transforms than on the rifts, opposite to the observations. In contrast to the dynamic stress, we calculate that the mainshock brought the transform segments approximately 0.2 bar (0.02 MPa) farther from static Coulomb failure and the rift segments approximately 0.2 bar closer to static failure, consistent with the seismic observations. This accord means that changes in seismicity rate are sufficiently predictable to be included in post-mainshock hazard evaluations. PMID:22949694

  11. Membrane cholesterol plays an important role in enteropathogen adhesion and the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Duan, Qiangde; Li, Yinchau; Yang, Yang; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich ordered microdomains distributed in the plasma membrane that participates in mammalian signal transduction pathways. To determine the role of lipid rafts in mediating interactions between enteropathogens and intestinal epithelial cells, membrane cholesterol was depleted from Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells using methyl-β-cyclodextrin. Cholesterol depletion significantly reduced Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis adhesion and invasion into intestinal epithelial cells. Complementation with exogenous cholesterol restored bacterial adhesion to basal levels. We also evaluated the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Toll-like receptor 5 signaling by bacterial flagellin. Depleting membrane cholesterol reduced the ability of purified recombinant E. coli flagellin to activate TLR5 signaling in intestinal cells. These data suggest that both membrane cholesterol and lipid rafts play important roles in enteropathogen adhesion and contribute to the activation of innate immunity via flagellin-TLR5 signaling. PMID:25935453

  12. The nuclear protein GmbZIP110 has transcription activation activity and plays important roles in the response to salinity stress in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaolong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Xu, Ling; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Yi, Jinxin; Shao, Hongbo; Ma, Hongxiang; Zhang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Plant basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes and are involved in the regulation of salt stress tolerance. Previously, our lab generated digital gene expression profiling (DGEP) data to identify differentially expressed genes in a salt-tolerant genotype of Glycine soja (STGoGS) and a salt-sensitive genotype of Glycine max (SSGoGM). This DGEP data revealed that the expression (log2 ratio) of GmbZIP110 was up-regulated 2.76-fold and 3.38-fold in SSGoGM and STGoGS, respectively. In the present study, the salt inducible gene GmbZIP110 was cloned and characterized through phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization and in silico transcript abundance analysis in different tissues. The functional role of this gene in salt tolerance was studied through transactivation analysis, DNA binding ability, expression in soybean composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis, and the effect of GmbZIP110 on the expression of stress-related genes in transgenic Arabidopsis was investigated. We found that GmbZIP110 could bind to the ACGT motif, impact the expression of many stress-related genes and the accumulation of proline, Na+ and K+, and enhanced the salt tolerance of composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis. Integrating all these results, we propose that GmbZIP110 plays a critical role in the response to salinity stress in soybean and has high potential usefulness in crop improvement. PMID:26837841

  13. The nuclear protein GmbZIP110 has transcription activation activity and plays important roles in the response to salinity stress in soybean.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaolong; Ali, Zulfiqar; Xu, Ling; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Yi, Jinxin; Shao, Hongbo; Ma, Hongxiang; Zhang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Plant basic-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors play important roles in many biological processes and are involved in the regulation of salt stress tolerance. Previously, our lab generated digital gene expression profiling (DGEP) data to identify differentially expressed genes in a salt-tolerant genotype of Glycine soja (STGoGS) and a salt-sensitive genotype of Glycine max (SSGoGM). This DGEP data revealed that the expression (log2 ratio) of GmbZIP110 was up-regulated 2.76-fold and 3.38-fold in SSGoGM and STGoGS, respectively. In the present study, the salt inducible gene GmbZIP110 was cloned and characterized through phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization and in silico transcript abundance analysis in different tissues. The functional role of this gene in salt tolerance was studied through transactivation analysis, DNA binding ability, expression in soybean composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis, and the effect of GmbZIP110 on the expression of stress-related genes in transgenic Arabidopsis was investigated. We found that GmbZIP110 could bind to the ACGT motif, impact the expression of many stress-related genes and the accumulation of proline, Na(+) and K(+), and enhanced the salt tolerance of composite seedlings and transgenic Arabidopsis. Integrating all these results, we propose that GmbZIP110 plays a critical role in the response to salinity stress in soybean and has high potential usefulness in crop improvement. PMID:26837841

  14. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T.

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  15. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Burclaff, Joseph; Anderson, James T

    2016-01-01

    RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH) and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain) coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities. PMID:26820724

  16. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2E3 and its import receptor importin-11 regulate the localization and activity of the antioxidant transcription factor NRF2

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Kendra S.; Plafker, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2 p45–related factor (Nrf2) induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins that maintain and restore redox homeostasis. Nrf2 levels and activity are tightly regulated, and three subcellular populations of the transcription factor have been identified. During homeostasis, the majority of Nrf2 is degraded in the cytoplasm by ubiquitin (Ub)-mediated degradation. A second population is transcriptionally active in the nucleus, and a third population localizes to the outer mitochondrial membrane. Still unresolved are the mechanisms and factors that govern Nrf2 distribution between its subcellular locales. We show here that the Ub-conjugating enzyme UBE2E3 and its nuclear import receptor importin 11 (Imp-11) regulate Nrf2 distribution and activity. Knockdown of UBE2E3 reduces nuclear Nrf2, decreases Nrf2 target gene expression, and relocalizes the transcription factor to a perinuclear cluster of mitochondria. In a complementary manner, Imp-11 functions to restrict KEAP1, the major suppressor of Nrf2, from prematurely extracting the transcription factor off of a subset of target gene promoters. These findings identify a novel pathway of Nrf2 modulation during homeostasis and support a model in which UBE2E3 and Imp-11 promote Nrf2 transcriptional activity by restricting the transcription factor from partitioning to the mitochondria and limiting the repressive activity of nuclear KEAP1. PMID:25378586

  17. Importance of the Chiral Centers of Jasmonic Acid in the Responses of Plants (Activities and Antagonism between Natural and Synthetic Analogs).

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, L.; Tung, P.; Ward, K.; Reid, D. M.; Abrams, S.; Lamb, N.; Quail, J. W.; Moloney, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of the two chiral centers at C-3 and C-7 in the molecular structure of jasmonic acid in plant responses was investigated. We separated methyl jasmonate (MeJA) into (3R)- and (3S)-isomers with a fixed stereochemistry at C-3, but epimerization at C-7 is possible. The four isomers of the nonepimerizable analog 7-methyl MeJA were synthesized. These six esters and their corresponding acids were tested in three bioassays: (a) senescence in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cotyledons; (b) proteinase inhibitor II gene expression in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with [beta]-glucuronidase as a biochemical reporter; and (c) seed germination in Brassica napus and wheat (Triticum aestivum). The esters and acids had similar activities in the three assays, with the ester being more effective than its acid. The (3R)-stereochemistry was critical for jasmonate activity. Although activity was reduced after substituting the C-7 proton with a methyl group, the analogs with (3R,7R)- or (3R,7S)-stereochemistry were active in some of the assays. Although the four isomers of 7-methyl MeJA were inactive or only weakly active in the senescence assay, they could overcome the senescence-promoting effect of (3R)-MeJA. The strongest antagonistic effect was observed with the (3R,7S)-isomer. PMID:12223716

  18. The Importance of the Prenyl Group in the Activities of Osthole in Enhancing Bone Formation and Inhibiting Bone Resorption In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yuan-Kun; Pan, Ya-Lei; Niu, Yin-Bo; Li, Chen-Rui; Wu, Xiang-Long; Fan, Wu-Tu; Lu, Ting-Li; Mei, Qi-Bing; Xian, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis treatment always aimed at keeping the balance of bone formation and bone resorption. Recently, prenyl group in natural products has been proposed as an active group to enhance the osteogenesis process. Osthole has both the prenyl group and bone-protective activities, but the relationship is still unknown. In this study we found that osthole exerted a potent ability to promote proliferation and osteogenic function of rat bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts, including improved cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, enhanced secretion of collagen-I, bone morphogenetic protein-2, osteocalcin and osteopontin, stimulated mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor-1, runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix, OPG (osteoprotegerin), RANKL (receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand), and the ratio of OPG/RANKL, as well as increasing the formation of mineralized nodules. However, 7-methoxycoumarin had no obvious effects. Osthole also inhibited osteoclastic bone resorption to a greater extent than 7-methoxycoumarin, as shown by a lower tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity and lower number and smaller area of resorption pits. Our findings demonstrate that osthole could be a potential agent to stimulate bone formation and inhibit bone resorption, and the prenyl group plays an important role in these bone-protective effects. PMID:25147567

  19. Fractionating ambient humic-like substances (HULIS) for their reactive oxygen species activity - Assessing the importance of quinones and atmospheric aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Wang, Ying; El-Afifi, Rawan; Fang, Ting; Rowland, Janessa; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a technique to identify the redox-active components of fine organic aerosols by fractionating humic-like substances (HULIS). We applied this technique to a dithiothreitol (DTT) assay - a measure of the capability of PM to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and assessed the contribution of quinones to the DTT activity of ambient water-soluble PM. Filter samples from the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution & Epidemiology (SCAPE) were extracted in water and then passed-through a C-18 column to isolate the HULIS fraction by retention on the column. The HULIS was then eluted with a sequence of solvents of increasing polarity, i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM) and then methanol. Each of these eluted fractions was analyzed for DTT activity. The methanol fraction was found to possess most of the DTT activity (>70%), while the hexane fraction had the least activity (<5%), suggesting that the ROS-active compounds of ambient water-soluble PM2.5 HULIS are mostly polar in nature. A number of quinones thought to contribute to ambient PM DTT activity were also tested. 1,4 Naphthoquinone (1,4 NQ), 1,2 Naphthoquinone (1,2 NQ), 9,10 Phenanthrenequinone (PQ), and 5-hydroxy-1,4 NQ were analyzed by the same protocol. The hexane fraction of two quinones (PQ, and 1,4 NQ) was the most-DTT active, while methanol was the least, confirming that PQ, 1,4 NQ, and 1,2 NQ (which could not be recovered from the column) do not contribute significantly to the water-soluble DTT activity of ambient PM2.5. However, an oxygenated derivative of 1,4 NQ, (5-hydroxy-1,4 NQ), which is also intrinsically more DTT-active than 1,4 NQ, was mostly (>60%) eluted in methanol. The results demonstrate the importance of atmospheric aging (oxidation) of organic aerosols in enhancing the ROS activity of ambient PM.

  20. Activation of P2X7 Receptor by ATP Plays an Important Role in Regulating Inflammatory Responses during Acute Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin H.; Hwang, David M.; Palaniyar, Nades; Grinstein, Sergio; Philpott, Dana J.; Hu, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Acute viral infection causes damages to the host due to uncontrolled viral replication but even replication deficient viral vectors can induce systemic inflammatory responses. Indeed, overactive host innate immune responses to viral vectors have led to devastating consequences. Macrophages are important innate immune cells that recognize viruses and induce inflammatory responses at the early stage of infection. However, tissue resident macrophages are not easily activated by the mere presence of virus suggesting that their activation requires additional signals from other cells in the tissue in order to trigger inflammatory responses. Previously, we have shown that the cross-talk between epithelial cells and macrophages generates synergistic inflammatory responses during adenoviral vector infection. Here, we investigated whether ATP is involved in the activation of macrophages to induce inflammatory responses during an acute adenoviral infection. Using a macrophage-epithelial cell co-culture system we demonstrated that ATP signaling through P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is required for induction of inflammatory mediators. We also showed that ATP-P2X7R signaling regulates inflammasome activation as inhibition or deficiency of P2X7R as well as caspase-1 significantly reduced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, we found that intranasal administration of replication deficient adenoviral vectors in mice caused a high mortality in wild-type mice with symptoms of acute respiratory distress syndrome but the mice deficient in P2X7R or caspase-1 showed increased survival. In addition, wild-type mice treated with apyrase or inhibitors of P2X7R or caspase-1 showed higher rates of survival. The improved survival in the P2X7R deficient mice correlated with diminished levels of IL-1β and IL-6 and reduced neutrophil infiltration in the early phase of infection. These results indicate that ATP, released during viral infection, is an important inflammatory regulator that activates the

  1. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2015-07-15

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA–protein crosslinks (DPCs) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. - Highlights: • Proteasome inhibition enhances cytotoxicity of low-dose FA in human lung cells. • Active proteasomes diminish replication-inhibiting effects of FA. • Proteasome activity prevents delayed G2 arrest in FA-treated cells. • Proteasome inhibition exacerbates replication stress by FA in

  2. Activity of mitochondrially synthesized reporter proteins is lower than that of imported proteins and is increased by lowering cAMP in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed Central

    Demlow, Christina M; Fox, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    We selected for increased phenotypic expression of a synthetic cox2::arg8m-G66S reporter gene inserted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA in place of COX2. Recessive mutations in ras2 and cyr1, as well as elevated dosage of PDE2, allowed cox2::arg8m-G66S to support Arg prototrophy. Each of these genetic alterations should decrease cellular cAMP levels. The resulting signal was transduced through redundant action of the three cAMP-dependent protein kinases, TPK1, TPK2, and TPK3. ras2 had little or no effect on the level of wild-type Arg8p encoded by cox2::ARG8m, but did increase Arg8p activity, as judged by growth phenotype. ras2 also caused increased fluorescence in cells carrying the synthetic cox3::GFPm reporter in mtDNA, but had little effect on the steady-state level of GFP polypeptide detected immunologically. Thus, decreased cAMP levels did not affect the synthesis of mitochondrially coded protein reporters in glucose-grown cells, but rather elevated activities in the matrix that promote efficient folding. Furthermore, we show that when Arg8p is synthesized in the cytoplasm and imported into mitochondria, it has greater activity than when it is synthesized in the matrix. Thus, mitochondrially synthesized proteins may not have the same access to matrix chaperones as cytoplasmically synthesized proteins emerging from the import apparatus. PMID:14668357

  3. Stress-triggered Activation of the Metalloprotease Oma1 Involves Its C-terminal Region and Is Important for Mitochondrial Stress Protection in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Bohovych, Iryna; Donaldson, Garrett; Christianson, Sara; Zahayko, Nataliya; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2014-01-01

    Functional integrity of mitochondria is critical for optimal cellular physiology. A suite of conserved mitochondrial proteases known as intramitochondrial quality control represents one of the mechanisms assuring normal mitochondrial function. We previously demonstrated that ATP-independent metalloprotease Oma1 mediates degradation of hypohemylated Cox1 subunit of cytochrome c oxidase and is active in cytochrome c oxidase-deficient mitochondria. Here we show that Oma1 is important for adaptive responses to various homeostatic insults and preservation of normal mitochondrial function under damage-eliciting conditions. Changes in membrane potential, oxidative stress, or chronic hyperpolarization lead to increased Oma1-mediated proteolysis. The stress-triggered induction of Oma1 proteolytic activity appears to be associated with conformational changes within the Oma1 homo-oligomeric complex, and these alterations likely involve C-terminal residues of the protease. Substitutions in the conserved C-terminal region of Oma1 impair its ability to form a labile proteolytically active complex in response to stress stimuli. We demonstrate that Oma1 genetically interacts with other inner membrane-bound quality control proteases. These findings indicate that yeast Oma1 is an important player in IM protein homeostasis and integrity by acting in concert with other intramitochondrial quality control components. PMID:24648523

  4. TALE1 from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis acts as a transcriptional activator in plant cells and is important for pathogenicity in cassava plants.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Gil, Juliana; Rojas, Alejandro; Osorio, Daniela; Gutiérrez, Sonia; Muñoz-Bodnar, Alejandra; Perez-Quintero, Alvaro L; Koebnik, Ralf; Szurek, Boris; López, Camilo; Restrepo, Silvia; Verdier, Valérie; Bernal, Adriana J

    2013-01-01

    Many plant-pathogenic bacteria suppress pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity by injecting effector proteins into the host cytoplasm during infection through the type III secretion system (TTSS). This type III secretome plays an important role in bacterial pathogenicity in susceptible hosts. Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam), the causal agent of cassava bacterial blight, injects several effector proteins into the host cell, including TALE1(Xam) . This protein is a member of the Transcriptional Activator-Like effector (TALE) protein family, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA family. TALE1(Xam) has 13.5 tandem repeats of 34 amino acids each, as well as two nuclear localization signals and an acidic activation domain at the C-terminus. In this work, we demonstrate the importance of TALE1(Xam) in the pathogenicity of Xam. We use versions of the gene that lack different domains in the protein in structure-function studies to show that the eukaryotic domains at the 3' end are critical for pathogenicity. In addition, we demonstrate that, similar to the characterized TALE proteins from other Xanthomonas species, TALE1(Xam) acts as a transcriptional activator in plant cells. This is the first report of the identification of a TALE in Xam, and contributes to our understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms employed by this bacterium to colonize and cause disease in cassava. PMID:22947214

  5. Sp1 is a co-activator with Ets-1, and Net is an important repressor of the transcription of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase alpha.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Koichi; Sugimoto, Sayaka; Satou, Motoyasu; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Vance, Dennis E; Izumi, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis via the CDP-choline pathway is primarily regulated by CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CT) encoded by the Pcyt1a and Pcyt1b genes. Previously, we identified an Ets-1-binding site located at -49/-47 in the promoter of Pcyt1a as an important transcriptional element involved in basal CTalpha transcription (Sugimoto, H., Sugimoto, S., Tatei, K., Obinata, H., Bakovic, M., Izumi, T., and Vance, D. E. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 19716-19722). In this study, we determined whether or not there were other important elements and binding proteins for basal CTalpha transcription in the Pcyt1a promoter, and if other Ets family proteins bind to the Ets-1-binding site. The results indicate the formation of a ternary complex with Ets-1 binding at -49/-47 and Sp1 binding at -58/-54 of the Pcyt1a promoter that is important for activating CTalpha transcription. When nuclear extracts of COS-7 cells expressing various Ets family repressors were incubated with DNA probes, binding of Net to the probes was observed. Net dose-dependently depressed the promoter-luciferase activity by 98%, even when co-expressed with Ets-1. RNA interference targeting Net caused an increase of endogenous CTalpha mRNA. After synchronizing the cell cycle in NIH3T3 cells, CTalpha mRNA increased at the S-M phase corresponding to an increase of Ets-1 mRNA and a decrease of Net mRNA. These results indicated that Net is an important endogenous repressor for CTalpha transcription. PMID:16157598

  6. Analytic Hierarchy Process to Define the Most Important Factors and Related Technologies for Empowering Elderly People in Taking an Active Role in their Health.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Gaeta, E; Arredondo, M T; Pecchia, L

    2015-09-01

    Successful management of health conditions in older population is determined by strategic involvement of a professional team of careers and by empowering patients and their caregivers to take over a central role and responsibility in the daily management of condition. Identifying, structuring and ranking the most important needs related to these aspects could pave the way for improved strategies in designing systems and technological solutions supporting user empowerment. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study aiming to elicit these needs. Healthcare professionals, working together in the European and Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) initiative, have defined a set of needs and factors that have been organized in two hierarchies around the concepts of patient activation and proactive and prepared care team, defined in the Chronic Care Model. The two hierarchies have been mapped, by a team of experts in computer science, with technologies and solutions that could facilitate the achievement of the identified needs. PMID:26254254

  7. Chaperone-like activities of different molecular forms of beta-casein. Importance of polarity of N-terminal hydrophilic domain.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Reza; Shchutskaya, Yulia Y; Zimny, Jaroslaw; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali A; Muronetz, Vladimir I; Zuev, Yuriy F; Chobert, Jean-Marc; Haertlé, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    As a member of intrinsically unstructured protein family, beta-casein (beta-CN) contains relatively high amount of prolyl residues, adopts noncompact and flexible structure and exhibits chaperone-like activity in vitro. Like many chaperones, native beta-CN does not contain cysteinyl residues and exhibits strong tendencies for self-association. The chaperone-like activities of three recombinant beta-CNs wild type (WT) beta-CN, C4 beta-CN (with cysteinyl residue in position 4) and C208 beta-CN (with cysteinyl residue in position 208), expressed and purified from E. coli, which, consequently, lack the phosphorylated residues, were examined and compared with that of native beta-CN using insulin and alcohol dehydrogenase as target/substrate proteins. The dimers (beta-CND) of C4-beta-CN and C208 beta-CN were also studied and their chaperone-like activities were compared with those of their monomeric forms. Lacking phosphorylation, WT beta-CN, C208 beta-CN, C4 beta-CN and C4 beta-CND exhibited significantly lower chaperone-like activities than native beta-CN. Dimerization of C208 beta-CN with two distal hydrophilic domains considerably improved its chaperone-like activity in comparison with its monomeric form. The obtained results demonstrate the significant role played by the polar contributions of phosphorylated residues and N-terminal hydrophilic domain as important functional elements in enhancing the chaperone-like activity of native beta-CN. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 623-632, 2009.This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The "Published Online" date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com. PMID:19322774

  8. Contrasted enzymatic cocktails reveal the importance of cellulases and hemicellulases activity ratios for the hydrolysis of cellulose in presence of xylans.

    PubMed

    Dondelinger, Eve; Aubry, Nathalie; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Cohen, Céline; Tayeb, Jean; Rémond, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Various enzymatic cocktails were produced from two Trichoderma reesei strains, a cellulase hyperproducer strain and a strain with β-glucosidase activity overexpression. By using various carbon sources (lactose, glucose, xylose, hemicellulosic hydrolysate) for strains growth, contrasted enzymatic activities were obtained. The enzymatic cocktails presented various levels of efficiency for the hydrolysis of cellulose Avicel into glucose, in presence of xylans, or not. These latter were also hydrolyzed with different extents according to cocktails. The most efficient cocktails (TR1 and TR3) on Avicel were richer in filter paper activity (FPU) and presented a low ratio FPU/β-glucosidase activity. Cocktails TR2 and TR5 which were produced on the higher amount of hemicellulosic hydrolysate, possess both high xylanase and β-xylosidase activities, and were the most efficient for xylans hydrolysis. When hydrolysis of Avicel was conducted in presence of xylans, a decrease of glucose release occurred for all cocktails compared to hydrolysis of Avicel alone. Mixing TR1 and TR5 cocktails with two different ratios of proteins (1/1 and 1/4) resulted in a gain of efficiency for glucose release during hydrolysis of Avicel in presence of xylans compared to TR5 alone. Our results demonstrate the importance of combining hemicellulase and cellulase activities to improve the yields of glucose release from Avicel in presence of xylans. In this context, strategies involving enzymes production with carbon sources comprising mixed C5 and C6 sugars or combining different cocktails produced on C5 or on C6 sugars are of interest for processes developed in the context of lignocellulosic biorefinery. PMID:27001439

  9. A Comprehensive Review on the Phytochemical Constituents and Pharmacological Activities of Pogostemon cablin Benth.: An Aromatic Medicinal Plant of Industrial Importance.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani

    2015-01-01

    Pogostemon cablin Benth. (patchouli) is an important herb which possesses many therapeutic properties and is widely used in the fragrance industries. In traditional medicinal practices, it is used to treat colds, headaches, fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, insect and snake bites. In aromatherapy, patchouli oil is used to relieve depression, stress, calm nerves, control appetite and to improve sexual interest. Till now more than 140 compounds, including terpenoids, phytosterols, flavonoids, organic acids, lignins, alkaloids, glycosides, alcohols, aldehydes have been isolated and identified from patchouli. The main phytochemical compounds are patchouli alcohol, α-patchoulene, β-patchoulene, α-bulnesene, seychellene, norpatchoulenol, pogostone, eugenol and pogostol. Modern studies have revealed several biological activities such as antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antithrombotic, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, antimutagenic, antiemetic, fibrinolytic and cytotoxic activities. However, some of the traditional uses need to be verified and may require standardizing and authenticating the bioactivity of purified compounds through scientific methods. The aim of the present review is to provide comprehensive knowledge on the phytochemistry and pharmacological activities of essential oil and different plant extracts of patchouli based on the available scientific literature. This information will provide a potential guide in exploring the use of main active compounds of patchouli in various medical fields. PMID:25985355

  10. CodY Regulates the Activity of the Virulence Quorum Sensor PlcR by Controlling the Import of the Signaling Peptide PapR in Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Slamti, Leyla; Lemy, Christelle; Henry, Céline; Guillot, Alain; Huillet, Eugénie; Lereclus, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, cell–cell communication mainly relies on cytoplasmic sensors of the RNPP family. Activity of these regulators depends on their binding to secreted signaling peptides that are imported into the cell. These quorum sensing regulators control important biological functions in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group, such as virulence and necrotrophism. The RNPP quorum sensor PlcR, in complex with its cognate signaling peptide PapR, is the main regulator of virulence in B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Recent reports have shown that the global stationary phase regulator CodY, involved in adaptation to nutritional limitation, is required for the expression of virulence genes belonging to the PlcR regulon. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation was not described. Using genetics and proteomics approaches, we showed that CodY regulates the expression of the virulence genes through the import of PapR. We report that CodY positively controls the production of the proteins that compose the oligopeptide permease OppABCDF, and of several other Opp-like proteins. It was previously shown that the pore components of this oligopeptide permease, OppBCDF, were required for the import of PapR. However, the role of OppA, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), was not investigated. Here, we demonstrated that OppA is not the only SBP involved in the recognition of PapR, and that several other OppA-like proteins can allow the import of this peptide. Altogether, these data complete our model of quorum sensing during the lifecycle of Bt and indicate that RNPPs integrate environmental conditions, as well as cell density, to coordinate the behavior of the bacteria throughout growth. PMID:26779156

  11. CodY Regulates the Activity of the Virulence Quorum Sensor PlcR by Controlling the Import of the Signaling Peptide PapR in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Slamti, Leyla; Lemy, Christelle; Henry, Céline; Guillot, Alain; Huillet, Eugénie; Lereclus, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In Gram-positive bacteria, cell-cell communication mainly relies on cytoplasmic sensors of the RNPP family. Activity of these regulators depends on their binding to secreted signaling peptides that are imported into the cell. These quorum sensing regulators control important biological functions in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group, such as virulence and necrotrophism. The RNPP quorum sensor PlcR, in complex with its cognate signaling peptide PapR, is the main regulator of virulence in B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Recent reports have shown that the global stationary phase regulator CodY, involved in adaptation to nutritional limitation, is required for the expression of virulence genes belonging to the PlcR regulon. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation was not described. Using genetics and proteomics approaches, we showed that CodY regulates the expression of the virulence genes through the import of PapR. We report that CodY positively controls the production of the proteins that compose the oligopeptide permease OppABCDF, and of several other Opp-like proteins. It was previously shown that the pore components of this oligopeptide permease, OppBCDF, were required for the import of PapR. However, the role of OppA, the substrate-binding protein (SBP), was not investigated. Here, we demonstrated that OppA is not the only SBP involved in the recognition of PapR, and that several other OppA-like proteins can allow the import of this peptide. Altogether, these data complete our model of quorum sensing during the lifecycle of Bt and indicate that RNPPs integrate environmental conditions, as well as cell density, to coordinate the behavior of the bacteria throughout growth. PMID:26779156

  12. Induction of CYP26A1 by Metabolites of Retinoic Acid: Evidence That CYP26A1 Is an Important Enzyme in the Elimination of Active Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Topletz, Ariel R.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Foti, Robert S.; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2015-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, induces gene transcription via binding to nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs). The primary hydroxylated metabolites formed from atRA by CYP26A1, and the subsequent metabolite 4-oxo-atRA, bind to RARs and potentially have biologic activity. Hence, CYP26A1, the main atRA hydroxylase, may function either to deplete bioactive retinoids or to form active metabolites. This study aimed to determine the role of CYP26A1 in modulating RAR activation via formation and elimination of active retinoids. After treatment of HepG2 cells with atRA, (4S)-OH-atRA, (4R)-OH-atRA, 4-oxo-atRA, and 18-OH-atRA, mRNAs of CYP26A1 and RARβ were increased 300- to 3000-fold, with 4-oxo-atRA and atRA being the most potent inducers. However, >60% of the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers were converted to 4-oxo-atRA in the first 12 hours of treatment, suggesting that the activity of the 4-OH-atRA was due to 4-oxo-atRA. In human hepatocytes, atRA, 4-OH-atRA, and 4-oxo-atRA induced CYP26A1 and 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed from 4-OH-atRA. In HepG2 cells, 4-oxo-atRA formation was observed even in the absence of CYP26A1 activity and this formation was not inhibited by ketoconazole. In human liver microsomes, 4-oxo-atRA formation was supported by NAD+, suggesting that 4-oxo-atRA formation is mediated by a microsomal alcohol dehydrogenase. Although 4-oxo-atRA was not formed by CYP26A1, it was depleted by CYP26A1 (Km = 63 nM and intrinsic clearance = 90 μl/min per pmol). Similarly, CYP26A1 depleted 18-OH-atRA and the 4-OH-atRA enantiomers. These data support the role of CYP26A1 to clear bioactive retinoids, and suggest that the enzyme forming active 4-oxo-atRA may be important in modulating retinoid action. PMID:25492813

  13. Growth arrest vs direct cytotoxicity and the importance of molecular structure for the in vitro anti-tumour activity of ether lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lohmeyer, M.; Workman, P.

    1995-01-01

    A panel of 25 different lipid agents was evaluated for in vitro activity against HT29 human colon carcinoma and HL60 promyelocytic leukaemia cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The structure-activity relationships seen with this series, including those for four sets of positional or stereoisomers, indicate that specific receptor proteins are unlikely as targets for anti-tumour lipid (ATL) action. Additional data confirm the lack of involvement of the platelet-activating factor receptor in particular and suggest that metabolic stability is a most important determinant of ATL activity. More detailed studies, with 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET18-OCH3) and (+/-)-2-(Hydroxy[tetrahydro-2-(octadecyloxy)methylfuran-2- yl]methoxyphosphinyloxy)-N,N,N,-trimethylethaniminium hydroxide (SRI 62-834), suggest three different modes of activity, depending on drug concentration and exposure time. Low doses of up to 5 microM in standard serum-containing medium cause population growth arrest after prolonged exposure. Growth arrest was associated with a leaky G2/M block as determined by flow cytometry. These effects are reversible. Intermediate concentrations (5-40 microM) were cytotoxic, causing a net reduction in cell numbers after 2-3 days. At even higher concentrations, all lipids caused rapid, direct membrane lysis. When the clonogenic assay was used to assess the effects of ATLs, most agents reduced colony formation at concentrations above 5 microM. However, some compounds proved stimulatory at nanomolar concentrations, suggesting that they might possess mitogenic properties. These results, particularly those concerning the concentration and time dependence, may be relevant to current clinical trials with ether lipids. PMID:7640206

  14. Does Litter Impart A Detectable Chemical Signal on Soil DOC? DOC Fluorescence Signatures in Soils Undergoing Long-Term Litter Manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtha, K.; Strid, A.; Lee, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a small but crucial part of the forest carbon cycle. Characterizing the relationship between organic matter inputs to soil and DOC chemistry is crucial to understanding the ultimate fate of root carbon, fallen wood and needles. Chemical differences in the DOC pool may help to explain whether fractions are sorbed to mineral surfaces and contribute to accumulation of soil organic carbon, respired as CO2, or exported. Soil solution DOC was sampled from the detrital input and removal treatment (DIRT) plots located in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, OR to determine whether detrital inputs impart a detectable signal on DOC in mineral soil. Multiple types of fresh litter extracts, along with lysimeter and soil extracts from DIRT treatment plots were characterized using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy coupled with the Cory and McKnight (2005) parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Principal component analysis of 13 unique fluorophores distinguished using PARAFAC show that litter and soil extracts (needles, wood of decomposition Class 1, Class 3 and Class 5, O-horizon, and A-horizon) each have distinct fluorescence signatures. However, while litter-leached DOC chemistry varies by litter type, neither lysimeter-collected DOC or soil extracts show statistically significant differences in fluorescence signatures among treatments, even after 17 years of litter manipulations. The lack of observed differences among DIRT treatments suggests a "Soil Blender" hypothesis whereby both abiotic and biotic mechanisms effectively homogenize organic carbon constituents within the dissolved pool. The results of this work emphasize the ability of sorption and biodegradation to homogenize soil DOC and demonstrate that fluorescence can be an effective fingerprinting technique for soil DOC composition.

  15. Identification of functionally important residues of the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor, an insect ortholog of the vertebrate neuromedin U receptor.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takeshi; Katayama, Yukie; Guo, Linjun; Liu, Desheng; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Kou; Lee, Jae Min; Nagamine, Toshihiro; Hull, J Joe; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji

    2014-07-01

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by the interaction between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. To identify functionally important amino acid residues in the silkmoth PBANR, a series of 27 alanine substitutions was generated using a PBANR chimera C-terminally fused with enhanced GFP. The PBANR mutants were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and their ability to bind and be activated by a core PBAN fragment (C10PBAN(R2K)) was monitored. Among the 27 mutants, 23 localized to the cell surface of transfected Sf9 cells, whereas the other four remained intracellular. Reduced binding relative to wild type was observed with 17 mutants, and decreased Ca(2+) mobilization responses were observed with 12 mutants. Ala substitution of Glu-95, Glu-120, Asn-124, Val-195, Phe-276, Trp-280, Phe-283, Arg-287, Tyr-307, Thr-311, and Phe-319 affected both binding and Ca(2+) mobilization. The most pronounced effects were observed with the E120A mutation. A molecular model of PBANR indicated that the functionally important PBANR residues map to the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th transmembrane helices, implying that the same general region of class A G-protein-coupled receptors recognizes both peptidic and nonpeptidic ligands. Docking simulations suggest similar ligand-receptor recognition interactions for PBAN-PBANR and the orthologous vertebrate pair, neuromedin U (NMU) and NMU receptor (NMUR). The simulations highlight the importance of two glutamate residues, Glu-95 and Glu-120, in silkmoth PBANR and Glu-117 and Glu-142 in human NMUR1, in the recognition of the most functionally critical region of the ligands, the C-terminal residue and amide. PMID:24847080

  16. Identification of Functionally Important Residues of the Silkmoth Pheromone Biosynthesis-activating Neuropeptide Receptor, an Insect Ortholog of the Vertebrate Neuromedin U Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Katayama, Yukie; Guo, Linjun; Liu, Desheng; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Kou; Lee, Jae Min; Nagamine, Toshihiro; Hull, J. Joe; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by the interaction between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. To identify functionally important amino acid residues in the silkmoth PBANR, a series of 27 alanine substitutions was generated using a PBANR chimera C-terminally fused with enhanced GFP. The PBANR mutants were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and their ability to bind and be activated by a core PBAN fragment (C10PBANR2K) was monitored. Among the 27 mutants, 23 localized to the cell surface of transfected Sf9 cells, whereas the other four remained intracellular. Reduced binding relative to wild type was observed with 17 mutants, and decreased Ca2+ mobilization responses were observed with 12 mutants. Ala substitution of Glu-95, Glu-120, Asn-124, Val-195, Phe-276, Trp-280, Phe-283, Arg-287, Tyr-307, Thr-311, and Phe-319 affected both binding and Ca2+ mobilization. The most pronounced effects were observed with the E120A mutation. A molecular model of PBANR indicated that the functionally important PBANR residues map to the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th transmembrane helices, implying that the same general region of class A G-protein-coupled receptors recognizes both peptidic and nonpeptidic ligands. Docking simulations suggest similar ligand-receptor recognition interactions for PBAN-PBANR and the orthologous vertebrate pair, neuromedin U (NMU) and NMU receptor (NMUR). The simulations highlight the importance of two glutamate residues, Glu-95 and Glu-120, in silkmoth PBANR and Glu-117 and Glu-142 in human NMUR1, in the recognition of the most functionally critical region of the ligands, the C-terminal residue and amide. PMID:24847080

  17. Proteasome activity is important for replication recovery, CHK1 phosphorylation and prevention of G2 arrest after low-dose formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Atienza, Sara; Green, Samantha E.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a human carcinogen with numerous sources of environmental and occupational exposures. This reactive aldehyde is also produced endogenously during metabolism of drugs and other processes. DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) are considered to be the main genotoxic lesions for FA. Accumulating evidence suggests that DPC repair in high eukaryotes involves proteolysis of crosslinked proteins. Here, we examined a role of the main cellular proteolytic machinery proteasomes in toxic responses of human lung cells to low FA doses. We found that transient inhibition of proteasome activity increased cytotoxicity and diminished clonogenic viability of FA-treated cells. Proteasome inactivation exacerbated suppressive effects of FA on DNA replication and increased the levels of the genotoxic stress marker γ-H2AX in normal human cells. A transient loss of proteasome activity in FA-exposed cells also caused delayed perturbations of cell cycle, which included G2 arrest and a depletion of S-phase populations at FA doses that had no effects in control cells. Proteasome activity diminished p53-Ser15 phosphorylation but was important for FA-induced CHK1 phosphorylation, which is a biochemical marker of DPC proteolysis in replicating cells. Unlike FA, proteasome inhibition had no effect on cell survival and CHK1 phosphorylation by the non-DPC replication stressor hydroxyurea. Overall, we obtained evidence for the importance of proteasomes in protection of human cells against biologically relevant doses of FA. Biochemically, our findings indicate the involvement of proteasomes in proteolytic repair of DPC, which removes replication blockage by these highly bulky lesions. PMID:25817892

  18. Surfactant protein A integrates activation signal strength to differentially modulate T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sambuddho; Giamberardino, Charles; Thomas, Joseph; Evans, Kathy; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ledford, Julie G; Hsia, Bethany; Pastva, Amy M; Wright, Jo Rae

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lipoproteins lower the surface tension at the alveolar-airway interface of the lung and participate in host defense. Previous studies reported that surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits lymphocyte proliferation. We hypothesized that SP-A-mediated modulation of T cell activation depends upon the strength, duration, and type of lymphocyte activating signals. Modulation of T cell signal strength imparted by different activating agents ex vivo and in vivo in different mouse models and in vitro with human T cells shows a strong correlation between strength of signal (SoS) and functional effects of SP-A interactions. T cell proliferation is enhanced in the presence of SP-A at low SoS imparted by exogenous mitogens, specific Abs, APCs, or in homeostatic proliferation. Proliferation is inhibited at higher SoS imparted by different doses of the same T cell mitogens or indirect stimuli such as LPS. Importantly, reconstitution with exogenous SP-A into the lungs of SP-A(-/-) mice stimulated with a strong signal also resulted in suppression of T cell proliferation while elevating baseline proliferation in unstimulated T cells. These signal strength and SP-A-dependent effects are mediated by changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels over time, involving extrinsic Ca(2+)-activated channels late during activation. These effects are intrinsic to the global T cell population and are manifested in vivo in naive as well as memory phenotype T cells. Thus, SP-A appears to integrate signal thresholds to control T cell proliferation. PMID:22219327

  19. Structural analysis of a penicillin V acylase from Pectobacterium atrosepticum confirms the importance of two Trp residues for activity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Avinash, Vellore Sunder; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Chand, Deepak; Pundle, Archana; Suresh, Cheravakattu Gopalan; Ramasamy, Sureshkumar

    2016-02-01

    Penicillin V acylases (PVA) catalyze the deacylation of the beta-lactam antibiotic phenoxymethylpenicillin (Pen V). They are members of the Ntn hydrolase family and possess an N-terminal cysteine as the main catalytic nucleophile residue. They form the evolutionarily related cholylglycine hydrolase (CGH) group which includes bile salt hydrolases (BSH) responsible for bile deconjugation. Even though a few PVA and BSH structures have been reported, no structure of a functional PVA from Gram-negative bacteria is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of a highly active PVA from Gram-negative Pectobacterium atrosepticum (PaPVA) at 2.5Å resolution. Structural comparison with PVAs from Gram-positive bacteria revealed that PaPVA had a distinctive tetrameric structure and active site organization. In addition, mutagenesis of key active site residues and biochemical characterization of the resultant variants elucidated the role of these residues in substrate binding and catalysis. The importance of residue Trp23 and Trp87 side chains in binding and correct positioning of Pen V by PVAs was confirmed using mutagenesis and substrate docking with a 15ns molecular dynamics simulation. These results establish the unique nature of Gram-negative CGHs and necessitate further research about their substrate spectrum. PMID:26707624

  20. Overweight and Obese Adolescent Girls: The Importance of Promoting Sensible Eating and Activity Behaviors from the Start of the Adolescent Period

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Alwyn S.; Street, Steven J.; Ziviani, Jenny; Byrne, Nuala M.; Hills, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    The adolescent period is associated with changes in eating and activity behaviors in girls. Less reliance on parental provision and choice of food, coupled with a decrease in participation in physical activity and sport, can create an energy imbalance, predisposing to weight gain. Physiological alterations to body composition, reduction in insulin sensitivity, and psychological adjustments may further amplify the risk of becoming overweight and maintaining an unhealthy level of body fat into childbearing years. During pregnancy excess body fat is a risk factor for poor pregnancy outcomes and may predispose an infant to a lifelong heightened risk of being overweight and developing chronic disease. Interventions aimed at preventing the accumulation of body fat in adolescent girls and young women may have far reaching impact and be critically important in reducing intergenerational weight gain. Lifestyle interventions in adolescence have the potential to modify adult obesity risk by switching at-risk individuals from a high to lower obesity risk trajectory. This paper discusses multiple approaches to assist at-risk individuals reduce obesity risk. A key focus is placed on engagement in food preparation and choice, and opportunities for physical activity and sport. Support, education, and opportunity at home and at school, are often associated with the success of lifestyle interventions, and may enable adolescents to make positive choices, and engage in health promoting behaviors during adolescence and childbearing years. PMID:25690003

  1. Activation of the Nrf2 Cell Defense Pathway by Ancient Foods: Disease Prevention by Important Molecules and Microbes Lost from the Modern Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Donald R.; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 (NFE2L2) cell defense pathway protects against oxidative stress and disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration. Although activated modestly by oxidative stress alone, robust activation of the Nrf2 defense mechanism requires the additional presence of co-factors that facilitate electron exchange. Various molecules exhibit this co-factor function, including sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables. However, natural co-factors that are potent and widely available from dietary sources have not been identified previously. The objectives of this study were to investigate support of the Nrf2 cell defense pathway by the alkyl catechols: 4-methylcatechol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-ethylcatechol. These small electrochemicals are naturally available from numerous sources but have not received attention. Findings reported here illustrate that these compounds are indeed potent co-factors for activation of the Nrf2 pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Each strongly supports expression of Nrf2 target genes in a variety of human cell types; and, in addition, 4-ethylcatechol is orally active in mice. Furthermore, findings reported here identify important and previously unrecognized sources of these compounds, arising from biotransformation of common plant compounds by lactobacilli that express phenolic acid decarboxylase. Thus, for example, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus collinoides, which are consumed from a diet rich in traditionally fermented foods and beverages, convert common phenolic acids found in fruits and vegetables to 4-vinylcatechol and/or 4-ethylcatechol. In addition, all of the alkyl catechols are found in wood smoke that was used widely for food preservation. Thus, the potentially numerous sources of alkyl catechols in traditional foods suggest that these co-factors were common in ancient diets. However, with radical changes in food preservation, alkyl catechols have been lost from modern foods. The absence of alkyl

  2. Activation of the Nrf2 Cell Defense Pathway by Ancient Foods: Disease Prevention by Important Molecules and Microbes Lost from the Modern Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Senger, Donald R; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 (NFE2L2) cell defense pathway protects against oxidative stress and disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration. Although activated modestly by oxidative stress alone, robust activation of the Nrf2 defense mechanism requires the additional presence of co-factors that facilitate electron exchange. Various molecules exhibit this co-factor function, including sulforaphane from cruciferous vegetables. However, natural co-factors that are potent and widely available from dietary sources have not been identified previously. The objectives of this study were to investigate support of the Nrf2 cell defense pathway by the alkyl catechols: 4-methylcatechol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-ethylcatechol. These small electrochemicals are naturally available from numerous sources but have not received attention. Findings reported here illustrate that these compounds are indeed potent co-factors for activation of the Nrf2 pathway both in vitro and in vivo. Each strongly supports expression of Nrf2 target genes in a variety of human cell types; and, in addition, 4-ethylcatechol is orally active in mice. Furthermore, findings reported here identify important and previously unrecognized sources of these compounds, arising from biotransformation of common plant compounds by lactobacilli that express phenolic acid decarboxylase. Thus, for example, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Lactobacillus collinoides, which are consumed from a diet rich in traditionally fermented foods and beverages, convert common phenolic acids found in fruits and vegetables to 4-vinylcatechol and/or 4-ethylcatechol. In addition, all of the alkyl catechols are found in wood smoke that was used widely for food preservation. Thus, the potentially numerous sources of alkyl catechols in traditional foods suggest that these co-factors were common in ancient diets. However, with radical changes in food preservation, alkyl catechols have been lost from modern foods. The absence of alkyl

  3. Early activation of splenic macrophages by tumor necrosis factor alpha is important in determining the outcome of experimental histoplasmosis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Hsieh, B A; Lee, G S; Franco, M; Hofman, F M

    1992-01-01

    Experimental infection of animals with Histoplasma capsulatum caused a massive macrophage infiltration into the spleen and induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) locally. The cytokine was also produced in vitro by peritoneal exudate macrophages exposed to a large inoculum of yeast cells. Depletion of the cytokine by injection of polyclonal sheep anti-TNF-alpha antibody was detrimental to sublethally infected mice. Fungous burdens in the spleens of TNF-alpha-depleted mice were higher than they were in the infected control mice at days 2, 7, and 9 after infection, and the antibody-treated animals succumbed to the infection. Histopathological study of spleen sections revealed that splenic macrophages were not able to control proliferation of intracellular yeasts as a result of TNF-alpha depletion. It seems that TNF-alpha plays a role in early activation of splenic macrophages which is important in controlling the outcome of an infection. Images PMID:1398934

  4. Low density lipoprotein receptor-binding activity in human tissues: quantitative importance of hepatic receptors and evidence for regulation of their expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rudling, M J; Reihnér, E; Einarsson, K; Ewerth, S; Angelin, B

    1990-01-01

    The heparin-sensitive binding of 125I-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to homogenates from 18 different normal human tissues and some solid tumors was determined. The binding to adrenal and liver homogenates fulfilled criteria established for the binding of LDL to its receptor--namely, (i) saturability, (ii) sensitivity to proteolytic destruction, (iii) inhibition by EDTA, and (iv) heat sensitivity. When the binding of 125I-labeled LDL was assayed at a constant concentration (50 micrograms/ml), the adrenal gland and the ovary had the highest binding of normal tissues. The highest binding per g of tissue overall was obtained in homogenates of a gastric carcinoma and a parotid adenoma. When the weights of the parenchymatous organs were considered, the major amount of LDL receptors was contained in the liver. To study the possible regulation of hepatic LDL-receptor expression, 11 patients were pretreated with cholestyramine (8 g twice a day for 3 weeks). Increased binding activity (+105%, P less than 0.001) was obtained in homogenates from liver biopsies from the cholestyramine-treated patients as compared with 12 untreated controls. It is concluded that the liver is the most important organ for LDL catabolism in humans and that the receptor activity in this organ can be regulated upon pharmacologic intervention. Further studies are needed to confirm the possibility that certain solid tumors can exhibit high numbers of LDL receptors. PMID:2110363

  5. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-10-25

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  6. Insecticidal, fumigant, and repellent activities of sweet wormwood oil and its individual components against red imported fire ant workers (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Tang, Liang; Hu, Wei; Wang, Kun; Zhou, You; Li, Hong; Huang, Congling; Chun, Jiong; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    In total, 29 compounds from sweet wormwood (Artemisia annua L.) oil were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The five active components were D-camphor, linalool, cineole, α-terpineol, and L(-)-borneol. The effectiveness of A. annua oil, as well as d-camphor, linalool, cineole, α-terpineol, and L(-)-borneol, as fumigants, contact insecticides, and repellents, were tested on the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren. The results indicated that A. annua oil has no significant topical toxicity; however, the spray contact test revealed that it has strong insecticidal activity and the inhibitory effect is stronger during closed exposure than during open exposure. In the fumigant test, cineole and D-camphor exhibited strong fumigant toxicity on minor and major S. invicta workers. They also caused 100% mortality at 5, 3, 2, and 1 mg/centrifuge tube but not at 0.5 mg/centrifuge tube. The mortality rates of linalool, α-terpineol, and L(-)-borneol exceeded 80% at 5, 3, and 2 mg/centrifuge tube. In the repellent test, cineole and d-camphor showed significant repellency at 100, 10, and 1 mg/kg. However, linalool, α-terpineol, and L(-)-borneol significantly facilitated digging at 10 and 1 mg/kg. PMID:25525106

  7. IMPORTANCE OF D1 AND D2 RECEPTORS IN THE DORSAL CAUDATE-PUTAMEN FOR THE LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY AND STEREOTYPED BEHAVIORS OF PREWEANLING RATS

    PubMed Central

    CHARNTIKOV, S.; DER-GHAZARIAN, T.; HERBERT, M. S.; HORN, L. R.; WIDARMA, C. B.; GUTIERREZ, A.; VARELA, F. A.; MCDOUGALL, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic compounds often affect the unlearned behaviors of preweanling and adult rats differently, although the brain regions underlying these age-dependent behavioral effects have not been specified. A candidate brain region is the dorsal caudate-putamen (CPu); thus, a goal of the present study was to determine whether D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu are capable of modulating the unlearned behaviors of preweanling rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, selective and nonselective dopamine agonists were bilaterally microinjected into the dorsal CPu on postnatal day (PD) 18 and both locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. In Experiment 3, the functional coupling of D1 and D2 receptors was assessed by microinjecting the D1 agonist SKF-82958 and the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole either alone or in combination. In Experiments 4 and 5, quinpirole and the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390, or SKF-82958 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, were co-administered into the dorsal CPu to further assess whether a functional D1 or D2 receptor system is necessary for the expression of quinpirole- or SKF-82958-induced behaviors. Results showed that selective stimulation of D1 or D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu increased both the locomotor activity and stereotypy of preweanling rats. Receptor coupling was evident on PD 18 because co-administration of a subthreshold dose of SKF-82958 and quinpirole produced more locomotor activity than either agonist alone. Lastly, the dopamine antagonist experiments showed that both D1 and D2 receptor systems must be functional for SKF-82958- or quinpirole-induced locomotor activity to be fully manifested. When the present data are compared to results from non-ontogenetic studies, it appears that pharmacological manipulation of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu affects the behavior of preweanling and adult rats in a generally similar manner, although some important age-dependent differences are apparent. For example, D1 and/or D2

  8. Importance of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal caudate-putamen for the locomotor activity and stereotyped behaviors of preweanling rats.

    PubMed

    Charntikov, S; Der-Ghazarian, T; Herbert, M S; Horn, L R; Widarma, C B; Gutierrez, A; Varela, F A; McDougall, S A

    2011-06-01

    Dopaminergic compounds often affect the unlearned behaviors of preweanling and adult rats differently, although the brain regions underlying these age-dependent behavioral effects have not been specified. A candidate brain region is the dorsal caudate-putamen (CPu); thus, a goal of the present study was to determine whether D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu are capable of modulating the unlearned behaviors of preweanling rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, selective and nonselective dopamine agonists were bilaterally microinjected into the dorsal CPu on postnatal day (PD) 18 and both locomotor activity and stereotypy were measured. In Experiment 3, the functional coupling of D1 and D2 receptors was assessed by microinjecting the D1 agonist SKF-82958 and the D₂/D₃ agonist quinpirole either alone or in combination. In Experiments 4 and 5, quinpirole and the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390, or SKF-82958 and the D2 receptor antagonist raclopride, were co-administered into the dorsal CPu to further assess whether a functional D1 or D2 receptor system is necessary for the expression of quinpirole- or SKF-82958-induced behaviors. Results showed that selective stimulation of D1 or D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu increased both the locomotor activity and stereotypy of preweanling rats. Receptor coupling was evident on PD 18 because co-administration of a subthreshold dose of SKF-82958 and quinpirole produced more locomotor activity than either agonist alone. Lastly, the dopamine antagonist experiments showed that both D1 and D2 receptor systems must be functional for SKF-82958- or quinpirole-induced locomotor activity to be fully manifested. When the present data are compared to results from non-ontogenetic studies, it appears that pharmacological manipulation of D1 and D2 receptors in the dorsal CPu affects the behavior of preweanling and adult rats in a generally similar manner, although some important age-dependent differences are apparent. For example, D1 and/or D2

  9. Energy imparted-based estimates of the effect of z overscanning on adult and pediatric patient effective doses from multi-slice computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-04-15

    In the present study effective dose values normalized to computed tomography dose index measured free in air were calculated for adult, newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 year old patients regarding scans of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, abdomen and pelvis, and trunk, using the energy imparted method. The effect of z overscanning on patient doses was accounted for, and normalized doses are provided for varying beam collimation, pitch and reconstruction slice width values. The contribution of overscanning depends on patient age, anatomic region imaged, acquisition and reconstruction settings. For a head scan it constitutes 15% of the adult effective dose and 24% of the effective dose to a newborn but for an abdomen scan it may be as high as 58% for a newborn and 31% for an adult. The ratios of normalized pediatric doses relative to that for adults for helical scans depend not only on age but also on acquisition and reconstruction parameters, because of variations in the relative distance between the primary beam and the radiosensitive tissues/organs of the body. Regarding scans of the trunk, pediatric doses are up to a factor of 2.5 times higher compared to adult doses (abdominal scans), whereas for scans of the head up to a factor of 1.5. Increasing the pitch value of helical scans while maintaining the same effective mAs setting, and hence noise levels, leads to an increase in patient doses which depends on age, body region, scan and reconstruction parameters. The % difference between doses at pitch 1.5 and pitch 1 is more pronounced in the abdominal region (14% increase for adults) and in young patients (31% in a newborn and 18% in a 10 year old patient) and it is minimal in head scans (4% increase in newborns and 1% in adults). If multiple body regions are to be imaged, doses to adults can be reduced by up to 15% and 36% to children by performing single long-range scans. Scanning adult patients at 100 kVp instead of 120 kVp, results in a 32% reduction in effective

  10. Physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins play an important role in their cooperative activation of the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, A G; Anandappa, R T; Leiden, J M

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional regulatory elements of many inducible T-cell genes contain adjacent or overlapping binding sites for the Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT families of transcription factors. Similar arrays of functionally important NF-kappaB/NFAT and Ets binding sites are present in the transcriptional enhancers of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2), suggesting that this pattern of nuclear protein binding sites reflects an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating inducible T-cell gene expression that has been co-opted during HIV evolution. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms by which Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins cooperatively regulate inducible T-cell gene expression remained unknown. In the studies described in this report, we demonstrated a physical interaction between multiple Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins both in vitro and in activated normal human T cells. This interaction is mediated by the Ets domain of Ets proteins and the C-terminal region of the Rel homology domains of NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins. In addition, the Ets-NF-kappaB/NFAT interaction requires the presence of DNA binding sites for both proteins, as it is abolished by the DNA intercalating agents propidium iodide and ethidium bromide and enhanced by the presence of synthetic oligonucleotides containing binding sites for Ets and NF-kappaB proteins. A dominant-negative mutant of NF-kappaB p50 that binds DNA but fails to interact with Ets proteins inhibits the synergistic activation of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers by NF-kappaB (p50 + p65) and Ets-1, suggesting that physical interaction between Ets and NF-kappaB proteins is required for the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins are important in regulating the inducible expression of T-cell genes and viruses. These interactions represent a potential target

  11. Modeling of Active Transmembrane Transport in a Mixture Theory Framework

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature. PMID:20213212

  12. Identification of N-terminal receptor activity-modifying protein residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and amylin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tao; Christopoulos, George; Bailey, Richard J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2008-10-01

    Calcitonin-family receptors comprise calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL) or calcitonin receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP) pairings. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors are CL/RAMP1, whereas adrenomedullin (AM) receptors are CL/RAMP2 (AM1 receptor) or CL/RAMP3 (AM2 receptor). Amylin (Amy) receptors are RAMP hetero-oligomers with the calcitonin receptor (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3, respectively). How RAMPs change G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology is not fully understood. We exploited sequence differences between RAMP1 and RAMP3 to identify individual residues capable of altering receptor pharmacology. Alignment of human RAMPs revealed eight residues that are conserved in RAMP2 and RAMP3 but are different in RAMP1. We hypothesized that residues in RAMP2 and RAMP3, but not RAMP1, are responsible for making CL/RAMP2 and CL/RAMP3 AM receptors. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we introduced individual RAMP3 residues into RAMP1 and vice versa in these eight positions. Mutant or wild-type RAMPs were transfected into Cos7 cells with CL or the insert-negative form of the calcitonin receptor [CT(a)]. Agonist-stimulated cAMP production and cell-surface expression of constructs were measured. Position 74 in RAMP1 and RAMP3 was critical for determining AM potency and affinity, and Phe93 in RAMP1 was an important contributor to alphaCGRP potency at CGRP receptors. Mutant RAMP/CT(a) receptor complexes displayed different phenotypes. It is noteworthy that RAMP1 S103N and W74E mutations led to enhanced rAmy potency, probably related to increased cell-surface expression of these complexes. This differs from the effect on CL-based receptors where expression was unchanged. Targeted substitution has emphasized the importance of position 74 in RAMP1/RAMP3 as a key determinant of AM pharmacology. PMID:18593822

  13. Larvicidal activity of the extracts from different parts of the plant Solanum xanthocarpum against important mosquito vectors in the arid region.

    PubMed

    Bansal, S K; Singh, Karam V; Kumar, Suresh

    2009-03-01

    Larvicidal efficacy of the aqueous and methanol extracts from green unripe and yellow ripe fruits, seeds, leaves and roots of the plant Solanum xanthocarpum was evaluated against Anopheles culicifacies, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus, the important mosquito vectors prevalent in the arid region. Studies were carried out on late 3rd orearly 4th instarlarvae of these species using standard WHO technique. Based on concentration mortality data LC50 and LC90 values along with their fiducial limits, regression equation, chi-square (chi2)/heterogeneity of the response have been determined bylog probit regression analysis. The 24 hr LC50 values as observed for aqueous extracts for green unripe and yellow ripe fruits were 112.7, 498.2 and 846.3 mg l(-1) and 104.7, 267.7and 832.2 mg l(-1) for Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus respectively. However, the 24 hr LC50 values formethanol extracts of yellow ripe fruits and seeds were 51.6, 52.2, 118.3 and 157.1 mg l(-1) and 66.9, 73.7, 123.8 and 154.9 mg l(-1) for the above four vector species respectively. The results showed that larvae of anophelines were much more susceptible as compared to culicines to both the aqueous and methanol extracts from fruits and seeds of the plant tested. The methanol extracts were found 2-5 times more effective as compared to the aqueous extracts. The chi-square values calculated during the analysis did not show any heterogeneity of the response. Experiments conducted with aqueous and methanol extracts from leaves and roots of this plant species didn't show any larvicidal activity against any of the mosquito species tested. The study would be of great importance while formulating vector control strategy based on alternative plant based insecticides. PMID:20121022

  14. A dominant-negative cyclin D1 mutant prevents nuclear import of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and its phosphorylation by CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, J A; Sherr, C J

    1997-01-01

    Cyclins contain two characteristic cyclin folds, each consisting of five alpha-helical bundles, which are connected to one another by a short linker peptide. The first repeat makes direct contact with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subunits in assembled holoenzyme complexes, whereas the second does not contribute directly to the CDK interface. Although threonine 156 in mouse cyclin D1 is predicted to lie at the carboxyl terminus of the linker peptide that separates the two cyclin folds and is buried within the cyclin subunit, mutation of this residue to alanine has profound effects on the behavior of the derived cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes. CDK4 in complexes with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E but not T156S) is not phosphorylated by recombinant CDK-activating kinase (CAK) in vitro, fails to undergo activating T-loop phosphorylation in vivo, and remains catalytically inactive and unable to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, when it is ectopically overexpressed in mammalian cells, cyclin D1 (T156A) assembles with CDK4 in the cytoplasm but is not imported into the cell nucleus. CAK phosphorylation is not required for nuclear transport of cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes, because complexes containing wild-type cyclin D1 and a CDK4 (T172A) mutant lacking the CAK phosphorylation site are efficiently imported. In contrast, enforced overexpression of the CDK inhibitor p21Cip1 together with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A)-CDK4 complexes enhanced their nuclear localization. These results suggest that cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E) forms abortive complexes with CDK4 that prevent recognition by CAK and by other cellular factors that are required for their nuclear localization. These properties enable ectopically overexpressed cyclin D1 (T156A), or a more stable T156A/T286A double mutant that is resistant to ubiquitination, to compete with endogenous cyclin D1 in mammalian cells, thereby mobilizing CDK4 into cytoplasmic, catalytically inactive complexes and dominantly inhibiting

  15. Key importance of small RNA binding for the activity of a glycine-tryptophan (GW) motif-containing viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-30

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  16. Key Importance of Small RNA Binding for the Activity of a Glycine-Tryptophan (GW) Motif-containing Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  17. The effects of exercise on cocaine self-administration, food-maintained responding, and locomotor activity in female rats: importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Witte, Maryam A

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that exercise decreases cocaine self-administration in rats with long-term access (8+ weeks) to activity wheels in the home cage. The purpose of this study was to (a) examine the importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure, (b) determine the effects of exercise on responding maintained by a nondrug reinforcer (i.e., food), and (c) investigate the effects of exercise on cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. To this end, female rats were obtained at weaning and divided into 4 groups: (a) EXE-SED rats were housed in exercise cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to sedentary cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (b) SED-EXE rats were housed in sedentary cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to exercise cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (c) SED-SED rats remained in sedentary cages for the duration of the study; and (d) EXE-EXE rats remained in exercise cages for the duration of the study. Relative to the sedentary group (SED-SED), exercise reduced cocaine self-administration in both groups with access to activity wheels after initial drug exposure (EXE-EXE, SED-EXE) but did not reduce cocaine self-administration in the group with access to activity wheels only before drug exposure (EXE-SED). Exercise also decreased the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity but did not reduce responding maintained by food. These data suggest that exercise may reduce cocaine use in drug-experienced individuals with no prior history of aerobic activity without decreasing other types of positively reinforced behaviors. PMID:22924703

  18. Conantokins Derived from the Asprella Clade Impart ConRl-B, an NMDA Receptor Antagonist with a Unique Selectivity Profile for NR2B Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gowd, Konkallu Hanumae; Han, Tiffany S.; Twede, Vernon; Gajewiak, Joanna; Smith, Misty D.; Watkins, Maren; Platt, Randall J.; Toledo, Gabriela; White, H. Steve; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bulaj, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Using molecular phylogeny has accelerated the discovery of peptidic ligands targeted to ion channels and receptors. One clade of venomous cone snails, Asprella, appears to be significantly enriched in conantokins, antagonists of N-Methyl D-Asparate receptors (NMDARs). Here, we describe the characterization of two novel conantokins from Conus rolani, including conantokin conRl-B that has shown an unprecedented selectivity for blocking NMDARs that contain NR2B subunits. ConRl-B shares only some sequence similarity to the most studied NR2B-selective conantokin, conG. The divergence between conRl-B and conG in the second inter-Gla loop was used to design analogs for structure-activity studies; the presence of Pro10 was found to be key to the high potency of conRl-B for NR2B, whereas the ε-amino group of Lys8 contributed to discrimination in blocking NR2B- and NR2A-containing NMDARs. In contrast to previous findings from Tyr5 substitutions in other conantokins, conRl-B [L5Y] showed potencies on the four NR2 NMDA receptor subtypes that were similar to those of the native conRl-B. When delivered into the brain, conRl-B was active in suppressing seizures in the model of epilepsy in mice, consistent with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors being potential targets for antiepileptic drugs. Circular dichroism experiments confirmed that the helical conformation of conRl-B is stabilized by divalent metal ions. Given the clinical applications of NMDA antagonists, conRl-B provides a potentially important pharmacological tool for understanding the differential roles of NMDA receptor subtypes in the nervous system. This work shows the effectiveness of coupling molecular phylogeny, chemical synthesis and pharmacology for discovering new bioactive natural products. PMID:22594498

  19. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S.-M.; Bekkers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K+, blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  20. Aspergillus niger lipase: Heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, molecular modeling prediction and the importance of the hinge domains at both sides of the lid domain to interfacial activation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Zhengyu; Duan, Mojie; Yang, Jiangke; Xu, Li; Yan, Yunjun

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus niger lipase (ANL) is an important biocatalyst in the food processing industry. However, there is no report of its detailed three-dimensional structure because of difficulties in crystallization. In this article, based on experimental data and bioinformational analysis results, the structural features of ANL were simulated. Firstly, two recombinant ANLs expressed in Pichia pastoris were purified to homogeneity and their corresponding secondary structure compositions were determined by circular dichroism spectra. Secondly, the primary structure, the secondary structure and the three-dimensional structure of ANL were modeled by comparison with homologous lipases with known three-dimensional structures using the BioEdit software, lipase engineering database (http://www.led.uni-stuttgart.de/), PSIPRED server and SwissModel server. The predicted molecular structure of ANL presented typical features of the alpha/beta hydrolase fold including positioning of the putative catalytic triad residues and the GXSXG signature motif. Comparison of the predicted three-dimensional structure of ANL with the X-ray three-dimensional structure of A. niger feruloyl esterase showed that the functional difference of interfacial activation between lipase and esterase was concerned with the difference in position of the lid. Our three-dimensional model of ANL helps to modify lipase structure by protein engineering, which will further expand the scope of application of ANL. PMID:19248178

  1. Comparative activity of TiO2 microspheres and P25 powder for organic degradation: Implicative importance of structural defects and organic adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Liu, Hong; Liu, Yuan; He, Guang'an; Jiang, Chengchun

    2014-11-01

    TiO2 microspheres have been employed as a promisingly new photocatalyst for water and wastewater treatment. P25 TiO2 is commonly employed and its properties are well established as photocatalyst. In this study, photocatalytic activities of the two TiO2 samples are compared by degrading sulfosalicylic acid (SSA), phenol, and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) under 365 nm UV illumination in a suspension system at neutral pH and associated optimized TiO2 dosages. The results showed that the three organic compounds unexceptionally degraded more rapidly on P25 than on TiO2 microspheres in terms of the concentration-time curves and total organic carbon removals at 120 min. This might me attributed the presence of oxygen vacancies and Ti(III) defects already present on P25 as determined by electron paramagnetic resonance, implying that the defects played an important role for the enhancement of the charge transfer step as rate-determining step. The degradations of three organic compounds on P25 and TiO2 microspheres could be well described by the first-order rate equation, while the degradation kinetics of SSA on TiO2 microspheres was quite different. The difference was ascribed to the medium adsorption ability of SSA on the TiO2 surface.

  2. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S-M; Bekkers, John M

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K(+), blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  3. Analysis of Rab GTPase-Activating Proteins Indicates that Rab1a/b and Rab43 Are Important for Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Secondary Envelopment ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zenner, Helen L.; Yoshimura, Shin-ichiro; Barr, Francis A.; Crump, Colin M.

    2011-01-01

    Assembly of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) occurs in the cytoplasm, where the capsid and tegument bud into host cell membranes. It is at this point that the viral glycoproteins are incorporated into the virion, as they are located at the assembly site. We investigated the role of the Rab GTPases in coordinating the assembly process by overexpressing 37 human Rab GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and assessing infectious titers. Rab GTPases are key cellular regulators of membrane trafficking events that, by their membrane association and binding of effector proteins, ensure the appropriate fusion of membranes. We identified that TBC1D20 and RN-tre and their partner Rabs, Rab1a/b and Rab43, respectively, are important for virion assembly. In the absence of Rab1a/b, the viral glycoproteins are unable to traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum to the assembly compartment, and thus unenveloped particles build up in the cytoplasm. The defect resulting from Rab43 depletion is somewhat more complex, but it appears that the fragmentation and dispersal of the trans-Golgi network and associated membranes render these compartments unable to support secondary envelopment. PMID:21680502

  4. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M.; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S.; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Posey, James E.; Sable, Suraj B.

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime–boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32–52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime–BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime–boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime–boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  5. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  6. Effect of the permafrost thawing on the organic carbon and microbial activity in thermokarst lakes of Western Siberia: important source of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokova, L. S.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Kirpotin, S. N.; Dupre, B.

    2008-12-01

    "khasyrei" exhibits the highest pH (5.5-6.0), presence of green algae and plants, very low conductivity (4-9 μS) and the lowest OC concentrations. However, there is still quite weak primary productivity (˜ 0.01 mg/C/L) and significant mineralization rate (0.3 mg C/L/day). The bacterial biomass and the number of colony-forming units for different nutrient media demonstrate clear decrease with the temporal evolution of the lake from dystrophic (7000 CFU/mL) at the begging of permafrost thawing to oligotrophic/mesotrophic at the final "khasyrey" stage (80 CFU/mL). Two main conclusions can be drawn from this work: 1) At all stages of lake evolution, there is always high amount of active OM-mineralizing heterotrophic bacteria, and 2) mineralization processes by these microorganisms clearly dominate any possible CO2 consumption by the phytoplankton. As a result, Western Siberia thermokarstic lakes are likely to act as important source of CO2 to the atmosphere. The CO2 flux associated with this microbial activity (i.e., 400 +/- 200 t/km2/y, assuming average lake depth of 1 m) is at least one order of magnitude higher than the riverine DOC flux, bearing in mind very high proportion of newly formed lakes in the Western Siberia (up to 30 percent).

  7. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  8. Selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition imparts beneficial effects in Huntington's disease mice: implications for the ubiquitin–proteasomal and autophagy systems

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haiqun; Kast, Ryan J.; Steffan, Joan S.; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, 4b, which preferentially targets HDAC1 and HDAC3, ameliorates Huntington's disease (HD)-related phenotypes in different HD model systems. In the current study, we investigated extensive behavioral and biological effects of 4b in N171-82Q transgenic mice and further explored potential molecular mechanisms of 4b action. We found that 4b significantly prevented body weight loss, improved several parameters of motor function and ameliorated Huntingtin (Htt)-elicited cognitive decline in N171-82Q transgenic mice. Pathways analysis of microarray data from the mouse brain revealed gene networks involving post-translational modification, including protein phosphorylation and ubiquitination pathways, associated with 4b drug treatment. Using real-time qPCR analysis, we validated differential regulation of several genes in these pathways by 4b, including Ube2K, Ubqln, Ube2e3, Usp28 and Sumo2, as well as several other related genes. Additionally, 4b elicited increases in the expression of genes encoding components of the inhibitor of kappaB kinase (IKK) complex. IKK activation has been linked to phosphorylation, acetylation and clearance of the Htt protein by the proteasome and the lysosome, and accordingly, we found elevated levels of phosphorylated endogenous wild-type (wt) Htt protein at serine 16 and threonine 3, and increased AcK9/pS13/pS16 immunoreactivity in cortical samples from 4b-treated mice. We further show that HDAC inhibitors prevent the formation of nuclear Htt aggregates in the brains of N171-82Q mice. Our findings suggest that one mechanism of 4b action is associated with the modulation of the ubiquitin–proteasomal and autophagy pathways, which could affect accumulation, stability and/or clearance of important disease-related proteins, such as Htt. PMID:22965876

  9. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  10. Activation Mechanism of Oncogenic Deletion Mutations in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2.

    PubMed

    Foster, Scott A; Whalen, Daniel M; Özen, Ayşegül; Wongchenko, Matthew J; Yin, JianPing; Yen, Ivana; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mayfield, John D; Chmielecki, Juliann; Stephens, Philip J; Albacker, Lee A; Yan, Yibing; Song, Kyung; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Shaw, Andrey S; Manning, Gerard; Skelton, Nicholas J; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Malek, Shiva

    2016-04-11

    Activating mutations in protein kinases drive many cancers. While how recurring point mutations affect kinase activity has been described, the effect of in-frame deletions is not well understood. We show that oncogenic deletions within the β3-αC loop of HER2 and BRAF are analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletions. We identify pancreatic carcinomas with BRAF deletions mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations. Crystal structures of BRAF deletions reveal the truncated loop restrains αC in an active "in" conformation, imparting resistance to inhibitors like vemurafenib that bind the αC "out" conformation. Characterization of loop length explains the prevalence of five amino acid deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 and highlights the importance of this region for kinase activity and inhibitor efficacy. PMID:26996308

  11. Active normal faults and river damming: the importance of tectonics and climate in shaping the landscape of the southern Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, E.; van der Woerd, J.; Liu-Zeng, J.; LeBéon, M.; Leloup, P.-H.; Mahéo, G.; Tapponnier, P.; Thuizat, R.

    2012-04-01

    these data indicate vertical rates on the order of 0.6 to 1.7 mm/yr on the North-Ssouth active faults in the Ama Drime area. The peculiar course of the Arun river meandering within gorges into the footwall of the Kharta fault downstream of the paleolake remnants indicates interaction between river damming and active normal faulting. The high lake stands may be correlated to the penultimate and last interglacial stages corresponding to enhance moisture across the Himalayas. It further suggest dam buildup during cold and dry glacial stages favoring diminished fluvial erosion and enhanced morainic debris accumulation in the gorge during continuous tectonic uplift. The end of the last lake high-stand (100-120ka) is in agreement with the highest and oldest evidence of fluvial terraces downstream of the gorge. These results show the importance of fluvial and tectonic interaction in connecting closed basins to drained valleys and thus in shaping large parts of the Tibetan plateau.

  12. The Relationship between High School Music Activities and the College Student's Musical Independence. (How Musically Important Are All-State Band, Concert Festival, Private Lessons, Marching Contests, Etc.?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobbett, Gordon C.; And Others

    This paper presents a study attempting to identify and evaluate high school activities that impact instrumental student outcome. High school music activities and their impact on student instrumental outcome from a variety of perspectives were examined. There is a subtle difference between musical independence and musical achievement. Musical…

  13. A QSAR study of radical scavenging antioxidant activity of a series of flavonoids using DFT based quantum chemical descriptors--the importance of group frontier electron density.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ananda; Middya, Tapas Ranjan; Jana, Atish Dipnakar

    2012-06-01

    In a pursuit of electronic level understanding of the antioxidant activity of a series of flavonoids, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies have been carried out using density functional theory (DFT) based quantum chemical descriptors. The best QSAR model have been selected for which the computed square correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.937 and cross-validated squared correlation coefficient q(2) =0.916. The QSAR model indicates that hardness (η), group electrophilic frontier electron density (F(E)(A)) and group philicity (ω(B)(+)) of individual molecules are responsible for in vitro biological activity. To the best our knowledge, the group electrophilic frontier electron density (F(E)(A)) has been used for the first time to explain the radical scavenging activity (RSA) of flavonoids. The excellent correlation between the RSA and the above mentioned DFT based descriptors lead us to predict new antioxidants having very good antioxidant activity. PMID:22080306

  14. "We will remember them": a mixed-method study to explore which post-funeral remembrance activities are most significant and important to bereaved people living with loss, and why those particular activities are chosen.

    PubMed

    Vale-Taylor, P

    2009-09-01

    In an increasingly secular age in which society no longer offers a code of behaviour for those who are bereaved as in Victorian times, the majority of people do not seek support from church-based rituals of remembrance. Most hospices provide religious Services of Remembrance and Thanksgiving or non-faith remembrance gatherings for families and friends, and although these are usually well attended, the average number of families represented is usually less than 20% raising the question of whether alternative support should be offered to the remaining majority of families. This study explored which post-funeral remembrance activities are most significant and important to people living with death-related loss, and why those particular activities are chosen. A total of 43 participants took part in a mixed-method study using 2 different data sets: a self-report questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. To add further contextual data to support the study, a third dataset was created when six hospice bereavement counsellors met as a Focus Group. Results indicated that although formal remembrance events are valued, informal rituals created by the bereaved are more important and significant to them. Results could be divided into four different categories: rituals to maintain a 'direct link', or those undertaken 'for' the deceased, rituals that remember the deceased within the community and those viewed as an act of remembrance. The most common reason for choosing a ritual was to keep a bond with the deceased or ensure that the deceased was remembered by others. Remembrance and ritual is personal to each individual and is dynamic, altering from day to day. Remembrance appears to be a journey made up of many small daily rituals, some of which are generic to bereaved people and some of which are highly individualistic. For the majority of people, their informal rituals are far more important than the large planned events that hospices offer because the informal rituals

  15. Vicilin-like peptides from Capsicum baccatum L. seeds are α-amylase inhibitors and exhibit antifungal activity against important yeasts in medical mycology.

    PubMed

    Vieira Bard, Gabriela C; Nascimento, Viviane V; Oliveira, Antônia Elenir A; Rodrigues, Rosana; Da Cunha, Maura; Dias, Germana B; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Carvalho, Andre O; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum baccatum seeds and evaluate their antimicrobial activity and inhibitory effects against α-amylase. Initially, proteins from the flour of C. baccatum seeds were extracted in sodium phosphate buffer, pH 5.4, and precipitated with ammonium sulfate at 90% saturation. The D1 and D2 fractions were subjected to antifungal tests against the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Kluyveromyces marxiannus, and tested against α-amylases from Callosobruchus maculates and human saliva. The D2 fraction presented higher antimicrobial activity and was subjected to further purification and seven new different fractions (H1-H7) were obtained. Peptides in the H4 fraction were sequenced and the N-terminal sequences revealed homology with previously reported storage vicilins from seeds. The H4 fraction exhibited strong antifungal activity and also promoted morphological changes in yeast, including pseudohyphae formation. All fractions, including H4, inhibited mammalian α-amylase activity but only the H4 fraction was able to inhibit C. maculatus α-amylase activity. These results suggest that the fractions isolated from the seeds of C. baccatum can act directly in plant defenses against pathogens and insects. PMID:24817604

  16. The unusual importance of activity coefficients for micelle solutions illustrated by an osmometry study of aqueous sodium decanoate and aqueous sodium decanoate + sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam; MacNeil, Jennifer A; Bowles, Justine; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-12-28

    Freezing-point and vapor-pressure osmometry data are reported for aqueous sodium decanoate (NaD) solutions and aqueous NaD + NaCl solutions. The derived osmotic coefficients are analyzed with a mass-action model based on the micelle formation reaction qNa(+) + nD(-) = (Na(q)D(n))(q-n) and Guggenheim equations for the micelle and ionic activity coefficients. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the NaD and NaCl components and the equilibrium constant for micelle formation are evaluated. Illustrating the remarkable but not widely appreciated nonideal behavior of ionic surfactant solutions, the micelle activity coefficient drops to astonishingly low values, below 10(-7) (relative to unity for ideal solutions). The activity coefficients of the Na(+) and D(-) ions, raised to large powers of q and n, reduce calculated extents of micelle formation by up to 15 orders of magnitude. Activity coefficients, frequently omitted from the Gibbs equation, are found to increase the calculated surface excess concentration of NaD by up to an order of magnitude. Inflection points in the extent of micelle formation, used to calculate critical micelle concentration (cmc) lowering caused by added salt, provide unexpected thermodynamic evidence for the elusive second cmc. PMID:22037556

  17. Quantification of pulmonary thallium-201 activity after upright exercise in normal persons: importance of peak heart rate and propranolol usage in defining normal values

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1984-06-01

    Fifty-nine normal patients (34 angiographically normal and 25 clinically normal by Bayesian analysis) underwent thallium-201 imaging after maximal upright exercise. Lung activity was quantitated relative to myocardial activity and a lung/myocardial activity ratio was determined for each patient. Stepwise regression analysis was then used to examine the influence of patient clinical characteristics and exercise variables on the lung/myocardium ratio. Peak heart rate during exercise and propranolol usage both showed significant negative regression coefficients (p less than 0.001). No other patient data showed a significant relation. Using the regression equation and the estimated variance, a 95% confidence level upper limit of normal could be determined for a give peak heart rate and propranolol status. Sixty-one other patients were studied to validate the predicted upper limits of normal based on this model. None of the 27 patients without coronary artery disease had an elevated lung/myocardial ratio, compared with 1 of 8 with 1-vessel disease (difference not significant), 6 of 14 with 2-vessel disease (p less than 0.005), and 6 of 12 with 3-vessel disease (p less than 0.0001). Thus, lung activity on upright exercise thallium-201 studies can be quantitated relative to myocardial activity, and is inversely related to peak heart rate and propranolol use. Use of a regression analysis allows determination of a 95% confidence upper limit of normal to be anticipated in an individual patient.

  18. Image-Based Analysis to Predict the Activity of Tariquidar Analogs as P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors: The Importance of External Validation.

    PubMed

    Shayanfar, Shadi; Shayanfar, Ali; Ghandadi, Morteza

    2016-02-01

    Permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) is involved in the pathology of various diseases including cancer and epilepsy, mainly through the translocation of some medicines across the cell membrane. Here, we employed image-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the P-gp inhibitory activity of some Tariquidar derivatives. The structures of 65 Tariquidar derivatives and their P-gp inhibition activities were collected from the literature. For each compound, the pixels of bidimensional images and their principal components (PCs) were calculated using MATLAB software. Various statistical methods including principal component regression, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines were employed to investigate the correlation between the PCs and the activity of the compounds. The predictability of the models was investigated using external validation and applicability domain analysis. An artificial neural network-based model demonstrated the best prediction results for the test set. Moreover, external validation analysis of the developed models supports the idea that R(2) cannot assure the validity of QSAR models and another criterion, i.e., the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) parameter, should be involved to evaluate the validity of the QSAR models. The results of this study indicate that image analysis could be as suitable as descriptors calculated by commercial software to predict the activity of drug-like molecules. PMID:26708190

  19. In vitro antifungal activity of ZJ-522, a new triazole restructured from fluconazole and butenafine, against clinically important fungi in comparison with fluconazole and butenafine.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping-Hui; Cao, Yong-Bing; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jun-Dong; Zhang, Wan-Nian; Wang, Yan; Gu, Jun; Cao, Ying-Ying; Li, Ruo-Yu; Jia, Xin-Ming; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2005-08-01

    The antifungal activity of ZJ-522, a new triazole antifungal agent restructured from fluconazole and butenafine, was compared to that of fluconazole and butenafine against 43 strains of fungi representing 13 fungal species. MICs were determined by using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)-recommended broth microdilution method for yeasts, which was modified for filamentous fungi. ZJ-522 was about 50-fold and 2 to 16-fold more potent than fluconazole against yeasts and filamentous fungi respectively, but it was less active than butenafine against filamentous fungi, although butenafine was inactive against most yeasts. Thus, the fashion of ZJ-522 antifungal activity more similar to that of fluconazole than that of butenafine indicates that ZJ-522 should be an inhibitor of lanosterol 14alpha-demethylase but not of squalene epoxidase, and should be a candidate for clinical development. PMID:16079485

  20. Controlling the corrosion and cathodic activation of magnesium via microalloying additions of Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. L.; Hurley, M. F.; Kvryan, A.; Williams, G.; Scully, J. R.; Birbilis, N.

    2016-06-01

    The evolution of corrosion morphology and kinetics for magnesium (Mg) have been demonstrated to be influenced by cathodic activation, which implies that the rate of the cathodic partial reaction is enhanced as a result of anodic dissolution. This phenomenon was recently demonstrated to be moderated by the use of arsenic (As) alloying as a poison for the cathodic reaction, leading to significantly improved corrosion resistance. The pursuit of alternatives to toxic As is important as a means to imparting a technologically safe and effective corrosion control method for Mg (and its alloys). In this work, Mg was microalloyed with germanium (Ge), with the aim of improving corrosion resistance by retarding cathodic activation. Based on a combined analysis herein, we report that Ge is potent in supressing the cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction (reduction of water) upon Mg, improving corrosion resistance. With the addition of Ge, cathodic activation of Mg subject to cyclic polarisation was also hindered, with beneficial implications for future Mg electrodes.

  1. Learning Outcomes Assessment Activities, 1989-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathay, Geoffrey A.

    In 1987, Seattle Central Community College (SCCC), in Washington, began a 5-year project to gather evidence on SCCC's success in imparting knowledge, skills, and values to its students. This report represents a compilation of major assessment activities and provides brief descriptions of 10 studies on outcomes grouped by specific dimensions of…

  2. How important is importance for prospective memory? A review

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Stefan; Meier, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Forgetting to carry out an intention as planned can have serious consequences in everyday life. People sometimes even forget intentions that they consider as very important. Here, we review the literature on the impact of importance on prospective memory performance. We highlight different methods used to manipulate the importance of a prospective memory task such as providing rewards, importance relative to other ongoing activities, absolute importance, and providing social motives. Moreover, we address the relationship between importance and other factors known to affect prospective memory and ongoing task performance such as type of prospective memory task (time-, event-, or activity-based), cognitive loads, and processing overlaps. Finally, we provide a connection to motivation, we summarize the effects of task importance and we identify important venues for future research. PMID:25018743

  3. Activation and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 by phosphorylation; a molecular dynamics study reveals the functional importance of the glycine-rich loop

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Iveta; Otyepka, Michal; Kříž, Zdeněk; Koča, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of differently active complexes of human cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (inactive CDK2/ATP, semiactive CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, fully active pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, inhibited pT14-; pY15-; and pT14,pY15,pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP) were compared. The MD simulations results of CDK2 inhibition by phosphorylation at T14 and/or Y15 sites provide insight into the structural aspects of CDK2 deactivation. The inhibitory sites are localized in the glycine-rich loop (G-loop) positioned opposite the activation T-loop. Phosphorylation of T14 and both inhibitory sites T14 and Y15 together causes ATP misalignment for phosphorylation and G-loop conformational change. This conformational change leads to the opening of the CDK2 substrate binding box. The phosphorylated Y15 residue negatively affects substrate binding or its correct alignment for ATP terminal phospho-group transfer to the CDK2 substrate. The MD simulations of the CDK2 activation process provide results in agreement with previous X-ray data. PMID:15133164

  4. Ionic interactions near the loop L4 are important for maintaining the active-site environment and the dimer stability of (pro)caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    We have examined the role of a salt bridge between Lys242 and Glu246 in loop L4 of procaspase 3 and of mature caspase 3, and we show that the interactions are required for stabilizing the active site. Replacing either of the residues with an alanine residue results in a complete loss of procaspase 3 activity. Although both mutants are active in the context of the mature caspase 3, the mutations result in an increase in Km and a decrease in kcat when compared with the wild-type caspase 3. In addition, the mutations result in an increase in the pKa value associated with a change in kcat with pH, but does not affect the transition observed for Km versus pH. The mutations also affect the accessibility of the active-site solvent as measured by tryptophan fluorescence emission in the presence of quenching agents and as a function of pH. We show that, as the pH is lowered, the (pro)caspase dissociates, and the mutations increase the pH-dependent instability of the dimer. Overall, the results suggest that the contacts lost in the procaspase as a result of replacing Lys242 and Glu246 are compensated partially in the mature caspase as a result of new contacts that are known to form on zymogen processing. PMID:15312047

  5. Validity, Responsiveness, Minimal Detectable Change, and Minimal Clinically Important Change of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Keh-chung; Chen, Hui-fang; Chen, Chia-ling; Wang, Tien-ni; Wu, Ching-yi; Hsieh, Yu-wei; Wu, Li-ling

    2012-01-01

    This study examined criterion-related validity and clinimetric properties of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL) in children with cerebral palsy. Study participants were 41 children (age range: 28-113 months) and their parents. Criterion-related validity was evaluated by the associations between the PMAL and criterion measures at baseline and…

  6. Isolation of CA1 nuclear enriched fractions from hippocampal slices to study activity-dependent nuclear import of synapto-nuclear messenger proteins.

    PubMed

    Yuanxiang, Pingan; Bera, Sujoy; Karpova, Anna; Kreutz, Michael R; Mikhaylova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Studying activity dependent protein expression, subcellular translocation, or phosphorylation is essential to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) induced in acute hippocampal slices are widely accepted as cellular models of learning and memory. There are numerous studies that use live cell imaging or immunohistochemistry approaches to visualize activity dependent protein dynamics. However these methods rely on the suitability of antibodies for immunocytochemistry or overexpression of fluorescence-tagged proteins in single neurons. Immunoblotting of proteins is an alternative method providing independent confirmation of the findings. The first limiting factor in preparation of subcellular fractions from individual tetanized hippocampal slices is the low amount of material. Second, the handling procedure is crucial because even very short and minor manipulations of living slices might induce activation of certain signaling cascades. Here we describe an optimized workflow in order to obtain sufficient quantity of nuclear enriched fraction of sufficient purity from the CA1 region of acute hippocampal slices from rat brain. As a representative example we show that the ERK1/2 phosphorylated form of the synapto-nuclear protein messenger Jacob actively translocates to the nucleus upon induction of LTP and can be detected in a nuclear enriched fraction from CA1 neurons. PMID:25145907

  7. Diet and gender are important factors modulating low frequency EEG activity during processing of language sounds in 3 month old infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about how early postnatal diet affects brain processes related to cognitive function in healthy infants. To address this question we examined EEG activity recorded from 3 month old infants [breastfed (BF: n = 104, 55 males), milk-based formula fed (MF: n = 114, 57 males) or soy for...

  8. Hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol: Importance of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces in the activation of CO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rodriguez, José A.; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the high thermochemical stability of CO2 makes it very difficult to achieve the catalytic conversion of the molecule into alcohols or other hydrocarbon compounds, which can be used as fuels or the starting point for the generation of fine chemicals. Pure metals and bimetallic systems used for the CO2 → CH3OH conversion usually bind CO2 too weakly and, thus, show low catalytic activity. Here, we discuss a series of recent studies that illustrate the advantages of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces when aiming at the conversion of CO2 into methanol. CeOx/Cu(111), Cu/CeOx/TiO2(110), and Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) exhibit an activity formore » the CO2 → CH3OH conversion that is 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than that of a benchmark Cu(111) catalyst. In the Cu–ceria and Au–ceria interfaces, the multifunctional combination of metal and oxide centers leads to complementary chemical properties that open active reaction pathways for methanol synthesis. Efficient catalysts are also generated after depositing Cu and Au on TiC(001). In these cases, strong metal–support interactions modify the electronic properties of the admetals and make them active for the binding of CO2 and its subsequent transformation into CH3OH at the metal–carbide interfaces.« less

  9. The RNA cleavage activity of RNA polymerase III is mediated by an essential TFIIS-like subunit and is important for transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Chédin, Stéphane; Riva, Michel; Schultz, Patrick; Sentenac, André; Carles, Christophe

    1998-01-01

    Budding yeast RNA polymerase III (Pol III) contains a small, essential subunit, named C11, that is conserved in humans and shows a strong homology to TFIIS. A mutant Pol III, heterocomplemented with Schizosaccharomyces pombe C11, was affected in transcription termination in vivo. A purified form of the enzyme (Pol III Δ), deprived of C11 subunit, initiated properly but ignored pause sites and was defective in termination. Remarkably, Pol III Δ lacked the intrinsic RNA cleavage activity of complete Pol III. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that Pol III RNA cleavage activity is mediated by C11. Mutagenesis in C11 of two conserved residues, which are critical for the TFIIS-dependent cleavage activity of Pol II, is lethal. Immunoelectron microscopy data suggested that C11 is localized on the mobile thumb-like stalk of the polymerase. We propose that C11 allows the enzyme to switch between an RNA elongation and RNA cleavage mode and that the essential role of the Pol III RNA cleavage activity is to remove the kinetic barriers to the termination process. The integration of TFIIS function into a specific Pol III subunit may stem from the opposite requirements of Pol III and Pol II in terms of transcript length and termination efficiency. PMID:9869639

  10. Whole structure-activity relationships of the fat-accumulation inhibitor (-)-ternatin: recognition of the importance of each amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Kenichiro; Iwase, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Ryoka; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke

    2008-10-01

    A series of Ala and Aoc analogues of (-)-ternatin were prepared, and their bioactivities were assessed by a fat-accumulation inhibition assay using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which led to the discovery of key structure-activity relationships (SAR). PMID:18798610

  11. Relative importances of outer membrane permeability and group 1 beta-lactamase as determinants of meropenem and imipenem activities against Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed Central

    Cornaglia, G; Russell, K; Satta, G; Fontana, R

    1995-01-01

    The roles of outer membrane permeability and Bush group 1 beta-lactamase activity in determining Enterobacter cloacae susceptibility to either meropenem or imipenem were investigated. A beta-lactamase-deficient strain was obtained by mutagenesis from a clinical isolate of E. cloacae, and a porin-deficient strain was selected from this mutant with cefoxitin. Both strains were transformed with the plasmid pAA20R, which contained the gene coding for the carbapenem-hydrolyzing CphA beta-lactamase, and the carbapenem permeability coefficients were measured by the Zimmermann and Rosselet technique (W. Zimmermann and A. Rosselet, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 12:368-372, 1977). The permeability coefficient of meropenem was roughly half that of imipenem in the normally permeable strain and almost seven times lower than that of imipenem in the porin-deficient strain. In the porin-deficient strain, the virtual absence of porins caused the MICs of meropenem to increase from 8 to 16 times, while it did not affect the MICs of imipenem. Conversely, the beta-lactamase affected imipenem but not meropenem activity: meropenem showed a similar activity in the parent strain and in the beta-lactamase-deficient mutant with both a low- and high-density inoculum, whereas imipenem was 16 times less active against the parent strain when the high-density inoculum was used. It is concluded that outer membrane permeability and stability to group 1 beta-lactamase have different impacts on the activities of meropenem and imipenem against E. cloacae. PMID:7726496

  12. Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Monitored In Vivo by Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Its Importance for pH Regulation in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Sladen, Helen; Kettunen, Mikko I; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Wright, Alan; Gill, Andrew B; McGuire, Sarah; Booth, Thomas C; Boren, Joan; McIntyre, Alan; Miller, Jodi L; Lee, Shen-Han; Honess, Davina; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Howat, William J; Harris, Adrian L; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase buffers tissue pH by catalyzing the rapid interconversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)). We assessed the functional activity of CAIX in two colorectal tumor models, expressing different levels of the enzyme, by measuring the rate of exchange of hyperpolarized (13)C label between bicarbonate (H(13)CO3(-)) and carbon dioxide ((13)CO2), following injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO3(-), using (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) magnetization transfer measurements. (31)P-MRS measurements of the chemical shift of the pH probe, 3-aminopropylphosphonate, and (13)C-MRS measurements of the H(13)CO3(-)/(13)CO2 peak intensity ratio showed that CAIX overexpression lowered extracellular pH in these tumors. However, the (13)C measurements overestimated pH due to incomplete equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between the H(13)CO3(-) and (13)CO2 pools. Paradoxically, tumors overexpressing CAIX showed lower enzyme activity using magnetization transfer measurements, which can be explained by the more acidic extracellular pH in these tumors and the decreased activity of the enzyme at low pH. This explanation was confirmed by administration of bicarbonate in the drinking water, which elevated tumor extracellular pH and restored enzyme activity to control levels. These results suggest that CAIX expression is increased in hypoxia to compensate for the decrease in its activity produced by a low extracellular pH and supports the hypothesis that a major function of CAIX is to lower the extracellular pH. PMID:26249175

  13. Colonization strategies of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1: activation of soil-specific genes important for diverse and specific environments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common inhabitant of soil and the rhizosphere environment. In addition to potential applications in biocontrol and bioremediation, P. fluorescens is of interest as a model for studying bacterial survival and fitness in soil. A previous study using in vivo expression technology (IVET) identified 22 genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1 which are up-regulated during growth in Massachusetts loam soil, a subset of which are important for fitness in soil. Despite this and other information on adaptation to soil, downstream applications such as biocontrol or bioremediation in diverse soils remain underdeveloped. We undertook an IVET screen to identify Pf0-1 genes induced during growth in arid Nevada desert soil, to expand our understanding of growth in soil environments, and examine whether Pf0-1 uses general or soil type-specific mechanisms for success in soil environments. Results Twenty six genes were identified. Consistent with previous studies, these genes cluster in metabolism, information storage/processing, regulation, and ‘hypothetical’, but there was no overlap with Pf0-1 genes induced during growth in loam soil. Mutation of both a putative glutamine synthetase gene (Pfl01_2143) and a gene predicted to specify a component of a type VI secretion system (Pfl01_5595) resulted in a decline in arid soil persistence. When examined in sterile loam soil, mutation of Pfl01_5595 had no discernible impact. In contrast, the Pfl01_2143 mutant was not impaired in persistence in sterile soil, but showed a significant reduction in competitive fitness. Conclusions These data support the conclusion that numerous genes are specifically important for survival and fitness in natural environments, and will only be identified using in vivo approaches. Furthermore, we suggest that a subset of soil-induced genes is generally important in different soils, while others may contribute to success in specific types of soil. The importance of glutamine

  14. Hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol: Importance of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces in the activation of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, José A.; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; White, Michael G.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the high thermochemical stability of CO2 makes it very difficult to achieve the catalytic conversion of the molecule into alcohols or other hydrocarbon compounds, which can be used as fuels or the starting point for the generation of fine chemicals. Pure metals and bimetallic systems used for the CO2 → CH3OH conversion usually bind CO2 too weakly and, thus, show low catalytic activity. Here, we discuss a series of recent studies that illustrate the advantages of metal–oxide and metal–carbide interfaces when aiming at the conversion of CO2 into methanol. CeOx/Cu(111), Cu/CeOx/TiO2(110), and Au/CeOx/TiO2(110) exhibit an activity for the CO2 → CH3OH conversion that is 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than that of a benchmark Cu(111) catalyst. In the Cu–ceria and Au–ceria interfaces, the multifunctional combination of metal and oxide centers leads to complementary chemical properties that open active reaction pathways for methanol synthesis. Efficient catalysts are also generated after depositing Cu and Au on TiC(001). In these cases, strong metal–support interactions modify the electronic properties of the admetals and make them active for the binding of CO2 and its subsequent transformation into CH3OH at the metal–carbide interfaces.

  15. Study of the modulatory activity of BZ (omega) receptor ligands on defensive behaviors in mice: evaluation of the importance of intrinsic efficacy and receptor subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Griebel, G; Perrault, G; Sanger, D J

    1999-01-01

    1. This study examined the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepine (BZ (omega)) receptor ligands may be associated with actions at a defined receptor subtype and/or their level of intrinsic activity using the mouse defense test battery. 2. This test has been designed to assess defensive reactions of Swiss mice confronted with a natural threat (a rat) and situations associated with this threat. Primary measures taken before, during and after rat confrontation were escape attempts, flight, risk assessment and defensive threat and attack. 3. The drugs used were the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonist diazepam, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor partial agonist bretazenil and the beta-carboline abecarnil which acts as a full agonist on GABAA receptors containing the alpha 1- and the alpha 3-subunits and as a partial agonist at receptors containing the alpha 2- and the alpha 5-subunits. The drugs were given alone and diazepam was co-administered with either bretazenil or abecarnil. 4. When administered alone, diazepam attenuated several defensive responses including risk assessment activities, defensive threat/attack reactions upon forced contact with the rat and escape attempts following the removal of the rat from the apparatus. Unlike diazepam, bretazenil was devoid of significant activity on defense and abecarnil displayed depressant activity. 5. Bretazenil blocked all behavioral effects of diazepam on defense behaviors. The co-administration of diazepam and abecarnil produced a behavioral profile similar to that observed when diazepam was administered alone, indicating that abecarnil did not influence the effects of diazepam on defense. By contrast, diazepam completely antagonized the sedative effects of abecarnil. 6. These findings indicate that only BZ (omega) ligands with high intrinsic efficacy at all BZ (omega) receptor subtypes display clear and specific effects on defensive behaviors in mice, and suggest that GABAA receptors

  16. West Nile Virus Activity in a Winter Roost of American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos): Is Bird-To-Bird Transmission Important in Persistence and Amplification?

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, M. G.; Reisen, W. K.; Wheeler, S. S.; Townsend, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Since its emergence in North America, West Nile virus (WNV) has had a large impact on equines, humans, and wild bird communities, yet gaps remain in our understanding of how the virus persists at temperate latitudes when winter temperatures preclude virus replication and host-seeking activity by mosquito vectors. Bird-to-bird transmission at large communal American Crow roosts could provide one mechanism for WNV persistence. Herein, we describe seasonal patterns of crow and Culex mosquito abundance, WNV infection rates, and the prevalence of WNV-positive fecal samples at a winter crow roost to test the hypothesis that bird-to-bird transmission allows WNV to persist at winter crow roosts. Samples were collected from large winter crow roosts in the Sacramento Valley of California from January 2013 until August 2014, encompassing two overwintering roost periods. West Nile virus RNA was detected in local crow carcasses in both summer [13/18 (72% WNV positive)] and winter [18/44 (41% WNV positive)] 2013–2014. Winter infections were unlikely to have arisen by recent bites from infected mosquitoes because Culex host-seeking activity was very low in winter and all Culex mosquitoes collected during winter months tested negative for WNV. Opportunities existed for fecal-oral transfer at the overwintering roost: most carcasses that tested positive for WNV had detectable viral RNA in both kidney and cloacal swabs, suggesting that infected crows were shedding virus in their feces, and >50% of crows at the roost were stained with feces by mid-winter. Moreover, 2.3% of fecal samples collected in late summer, when mosquitoes were active, tested positive for WNV RNA. Nevertheless, none of the 1,119 feces collected from three roosts over two winters contained detectable WNV RNA. This study provided evidence of WNV infection in overwintering American crows without mosquito vector activity, but did not elucidate a mechanism of WNV transmission during winter. PMID:26335475

  17. Diet effects on glucose absorption in the small intestine of neonatal calves: importance of intestinal mucosal growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff-Wagner, Julia; Zitnan, Rudolf; Schönhusen, Ulrike; Pfannkuche, Helga; Hudakova, Monika; Metges, Cornelia C; Hammon, Harald M

    2014-10-01

    Colostrum (C) feeding in neonatal calves improves glucose status and stimulates intestinal absorptive capacity, leading to greater glucose absorption when compared with milk-based formula feeding. In this study, diet effects on gut growth, lactase activity, and glucose transporters were investigated in several gut segments of the small intestine. Fourteen male German Holstein calves received either C of milkings 1, 3, and 5 (d 1, 2, and 3 in milk) or respective formulas (F) twice daily from d 1 to d 3 after birth. Nutrient content, and especially lactose content, of C and respective F were the same. On d 4, calves were fed C of milking 5 or respective F and calves were slaughtered 2h after feeding. Tissue samples from duodenum and proximal, mid-, and distal jejunum were taken to measure villus size and crypt depth, mucosa and brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were taken to determine protein content, and mRNA expression and activity of lactase and mRNA expression of sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) and facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) were determined from mucosal tissue. Additionally, protein expression of SGLT1 in BBMV and GLUT2 in crude mucosal membranes and BBMV were determined, as well as immunochemically localized GLUT2 in the intestinal mucosa. Villus circumference, area, and height were greater, whereas crypt depth was smaller in C than in F. Lactase activity tended to be greater in C than in F. Protein expression of SGLT1 was greater in F than in C. Parameters of villus size, lactase activity, SGLT1 protein expression, as well as apical and basolateral GLUT2 localization in the enterocytes differed among gut segments. In conclusion, C feeding, when compared with F feeding, enhances glucose absorption in neonatal calves primarily by stimulating mucosal growth and increasing absorptive capacity in the small intestine, but not by stimulating abundance of intestinal glucose transporters. PMID:25108868

  18. Cool-weather activity of the forensically important hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on carrion in Upstate South Carolina, United States.

    PubMed

    Cammack, Jonathan A; Nelder, Mark P

    2010-02-25

    The hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) has expanded its range in the United States since its introduction into Texas (ca. 1980) and has been collected in 15 states. We investigated the bionomics of immature and adult C. rufifacies collected from carcasses of a raccoon Procyon lotor (Linnaeus) and white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman in Upstate South Carolina during November 2007, and used these insects to estimate the minimum period of insect activity. Puparia of C. rufifacies were collected from deer carrion; 28% were parasitized by Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). The mean daily ambient temperature during this study was 11.4+/-1.02 degrees C, representing the lowest recorded mean temperature for adult activity of C. rufifacies; adults of C. rufifacies were observed flying among the carcasses at 9.0 degrees C. Although C. rufifacies is considered a warm-weather blow fly, researchers should be aware of its activity at suboptimal conditions, behavior that might aid its expansion into more northern areas. PMID:20042303

  19. Modes of Action of the New Arylguanidine Abafungin beyond Interference with Ergosterol Biosynthesis and in vitro Activity against Medically Important Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, C.; Schaller, M.; Niewerth, M.; Nocker, K.; Baasner, B.; Berg, D.; Tiemann, R.; Tietjen, K.; Fugmann, B.; Lang-Fugmann, S.; Korting, H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background In contrast to the increasing numbers of agents for the treatment of invasive fungal infections, discoveries of new antifungal agents with therapeutic value in dermatomycoses are reported only rarely. Methods Abafungin (chemical abstracts service registry No. 129639-79/8) is the first member of a novel class of synthetic antifungal compounds, the arylguanidines. It was first synthesized at Bayer AG, Leverkusen, Germany, and its antifungal action was discovered during the screening of H2-receptor antagonists based on the structure of famotidine. To obtain insight into its mode of action and antifungal activity, various tests were carried out with different fungal pathogensin vitro. Results Abafungin was found to have potent antifungal activity. Furthermore, mode-of-action studies suggested that abafungin exerts its antifungal activity regardless of whether the pathogens are growing or in a resting state. One target of abafungin was found to be the inhibition of transmethylation at the C-24 position of the sterol side chain, catalyzed by the enzyme sterol-C-24-methyltransferase. A second action of abafungin seems to be a direct effect on the fungal cell membrane. Conclusion The observed characteristics of abafungin indicate that abafungin might be a promising antifungal agent defining a new class of antimycotics. PMID:18587237

  20. ATXN7L3 and ENY2 Coordinate Activity of Multiple H2B Deubiquitinases Important for Cellular Proliferation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, Boyko S; Mohan, Ryan D; Lan, Xianjiang; Kuang, Xianghong; Lu, Yue; Lin, Kevin; McIvor, Elizabeth; Li, Wenqian; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Byrum, Stephanie D; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Koutelou, Evangelia; Wang, Li; Tang, Dean G; Tackett, Alan J; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2016-05-19

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) is centrally involved in gene regulation. The deubiquitination module (DUBm) of the SAGA complex is a major regulator of global H2Bub1 levels, and components of this DUBm are linked to both neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Unexpectedly, we find that ablation of USP22, the enzymatic center of the DUBm, leads to a reduction, rather than an increase, in global H2bub1 levels. In contrast, depletion of non-enzymatic components, ATXN7L3 or ENY2, results in increased H2Bub1. These observations led us to discover two H2Bub1 DUBs, USP27X and USP51, which function independently of SAGA and compete with USP22 for ATXN7L3 and ENY2 for activity. Like USP22, USP51 and USP27X are required for normal cell proliferation, and their depletion suppresses tumor growth. Our results reveal that ATXN7L3 and ENY2 orchestrate activities of multiple deubiquitinating enzymes and that imbalances in these activities likely potentiate human diseases including cancer. PMID:27132940

  1. Extracellular enzyme activity and microbial diversity measured on seafloor exposed basalts from Loihi seamount indicate the importance of basalts to global biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Sylvan, Jason B; Edwards, Katrina J

    2014-08-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1); the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)(-1) h(-1). The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 μM, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 μM. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  2. Multiple Mechanisms Contribute to the Cell Growth Defects Imparted by Human Telomerase Insertion in Fingers Domain Mutations Associated with Premature Aging Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tsz Wai; MacNeil, Deanna Elise; Autexier, Chantal

    2016-04-15

    Normal human stem cells rely on low levels of active telomerase to sustain their high replicative requirements. Deficiency in telomere maintenance mechanisms leads to the development of premature aging diseases, such as dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia. Mutations in the unique "insertion in fingers domain" (IFD) in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase catalytic subunit (hTERT) have previously been identified and shown to be associated with dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms impacted by these IFD mutations. We performed comparative functional analyses of disease-associated IFD variants at the molecular and cellular levels. We report that hTERT-P721R- and hTERT-R811C-expressing cells exhibited growth defects likely due to impaired TPP1-mediated recruitment of these variant enzymes to telomeres. We showed that activity and processivity of hTERT-T726M failed to be stimulated by TPP1-POT1 overexpression and that dGTP usage by this variant was less efficient compared with the wild-type enzyme. hTERT-P785L-expressing cells did not show growth defects, and this variant likely confers cell survival through increased DNA synthesis and robust activity stimulation by TPP1-POT1. Altogether, our data suggest that multiple mechanisms contribute to cell growth defects conferred by the IFD variants. PMID:26887940

  3. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations. PMID:16411898

  4. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33→Ala33, Asp60→Ala60, Ser62→Ala62, and Thr220→Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (ΔΔGT). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the Km values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations. PMID:16411898

  5. Tsetse GmmSRPN10 Has Anti-complement Activity and Is Important for Successful Establishment of Trypanosome Infections in the Fly Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Haines, Lee R.; Southern, Daniel M.; Lehane, Michael J.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade in mammalian blood can damage the alimentary tract of haematophagous arthropods. As such, these animals have evolved their own repertoire of complement-inactivating factors, which are inadvertently exploited by blood-borne pathogens to escape complement lysis. Unlike the bloodstream stages, the procyclic (insect) stage of Trypanosoma brucei is highly susceptible to complement killing, which is puzzling considering that a tsetse takes a bloodmeal every 2–4 days. In this study, we identified four tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) serine protease inhibitors (serpins) from a midgut expressed sequence tag (EST) library (GmmSRPN3, GmmSRPN5, GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10) and investigated their role in modulating the establishment of a T. brucei infection in the midgut. Although not having evolved in a common blood-feeding ancestor, all four serpins have an active site sharing remarkable homology with the human complement C1-inhibitor serpin, SerpinG1. RNAi knockdown of individual GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10 genes resulted in a significant decreased rate of infection by procyclic form T. brucei. Furthermore, recombinant GmmSRPN10 was both able to inhibit the activity of human complement-cascade serine proteases, C1s and Factor D, and to protect the in vitro killing of procyclic trypanosomes when incubated with complement-activated human serum. Thus, the secretion of serpins, which may be part of a bloodmeal complement inactivation system in tsetse, is used by procyclic trypanosomes to evade an influx of fresh trypanolytic complement with each bloodmeal. This highlights another facet of the complicated relationship between T. brucei and its tsetse vector, where the parasite takes advantage of tsetse physiology to further its chances of propagation and transmission. PMID:25569180

  6. Tsetse GmmSRPN10 has anti-complement activity and is important for successful establishment of trypanosome infections in the fly midgut.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Haines, Lee R; Southern, Daniel M; Lehane, Michael J; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The complement cascade in mammalian blood can damage the alimentary tract of haematophagous arthropods. As such, these animals have evolved their own repertoire of complement-inactivating factors, which are inadvertently exploited by blood-borne pathogens to escape complement lysis. Unlike the bloodstream stages, the procyclic (insect) stage of Trypanosoma brucei is highly susceptible to complement killing, which is puzzling considering that a tsetse takes a bloodmeal every 2-4 days. In this study, we identified four tsetse (Glossina morsitans morsitans) serine protease inhibitors (serpins) from a midgut expressed sequence tag (EST) library (GmmSRPN3, GmmSRPN5, GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10) and investigated their role in modulating the establishment of a T. brucei infection in the midgut. Although not having evolved in a common blood-feeding ancestor, all four serpins have an active site sharing remarkable homology with the human complement C1-inhibitor serpin, SerpinG1. RNAi knockdown of individual GmmSRPN9 and GmmSRPN10 genes resulted in a significant decreased rate of infection by procyclic form T. brucei. Furthermore, recombinant GmmSRPN10 was both able to inhibit the activity of human complement-cascade serine proteases, C1s and Factor D, and to protect the in vitro killing of procyclic trypanosomes when incubated with complement-activated human serum. Thus, the secretion of serpins, which may be part of a bloodmeal complement inactivation system in tsetse, is used by procyclic trypanosomes to evade an influx of fresh trypanolytic complement with each bloodmeal. This highlights another facet of the complicated relationship between T. brucei and its tsetse vector, where the parasite takes advantage of tsetse physiology to further its chances of propagation and transmission. PMID:25569180

  7. Extracellular Enzyme Activity and Microbial Diversity Measured on Seafloor Exposed Basalts from Loihi Seamount Indicate the Importance of Basalts to Global Biogeochemical Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Sylvan, Jason B.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor basalts are widely distributed and host diverse prokaryotic communities, but no data exist concerning the metabolic rates of the resident microbial communities. We present here potential extracellular enzyme activities of leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) measured on basalt samples from different locations on Loihi Seamount, HI, coupled with analysis of prokaryotic biomass and pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The community maximum potential enzyme activity (Vmax) of LAP ranged from 0.47 to 0.90 nmol (g rock)−1 h−1; the Vmax for AP was 28 to 60 nmol (g rock)−1 h−1. The Km of LAP ranged from 26 to 33 μM, while the Km for AP was 2 to 7 μM. Bacterial communities on Loihi basalts were comprised primarily of Alpha-, Delta-, andGammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Planctomycetes. The putative ability to produce LAP is evenly distributed across the most commonly detected bacterial orders, but the ability to produce AP is likely dominated by bacteria in the orders Xanthomonadales, Flavobacteriales, and Planctomycetales. The enzyme activities on Loihi basalts were compared to those of other marine environments that have been studied and were found to be similar in magnitude to those from continental shelf sediments and orders of magnitude higher than any measured in the water column, demonstrating that the potential for exposed basalts to transform organic matter is substantial. We propose that microbial communities on basaltic rock play a significant, quantifiable role in benthic biogeochemical processes. PMID:24907315

  8. Mechanisms Underlying the Delayed Activation of the Cap1 Transcription Factor in Candida albicans following Combinatorial Oxidative and Cationic Stress Important for Phagocytic Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Iaroslava; Patterson, Miranda J.; Znaidi, Sadri; Kaloriti, Despoina; da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen M.; d’Enfert, Christophe; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Following phagocytosis, microbes are exposed to an array of antimicrobial weapons that include reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cationic fluxes. This is significant as combinations of oxidative and cationic stresses are much more potent than the corresponding single stresses, triggering the synergistic killing of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by “stress pathway interference.” Previously we demonstrated that combinatorial oxidative plus cationic stress triggers a dramatic increase in intracellular ROS levels compared to oxidative stress alone. Here we show that activation of Cap1, the major regulator of antioxidant gene expression in C. albicans, is significantly delayed in response to combinatorial stress treatments and to high levels of H2O2. Cap1 is normally oxidized in response to H2O2; this masks the nuclear export sequence, resulting in the rapid nuclear accumulation of Cap1 and the induction of Cap1-dependent genes. Here we demonstrate that following exposure of cells to combinatorial stress or to high levels of H2O2, Cap1 becomes trapped in a partially oxidized form, Cap1OX-1. Notably, Cap1-dependent gene expression is not induced when Cap1 is in this partially oxidized form. However, while Cap1OX-1 readily accumulates in the nucleus and binds to target genes following high-H2O2 stress, the nuclear accumulation of Cap1OX-1 following combinatorial H2O2 and NaCl stress is delayed due to a cationic stress-enhanced interaction with the Crm1 nuclear export factor. These findings define novel mechanisms that delay activation of the Cap1 transcription factor, thus preventing the rapid activation of the stress responses vital for the survival of C. albicans within the host. PMID:27025253

  9. The importance of rhamnolipid-biosurfactant-induced changes in bacterial membrane lipids of Bacillus subtilis for the antimicrobial activity of thiosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Sotirova, Anna; Avramova, Tatyana; Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Lazarkevich, Irina; Lubenets, Vera; Karpenko, Elena; Galabova, Danka

    2012-11-01

    The antimicrobial properties of methyl (MTS) and ethyl (ETS) esters of thiosulfonic acid alone and in combination with rhamnolipid-biosurfactant (RL) have been characterized for their ability to disrupt the normal physiological functions of living pathogens. Bactericidal and fungicidal activities of MTS and ETS and their combination with rhamnolipid were demonstrated on strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Rhizopus ngtricans. It was found that the combination of rhamnolipid and thiosulfonic esters has a synergistic effect leading to decreasing of bactericidal and fungicidal concentrations of MTS and ETS. More extensively was studied the effect of rhamnolipid on the lipid composition of B. subtilis bacterial membrane. To our knowledge, in this article is reported for the first time a remarkable increase of negatively charged phospholipid cardiolipin in the presence of rhamnolipid. The capacity of RL as a surface-active substance was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The occurrence of surface infolds and blebs on B. subtilis shown by SEM, was not accompanied by changes in membrane permeability tested by a live/dead viability staining for fluorescence microscopy. When RL was applied in combination with MTS, a dramatic permeability shift for propidium iodide was observed in vegetative cells. PMID:22810959

  10. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  11. Sorting nexin 9 differentiates ligand-activated Smad3 from Smad2 for nuclear import and transforming growth factor β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Mark C.; Repellin, Claire E.; Kang, Jeong-Han; Andrianifahanana, Mahefatiana; Yin, Xueqian; Leof, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is a pleiotropic protein secreted from essentially all cell types and primary tissues. While TGFβ’s actions reflect the activity of a number of signaling networks, the primary mediator of TGFβ responses are the Smad proteins. Following receptor activation, these cytoplasmic proteins form hetero-oligomeric complexes that translocate to the nucleus and affect gene transcription. Here, through biological, biochemical, and immunofluorescence approaches, sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) is identified as being required for Smad3-dependent responses. SNX9 interacts with phosphorylated (p) Smad3 independent of Smad2 or Smad4 and promotes more rapid nuclear delivery than that observed independent of ligand. Although SNX9 does not bind nucleoporins Nup153 or Nup214 or some β importins (Imp7 or Impβ), it mediates the association of pSmad3 with Imp8 and the nuclear membrane. This facilitates nuclear translocation of pSmad3 but not SNX9. PMID:26337383

  12. The possibly important role played by Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} during the activation of GaN photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiaoqian E-mail: 214808748@qq.com; Wang, Honggang; Zhang, Junju; Li, Zhiming; Cui, Shiyao; Zhang, Lejuan

    2015-08-14

    Three different chemical solutions are used to remove the possible contamination on GaN surface, while Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} is still found at the surface. After thermal annealing at 710 °C in the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber and activated with Cs/O, all the GaN samples are successfully activated to the effective negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathodes. Among all samples, the GaN sample with the highest content of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} after chemical cleaning obtains the highest quantum efficiency. By analyzing the property of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the surface processing results, and electron affinity variations during Cs and Cs/O{sub 2} deposition on GaN of other groups, it is suggested that before the adsorption of Cs, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not completely removed from GaN surface in our samples, which will combine with Cs and lead to a large decrease in electron affinity. Furthermore, the effective NEA is formed for GaN photocathode, along with the surface downward band bending. Based on this assumption, a new dipole model Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Cs is suggested, and the experimental effects are explained and discussed.

  13. Importance of the operating pH in maintaining the stability of anoxic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity in moving bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Jaroszynski, L W; Cicek, N; Sparling, R; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2011-07-01

    Two bench-scale parallel moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR) were operated to assess pH-associated anammox activity changes during long term treatment of anaerobically digested sludge centrate pre-treated in a suspended growth partial nitrification reactor. The pH was maintained at 6.5 in reactor R1, while it was allowed to vary naturally between 7.5 and 8.1 in reactor R2. At high nitrogen loads reactor R2 had a 61% lower volumetric specific nitrogen removal rate than reactor R1. The low pH and the associated low free ammonia (FA) concentrations were found to be critical to stable anammox activity in the MBBR. Nitrite enhanced the nitrogen removal rate in the conditions of low pH, all the way up to the investigated level of 50mg NO(2)-N/L. At low FA levels nitrite concentrations up to 250 mg NO(2)-N/L did not cause inactivation of anammox consortia over a 2-days exposure time. PMID:21565492

  14. On the ionization state of the substrate in the active site of glutamate racemase. A QM/MM study about the importance of being zwitterionic.

    PubMed

    Puig, Eduard; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; González-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M

    2006-01-19

    Computer simulations on a QM/MM potential energy surface have been carried out to gain insights into the catalytic mechanism of glutamate racemase (MurI). Understanding such a mechanism is a challenging task from the chemical point of view because it involves the deprotonation of a low acidic proton by a relatively weak base to give a carbanionic intermediate. First, we have examined the dependency of the kinetics and thermodynamics of the racemization process catalyzed by MurI on the ionization state of the substrate (glutamate) main chain. Second, we have employed an energy decomposition procedure to study the medium effect on the enzyme-substrate electrostatic and polarization interactions along the reaction. Importantly, the present theoretical results quantitatively support the mechanistic proposal by Rios et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 9373-9385] for the PLP-independent amino acid racemases. PMID:16405345

  15. Expression of GhNAC2 from G. herbaceum, improves root growth and imparts tolerance to drought in transgenic cotton and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gunapati, Samatha; Naresh, Ram; Ranjan, Sanjay; Nigam, Deepti; Hans, Aradhana; Verma, Praveen C.; Gadre, Rekha; Pathre, Uday V.; Sane, Aniruddha P.; Sane, Vidhu A.

    2016-01-01

    NAC proteins are plant-specific transcription factors that play essential roles in regulating development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. We show that over-expression of the cotton GhNAC2 under the CaMV35S promoter increases root growth in both Arabidopsis and cotton under unstressed conditions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants also show improved root growth in presence of mannitol and NaCl while transgenic cotton expressing GhNAC2 show reduced leaf abscission and wilting upon water stress compared to control plants. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants also have larger leaves, higher seed number and size under well watered conditions, reduced transpiration and higher relative leaf water content. Micro-array analysis of transgenic plants over-expressing GhNAC2 reveals activation of the ABA/JA pathways and a suppression of the ethylene pathway at several levels to reduce expression of ERF6/ERF1/WRKY33/ MPK3/MKK9/ACS6 and their targets. This probably suppresses the ethylene-mediated inhibition of organ expansion, leading to larger leaves, better root growth and higher yields under unstressed conditions. Suppression of the ethylene pathway and activation of the ABA/JA pathways also primes the plant for improved stress tolerance by reduction in transpiration, greater stomatal control and suppression of growth retarding factors. PMID:27113714

  16. Expression of GhNAC2 from G. herbaceum, improves root growth and imparts tolerance to drought in transgenic cotton and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gunapati, Samatha; Naresh, Ram; Ranjan, Sanjay; Nigam, Deepti; Hans, Aradhana; Verma, Praveen C; Gadre, Rekha; Pathre, Uday V; Sane, Aniruddha P; Sane, Vidhu A

    2016-01-01

    NAC proteins are plant-specific transcription factors that play essential roles in regulating development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. We show that over-expression of the cotton GhNAC2 under the CaMV35S promoter increases root growth in both Arabidopsis and cotton under unstressed conditions. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants also show improved root growth in presence of mannitol and NaCl while transgenic cotton expressing GhNAC2 show reduced leaf abscission and wilting upon water stress compared to control plants. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants also have larger leaves, higher seed number and size under well watered conditions, reduced transpiration and higher relative leaf water content. Micro-array analysis of transgenic plants over-expressing GhNAC2 reveals activation of the ABA/JA pathways and a suppression of the ethylene pathway at several levels to reduce expression of ERF6/ERF1/WRKY33/ MPK3/MKK9/ACS6 and their targets. This probably suppresses the ethylene-mediated inhibition of organ expansion, leading to larger leaves, better root growth and higher yields under unstressed conditions. Suppression of the ethylene pathway and activation of the ABA/JA pathways also primes the plant for improved stress tolerance by reduction in transpiration, greater stomatal control and suppression of growth retarding factors. PMID:27113714

  17. The importance of active surveillance, and immediate re-biopsy in low-risk prostate cancer: The largest series from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Bayar, Göksel; Horasanlı, Kaya; Acinikli, Hüseyin; Tanrıverdi, Orhan; Dalkılıç, Ayhan; Arısan, Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate long-term outcomes of active surveillance (AS) applied in low-risk prostate cancer patients, and the impact of re-biopsy results on the prediction of progression. Material and methods In our clinic, patients who had undergone AS for low-risk localized prostate cancer between the years 2005–2013 were included in the study. Our AS criteria are Gleason score ≤6, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level <10 ng/mL, number of positive cores <3, maximum cancer involvement ratio <50% each core. Immediate re-biopsy (within 3 months) was performed to 65 patients who accepted AS. Finally, 43 patients who met re-biopsy criteria were included in the study. Prostate biopsy specimens were harvested from 12 cores under the guidance of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). Re-biopsy was performed within 3 months (1–12 weeks). In re-biopsy, a total of 20 core biopsies were performed including the far lateral (6 cores) and transition zone (2 cores) in addition to standard 12 core biopsy. Our follow-up protocol is PSA measurement and digital rectal examination (DRE) every 3 months within the first 2 years, than every 6 months. Control biopsies was performed one year later and once upon every 3 years to patients whose PSA levels and DREs were normal at follow-up visits. More than 2 tumor invaded cores or 50% tumor in one core, and Gleason score exceeding 6 points were accepted as indications for definitive treatment. Patients were divided into two groups by re-biopsy results and compared according to the time to progression. We have done multivariate regression analysis to predict prognosis by using data on age, PSA level, and detection of tumor in re-biopsy specimens. Results Patients’ median age was 61 years and PSA level was 5 (2.7–9) ng/mL. Tumor was detected in 22 (34%) patients at re-biopsy and they underwent definitive treatment. Additionally tumor was detected in 9 patients, but active surveillance was maintained because their pathologic results met active

  18. Human Erythropoietin Dimers with Markedly Enhanced in vivo Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytkowski, Arthur J.; Dotimas Lunn, Elizabeth; Davis, Kerry Lynn; Feldman, Laurie; Siekman, Suvia

    1998-02-01

    Human erythropoietin, a widely used and important therapeutic glycoprotein, has a relatively short plasma half-life due to clearance by glomerular filtration as well as by other mechanisms. We hypothesized that an erythropoietin species with a larger molecular size would exhibit an increased plasma half-life and, potentially, an enhanced biological activity. We now report the production of biologically active erythropoietin dimers and trimers by chemical crosslinking of the conventional monomeric form. We imparted free sulfhydryl residues to a pool of erythropoietin monomer by chemical modification. A second pool was reacted with another modifying reagent to yield monomer with male-imido groups. Upon mixing these two pools, covalently linked dimers and trimers were formed that were biologically active in vitro. The plasma half-life of erythropoietin dimers in rabbits was >24 h compared with 4 h for the monomers. Importantly, erythropoietin dimers were biologically active in vivo as shown by their ability to increase the hematocrits of mice when injected subcutaneously. In addition, the dimers exhibited >26-fold higher activity in vivo than did the monomers and were very effective after only one dose. Dimeric and other oligomeric forms of Epo may have an important role in therapy.

  19. Structure-activity relationship of genotoxic polycyclic aromatic nitro compounds: Further evidence for the importance of hydrophobicity and molecular orbital energies in genetic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Debnath, A.K.; Hansch, C. )

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) has been formulated for 15 polycyclic aromatic nitro compounds acting on E. coli PQ37. Upon damage of DNA by these substances [beta]-galactosidase is induced and can be easily assayed colorimetrically, hence, this is a short-term test for mutagenicity. The QSAR (log SOSIP = 1.07 log P - 1.57 e[sub LUMO] - 6.41) is strikingly similar to that found earlier with nitroaromatics acting in the Ames test (TA100) and differs significantly for that found using TA98 organisms. The QSAR brings out in a unique manner the underlying similarity in the two test systems. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ethnomedicinally Important Analgesic Plant Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth: Mechanistic Study and Identifications of Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Anwar; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth. is extensively used as traditional medicine for the management of various types of pain including tooth ache, gastric pain, abdominal pain, ear ache, and generalized body pain. The current study is designed to scientifically verify the purported uses of I. rugosus as analgesic agent and to figure out its possible mechanism of action. Bioactive compounds responsible for analgesic activity were identified using GC and GC-MS analysis. Analgesic potentials were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate test, and formalin induced paw licking test. In acetic acid induced writhing chloroform fraction (Ir.Chf) exhibited 53% analgesia while formalin test displayed 61% inhibition at phase-I and 45% at phase-II respectively at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Similarly, in hot plate test Ir.Chf displayed average reaction time of 7 min at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min intervals. The possible mechanism of action was found to be the central pathway via opioidergic receptors as the mice showed morphine like analgesic activity at pre-administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist) in hot plate and formalin tests. In GC-MS analysis, 83 compounds were identified among which eight compounds including benzyl alcohol, sebacic acid, myristic acid, phytol, sugiol, Tocopherol, α-Amyrin, and stigmasterol were sorted out as previously reported analgesic compounds. Current study revealed that analgesic potential of I. rugosus can attributed to the presence of analgesic compounds. It may also be concluded that opioids receptors are involved in the analgesic mechanism of I. rugosus due to effective antagonism of nalaxone. PMID:27458379

  1. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995–97 and in 2006–08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents. PMID:27082110

  2. Familial Risk of Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and the Importance of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Prospective Data from the HUNT Study, Norway.

    PubMed

    Lier, Ragnhild; Mork, Paul Jarle; Holtermann, Andreas; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of the current study was i) to prospectively examine if chronic musculoskeletal pain in parents is associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring, and ii) to assess if these parent-offspring associations are modified by offspring body mass index and leisure time physical activity. We used data on 4,742 adult offspring linked with their parents who participated in the population-based HUNT Study in Norway in 1995-97 and in 2006-08. Family relations were established through the national Family Registry. A Poisson regression model was used to estimate relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). In total, 1,674 offspring (35.3%) developed chronic musculoskeletal pain during the follow-up period of approximately 11 years. Both maternal (RR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.55) and paternal chronic musculoskeletal pain (RR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.57) was associated with increased risk of offspring chronic musculoskeletal pain. Compared to offspring of parents without chronic musculoskeletal pain, the adverse effect of parental pain was somewhat stronger among offspring who reported a low (RR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.32, 2.52) versus high (RR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.95, 1.84) level of leisure time physical activity. Offspring of parents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and who were classified as obese had more than twofold increased risk (RR: 2.33, 95% CI: 1.68, 3.24) of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared to normal weight offspring of parents without pain. In conclusion, parental chronic musculoskeletal pain is positively associated with risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in their adult offspring. Maintenance of normal body weight may reduce the risk of chronic musculoskeletal pain in offspring of pain-afflicted parents. PMID:27082110

  3. Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ethnomedicinally Important Analgesic Plant Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth: Mechanistic Study and Identifications of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Anwar; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth. is extensively used as traditional medicine for the management of various types of pain including tooth ache, gastric pain, abdominal pain, ear ache, and generalized body pain. The current study is designed to scientifically verify the purported uses of I. rugosus as analgesic agent and to figure out its possible mechanism of action. Bioactive compounds responsible for analgesic activity were identified using GC and GC-MS analysis. Analgesic potentials were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate test, and formalin induced paw licking test. In acetic acid induced writhing chloroform fraction (Ir.Chf) exhibited 53% analgesia while formalin test displayed 61% inhibition at phase-I and 45% at phase-II respectively at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Similarly, in hot plate test Ir.Chf displayed average reaction time of 7 min at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min intervals. The possible mechanism of action was found to be the central pathway via opioidergic receptors as the mice showed morphine like analgesic activity at pre-administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist) in hot plate and formalin tests. In GC-MS analysis, 83 compounds were identified among which eight compounds including benzyl alcohol, sebacic acid, myristic acid, phytol, sugiol, Tocopherol, α-Amyrin, and stigmasterol were sorted out as previously reported analgesic compounds. Current study revealed that analgesic potential of I. rugosus can attributed to the presence of analgesic compounds. It may also be concluded that opioids receptors are involved in the analgesic mechanism of I. rugosus due to effective antagonism of nalaxone. PMID:27458379

  4. The Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative (ACTIVE): Purpose and Goals for Assessing Important and Salient Issues for Medications Development in Alcohol Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Raymond F; Litten, Raye Z; Falk, Daniel E; Palumbo, Joseph M; Bartus, Raymond T; Robinson, Rebecca L; Kranzler, Henry R; Kosten, Thomas R; Meyer, Roger E; O'Brien, Charles P; Mann, Karl; Meulien, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the treatment of alcohol use disorders, more effective treatments are needed. In the last 15 years, several medications have been approved for use in alcohol dependence but have only limited effectiveness and clinical acceptance. While academics have developed some ‘standards' for the performance of clinical trials for alcohol dependence, they vary considerably, in the type of populations to be studied, the length of trials, salient outcome measures, and data analyses to be used (especially in the treatment of missing data). This variability impedes the commercial development of medications to treat alcohol dependence. Using a model similar to that used to develop an expert consensus for medications to improve cognitive aspects of schizophrenia (MATRICS) and in the treatment of pain (IMMPACT), a workgroup has been formed under the auspices of ACNP, known as the ACTIVE (Alcohol Clinical Trials Initiative) group, to evaluate data from completed clinical trials to develop a consensus on key issues in the conduct of clinical trials in alcohol dependence. ACTIVE consists of academic experts, industry representatives, and staff from the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This paper describes the rationale behind the effort, its history and organization, and initial key questions that have been identified as the primary focus of the workgroup. Future papers will focus on knowledge gained from the re-analysis of completed trials and provide consensus opinions regarding the performance of clinical trials that might be undertaken in the future. PMID:21900883

  5. Holocene changes in fire frequency in the Daihai Lake region (north-central China): indications and implications for an important role of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Xiao, Jule; Cui, Linlin; Ding, Zhongli

    2013-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) content in a sediment core from Daihai Lake, Inner Mongolia, was analyzed to reconstruct a high-resolution history of fires occurring in northern China during the Holocene and to examine the impacts of natural changes and human activities on the fire regime. The black carbon mass sedimentation rate (BCMSR) was disintegrated into two components: the background BCMSR and the BCMSR peak, with the BCMSR peak representing the frequency of fire episodes. Both the background BCMSR and the magnitude of the BCMSR peak display a close relation with the percentage of tree pollen from the same sediment core, suggesting that regional vegetation type would be a factor controlling the intensity of fires. The inferred fire-episode frequency for the Holocene exhibits two phases of obvious increases, i.e., the first increase from <5 to ˜10 episodes/1000 yrs occurring at 8200 cal. yrs BP when the vegetation of the lake basin shifted from grasses to forests and the climate changed from warm/dry to warm/humid condition, and the further increase to a maximum frequency of 13 episodes/1000 yrs occurring at 2800 cal. yrs BP when herbs and shrubs replaced the forests in the lake basin and the climate became cool/dry. Both increases in the fire frequency contradict the previous interpretation that fires occurred frequently in the monsoon region of northern China when steppe developed under the cold/dry climate. We thus suggest that human activities would be responsible for the increased frequencies of fires in the Daihai Lake region in terms that the appearance of early agriculture and the expansion of human land use were considered to take place in northern China at ca 8000 and 3000 cal. yrs BP, respectively.

  6. Metal Ion Adsorption by Activated Carbons Made from Pecan Shells: Effect of Oxygen Level During Activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural by-products represent a considerable quantity of harvested commodity crops. The use of by-products as precursors for the production of widely used adsorbents, such as activated carbons, may impart a value-added component of the overall biomass harvested. Our objective in this presenta...

  7. BdorCSP2 Is Important for Antifeed and Oviposition-Deterring Activities Induced by Rhodojaponin-III against Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaolin; Wang, Peidan; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Rhodojaponin-III is a nonvolatile botanical grayanoid diterpene compound, which has antifeedant and oviposition deterrence effects against many kinds of insects. However, the molecular mechanism of the chemoreception process remains unknown. In this study, the important role of BdorCSP2 in the recognition of Rhodojaponin-III was identified. The full length cDNA encoding BdorCSP2 was cloned from legs of Bactrocera dorsalis. The results of expression pattern revealed that BdorCSP2 was abundantly expressed in the legs of adult B. dorsalis. Moreover, the expression of BdorCSP2 could be up-regulated by Rhodojaponin-III. In order to gain comprehensive understanding of the recognition process, the binding affinity between BdorCSP2 and Rhodojaponin-III was measured by fluorescence binding assay. Silencing the expression of BdorCSP2 through the ingestion of dsRNA could weaken the effect of oviposition deterrence and antifeedant of Rhodojaponin-III. These results suggested that BdorCSP2 of B. dorsalis could be involved in chemoreception of Rhodojaponin-III and played a critical role in antifeedant and oviposition behaviors induced by Rhodojaponin-III. PMID:24155937

  8. Lnk is an important modulator of insulin-like growth factor-1/Akt/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma axis during adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Hyang Seon; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Jae Ho; Bae, Sun Sik; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-09-01

    Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for metabolic homeostasis and nutrient signaling during development. However, limited information is available on the pivotal modulators of adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Adaptor protein Lnk (Src homology 2B3 [SH2B3]), which belongs to a family of SH2-containing proteins, modulates the bioactivities of different stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells. In this study, we investigated whether an interaction between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Lnk regulated IGF-1-induced adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. We found that wild-type MSCs showed greater adipogenic differentiation potential than Lnk (-/-) MSCs. An ex vivo adipogenic differentiation assay showed that Lnk (-/-) MSCs had decreased adipogenic differentiation potential compared with wild-type MSCs. Interestingly, we found that Lnk formed a complex with IGF-1R and that IGF-1 induced the dissociation of this complex. In addition, we observed that IGF-1-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin was triggered by the dissociation of the IGF-1R-Lnk complex. Expression levels of a pivotal transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and its adipogenic target genes (LPL and FABP4) significantly decreased in Lnk (-/-) MSCs. These results suggested that Lnk adaptor protein regulated the adipogenesis of MSCs through the IGF-1/Akt/PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27610032

  9. Lnk is an important modulator of insulin-like growth factor-1/Akt/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma axis during adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Hyang Seon; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Jae Ho; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for metabolic homeostasis and nutrient signaling during development. However, limited information is available on the pivotal modulators of adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Adaptor protein Lnk (Src homology 2B3 [SH2B3]), which belongs to a family of SH2-containing proteins, modulates the bioactivities of different stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells. In this study, we investigated whether an interaction between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Lnk regulated IGF-1-induced adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. We found that wild-type MSCs showed greater adipogenic differentiation potential than Lnk–/– MSCs. An ex vivo adipogenic differentiation assay showed that Lnk–/– MSCs had decreased adipogenic differentiation potential compared with wild-type MSCs. Interestingly, we found that Lnk formed a complex with IGF-1R and that IGF-1 induced the dissociation of this complex. In addition, we observed that IGF-1-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin was triggered by the dissociation of the IGF-1R–Lnk complex. Expression levels of a pivotal transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and its adipogenic target genes (LPL and FABP4) significantly decreased in Lnk–/– MSCs. These results suggested that Lnk adaptor protein regulated the adipogenesis of MSCs through the IGF-1/Akt/PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27610032

  10. The importance of the electrode mass ratio in a Li-ion capacitor based on activated carbon and Li4Ti5O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dsoke, Sonia; Fuchs, Bettina; Gucciardi, Emanuele; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret

    2015-05-01

    This study shows how the simple modulation of the cathode/anode mass ratio, in a Li-ion capacitor based on activated carbon (AC) and Li4Ti5O12 (LTO), results in a drastic increase in performance. Starting with a device balanced in the classical way (with an AC/LTO mass ratio of 4.17), the cathode/anode mass ratio has been reduced to 1.54 and then to 0.72. At a high power density, the device with a cathode/anode mass ratio of 0.72 shows the highest energy density. In fact, at 2.3 kW L-1, it delivers an energy density of 31 Wh L-1, which is almost 10 times greater than the energy obtained with a capacitor balanced with an AC/LTO ratio of 4.17 (3.68 Wh L-1). Moreover, the reduction in the cathode/anode mass ratio from 4.17 to 0.72 improves the cycling stability with a factor of 4.8 after 1000 cycles at 10C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals that the better power performance is due to reduced diffusion and charge transfer resistances. In addition, the anode polarization is less pronounced for the system with a lower AC/LTO mass ratio, leading to a minimization in electrolyte decomposition on the anode surface and therefore limiting the increase in the electrode resistance during cycles.

  11. Characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv alkyl hydroperoxidase AhpC points to the importance of ionic interactions in oligomerization and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, R; Mande, S C

    2001-01-01

    An alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpC) has been found frequently to be overexpressed in isoniazid-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These strains have an inactivated katG gene encoding a catalase peroxidase, which might render mycobacteria susceptible to the toxic peroxide radicals, thus leading to the concomitant overexpression of the AhpC. Although the overexpressed AhpC in isoniazid-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis may not directly participate in isoniazid action, AhpC might still assist M. tuberculosis in combating oxidative damage in the absence of the catalase. Here we have attempted to characterize the AhpC protein biochemically and report its functional and oligomerization properties. The alkyl hydroperoxidase of M. tuberculosis is unique in many ways compared with its well-characterized homologues from enteric bacteria. We show that AhpC is a decameric protein, composed of five identical dimers held together by ionic interactions. Dimerization of individual subunits takes place through an intersubunit disulphide linkage. The ionic interactions play a significant role in enzymic activity of the AhpC protein. The UV absorption spectrum and three-dimensional model of AhpC suggest that interesting conformational changes may take place during oxidation and reduction of the intersubunit disulphide linkage. In the absence of the partner AhpF subunit in M. tuberculosis, the mycobacterial AhpC might use small-molecule reagents, such as mycothiol, for completing its enzymic cycle. PMID:11171096

  12. Food as medicine in psychiatric care: which profession should be responsible for imparting knowledge and use of omega-3 fatty acids in psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Berit; Skagestad, Ingjerd; Bergkaasa, Anne Mari

    2011-05-01

    The effect of omega-3 fatty acids on depression is well documented. The purpose of this study was to determine if and how food is used as medicine in psychiatric care, especially how omega-3 fatty acids are used as a supplement in the treatment of depression. This is a pilot study with a qualitative design using questionnaires and interviews among nursing students, tutor nurses and psychiatrists. Three main categories emerged: 1. Nutrition is considered important but few evaluations are made. 2. There was a lack of knowledge of the effects of Omega 3. 3. There was an unclear division of responsibility among health personnel. A change in knowledge paradigms and clarification of responsibility is called for if food-as-medicine is to take its true place in psychiatric care. It is also necessary to include CAM and holistic perspectives. Further research is needed to determine why health education and health workers do not focus on nutrition therapy in psychiatric care. Further research is also needed to reveal both the patients, the GPs and the CAM practitioners' knowledge and attitude to the use of dietary supplements. PMID:21457901

  13. The Burkholderia pseudomallei Δasd Mutant Exhibits Attenuated Intracellular Infectivity and Imparts Protection against Acute Inhalation Melioidosis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Michael H.; Propst, Katie L.; Kang, Yun; Dow, Steven W.; Schweizer, Herbert P.; Hoang, Tung T.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the cause of serious and life-threatening diseases in humans, is of national biodefense concern because of its potential use as a bioterrorism agent. This microbe is listed as a select agent by the CDC; therefore, development of vaccines is of significant importance. Here, we further investigated the growth characteristics of a recently created B. pseudomallei 1026b Δasd mutant in vitro, in a cell model, and in an animal model of infection. The mutant was typified by an inability to grow in the absence of exogenous diaminopimelate (DAP); upon single-copy complementation with a wild-type copy of the asd gene, growth was restored to wild-type levels. Further characterization of the B. pseudomallei Δasd mutant revealed a marked decrease in RAW264.7 murine macrophage cytotoxicity compared to the wild type and the complemented Δasd mutant. RAW264.7 cells infected by the Δasd mutant did not exhibit signs of cytopathology or multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, which were observed in wild-type B. pseudomallei cell infections. The Δasd mutant was found to be avirulent in BALB/c mice, and mice vaccinated with the mutant were protected against acute inhalation melioidosis. Thus, the B. pseudomallei Δasd mutant may be a promising live attenuated vaccine strain and a biosafe strain for consideration of exclusion from the select agent list. PMID:21807903

  14. Structural Waters Define a Functional Channel Mediating Activation of the GPCR, rhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, T.; Gupta, S; Jastrzebska, B; Palczewski, K; Chance, M

    2009-01-01

    Structural water molecules may act as prosthetic groups indispensable for proper protein function. In the case of allosteric activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), water likely imparts structural plasticity required for agonist-induced signal transmission. Inspection of structures of GPCR superfamily members reveals the presence of conserved embedded water molecules likely important to GPCR function. Coupling radiolytic hydroxyl radical labeling with rapid H2O18 solvent mixing, we observed no exchange of these structural waters with bulk solvent in either ground state or for the Meta II or opsin states. However, the radiolysis approach permitted labeling of selected side chain residues within the transmembrane helices and revealed activation-induced changes in local structural constraints likely mediated by dynamics of both water and protein. These results suggest both a possible general mechanism for water-dependent communication in family A GPCRs based on structural conservation, and a strategy for probing membrane protein structure.

  15. Effect of D to E mutation of the RGD motif in rhodostomin on its activity, structure, and dynamics: importance of the interactions between the D residue and integrin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Shiu, Jia-Hau; Hsieh, Yao-Husn; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yi-Chun; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Tang, Ming-Jer; Lo, Szecheng J; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2009-09-01

    Rhodostomin (Rho) is a snake venom protein containing an RGD motif that specifically inhibits the integrin-binding function. Rho produced in Pichia pastoris inhibits platelet aggregation with a K(I) of 78 nM as potent as native Rho. In contrast, its D51E mutant inhibits platelet aggregation with a K(I) of 49 muM. Structural analysis of Rho and its D51E mutant showed that they have the same tertiary fold with three two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets. There are no structural backbone differences between the RG[D/E] loop which extends outward from the protein core and the RG[D/E] sequence at its apex in a four-residue RG[D/E]M type I turn. Two minor differences between Rho and its D51E mutant were only found from their backbone dynamics and 3D structures. The R(2) value of E51 is 13% higher than that of the D51 residue. A difference in the charge separation of 1.76 A was found between the sidechains of positive (R49) and negative residues (D51 or E51).The docking of Rho into integrin alphavbeta3 showed that the backbone amide and carbonyl groups of the D51 residue of Rho were formed hydrogen bonds with the integrin residues R216 and R214, respectively. In contrast, these hydrogen bonds were absent in the D51E mutant-integrin complex. Our findings suggest that the interactions between both the sidechain and backbone of the D residue of RGD-containing ligands and integrin are important for their binding. PMID:19280603

  16. Acquired resistance to rechallenge injury in rats recovered from subclinical renal damage with uranyl acetate-Importance of proliferative activity of tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuan; Fujigaki, Yoshihide; Sakakima, Masanori; Hishida, Akira

    2010-02-15

    Animals recovered from acute renal failure are resistant to subsequent insult. We investigated whether rats recovered from mild proximal tubule (PT) injury without renal dysfunction (subclinical renal damage) acquire the same resistance. Rats 14 days after recovering from subclinical renal damage, which was induced by 0.2 mg/kg of uranyl acetate (UA) (sub-toxic dose), were rechallenged with 4 mg/kg of UA (nephrotoxic dose). Fate of PT cells and renal function were examined in response to nephrotoxic dose of UA. All divided cells after sub-toxic dose of UA insult were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days then the number of PT cells with or without BrdU-labeling was counted following nephrotoxic dose of UA insult. Rats recovered from subclinical renal damage gained resistance to nephrotoxic dose of UA with reduced renal dysfunction, less severity of peak damage (necrotic and TUNEL+ apoptotic cells) and accelerated PT cell proliferation, but with earlier peak of PT damage. The decrease in number of PT cells in the early phase of rechallenge injury with nephrotoxic UA was more in rats pretreated with sub-toxic dose of UA than vehicle pretreated rats. The exaggerated loss of PT cells was mainly caused by the exaggerated loss of BrdU+ divided cells. In contrast, accelerated cell proliferation in rats recovered from sub-toxic dose of UA was observed mainly in BrdU- non-divided cells. The findings suggest that rats recovered from subclinical renal damage showed partial acquired resistance to nephrotoxic insult. Accelerated recovery with increased proliferative activity of non-divided PT cells after subclinical renal damage may mainly contribute to acquired resistance.

  17. Identification of arginine 331 as an important active site residue in the class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, S.; Marsh, K.; Berry, A.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of the Class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of Escherichia coli with the arginine-specific alpha-dicarbonyl reagents, butanedione or phenylglyoxal, results in inactivation of the enzyme. The enzyme is protected from inactivation by the substrate, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, or by inorganic phosphate. Modification with [7-14C] phenylglyoxal in the absence of substrate demonstrates that enzyme activity is abolished by the incorporation of approximately 2 moles of reagent per mole of enzyme. Sequence alignment of the eight known Class II FBP-aldolases shows that only one arginine residue is conserved in all the known sequences. This residue, Arg-331, was mutated to either alanine or glutamic acid. The mutant enzymes were much less susceptible to inactivation by phenylglyoxal. Measurement of the steady-state kinetic parameters revealed that mutation of Arg-331 dramatically increased the K(m) for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Comparatively small differences in the inhibitor constant Ki for dihydroxyacetone phosphate or its analogue, 2-phosphoglycolate, were found between the wild-type and mutant enzymes. In contrast, the mutation caused large changes in the kinetic parameters when glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was used as an inhibitor. Kinetic analysis of the oxidation of the carbanionic aldolase-substrate intermediate of the reaction by hexacyanoferrate (III) revealed that the K(m) for dihydroxyacetone phosphate was again unaffected, whereas that for fructose 1,6-bisphosphate was dramatically increased. Taken together, these results show that Arg-331 is critically involved in the binding of fructose bisphosphate by the enzyme and demonstrate that it interacts with the C-6 phosphate group of the substrate. PMID:8771208

  18. Multiplatform inversion of the 2013 Rim Fire smoke emissions using regional-scale modeling: important nocturnal fire activity, air quality, and climate impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saide, P. E.; Peterson, D. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Dibb, J. E.; Yokelson, R. J.; Toon, B.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Large wildfire events are increasingly recognized for their adverse effects on air quality and visibility, thus providing motivation for improving smoke emission estimates. The Rim Fire, one of the largest events in California's history, produced a large smoke plume that was sampled by the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) DC-8 aircraft with a full suite of in-situ and remote sensing measurements on 26-27 August 2013. We developed an inversion methodology which uses the WRF-Chem modeling system to constrain hourly fire emissions, using as initial estimates the NASA Quick Fire Emissions Dataset (QFED). This method differs from the commonly performed top-down estimates that constrain daily (or longer time scale) emissions. The inversion method is able to simultaneously improve the model fit to various SEAC4RS airborne measurements (e.g., organic aerosol, carbon monoxide (CO), aerosol extinction), ground based measurements (e.g., AERONET aerosol optical depth (AOD), CO), and satellite data (MODIS AOD) by modifying fire emissions and utilizing the information content of all these measurements. Preliminary results show that constrained emissions for a 6 day period following the largest fire growth are a factor 2-4 higher than the initial top-down estimates. Moreover, there is a tendency to increase nocturnal emissions by factors sometimes larger than 20, indicating that vigorous fire activity continued during the night. This deviation from a typical diurnal cycle is confirmed using geostationary satellite data. The constrained emissions also have a larger day-to-day variability than the initial emissions and correlate better to daily area burned estimates as observed by airborne infrared measurements (NIROPS). Experiments with the assimilation system show that performing the inversion using only satellite AOD data produces much smaller correction factors than when using all available data

  19. Importance of Effective Listening Infomercial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2009-01-01

    This article details an activity intended for use in a course with a unit on effective listening, including listening courses, public speaking, and interpersonal communication. Students will explain the importance of effective and active listening for a target audience by producing an infomercial for a product or service which they design.

  20. Interdisciplinary Robotic Activity Hones Important Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Dan; Zeigler, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    As educators, the authors believe in guiding students towards the life skills, knowledge, and expertise they need to succeed in life and in the workforce of the 21st century. With that in mind, they have created a project in which students drive their own learning through creativity and collaborative work to develop an efficient product. Through…