Science.gov

Sample records for activities include ground-based

  1. Space life sciences: ground-based iron-ion biology and physics, including shielding.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    This session of the 35th Scientific Assembly of COSPAR focuses on recent advances in ground-based studies of high-energy (mainly 1 GeV/nucleon) iron ions. The theme is interdisciplinary in nature and encompasses both physics and biology reports. Manned space missions, including those of the International Space Station and the planned Mars mission, will require the extended presence of crew members in space. As such, a better understanding in shielding design--in radiation detection as well as radio-protection based on simulating studies--is much needed. On the other hand, a better understanding of the basic mechanisms that modulate radiation sensitivity; in determining DNA double strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and the induction of apoptosis, will provide important information for an interventional approach. PMID:15929229

  2. Spitzer, Kepler, and Ground Based Reverberation Mapping of 3 Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Malkan, Matthew; Barth, Aaron; Filippenko, Alex; Bloom, Joshua

    2011-05-01

    Near-infrared reverberation measurements have proven to be a valuable tool for mapping the location of hot dust in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Ground-based campaigns have shown that the K-band continuum varies in response to changes in the optical continuum, and measurements of the K-band lag time give the size scale of the hot dust emission region. Reverberation measurements at longer wavelengths can add valuable information on the dust temperature profile in AGNs and the structure of the putative dusty torus, but there have not previously been any definitive measurements of dust reverberation at wavelengths longer than the K band. In our Cycle 7 campaign we proposed to conduct a campaign of high-cadence monitoring observations (1 observation per ~72 hours) of three bright, low-redshift AGNs in order to detect 3.6 micron variability and to measure the reverberation lag time of the 3.6 micron continuum relative to the optical continuum. Four obstacles needed to be overcome to do reverberation mapping at 3.6 microns: 1. Could we obtain long and well sampled 3.6 micron light curves with high precision? 2. Would the monitored AGN show significant optical variation? 3. Would IRAC detect significant variations during the observing window? 4. Finally, would there be correlated variability between the IR and the optical light curves? Based on our first observed source, Zw 229-015, the answer to all those questions is YES! In addition to Zw 229-105 which is also a Kepler monitoring target and so it has become a key AGN for coordinated multi-wavelength monitoring; our sample includes two well-studied and highly variable AGNs, NGC 4051 and Mrk 817. We will conitnue to obtain ground-based optical (V-band) and near-IR (JHK) monitoring data for these AGNs in order to compare the near-IR and 3.6 micron variability with the optical light curves, providing unique new constraints on the dust temperature profiles in these AGNs.

  3. Characterization of Activity at Loki from Galileo and Ground-based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. R.; Lopes, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    While Loki is the most active volcanic center on Io, major questions remain concerning the nature of that activity. Rathbun et al. showed that the activity was semi-periodic, and suggested it was due to a resurfacing wave which swept across a lava lake as the crust cooled and become unstable. However in 2001 new observations showed that an intermediate level, less periodic mode of activity had apparently begun. Galileo-NIMS observations of Loki clearly show that the highest temperatures are found near the edge of the patera, consistent with disruption of a lava lake at the margins. NIMS observations also show gradients in temperature across the patera which, when modeled in terms of lava cooling models, are generally consistent with ages expected for the resurfacing wave but may also be consistent with spreading flows. We present a further analysis of NIMS data from I24 and I32 which help define the nature of the temperature variations present in Loki patera, along with Galileo-SSI images from the G1-I32 flybys which show albedo changes apparently correlated with the "periodic" activity measured from ground-based observations.

  4. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Studies on global climate change show that the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) on the Earth's radiation balance and climate, also known as indirect aerosol effects, are the most uncertain among all the effects involving the atmospheric constituents and processes (Stocker et al., IPCC, 2013). Droplet activation is the most important and challenging process in the understanding of ACI. It represents the direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds and it is probably the largest source of uncertainty in estimating indirect aerosol effects. An accurate estimation of aerosol-clouds microphysical and optical properties in proximity and within the cloud boundaries represents a good frame for the study of droplet activation. This can be obtained by using ground-based profiling remote sensing techniques. In this work, a methodology for the experimental investigation of droplet activation, based on ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidar and Doppler radar technique, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin liquid water clouds, which are low or midlevel super-cooled clouds characterized by a liquid water path (LWP) lower than about 100 gm-2(Turner et al., 2007). These clouds are often optically thin, which means that ground-based Raman lidar allows the detection of the cloud top and of the cloud structure above. Broken clouds are primarily inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure using ground based remote sensing. Observations are performed simultaneously with multi-wavelength Raman lidars, a cloud Doppler radar and a microwave radiometer at CIAO (CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory: www.ciao.imaa.cnr.it), in Potenza, Southern Italy (40.60N, 15.72E, 760 m a.s.l.). A statistical study of the variability of optical properties and humidity in the transition from cloudy regions to cloud-free regions surrounding the clouds leads to the identification of threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the

  5. Study of Droplet Activation in Thin Clouds Using Ground-Based Raman Lidar and Ancillary Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoldi, Marco; Madonna, Fabio; Gumà Claramunt, Pilar; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-06-01

    A methodology for the study of cloud droplet activation based on the measurements performed with ground-based multi-wavelength Raman lidars and ancillary remote sensors collected at CNR-IMAA observatory, Potenza, South Italy, is presented. The study is focused on the observation of thin warm clouds. Thin clouds are often also optically thin: this allows the cloud top detection and the full profiling of cloud layers using ground-based Raman lidar. Moreover, broken clouds are inspected to take advantage of their discontinuous structure in order to study the variability of optical properties and water vapor content in the transition from cloudy regions to cloudless regions close to the cloud boundaries. A statistical study of this variability leads to identify threshold values for the optical properties, enabling the discrimination between clouds and cloudless regions. These values can be used to evaluate and improve parameterizations of droplet activation within numerical models. A statistical study of the co-located Doppler radar moments allows to retrieve droplet size and vertical velocities close to the cloud base. First evidences of a correlation between droplet vertical velocities measured at the cloud base and the aerosol effective radius observed in the cloud-free regions of the broken clouds are found.

  6. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Feltz, W. F.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote sensors as well as traditional in situ radiosonde measurements. Remote sensing technologies include an automated Raman lidar and an automated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), which are able to retrieve water vapor profiles operationally through the lower troposphere throughout the diurnal cycle. Comparisons of these two water vapor remote sensing methods to each other and to radiosondes over an 8-month period are presented and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and limitations of each method. Additionally, the AERI is able to retrieve profiles of temperature while the Raman lidar is able to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles operationally. These data, coupled with hourly wind profiles from a 915-MHz wind profiler, provide complete specification of the state of the atmosphere in noncloudy skies. Several case studies illustrate the utility of these high temporal resolution measurements in the characterization of mesoscale features within a 3-day time period in which passage of a dryline, warm air advection, and cold front occurred.

  7. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  8. SO2 on Venus: IUE, HST and ground-based measurements, and the active volcanism connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Na, C. Y.; Barker, E. S.; Stern, S. A.; Esposito, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Magellan images have shown that the volcanic features are widespread over the surface of Venus. The question of whether there is active volcanism is important for understanding both the atmospheric and the geological processes on Venus. The thick cloud cover of Venus precludes any direct observation of active volcanoes even if they exist. The only means of monitoring the active volcanism on Venus at present seems to be remote sensing from Earth. Continuous monitoring of SO2 is important to establish the long term trend of SO2 abundance and to understand the physical mechanism responsible for the change.

  9. Infrared sensor modeling for discrimination of ground-based human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flug, Eric; Deaver, Dawne

    2008-04-01

    In an initial effort to better understand how motion in human activities influences sensor performance, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) developed a perception experiment that tests an observer's ability to identify an activity in static and dynamic scenes. Current sensor models such as NVTherm were calibrated using static imagery of military vehicles but, given the current battlefield environment, the focus has shifted more towards discriminating human activities. In these activities, motion plays an important role but this role is not well quantified by the model. This study looks at twelve hostile and non-hostile activities that may be performed on an urban roadside such as digging a hole, raking, surveillance with binoculars, and holding several weapons. The forced choice experiment presents the activities in both static and dynamic scenes so that the effect of adding motion can be evaluated. The results are analyzed and attempts are made at relating observer performance to various static and dynamic metrics and ultimately developing a calibration for the sensor model.

  10. Finding year-long activity cycles in ground-based and space-borne photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vida, Krisztián; Oláh, Katalin; Szabó, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    Using long­term ground­based photometry of fast­rotating M­-dwarfs (EY Dra, V405 And, GSC 3377­0296 and V374 Peg), all with rotational periods near 0.5 day, but with different internal structures, we found activity cycles in the form of long-­term brightness changes, on the time scales of about one year. Using the cycling stars as templates, we searched for similar, fast rotating (P < 1d), active, late­-type targets in the Kepler Input Catalogue. Analysing the light curves of these 39 stars, we found hints of 300­-900 day­-long cycles in 9 cases detecting small variations in the rotation periods caused by differential rotation and the changing spot emergence latitudes over the cycle (i.e., the butterfly diagram).

  11. The VO and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John

    The era of extremely large public databases in astronomy is upon us. such databases are opening the field to new research and new researchers. However it is important to be sure the resources are available to properly archive ground-based astronomical data and include the necessary quality checks and calibrations. A Virtual Observatory without proper archives will have limited usefulness. This also implies that with limited resources not all data can or should be archived. NASA already has a very good handle on US space-based astronomical data. Agencies and organizations that operate astronomical facilities particularly ground based observatories need to plan and budget for these activities now. We should not underestimate the effort required to produce high quality data products that will be useful for the broader community. Currently the best way to ""fill"" archives is with data ftom surveys. That will continue to be the case for most ground based observatories.

  12. Parallel robots in a ground-based telescope active optics system: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipani, P.; Ferragina, L.; Marty, L.; Grado, A.; Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; La Rana, A.; Busatta, A.

    2007-10-01

    This work deals with the application of parallel robots for the correction of defocus and coma optical aberrations in the case study of the VST (VLT Survey Telescope) telescope, to be installed at the ESO observatory of Cerro Paranal (Chile). The parallel robots are used to change position and orientation of the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror positioning capability is a fundamental part in an active optics system, i.e. a closed loop control system for the minimization of the telescope optical aberrations, where the outer optical feedback coming from the wavefront sensor is used to generate references for the inner motion control loop of the secondary mirror positioning robots. Two devices are presented: a 6-6 Stewart platform where both fixed and mobile platforms are regular and similar hexagons whose vertexes belong to the same plane and are on a circle, and a two stages device composed by a XY table plus a tilt platform. The basic theory of active optics corrections is presented. The kinematics of both devices is solved in connection with the active optics application; first test data are presented.

  13. Tragaldabas: a muon ground-based detector for the study of the solar activity; first observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Blanco, Juan

    2016-04-01

    A new RPC-based cosmic ray detector, TRAGALDABAS (acronym of "TRAsGo for the AnaLysis of the nuclear matter Decay, the Atmosphere, the earth's B-field And the Solar activity") has been installed at the Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain (N:42°52'34",W:8°33'37"). The detector, in its present layout, consists of three 1.8 m2 planes of three 1mm-gap glass RPCs. Each plane is readout with 120 pads with grounded guard electrodes between them to minimize the crosstalk noise. The main performances of the detectors are: an arrival time resolution of about ~300 ps, a tracking angular resolution below 3°, a detection efficiency close to 1, and a solid angle acceptance of ~5 srad. TRAGALDABAS will be able to monitor the cosmic ray low energy component strongly modulated by solar activity by mean the observation of secondary muons from the interaction between cosmic rays and atmospheric molecules. Its cadence and its angular resolution will allow to study in detail, small variations in cosmic ray anisotropy. These variations can be a key parameter to understand the effect of solar disturbances on the propagation of cosmic ray in the inner heliosphere and, maybe, provide a new tool for space weather analysis. In this work first TRAGALDABAS observations of solar events are shown

  14. Movable Ground Based Recovery System for Reuseable Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, George L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A reusable space flight launch system is configured to eliminate complex descent and landing systems from the space flight hardware and move them to maneuverable ground based systems. Precision landing of the reusable space flight hardware is enabled using a simple, light weight aerodynamic device on board the flight hardware such as a parachute, and one or more translating ground based vehicles such as a hovercraft that include active speed, orientation and directional control. The ground based vehicle maneuvers itself into position beneath the descending flight hardware, matching its speed and direction and captures the flight hardware. The ground based vehicle will contain propulsion, command and GN&C functionality as well as space flight hardware landing cushioning and retaining hardware. The ground based vehicle propulsion system enables longitudinal and transverse maneuverability independent of its physical heading.

  15. A wavelet spectral analysis tool for multipoint space and ground-based observations of ULF wave activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daglis, I. A.; Balasis, G.; Georgiou, M.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetospheric ULF waves influence radiation belt dynamics and are therefore of particular relevance for space weather nowcasting and forecasting efforts. We have used novel algorithms based on wavelet spectral methods to analyze multipoint observations of ULF wave activity by the Cluster and THEMIS missions and by ground-based magnetometers. Wavelet analysis is becoming a common tool for analyzing localized variations of power within a time series. By decomposing a time series into time-frequency space, we are able to determine both the dominant modes of variability and how these modes vary in time. The advantage of analyzing a signal with wavelets as the analyzing kernel is that it enables us to study features of the signal locally with a detail matched to their scale. Owing to its unique time-frequency localization, wavelet analysis is especially useful for signals that are non-stationary, have short-lived transient components, have features at different scales, or have singularities. The results are rather promising for the development of automatic identification tools, which will allow the detection and classification of various categories of ULF waves from multipoint magnetospheric observations according to well-defined criteria.

  16. Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changyong; Zong, Yuqing; Bai, Yan; Shao, Xi

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm-2·sr-1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth's atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.

  17. Application of triple collocation for the ground-based validation of soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) soil moisture products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contrast in horizontal spatial support between ground-based soil moisture observations and satellite-derived soil moisture estimates represents a long-standing challenge for the validation of satellite soil moisture data products [Crow et al., 2014]. This challenge can be alleviated by limiting ...

  18. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  19. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  20. Ground based infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic instrumentation has been developed for ground-based measurements of astrophysical objects in the intermediate infrared. A conventional Michelson interferometer is limited for astronomical applications in the intermediate infrared by quantum noise fluctuations in the radiation form the source and/or background incident on the detector, and the multiplex advantage is no longer available. One feasible approach to recovering the multiplex advantage is post-dispersion. The infrared signal after passing through telescope and interferometer, is dispersed by a low resolution grating spectrometer onto an array of detectors. The feasibility of the post-dispersion system has been demonstrated with observations of astrophysical objects in the 5 and 10 micrometer atmospheric windows from ground-based telescopes. During FY87/88 the post-disperser was used at the Kitt Peak 4-meter telescope and McMath telescope with facility Fourier transform spectrometers. Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus were observed. On Jupiter, the resolution at 12 micrometer was 0.01/cm, considerably higher than had been acheived previously. The spectrum contains Jovian ethane and acetylene emission. Construction was begun on the large cryogenic grating spectrometer.

  1. Connecting Io's volcanic activity to the Io plasma torus: comparison of Galileo/NIMS volcanic and ground-based torus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, F. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Rathbun, J. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Echer, E.; Echer, M. P. D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Io, the innermost of the Jupiter's four Galilean moons, is a remarkable object in the Solar System, due to its intense and energetic volcanic activity. The volcanic sulfur and oxygen in Io's tenuous atmosphere escapes forming an extended neutral cloud around Io and Jupiter. Subsequently, by ionization and pickup ions, a ring of charged particles encircling Jupiter is created, forming the Io plasma torus. Considering this scenario, it is reasonable to expect that the Io plasma torus should be affected by changes in Io's volcanism. Interactions between Io and the Jovian environment is unique and yet not very well understood. Here we present two sets of observations. One from the Galileo Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (NIMS) instrument, which obtained spectral image cubes between 0.7 and 5.2 microns. The other dataset is from ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines from the Io plasma torus, obtained at McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak. Our dataset from the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines cover more years than the one from the NIMS data. The years presented in this work for a comparative study are from 1998 through 2001. Using the NIMS instrument we were able to identify which volcanoes were active and measure their level of activity. From the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines we were able to trace the densest part of the torus and also the brightness of both ansa. By comparing the results from the Galileo instrument and the ground-based observations, we are exploring how the Io plasma torus responds to large eruptions from Io. We aim with this study to help improve our understanding of this complex coupled system, Jupiter-Io.

  2. L-band active/passive time series measurements over a growing season usign the COMRAD ground-based SMAP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheduled to launch in October 2014, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide high-resolution global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. These new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth’s surface will build on data from European Spa...

  3. Ground-based verification and data processing of Yutu rover Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dong-Ya; Wang, Huan-Yu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Liu, Ya-Qing; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Dong, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Gao, Min; Yang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Li, Chun-Lai; Zou, Yong-Liao; Zhang, Guang-Liang; Zhang, Li-Yan; Fu, Xiao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    The Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) is one of the payloads on board the Yutu rover of the Chang'E-3 mission. In order to assess the instrumental performance of APXS, a ground verification test was performed for two unknown samples (basaltic rock, mixed powder sample). In this paper, the details of the experiment configurations and data analysis method are presented. The results show that the elemental abundance of major elements can be well determined by the APXS with relative deviations <15 wt.% (detection distance=30 mm, acquisition time=30 min). The derived detection limit of each major element is inversely proportional to acquisition time and directly proportional to detection distance, suggesting that the appropriate distance should be <50 mm. Supported by National Science and Technology Major Project (Chang'E-3 Active Particle-induced X-ray Spectrometer)

  4. Following solar activity with geomagnetic and cosmic-ray ground-based stations in the Iberian Peninsula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasante-Marcos, Victor; José Blanco, Juan; Miquel Torta, Joan; Catalán, Manuel; Ribeiro, Paulo; Morozova, Anna; Tordesillas, José Manuel; Solé, Germán; Gomis-Moreno, Almudena

    2016-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula is located in the South-West of Europe between 36°00' N and 43°47' N and between 9°29' W and 3°19' E. There are four Geomagnetic Observatories currently operative in this area devoted to the observation of the Earth's magnetic field: Observatori de l'Ebre (NE Spain); Observatorio de San Pablo de los Montes (central Spain); Observatorio de San Fernando (southern Spain); Observatório de Coimbra (central Portugal); plus another one, Observatorio de Güímar, in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). There is also one neutron monitor located in Guadalajara (central Spain; 40°38' N, 3°9' W at 708 m asl) continuously measuring the arrival of cosmic rays to the Earth's surface. In this work we show combined observations of these six stations during events caused by solar activity. We analyze them looking for differences that could imply extremely local effects caused by the response of the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere to solar activity.

  5. Use of active and passive ground based remote sensors to explore cloud droplet modifications in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw Thet

    We explore the potential aerosol impact on cloud optical properties which is a strong modifier of climate forcing. Previous studies have shown that increased aerosol loading can affect the cloud optical properties such as cloud optical depth and cloud droplet effective radius in rural areas, particularly at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Southern Great Plain site. In this study, we attempt to observe and quantify aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City, using a combination of passive and active radiometric sensors. In particular, we look for signatures of the Twomey indirect effect which states that the droplet size of water phase clouds will decrease with increasing aerosols. We find that under certain conditions, a strong signature is found between the cloud drop effective radius and extinction and this effect is in part due to vertical wind uptake. In demonstrating the Aerosol Cloud Interaction, we use multiple approaches. For example, we derive the integrated liquid water path using both a multiband neural network and dual channel approach and show general agreement between two methods while the DC approach seems more robust. We also find that these measurements are difficult and sensitive to the position of the aerosols relative to the cloud base. As a corollary, we explore whether near surface aerosol loading can effecting the cloud by using particulate matter (PM2.5) and find that the effects are too variable to be given any statistical weight. Finally, we explore the potential of modifying our approach to remove the noisy and difficult measurement of Raman LIDAR derived extinction with calibrated LIDAR backscatter. The results seem to show a general improvement in correlation and offer the possibility of increasing the number of cases observed.

  6. Sequential digital elevation models of active lava flows from ground-based stereo time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a framework for deriving sequences of digital elevation models (DEMs) for the analysis of active lava flows using oblique stereo-pair time-lapse imagery. A photo-based technique was favoured over laser-based alternatives due to low equipment cost, high portability and capability for network expansion, with images of advancing flows captured by digital SLR cameras over durations of up to several hours. However, under typical field scale scenarios, relative camera orientations cannot be rigidly maintained (e.g. through the use of a stereo bar), preventing the use of standard stereo time-lapse processing software. Thus, we trial semi-automated DEM-sequence workflows capable of handling the small camera motions, variable image quality and restricted photogrammetric control that result from the practicalities of data collection at remote and hazardous sites. The image processing workflows implemented either link separate close-range photogrammetry and traditional stereo-matching software, or are integrated in a single software package based on structure-from-motion (SfM). We apply these techniques in contrasting case studies from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii and Mount Etna, Sicily, which differ in scale, duration and image texture. On Kilauea, the advance direction of thin fluid lava lobes was difficult to forecast, preventing good distribution of control. Consequently, volume changes calculated through the different workflows differed by ∼10% for DEMs (over ∼30 m2) that were captured once a minute for 37 min. On Mt. Etna, more predictable advance (∼3 m h-1 for ∼3 h) of a thicker, more viscous lava allowed robust control to be deployed and volumetric change results were generally within 5% (over ∼500 m2). Overall, the integrated SfM software was more straightforward to use and, under favourable conditions, produced results comparable to those from the close-range photogrammetry pipeline. However, under conditions with limited options for photogrammetric

  7. Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 Through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, Reginald; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Cable, William; Kholodov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multidecadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer. Satellite-based 6.925 and 10.65 GHz sensor algorithmic retrievals of soil moisture by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard NASA-Aqua and follow-on AMSR2 onboard JAXA-Global Change Observation Mission - Water-1 are ongoing since July 2002. Accurate land-surface temperature and vegetation parameters are critical to the success of passive microwave algorithmic retrieval schemes. Strategically located soil moisture measurements are needed for spatial and temporal co-location evaluation and validation of the space-based algorithmic estimates. We compare on a daily basis ground-based (subsurface-probe) 50- and 70-MHz radio-frequency soil moisture measurements with NASA- and JAXA-algorithmic retrieval passive microwave retrievals. We find improvements in performance of the JAXA-algorithm (AMSR-E reprocessed and AMSR2 ongoing) relative to the earlier NASA-algorithm version. In the boreal forest regions accurate land-surface temperatures and vegetation parameters are still needed for algorithmic retrieval success. Over the period of AMSR-E retrievals we find evidence of at the high northern latitudes of growing terrestrial radio-frequency interference in the 10.65 GHz channel soil moisture content. This is an important error source for satellite-based active and passive microwave remote sensing soil moisture retrievals in Arctic regions that must be addressed. Ref: Muskett, R

  8. Space-Borne and Ground-Based Sar Interferometry for Landslide Activity Analysis and Monitoring in the Appennines of Emilia Romagna (Italy): Review of Methods and Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, M.; Corsini, A.; Casagli, N.; Farina, P.; Coren, F.; Sterzai, P.; Leva, D.; Tarchi, D.

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns the application of SAR interferometry for the assessment of the long-term analysis of the state of activity of deep seated mass movements affecting some urban areas in the northern Appennines of Emilia Romagna region (from 1994-2001 space-borne ERS data) and for the real-time monitoring of active flow-like landslides in year 2002 (from ground-based system). These activities are part of an ongoing research project supported by civil protection authorities of the Emilia-Romagna region that involves several research institutes with diverse expertises. A set of test sites characterized by a high landslide risk have been selected mainly taking into account phenomena characteristics such as deformation rates and vegetation coverage, with respect to the employed techniques. After a preliminary detailed geomorphologic characterization of the sites, the interferometric analyses, still in progress, have been implemented. In particular space-borne DInSAR has been applied for 10 unstable areas using a set of ERS1/ERS2 data acquired in the last 7 years. From 9 interferograms, the line-of-sight displacement maps have been calculated and, later on, post processed in GIS environment in order to have on-slope-direction displacement maps that could fully be integrated with geomorphologic and ancillary data and that could semi-quantitatively be compared with other traditional monitoring data. The results obtained have been rather satisfactory, especially in some test sites where entire villages are settled on the mass movement, as in the case of Berceto (Parma) presented in the paper, and post-processed products have proved a significant amelioration of basic interferometric ones. Moreover, in order to measure terrain displacements induced by landslide characterized by high deformation rates and little urbanisation, ground-based SAR interferometry (GBInSAR) has been used for the monitoring of a test site located in the province of Bologna. This application proved

  9. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS AND ACTIVITY IN PROCYON: A COMPARISON OF THE 2007 MOST AND GROUND-BASED RADIAL VELOCITY CAMPAIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Guenter; Kallinger, Thomas; Weiss, Werner W.; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2011-04-20

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A{sub l=0,phot} = 9.1 {+-} 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A{sub l=0,phot}/A{sub l=0,RV} = 0.24 {+-} 0.02 ppm cm{sup -1} s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity.

  10. Distant activity of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014: Ground-based results during the Rosetta pre-landing phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, Colin; Jehin, Emmanuel; Manfroid, Jean; Opitom, Cyrielle; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Tozzi, Gian Paolo; Faggi, Sara; Yang, Bin; Knight, Matthew M.; Conn, Blair C.; Lister, Tim; Hainaut, Olivier; Bramich, D. M.; Lowry, Stephen C.; Rozek, Agata; Tubiana, Cecilia; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurélie

    2016-04-01

    Context. As the ESA Rosetta mission approached, orbited, and sent a lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014, a large campaign of ground-based observations also followed the comet. Aims: We constrain the total activity level of the comet by photometry and spectroscopy to place Rosetta results in context and to understand the large-scale structure of the comet's coma pre-perihelion. Methods: We performed observations using a number of telescopes, but concentrate on results from the 8 m VLT and Gemini South telescopes in Chile. We use R-band imaging to measure the dust coma contribution to the comet's brightness and UV-visible spectroscopy to search for gas emissions, primarily using VLT/FORS. In addition we imaged the comet in near-infrared wavelengths (JHK) in late 2014 with Gemini-S/Flamingos-2. Results: We find that the comet was already active in early 2014 at heliocentric distances beyond 4 au. The evolution of the total activity (measured by dust) followed previous predictions. No gas emissions were detected despite sensitive searches. Conclusions: The comet maintains a similar level of activity from orbit to orbit, and is in that sense predictable, meaning that Rosetta results correspond to typical behaviour for this comet. The gas production (for CN at least) is highly asymmetric with respect to perihelion, as our upper limits are below the measured production rates for similar distances post-perihelion in previous orbits. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 592.C-0924, 093.C-0593, 094.C-0054, and at Gemini South under GS-2014B-Q-15 and GS-2014B-Q-76.

  11. Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 Through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, Reginald; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Cable, William; Kholodov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multidecadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer. Satellite-based 6.925 and 10.65 GHz sensor algorithmic retrievals of soil moisture by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard NASA-Aqua and follow-on AMSR2 onboard JAXA-Global Change Observation Mission - Water-1 are ongoing since July 2002. Accurate land-surface temperature and vegetation parameters are critical to the success of passive microwave algorithmic retrieval schemes. Strategically located soil moisture measurements are needed for spatial and temporal co-location evaluation and validation of the space-based algorithmic estimates. We compare on a daily basis ground-based (subsurface-probe) 50- and 70-MHz radio-frequency soil moisture measurements with NASA- and JAXA-algorithmic retrieval passive microwave retrievals. We find improvements in performance of the JAXA-algorithm (AMSR-E reprocessed and AMSR2 ongoing) relative to the earlier NASA-algorithm version. In the boreal forest regions accurate land-surface temperatures and vegetation parameters are still needed for algorithmic retrieval success. Over the period of AMSR-E retrievals we find evidence of at the high northern latitudes of growing terrestrial radio-frequency interference in the 10.65 GHz channel soil moisture content. This is an important error source for satellite-based active and passive microwave remote sensing soil moisture retrievals in Arctic regions that must be addressed. Ref: International

  12. Solar-like Oscillations and Activity in Procyon: A Comparison of the 2007 MOST and Ground-based Radial Velocity Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Arentoft, Torben; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Günter; Kallinger, Thomas; Kjeldsen, Hans; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Stello, Dennis; Weiss, Werner W.

    2011-04-01

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A l=0,phot = 9.1 ± 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A l=0,phot/A l=0,RV = 0.24 ± 0.02 ppm cm-1 s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  13. Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 Through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muskett, R. R.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.; Kholodov, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multidecadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer. Satellite-based 6.925 and 10.65 GHz sensor algorithmic retrievals of soil moisture by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard NASA-Aqua and follow-on AMSR2 onboard JAXA-Global Change Observation Mission - Water-1 are ongoing since July 2002. Accurate land-surface temperature and vegetation parameters are critical to the success of passive microwave algorithmic retrieval schemes. Strategically located soil moisture measurements are needed for spatial and temporal co-location evaluation and validation of the space-based algorithmic estimates. We compare on a daily basis ground-based (subsurface-probe) 50- and 70-MHz radio-frequency soil moisture measurements with NASA- and JAXA-algorithmic retrieval passive microwave retrievals. We find improvements in performance of the JAXA-algorithm (AMSR-E reprocessed and AMSR2 ongoing) relative to the earlier NASA-algorithm version. In the boreal forest regions accurate land-surface temperatures and vegetation parameters are still needed for algorithmic retrieval success. Over the period of AMSR-E retrievals we find evidence of at the high northern latitudes of growing terrestrial radio-frequency interference in the 10.65 GHz channel soil moisture content. This is an important error source for satellite-based active and passive microwave remote sensing soil moisture retrievals in Arctic regions that must be addressed. Ref: Muskett, R

  14. Ground-Based Telescope Parametric Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Rowell, Ginger Holmes

    2004-01-01

    A parametric cost model for ground-based telescopes is developed using multi-variable statistical analysis, The model includes both engineering and performance parameters. While diameter continues to be the dominant cost driver, other significant factors include primary mirror radius of curvature and diffraction limited wavelength. The model includes an explicit factor for primary mirror segmentation and/or duplication (i.e.. multi-telescope phased-array systems). Additionally, single variable models based on aperture diameter are derived. This analysis indicates that recent mirror technology advances have indeed reduced the historical telescope cost curve.

  15. Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2015-10-01

    I will described the campaign of observations from ground-based (and Earth orbiting) telescopes that supports the Rosetta mission. Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at #1000km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This not only helps to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also allows us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground, and in that way extend the results of the Rosetta mission to the wider population. The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it will be considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will show results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from early 2015 observations. I will also describe the varied observations that will be included in the campaign post-perihelion, and how all of these results fit around what we are learning about 67P from Rosetta.

  16. Ground-based IRCM testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Derek; Owen, Mark

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in the ability to perform comprehensive ground based Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) testing have the capability to fill the Test and Evaluation (T&E) gaps for existing and future weapons system acquisition. IRCM testing has historically been dominated and in a manner limited by expensive live fire testing requirements. While live fire testing is a vital part of IRCM T&E, next generation technological developments now enable closed-loop, ground-based IRCM testing to provide valuable complementary test data at a much lower cost. The high cost and limited assets that have prevented live fire and flight testing from providing a thorough hardware based data set required for previous T&E analysis is no longer an issue. In the past, traditional physics based digital system model (DSM) analysis has been utilized to augment the IRCM data sets to make them statistically significant. While DSM is a useful tool in the development of IRCM systems, the newly developed installed system testing utilizing a hardware-in-the-loop construct provides for an enhanced level of fidelity and assurance that the systems will meet the warfighter's needs. The goal of the newly developed test technologies is to develop a statistical significant data set utilizing hardware-in-the-loop at a significantly lower cost than historical methods.

  17. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. 6: Variability of NGC 3783 from ground-based data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirpe, G. M.; Winge, C.; Altieri, B.; Alloin, D.; Aguero, E. L.; Anupama, G. C.; Ashley, R.; Bertram, R.; Calderon, J. H.; Catchpole, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3783 was intensely monitored in several bands between 1991 December and 1992 August. This paper presents the results from the ground-based observations in the optical and near-IR bands, which complement the data set formed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra, discussed elsewhere. Spectroscopic and photometric data from several observatories were combined in order to obtain well-sampled light curves of the continuum and of H(beta). During the campaign the source underwent significant variability. The light curves of the optical continuum and of H(beta) display strong similarities to those obtained with the IUE. The near-IR flux did not vary significantly except for a slight increase at the end of the campaign. The cross-correlation analysis shows that the variations of the optical continuum have a lag of 1 day or less with respect to those of the UV continuum, with an uncertainty of is less than or equal to 4 days. The integrated flux of H(beta) varies with a delay of about 8 days. These results confirm that (1) the continuum variations occur simultaneously or with a very small lag across the entire UV-optical range, as in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 5548; and (2) the emission lines of NGC 3783 respond to ionizing continuum variations with less delay than those of NGC 5548. As observed in NGC 5548, the lag of H(beta) with respect to the continuum is greater than those of the high-ionization lines.

  18. THEMIS Ground-based Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D.; Means, J. D.; Dearborn, D.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Mende, S.; Craig, N.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a fluxgate suitable for full earth's field ground measurements and to be used for the ground-based segment of the THEMIS project.. The operation of the electronics is based on a 2nd order sigma-delta technique that yields a 24 bit/axis vector value with 4ppm measurement resolution at 2Hz without the use of analog to digital converters. This digital design produces superior noise performance over more conventional techniques while dramatically increasing the resolution of the magnetic field measurement. The magnetometer system is equipped with a DAC offsetting system which by program control can offset the Earth's field in any sensor orientation. Time and position data are maintained to an accuracy of 100usec and 40 meters with a dedicated Trimble Acutime2000 GPS receiver. The magnetometer may be powered from any un-regulated DC source capable of delivering 300ma. @ +10-24VDC. All data are output via USB or RS-232 interface to LabView host software which has been developed to support either Windows or Linux operating systems.Interrogation and control of the magnetometer is available via TCP protocol through a host internet connection.

  19. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragan, Ken

    2002-04-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma rays in the energy range from 50 to 500 GeV using an array of heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in New Mexico. The mirrors collect Cherenkov light generated by gamma-ray air showers and concentrate it onto cameras composed of photomultiplier tubes. The STACEE instrument is now complete, and uses a total of 64 heliostats. Prototype instruments, using smaller numbers of heliostats, have previously detected gamma emission from both the Crab Nebula and the Active Galactic Nucleus Mrk421. The complete instrument has a lower threshold -- approximately 50 GeV -- than those prototypes due to superior triggering and electronics, including flash ADCs for every channel.We will discuss the performance of the complete instrument in its first full season of operation, and present preliminary results of selected observations.

  20. Cokriging with ground-based radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, P. M.; Webster, R.; Curran, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The formulas for cokriging and a coherent coregionalization model are presented. The model is applied to design sampling strategies for surveys using a ground-based radiometer. Results indicate that cokriging based on measured radiation is nine times as efficient as kriging the cover alone. It is concluded that cokriging in conjunction with ground-based radiometry provides an economical and operational technique for using reflectance to estimate the earth surface properties.

  1. Ground-Based Sensing System for Weed Mapping in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A ground-based weed mapping system was developed to measure weed intensity and distribution in a cotton field. The weed mapping system includes WeedSeeker® PhD600 sensor modules to indicate the presence of weeds between rows, a GPS receiver to provide spatial information, and a data acquisition and ...

  2. Ground based research in microgravity materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Rathz, Tom

    1994-01-01

    The core activities performed during this time period have been concerned with tracking the TEMPEST experiments on the shuttle with drops of Zr, Ni, and Nb alloys. In particular a lot of Zr drops are being made to better define the recalescence characteristics of that system so that accurate comparisons of the drop tube results with Tempest can be made. A new liner, with minimal reflectivity characteristics, has been inserted into the drop tube in order to improve the recalescence measurements of the falling drops. The first installation to make the geometric measurements to ensure a proper fit has been made. The stovepipe sections are currently in the shop at MSFC being painted with low reflectivity black paint. Work has also continued on setting up the MEL apparatus obtained from Oak Ridge in the down stairs laboratory at the Drop Tube Facilities. Some ground-based experiments on the same metals as are being processed on TEMPEST are planned for the MEL. The flight schedules for the KC-135 experiments are still to be determined in the near future.

  3. Fine structure of breakup development inferred from satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, T. A.; Kornilov, I. A.; Kornilov, O. I.

    2008-05-01

    More than 60 breakups, including weak activations of the pseudo-breakup type, moderate breakups, and events of very strong auroral activity, were analyzed using ground-based TV data, together with satellite auroral images. We studied the fine subvisual details of spatial and temporal dynamics of active auroral forms and surrounding diffuse luminosity, both in the longitudinal and latitudinal directions of the TV camera field of view. For all types of breakups a close interconnection of auroral activity was found across and along the auroral oval.

  4. Challenges and Rewards in Ground-Based Observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reardon, Kevin P.

    2016-05-01

    DKIST will be largest ground-based project in solar physics, and will offer access and data to the whole community. In pursuit of exciting science, many users may have their first encounters with high-resolution, ground-based solar observations. New facilities, space or ground-based, all bring particular signatures in their data. While tools or processed datasets might serve to minimize such non-solar signatures, it is nonetheless important for users to understand the impacts on observation planning, the nature of the corrections applied, and any residual effects on their data.In this talk I will review some of the instrumental and atmospheric signatures that are important for ground-based observing, in particular in planning for the potential capabilities of the DKIST Data Center. These techniques include image warping, local PSF deconvolution, atmospheric dispersion correction, and scattered light removal. I will present examples of data sets afflicted by such problems as well as some of the algorithms used in characterizing and removing these contributions. This will demonstrate how even with the challenges of observing through a turbulent atmosphere, it is possible to achieve dramatic scientific results.

  5. Spatial features of Weddell Sea and Yakutsk Anomalies in foF2 diurnal variations during high solar activity periods: Interkosmos-19 satellite and ground-based ionosonde observations, IRI reproduction and GSM TIP model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Karpachev, A. T.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Stepanov, A. E.

    2015-04-01

    We studied the main morphology of the formation of summer ionospheric anomalies which includes the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) and the Yakutsk Anomaly (YA) in terms of positive night-to-day foF2 differences. For this purpose, we have for the first time used topside sounding (Interkosmos-19 satellite) and ground-based (ionosonde) data as well as results from an empirical model (International Reference Ionosphere - IRI) and from a first-principles model (Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere - GSM TIP). The main spatial morphological characteristics of the WSA and YA are similar which points to a common cause for their occurrence. Our preliminary GSM TIP model results showed that the foF2 values at nighttime are greater than at daytime due to: (1) the horizontal plasma transport due to electromagnetic drift; (2) the vertical component of plasma transport along the geomagnetic field lines via meridional neutral wind; (3) the distribution of the neutral composition of the thermosphere.

  6. Synergy benefit in temperature, humiditiy and cloud property profiling by integrating ground based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebell, K.; Orlandi, E.; Hünerbein, A.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate, highly vertically resolved temperature, humidity and cloud property profiles are needed for many applications. They are essential for climate monitoring, a better process understanding and the subsequent improvement of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models. In order to provide such profiles with a high temporal resolution, multiple wavelength active and passive remote sensing techniques available at ground based observatories, e.g. the Atmospheric Radiation Measruement (ARM) Program and Cloudnet facilities, need to be exploited. In particular, the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT, Löhnert et al., 2008) has been successfully applied to simultaneously derive profiles of temperature, humidity and liquid water by a Bayesian based retrieval using a combination of ground based microwave radiometer, cloud radar and a priori information. Within the project ICOS (Integrating Cloud Observations from Ground and Space - a Way to Combine Time and Space Information), we develop a flexible IPT, which allows for the combination of a variety of ground based measurements from cloud radar, microwave radiometer (MWR) and IR spectrometer as well as satellite based information from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of METEOSAT. As ground based observations are mainly sensitive to the lower parts of the troposphere, the satellite measurements provide complementary information and are thus expected to improve the estimates of the thermodynamic and cloud property profiles, i. e. hydrometeor content and effective radius, considerably. In addition to the SEVIRI IR measurements, which are provided with a high repetition time, information from polar orbiting satellites could be included. In paticular, the potential of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and Microwave Sounding Unit (MHS) in the retrieval is investigated. In order to understand the improvement by integrating the measurements of the above

  7. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  8. MSFC Skylab ground-based astronomy program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Ground-Based Astronomy Program (SGAP) was conducted to enhance the data base of solar physics obtained during the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) mission flown in conjunction with the Skylab orbital station. Leading solar physicists from various observatories obtained data from the ground at the same time that orbital data were being acquired by ATM. The acquisition of corollary solar data from the ground simultaneously with the ATM orbital observations helped to provide a broader basis for understanding solar physics by increasing spectral coverage and by the use of additional sophisticated instruments of various types. This report briefly describes the individual tasks and the associated instrumentation selected for this ground-based program and contains as appendices, the final reports from the Principal Investigators.

  9. The WASP and NGTS ground-based transit surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatley, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    I will review the current status of ground-based exoplanet transit surveys, using the Wide Angle Search for Planets (WASP) and the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) as specific examples. I will describe the methods employed by these surveys and show how planets from Neptune to Jupiter-size are detected and confirmed around bright stars. I will also give an overview of the remarkably wide range of exoplanet characterization that is made possible with large-telescope follow up of these bright transiting systems. This characterization includes bulk composition and spin-orbit alignment, as well as atmospheric properties such as thermal structure, composition and dynamics. Finally, I will outline how ground-based photometric studies of transiting planets will evolve with the advent of new space-based surveys such as TESS and PLATO.

  10. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  11. Silicon carbide optics for space and ground based astronomical telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robichaud, Joseph; Sampath, Deepak; Wainer, Chris; Schwartz, Jay; Peton, Craig; Mix, Steve; Heller, Court

    2012-09-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) optical materials are being applied widely for both space based and ground based optical telescopes. The material provides a superior weight to stiffness ratio, which is an important metric for the design and fabrication of lightweight space telescopes. The material also has superior thermal properties with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity. The thermal properties advantages are important for both space based and ground based systems, which typically need to operate under stressing thermal conditions. The paper will review L-3 Integrated Optical Systems - SSG’s (L-3 SSG) work in developing SiC optics and SiC optical systems for astronomical observing systems. L-3 SSG has been fielding SiC optical components and systems for over 25 years. Space systems described will emphasize the recently launched Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) developed for JHU-APL and NASA-GSFC. Review of ground based applications of SiC will include supporting L-3 IOS-Brashear’s current contract to provide the 0.65 meter diameter, aspheric SiC secondary mirror for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST).

  12. Precursor Analysis for Flight- and Ground-Based Anomaly Risk Significance Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groen, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the precursor analysis for flight and ground based anomaly risk significance. It includes information on accident precursor analysis, real models vs. models, and probabilistic analysis.

  13. Performance evaluation of ground based radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Stanley E.

    1994-06-01

    Ground based radar systems are a critical resource to the command, control, and communications system. This thesis provides the tools and methods to better understand the actual performance of an operational ground based radar system. This thesis defines two measurable performance standards: (1) the baseline performance, which is based on the sensor's internal characteristics, and (2) the theoretical performance, which considers not only the sensor's internal characteristics, but also the effects of the surrounding terrain and atmosphere on the sensor's performance. The baseline radar system performance, often used by operators, contractors, and radar modeling software to determine the expected system performance, is a simplistic and unrealistic means to predict actual radar system performance. The theoretical radar system performance is more complex; but, the results are much more indicative of the actual performance of an operational radar system. The AN/UPS-1 at the Naval Postgraduate School was used as the system under test to illustrate the baseline and theoretical radar system performance. The terrain effects are shown by performing a multipath study and producing coverage diagrams. The key variables used to construct the multipath study and coverage diagrams are discussed in detail. The atmospheric effects are illustrated by using the Integrated Refractive Effects Prediction System (IREPS) and the Engineer's Refractive Effects Prediction System (EREPS) software tools to produce propagations conditions summaries and coverage displays.

  14. Mitigating ground-based sensor failures with video motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macior, Robert E.; Knauth, Jonathan P.; Walter, Sharon M.; Evans, Richard

    2008-10-01

    Unattended Ground Sensor (UGS) systems typically employ distributed sensor nodes utilizing seismic, magnetic or passive IR sensing modalities to alarm if activity is present. The use of an imaging component to verify sensor events is beneficial to create actionable intelligence. Integration of the ground-based images with other ISR data requires that the images contain valid activity and are appropriately formatted, such as prescribed by Standard NATO Agreement (STANAG) 4545 or the National Imagery Transmission Format, version 2.1 (NITF 2.1). Ground activity sensors suffer from false alarms due to meteorological or biological activity. The addition of imaging allows the analyst to differentiate valid threats from nuisance alarms. Images are prescreened based on target size and temperature difference relative to the background. The combination of video motion detection based on thermal imaging with seismic, magnetic or passive IR sensing modalities improves data quality through multi-phenomenon combinatorial logic. The ground-based images having a nominally vertical aspect are transformed to the horizontal geospatial domain for exploitation and correlation of UGS imagery with other ISR data and for efficient archive and retrieval purposes. The description of an UGS system utilized and solutions that were developed and implemented during an experiment to correlate and fuse IR still imagery with ground moving target information, forming real-time, actionable, coalition intelligence, are presented.

  15. Flight- and Ground-Based Materials Science Programs at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    The Microgravity Research Division of NASA funds research programs in all branches of materials science including ceramics and glasses. A NASA Research Announcement (NRA)is currently planned with proposals due in March 1999. Proposals are accepted for both flight- definition and ground- based research projects with a main criterion being a strong justification for microgravity. A review of the program in its entirety will be given, with special emphasis on microgravity related ceramics research. The topics of current interest in the NRA will be discussed in terms of International Space Station research and NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) initiative.

  16. Sky type discrimination using a ground-based sun photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Wylie, B.K.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-year feasibility study was conducted at the USGS EROS Data Center, South Dakota (43.733°N, 96.6167°W) to assess whether a four-band, ground-based, sun photometer could be used to discriminate sky types. The results indicate that unique spectral signatures do exist between sunny skies (including clear and hazy skies) and cirrus, and cirrostratus, altocumulus or fair-weather cumulus, and thin stratocumulus or altostratus, and fog/fractostratus skies. There were insufficient data points to represent other cloud types at a statistically significant level.

  17. Microgravity research in NASA ground-based facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack

    1989-01-01

    An overview of reduced gravity research performed in NASA ground-based facilities sponsored by the Microgravity Science and Applications Program of the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications is presented. A brief description and summary of the operations and capabilities of each of these facilities along with an overview of the historical usage of them is included. The goals and program elements of the Microgravity Science and Applications programs are described and the specific programs that utilize the low gravity facilities are identified. Results from two particular investigations in combustion (flame spread over solid fuels) and fluid physics (gas-liquid flows at microgravity conditions) are presented.

  18. 10 years of the IAU Efforts for Capitalizing the Ground-Based Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda; Thuillot, William

    2011-06-01

    In 2000 a new IAU working group was founded (IAU GA, Manchester): Future Development of Ground-Based Astrometry (FDGBA). It was revised in 2003 during the IAU GA in Sydney. A new one replaced it in 2006 (IAU GA, Prague): Astrometry by Small Ground-Based Telescopes (ASGBT). It was renewed for other three years during the IAU GA in Rio de Janeiro. The main aim of the working groups followed the Newsletter No. 1 of the IAU Commission 8, which says: The post-Hipparcos era has brought an element of uncertainty as to the goals and future programs for all of ground-based astrometry The purpose of the WGs was "to update and maintain information on astrometric programmes and activities carried out by small telescopes, to diffuse news through these pages and e-mails, to facilitate the collaborations and to help for the coordination of the activities, when possible, in astrometry from ground-based telescopes".

  19. Ground-Based Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Jamie

    2014-10-01

    This paper is the write-up of a rapporteur talk given by the author at the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2013. It attempts to summarize results and developments in ground-based gamma-ray observations and instrumentation from among the ˜300 submissions to the gamma-ray sessions of the meeting. Satellite observations and theoretical developments were covered by a companion rapporteur (Stawarz, L., 33rd ICRC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Rapporteur talk: Space-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy, 2013). Any review of this nature is unavoidably subjective and incomplete. Nevertheless, the article should provide a useful status report for those seeking an overview of this exciting and fast-moving field.

  20. Report on the ground-based observation campaign of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehin, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta gets closer to the nucleus than any previous mission, and returns wonderfully detailed measurements from the heart of the comet, but at the cost of not seeing the large scale coma and tails. The ground-based campaign fills in the missing part of the picture, studying the comet at about 1000 km resolution, and following how the overall activity of the comet varies. These data provide context information for Rosetta, so changes in the inner coma seen by the spacecraft can be correlated with the phenomena observable in comets. This will not only help to complete our understanding of the activity of 67P, but also to allow us to compare it with other comets that are only observed from the ground.The ground-based campaign includes observations with nearly all major facilities world-wide. In 2014 the majority of data came from the ESO VLT, as the comet was still relatively faint and in Southern skies, but as it returns to visibility from Earth in 2015 it is considerably brighter, approaching its perihelion in August, and at Northern declinations. I will present results from the 2014 campaign, including visible wavelength photometry and spectroscopy, and the latest results from 2015 observations.

  1. Augmenting WFIRST Microlensing with a Ground-Based Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Gould, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Augmenting the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) microlensing campaigns with intensive observations from a ground-based network of wide-field survey telescopes would have several major advantages. First, it would enable full two-dimensional (2-D) vector microlens parallax measurements for a substantial fraction of low-mass lenses as well as planetary and binary events that show caustic crossing features. For a significant fraction of the free-floating planet (FFP) events and all caustic-crossing planetary/binary events, these 2-D parallax measurements directly lead to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) of the lens object (or lens system). For even more events, the complementary ground-based observations will yield 1-D parallax measurements. Together with the 1-D parallaxes from WFIRST alone, they can probe the entire mass range M > M_Earth. For luminous lenses, such 1-D parallax measurements can be promoted to complete solutions (mass, distance, transverse velocity) by high-resolution imaging. This would provide crucial information not only about the hosts of planets and other lenses, but also enable a much more precise Galactic model. Other benefits of such a survey include improved understanding of binaries (particularly with low mass primaries), and sensitivity to distant ice-giant and gas-giant companions of WFIRST lenses that cannot be detected by WFIRST itself due to its restricted observing windows. Existing ground-based microlensing surveys can be employed if WFIRST is pointed at lower-extinction fields than is currently envisaged. This would come at some cost to the event rate. Therefore the benefits of improved characterization of lenses must be weighed against these costs.

  2. A possible explanation for the inconsistency between the Giotto grain mass distribution and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, C. H.; Green, S. F.; Mcdonnell, J. A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Giotto measured the in situ Halley dust grain mass distribution with 2 instruments, Particle Impact Analyzer and Dust Impact Detection System (DIDSY), as well as the total intercepted mass from the deceleration of the spacecraft (Giotto Radio-Science Experiment, GRE). Ground based observations made shortly before encounter have fluxes much higher than would be predicted from Giotto data. It is concluded that Giotto DIDSY and GRE data represent observations of dust originating from a narrow track along the nucleus. They are consistent with ground based data, if assumptions are made about the level of activity along this track. The actual size distribution that should be used for modeling of the whole coma should not include the large mass excess actually observed by Giotto. Extrapolation of the small grain data should be used, since for these grains the velocity dispersion is low and temporal changes at the nucleus would not affect the shape of the mass distribution.

  3. Multi-GNSS assessment of ionospheric threat model parameters for Ground Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onur Karslioglu, Mahmut; Durmaz, Murat; YeganehSahab, Amir

    2015-04-01

    Ground-Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) makes aircraft precision approach and landing possible by providing differential corrections and integrity information for pseude range measurements obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS).These information are transmited to the aviation users by means of very high frequency (VHF) or ultra high frequency (UHF) bands on the basis of GBAS local networks which support avionic receivers approximately within 20 kilometers of the airport. GBAS is strongly affected by anomalous ionospheric gradients during high ionospheric activities which can treaten the safety of the users. Therefore anomalous ionospheric gradients must be determined to understand and mitigate ionosphere threats occurring in different geographical regions. In this work, we assess an ionospheric anomaly threat model by analysing ionospheric gradients around Istanbul Ataturk Airport. For this, real ground-based observations from both GPS and GLONASS during high ionospheric activities since 2009 are pre-processed to extract ionospheric gradients. Afterwards ionospheric delays at each ionospheric piercing point are determined by applying different local ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) modeling and filtering techniques on the basis of raw carrier-phase observations. The ionospheric fronts are searched by looking at high ionospheric gradients which result from ionospheric delay differences between ionospheric piercing points. Then, the ionospheric threat parameters in terms of width, slope and velocity of the ionospheric wavefront are estimated from the extracted front occurences and gradients including velocity information of ionospheric piercing points. Finally, the estimated threat model parameters are examined and assessed by comparing the results from different techniques.

  4. SCIENTIFIC EFFICIENCY OF GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received {>=}100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  5. Ground Based Studies of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.

    2005-01-01

    This report covers progress to date under this grant on our continuing program to conduct ground based studies of the outer solar system planets and satellites, with emphasis on spectroscopy and atmospheric phenomena. The research continues under our new PAST grant, NNG04G131G beginning 5/1/2004. The original period of performance of the subject grant was 3/1/2001 to 2/28/2004, but was extended one year at no cost. Although there is some overlap in the scientific projects conducted during the extended year with those of the new grant, this report is confined to the portion of the work funded under NAG5-10435. The primary goals for this grant period were a comparative study of outer planet thermospheres/ionospheres near solar maximum, extended to the mid-IR, and the investigation of molecular dimers in outer solar system atmospheres. This project supports NASA's planned space missions, Jupiter Polar Orbiter, outer Planet Microprobes, and the recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter. It also supports the OSS strategic plan themes, The Exploration of the Solar System and The Sun-Earth Connection/ Understanding comparative planetary space environments.

  6. Scientific Efficiency of Ground-based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2012-10-01

    I scanned the six major astronomical journals of 2008 for all 1589 papers that are based on new data obtained from ground-based optical/IR telescopes worldwide. Then I collected data on numbers of papers, citations to them in 3+ years, the most-cited papers, and annual operating costs. These data are assigned to four groups by telescope aperture. For instance, while the papers from telescopes with an aperture >7 m average 1.29 more citations than those with an aperture of 2 to <4 m, this represents a small return for a factor of four difference in operating costs. Among the 17 papers that have received >=100 citations in 3+ years, only half come from the large (>7 m) telescopes. I wonder why the large telescopes do so relatively poorly and suggest possible reasons. I also found that papers based on archival data, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, produce 10.6% as many papers and 20.6% as many citations as those based on new data. Also, the 577.2 papers based on radio data produced 36.3% as many papers and 33.6% as many citations as the 1589 papers based on optical/IR telescopes.

  7. Aerosol Remote Sensing from AERONET, the Ground-Based Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, Brent N.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric particles including mineral dust, biomass burning smoke, pollution from carbonaceous aerosols and sulfates, sea salt, impact air quality and climate. The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) program, established in the early 1990s, is a federation of ground-based remote sensing aerosol networks of Sun/sky radiometers distributed around the world, which provides a long-term, continuous and readily accessible public domain database of aerosol optical (e.g., aerosol optical depth) and microphysical (e.g., aerosol volume size distribution) properties for aerosol characterization, validation of satellite retrievals, and synergism with Earth science databases. Climatological aerosol properties will be presented at key worldwide locations exhibiting discrete dominant aerosol types. Further, AERONET's temporary mesoscale network campaign (e.g., UAE2, TIGERZ, DRAGON-USA.) results that attempt to quantify spatial and temporal variability of aerosol properties, establish validation of ground-based aerosol retrievals using aircraft profile measurements, and measure aerosol properties on compatible spatial scales with satellite retrievals and aerosol transport models allowing for more robust validation will be discussed.

  8. Ground-based observation of near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffey, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An increased ground-based observation program is an essential component of any serious attempt to assess the resource potential of near-Earth asteroids. A vigorous search and characterization program could lead to the discovery and description of about 400 to 500 near-Earth asteroids in the next 20 years. This program, in conjunction with meteorite studies, would provide the data base to ensure that the results of a small number of asteroid-rendezvous and sample-return missions could be extrapolated with confidence into a geological base map of the Aten, Apollo, and Amor asteroids. Ground-based spectral studies of nearly 30 members of the Aten/Apollo/Amor population provide good evidence that this class includes bodies composed of silicates, metal-silicates, and carbonaceous assemblages similar to those found in meteorites. The instruments that are being used or could be used to search for near-Earth asteroids are listed. Techniques useful in characterizing asteroids and the types of information obtainable using these techniques are listed.

  9. THEMIS Ground Based Magnetometers and the Involvement of GEONS Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, N.; Peticolas, L.; Shutkin, A.; Dearborn, D.; Pierce, D.; Odenwald, S.; Orr, L.; Gehman, W.; Dewolf, C.; Walker, A.

    2005-05-01

    The THEMIS Education and Public Outreach team selected ten ground-based magnetometer stations each located in the proximity of a rural school in traditionally under-served, under-represented communities from Alaska to Vermont. These `ground based magnetometer' observatories will assist the THEMIS Mission's five identical satellites, called probes, when they are launched in the fall of 2006. The five probes, placed in strategic locations in Earth's magnetosphere, will help to determine the onset of auroral substorms. A teacher at each of these schools is responsible for their magnetometer data and system as well as using the data with their students through lesson plans developed collaboratively with the E/PO team. The network of teachers, students, and magnetometers together with other students who participate in monitoring the geomagnetic disturbances using the web is called the Geomagnetic Event Observation Network by Students (GEONS). We will report specific contributions to the project from the Oregon, South Dakota and Michigan GEONS teachers. We have installed five magnetometers during the Fall of 2004, and will be installing the remaining five in the Spring of 2005, and have started to display the data from the first five schools on the web. We will describe the pedagogical challenges of bringing understanding of the physics behind the THEMIS science which requires some understanding of magnetic fields, charged particles, forces, motions, and energy to middle school and high school classrooms. We will also include the formative evaluation results to date.

  10. Analysis of stratospheric NO2 trends above Kiruna using ground-based zenith sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Myojeong; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Hendrick, François; Platt, Ulrich; Pukite, Janis; Raffalski, Uwe; Van Roozendael, Michel; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric NO2 not only destroys ozone but acts as a buffer against halogen catalyzed ozone loss by converting halogen species into stable nitrates. To a better understanding of the impacts of stratospheric NO2 and O3 chemistry, we need long-term measurement data. In this study, ground-based zenith sky DOAS has successfully monitored trace gases related to stratospheric ozone chemistry since 1997. In this study, we shows the trend in stratospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) at Kiruna, Sweden (68.84°N, 20.41°E) as derived from ground-based zenith sky DOAS over the period 1997 to 2015. The results will be compared with satellite data measured from GOME on ERS-2, SCIAMACHY on EnviSAT, and GOME-2 on METOP-A. To calculate the trends, we apply a multiple linear regression model including variables to describe effects caused by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar activity, and stratospheric aerosol amount.

  11. Revised global model of thermosphere winds using satellite and ground-based observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Spencer, N. W.; Biondi, M. A.; Burnside, R. G.; Hernandez, G.; Johnson, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermospheric wind data obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer E and Dynamics Explorer 2 satellites have been combined with wind data for the lower and upper thermosphere from ground-based incoherent scatter radar and Fabry-Perot optical interferometers to generate a revision (HWM90) of the HWM87 empirical model and extend its applicability to 100 km. Comparison of the various data sets with the aid of the model shows in general remarkable agreement, particularly at mid and low latitudes. The ground-based data allow modeling of seasonal/diurnal variations, which are most distinct at midlatitudes. While solar activity variations are now included, they are found to be small and not always very clearly delineated by the current data. They are most obvious at the higher latitudes. The model describes the transition from predominately diurnal variations in the upper thermosphere to semidiurnal variations in the lower thermosphere and a transition from summer to winter flow above 140 km to winter to summer flow below. Significant altitude gradients in the wind are found to extend to 300 km at some local times and pose complications for interpretation of Fabry-Perot observations.

  12. Steps toward determination of the size and structure of the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei. 8: An intensive HST, IUE, and ground-based study of NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korista, K.; Alloin, D.; Barr, P.; Clavel, J.; Cohen, R. D.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Evans, I. N.; Horne, K.; Koratkar, A. P.; Kriss, G. A.

    1994-01-01

    We present the data and initial results from a combined HST/IUE/ground-based spectroscopic monitoring campaign on the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 that was undertaken in order to address questions that require both higher temporal resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratios than were obtained in our previous multiwavelength monitoring of this galaxy in 1988-89. IUE spectra were obtained once every two days for a period of 74 days beginning on 14 March 1993. During the last 39 days of this campaign, spectroscopic observations were also made with the HST Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) on a daily basis. Ground-based observations, consisting of 165 optical spectra and 77 photometric observations (both CCD imaging and aperture photometry), are reported for the period 1992 October to 1993 September, although much of the data are concentrated around the time of the satellite-based program. These data constitute a fifth year of intensive optical monitoring of this galaxy. In this contribution, we describe the acquisition and reduction of all of the satellite and ground-based data obtained in this program. We describe in detail various photometric problems with the FOS and explain how we identified and corrected for various anomalies. During the HST portion of the monitoring campaign, the 1350 A continuum flux is found to have varied by nearly a factor of two. In other wavebands, the continuum shows nearly identical behavior, except that the amplitude of variability is larger at shorter wavelengths, and the continuum light curves appear to show more short time-scale variability at shorter wavelengths. The broad emission lines also vary in flux, with amplitudes that are slightly smaller than the UV continuum variations and with a small time delay relative to the UV continuum. On the basis of simple time-series analysis of the UV and optical continuum and emission line light curves, we find (1) that the ultraviolet and optical continuum variations are virtually simultaneous

  13. Ground-based research of crystal growth of II-VI compound semiconductors by physical vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Gillies, D. C.; Szofran, F. R.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, Ching-Hua; Sha, Yi-Gao; Zhou, W.; Dudley, M.; Liu, Hao-Chieh; Brebrick, R. F.; Wang, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based investigation of the crystal growth of II-VI semiconductor compounds, including CdTe, CdS, ZnTe, and ZnSe, by physical vapor transport in closed ampoules was performed. The crystal growth experimental process and supporting activities--preparation and heat treatment of starting materials, vapor partial pressure measurements, and transport rate measurements are reported. The results of crystal characterization, including microscopy, microstructure, optical transmission photoluminescence, synchrotron radiation topography, and chemical analysis by spark source mass spectrography, are also discussed.

  14. Telerobotic manipulator developments for ground-based space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, J. N.; Babcock, S. M.; Butler, P. L.; Costello, H. M.; Glassell, R. L.; Kress, Reid L.; Kuban, D. P.; Rowe, J. C.; Williams, D. M.; Meintel, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    New opportunities for the application of telerobotic systems to enhance human intelligence and dexterity in the hazardous environment of space are presented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Station Program. Because of the need for significant increases in extravehicular activity and the potential increase in hazards associated with space programs, emphasis is being heightened on telerobotic systems research and development. The Automation Technology Branch at NASA Langley Research Center currently is sponsoring the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop and demonstrate ground-based telerobotic manipulator system hardware for research and demonstrations aimed at future NASA applications. The LTM incorporates traction drives, modularity, redundant kinematics, and state-of-the-art hierarchical control techniques to form a basis for merging the diverse technological domains of robust, high-dexterity teleoperations and autonomous robotic operation into common hardware to further NASA's research.

  15. Ground-based Space Weather Monitoring with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael; van Haarlem, Michiel; Lawrence, Gareth; Reid, Simon; Bos, Andre; Rawlings, Steve; Salvini, Stef; Mitchell, Cathryn; Soleimani, Manuch; Amado, Sergio; Teresa, Vital

    As one of the first of a new generation of radio instruments, the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) will provide a number of unique and novel capabilities for the astronomical community. These include remote configuration and operation, dynamic real-time processing and system response, and the ability to provide multiple simultaneous streams of data to a community whose scientific interests run the gamut from lighting in the atmospheres of distant planets to the origins of the universe itself. The LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) system is optimized for a frequency range from 30-240 MHz and consists of multiple antenna fields spread across Europe. In the Netherlands, a total 36 LOFAR stations are nearing completion with an initial 8 international stations currently being deployed in Germany, France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR has the potential to achieve unparalleled sensitivity and spatial resolution in the low frequency radio regime. LOFAR will also be one of the first radio observatories to feature automated processing pipelines to deliver fully calibrated science products to its user community. As we discuss in this presentation, the same capabilities that make LOFAR a powerful tool for radio astronomy also provide an excellent platform upon which to build a ground-based monitoring system for space weather events. For example, the ability to monitor Solar activity in near real-time is one of the key scientific capabilities being developed for LOFAR. With only a fraction of its total observing capacity, LOFAR will be able to provide continuous monitoring of the Solar spectrum over the entire 10-240 MHz band down to microsecond timescales. Autonomous routines will scan these incoming spectral data for evidence of Solar flares and be

  16. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  17. Ground-based vicarious radiometric calibration of Terra MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.

    2009-12-01

    Accurate radiometric calibration is required by Earth-observing systems to ensure that the derived data products are of the highest quality. Preflight calibration is used as a baseline to understand the system before it is launched on orbit, while post-launch calibration is used to understand changes that may have occurred due to the nature of launching an instrument into space. On-orbit radiometric calibration ensures that changes in the system, including any onboard calibration sources, can be monitored. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona has been directly involved in the ground-based vicarious calibration of both Terra and Aqua MODIS since their respective launches in 1999 and 2002. RSG personnel are present at a test site during sensor overpass, and surface reflectance and atmospheric attenuation measurements are used as inputs to a radiative transfer code to determine the top-of-atmosphere radiance for the sensor under test. In the case of Terra MODIS, a 1-km2 site at Railroad Valley, Nevada, is used as a test site. This work presents results obtained using the reflectance-based approach at RSG’s Railroad Valley test site. Results from 10 years of in situ data collection at Railroad Valley show a percent difference in the seven land spectral channels between RSG and Terra MODIS ranging from 1.6 % in channel 6 (1632 nm), to 5.1% in channel 4 (553 nm). The average percent difference for Terra MODIS’s seven land channels and RSG is 3.5%. The uncertainty is within the 3-5% predicted for ground-based vicarious calibration.

  18. Progress report of FY 1997 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1997-10-05

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this proposal was to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. The algorithm will include recently-developed quality control procedures for radiometers. The focus of this years activities has been on the intercomparison of data obtained during an intensive operating period at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma.

  19. Unsupervised learning in persistent sensing for target recognition by wireless ad hoc networks of ground-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2008-04-01

    In previous work by the author, effective persistent and pervasive sensing for recognition and tracking of battlefield targets were seen to be achieved, using intelligent algorithms implemented by distributed mobile agents over a composite system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for persistence and a wireless network of unattended ground sensors for pervasive coverage of the mission environment. While simulated performance results for the supervised algorithms of the composite system are shown to provide satisfactory target recognition over relatively brief periods of system operation, this performance can degrade by as much as 50% as target dynamics in the environment evolve beyond the period of system operation in which the training data are representative. To overcome this limitation, this paper applies the distributed approach using mobile agents to the network of ground-based wireless sensors alone, without the UAV subsystem, to provide persistent as well as pervasive sensing for target recognition and tracking. The supervised algorithms used in the earlier work are supplanted by unsupervised routines, including competitive-learning neural networks (CLNNs) and new versions of support vector machines (SVMs) for characterization of an unknown target environment. To capture the same physical phenomena from battlefield targets as the composite system, the suite of ground-based sensors can be expanded to include imaging and video capabilities. The spatial density of deployed sensor nodes is increased to allow more precise ground-based location and tracking of detected targets by active nodes. The "swarm" mobile agents enabling WSN intelligence are organized in a three processing stages: detection, recognition and sustained tracking of ground targets. Features formed from the compressed sensor data are down-selected according to an information-theoretic algorithm that reduces redundancy within the feature set, reducing the dimension of samples used in the target

  20. Space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide anomalies: The importance of ground-based validation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Carn, S. A.; Corradini, S.; Merucci, L.; Salerno, G.; La Spina, A.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) anomalies, and their integration with ground-based observations. Three goals provide motivation to their integration: (a) development of new volcano monitoring techniques, with better spatial and temporal coverage, because pre-eruptive volcanic CO2 emissions are potentially the earliest available indicators of volcanic unrest; (b) improvement the currently very poor global CO2 source strength inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude strong point source emission and dispersion studies. (1) Feasibility of space-borne detection of volcanic CO2 anomalies. Volcanoes are highly variable but continuous CO2 emitters, distributed globally, and emissions often occur at high altitudes. To detect strong point sources of CO2 from space, several hurdles have to be overcome: orographic clouds, unknown dispersion behavior, a high CO2 background in the troposphere, and sparse data coverage from existing satellite sensors. These obstacles can be overcome by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, and by employing repeat target mode observation strategies. The Japanese GOSAT instrument has been operational since January 2009, producing CO2 total column measurements with a repeat cycle of 3 days and a field of view of 10km. GOSAT thus has the potential to provide spatially integrated data for entire volcanic edifices, especially in target mode. Since summer 2010 we have conducted repeated target mode observations of over 20 persistently active global volcanoes including Etna (Italy), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), and Ambrym (Vanuatu), using L2 GOSAT FTS SWIR data. One of our best-studied test cases is Mt. Etna on Sicily (Italy), which reawakened in 2011 after a period of quiescence and produced a sequence of eruptive activities including lava fountaining events, coinciding with target-mode GOSAT observations conducted there since 2010. For the

  1. Extragalactic Science with the Next Generation of Ground Based TeV {gamma}-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Krawczynski, Henric

    2008-12-24

    The ground based Cherenkov telescope experiments H.E.S.S., MAGIC, and VERITAS, and the space borne Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope are currently exploring the galactic and extragalactic Universe in {gamma}-rays. At the time of writing this article, a large number of Active Galactic Nuclei have been studied in great detail and the {gamma}-ray observations have had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of jets from these objects. In this contribution, the status of ground based {gamma}-ray observations of AGN and other extragalactic source classes is reviewed as of October, 2008. After discussing source classes that could be detected with next generation ground based experiments like AGIS, CTA, and HAWC, the potential impact of the observations on the fields of high energy astrophysics, structure formation, observational cosmology, and fundamental physics is reviewed. We close with a discussion of the technical requirements that arise from the science drivers.

  2. Optimal design of active and semi-active suspensions including time delays and preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac', A.; Youn, I.

    1993-10-01

    Several control laws for active and semi-active suspension based on a linear half car model are derived and investigated. The strategies proposed take full advantage of the fact that the road input to the rear wheels is a delayed version of that to the front wheels, which in turn can be obtained either from the measurements of the front wheels and body motions or by direct preview of road irregularities if preview sensors are available. The suspension systems are optimized with respect to ride comfort, road holding and suspension rattle space as expressed by the mean-square-values of body acceleration (including effects of heave and pitch), tire deflections and front and rear suspension travels. The optimal control laws that minimize the given performance index and include passivity constraints in the semi-active case are derived using calculus of variation. The optimal semi-active suspension becomes piecewise linear, varying between passive and fully active systems and combinations of them. The performances of active and semi-active systems with and without preview were evaluated by numerical simulation in the time and frequency domains. The results show that incorporation of time delay between the front and rear axles in controller design improves the dynamic behavior of the rear axle and control of body pitch motion, while additional preview improves front wheel dynamics and body heave.

  3. Progress report of FY 1998 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1999-10-01

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this effort is to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. The focus of this years activities has been on the intercomparison of data obtained during the Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period'97 at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma.

  4. Development requirements for a successful ground based CELSS demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Considerations critical to a ground based control demonstration were identified. The controlled ecological life support system technologies were assessed for nutrition and food processing, food production, waste processing, and systems engineering/modeling.

  5. Space transfer with ground-based laser/electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Stavnes, Mark; Oleson, Steve; Bozek, John

    1993-01-01

    A new method of providing power to space vehicles consists of using ground-based lasers to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space. This can be used as a power source for electrically propelled orbital transfer vehicles.

  6. Analysis of the substorm trigger phase using multiple ground-based instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kauristie, K.; Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    The authors discuss in detail the observation of an event of auroral activity fading during the trigger, or growth phase of a magnetic storm. This event was observed by all-sky cameras, EISCAT radar and magnetometers, riometers, and pulsation magnetometers, from ground based stations in Finland and Scandanavia. Based on their detailed analysis, they present a possible cause for the observed fading.

  7. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude high-altitude clouds from 4 ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, J. C.; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Comstock, J.; Winker, D.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2009-04-01

    Cirrus clouds not only play a major role in the energy budget of the Earth-Atmosphere system, but are also important in the hydrological cycle [Stephens et al., 1990; Webster, 1994]. According to satellite passive remote sensing, high-altitude clouds cover as much as 40% of the earth's surface on average (Liou 1986; Stubenrauch et al., 2006) and can reach 70% of cloud cover over the Tropics (Wang et al., 1996; Nazaryan et al., 2008). Hence, given their very large cloud cover, they have a major role in the climate system (Lynch et al. 2001). Cirrus clouds can be classified into three distinct families according to their optical thickness, namely subvisible clouds (OD<0.03), semi-transparent clouds (0.03active remote sensing: ground-based lidars at four mid-latitude observatories and the spaceborne instrument CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization). Lidar sampling, macrophysical (cloud base height, cloud top height, cloud thickness) and optical (cloud optical thickness) properties statistics are then evaluated and compared between the four observatories ground-based lidar measurements and quasi-simultaneously CALIOP overpasses. We note an overall good

  8. Challenges and Opportunities for Ground-based Helioseismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, W. J.

    2013-12-01

    I summarize the current status of ground-based helioseismic observations, in particular the two operational networks GONG and BiSON. I then discuss requirements for continued and future ground-based observations based on key science drivers, finishing with a discussion of SPRING, a proposed future high-spatial-resolution network that would provide helioseismic data and a broad range of synoptic data products.

  9. Predicting thunderstorm evolution using ground-based lightning detection networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Lightning measurements acquired principally by a ground-based network of magnetic direction finders are used to diagnose and predict the existence, temporal evolution, and decay of thunderstorms over a wide range of space and time scales extending over four orders of magnitude. The non-linear growth and decay of thunderstorms and their accompanying cloud-to-ground lightning activity is described by the three parameter logistic growth model. The growth rate is shown to be a function of the storm size and duration, and the limiting value of the total lightning activity is related to the available energy in the environment. A new technique is described for removing systematic bearing errors from direction finder data where radar echoes are used to constrain site error correction and optimization (best point estimate) algorithms. A nearest neighbor pattern recognition algorithm is employed to cluster the discrete lightning discharges into storm cells and the advantages and limitations of different clustering strategies for storm identification and tracking are examined.

  10. Ground-based Observations of the Solar Sources of Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronig, A. M.; Pötzi, W.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of the Sun and its activity is a task of growing importance in the frame of space weather research and awareness. Major space weather disturbances at Earth have their origin in energetic outbursts from the Sun: solar flares, coronal mass ejections and associated solar energetic particles. In this review we discuss the importance and complementarity of ground-based and space-based observations for space weather studies. The main focus is drawn on ground-based observations in the visible range of the spectrum, in particular in the diagnostically manifold Hα spectral line, which enables us to detect and study solar flares, filaments (prominences), filament (prominence) eruptions, and Moreton waves. Existing Hα networks such as the GONG and the Global High-Resolution Hα Network are discussed. As an example of solar observations from space weather research to operations, we present the system of real-time detection of Hα flares and filaments established at Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO; Austria) in the frame of the space weather segment of the ESA Space Situational Awareness programme (swe.ssa.esa.int). An evaluation of the system, which is continuously running since July 2013 is provided, covering an evaluation period of almost 2.5 years. During this period, KSO provided 3020 hours of real-time Hα observations at the ESA SWE portal. In total, 824 Hα flares were detected and classified by the real-time detection system, including 174 events of Hα importance class 1 and larger. For the total sample of events, 95 % of the automatically determined flare peak times lie within ±5 min of the values given in the official optical flares reports (by NOAA and KSO), and 76 % of the start times. The heliographic positions determined are better than ±5°. The probability of detection of flares of importance 1 or larger is 95 %, with a false alarm rate of 16 %. These numbers confirm the high potential of automatic flare detection and alerting from ground-based

  11. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    The test results for the onboard navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert System Trainer System for an aircraft/space shuttle navigation entry phase system are described. A summary of the test methods and analysis results are included. Functional inspection and execution, interface tests, default data sources, function call returns, status light indicators, and user interface command acceptance are covered.

  12. A design for a ground-based data management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambird, Barbara A.; Lavine, David

    1988-01-01

    An initial design for a ground-based data management system which includes intelligent data abstraction and cataloging is described. The large quantity of data on some current and future NASA missions leads to significant problems in providing scientists with quick access to relevant data. Human screening of data for potential relevance to a particular study is time-consuming and costly. Intelligent databases can provide automatic screening when given relevent scientific parameters and constraints. The data management system would provide, at a minimum, information of availability of the range of data, the type available, specific time periods covered together with data quality information, and related sources of data. The system would inform the user about the primary types of screening, analysis, and methods of presentation available to the user. The system would then aid the user with performing the desired tasks, in such a way that the user need only specify the scientific parameters and objectives, and not worry about specific details for running a particular program. The design contains modules for data abstraction, catalog plan abstraction, a user-friendly interface, and expert systems for data handling, data evaluation, and application analysis. The emphasis is on developing general facilities for data representation, description, analysis, and presentation that will be easily used by scientists directly, thus bypassing the knowledge acquisition bottleneck. Expert system technology is used for many different aspects of the data management system, including the direct user interface, the interface to the data analysis routines, and the analysis of instrument status.

  13. Polarimetric Ground Based Interferometric Radar for Surface Deformation Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F. G.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Deng, H.; Held, B.; Jenkins, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements of surface deformation at sub-millimeter sensitivity may be desirable for a number of earth science applications including terrain mapping and monitoring of landslide movements. Through University of Missouri (MU) led efforts, a portable polarimetric GBIR has been developed for surface deformation mapping. Fully polarimetric capabilities allow the application of polarimetric interferometry, scatterer decomposition, and other advanced polarimetric methods. Using open literature techniques, polarimetric calibration and absolute radiometric calibration using known targets may be performed. The MU GBIR radiates electromagnetic waves at a number of free space wavelengths including C-band approximately 5.7 cm and Ku-band about 1.8 cm. The initial mechanical deployment setup time is typically about 10 minutes. For image formation, the MU GBIR employs azimuth scanning, which may collect data for a single pass interferogram in 20 seconds for a 180 degree azimuth sweep. Initial inteferograms may be formed at the deployment site in near real time. Moreover, the MU GBIR can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with relatively high (geodetic-grade) precision. A number of field experiments have been performed at various sites using the system. Demonstration of millimeter and better sensitivity to deformation over the course of a day of data collects has been performed at a test site using the MU GBIR. Study results and further development progress will be presented. This project is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

  14. Ground-Based Research within NASA's Materials Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based research in Materials Science for NASA's Microgravity program serves several purposes, and includes approximately four Principal Investigators for every one in the flight program. While exact classification is difficult. the ground program falls roughly into the following categories: (1) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Theoretical Studies; (2) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Bringing to Maturity New Research; (3) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Enabling Characterization; (4) Intellectual Underpinning of the Flight Program - Thermophysical Property Determination; (5) Radiation Shielding; (6) Preliminary In Situ Resource Utilization; (7) Biomaterials; (8) Nanostructured Materials; (9) Materials Science for Advanced Space Propulsion. It must be noted that while the first four categories are aimed at using long duration low gravity conditions, the other categories pertain more to more recent NASA initiatives in materials science. These new initiatives address NASA's future materials science needs in the realms of crew health and safety, and exploration, and have been included in the most recent NASA Research Announcements (NRA). A description of each of these nine categories will be given together with examples of the kinds of research being undertaken.

  15. Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone Levels in Ground Based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. O.

    1972-01-01

    Baseline values of immunoreactive ACTH were established in the normal healthy adult. Normal levels of ACTH secretion were determined for both the male and the female in circulating plasma and serum. The data obtained in these studies are particularly significant in that the sampling was carefully controlled; only healthy employed individuals of both sexes were tested in a routine work situation that would not be considered conducive to stress. It has been found that alterations in the classically described circadian rhythm of ACTH secretion can occur when activities (such as work/rest cycles) are imposed on the individual studied. These changes can be demonstrated even when there is no appreciable change noted in the rhythm of hydrocortisone secretion.

  16. Future enhancements to ground-based microburst detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Matthews, Michael P.; Dasey, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    This set of viewgraphs presents the results of the Cockpit Weather Information (CWI) program at M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. The CWI program has been funded through NaSA Langley Research Center by the joint NASA/FAA Integrated Airborne Wind Shear Program for the past four years. During this time, over 120 microburst penetrations by research aircraft have been conducted under Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) testbed radar surveillance at Orlando, FL. The results of these in-situ measurements have been compared with ground-based detection methods. Several valuable insights were gained from this research activity. First, it was found that the current TDWR microburst shapes do not permit accurate characterization of microburst hazard in terms of the F factor hazard index, because they are based on loss value rather than shear. Second, it was found that the horizontal component of the F factor can be accurately estimated from shear, provided compensation is made for the dependence of outflow strength on altitude. Third, it was found that a simple continuity assumption for estimating the vertical component of the F factor yielded poor results. However, further research has shown that downdraft strength is correlated with features aloft detected by the TDWR radar scan strategy. The outcome of the CWI program is to move from the loss-based wind shear detection algorithm used in the TDWR to a shear-based detection scheme as proposed in the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS).

  17. Simulating the Performance of Ground-Based Optical Asteroid Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Eric J.; Shelly, Frank C.; Gibbs, Alex R.; Grauer, Albert D.; Hill, Richard E.; Johnson, Jess A.; Kowalski, Richard A.; Larson, Stephen M.

    2014-11-01

    We are developing a set of asteroid survey simulation tools in order to estimate the capability of existing and planned ground-based optical surveys, and to test a variety of possible survey cadences and strategies. The survey simulator is composed of several layers, including a model population of solar system objects and an orbital integrator, a site-specific atmospheric model (including inputs for seeing, haze and seasonal cloud cover), a model telescope (with a complete optical path to estimate throughput), a model camera (including FOV, pixel scale, and focal plane fill factor) and model source extraction and moving object detection layers with tunable detection requirements. We have also developed a flexible survey cadence planning tool to automatically generate nightly survey plans. Inputs to the cadence planner include camera properties (FOV, readout time), telescope limits (horizon, declination, hour angle, lunar and zenithal avoidance), preferred and restricted survey regions in RA/Dec, ecliptic, and Galactic coordinate systems, and recent coverage by other asteroid surveys. Simulated surveys are created for a subset of current and previous NEO surveys (LINEAR, Pan-STARRS and the three Catalina Sky Survey telescopes), and compared against the actual performance of these surveys in order to validate the model’s performance. The simulator tracks objects within the FOV of any pointing that were not discovered (e.g. too few observations, too trailed, focal plane array gaps, too fast or slow), thus dividing the population into “discoverable” and “discovered” subsets, to inform possible survey design changes. Ongoing and future work includes generating a realistic “known” subset of the model NEO population, running multiple independent simulated surveys in coordinated and uncoordinated modes, and testing various cadences to find optimal strategies for detecting NEO sub-populations. These tools can also assist in quantifying the efficiency of novel

  18. Observing Tsunamis in the Ionosphere Using Ground Based GPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Komjathy, A.; Song, Y. Tony; Stephens, P.; Hickey, M. P.; Foster, J.

    2011-01-01

    Ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) show variations consistent with atmospheric internal gravity waves caused by ocean tsunamis following recent seismic events, including the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011. We observe fluctuations correlated in time, space, and wave properties with this tsunami in TEC estimates processed using JPL's Global Ionospheric Mapping Software. These TEC estimates were band-pass filtered to remove ionospheric TEC variations with periods outside the typical range of internal gravity waves caused by tsunamis. Observable variations in TEC appear correlated with the Tohoku tsunami near the epicenter, at Hawaii, and near the west coast of North America. Disturbance magnitudes are 1-10% of the background TEC value. Observations near the epicenter are compared to estimates of expected tsunami-driven TEC variations produced by Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Spectral Full Wave Model, an atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model, and found to be in good agreement. The potential exists to apply these detection techniques to real-time GPS TEC data, providing estimates of tsunami speed and amplitude that may be useful for future early warning systems.

  19. Ground based studies of thermocapillary flows in levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical studies along with ground-based experiments are presently being carried out in connection with thermocapillary phenomena associated with drops and bubbles in a containerless environment. The effort here focuses on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of acoustically levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the Marangoni effect on drops under conditions of local spot-heating and other types of heating are being studied. With the experiments conducted to date, fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved and successful flow visualization by light scattering from smoke particles has been carried out. The results include situations with and without heating. As a preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results, we consider the external flow pattern as a superposition of three discrete circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. The observations of the flow fields also indicate the existence of a steady state torque induced by the streaming flows. The theoretical studies have been concentrated on the analysis of streaming flows in a gaseous medium with the presence of a spherical particle undergoing periodic heating. A matched asymptotic analysis was carried out for small parameters derived from approximations in the high frequency range. The heating frequency being 'in tune' with the acoustic frequency results in a nonzero time-averaged thermal field. This leads to a steady heat flow across the equatorial plane of the sphere.

  20. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-based experiments together with analytical studies are presently being conducted for levitated drops. Both acoustic and electrostatic techniques are being employed to achieve levitation of drops in a gaseous environment. The scientific effort is principally on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the thermocapillary flow associated with local spot heating is being studied. Fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved with some exceptions when random rotational motion of the drop persists. The flow visualization has been carried out by light scattering from smoke particles for the exterior flow and fluorescent tracer particles in the drop. The results indicate a lack of axial symmetry in the internal flow even though the apparatus and the heating are symmetric. The theoretical studies for the past year have included fundamental analyses of acoustically levitated spherical drops. The flow associated with a particle near the velocity antinode is being investigated by the singular perturbation technique. As a first step towards understanding the effect of the particle displacement from the antinode, the flow field about the node has been calculated for the first time. The effect of the acoustic field on the interior of a liquid drop has also been investigated. The results predict that the internal flow field is very weak.

  1. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.

    2013-07-01

    Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP) retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  2. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.

    2013-02-01

    Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP) retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  3. Localized Surface Deformation Monitoring Applications using Ground Based Interferometric Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, J. J.; Gomez, F. G.; Rosenblad, B.; Loehr, E.; Gurnani, G.; Fallert, Z.; Gilliam, J.

    2014-12-01

    Ground based interferometric radar (GBIR) measurements of localized surface deformation may be sought-after in various geosciences applications. The University of Missouri (MU) GBIR system is highly portable; moreover, it can be removed and re-positioned at the same point with geodetic-grade precision for long-term and repeat surveys. Initial quick-look imagery at C-band and Ku-band may be viewed in near real-time at the study site. Polarimetric calibration, radiometric calibration, and time-series analysis may further enhance the imagery. The MU GBIR has demonstrated millimeter and better sensitivity to localized surface deformation. Using real-aperture imaging and precision rotation, the MU GBIR acquires data by deploying three antennas that may be mounted parallel to one another on a 1-meter high tower. During typical operation, images are acquired by azimuthally rotating the GBIR antennas about its vertical axis. During deployment, the fast imaging capabilities allow a data collect scan in about 20 seconds for a 180 degree field of view. During the 2013 and 2014 field seasons using the MU GBIR, several locations were studied. The study sites include a rockfall experiment in Colorado, several dams in Kansas and Missouri, and a rock glacier in southern Colorado. Study results and additional progress will be presented. These projects are sponsored by grants from the University of Missouri Research Board and the National Science Foundation.

  4. Characterizing GEO Titan Transtage Fragmentations using Ground-based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2016-01-01

    In a continued effort to better characterize the Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environment, NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) utilizes various ground-based optical assets to acquire photometric and spectral data of known debris associated with fragmentations in or near GEO. The Titan IIIC Transtage upper stage is known to have fragmented four times. Two of the four fragmentations were in GEO while a third Transtage fragmented in GEO transfer orbit. The forth fragmentation occurred in Low Earth Orbit. In order to better assess what may be causing these fragmentations, the NASA ODPO recently acquired a Titan Transtage test and display article that was previously in the custody of the 309th Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Group (AMARG) in Tucson, Arizona. After initial inspections at AMARG demonstrated that the test article was of sufficient fidelity to be of interest, the test article was brought to JSC to continue material analysis and historical documentation of the Titan Transtage. The Transtage will be a subject of forensic analysis using spectral measurements to compare with telescopic data; as well, a scale model will be created to use in the Optical Measurement Center for photometric analysis of an intact Transtage, including a BRDF. The following presentation will provide a review of the Titan Transtage, the current analysis that has been done to date, and the future work to be completed in support of characterizing the GEO and near GEO orbital debris environment.

  5. Conditions of possible programs using small and medium size ground-based astrometric instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, J.

    The post-HIPPARCOS era has brought some uncertainty on the future of ground-based astrometry. However, the discussions that were initiated by the IAU Working Group on future development of ground-based astrometry, showed that there are a number of fields that will not be satisfactorily covered by space astrometry. The instruments that could be used are shortly described. Then the complementarity of ground-based and space astrometry is discussed. The papers presented at this very session confirm the point of view that, with minor modifications and improvement of existing instruments, many sound scientific programs can be undertaken. The principal domains in which major scientific inputs are expected from ground-based astrometry concern the dynamics of minor planets and satellites, the shape of the Sun, double stars, kinematics within stellar clusters and radiosource optical counterparts. In addition, the use of some small telescopes for monitoring long period irregular variable stars could be a useful reconversion of astrometric activity. Some possible projects in these fields will be presented, but the Working Group cannot manage such programs. Its objective is to help organizing them and to encourage people to join them. An important point concerning these programs is that all the participants should have a reward in their work in terms of publications.

  6. Ground Base Skylab Electron Beam Welds in Tantalum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of ground-based (left) and Skylab (right) electron beam welds in pure tantalum (Ta) (10X magnification). Residual votices left behind in the ground-based sample after the electron beam passed were frozen into the grain structure. These occurred because of the rapid cooling rate at the high temperature. Although the thermal characteristics and electron beam travel speeds were comparable for the skylab sample, the residual vortices were erased in the grain structure. This may have been due to the fact that final grain size of the solidified material was smaller in the Skylab sample compared to the ground-based sample. The Skylab sample was processed in the M512 Materials Processing Facility (MPF) during Skylab SL-2 Mission. Principal Investigator was Richard Poorman.

  7. T cell regulation in microgravity - The current knowledge from in vitro experiments conducted in space, parabolic flights and ground-based facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschild, Swantje; Tauber, Svantje; Lauber, Beatrice; Thiel, Cora S.; Layer, Liliana E.; Ullrich, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    Dating back to the Apollo and Skylab missions, it has been reported that astronauts suffered from bacterial and viral infections during space flight or after returning to Earth. Blood analyses revealed strongly reduced capability of human lymphocytes to become active upon mitogenic stimulation. Since then, a large number of in vitro studies on human immune cells have been conducted in space, in parabolic flights, and in ground-based facilities. It became obvious that microgravity affects cell morphology and important cellular functions. Observed changes include cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction and gene expression. This review gives an overview of the current knowledge of T cell regulation under altered gravity conditions obtained by in vitro studies with special emphasis on the cell culture conditions used. We propose that future in vitro experiments should follow rigorous standardized cell culture conditions, which allows better comparison of the results obtained in different flight- and ground-based experiment platforms.

  8. Exoplanets -New Results from Space and Ground-based Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udry, Stephane

    The exploration of the outer solar system and in particular of the giant planets and their environments is an on-going process with the Cassini spacecraft currently around Saturn, the Juno mission to Jupiter preparing to depart and two large future space missions planned to launch in the 2020-2025 time frame for the Jupiter system and its satellites (Europa and Ganymede) on the one hand, and the Saturnian system and Titan on the other hand [1,2]. Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is the only other object in our Solar system to possess an extensive nitrogen atmosphere, host to an active organic chemistry, based on the interaction of N2 with methane (CH4). Following the Voyager flyby in 1980, Titan has been intensely studied from the ground-based large telescopes (such as the Keck or the VLT) and by artificial satellites (such as the Infrared Space Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope) for the past three decades. Prior to Cassini-Huygens, Titan's atmospheric composition was thus known to us from the Voyager missions and also through the explorations by the ISO. Our perception of Titan had thus greatly been enhanced accordingly, but many questions remained as to the nature of the haze surrounding the satellite and the composition of the surface. The recent revelations by the Cassini-Huygens mission have managed to surprise us with many discoveries [3-8] and have yet to reveal more of the interesting aspects of the satellite. The Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturnian system has been an extraordinary success for the planetary community since the Saturn-Orbit-Insertion (SOI) in July 2004 and again the very successful probe descent and landing of Huygens on January 14, 2005. One of its main targets was Titan. Titan was revealed to be a complex world more like the Earth than any other: it has a dense mostly nitrogen atmosphere and active climate and meteorological cycles where the working fluid, methane, behaves under Titan conditions the way that water does on

  9. Preparatory study of a ground-based space radiobiology program in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has long been acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions. Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models. In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures, NASA initiated several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program, which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan. The European Space Agency (ESA) has recently established an ambitious exploration program (AURORA), and within this program it has been decided to include a space radiation research program. Europe has a long tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators, generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy. This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk. To support research in this field in Europe, ESA issued a call for tender in 2005 for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation (IBER). This study will provide guidance on future ESA-supported activities in space radiation research by identifying the most appropriate European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation, and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities. The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics, and a detailed proposal for experimental campaigns for the following 5 10 years.

  10. Ground-Based Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringuette, R. A.; Cannady, N.; Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Granger, D.; Isbert, J.; Stewart, M.

    2010-10-01

    First seen from space by the BATSE gamma ray telescope in the 1990s, Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGFs) consist of extremely fast bursts of high energy (up to 40 MeV) gamma rays correlated with intense lightning from thunderstorms. Spacecraft experiments are sensitive to very large events, but ground-based detectors closer to the thunderstorms may provide data on the intensity spectrum of smaller events. Four detectors consisting of NaI scintillators viewed by photomultipliers have been placed on rooftops at LSU's Baton Rouge campus to monitor TGFs. The setup and design of the ground-based experiment will be discussed.

  11. A Fast Method for Embattling Optimization of Ground-Based Radar Surveillance Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.

    A growing number of space activities have created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flight. For the safety of in-orbit spacecraft, a lot of observation facilities are needed to catalog space objects, especially in low earth orbit. Surveillance of Low earth orbit objects are mainly rely on ground-based radar, due to the ability limitation of exist radar facilities, a large number of ground-based radar need to build in the next few years in order to meet the current space surveillance demands. How to optimize the embattling of ground-based radar surveillance network is a problem to need to be solved. The traditional method for embattling optimization of ground-based radar surveillance network is mainly through to the detection simulation of all possible stations with cataloged data, and makes a comprehensive comparative analysis of various simulation results with the combinational method, and then selects an optimal result as station layout scheme. This method is time consuming for single simulation and high computational complexity for the combinational analysis, when the number of stations increases, the complexity of optimization problem will be increased exponentially, and cannot be solved with traditional method. There is no better way to solve this problem till now. In this paper, target detection procedure was simplified. Firstly, the space coverage of ground-based radar was simplified, a space coverage projection model of radar facilities in different orbit altitudes was built; then a simplified objects cross the radar coverage model was established according to the characteristics of space objects orbit motion; after two steps simplification, the computational complexity of the target detection was greatly simplified, and simulation results shown the correctness of the simplified results. In addition, the detection areas of ground-based radar network can be easily computed with the

  12. Progress report of FY 1999 activities: The application of Kalman filtering to derive water vapor profiles from combined ground-based sensors: Raman lidar, microwave radiometers, GPS, and radiosondes

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han

    1999-09-10

    Previously, the proposers have delivered to ARM a documented algorithm, that is now applied operationally, and which derives water vapor profiles from combined remote sensor measurements of water vapor radiometers, cloud-base ceilometers, and radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS). With the expanded deployment of a Raman lidar at the CART Central Facility, high quality, high vertical-resolution, water vapor profiles will be provided during nighttime clear conditions, and during clear daytime conditions, to somewhat lower altitudes. The object of this effort is to use Kalman Filtering, previously applied to the combination of nighttime Raman lidar and microwave radiometer data, to derive high-quality water vapor profiles, during non-precipitating conditions, from data routinely available at the CART site. Input data to the algorithm would include: Raman lidar data, highly quality-controlled data of integrated moisture from microwave radiometers and GPS, RASS, and radiosondes. While analyzing data obtained during the Water Vapor Intensive Operating Period'97 at the SGP CART site in central Oklahoma, several questions arose about the calibration of the ARM microwave radiometers (MWR). A large portion of this years effort was a thorough analysis of the many factors that are important for the calibration of this instrument through the tip calibration method and the development of algorithms to correct this procedure. An open literature publication describing this analysis has been accepted.

  13. Geospace Science from Ground-based Magnetometer Arrays: Advances in Sensors, Data Collection, and Data Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Chi, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Networks of ground-based magnetometers now provide the basis for the diagnosis of magnetic disturbances associated with solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling on a truly global scale. Advances in sensor and digitisation technologies offer increases in sensitivity in fluxgate, induction coil, and new micro-sensor technologies - including the promise of hybrid sensors. Similarly, advances in remote connectivity provide the capacity for truly real-time monitoring of global dynamics at cadences sufficient for monitoring and in many cases resolving system level spatio-temporal ambiguities especially in combination with conjugate satellite measurements. A wide variety of the plasmaphysical processes active in driving geospace dynamics can be monitored based on the response of the electrical current system, including those associated with changes in global convection, magnetospheric substorms and nightside tail flows, as well as due to solar wind changes in both dynamic pressure and in response to rotations of the direction of the IMF. Significantly, any changes to the dynamical system must be communicated by the propagation of long-period Alfven and/or compressional waves. These wave populations hence provide diagnostics for not only the energy transport by the wave fields themselves, but also provide a mechanism for diagnosing the structure of the background plasma medium through which the waves propagate. Ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves are especially significant in offering a monitor for mass density profiles, often invisible to particle detectors because of their very low energy, through the application of a variety of magneto-seismology and cross-phase techniques. Renewed scientific interest in the plasma waves associated with near-Earth substorm dynamics, including magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at substorm onset and their relation to magnetotail flows, as well the importance of global scale ultra-low frequency waves for the energisation, transport

  14. Cryogenics for ground based and space-borne instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duband, L.

    In many space sciences project cryogenic detectors are essential for the accomplishment of the scientific objectives, offering unique advantages and unmatched performance. In addition several other components such as the optics can benefit from a cryogenic cooling which reduces the radiative loading. The Service des Basses Températ- ures (SBT) of CEA Grenoble has been involved in space cryogenics for over 20 years now and features a dedicated laboratory, the Cryocoolers and Space Cryogenics group. Various cryocoolers have been developed in the past and our fields of activity focus now on four main technologies: sorption coolers, multistage pulse tubes, adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR), and cryogenic loop heat pipes. In addition work on two new concepts for ground based dilution refrigerators is also ongoing. Finally developments on various key technologies such as the heat switches, the suspension or structural systems are also carried out. These developments are mainly funded by the European Space Agency (ESA) or by the Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES). In this paper we mostly give an overview of the developments carried out at SBT along with several examples of other relevant systems. We use space cryogenics as a thread. However these coolers or techniques can be used on ground, particularly on remote locations where liquid cryogen are unavailable and/or where maintenance must be limited to a strict minimum. In this case they can be simplified and take advantage of on ground resources, and their cost can be significantly reduced. For most of these systems the common feature is the absence of any moving parts or any friction, which guarantees a very good reliability and make them very good candidates for space borne instruments requiring cryogenic temperatures.

  15. Ground-based and spacecraft-based data sets: examples of synergy from recent missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Hicks, Michael; Bauer, James

    2015-08-01

    Missions to small bodies have returned a wealth of observations at high spatial resolution and new wavelengths. Nevertheless, spacecraft data is often deficient in many ways, lacking in temporal coverage, specific viewing geometries, context, spectral range, and calibrations. Several recent examples illustrate how modest ground-based “support” measurements for missions to small bodies have substantially enhanced the results from these missions. Triton, Neptune’s giant moon, was observed by Voyager 2 in 1989: high resolution images showed a sublimating polar cap and explosive plumes of volatiles. This instant in time was placed into context by subsequent ground-based and HST observations of the moon that showed continued volatile transport. Similarly, decades of ground-based observations leading up to the New Horizons fast flyby of Pluto monitored long-term changes in frosts on the dwarf planet’s surface. Another example of synergistic measurements for small-body missions is that of complementary solar phase angle coverage. Space-based missions seldom have small phase angle measurements; similarly, ground-based measurements are often lacking at large solar phase angles (except of course for NEOs). This complementary phase angle coverage enables accurate photometric modeling, including determination of the bolometric Bond albedo, which is a key parameter for thermal modeling. Another key use of ground-based observations is to check and refine spacecraft calibrations, at least at wavelengths that are visible from Earth. In some cases, complete calibration sets are provided by Earth-based observing programs, such as that of ROLO (RObotic Lunar Observatory) for the Moon. Finally, context and the “big picture” in both time and space are provided by telescopic views of spacecraft targets before, during, and after mission durations or critical events.The astronomical community should continue to support, and participate in, teams that make synergistic

  16. Comparison of MODIS and VIIRS cloud properties with ARM ground-based observations over Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporre, Moa K.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Håkansson, Nina; Thoss, Anke; Swietlicki, Erik; Petäjä, Tuukka

    2016-07-01

    Cloud retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the satellites Terra and Aqua and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the Suomi-NPP satellite are evaluated using a combination of ground-based instruments providing vertical profiles of clouds. The ground-based measurements are obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) programme mobile facility, which was deployed in Hyytiälä, Finland, between February and September 2014 for the Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC) campaign. The satellite cloud parameters cloud top height (CTH) and liquid water path (LWP) are compared with ground-based CTH obtained from a cloud mask created using lidar and radar data and LWP acquired from a multi-channel microwave radiometer. Clouds from all altitudes in the atmosphere are investigated. The clouds are diagnosed as single or multiple layer using the ground-based cloud mask. For single-layer clouds, satellites overestimated CTH by 326 m (14 %) on average. When including multilayer clouds, satellites underestimated CTH by on average 169 m (5.8 %). MODIS collection 6 overestimated LWP by on average 13 g m-2 (11 %). Interestingly, LWP for MODIS collection 5.1 is slightly overestimated by Aqua (4.56 %) but is underestimated by Terra (14.3 %). This underestimation may be attributed to a known issue with a drift in the reflectance bands of the MODIS instrument on Terra. This evaluation indicates that the satellite cloud parameters selected show reasonable agreement with their ground-based counterparts over Finland, with minimal influence from the large solar zenith angle experienced by the satellites in this high-latitude location.

  17. Preliminary design document: Ground based testbed for avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The design and interface requirements for an avionics Ground Based Test bed (GBT) to support Heavy Lift Cargo Vehicles (HLCV) is presented. It also contains data on the vehicle subsystem configurations that are to be supported during their early, pre-PDR developmental phases. Several emerging technologies are also identified for support. A Preliminary Specification Tree is also presented.

  18. Vigilant Eagle: ground-based countermeasure system against MANPADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollin, Jeff

    2006-05-01

    Man-Portable Air Defense Systems, or MANPADS, have arisen as a major threat to commercial and military air traffic. While no MANPADS attacks have yet occurred within the United States, the risk posed by these weapons is undeniable. MANPADS were originally developed by the Soviet Union and the United States for tactical air defense, but since then these weapons have proliferated around the world. Two major approaches to countering these weapons have arisen: aircraft based and ground based. Aircraft-based systems typically use either flares or lasers to either confuse or blind the oncoming missile, thus driving it off target. These systems have been in use for many years on military aircraft and have been proven effective. However, when one considers the commercial air travel industry, the cost of providing a countermeasure system on every plane becomes prohibitive. A ground-based system by contrast protects every aircraft arriving or departing from an airport. By deploying a ground-based system at high-traffic and hub airports, a large percentage of the flying public can be protected affordably. Vigilant Eagle is such a ground based system which uses High Power Microwaves (HPM) to accomplish this mission.

  19. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  20. Science Highlights from Ground-Based O/IR Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlister, Harold A.; Akeson, R.; Armstrong, T.; Bakker, E.; Boden, A.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Creech-Eakman, M.; Hutter, D.

    2007-05-01

    Ground-based optical/infrared long-baseline interferometry has come of age in the U.S. where several existing or planned facilities have produced remarkable scientific results demonstrating the power of the technique within a broad range of scientific applications. This paper presents brief overviews of the following facilities: the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) on Mt. Palomar, CA; the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) located on Anderson Mesa near Flagstaff, AZ; the Keck Interferometer (KI) on Mauna Kea, HI; and the CHARA Array on Mt. Wilson, CA. Also described is the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI) to be built at the highest elevation of the Magdalena Mountains of New Mexico. Example scientific highlights to date include: The first measurement of stellar rotational oblateness (Altair), the detection of Cepheid pulsations, and ultra-precise astrometry of binaries with PTI; the first six-telescope images (the triple system eta Virginis) and constraints on disk parameters of Be stars with NPOI; resolving the nucleus of NGC 4151 and probing the inner disk regions of YSOs with KI; and, the first direct detection of gravity darkening in single stars (Regulus), calibration of the Baade-Wesselink method for Cepheids, and the first direct measurement of the diameter of an exoplanet (the transit system HD 189733) using the CHARA Array. While the great majority of results to date have focused on stellar astrophysics, the MROI strives to have sensitivity sufficient to access a number of AGN. Research with these independently operated facilities is sponsored by the California Institute of Technology and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for PTI; the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Naval Research Laboratory for NPOI; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for KI; and, the National Science Foundation and Georgia State University for the CHARA Array. Funding for MROI is administered through the Office of Naval Research.

  1. A new research program for ground-based space radiobiology in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Kraft, G.; O'Neill, P.; Reitz, G.; Sabatier, L.; Schneider, U.

    Space radiation has been long acknowledged as a potential showstopper for long duration manned interplanetary missions Our knowledge of biological effects of cosmic radiation in deep space is almost exclusively derived from ground-based accelerator experiments with heavy ions in animal or in vitro models In an effort to gain more information on space radiation risk and to develop countermeasures NASA started several years ago a Space Radiation Health Program which is currently supporting biological experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton NY Accelerator-based radiobiology research in the field of space radiation research is also under way in Russia and Japan The European Space Agency ESA has recently established an ambitious exploration program AURORA and within this program it has been decided to start a space radiation research program Europe has a wide tradition in radiobiology research at accelerators generally focussing on charged-particle cancer therapy This expertise can be adapted to address the issue of space radiation risk To support research in this field in Europe ESA issued in 2005 a call for tender for a preliminary study of investigations on biological effects of space radiation IBER This study will prepare future ESA supported-activities in space radiation research by selecting the best European accelerator facilities to be targeted for cooperation and by drafting a roadmap for future research activities The roadmap will include a prioritisation of research topics and a detailed proposal

  2. Ground-based microwave radar and optical lidar signatures of volcanic ash plumes: models, observations and retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereu, Luigi; Marzano, Frank; Mori, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Cimini, Domenico; Martucci, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    The detection and quantitative retrieval of volcanic ash clouds is of significant interest due to its environmental, climatic and socio-economic effects. Real-time monitoring of such phenomena is crucial, also for the initialization of dispersion models. Satellite visible-infrared radiometric observations from geostationary platforms are usually exploited for long-range trajectory tracking and for measuring low level eruptions. Their imagery is available every 15-30 minutes and suffers from a relatively poor spatial resolution. Moreover, the field-of-view of geostationary radiometric measurements may be blocked by water and ice clouds at higher levels and their overall utility is reduced at night. Ground-based microwave radars may represent an important tool to detect and, to a certain extent, mitigate the hazard from the ash clouds. Ground-based weather radar systems can provide data for determining the ash volume, total mass and height of eruption clouds. Methodological studies have recently investigated the possibility of using ground-based single-polarization and dual-polarization radar system for the remote sensing of volcanic ash cloud. A microphysical characterization of volcanic ash was carried out in terms of dielectric properties, size distribution and terminal fall speed, assuming spherically-shaped particles. A prototype of volcanic ash radar retrieval (VARR) algorithm for single-polarization systems was proposed and applied to S-band and C-band weather radar data. The sensitivity of the ground-based radar measurements decreases as the ash cloud is farther so that for distances greater than about 50 kilometers fine ash might be not detected anymore by microwave radars. In this respect, radar observations can be complementary to satellite, lidar and aircraft observations. Active remote sensing retrieval from ground, in terms of detection, estimation and sensitivity, of volcanic ash plumes is not only dependent on the sensor specifications, but also on

  3. Recent Ground-Based Photometry Compared with Space-Based TSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A.; Preminger, D.

    2010-12-01

    Solar activity continues at low levels with occasional modest increases. We will compare indices from ground-based photometry with variations in Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) from SORCE/TIM as well as other space-based instruments. During the solar minimum of 2008-2009 regressions of solar indices with SORCE/TIM gave a quiet sun TSI of 1360.62 +/- 0.04 W/m^2. This work has been partly supported by NSF grant ATM-0848518.

  4. Entry Dispersion Analysis for the HAYABUSA Spacecraft using Ground-Based Optical Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Yagi, Masafumi; Tholen, David J.

    2011-10-01

    The HAYABUSA asteroid explorer successfully released its sample capsule to Australia on 2010 June 13. Since the Earth reentry phase of sample return was critical, many backup plans for predicting the landing location were prepared. This paper considers the reentry dispersion using ground-based optical observation as a backup observation for radiometric observation. Several scenarios were calculated and compared for the reentry phase of HAYABUSA to evaluate the navigation accuracy of the ground-based observation. The optical observation doesn't require any active reaction from a spacecraft, and thus these results show that optical observations could be a steady backup strategy even if a spacecraft had some trouble. We also evaluated the landing dispersion of HAYABUSA only with optical observation.

  5. New developments for ground based instruments at Esrange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widell, Ola

    2001-08-01

    Development on the Esrange MST radar system, ESRAD, the establishment of a new optical platform called KEOPS and the collection of other ground based instruments, makes Esrange to an unique place for space related research using rockets and balloons. ESRAD located at 67°53'N and 21°06'E is operated jointly by the Swedish Institute of Space Physics and SSC, Esrange. The radar is a MST-type operating at 52 MHz and has been in near continuous operation since 1996. The Kiruna Esrange Optical Platform System, KEOPS is located at 67°52'N and 21°04'E on a mountain at 530 m latitude 1.5 km west of Esrange. KEOPS facility is an excellent place for location of optical ground based instruments. Telescience applications by remote interaction using Internet are offered.

  6. Rainfall Measurement with a Ground Based Dual Frequency Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Nobuhiro; Horie, Hiroaki; Meneghini, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Dual frequency methods are one of the most useful ways to estimate precise rainfall rates. However, there are some difficulties in applying this method to ground based radars because of the existence of a blind zone and possible error in the radar calibration. Because of these problems, supplemental observations such as rain gauges or satellite link estimates of path integrated attenuation (PIA) are needed. This study shows how to estimate rainfall rate with a ground based dual frequency radar with rain gauge and satellite link data. Applications of this method to stratiform rainfall is also shown. This method is compared with single wavelength method. Data were obtained from a dual frequency (10 GHz and 35 GHz) multiparameter radar radiometer built by the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), Japan, and located at NASA/GSFC during the spring of 1997. Optical rain gauge (ORG) data and broadcasting satellite signal data near the radar t location were also utilized for the calculation.

  7. GLAST and Ground-based {gamma}-ray astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Carson, J. E.; Giebels, B.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J. E.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C

    2007-07-12

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) in 2007 will open the possibility of combined studies of astrophysical sources with existing ground-based VHE {gamma}-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS and MAGIC. Ground-based {gamma}-ray observatories provide complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal, spatial and population studies of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources. Joint observations cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 50 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing us to perform long-term monitoring of variable sources under uniform observation conditions and to detect flaring sources promptly. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) will complement these observations with high-sensitivity pointed observations on regions of interest.

  8. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; Carson, J.E.; Giebels, B.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.E.; Paneque, D.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L.C.

    2007-10-10

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) in 2007 will open the possibility of combined studies of astrophysical sources with existing ground-based VHE {gamma}-ray experiments such as H.E.S.S., VERITAS and MAGIC. Ground-based {gamma}-ray observatories provide complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal, spatial and population studies of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources. Joint observations cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 50 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing us to perform long-term monitoring of variable sources under uniform observation conditions and to detect flaring sources promptly. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs) will complement these observations with high-sensitivity pointed observations on regions of interest.

  9. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Jennings, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote- sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme`s (IGBP`s) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. J.; Scurlock, J. M. O.; Turner, R. S.; Jennings, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote-sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program's (IGBP's) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Space transfer with ground-based laser/electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Stavnes, Mark; Oleson, Steve; Bozek, John

    1992-01-01

    Ground-based high-power CW lasers can be used to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space that furnish electricity to space vehicles; this energy can also be used to power electric-propulsion orbital transfer vehicles. An account is presently given of the anticipated requirements for the pulsed FEL lasers, large adaptive optics, photovoltaic receivers, and high specific impulse electrical propulsion. Preliminary system analysis results are presented.

  12. New Ground Based facilities in QSO research; The GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.

    New ground based observing opportunities are becoming, or about to become, available to astronomers for QSO research. These, combined with state of the art focal plane instruments, provide unprecedented sensitivity for detecting faint surface brightness features. During the talk I will take the liberty of talking about one of these new large telescope facilities currently being built in Spain, and will discuss some of the advantages for QSO research offered by these new facilities.

  13. Ground-Based Calibration Of A Microwave Landing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John J.; Scott, Marshall M., Jr.; Willis, Alfred D.; Erdogan, Temel; Reyes, Rolando

    1996-01-01

    System of microwave instrumentation and data-processing equipment developed to enable ground-based calibration of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at distances of about 500 to 1,000 ft from MSBLS transmitting antenna. Ensures accuracy of MSBLS near touchdown point, without having to resort to expense and complex logistics of aircraft-based testing. Modified versions prove useful in calibrating aircraft instrument landing systems.

  14. Combined Characterisation of GOME and TOMS Total Ozone Using Ground-Based Observations from the NDSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, J.-C.; VanRoozendael, M.; Simon, P. C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Goutail, F.; Andersen, S. B.; Arlander, D. W.; BuiVan, N. A.; Claude, H.; deLaNoee, J.; DeMaziere, M.; Dorokhov, V.; Eriksen, P.; Gleason, J. F.; Tornkvist, K. Karlsen; Hoiskar, B. A. Kastad; Kyroe, E.; Leveau, J.; Merienne, M.-F.; Milinevsky, G.

    1998-01-01

    Several years of total ozone measured from space by the ERS-2 GOME, the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), and the ADEOS TOMS, are compared with high-quality ground-based observations associated with the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC), over an extended latitude range and a variety of geophysical conditions. The comparisons with each spaceborne sensor are combined altogether for investigating their respective solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence, dispersion, and difference of sensitivity. The space- and ground-based data are found to agree within a few percent on average. However, the analysis highlights for both Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and TOMS several sources of discrepancies, including a dependence on the SZA at high latitudes and internal inconsistencies.

  15. Postural Responses Following Space Flight and Ground Based Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, Igor S.; Reschke, Millard F.; Cerisano, Jody M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Tomilovskaya, Elena V.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa B.; Bloomberg, Jacob B.

    2013-01-01

    With the transition from the Shuttle program to the International Space Station (ISS), the opportunity to fly sensorimotor experiments in a weightless environment has become increasingly more difficult to obtain. As a result, more investigations have turned to ground-based analogs as a way of evaluating an experiment's viability. The two primary analogs available to most investigators are 6deg head down bed rest (HDBR) and dry immersion (DI). For the time being, HDBR investigations have been associated with studies conducted in the United States while the Russians and several other European Union states have concentrated their efforts on using DI as the space flight analog of choice. While either model may be viable for cardiovascular, bone and other system changes, vestibular and sensorimotor investigators have retained serious reservations of either analog's potential to serve as a replacement for a true weightless environment. These reservations have merit, but it is worthwhile to consider that not all changes associated with sensorimotor function during space flight are the result of top-down modifications, but may also be due to the lack, or change, of appropriate support surfaces applying force to the bottom of the feet. To this end we have compared quiet stance postural responses between short duration Space Shuttle flights, long duration ISS flights and HDBR of varying duration. Using these three platforms, representing different modifications of support we investigated postural ataxia using a quiet stance model. Quiet stance was obtained by asking the subjects to stand upright on a force plate, eyes open, arms at the side of the body for three min. From the force plate we obtained average sway velocity in two axes as well as length of line (stabilogram). These parameters were then related to EMG activity recorded from the medial gastrocnemius and lateral tibialis. It is significant to note that postural ataxia measured as quiet stance shows analogous

  16. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... promotion activities, including paid advertising. (a) In order for a handler to receive credit for his/her own promotional activities from his/her pro rata portion of advertising assessment payments, pursuant... professional practices and rates for the type of activity conducted. In the case of claims for...

  17. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... promotion activities, including paid advertising. (a) In order for a handler to receive credit for his/her own promotional activities from his/her pro rata portion of advertising assessment payments, pursuant... professional practices and rates for the type of activity conducted. In the case of claims for...

  18. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... promotion activities, including paid advertising. (a) In order for a handler to receive credit for his/her own promotional activities from his/her pro rata portion of advertising assessment payments, pursuant... professional practices and rates for the type of activity conducted. In the case of claims for...

  19. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... promotion activities, including paid advertising. (a) In order for a handler to receive credit for his/her own promotional activities from his/her pro rata portion of advertising assessment payments, pursuant... professional practices and rates for the type of activity conducted. In the case of claims for...

  20. Ground-based lidar for atmospheric boundary layer ozone measurements.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-05-20

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than ±10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures. PMID:23736241

  1. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  2. Processing electronic photos of Mercury produced by ground based observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    New images of Mercury have been obtained by processing of ground based observations that were carried out using the short exposure technique. The disk of the planet extendeds usually from 6 to 7 arc seconds, with the linear size of the image in a focal plane of the telescope about 0.3-0.5 mm on the average. Processing initial millisecond electronic photos of the planet is very labour-consuming. Some features of processing of initial millisecond electronic photos by methods of correlation stacking were considered in (Ksanfomality et al., 2005; Ksanfomality and Sprague, 2007). The method uses manual selection of good photos including a so-called pilot- file, the search for which usually must be done manually. The pilot-file is the most successful one, in opinion of the operator. It defines the future result of the stacking. To change pilot-files increases the labor of processing many times. Programs of processing analyze the contents of a sample, find in it any details, and search for recurrence of these almost imperceptible details in thousand of other stacking electronic pictures. If, proceeding from experience, the form and position of a pilot-file still can be estimated, the estimation of a reality of barely distinct details in it is somewhere in between the imaging and imagination. In 2006-07 some programs of automatic processing have been created. Unfortunately, the efficiency of all automatic programs is not as good as manual selection. Together with the selection, some other known methods are used. The point spread function (PSF) is described by a known mathematical function which in its central part decreases smoothly from the center. Usually the width of this function is accepted at a level 0.7 or 0.5 of the maxima. If many thousands of initial electronic pictures are acquired, it is possible during their processing to take advantage of known statistics of random variables and to choose the width of the function at a level, say, 0.9 maxima. Then the

  3. Ground-based FTIR measurements of Antarctic trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybdahl, Arthur W.

    2001-06-01

    Ground-based long path FTIR hyper-resolution spectroscopy was employed to measure solar absorption spectra at Arrival Heights, Antarctica during nearly the entire 1998-1999 daylight season. The spectra were analyzed to retrieve vertical total column amounts and volume mixing ratio (VMR)profiles for each of five atmospheric trace gases: HCl, HF, CH4, N 2O and O3. HCl is a major reservoir for free atomic chlorine that directly destroys ozone within the Antarctic stratosphere. This was the first time that these gases were measured over such a long period of time in Antarctica, from just after seasonal sunrise to the approach of sunset. Two analytical tools were used to analyze the absorption microwindows cut from the spectra measured with the University of Denver instrument called SORTI: SFIT-1 that retrieved the vertical column amounts for each of the five trace gases, and SFIT-1-plus-PROFIT that in addition to retrieving the total column amounts for each gas, also retrieved vertical VMR profiles extending from the surface up to an altitude of 80 km. The column amounts and VMR's for each tract gas were assessed for temporal behavior throughout the daylight season. The seasonal losses of HCl due to heterogeneous chemistry were measured. The springtime depletion of ozone within the stratosphere was measured along with its subsequent recovery during the summer and autumn seasons. An extensive error analysis was conducted for each trace gas employing the measured random errors and systematic errors to obtain the relative uncertainty associated with each total column amount calculated. A correlation analysis was performed to determine the inter- relationships among eleven physical and dynamic parameters that included total column amounts for each trace gas, the temperature and height of the Antarctic tropopause, and the potential vorticity obtained for each of four stratospheric altitudes. Historical comparisons of the total column abundances measured during this study

  4. Development of a Portable, Ground-Based Ozone Lidar Instrument for Tropospheric Ozone Research and Educational Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas; Zenker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a portable, eye-safe, ground-based ozone lidar instrument specialized for ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements in the troposphere. This prototype instrument is intended to operate at remote field sites and to serve as the basic unit for monitoring projects requiring multi-instrument networks, such as that discussed in the science plan for the Global Tropospheric Ozone Project (GTOP). This instrument will be based at HU for student training in lidar technology as well as atmospheric ozone data analysis and interpretation. It will be also available for off-site measurement campaigns and will serve as a test bed for further instrument development. Later development beyond this grant to extend the scientific usefulness of the instrument may include incorporation of an aerosol channel and upgrading the laser to make stratospheric ozone measurements. Undergraduate and graduate students have been and will be active participants in this research effort.

  5. Ground-Based VIS/NIR Reflectance Spectra of 25143 Itokawa: What Hayabusa will See and How Ground-Based Data can Augment Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilas, Faith; Abell, P. A.; Jarvis, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    Planning for the arrival of the Hayabusa spacecraft at asteroid 25143 Itokawa includes consideration of the expected spectral information to be obtained using the AMICA and NIRS instruments. The rotationally-resolved spatial coverage the asteroid we have obtained with ground-based telescopic spectrophotometry in the visible and near-infrared can be utilized here to address expected spacecraft data. We use spectrophotometry to simulate the types of data that Hayabusa will receive with the NIRS and AMICA instruments, and will demonstrate them here. The NIRS will cover a wavelength range from 0.85 m, and have a dispersion per element of 250 Angstroms. Thus, we are limited in coverage of the 1.0 micrometer and 2.0 micrometer mafic silicate absorption features. The ground-based reflectance spectra of Itokawa show a large component of olivine in its surface material, and the 2.0 micrometer feature is shallow. Determining the olivine to pyroxene abundance ratio is critically dependent on the attributes of the 1.0- and 2.0 micrometer features. With a cut-off near 2,1 micrometer the longer edge of the 2.0- feature will not be obtained by NIRS. Reflectance spectra obtained using ground-based telescopes can be used to determine the regional composition around space-based spectral observations, and possibly augment the longer wavelength spectral attributes. Similarly, the shorter wavelength end of the 1.0 micrometer absorption feature will be partially lost to the NIRS. The AMICA filters mimic the ECAS filters, and have wavelength coverage overlapping with the NIRS spectral range. We demonstrate how merging photometry from AMICA will extend the spectral coverage of the NIRS. Lessons learned from earlier spacecraft to asteroids should be considered.

  6. Quantifying Stream Habitat: Relative Effort Versus Quality of Competing Remote Sensing & Ground-Based Survey Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangen, S. G.; Wheaton, J. M.; Bouwes, N.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous field and analytical methods exist to assist in the quantification of the quantity and quality of in-stream habitat for salmonids. These methods range from field sketches or ‘tape and stick’ ground-based surveys, through to spatially explicit topographic and aerial photographic surveys from a mix of ground-based and remotely sensed airborne platforms. Although some investigators have assessed the quality of specific individual survey methods, the inter-comparison of competing techniques across a diverse range of habitat conditions (wadeable headwater channels to non-wadeable mainstem channels) has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we seek to quantify relative quality (i.e. accuracy, precision, extent) of habitat metrics and inventories derived from different ground-based and remotely sensed surveys of varying degrees of sophistication, as well as enumerate the effort and cost in completing the surveys. Over the summer of 2010, seven sample reaches of varying habitat complexity were surveyed in the Lemhi River Basin, Idaho, USA. Three different traditional (“stick and tape”) survey techniques were used, including a variant using map-grade GPS. Complete topographic/bathymetric surveys were attempted at each site using separate rtkGPS, total station, ground-based LiDaR, boat-based echo-sounding (w/ ADCP), traditional airborne LiDaR, and imagery-based spectral methods. Separate, georectified aerial imagery surveys were acquired using a tethered blimp, a drone UAV, and a traditional fixed-wing aircraft. Preliminary results from the surveys highlight that no single technique works across the full range of conditions where stream habitat surveys are needed. The results are helpful for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of each approach in specific conditions, and how a hybrid of data acquisition methods can be used to build a more complete quantification of habitat conditions in rivers.

  7. Connecting ground-based in-situ observations, ground-based remote sensing and satellite data within the Pan Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petäjä, Tuukka; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Lappalainen, Hanna K.; Moisseev, Dmitri; O'Connor, Ewan; Bondur, Valery; Kasimov, Nikolai; Kotlyakov, Vladimir; Guo, Huadong; Zhang, Jiahua; Matvienko, Gennadii; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Baklanov, Alexander; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-10-01

    Human activities put an increasing stress on the Earth' environment and push the safe and sustainable boundaries of the vulnerable eco-system. It is of utmost importance to gauge with a comprehensive research program the current status of the environment, particularly in the most vulnerable locations. The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a new multidisciplinary research program aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in the Earth system science and global sustainability questions in the Arctic and boreal Pan-Eurasian regions. The PEEX program aims to (i) understand the Earth system and the influence of environmental and societal changes in both pristine and industrialized Pan-Eurasian environments, (ii) establish and sustain long-term, continuous and comprehensive ground-based airborne and seaborne research infrastructures, and utilize satellite data and multi-scale model frameworks filling the gaps of the insitu observational network, (iii) contribute to regional climate scenarios in the northern Pan-Eurasia and determine the relevant factors and interactions influencing human and societal wellbeing (iv) promote the dissemination of PEEX scientific results and strategies in scientific and stake-holder communities and policy making, (v) educate the next generation of multidisciplinary global change experts and scientists, and (vi) increase the public awareness of climate change impacts in the Pan- Eurasian region. In this contribution, we underline general features of the satellite observations relevant to the PEEX research program and how satellite observations connect to the ground-based observations.

  8. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  9. Data Management for Ground-Based Science Surveys at CASU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Mike

    2015-12-01

    In this talk I will review the data management facilities at CASU for handling large scale ground-based imaging and spectroscopic surveys. The overarching principle for all science data processing at CASU is to provide an end-to-end system that attempts to deliver fully calibrated optimally extracted data products ready for science use. The talk will outline our progress in achieving this and how end users visualize the state-of-play of the data processing and interact with the final products via our internal data repository.

  10. Asteroseismology: Ground based efforts and the need for space observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1994-01-01

    Detection of the oscillations expected to be present on solar-like stars is very difficult. Photometric observations from the ground suffer from two problems: (1) an atmospheric scintillation noise that drops only slowly with telescope aperture size, and (2) mode frequency spacings that require nearly continuous observations over at least several days for resolution. I will review the very limited possibilities for asteroseismology of solar-like stars from ground-based photometric observations. FRESIP could provide an excellent opportunity for pursuing asteroseismology observations of a far richer nature than can be contemplated from the ground.

  11. Biosensors for EVA: Improved Instrumentation for Ground-based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soller, B.; Ellerby, G.; Zou, F.; Scott, P.; Jin, C.; Lee, S. M. C.; Coates, J.

    2010-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group has developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO 2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI project has 4 objectives: (1) increase the accuracy of the metabolic rate calculation through improved prediction of stroke volume; (2) investigate the relative contributions of calf and thigh oxygen consumption to metabolic rate calculation for walking and running; (3) demonstrate that the NIRS-based noninvasive metabolic rate methodology is sensitive enough to detect decrement in VO 2 in a space analog; and (4) improve instrumentation to allow testing within a spacesuit. Over the past year we have made progress on all four objectives, but the most significant progress was made in improving the instrumentation. The NIRS system currently in use at JSC is based on fiber optics technology. Optical fiber bundles are used to deliver light from a light source in the monitor to the patient, and light reflected back from the patient s muscle to the monitor for spectroscopic analysis. The fiber optic cables are large and fragile, and there is no way to get them in and out of the test spacesuit used for ground-based studies. With complimentary funding from the US Army, we undertook a complete redesign of the sensor and control electronics to build a novel system small enough to be used within the spacesuit and portable enough to be used by a combat medic. In the new system the filament lamp used in the fiber optic system was replaced with a novel broadband near infrared

  12. Hyperspectral Observations of Land Surfaces Using Ground-based, Airborne, and Satellite Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuteson, R. O.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Tobin, D. C.

    2006-12-01

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) has helped pioneer the use of high spectral resolution infrared spectrometers for application to atmospheric and surface remote sensing. This paper is focused on observations of land surface infrared emission from high spectral resolution measurements collected over the past 15 years using airborne, ground-based, and satellite platforms. The earliest data was collected by the High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS), an instrument designed in the 1980s for operation on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The HIS was replaced in the late 1990s by the Scanning-HIS instrument which has flown on the NASA ER-2, WB-57, DC-8, and Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft and continues to support field campaigns, such as those for EOS Terra, Aqua, and Aura validation. Since 1995 the UW-SSEC has fielded a ground-based Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) in a research vehicle (the AERIBAGO) which has allowed for direct field measurements of land surface emission from a height of about 16 ft above the ground. Several ground-based and aircraft campaigns were conducted to survey the region surrounding the ARM Southern Great Plains site in north central Oklahoma. The ground- based AERIBAGO has also participated in surface emissivity campaigns in the Western U.S.. Since 2002, the NASA Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) has provided similar measurements from the Aqua platform in an afternoon sun-synchronous polar orbit. Ground-based and airborne observations are being used to validate the land surface products derived from the AIRS observations. These cal/val activities are in preparation for similar measurements anticipated from the operational Cross-track InfraRed Sounder (CrIS) on the NPOESS Preparatory Platform (NPP), expected to be launched in 2008. Moreover, high spectral infrared observations will soon be made by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) on the

  13. Kepler and Ground-Based Transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Drake; Sada, Pedro V.; Jackson, Brian; Peterson, Steven W.; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.; Jennings, Donald E.; Haase, Plynn; Bays, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields Rp = 4.31 R xor 0.06 R xor and Rs = 0.683 R solar mass 0.009 R solar mass, both about 3 sigma smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases 0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12 deg 5 deg to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  14. Inter-Comparison of Lightning Trends from Ground-Based Networks During Severe Weather: Applications Toward GLM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Schultz, Chris J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Rudlosky, Scott D.; Bateman, Monte; Cecil, Daniel J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Goodman, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The planned GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) will provide total lightning data on the location and intensity of thunderstorms over a hemispheric spatial domain. Ongoing GOES-R research activities are demonstrating the utility of total flash rate trends for enhancing forecasting skill of severe storms. To date, GLM total lightning proxy trends have been well served by ground-based VHF systems such as the Northern Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The NALMA (and other similar networks in Washington DC and Oklahoma) provide high detection efficiency (> 90%) and location accuracy (< 1 km) observations of total lightning within about 150 km from network center. To expand GLM proxy applications for high impact convective weather (e.g., severe, aviation hazards), it is desirable to investigate the utility of additional sources of continuous lightning that can serve as suitable GLM proxy over large spatial scales (order 100 s to 1000 km or more), including typically data denied regions such as the oceans. Potential sources of GLM proxy include ground-based long-range (regional or global) VLF/LF lightning networks such as the relatively new Vaisala Global Lightning Dataset (GLD360) and Weatherbug Total Lightning Network (WTLN). Before using these data in GLM research applications, it is necessary to compare them with LMAs and well-quantified cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning networks, such as Vaisala s National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), for assessment of total and CG lightning location accuracy, detection efficiency and flash rate trends. Preliminary inter-comparisons from these lightning networks during selected severe weather events will be presented and their implications discussed.

  15. Comparisons of Space-based GPS Occultation Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements with Ground-based VHF Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, F. H.; Groves, K. M.; Starks, M. J.; Beach, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Ionospheric irregularities are known to cause scintillation of transionospheric radio signals and can affect space-based UHF/VHF communications, causing outages, and degrade GPS accuracy and precision. Current capability for characterizing and predicting ionospheric scintillation utilizes a network of ground- based receivers to detect scintillation and then extrapolate for short-term forecasts. Practical limits on deploying the ground receivers limits the accuracy and spatial coverage one can achieve with this approach. A more global approach is to use a set of space-based satellites equipped with GPS receivers, such as the COSMIC satellite constellation, to measure scintillations observed during so-called occultations with GPS satellites. The term occultation refers to the geometry where the clear line-of-sight path between the space- based GPS receiver and the GPS satellite is ultimately blocked, or occulted, by the earth's surface. Before or after occultation the ray-path passes through the lower atmosphere and ionosphere providing information on the total electron content (TEC) and irregularities between the transmitter and the receiver. In this paper the signal-to-noise values of GPS L1 signals received on the COSMIC (and possibly C/NOFS if available) satellites are examined to help identify areas of ionospheric scintillation. The S4 scintillation index values from these occultations are compared with ground-based VHF S4 scintillation measurements from several equatorial stations. Preliminary results show that while there are cases where both the occultation and ground measurements indicate enhanced scintillation, there are also a number of cases where the occultation GPS S4 is significantly larger than the ground-based VHF S4, somewhat contrary to expectations given that scintillation effects generally increase with decreasing frequency. Reasons for high GPS S4 in the presence of relatively low VHF S4 include geometry differences between space- and ground-based

  16. Ground-based visual inspection for CTBT verification

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, W.; Wohletz, K.

    1997-11-01

    Ground-based visual inspection will play an essential role in On-Site Inspection (OSI) for Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification. Although seismic and remote sensing techniques are the best understood and most developed methods for detection of evasive testing of nuclear weapons, visual inspection will greatly augment the certainty and detail of understanding provided by these more traditional methods. Not only can ground-based visual inspection offer effective documentation in cases of suspected nuclear testing, but it also can provide accurate source location and testing media properties necessary for detailed analysis of seismic records. For testing in violation of the CTBT, an offending state may attempt to conceal the test, which most likely will be achieved by underground burial. While such concealment may not prevent seismic detection, evidence of test deployment, location, and yield can be disguised. In this light, if a suspicious event is detected by seismic or other remote methods, visual inspection of the event area is necessary to document any evidence that might support a claim of nuclear testing and provide data needed to further interpret seismic records and guide further investigations. However, the methods for visual inspection are not widely known nor appreciated, and experience is presently limited. Visual inspection can be achieved by simple, non-intrusive means, primarily geological in nature, and it is the purpose of this report to describe the considerations, procedures, and equipment required to field such an inspection. The inspections will be carried out by inspectors from members of the CTBT Organization.

  17. Light pollution simulations for planar ground-based light sources.

    PubMed

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2008-02-20

    The light pollution model is employed to analyze spatial behavior of luminance at the night sky under cloudless and overcast conditions. Enhanced light excess is particularly identified at cloudy skies, because the clouds efficiently contribute to the downward luminous flux. It is evident that size of ground-based light sources can play an important role in the case of overcast sky conditions. Nevertheless, the realistically sized light sources are rarely embedded into light pollution modeling, and rather they are replaced by simple point sources. We discuss the discrepancies between sky luminance distributions when at first the planar light sources are considered and at second the point-source approximation is accepted. The found differences are noticeable if the size of the light source, distance to the observer, and altitude of a cloudy layer are comparable one to the other. Compared with point-source approximation, an inclusion of the size factor into modeling the light sources leads to partial elimination of the steep changes of sky luminance (typical for point sources of light). The narrow and sharp light pillars normally presented on the sky illuminated by point light sources can disappear or fuse together when two or more nearby light sources are considered with their real sizes. Sky elements situated close to the horizon will glow efficiently if luminous flux originates from two-dimensional ground-based entities (such as cities or villages). PMID:18288228

  18. Ground-based solar astrometric measurements during the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbah, A.; Meftah, M.; Corbard, T.; Ikhlef, R.; Morand, F.; Assus, P.; Fodil, M.; Lin, M.; Ducourt, E.; Lesueur, P.; Poiet, G.; Renaud, C.; Rouze, M.

    2011-11-01

    PICARD is a space mission developed mainly to study the geometry of the Sun. The satellite was launched in June 2010. The PICARD mission has a ground program which is based at the Calern Observatory (Observatoire de la C^ote d'Azur). It will allow recording simultaneous solar images from ground. Astrometric observations of the Sun using ground-based telescopes need however an accurate modelling of optical e®ects induced by atmospheric turbulence. Previous works have revealed a dependence of the Sun radius measurements with the observation conditions (Fried's parameter, atmospheric correlation time(s) ...). The ground instruments consist mainly in SODISM II, replica of the PICARD space instrument and MISOLFA, a generalized daytime seeing monitor. They are complemented by standard sun-photometers and a pyranometer for estimating a global sky quality index. MISOLFA is founded on the observation of Angle-of-Arrival (AA) °uctuations and allows us to analyze atmospheric turbulence optical e®ects on measurements performed by SODISM II. It gives estimations of the coherence parameters characterizing wave-fronts degraded by the atmospheric turbulence (Fried's parameter, size of the isoplanatic patch, the spatial coherence outer scale and atmospheric correlation times). This paper presents an overview of the ground based instruments of PICARD and some results obtained from observations performed at Calern observatory in 2011.

  19. Airborne and Ground-Based Measurements Using a High-Performance Raman Lidar. Part 2; Ground Based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Cadirola, Martin; Venable, Demetrius; Connell, Rasheen; Rush, Kurt; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    The same RASL hardware as described in part I was installed in a ground-based mobile trailer and used in a water vapor lidar intercomparison campaign, hosted at Table Mountain, CA, under the auspices of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). The converted RASL hardware demonstrated high sensitivity to lower stratospheric water vapor indicating that profiling water vapor at those altitudes with sufficient accuracy to monitor climate change is possible. The measurements from Table Mountain also were used to explain the reason, and correct , for sub-optimal airborne aerosol extinction performance during the flight campaign.

  20. A Preliminary Assessment of Phase Separator Ground-Based and Reduced-Gravity Testing for ALS Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Nancy Rabel

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of phase separator ground-based and reduced-gravity testing for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Multiphase Flow Technology Program; 2) Types of Separators; 3) MOBI Phase Separators; 4) Experiment set-up; and 5) Preliminary comparison/results.

  1. Research and development for Onboard Navigation (ONAV) ground based expert/trainer system: Preliminary ascent knowledge requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bochsler, Daniel C.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminary version of expert knowledge for the Onboard Navigation (ONAV) Ground Based Expert Trainer Ascent system for the space shuttle is presented. Included is some brief background information along with the information describing the knowledge the system will contain. Information is given on rules and heuristics, telemetry status, landing sites, inertial measurement units, and a high speed trajectory determinator (HSTD) state vector.

  2. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  3. Test and training simulator for ground-based teleoperated in-orbit servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bernd E.

    1989-01-01

    For the Post-IOC(In-Orbit Construction)-Phase of COLUMBUS it is intended to use robotic devices for the routine operations of ground-based teleoperated In-Orbit Servicing. A hardware simulator for verification of the relevant in-orbit operations technologies, the Servicing Test Facility, is necessary which mainly will support the Flight Control Center for the Manned Space-Laboratories for operational specific tasks like system simulation, training of teleoperators, parallel operation simultaneously to actual in-orbit activities and for the verification of the ground operations segment for telerobotics. The present status of definition for the facility functional and operational concept is described.

  4. Solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 compared with ground-based photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Hoyt, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared total solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 with ground-based photometry from the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) for 109 days between 1 June and 31 December, 1988. We have also included in some analyses NOAA-9 SBUV2 data or F10.7 radio flux. The Nimbus-7 data are from orbital samples, averaged to the mean time of observation at SFO. Using the same parameters as in Chapman et al. (1992), the multiple regression gives an R(exp 2) = 0.9131 and a 'solar minimum' irradiance, S(sub 0) = 1371.76 +/- 0.18 W/sq m for the best fit.

  5. Agreements between ground-based and satellite-based observations. [of earth magnetospheric currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Weimer, D.; Iijima, T.; Ahn, B.-H.; Kamide, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The polar ionospheric parameters obtained by the meridian chain of magnetometers are compared with those obtained by satellites, and a number of ionospheric quantities including the distribution of the electric potential, field-aligned currents, ionospheric currents and their equatorial counterparts, and the relationship between the AE index and the cross-polar cap potential is determined. It is noted that the agreement observed between the ground-based and satellite-based results allows to reduce the search for the driving mechanism of the ionospheric Pedersen current to identifying the driving mechanism of the Pedersen counterpart current in the equatorial plane.

  6. Performance of ground-based high-frequency receiving arrays with electrically-small ground planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, M. M.

    1991-09-01

    Electrically-small ground planes degrade the performance of ground-based high-frequency receiving arrays because the arrays are more susceptible to earth multipath, ground losses, and external currents on element feed cables. Performance degradations include a reduction in element directive gain near the horizon, distortion of the element azimuthal pattern, an increase in the system internal noise factor, and increases in the array factor root-mean-squared (rms) phase error and beam-pointing errors. The advantage of electrically-small ground planes is their relatively low cost of construction and maintenance.

  7. Estimating forest LAI profiles and structural parameters using a ground-based laser called 'Echidna'.

    PubMed

    Jupp, David L B; Culvenor, D S; Lovell, J L; Newnham, G J; Strahler, A H; Woodcock, C E

    2009-02-01

    There are many techniques for measuring leaf area index (LAI) and forest canopy foliage profiles but their accuracy is questionable. This paper briefly reviews current methods of estimating forest LAI and presents a novel, ground-based laser system, Echidna that can make a wide range of measurements of forest structure, including LAI. Here, use of the system to provide field data and derived gap probabilities in the form of a 'hemispherical photograph with range' is demonstrated. The results show consistency and reproducibility and do not depend on special conditions for the natural light field. PMID:19203942

  8. Initial ground-based thermospheric wind measurements using Doppler asymmetric spatial heterodyne spectroscopy (DASH).

    PubMed

    Englert, Christoph R; Harlander, John M; Emmert, John T; Babcock, David D; Roesler, Frederick L

    2010-12-20

    We present the first thermospheric wind measurements using a Doppler Asymmetric Spatial Heterodyne (DASH) spectrometer and the oxygen red-line nightglow emission. The ground-based observations were made from Washington, DC and include simultaneous calibration measurements to track and correct instrument drifts. Even though the measurements were made under challenging thermal and light pollution conditions, they are of good quality with photon statistics uncertainties between about three and twenty-nine meters per second, depending on the nightglow intensity. The wind data are commensurate with a representative set of Millstone Hill Fabry-Perot wind measurements selected for similar geomagnetic and solar cycle conditions. PMID:21197018

  9. Ground-Based Gas-Liquid Flow Research in Microgravity Conditions: State of Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, J.; Colin, C.; Fabre, J.

    1999-01-01

    During the last decade, ground-based microgravity facilities have been utilized in order to obtain predictions for spacecraft system designers and further the fundamental understanding of two-phase flow. Although flow regime, pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient data has been obtained for straight tubes and a limited number of fittings, measurements of the void fraction, film thickness, wall shear stress, local velocity and void information are also required in order to develop general mechanistic models that can be utilized to ascertain the effects of fluid properties, tube geometry and acceleration levels. A review of this research is presented and includes both empirical data and mechanistic models of the flow behavior.

  10. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  11. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities, and Bibliography. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.; Long, Alison T.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population matters. The document describes 15 class sessions which integrate information for sociology, anthropology, psychology, biology, animal behavior, and education. Topics include the history of human…

  12. Unique cell culture systems for ground based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Marian L.

    1990-01-01

    The horizontally rotating fluid-filled, membrane oxygenated bioreactors developed at NASA Johnson for spacecraft applications provide a powerful tool for ground-based research. Three-dimensional aggregates formed by cells cultured on microcarrier beads are useful for study of cell-cell interactions and tissue development. By comparing electron micrographs of plant seedlings germinated during Shuttle flight 61-C and in an earth-based rotating bioreactor it is shown that some effects of microgravity are mimicked. Bioreactors used in the UAH Bioreactor Laboratory will make it possible to determine some of the effects of altered gravity at the cellular level. Bioreactors can be valuable for performing critical, preliminary-to-spaceflight experiments as well as medical investigations such as in vitro tumor cell growth and chemotherapeutic drug response; the enrichment of stem cells from bone marrow; and the effect of altered gravity on bone and muscle cell growth and function and immune response depression.

  13. Ground-Based Experiments on Vibrational Thermal Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Rogers, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-based experiments on g-jitter effects in fluid flow provide insight that complements both theoretical studies and space-based experiments on this problem. We report preliminary results for experiments on Rayleigh-Benard convection subjected to time-dependent accelerations on a shaker table. For sinusoidal modulation, two qualitatively different pattern forming mechanisms come into play: geometry induced wavenumber selection (as in the standard "no-shake" Rayleigh-Benard problem) and dispersion induced wavenumber selection due to parametric instability (as in the Faraday surface-wave problem). We discuss preliminary results on the competition and co-existence of patterns due to these different instability mechanisms. We also discuss the implications of this work on the general question of pattern formation in the presence of noise.

  14. Modelling atmospheric turbulence effects on ground-based telescope systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, L.W.; Flatte, S.M.; Max, C.E.

    1993-09-30

    Questions still exist concerning the appropriate model for turbulence- induced phase fluctuations seen in ground-based telescopes. Bester et al. used a particular observable (slope of the Allan variance) with an infrared interferometer in an attempt to distinguish models. The authors have calculated that observable for Kolmogorov and {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} models with a variety of outer scales and altitude-dependent turbulence and wind velocity. The authors have found that clear distinction between models requires good data on the vertical distribution of wind and turbulence. Furthermore, measurements at time separations of order 60 s are necessary to distinguish the {open_quotes}random walk{close_quotes} model from the Kolmogorov model.

  15. Systems analysis for ground-based optical navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Null, G. W.; Owen, W. M., Jr.; Synnott, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    Deep-space telecommunications systems will eventually operate at visible or near-infrared regions to provide increased information return from interplanetary spacecraft. This would require an onboard laser transponder in place of (or in addition to) the usual microwave transponder, as well as a network of ground-based and/or space-based optical observing stations. This article examines the expected navigation systems to meet these requirements. Special emphasis is given to optical astrometric (angular) measurements of stars, solar system target bodies, and (when available) laser-bearing spacecraft, since these observations can potentially provide the locations of both spacecraft and target bodies. The role of astrometry in the navigation system and the development options for astrometric observing systems are also discussed.

  16. Ground-based passive FT-IR spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert B.; Combs, Roger J.; Kroutil, Robert T.

    2002-02-01

    Absorbance and transmittance spectra were acquired with ground-based passive FT-IR spectrometry for industrial stack evaluations and open-air controlled vapor generation experiments. The industrial stack effluents of sulfur dioxide and nitrous oxide were detected from a coal-burning power plant and an acid plant, respectively, with both MWIR and LWIR passive sensors. The controlled open-air experiments relied on only a LWIR sensor. These experiments produced plumes of methanol and ethanol at three and four elevated plume temperatures, respectively. Various vapor concentration pathlength produces of both ethanol and methanol were generated and gravimetrically monitored in the range from 0 to 300 ppm-m. The associated absorbance values for these concentration pathlength products were found to obey Beer's Law for each elevate stack temperature of 125, 150, 175, and 200 degrees C.

  17. Successes of and prospects for ground-based interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, C.

    1992-05-01

    The development of optical interferometric techniques over the past twenty years is outlined, and future objectives are discussed. These techniques, still ground based, spanning from speckle imaging to long baseline direct beam recombination and analysis, are producing more and more scientific results. New techniques, such as adaptive optics, are continuously developed to take benefit of technical progress in detectors, sensors, and real time control. Part of the most recent results is due to critical progress in the visibility calibration. The range of scientific applications is already wide with results in binary stars, circumstellar envelopes, stellar diameters, solar system bodies, some atypical sources, a few extragalactic objects, and wide angle astrometry. Additionally, a deep knowledge was acquired on the atmospheric turbulence laws. The use of interferometry in the study of binary stars, circumstellar envelopes and stellar diameters is discussed.

  18. Ground-based lidar observations of ozone aerosol and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Heaps, W.S.

    1987-09-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the recently discovered, springtime ozone depletion over Antarctica, but additional data is necessary to establish what processes are producing this phenomenon. The preliminary results of the 1986-1987 National Ozone Expedition indicate that nitrogen oxides were present smaller amounts than anticipated and that chlorine compounds were more prevalent. These findings support chemical theories based on chlorine or chlorine-bromine chemical mechanisms are affecting the level of ozone in the stratosphere; however, not all climate dynamic theories are discounted by these data. The objective is to use a ground-based laser radar system (lidar) in an upward-looking mode to record ozone profiles, aerosol content, and temperature profiles. Although the system was not principally designed for these measurements, the author has modified it slightly to collect these data.

  19. GROMOS-C, a novel ground based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-03-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most of harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows to measure ozone profiles up to the mesopause, 24 h and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere, by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a preamplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features stands out the incorporation of different calibration loads, including a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen, therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station in Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS satellite data, ECMWF model data, as well as our nearby NDACC ozone radiometer measuring at Bern.

  20. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  1. First-generation science cases for ground-based terahertz telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Koch, Patrick M.; Matsushita, Satoki; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Urata, Yuji; Wang, Ming-Jye; Wang, Wei-Hao; Takahashi, Satoko; Tang, Ya-Wen; Chang, Hsian-Hong; Huang, Kuiyun; Morata, Oscar; Otsuka, Masaaki; Lin, Kai-Yang; Tsai, An-Li; Lin, Yen-Ting; Srinivasan, Sundar; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Pu, Hung-Yi; Kemper, Francisca; Patel, Nimesh; Grimes, Paul; Huang, Yau-De; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yen-Ru; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Lin, Lupin Chun-Che; Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Burgos, Roberto; Chen, Ming-Tang; Inoue, Makoto; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy in the coming decades. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (˜ 4″ for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205-μm lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming regions can also be explored since it traces the dust population contributing to the THz spectral peak. For survey-type observations, we focus on "sub-THz" extragalactic surveys, the uniqueness of which is detecting galaxies at redshifts z ˜ 1-2, where the dust emission per comoving volume is the largest in the history of the Universe. Finally we explore possibilities of flexible time scheduling, which enables us to monitor active galactic nuclei, and to target gamma-ray burst afterglows. For these objects, THz and submillimeter wavelength ranges have not yet been explored.

  2. Education and Public Outreach for MSFC's Ground-Based Observations in Support of the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Hagyard, Mona J.; Newton, Elizabeth K.

    1999-01-01

    A primary focus of NASA is the advancement of science and the communication of these advances to a number of audiences, both within the science research community and outside it. The upcoming High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission and the MSFC ground-based observing program, provide an excellent opportunity to communicate our knowledge of the Sun, its cycle of activity, the role of magnetic fields in that activity, and its effect on our planet. In addition to ground-based support of the HESSI mission, MSFC's Solar Observatory, located in North Alabama, will involve students and the local education community in its day-to-day operations, an experience which is more immediate, personal, and challenging than their everyday educational experience. Further, by taking advantage of the Internet, our program can reach beyond the immediate community. By joining with Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia, we will leverage their almost 30 years'experience in science program delivery in diverse situations to a distance learning opportunity which can encompass the entire Southeast and beyond. This poster will outline our education and public outreach plans in support of the HESSI mission in which we will target middle and high school students and their teachers.

  3. Education and Public Outreach for MSFC's Ground-based Observations in Support of the HESSI Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Hagyard, M. J.; Newton, E.

    1999-05-01

    A primary focus of NASA is the advancement of science and the communication of these advances to a number of audiences, both within the science research community and outside it. The upcoming High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission and the MSFC ground-based observing program, provide an excellent opportunity to communicate our knowledge of the Sun, its cycle of activity, the role of magnetic fields in that activity, and its effect on our planet. In addition to ground-based support of the HESSI mission, MSFC's Solar Observatory, located in North Alabama, will involve students and the local education community in its day-to-day operations, an experience which is more immediate, personal, and challenging than their everyday educational experience. Further, by taking advantage of the Internet, our program can reach beyond the immediate community. By joining with Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia, we will leverage their almost 30 years' experience in science program delivery in diverse situations to a distance learning opportunity which can encompass the entire Southeast and beyond. This poster will outline our education and public outreach plans in support of the HESSI mission in which we will target middle and high school students and their teachers.

  4. Coupled Simulations, Ground-Based Experiments and Flight Experiments for Astrodynamics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, R.; Brown, M.; Lorrain, P.; Capon, C.; Lambert, A.; Benson, C.; Tuttle, S.; Griffin, D.

    Near-Earth satellites undergo complex and poorly understood interactions with their environment, leading to large uncertainties in predicting orbits and an associated risk of collision with other satellites and with space debris. The nature, evolution and behaviour of the growing cloud of space debris in that environment is even less well understood. Significant effort and expenditure is currently being made by governments in Australia, UK, USA, Europe and elsewhere in space surveillance and tracking, in order to mitigate the risk. However, a major gap exists with respect to the science of in-orbit behaviour. Research is underway in Australia to enable the prediction of the orbits of near-Earth space objects with order(s) of magnitude greater fidelity than currently possible. This is being achieved by coupling together the necessary parts of the puzzle - the physics of rarefied space object “aerodynamics” and the space physics and space weather that affects it - and employing our capabilities in ground-based and in-orbit experiments, ground-based observations and high performance computing to do so. As part of the effort, UNSW Canberra is investing $10M to develop a sustainable university-led program to develop and fly affordable in-orbit missions for space research. In the coming 6 years, we will fly a minimum of four cubesat missions, some in partnership with DSTO, which will include flight experiments for validating Space Situational Awareness astrodynamics simulation and observation capabilities. The flights are underpinned by ground-based experimental research employing space test chambers, advanced diagnostics, and supercomputer simulations that couple DSMC and Particle-in-Cell methods for modelling space object interactions with the ionosphere. This paper will describe the research both underway and planned, with particular emphasis on the coupled numerical/experimental/flight approach.

  5. Ground-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of the Outer Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.

    2009-09-01

    This report presents both a retrospective of ground-based support for spacecraft missions to the outer solar system and a perspective of support for future missions. Past support is reviewed in a series of case studies involving the author. The most basic support is essential, providing the mission with information without which the planned science would not have been accomplished. Another is critical, without which science would have been returned, but missing a key element in its understanding. Some observations are enabling by accomplishing one aspect of an experiment which would otherwise not have been possible. Other observations provide a perspective of the planet as a whole which is not available to instruments with narrow fields of view and limited spatial coverage, sometimes motivating a re-prioritizing of experiment objectives. Ground-based support is also capable of providing spectral coverage not present in the complement of spacecraft instruments. Earth-based observations also have the capability of filling in gaps of spacecraft coverage of atmospheric phenomena, as well as providing surveillance of longer-term behavior than the coverage available to the mission. Future missions benefiting from ground-based support would include the Juno mission to Jupiter in the next decade, a flagship-class mission to the Jupiter or to the Saturn systems currently under consideration, and possible intermediate-class missions which might be proposed in NASA’s New Frontiers category. One of the principal benefits of future 30 m-class giant telescopes would be to improve the spatial resolution of maps of temperature and composition which are derived from observations of thermal emission at mid-infrared and longer wavelengths. In many situations, this spatial resolution is competitive with those of the relevant instruments on the spacecraft themselves.

  6. Proceedings of the 2009 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marv A; Aguilar - Chang, Julio; Anderson, Dale; Arrowsmith, Marie; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Baker, Diane; Begnaud, Michael; Harste, Hans; Maceira, Monica; Patton, Howard; Phillips, Scott; Randall, George; Rowe, Charlotte; Stead, Richard; Steck, Lee; Whitaker, Rod; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2009: Ground -Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2009 in Tucson, Arizona,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  7. Proceedings of the 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A; Patterson, Eileen F

    2010-09-21

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2010: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 21-23 September, 2010 in Orlando, Florida,. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, National Science Foundation (NSF), Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  8. Proceedings of the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2005-09-20

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 27th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 20-22 September, 2005 in Rancho Mirage, California. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  9. Proceedings of the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2006-09-19

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 28th Seismic Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 19-21 September, 2006 in Orlando, Florida. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  10. Proceedings of the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marv A; Aguilar-chang, Julio; Arrowsmith, Marie; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Baker, Diane; Begnaud, Michael; Harste, Hans; Maceira, Monica; Patton, Howard; Phillips, Scott; Randall, George; Revelle, Douglas; Rowe, Charlotte; Stead, Richard; Steck, Lee; Whitaker, Rod; Yang, Xiaoning

    2008-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 30th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 23-25 September, 2008 in Portsmouth, Virginia. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States’ capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  11. Proceedings of the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Benson, Jody; Patterson, Eileen F.

    2007-09-25

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 29th Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 25-27 September, 2007 in Denver, Colorado. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  12. Optical/infrared views of the distant universe with ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. S.; Tolstoy, E.

    1997-05-01

    Ground-based optical/IR observatories offer access to the rest frame ultraviolet and visible spectral regions of objects with high redshifts. Current observations of high redshift objects with natural seeing of 0.5-1 arcsec include optical/IR photometry and a variety of spectroscopic measurements. These take advantage of the large apertures and efficient instruments of ground-based observatories to obtain high spectral resolution and to reach low surface brightnesses, which is required to overcome cosmological effects. The success of natural guide star adaptive optics systems suggests that observations could become routine with image diameters <=0.25 arcsec (and often approaching 0.1 arcsec) over modest fields of view in the IJHK bands. The combination of adaptive optics on 8-10-m class telescopes, versatile arrays of powerful instruments (including multi-slit or integral field unit spectrographs), and airglow suppression schemes will support deeper and more intensive infrared investigations of faint galaxies, and will allow us to take advantage of increased brightness in strong emission lines. This work should lead to a better understanding of selection effects at high redshift, as well as the identification and measurement of internal properties for typical galaxies at early epochs.

  13. Capabilities and constraints of NASA's ground-based reduced gravity facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack; Neumann, Eric S.; Sotos, Raymond G.

    1993-01-01

    The ground-based reduced gravity facilities of NASA have been utilized to support numerous investigations addressing various processes and phenomina in several disciplines for the past 30 years. These facilities, which include drop towers, drop tubes, aircraft, and sounding rockets are able to provide a low gravity environment (gravitational levels that range from 10(exp -2)g to 10(exp -6)g) by creating a free fall or semi-free fall condition where the force of gravity on an experiment is offset by its linear acceleration during the 'fall' (drop or parabola). The low gravity condition obtained on the ground is the same as that of an orbiting spacecraft which is in a state of perpetual free fall. The gravitational levels and associated duration times associated with the full spectrum of reduced gravity facilities including spaced-based facilities are summarized. Even though ground-based facilities offer a relatively short experiment time, this available test time has been found to be sufficient to advance the scientific understanding of many phenomena and to provide meaningful hardware tests during the flight experiment development process. Also, since experiments can be quickly repeated in these facilities, multistep phenomena that have longer characteristic times associated with them can sometimes be examined in a step-by-step process. There is a large body of literature which has reported the study results achieved through using reduced-gravity data obtained from the facilities.

  14. Proceedings of the 2011 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Wetovsky, Marvin A.; Patterson, Eileen F.; Sandoval, Marisa N.

    2011-09-13

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the Monitoring Research Review 2011: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies, held 13-15 September, 2011 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), National Science Foundation (NSF), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States' capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  15. Ground-based measurements of the solar diameter during the rising phase of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Corbard, T.; Irbah, A.; Ikhlef, R.; Morand, F.; Renaud, C.; Hauchecorne, A.; Assus, P.; Borgnino, J.; Chauvineau, B.; Crepel, M.; Dalaudier, F.; Damé, L.; Djafer, D.; Fodil, M.; Lesueur, P.; Poiet, G.; Rouzé, M.; Sarkissian, A.; Ziad, A.; Laclare, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. For the past thirty years, modern ground-based time-series of the solar radius have shown different apparent variations according to different instruments. The origins of these variations may result from the observer, the instrument, the atmosphere, or the Sun. Solar radius measurements have been made for a very long time and in different ways. Yet we see inconsistencies in the measurements. Numerous studies of solar radius variation appear in the literature, but with conflicting results. These measurement differences are certainly related to instrumental effects or atmospheric effects. Use of different methods (determination of the solar radius), instruments, and effects of Earth's atmosphere could explain the lack of consistency on the past measurements. A survey of the solar radius has been initiated in 1975 by Francis Laclare, at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA). Several efforts are currently made from space missions to obtain accurate solar astrometric measurements, for example, to probe the long-term variations of solar radius, their link with solar irradiance variations, and their influence on the Earth climate. Aims: The Picard program includes a ground-based observatory consisting of different instruments based at the Calern site (OCA, France). This set of instruments has been named "Picard Sol" and consists of a Ritchey-Chrétien telescope providing full-disk images of the Sun in five narrow-wavelength bandpasses (centered on 393.37, 535.7, 607.1, 782.2, and 1025.0 nm), a Sun-photometer that measures the properties of atmospheric aerosol, a pyranometer for estimating a global sky-quality index, a wide-field camera that detects the location of clouds, and a generalized daytime seeing monitor allowing us to measure the spatio-temporal parameters of the local turbulence. Picard Sol is meant to perpetuate valuable historical series of the solar radius and to initiate new time-series, in particular during solar cycle 24

  16. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  17. Ground-based testing of space nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.G.

    1990-10-22

    Small nuclear power plants for space applications are evaluated according to their testability in this two part report. The first part introduces the issues involved in testing these power plants. Some of the concerns include oxygen embrittlement of critical components, the test environment, the effects of a vacuum environment on materials, the practically of racing an activated test chamber, and possible testing alternative the SEHPTR, king develop at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. ΔPK oncolytic activity includes modulation of the tumour cell milieu.

    PubMed

    Bollino, Dominique; Colunga, Aric; Li, Baiquan; Aurelian, Laure

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a unique cancer therapeutic that encompasses tumour cell lysis through both virus replication and programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. Nonetheless, clinical efficacy is relatively modest, likely related to the immunosuppressive tumour milieu. Our studies use the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-based oncolytic virus ΔPK that has documented anti-tumour activity associated with virus replication, PCD and cancer stem cell lysis. They are designed to examine whether ΔPK-mediated oncolysis includes the ability to reverse the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment by altering the balance of cytokines directly secreted by the melanoma cells and to define its mechanism. Here, we show that melanoma cells secreted the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and that secretion was inhibited by ΔPK through virus replication and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/c-Jun activation. ΔPK-induced IL-10 inhibition upregulated surface expression of MHC class I chain-related protein A, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor expressed on NK- and cytotoxic T-cells. Concomitantly, ΔPK also upregulated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-1β through autophagy-mediated activation of Toll-like receptor 2 pathways and pyroptosis, and it inhibited the expression of the negative immune checkpoint regulator cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. Pharmacologic inhibition of these processes significantly reduces the oncolytic activity of ΔPK. PMID:26602205

  19. Validation of GOME (ERS-2) NO2 vertical column data with ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionov, D.; Sinyakov, V.; Semenov, V.

    Starting from 1995 the global monitoring of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide is carried out by the measurements of nadir-viewing GOME spectrometer aboard ERS-2 satellite. Continuous validation of that data by means of comparisons with well-controlled ground-based measurements is important to ensure the quality of GOME data products and improve related retrieval algorithms. At the station of Issyk-Kul (Kyrgyzstan) the ground-based spectroscopic observations of NO2 vertical column have been started since 1983. The station is located on the northern shore of Issyk-Kul lake, 1650 meters above the sea level (42.6 N, 77.0 E). The site is equipped with grating spectrometer for the twilight measurements of zenith-scattered solar radiation in the visible range, and applies the DOAS technique to retrieve NO2 vertical column. It is included in the list of NDSC stations as a complementary one. The present study is focused on validation of GOME NO2 vertical column data, based on 8-year comparison with correlative ground-based measurements at Issyk-Kul station in 1996-2003. Within the investigation, an agreement of both individual and monthly averaged GOME measurements with corresponding twilight ground-based observations is examined. Such agreement is analyzed with respect to different conditions (season, sun elevation), temporal/spatial criteria choice (actual overpass location, correction for diurnal variation) and data processing (GDP version 2.7, 3.0). In addition, NO2 vertical columns were integrated from simultaneous stratospheric profile measurements by NASA HALOE and SAGE-II/III satellite instruments and introduced to explain the differences with ground-based observations. In particular cases, NO2 vertical profiles retrieved from the twilight ground-based measurements at Issuk-Kul were also included into comparison. Overall, summertime GOME NO2 vertical columns were found to be systematicaly lower than ground-based data. This work was supported by International Association

  20. Active seat suspension for a small vehicle: considerations for control system including observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Hiroyuki; Shiino, Hiroshi; Oshinoya, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa; Ozaki, Koichi; Ogino, Hirohiko

    2007-12-01

    We have examined the improvement of ride quality and the reduction of riding fatigue brought about by the active control of the seat suspension of small vehicles such as one-seater electric automobiles. A small active seat suspension, which is easy to install, was designed and manufactured for one-seater electric automobiles. For the actuator, a maintenance-free voice coil motor used as a direct drive was adopted. For fundamental considerations, we designed a one-degree-of-freedom model for the active seat suspension system. Then, we designed a disturbance cancellation control system that includes the observer for a two-degree-of-freedom model. In an actual driving test, a test road, in which the concavity and convexity of an actual road surface were simulated using hard rubber, was prepared and the control performance of vertical vibrations of the seat surface during driving was examined. As a result, in comparison with the one-degree-of-freedom control system, it was confirmed that the control performance was improved by the two-degree-of-freedom control system that includes the observer.

  1. In situ timing and pointing verification of the ICESat altimeter using a ground-based system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magruder, L.; Silverberg, E.; Webb, C.; Schutz, B.

    2005-11-01

    To provide validation of the ICESat laser altimeter time of measurement and geolocation, a ground-based technique was implemented at White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH), during the Laser 2a and 3a operational periods. The activities used an electro-optical detection system and a passive array of corner cube retro reflectors (CCR). The detectors and the CCRs were designed to provide an independent assessment of the laser footprint location, while the detectors also provide timing verification. This ground-based system unambiguously validated the elevation product time tag to 3 μsec +/- 1 μsec. In addition, the ground equipment provided in situ geolocations of the laser pulse. Comparing the in situ results to the ICESat GLA14 data product the positions differ by 10.6 m +/- 4.5 m for Laser 2a (Release 21) operations and 7.5 m +/- 6.6 m for Laser 3a (Release 23). These comparisons correlate to pointing validations at this site, for the specific overflight configurations.

  2. Synchronized observations by using the STEREO and the largest ground-based decametre radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalenko, A. A.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.; Mann, G.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Kaiser, M. L.; Briand, C.; Zarka, P.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Koval, A. A.; Mel'nik, V. N.; Mukha, D. V.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the approach to simultaneous (synchronous) solar observations of radio emission by using the STEREO-WAVES instruments (frequency range 0.125-16 MHz) and the largest ground-based low-frequency radio telescope. We illustrate it by the UTR-2 radio telescope implementation (10-30 MHz). The antenna system of the radio telescope is a T-shape-like array of broadband dipoles and is located near the village Grakovo in the Kharkiv region (Ukraine). The third observation point on the ground in addition to two space-based ones improves the space-mission performance capabilities for the determination of radio-emission source directivity. The observational results from the high sensitivity antenna UTR-2 are particularly useful for analysis of STEREO data in the condition of weak event appearances during solar activity minima. In order to improve the accuracy of flux density measurements, we also provide simultaneous observations with a large part of the UTR-2 radio telescope array and its single dipole close to the STEREO-WAVES antennas in sensitivity. This concept has been studied by comparing the STEREO data with ground-based records from 2007-2011 and shown to be effective. The capabilities will be useful in the implementation of new instruments (LOFAR, LWA, MWA, etc.) and during the future Solar Orbiter mission.

  3. Cardiovascular effects of weightlessness and ground-based simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandler, Harold

    1988-01-01

    A large number of animal and human flight and ground-based studies were conducted to uncover the cardiovascular effects of weightlessness. Findings indicate changes in cardiovascular function during simulations and with spaceflight that lead to compromised function on reambulation and/or return to earth. This altered state termed cardiovascular deconditioning is most clearly manifest when in an erect body state. Hemodynamic parameters inidicate the presence of excessive tachnycardia, hypotension (leading to presyncope in one-third of the subjects), decreased heart volume, decreased plasma and circulating blood volumes and loss of skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the lower limbs. No clinically harmful effects were observed to date, but in-depth follow-ups were limited, as was available physiologic information. Available data concerning the causes for the observed changes indicate significant roles for mechanisms involved with body fluid-volume regulation, altered cardiac function, and the neurohumoral control of the control of the peripheral circulation. Satisfactory measures are not found. Return to preflight state was variable and only slightly dependent on flight duration. Future progress awaits availability of flight durations longer than several weeks.

  4. Ground deformation from ground-based SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarchi, Dario; Casagli, Nicola; Fortuny-Guasch, Joaquim; Guerri, Letizia; Antonello, Giuseppe; Leva, Davide

    An in-depth analysis of the last two images acquired by the ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system installed on Stromboli before the 5 April 2003 explosion allowed us to detect the precursory signals of the explosion related to ground deformation. In particular, it was possible to estimate the exact time of the explosion through the time domain analysis of raw data from the radar acquisition. This was interrupted by a blackout that occurred a few seconds after the event. The explosion onset time corresponds to a clear change in the intensity of the backscattered energy, related to the dense volcanic plume emission from the Crater. In addiction, the use of a particular interferometric processing technique for the last two acquisitions, consisting of the selection of synthetic sub-apertures from the main ones and creating with these a sequence of interferograms with a higher temporal resolution, detected precursory deformations starting 2 min before the explosion. These observations indicate the occurrence of an elastic deformation of a centimeter amplitude that affected the volcanic edifice progressively from the Crater down to the Sciara del Fuoco depression.

  5. Assuring Ground-Based Detect and Avoid for UAS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganeshmadhav Jagadeesh; Berthold, Randall; Fladeland, Matthew; Storms, Bruce; Sumich, Mark

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of the Marginal Ice Zones Observations and Processes Experiment (MIZOPEX) NASA Earth science mission was to show the operational capabilities of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) when deployed on challenging missions, in difficult environments. Given the extreme conditions of the Arctic environment where MIZOPEX measurements were required, the mission opted to use a radar to provide a ground-based detect-and-avoid (GBDAA) capability as an alternate means of compliance (AMOC) with the see-and-avoid federal aviation regulation. This paper describes how GBDAA safety assurance was provided by interpreting and applying the guidelines in the national policy for UAS operational approval. In particular, we describe how we formulated the appropriate safety goals, defined the processes and procedures for system safety, identified and assembled the relevant safety verification evidence, and created an operational safety case in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements. To the best of our knowledge, the safety case, which was ultimately approved by the FAA, is the first successful example of non-military UAS operations using GBDAA in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), and, therefore, the first nonmilitary application of the safety case concept in this context.

  6. Nonlinear analysis of the ground-based magnetometer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiTommaso, Joseph Henry

    When the first magnetometer was created by Frederick Gauss in 1833, scientists gained a powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics, and strength of the Earth's magnetic field: the magnetosphere. Since Gauss' time, the world's scientific community has established ground-based magnetometer stations around the globe in an effort to study local and global perturbations and patterns of the Earth's magnetic field. The main focus of this network has been monitoring the magnetic flux and impact from the Sun's constant outflow of radiation and particles known as the solar wind, as well as its more violent eruptive events. There has been little work, by comparison, into the signals and correlations within the network itself. Since the Earth's field can roughly be mapped to a dipole and disturbances often have a large scale structure, one can surmise there should be some correlation between stations based on their relative positions to one another. What that correlation is or represents is not clear. To investigate this possible correlation and its nature, a set of nonlinear analytic methods were conducted on magnetic data collected from stations scattered across North America over an 18 year period. The analysis was focused on searching for spatial and temporal correlations of nonperiodic signals in the magnetometer network. The findings from that analysis suggest there exist nonlocal correlations between stations that are dependent on position, which could be useful in the development of a space weather risk assessment.

  7. Ground based preparation for microgravity growth of alloy semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, Archibald L.; Debnam, W. J.; Crouch, R. K.; Simchick, R. T.; Sorokach, S. K.; Rosch, W.; Knuteson, D. J.; Barber, P. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ground-based research conducted in order to prepare a microgravity space flight experiment is presented. The thermophysical properties of a PbSnTe alloy used for semiconductors are investigated, and furnace calibration and fluid-flow measurements are performed. The alloy has a zero energy crossing at approximately 40 percent SnTe in its band-gap vs composition diagram, which facilitates the design of long-wavelength IR detectors and lasers. The uniformity of devices made from this material depends on the ratio of PbTe and SnTe and requires the composition of the crystal growth to be closely controlled. The main obstacle to such control is the fact that liquid of this material is always solutally or thermally unstable, and, in a high-temperature gradient, the double convective instability cannot be made stable by balancing thermal and solutal expansion. In order to extend the science of crystal growth, the limits of suppression of convection have to be tested in low earth orbit.

  8. Ground-based gravitational-wave detection: now and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, Stanley E.

    2008-06-01

    In the past three years, the first generation of large gravitational-wave interferometers has begun operation near their design sensitivities, taking up the mantle from the bar detectors that pioneered the search for the first direct detection of gravitational waves. Even as the current ground-based interferometers were reaching their design sensitivities, plans were being laid for the future. Advances in technology and lessons learned from the first generation devices have pointed the way to an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity, as well as expanded frequency ranges and the capability to tailor the sensitivity band to address particular astrophysical sources. Advanced cryogenic acoustic detectors, the successors to the current bar detectors, are being researched and may play a role in the future, particularly at the higher frequencies. One of the most important trends is the growing international cooperation aimed at building a truly global network. In this paper, I survey the state of the various detectors as of mid-2007, and outline the prospects for the future.

  9. Spatial mapping of ground-based observations of total ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K.-L.; Guillas, S.; Fioletov, V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Total column ozone variations estimated using ground-based stations provide important independent source of information in addition to satellite-based estimates. This estimation has been vigorously challenged by data inhomogeneity in time and by the irregularity of the spatial distribution of stations, as well as by interruptions in observation records. Furthermore, some stations have calibration issues and thus observations may drift. In this paper we compare the spatial interpolation of ozone levels using the novel stochastic partial differential equation (SPDE) approach with the covariance-based kriging. We show how these new spatial predictions are more accurate, less uncertain and more robust. We construct long-term zonal means to investigate the robustness against the absence of measurements at some stations as well as instruments drifts. We conclude that time series analyzes can benefit from the SPDE approach compared to the covariance-based kriging when stations are missing, but the positive impact of the technique is less pronounced in the case of drifts.

  10. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-01

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements. Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken. This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  11. Bridge Testing With Ground-Based Interferometric Radar: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Chiara, P.; Morelli, A.

    2010-05-28

    The research of innovative non-contact techniques aimed at the vibration measurement of civil engineering structures (also for damage detection and structural health monitoring) is continuously directed to the optimization of measures and methods. Ground-Based Radar Interferometry (GBRI) represents the more recent technique available for static and dynamic control of structures and ground movements.Dynamic testing of bridges and buildings in operational conditions are currently performed: (a) to assess the conformity of the structure to the project design at the end of construction; (b) to identify the modal parameters (i.e. natural frequencies, mode shapes and damping ratios) and to check the variation of any modal parameters over the years; (c) to evaluate the amplitude of the structural response to special load conditions (i.e. strong winds, earthquakes, heavy railway or roadway loads). If such tests are carried out by using a non-contact technique (like GBRI), the classical issues of contact sensors (like accelerometers) are easily overtaken.This paper presents and discusses the results of various tests carried out on full-scale bridges by using a Stepped Frequency-Continuous Wave radar system.

  12. Are language-based activities in science effective for all students, including low achievers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, Léonard P.

    2004-05-01

    The study investigated achievement status as a factor determining the use of language-based activities for learning science. A total of 154 eighth-grade students were randomly assigned to four groups, all stratified for gender and achievement level. The treatments involved various combinations of talk and writing, and descriptive and explanatory tasks. The dependent measures included scores on multiple choice tests obtained at three times during the study. Records of student talk and writing were also analyzed to identify patterns of differences between groups of achievers. The findings suggested that low achievers complete more problems, and develop better understanding and comprehension of ecology concepts when they have engaged in peer discussions of explanatory tasks. In comparison, high achievers benefit more from writing than talking, and writing explanations enhances comprehension more than restricted writing activities.

  13. Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

    2012-05-30

    Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

  14. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  15. Functional Allocation for Ground-Based Automated Separation Assurance in NextGen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Martin, Lynne; Homola, Jeffrey; Cabrall, Christopher; Brasil, Connie

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research effort into functional allocation in a NextGen environment, a controller-in-the-loop study on ground-based automated separation assurance was conducted at NASA Ames' Airspace Operations Laboratory in February 2010. Participants included six FAA front line managers, who are currently certified professional controllers and four recently retired controllers. Traffic scenarios were 15 and 30 minutes long where controllers interacted with advanced technologies for ground-based separation assurance, weather avoidance, and arrival metering. The automation managed the separation by resolving conflicts automatically and involved controllers only by exception, e.g., when the automated resolution would have been outside preset limits. Results from data analyses show that workload was low despite high levels of traffic, Operational Errors did occur but were closely tied to local complexity, and safety acceptability ratings varied with traffic levels. Positive feedback was elicited for the overall concept with discussion on the proper allocation of functions and trust in automation.

  16. Using Ground-Based Measurements and Retrievals to Validate Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dong, Xiquan

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research is to use the DOE ARM ground-based measurements and retrievals as the ground-truth references for validating satellite cloud results and retrieving algorithms. This validation effort includes four different ways: (1) cloud properties on different satellites, therefore different sensors, TRMM VIRS and TERRA MODIS; (2) cloud properties at different climatic regions, such as DOE ARM SGP, NSA, and TWP sites; (3) different cloud types, low and high level cloud properties; and (4) day and night retrieving algorithms. Validation of satellite-retrieved cloud properties is very difficult and a long-term effort because of significant spatial and temporal differences between the surface and satellite observing platforms. The ground-based measurements and retrievals, only carefully analyzed and validated, can provide a baseline for estimating errors in the satellite products. Even though the validation effort is so difficult, a significant progress has been made during the proposed study period, and the major accomplishments are summarized in the follow.

  17. Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascarenas, David; Stull, Christopher; Farrar, Charles

    2011-11-01

    Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

  18. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies.

    PubMed

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-Aki K; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-05-20

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module ("Kibo") on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides "space-based controls" by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  19. Improving Agricultural Water Resources Management Using Ground-based Infrared Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghvaeian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the largest user of freshwater resources in arid/semi-arid parts of the world. Meeting rapidly growing demands in food, feed, fiber, and fuel while minimizing environmental pollution under a changing climate requires significant improvements in agricultural water management and irrigation scheduling. Although recent advances in remote sensing techniques and hydrological modeling has provided valuable information on agricultural water resources and their management, real improvements will only occur if farmers, the decision makers on the ground, are provided with simple, affordable, and practical tools to schedule irrigation events. This presentation reviews efforts in developing methods based on ground-based infrared thermometry and thermography for day-to-day management of irrigation systems. The results of research studies conducted in Colorado and Oklahoma show that ground-based remote sensing methods can be used effectively in quantifying water stress and consequently triggering irrigation events. Crop water use estimates based on stress indices have also showed to be in good agreement with estimates based on other methods (e.g. surface energy balance, root zone soil water balance, etc.). Major challenges toward the adoption of this approach by agricultural producers include the reduced accuracy under cloudy and humid conditions and its inability to forecast irrigation date, which is a critical knowledge since many irrigators need to decide about irrigations a few days in advance.

  20. Preliminary Design of a Ramjet for Integration with Ground-Based Launch Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayles, Emily L.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the preliminary design of a ramjet for integration with a ground based launch assist. The reasons for the use of ground-based launch assist and the proposed mechanism for a system are reviewed. The use of a Optimal Trajectory by Implicit Simulation (OTIS), to model the flight and comparison with an actual rocket trajectory is given. The OTIS system is reviewed, The benefits of a launch assist system are analyzed concluding that a launch assist can provide supersonic speeds thus allowing ignition of ramjet without an onboard compressor. This means a further reduction in total launch weight. The Ramjet study is reviewed next. This included a review of the ONX simulations, the verification of the ONX results with the use of Holloman Sled experiment data as derived from the Feasibility of Ramjet Engine Test Capability on The Holloman AFB Sled Track. The conclusion was that the ONX system was not sufficient to meet the needs for the modeling required. The GECAT (Graphical Engine Cycle Analysis Tool) is examined. The results of the GECAT simulations was verified with data from Stataltex and D21 flights. The Next steps are: to create a GECAT Model of a launch assist ramjet, to adjust the geometry to produce the desired thrust, and to survey the ramjet's performance over a range of Mach numbers. The assumptions and requirements of a launch assist ramjet are given, and the acceptable flight regimes are reviewed.

  1. Ground-based assessment of JAXA mouse habitat cage unit by mouse phenotypic studies

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Miki; Kudo, Takashi; Hamada, Michito; Jeon, Hyojung; Imamura, Yuki; Asano, Keigo; Okada, Risa; Tsunakawa, Yuki; Mizuno, Seiya; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Ishikawa, Chihiro; Li, Haiyan; Shiga, Takashi; Ishida, Junji; Hamada, Juri; Murata, Kazuya; Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Misuzu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Yamane, Mutsumi; Ikawa, Masahito; Morita, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Asahara, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Taishin; Akiyama, Nobuko; Sasanuma, Hiroki; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Zhou, Rui; Wang, Ying-Ying; Ito, Taito; Kokubu, Yuko; Noguchi, Taka-aki K.; Ishimine, Hisako; Kurisaki, Akira; Shiba, Dai; Mizuno, Hiroyasu; Shirakawa, Masaki; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency developed the mouse Habitat Cage Unit (HCU) for installation in the Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) onboard the Japanese Experimental Module (“Kibo”) on the International Space Station. The CBEF provides “space-based controls” by generating artificial gravity in the HCU through a centrifuge, enabling a comparison of the biological consequences of microgravity and artificial gravity of 1 g on mice housed in space. Therefore, prior to the space experiment, a ground-based study to validate the habitability of the HCU is necessary to conduct space experiments using the HCU in the CBEF. Here, we investigated the ground-based effect of a 32-day housing period in the HCU breadboard model on male mice in comparison with the control cage mice. Morphology of skeletal muscle, the thymus, heart, and kidney, and the sperm function showed no critical abnormalities between the control mice and HCU mice. Slight but significant changes caused by the HCU itself were observed, including decreased body weight, increased weights of the thymus and gastrocnemius, reduced thickness of cortical bone of the femur, and several gene expressions from 11 tissues. Results suggest that the HCU provides acceptable conditions for mouse phenotypic analysis using CBEF in space, as long as its characteristic features are considered. Thus, the HCU is a feasible device for future space experiments. PMID:26822934

  2. Detectability and Parameter Estimation of Gravitational Waves from Cosmic String with Ground-Based Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuzurihara, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    Cosmic string is one dimensional topological defects which might be formed at the phase transition in the early universe. Gravitational Wave (GW) waveform and its power spectrum from structure in closed cosmic string loop that is called as "cusp" are theoretically predicted. Cosmic string is thought to be described with two characteristic parameters: string tension μ and initial loop size α. We demonstrate numerical simulation for GWs from closed comic string loops to study detectability and parameter decision with ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA, advanced LIGO, advanced Virgo and LIGO-India. We employ characteristic parameters 10 - 13 < Gμ < 10 - 7 and 10 - 16 < α < 10 - 1, assuming uniform distribution of cosmic string in isotropic direction, at time epochs of loop forming and GW emission according to the universe model. We calculate waveform numerically in time domain of each GW from these distributed cosmic strings, and superpose waveforms to generate continuously observational signal on the ground-based GW detectors, including detector responses. We consider data analysis for stochastic background type gravitational wave signatures in the observation.

  3. A comparison of vibration damping methods for ground based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eric H.; Glaese, Roger M.; Neill, Douglas

    2008-07-01

    Vibration is becoming a more important element in design of telescope structures as these structures become larger and more compliant and include higher bandwidth actuation systems. This paper describes vibration damping methods available for current and future implementation and compares their effectiveness for a model of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), a structure that is actually stiffer than most large telescopes. Although facility and mount design, structural stiffening and occasionally vibration isolation have been adequate in telescopes built to date, vibration damping offers a mass-efficient means of reducing vibration response, whether the vibration results from external wind disturbances, telescope slewing, or other internal disturbances from translating or rotating components. The paper presents several damping techniques including constrained layer viscoelastics, viscous and magnetorheological (MR) fluid devices, passive and active piezoelectric dampers, tuned mass dampers (vibration absorbers) and active resonant dampers. Basic architectures and practical implementation considerations are discussed and expected performance is assessed using a finite element model of the LSST. With a goal of reducing settling time during the telescope's surveys, and considering practicalities of integration with the telescope structure, two damping methods were identified as most appropriate: passive tuned mass dampers and active electromagnetic resonant dampers.

  4. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations. PMID:25985872

  5. Macrophysical and optical properties of midlatitude cirrus clouds from four ground-based lidars and collocated CALIOP observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Jean-Charles; Haeffelin, M.; Morille, Y.; Noel, V.; Keckhut, P.; Winker, D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Chervet, P.; Roblin, A.

    2010-05-27

    Ground-based lidar and CALIOP datasets gathered over four mid-latitude sites, two US and two French sites, are used to evaluate the consistency of cloud macrophysical and optical property climatologies that can be derived by such datasets. The consistency in average cloud height (both base and top height) between the CALIOP and ground datasets ranges from -0.4km to +0.5km. The cloud geometrical thickness distributions vary significantly between the different datasets, due in part to the original vertical resolutions of the lidar profiles. Average cloud geometrical thicknesses vary from 1.2 to 1.9km, i.e. by more than 50%. Cloud optical thickness distributions in subvisible, semi-transparent and moderate intervals differ by more than 50% between ground and space-based datasets. The cirrus clouds with 2 optical thickness below 0.1 (not included in historical cloud climatologies) represent 30-50% of the non-opaque cirrus class. The differences in average cloud base altitude between ground and CALIOP datasets of 0.0-0.1 km, 0.0-0.2 km and 0.0-0.2 km can be attributed to irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without low-level clouds in ground-based data, respectively. The cloud geometrical thicknesses are not affected by irregular sampling of seasonal variations in the ground-based data, while up to 0.0-0.2 km and 0.1-0.3 km differences can be attributed to day-night differences in detection capabilities by CALIOP, and to the restriction to situations without lowlevel clouds in ground-based data, respectively.

  6. Analysis of Atmospheric Trace Constituents from High Resolution Infrared Balloon-Borne and Ground-Based Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Recent results and ongoing studies of high resolution solar absorption spectra will be presented. The analysis of these spectra is aimed at the identification and quantification of trace constituents important in atmospheric chemistry of the stratosphere and upper troposphere. Analysis of balloon-borne and ground-based spectra obtained at 0.0025/ cm covering the 700-2200/ cm interval will be presented. Results from ground-based 0.02/ cm solar spectra, from several locations such as Denver, South Pole, M. Loa, and New Zealand will also be shown. The 0.0025/ cm spectra show many new spectroscopic features. The analysis of these spectra, along with corresponding laboratory spectra, improves the spectral line parameters, and thus the accuracy of trace constituents quantification. The combination of the recent balloon flights, with earlier flights data since 1978 at 0.02/ cm resolution, provides trends analysis of several stratospheric trace species. Results for COF2, F22, SF6, and other species will be presented. Analysis of several ground-based solar spectra provides trends for HCl, HF and other species. The retrieval methods used for total column density and altitude distribution for both ground-based and balloon-borne spectra will be presented. These are extended for the analysis of the ground-based spectra to be obtained by the high resolution interferometers of the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC). Progress or the University of Denver studies for the NDSC will be presented. This will include intercomparison of solar spectra and trace gases retrievals obtained from simultaneous scans by the high resolution (0.0025/ cm) interferometers of BRUKER and BOMEM.

  7. Distribution of Io's Volcanic Thermal Emission From Galileo and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Davies, A. G.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.; Williams, D. A.; Radebaugh, J.

    2011-12-01

    Detections of Io's hot spots and identification of volcanic features have been catalogued by various workers [e.g., 1-4]. However, to understand the role played by volcanism in global heat transport, thermal emission from Io's volcanoes has to be quantified, locally, regionally and globally. Only then can robust estimates be made of volcanic advection, which may reveal internal heating patterns controlled by the evolving tidal resonance between Io, Europa and Ganymede. We have completed an analysis of all suitable spacecraft data and, using additional ground-based data, have quantified the thermal emission from all of Io's volcanoes during the Galileo epoch down to the limit of detection [5-7]. Galileo identified many dark features on Io that did not exhibit obvious anomalous thermal emission, yet their low albedo suggested that these features were at least warm (cool, high albedo sulphurous deposits had not formed on them). We used dark areas identified from the recently-published Io Global Map [3] and a knowledge of the detection limit of the Galileo NIMS instrument to quantify the thermal emission from these areas. In all, our analysis includes 272 individual thermal sources yielding ~60 TW. Our "snapshot" of global volcanic activity shows that Io's paterae yield ~80% of this amount, with a preponderance of thermal emission emanating from the northern hemisphere. This is strongly biased by Loki Patera and, to a lesser extent, by recent outburst locations. Of the remaining identified hot spot thermal emission, ~15% comes from active or recent lava flow fields, and the remaining 5% comes from massive outburst eruptions (some in paterae) and very small hot spots. The energy accounted for makes up ~60% of Io's total thermal emission of ~100 TW [8]. It is possible that a multitude of very small hot spots beneath instrument detection limits, and/or cooler, secondary volcanic processes involving sulphurous compounds may be responsible for the unaccounted heat flow

  8. KEPLER AND GROUND-BASED TRANSITS OF THE EXO-NEPTUNE HAT-P-11b

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Jackson, Brian; Jennings, Donald E.; Sada, Pedro V.; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; Agol, Eric; Knutson, Heather A.

    2011-10-10

    We analyze 26 archival Kepler transits of the exo-Neptune HAT-P-11b, supplemented by ground-based transits observed in the blue (B band) and near-IR (J band). Both the planet and host star are smaller than previously believed; our analysis yields R{sub p} = 4.31 R{sub +} {+-} 0.06 R{sub +} and R{sub s} = 0.683 R{sub sun} {+-} 0.009 R{sub sun}, both about 3{sigma} smaller than the discovery values. Our ground-based transit data at wavelengths bracketing the Kepler bandpass serve to check the wavelength dependence of stellar limb darkening, and the J-band transit provides a precise and independent constraint on the transit duration. Both the limb darkening and transit duration from our ground-based data are consistent with the new Kepler values for the system parameters. Our smaller radius for the planet implies that its gaseous envelope can be less extensive than previously believed, being very similar to the H-He envelope of GJ 436b and Kepler-4b. HAT-P-11 is an active star, and signatures of star spot crossings are ubiquitous in the Kepler transit data. We develop and apply a methodology to correct the planetary radius for the presence of both crossed and uncrossed star spots. Star spot crossings are concentrated at phases -0.002 and +0.006. This is consistent with inferences from Rossiter-McLaughlin measurements that the planet transits nearly perpendicular to the stellar equator. We identify the dominant phases of star spot crossings with active latitudes on the star, and infer that the stellar rotational pole is inclined at about 12{sup 0} {+-} 5{sup 0} to the plane of the sky. We point out that precise transit measurements over long durations could in principle allow us to construct a stellar Butterfly diagram to probe the cyclic evolution of magnetic activity on this active K-dwarf star.

  9. Should Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Include the Cost of Consumption Activities? AN Empirical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Adarkwah, Charles Christian; Sadoghi, Amirhossein; Gandjour, Afschin

    2016-02-01

    There has been a debate on whether cost-effectiveness analysis should consider the cost of consumption and leisure time activities when using the quality-adjusted life year as a measure of health outcome under a societal perspective. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of ill health on consumptive activities are spontaneously considered in a health state valuation exercise and how much this matters. The survey enrolled patients with inflammatory bowel disease in Germany (n = 104). Patients were randomized to explicit and no explicit instruction for the consideration of consumption and leisure effects in a time trade-off (TTO) exercise. Explicit instruction to consider non-health-related utility in TTO exercises did not influence TTO scores. However, spontaneous consideration of non-health-related utility in patients without explicit instruction (60% of respondents) led to significantly lower TTO scores. Results suggest an inclusion of consumption costs in the numerator of the cost-effectiveness ratio, at least for those respondents who spontaneously consider non-health-related utility from treatment. Results also suggest that exercises eliciting health valuations from the general public may include a description of the impact of disease on consumptive activities. PMID:25684073

  10. Antiviral activity of 1-docosanol, an inhibitor of lipid-enveloped viruses including herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, D H; Marcelletti, J F; Khalil, M H; Pope, L E; Katz, L R

    1991-01-01

    This article reports that 1-docosanol, a 22-carbon-long saturated alcohol, exerts a substantial inhibitory effect on replication of certain viruses (e.g., herpes simplex virus and respiratory syncytial virus) within primary target cells in vitro. To study the basis for its viral inhibitory activity, a suspension of 1-docosanol was formulated in an inert and nontoxic surfactant, Pluronic F-68; this suspension exerted potent inhibitory activity on the ability of susceptible viruses to infect cultured target cells. Susceptible viruses included wild-type herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 as well as acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus 2 and also respiratory syncytial virus--all of which are lipid-enveloped. In contrast, nonenveloped poliovirus was not susceptible to the inhibitory action of 1-docosanol. Although the precise mechanism has yet to be defined, current evidence suggests that 1-docosanol inhibits viral replication by interfering with the early intracellular events surrounding viral entry into target cells. It is possible that interaction between the highly lipophilic compound and components of target cell membranes renders such target cells less susceptible to viral fusion and/or entry. If this mechanism proves to be correct, 1-docosanol may provide a broad spectrum activity against many different viruses, especially those with lipid-containing envelopes. Images PMID:1660151

  11. Jovian thundercloud research with ground-based telescope and spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Kensuke; Takeuchi, Satoru; Sugiyama, Ko-Ichiro; Sato, Mitsuteru; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Sato, Soga; Yair, Yoav; Aplin, Karen; Fischer, Georg

    2010-05-01

    The latest observational and theoretical studies suggest that thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter, which determines the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also as a potentially very useful tool for probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. Here we suggest a very simple high-speed imaging unit onboard Jovian orbiter, Optical Lightning Detector, OLD, optimized for detecting optical emissions from lightning discharge in Jupiter. OLD consists of radiation-tolerant CMOS sensors and two H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm) filters. In normal sampling mode the frame intervals is 29ms with a full frame format of 512x512 pixels and in high-speed sampling mode the interval could be reduced down to 0.1ms by concentrating a limited area of 30x30 pixels. Weight, size and power consumption are about 1kg, 16x7x5.5 cm (sensor) and 16x12x4 cm (circuit), and 4W, respectively, though they can be reduced according to the spacecraft resources. Also we plan to investigate the optical flashes using a ground-based middle-sized telescope, which will be built by Hokkaido University, with narrow-band high speed imaging unit. Observational strategy with such optical lightning detectors and spectral imagers, which enable us to estimate the horizontal motion and altitude of clouds, will be introduced.

  12. Ground-Based Remote Retrievals of Cumulus Entrainment Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy J.; Turner, David D.; Berg, Larry K.; Krueger, Steven K.

    2013-07-26

    While fractional entrainment rates for cumulus clouds have typically been derived from airborne observations, this limits the size and scope of available data sets. To increase the number of continental cumulus entrainment rate observations available for study, an algorithm for retrieving them from ground-based remote sensing observations has been developed. This algorithm, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA), uses the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as inputs into a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation scheme, in which an assumed guess of the entrainment rate is iteratively adjusted through intercomparison of modeled liquid water path and cloud droplet effective radius to their observed counterparts. The forward model in this algorithm is the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), a cloud parcel model that treats entrainment as a series of discrete entrainment events. A quantified value for measurement uncertainty is also returned as part of the retrieval. Sensitivity testing and information content analysis demonstrate the robust nature of this method for retrieving accurate observations of the entrainment rate without the drawbacks of airborne sampling. Results from a test of ERICA on three months of shallow cumulus cloud events show significant variability of the entrainment rate of clouds in a single day and from one day to the next. The mean value of 1.06 km-¹ for the entrainment rate in this dataset corresponds well with prior observations and simulations of the entrainment rate in cumulus clouds.

  13. Ground-based Measurement Of Saharan Dust In Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M. J.; Ji, Q.; Tsay, S.; Hsu, C.; Hansell, R. A.; Augustine, D.

    2007-12-01

    An extensive field experiment, named NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) was conducted during August-September of 2006 to investigate the genesis and development of hurricanes. Two ground-based mobile laboratories, Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART) and Chemical, Optical, Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere (COMMIT), were deployed at Sal Island, Cape Verde to continuously monitor the structure and composition of the atmosphere in the major path of the Saharan Air Layer and the African Easterly Waves. A Micro-Pulse Lidar in SMART, which measures the vertical profiles of backscatter from the atmospheric particulates continuously, caught several episodes of Saharan dust layers reached the surface site. Simultaneously, physical and optical properties of aerosols (e.g., mixture of the Saharan dust and maritime aerosols) were captured by several instruments in COMMIT. In this study, we propose a novel method to separate dust properties from those of marine background aerosols by utilizing the synergy of a suite of in-situ measurements. Derived parameters are mass scattering coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) for dust near the surface (~10m). As a crosscheck, the SSA based on the surface measurements is compared with the result of Deep Blue satellite-based aerosol retrievals, which is now incorporated in the operational MODIS aerosol product. The presented preliminary results will be useful in studying the properties of Saharan dust originated from various source regions, which, in turns, can be used as inputs to aerosol transport models to help better understand the interactions between aerosol and cloud water cycle.

  14. Retrieval of ammonia from ground-based FTIR solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, E.; Vigouroux, C.; Palm, M.; Mahieu, E.; Warneke, T.; Smale, D.; Langerock, B.; Franco, B.; Van Damme, M.; Schaap, M.; Notholt, J.; Erisman, J. W.

    2015-11-01

    We present a retrieval method for ammonia (NH3) total columns from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations. Observations from Bremen (53.10° N, 8.85° E), Lauder (45.04° S, 169.68° E), Réunion (20.9° S, 55.50° E) and Jungfraujoch (46.55° N, 7.98° E) were used to illustrate the capabilities of the method. NH3 mean total columns ranging 3 orders of magnitude were obtained, with higher values at Bremen (mean of 13.47 × 1015 molecules cm-2) and lower values at Jungfraujoch (mean of 0.18 × 1015 molecules cm-2). In conditions with high surface concentrations of ammonia, as in Bremen, it is possible to retrieve information on the vertical gradient, as two layers can be distinguished. The retrieval there is most sensitive to ammonia in the planetary boundary layer, where the trace gas concentration is highest. For conditions with low concentrations, only the total column can be retrieved. Combining the systematic and random errors we have a mean total error of 26 % for all spectra measured at Bremen (number of spectra (N) = 554), 30 % for all spectra from Lauder (N = 2412), 25 % for spectra from Réunion (N = 1262) and 34 % for spectra measured at Jungfraujoch (N = 2702). The error is dominated by the systematic uncertainties in the spectroscopy parameters. Station-specific seasonal cycles were found to be consistent with known seasonal cycles of the dominant ammonia sources in the station surroundings. The developed retrieval methodology from FTIR instruments provides a new way of obtaining highly time-resolved measurements of ammonia burdens. FTIR-NH3 observations will be useful for understanding the dynamics of ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere and for satellite and model validation. It will also provide additional information to constrain the global ammonia budget.

  15. Project management for complex ground-based instruments: MEGARA plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Pérez-Calpena, Ana; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gallego, Jesús; Carrasco, Esperanza; Cedazo, Raquel; Iglesias, Jorge

    2014-08-01

    The project management of complex instruments for ground-based large telescopes is a challenge itself. A good management is a clue for project success in terms of performance, schedule and budget. Being on time has become a strict requirement for two reasons: to assure the arrival at the telescope due to the pressure on demanding new instrumentation for this first world-class telescopes and to not fall in over-costs. The budget and cash-flow is not always the expected one and has to be properly handled from different administrative departments at the funding centers worldwide distributed. The complexity of the organizations, the technological and scientific return to the Consortium partners and the participation in the project of all kind of professional centers working in astronomical instrumentation: universities, research centers, small and large private companies, workshops and providers, etc. make the project management strategy, and the tools and procedures tuned to the project needs, crucial for success. MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is a facility instrument of the 10.4m GTC (La Palma, Spain) working at optical wavelengths that provides both Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) capabilities at resolutions in the range R=6,000-20,000. The project is an initiative led by Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in collaboration with INAOE (Mexico), IAA-CSIC (Spain) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain). MEGARA is being developed under contract with GRANTECAN.

  16. Ground-based observations of the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.

    A series of ground-based 1-D spatially resolved, high resolution spectra (in SII, SIII, and OII) of the Io plasma torus were acquired in October 1999, around the time of the Galileo I24 passage through the IPT. In a previous paper (Thomas et al., JGR, 106, 26277, 2001), we have presented the initial results from these observations. In this presentation, we will describe recent more detailed analysis which seems to be lending further insight into the structure of the IPT. In particular, we have used an "onion-peeling" technique to remove line of sight effects from the observations. The resulting profiles, show the so-called ribbon region (5.7 RJ) being clearly separated from the cold torus (5.3 RJ) by a region of lower SII emission. SIII emission is now shown to be almost completely absent in the cold torus. The ratio of these two species is seen to rise systematically and almost linearly with jovicentric distance from the cold torus through to the warm torus (beyond 6.0 RJ). Models can be used to interpret this behaviour in terms of changing electron temperature with distance. We compare our results with the only other measurement of this property which was based on Voyager 1 PLS observations. We further show that the peak of OII emission is not centred at the, what we now call, the sulphur ribbon. We attempt to derive the relative composition of the three major species in the torus as a function of jovicentric distance using our data.

  17. Evolution of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy from the early days to the Cherenkov Telescope Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillas, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Most of what we know of cosmic gamma rays has come from spacecraft, but at energies above tens of GeV it has become possible to make observations with ground-based detectors of enormously greater collecting area. In recent years one such detector type, the cluster of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, has reached a very productive state, whilst several alternative approaches have been explored, including converted solar power collectors and novel high-altitude particle shower detectors which promised to extend the energy range covered. Key examples of development from 1952 to 2011 are followed, noting the problems and discoveries that stimulated the current work, explaining the logic of the alternative approaches that were taken. The merits of the current major Cherenkov observatories and of other viable detectors are examined and compared, with examples of the astrophysical information they are beginning to provide. The detectors are still evolving, as we still do not understand the processes onto which the gamma rays provide a window. These include the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (in particular, the wide-band spectra of radiation from some individual supernova remnants are still hard to interpret), the highly relativistic and variable jets from active galactic nuclei, and aspects of the electrodynamics of pulsars. Larger groups of Cherenkov telescopes still offer the possibility of an increase in power of the technique for resolvable Galactic sources especially.

  18. The research of the current situation about the Compass ground-based augmentation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xinying; Huang, Rijuan; Dan, Tang; Tang, Changzeng

    2015-12-01

    In the project of upgrading the Guangxi CORS(GXCORS) Beidou Ground-Based Augmentation System, Guangxi Bureau of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation, had completed the examination for the instrument of multiple producers about the Compass ground-based augmentation system. The contents of the tests contain the network RTK positioning accuracy, the static processing accuracy, the time availability, the space availability, the environmental availability, etc.. through analyzing the test data, in this paper, drawing some conclusions that reflect the current situation about the Compass Ground-based Augmentation System objectively, it is benefit for the construction and development of the Compass Ground-based Augmentation System.

  19. Spatiotemporal Path-Matching for Comparisons Between Ground- Based and Satellite Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Timothy A.; Valencia, Sandra; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.

    2005-01-01

    The spatiotemporal sampling differences between ground-based and satellite lidar data can contribute to significant errors for direct measurement comparisons. Improvement in sample correspondence is examined by the use of radiosonde wind velocity to vary the time average in ground-based lidar data to spatially match coincident satellite lidar measurements. Results are shown for the 26 February 2004 GLAS/ICESat overflight of a ground-based lidar stationed at NASA GSFC. Statistical analysis indicates that improvement in signal correlation is expected under certain conditions, even when a ground-based observation is mismatched in directional orientation to the satellite track.

  20. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... interpretative signs; (4) Provision for non-motorized trail activities including pedestrians and bicycles; (5) Provision for motorized trail activities including all terrain vehicles, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc.; (6...; (8) Maintenance and restoration of existing recreational trails; (9) Development and...

  1. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... interpretative signs; (4) Provision for non-motorized trail activities including pedestrians and bicycles; (5) Provision for motorized trail activities including all terrain vehicles, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc.; (6...; (8) Maintenance and restoration of existing recreational trails; (9) Development and...

  2. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... interpretative signs; (4) Provision for non-motorized trail activities including pedestrians and bicycles; (5) Provision for motorized trail activities including all terrain vehicles, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc.; (6...; (8) Maintenance and restoration of existing recreational trails; (9) Development and...

  3. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... interpretative signs; (4) Provision for non-motorized trail activities including pedestrians and bicycles; (5) Provision for motorized trail activities including all terrain vehicles, motorcycles, snowmobiles, etc.; (6...; (8) Maintenance and restoration of existing recreational trails; (9) Development and...

  4. Coordinated Ground-Based Observations and the New Horizons Fly-by of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot; Young, Leslie; Parker, Joel; Binzel, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft is scheduled to make its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015. NH carries seven scientific instruments, including separate UV and Visible-IR spectrographs, a long-focal-length imager, two plasma-sensing instruments and a dust counter. There are three arenas in particular in which ground-based observations should augment the NH instrument suite in synergistic ways: IR spectra at wavelengths longer than 2.5 µm (i.e., longer than the NH Ralph spectrograph), stellar occultation observations near the time of the fly-by, and thermal surface maps and atmospheric CO abundances based on ALMA observations - we discuss the first two of these. IR spectra in the 3 - 5 µm range cover the CH4 absorption band near 3.3 µm. This band can be an important constraint on the state and areal extent of nitrogen frost on Pluto's surface. If this band depth is close to zero (as was observed by Olkin et al. 2007), it limits the area of nitrogen frost, which is bright at that wavelength. Combined with the NH observations of nitrogen frost at 2.15 µm, the ground-based spectra will determine how much nitrogen frost is diluted with methane, which is a basic constraint on the seasonal cycle of sublimation and condensation that takes place on Pluto (and similar objects like Triton and Eris). There is a fortuitous stellar occultation by Pluto on 29-JUN-2015, only two weeks before the NH closest approach. The occulted star will be the brightest ever observed in a Pluto event, about 2 magnitudes brighter than Pluto itself. The track of the event is predicted to cover parts of Australia and New Zealand. Thanks to HST and ground based campaigns to find a TNO target reachable by NH, the position of the shadow path will be known at the +/-100 km level, allowing SOFIA and mobile ground-based observers to reliably cover the central flash region. Ground-based & SOFIA observations in visible and IR wavelengths will characterize the haze opacity and vertical

  5. Overview and Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements spanning a longer interval. The NSF/NCAR GV employed standard flight-level measurements and new airborne lidar and imaging measurements of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-105 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) and two IR "wing" cameras imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar measuring radial winds below the Falcon. DEEPWAVE also included extensive ground-based measurements in New Zealand, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean Islands. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights and 13 Falcon flights, and ground-based measurements occurred whether or not the aircraft were flying. Collectively, many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation spanning altitudes of 0-100 km were observed. Examples include strong mountain wave (MW) forcing and breaking in the lower and middle stratosphere, weak MW forcing yielding MW penetration into the MLT having very large amplitudes and momentum fluxes, MW scales at higher altitudes ranging from ~10-250 km, large-scale trailing waves from orography refracting into the polar vortex and extending to high altitudes, GW generation by deep convection, large-scale GWs arising from jet stream sources, and strong MWs in the MLT arising from strong surface flow over a small island. DEEPWAVE yielded a number of surprises, among

  6. Rosetta in context: Ground-based observations of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snodgrass, C.

    2014-04-01

    collaboration with the large and enthusiastic community of amateur comet observers, especially in 2015 when the comet is brighter (see also talks in the proamsessions at EPSC). The comet has been recovered (in late February 2014), with early indications from VLT photometry suggesting that activity had indeed already started beyond 4 AU from the Sun, as predicted[1]. Its activity level, as measured by the dust brightness, will be followed all year and used to make further predictions about the future activity. The comet is observable until November 2014 using large telescopes (primarily in the Southern hemisphere), and is getting brighter as it approaches the Sun. In addition to photometric observations, visible wavelength spectroscopy will be attempted during 2014, to constrain gas emissions. Polarimetric observations and high resolution imaging with the HST are also proposed. A wide range of observational techniques and wavelength ranges will be covered by the campaign in 2015 as the comet reaches perihelion. I will present an update on the ground-based observation campaign in support of the Rosetta mission, the current status of various observation programmes at the time of the EPSC conference, and results on the 2014 activity of the comet, for comparison with early Rosetta results. I will also discuss how well the 2014 observations match with our earlier predictions, and make an assessment of how active the comet appears to be relative to previous orbits. I will also describe what further observations are planned in 2015, and how these will support the primary 'escort' phase of the mission.

  7. Ground-based simulation of telepresence for materials science experiments. [remote viewing and control of processes aboard Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James C.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Bonner, Mary JO; Hahn, Richard C.; Herbach, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    A series of ground-based telepresence experiments have been performed to determine the minimum video frame rate and resolution required for the successive performance of materials science experiments in space. The approach used is to simulate transmission between earth and space station with transmission between laboratories on earth. The experiments include isothermal dendrite growth, physical vapor transport, and glass melting. Modifications of existing apparatus, software developed, and the establishment of an inhouse network are reviewed.

  8. Ground based chemical characterization of submicron aerosol during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Joel; Artaxo, Paulo; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Freitas, Saulo; Coe, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    This work presents the results of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) which was successfully operated at a ground station in Porto Velho, Brazil, during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA). SAMBBA is an international research project based on experimental and modeling activities designed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality and numerical weather prediction over South America. The measurement program was headed by the deployment of UK's Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft over Brazil during the dry season of 2012. The aircraft operation was coordinated with ground-based measurements at Porto Velho, operated by the University of Sao Paulo. Besides the aerosol chemical speciation, continuous measurements of aerosol size distribution and optical properties were carried out at the ground station, together with CO, CO2 and O3. Filters for trace elements measured by XRF and for OC/EC determined using a Sunset instrument were also collected at the ground based component of SAMBBA. The ACSM collected data for three weeks during September 2012. This period included a strong biomass burning event which showed a marked peak in f60, linked with Levoglucosan, a well-known biomass burning marker. During the biomass burning event, organics concentrations rose up to 80 μg/m3, black carbon close to 6 μg/m3 and CO mixing ratio above 2 ppmv. Fast biomass burning aerosol processing in the atmosphere could be observed through the relative contributions of C2H3O+ vs. CO2+ relative to total organic mass (f44 vs. f43). A clear diurnal variation throughout the sampling period has been observed for organic aerosols with a median peak of 9 μg/m3 at 04:00 LT and a minima of 5 μg/m3 at 18:00 LT. Preliminary results indicate that organics are responsible for 85% of PM1 non-refractory aerosols. The data set will allow the study of interactions between biomass burning and biogenic

  9. Monitoring active volcanoes and mitigating volcanic hazards: the case for including simple approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoiber, Richard E.; Williams, Stanley N.

    1990-07-01

    Simple approaches to problems brought about eruptions and their ensuing hazardous effects should be advocated and used by volcanologists while awaiting more sophisticated remedies. The expedients we advocate have all or many of the following attributes: only locally available materials are required; no extensive training of operators or installation is necessary; they are affordable and do not require foreign aid or exports; they are often labor intensive and are sustainable without outside assistance. Where appropriate, the involvement of local residents is advocated. Examples of simple expedients which can be used in forecasting or mitigating the effects of crises emphasize the relative ease and the less elaborate requirements with which simple approaches can be activated. Emphasis is on visual observations often by untrained observers, simple meteorogical measurements, observations of water level in lakes, temperature and chemistry of springs and fumaroles, new springs and collapse areas and observations of volcanic plumes. Simple methods are suggested which can be applied to mitigating damage from mudflows, nuées ardentes, tephra falls and gas discharge. A review in hindsight at Ruiz includes the use of both chemical indicators and simple mudflow alarms. Simple expedients are sufficiently effective that any expert volcanologist called to aid in a crisis must include them in the package of advice offered. Simple approaches are a critical and logical complement to highly technical solutions to hazardous situations.

  10. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  11. NVO, surveys and archiving ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchra, John P.

    2002-12-01

    The era of extremely large, public databases in astronomy is upon us. Such databases will open (are opening!) the field to new research and new researchers. However it is important to be sure the resources are available to properly archive groundbased astronomical data, and include the necessary quality checks and calibrations. An NVO without a proper archive will have limited usefulness. This also implies that with limited resources, not all data can or should be archived. NASA already has a very good handle on US space-based astronomical data. Agencies and organizations that operate astronomical facilities, particularly groundbased observatories, need to plan and budget for these activities now. We should not underestimate the effort required to produce high quality data products that will be useful for the broader community.

  12. Description of the Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) ground-based experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1991-01-01

    A description of the Large Gap Magnetic Suspension System (LGMSS) ground-based experiment is presented. The LGMSS provides five degrees of freedom control of a cylindrical suspended element which is levitated above a floor-mounted array of air core electromagnets. The uncontrolled degree of freedom is rotation about the long axis of the cylinder (roll). Levitation and control forces are produced on a permanent magnet core which is embedded in the cylinder. The cylinder also contains light emitting diodes (LEDs), assorted electrons, and a power supply. The LEDs provide active targets for an optical position measurement system which is being developed in-house at the Langley Research Center. The optical position measurement system will provide six degrees of freedom position information for the LGMSS control system.

  13. Site candidates for ground-based telescope devoted to space debris searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min

    2015-12-01

    The demands for space debris scanning have been increasingly urgent in recent decade. The more space activities, the more urgent demands for space debris information. China has laid out space debris scanning from ground-based observation facilities. According to the latitudinal boundaries of China, north latitudes of 20deg, 30deg, 40deg, 50deg, 60deg are considered to be candidates for telescope sites. Space debris distribution is simulated under the assumption that telescopes are stationed in north latitudes of 20deg, 30deg, 40deg, 50deg, 60deg respectively. According to space debris simulations, it is recommended that the telescope dedicated to space debris scanning should be deployed in lower latitudes in order to achieve a better performance in detecting space debrises for China observing users.

  14. The European Observation Network: Ground-Based Support for Gamma-Ray Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.; Spurný, P.; Florián, J.; Boček, J.; Tichy, M.; Tichá, J.; Vyskocil, L.; Wenzel, W.; Barthelmy, S.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.; Kouveliotou, C.; Mutafov, A.; Hovorka, F.

    While there is extended monitoring of the sky at gamma rays from satellites, mainly provided by the COMPTON Gamma Ray Observatory, there is still a lack of high-quality optical simultaneous and quasi-simultaneous data. On the other hand, the still puzzling nature of Gamma Ray Bursts requires a complex and multispectral approach. The situation changed significantly after the introduction of the BACODINE system which is able to notify ground-based observers immediately after the detection of bursts on the GRO satellite. We present and discuss preliminary results obtained with the European Observation Network providing such follow - up optical observations. This network consists of nine observatories in the Czech Republic, Germany and Bulgaria and has been involved into the BACODINE activities since April 1, 1994.

  15. Ground Based Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers with six degrees of freedom (DOF) acceleration measurement were successfully used in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions which to measure the Earth's gravity field. In our group, space inertial sensor based on the capacitance transducer and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for test of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, and satellite Earth's field recovery. The significant techniques of capacitive position sensor with the noise level at 2×10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are carried out and all the six servo loop controls by using a discrete PID algorithm are realized in a FPGA device. For testing on ground, in order to compensate one g earth's gravity, the fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. A short distance and a simple double capsule equipment the valid duration about 0.5 second is set up in our lab for the free fall tests of the engineering model which can directly verify the function of six DOF control. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension method is also realized and preliminary results show that the horizontal axis of acceleration noise is about 10-8m/s2/Hz1/2 level which limited mainly by the seismic noise. Reference: [1] Fen Gao, Ze-Bing Zhou, Jun Luo, Feasibility for Testing the Equivalence Principle with Optical Readout in Space, Chin. Phys. Lett. 28(8) (2011) 080401. [2] Z. Zhu, Z. B. Zhou, L. Cai, Y. Z. Bai, J. Luo, Electrostatic gravity gradiometer design for the advanced GOCE mission, Adv. Sp. Res. 51 (2013) 2269-2276. [3] Z B Zhou, L Liu, H B Tu, Y Z Bai, J Luo, Seismic noise limit for ground-based performance measurements of an inertial sensor using a torsion balance, Class. Quantum Grav. 27 (2010) 175012. [4] H B Tu, Y Z Bai, Z B Zhou, L Liu, L

  16. Ground-based IR observation of oxygen isotope ratios in Venus's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwagami, N.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Ohtsuki, S.; Takagi, S.; Robert, S.

    2015-08-01

    The oxygen isotope ratios 17O/16O and 18O/16O in Venus's atmosphere were measured simultaneously by ground-based IR spectroscopy. The CO2 absorption lines in the 2648 cm-1 (for 17O/18O) and 4582 cm-1 (for 18O/16O) regions were observed using the IRTF/CSHELL spectrometer. The deviations of the isotope fractions are found to be δ17O=+92±158‰ and δ18O=-42±85‰ as compared to the terrestrial standard (HITRAN 2012) where the uncertainties include both random and systematic errors. Such combination agrees with the Earth-Moon fractionation line within the errors. This is consistent to the fact that the proto-Venus matter was also well mixed with the proto-Earth-Moon matter.

  17. Quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from coal fires using airborne and ground-based methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, M.A.; Radke, L.F.; Heffern, E.L.; O'Keefe, J. M. K.; Smeltzer, C.D.; Hower, J.C.; Hower, J.M.; Prakash, A.; Kolker, A.; Eatwell, R.J.; ter, Schure A.; Queen, G.; Aggen, K.L.; Stracher, G.B.; Henke, K.R.; Olea, R.A.; Roman-Colon, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Coal fires occur in all coal-bearing regions of the world and number, conservatively, in the thousands. These fires emit a variety of compounds including greenhouse gases. However, the magnitude of the contribution of combustion gases from coal fires to the environment is highly uncertain, because adequate data and methods for assessing emissions are lacking. This study demonstrates the ability to estimate CO2 and CH4 emissions for the Welch Ranch coal fire, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, using two independent methods: (a) heat flux calculated from aerial thermal infrared imaging (3.7-4.4td-1 of CO2 equivalent emissions) and (b) direct, ground-based measurements (7.3-9.5td-1 of CO2 equivalent emissions). Both approaches offer the potential for conducting inventories of coal fires to assess their gas emissions and to evaluate and prioritize fires for mitigation. ?? 2011.

  18. The development of ground-based infrared multi-object spectrograph based on the microshutter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Graham, James R.; Roy, Aishwarya

    2014-07-01

    We report on our development of a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for ground-based applications using the micro-shutter array, which was originally developed for the Near Infrared Spectrograph of the James Webb Space Telescope. The micro-shutter array in this case acts as a source selector at a reimaged telescope focal plane. The developed spectrograph will be implemented either with ground-layer adaptive optics system or multi-conjugate adaptive optics system on a large telescope. This will enable for the first time fully reconfigurable infrared multi-object spectroscopy with adaptive optics systems. We envision studying diverse astronomical objects with our spectrograph, including high-redshift galaxies, galaxy clusters and super star clusters.

  19. Comparison of On-Orbit and Ground Based Hollow Cathode Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor); Carpenter, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed by the Rocketdyne division of Boeing to control charging of the International Space Station (ISS). Each PCU contains a Hollow Cathode Assembly (HCA), which emits the charge control electrons. The HCAs were designed and fabricated at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC). GRC's HCA development program included manufacture of engineering, qualification, and flight model HCAs as well as wear tests and qualification tests. GRC is currently tracking the on-orbit data for the flight HCAs. This data will be discussed with comparison to operating parameters verified by ground based HCA tests. The flight HCAs continue to operate flawlessly. The first unit has accumulated more than 3650 hours of on-orbit operation and the second unit has accumulated over 5550 hours.

  20. Ground-based lidar beach topography of Fire Island, New York, April 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, Owen T.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Spore, Nicholas J.; Brodie, Katherine L.; McNinch, Jesse E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in Florida and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility in Duck, North Carolina, collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach elevation data at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution elevation dataset was collected on April 10, 2013, to characterize beach topography following substantial erosion that occurred during Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, and multiple, strong winter storms. The ongoing beach monitoring is part of the Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Project GS2-2B. This USGS data series includes the resulting processed elevation point data (xyz) and an interpolated digital elevation model (DEM).

  1. Calibration of AIS Data Using Ground-based Spectral Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Present methods of correcting airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) data for instrumental and atmospheric effects include the flat- or curved-field correction and a deviation-from-the-average adjustment performed on a line-by-line basis throughout the image. Both methods eliminate the atmospheric absorptions, but remove the possibility of studying the atmosphere for its own sake, or of using the atmospheric information present as a possible basis for theoretical modeling. The method discussed here relies on use of ground-based measurements of the surface spectral reflectance in comparison with scanner data to fix in a least-squares sense parameters in a simplified model of the atmosphere on a wavelength-by-wavelength basis. The model parameters (for optically thin conditions) are interpretable in terms of optical depth and scattering phase function, and thus, in principle, provide an approximate description of the atmosphere as a homogeneous body intervening between the sensor and the ground.

  2. Space debris removal using a high-power ground-based laser

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, D.K.

    1993-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing a ground-based laser without an orbital mirror for space debris removal is examined. Technical issues include atmospheric transmission losses, adaptive-optics corrections of wavefront distortions, laser field of view limitations, and laser-induced impulse generation. The physical constraints require a laser with megawatt output, long run-time capability, and wavelength with good atmospheric transmission characteristics. It is found that a 5-MW reactor-pumped laser can deorbit debris having masses of the order of one kilogram from orbital altitudes to be used by Space Station Freedom. Debris under one kilogram can be deorbited after one pass over the laser site, while larger debris can be deorbited or transferred to alternate orbits after multiple passes over the site.

  3. Ground-based astrometry with the ASPHO: optical-radio reference systems connection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, V. A. F.; Leister, N. V.; Poppe, P. C. R.; Brito, A. A.; Mattos, L.

    2003-11-01

    Precise positions and proper motions of optical counterparts of radiostars are needed in order to determine a direct link between the radio reference frame (VLBI - Very long Baseline Interferometry) and the ground-based optical reference frame (based on fundamental stars) (Poma & Zanzu 1991, Kovalevsky 1990, Walter et al. 1990). The basic problems are concerning with the optical-radio systems connection and the quick deterioration that he Hipparcos system is subjected. Thus, there is a request of exact and systematic observations with the instruments in the Earth (Kovalevsky 1990). Radiostars are suitable intermediaries for linking optical stellar reference frame to the quasi-inertial radio reference frame (RRF) represented by compact extragalactic radio sources. With the goal of the connection radio-optical reference frames the observational programme has included a total of 36 radiostars.

  4. Instruments, Detectors and the Future of Astronomy with Large Ground Based Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Douglas A.; Amico, Paola; Baade, Dietrich; Barden, Sam; Campbell, Randall; Finger, Gert; Gilmore, Kirk; Gredel, Roland; Hickson, Paul; Howell, Steve; Hubin, Norbert; Kaufer, Andreas; Kohley, Ralf; MacQueen, Philip; Markelov, Sergej; Merrill, Mike; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Oliva, Tino; Richichi, Andrea; Salmon, Derrick; Schmidt, Ricardo; Su, Hongjun; Tulloch, Simon; García Vargas, Maria Luisa; Wagner, R. Mark; Wiecha, Olivier; Ye, Binxun

    2005-01-01

    Results of a survey of instrumentation and detector systems, either currently deployed or planned for use at telescopes larger than 3.5 m, in ground based observatories world-wide, are presented. This survey revealed a number of instrumentation design trends at optical, near, and mid-infrared wavelengths. Some of the most prominent trends include the development of vastly larger optical detector systems (> 109 pixels) than anything built to date, and the frequent use of mosaics of near-infrared detectors - something that was quite rare only a decade ago in astronomy. Some future science applications for detectors are then explored, in an attempt to build a bridge between current detectors and what will be needed to support the research ambitions of astronomers in the future.

  5. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  6. Synergic use of satellite and ground based remote sensing methods for monitoring the San Leo rock cliff (Northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frodella, William; Ciampalini, Andrea; Gigli, Giovanni; Lombardi, Luca; Raspini, Federico; Nocentini, Massimiliano; Scardigli, Cosimo; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The historic town of San Leo (Emilia Romagna Region, northern Italy) is located on top of an isolated rock massif above the Marecchia River valley hillside. On February 27th 2014, a northeastern sector of the massif collapsed; minor structural damages were reported in the town and a few buildings were evacuated as a precautionary measure. Although no fatalities occurred and the San Leo cultural heritage suffered no damage, minor rock fall events kept taking place on the newly formed rock wall, worsening this hazardous situation. In this framework, a monitoring system based on remote sensing techniques, such as radar interferometry (both spaceborne and ground-based) and terrestrial laser scanning, was planned in order to monitor the ground deformation of the investigated area and to evaluate the residual risk. In this paper the main outlines of a 1-year monitoring activity are described, including a pre-event analysis of possible landslide precursors and a post-event analysis of the displacements of both the collapse-affected rock wall sector and the rock fall deposits.

  7. Fusion of remotely sensed data from airborne and ground-based sensors for cotton regrowth study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study investigated the use of aerial multispectral imagery and ground-based hyperspectral data for the discrimination of different crop types and timely detection of cotton plants over large areas. Airborne multispectral imagery and ground-based spectral reflectance data were acquired at the sa...

  8. First results of ground-based LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Yu, Chun-chao; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng; Liao, Ning-fang; Su, Jun-hong

    2014-11-01

    The new progress of ground-based long-wave infrared remote sensing is presented. The LWIR hyperspectral imaging by using the windowing spatial and temporal modulation Fourier spectroscopy, and the results of outdoor ether gas detection, verify the features of LWIR hyperspectral imaging remote sensing and technical approach. It provides a new technical means for ground-based gas remote sensing.

  9. The cost of developing and maintain the monitoring and control software of large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Juan Carlos; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Bridger, Alan; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    There are several large ground-based telescopes currently under development such as the SKA and CCAT in radio as well as several 30m-class in the optical. A common challenge that all of these telescopes are facing is estimating the cost of design, construction and maintenance of their required software. This paper will present a cost breakdown of the monitoring and control software packages implemented for ASKAP including the effort spent to develop and maintain the in-house code and the effort saved by using third-party software, such as EPICS. The costing for ASKAP will be compared to those for the monitoring and control software of other large ground-based telescopes such as ALMA and VLT. This comparison will highlight trends and commonalities in the costing and provides a useful guide for costing future telescope control software builds or upgrades and the ongoing maintenance cost.

  10. Ground-Based Icing Condition Remote Sensing System Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Koenig, George G.

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the NASA Glenn Research Center activities to assess and down select remote sensing technologies for the purpose of developing a system capable of measuring icing condition hazards aloft. The information generated by such a remote sensing system is intended for use by the entire aviation community, including flight crews. air traffic controllers. airline dispatchers, and aviation weather forecasters. The remote sensing system must be capable of remotely measuring temperature and liquid water content (LWC), and indicating the presence of super-cooled large droplets (SLD). Technologies examined include Profiling Microwave Radiometer, Dual-Band Radar, Multi-Band Radar, Ka-Band Radar. Polarized Ka-Band Radar, and Multiple Field of View (MFOV) Lidar. The assessment of these systems took place primarily during the Mt. Washington Icing Sensors Project (MWISP) in April 1999 and the Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS) from November 1999 to February 2000. A discussion of the various sensing technologies is included. The result of the assessment is that no one sensing technology can satisfy all of the stated project goals. Therefore a proposed system includes radiometry and Ka-band radar. A multilevel approach is proposed to allow the future selection of the fielded system based upon required capability and available funding. The most basic level system would be the least capable and least expensive. The next level would increase capability and cost, and the highest level would be the most capable and most expensive to field. The Level 1 system would consist of a Profiling Microwave Radiometer. The Level 2 system would add a Ka-Band Radar. The Level 3 system would add polarization to the Ka-Band Radar. All levels of the system would utilize hardware that is already under development by the U.S. Government. However, to meet the needs of the aviation community, all levels of the system will require further development. In addition to the proposed system

  11. System-level view of geospace dynamics: Challenges for high-latitude ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research programs including GEM, CEDAR, GEMSIS, GO Canada, and others are focusing on how geospace works as a system. Coupling sits at the heart of system level dynamics. In all cases, coupling is accomplished via fundamental processes such as reconnection and plasma waves, and can be between regions, energy ranges, species, scales, and energy reservoirs. Three views of geospace are required to attack system level questions. First, we must observe the fundamental processes that accomplish the coupling. This "observatory view" requires in situ measurements by satellite-borne instruments or remote sensing from powerful well-instrumented ground-based observatories organized around, for example, Incoherent Scatter Radars. Second, we need to see how this coupling is controlled and what it accomplishes. This demands quantitative observations of the system elements that are being coupled. This "multi-scale view" is accomplished by networks of ground-based instruments, and by global imaging from space. Third, if we take geospace as a whole, the system is too complicated, so at the top level we need time series of simple quantities such as indices that capture important aspects of the system level dynamics. This requires a "key parameter view" that is typically provided through indices such as AE and DsT. With the launch of MMS, and ongoing missions such as THEMIS, Cluster, Swarm, RBSP, and ePOP, we are entering a-once-in-a-lifetime epoch with a remarkable fleet of satellites probing processes at key regions throughout geospace, so the observatory view is secure. With a few exceptions, our key parameter view provides what we need. The multi-scale view, however, is compromised by space/time scales that are important but under-sampled, combined extent of coverage and resolution that falls short of what we need, and inadequate conjugate observations. In this talk, I present an overview of what we need for taking system level research to its next level, and how

  12. Utilizing Ground-based LiDAR (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) to estimate hydraulic roughness in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minear, J. T.; Wright, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Roughness is one of the more difficult parameters to quantify in the field for hydraulic studies, partially because it occurs at a variety of scales (i.e. grain, unit and reach), and because individual roughness elements, such as trees, grass and sediment grains, are difficult to measure. Ground-based LiDAR (also known as Terrestrial Laser Scanning) is changing the collection of high-quality topographic datasets for a variety of scientific endeavors, including forestry, geomorphology and hydrology and can be used to quantify hydraulic roughness in the field. Using datasets collected from several rivers in California, we evaluate the use of ground-based LiDAR (also known as Terrestrial Laser Scanning) for estimating hydraulic roughness in gravel-bed rivers. From our initial measurements, in addition to topography, there are a number of useful parameters that can be collected quickly and efficiently with ground-based LiDAR, including some that are not explicitly considered by existing hydraulic equations.

  13. Towards a Handshake of Ground-Based Measurements and Remote-Sensing of Vegetation Traits at Global Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattge, J.; Díaz, S.; Lavorel, S.; Prentice, I. C.; Leadley, P.; Reich, P. B.; Banerjee, A.; Fazayeli, F.; Schrodt, F. I.; Joswig, J.; Mahecha, M. D.; Wirth, C.

    2014-12-01

    Plant traits determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services, and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Plant traits thus are a key to understand and predict the adaptation of ecosystems to environmental changes. At the same time ground based measurements of plant trait data are dispersed over a wide range of databases, many of these not publicly available. To overcome this deficiency IGBP and DIVERSITAS have initiated the development of a joint database, called TRY, aiming at constructing a standard resource of ground based plant trait observations for the ecological community and for the development of global vegetation models. So far the TRY initiative has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: about 250 trait databases have been contributed and the data repository currently contains about 5.6 million trait entries for 90,000 out of the world's 350,000 plant species. The database includes data for 1100 traits, characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. Based on advanced methods for gap-filling and spatial extrapolation currently being developed in applied statistics and machine learning and in combination with environmental information and species distribution ranges, the unprecedented availability of ground based trait measurements is expected to allow for up-scaling of trait observations from plant to ecosystem level and from point measurements to regional and global scales. These up-scaled data products are expected to provide a link from ground based trait measurements to remote sensing of vegetation function and traits with global coverage.

  14. Ground Based Test Results for Broad Band LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaps, W. S.; Georgieva, E.; Huang, W.; Baldauf, B.; McComb, T.

    2010-12-01

    a 1.57 μm superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) amplified by an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). In 2008 NGAS, leveraging expertise in thulium (Tm) fiber laser systems and recognizing the merit of the broadband approach, suggested a partnership with GSFC to develop a broadband lidar operating at 2.05 μm. Such a system takes advantage of the broad Tm-fiber gain spectrum and the inherent mechanical robustness, compact size, simple power scalability, efficiency and high beam quality offered by fiber lasers. In early 2010 NGAS completed development of a laboratory level, highly efficient, Tm-fiber laser that produces a specially formatted pulsed broadband output around 2.05 μm, a spectral region where CO2 has strong atmospheric absorption features. NGAS has loaned this tunable 2.05 μm laser to GSFC which had concurrently developed a 2.05 μm lidar sensor/receiver. In May 2010 the two systems were tested together to provide proof of concept of 2.05 µm broadband detection of CO2. This presentation will present results of ground based testing of the 1.57 μm and the 2.05 μm systems and discuss their potential application as space borne sensors for the ASCENDS mission.

  15. High Resolution Spectral Analysis of Hiss and Chorus Emissions in Ground Based Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Aliabad, S. P.; Golkowski, M.; Gibby, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic evolution of the radiation belts is believed to be controlled in large part by two separate but related classes of naturally occurring plasma waves: ELF/VLF chorus and hiss emissions. Although whistler mode chorus has been extensively studied since the first reports by Storey in 1953, the source mechanism and properties are still subjects of active research. Moreover, the origin of plasmaspheric hiss, the electromagnetic emission believed to be responsible for the gap between the inner and outer radiation belts, has been debated for over four decades. Although these waves can be observed in situ on spacecraft, ground-based observing stations can provide orders of magnitude higher data volumes and decades long data coverage essential for certain long-term and statistical studies of wave properties. Recent observational and theoretical works suggest that high resolution analysis of the spectral features of both hiss and chorus emissions can provide insight into generation processes and be used to validate existing theories. Application of the classic Fourier (FFT) technique unfortunately yields a tradeoff between time and frequency resolution. In additional to Fourier spectra, we employ novel methods to make spectrograms with high time and frequency resolutions, independently using minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR). These techniques are applied to ground based data observations of hiss and chorus made in Alaska. Plasmaspheric hiss has been widely regarded as a broadband, structure less, incoherent emission. We quantify the extent to which plasmaspheric hiss can be a coherent emission with complex fine structure. Likewise, to date, researchers have differentiated between hiss and chorus coherency primarily using qualitative "naked eye" approaches to amplitude spectra. Using a quantitative approach to observed amplitude and we present more rigorous classification criteria for these emissions.

  16. Ground-based observations of overshooting convection during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassim, M. E. E.; Lane, T. P.; May, P. T.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses gridded radar data to investigate the properties of deep convective storms that penetrate the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and overshoot the cold-point tropopause during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). Overshooting convection during the observed break period is relatively more intense and exhibits lesser diurnal variability than severe monsoonal storms in terms of mean overshooting area in the TTL (as covered by >20 dBZ echoes). However, ground-based radar has geometrical constraints and sampling gaps at high altitude that lead to biases in the final radar product. Using synthetic observations derived from model-based data, ground-based radar is shown to underestimate the mean overshooting area in the TTL across both TWP-ICE regimes. Differences range from ˜180 km2 (˜100 km2) to ˜14 km2 (˜8 km2) between 14 and 18 km for the active (break) period. This implies that the radar is underestimating the transport of water and ice mass into the TTL by convective overshoots during TWP-ICE. The synthetic data is also used to correct profiles of the mean observed overshooting area. These are shown to differ only marginally between the two sampled regimes once the influence of a large mesoscale convective system, considered as a departure from normal monsoon behavior, was removed from the statistics. The results of our study provide a useful cross-validation comparison for satellite-based detections of overshooting top areas over Darwin, Australia.

  17. Plans of a test bed for ionospheric modelling based on Fennoscandian ground-based instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Kero, Antti; Verronen, Pekka T.; Aikio, Anita; Vierinen, Juha; Lehtinen, Markku; Turunen, Esa; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Virtanen, Ilkka; Norberg, Johannes; Vanhamäki, Heikki; Kallio, Esa; Kestilä, Antti; Partamies, Noora; Syrjäsuo, Mikko

    2016-07-01

    One of the recommendations for teaming among research groups in the COSPAR/ILWS roadmap is about building test beds in which coordinated observing supports model development. In the presentation we will describe a test bed initiative supporting research on ionosphere-thermosphere-magnetosphere interactions. The EISCAT incoherent scatter radars with their future extension, EISCAT3D, form the backbone of the proposed system. The EISCAT radars are surrounded by versatile and dense arrays of ground-based instrumentation: magnetometers and auroral cameras (the MIRACLE and IMAGE networks), ionospheric tomography receivers (the TomoScand network) and other novel technology for upper atmospheric probing with radio waves (e.g. the KAIRA facility, riometers and the ionosonde maintained by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory). As a new opening, close coordination with the Finnish national cubesat program is planned. We will investigate opportunities to establish a cost efficient nanosatellite program which would support the ground-based observations in a systematic and persistent manner. First experiences will be gathered with the Aalto-1 and Aalto-2 satellites, latter of which will be the Finnish contribution to the international QB50 mission. We envisage close collaboration also in the development of data analysis tools with the goal to integrate routines and models from different research groups to one system, where the different elements support each other. In the longer run we are aiming for a modelling framework with observational guidance which gives a holistic description on ionosphere-thermosphere processes and this way enables reliable forecasts on upper atmospheric space weather activity.

  18. Combination of ground-based and satellite remote sensing measurements over Limassol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisantzi, Argyro; Mamouri, Rodanthi E.; Akylas, Evangelos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2013-08-01

    According to the International Panel of Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) there are still uncertainties in climate change predictions due to the impact of aerosols in the solar irradiance. The scattering procedure of aerosols depends strongly on their shape and size distribution while lidar techniques could give the vertical distribution of them. Southeastern Mediterranean is affected by air masses of different sources thus layers with complicate aerosol composition are frequently observed over Cyprus. A backscatter lidar has been established at Cyprus University of Technology's (CUT) premises (34°N, 33°E) since 2010, in order to provide vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties such as backscatter coefficient and particle depolarization ratio. More than 2 years of daily measurements have been analyzed for the period of May 2010 to May 2012. From this dataset, there are almost 45 CALISPO coincidence overpasses at a distance of less than 105km from the location of the ground-based lidar and from those two cases were selected. Both, ground based and space born active remote sensing techniques were used in order to characterize aerosol layers in the free troposphere over SE Mediterranean. The layers of CALIPSO and CUT's lidar observations have been examined with respect to their origin, in order to retrieve the backscatter coefficient and the particle depolarization ratio at 532nm. The analysis of the presented cases, together with the air mass back-trajectories calculations, in accordance with depolarization retrievals, show that non-spherical particles originated from Africa whereas marine layer consist of spherical particles. Furthermore aerosol optical properties such as Ångström exponents (AE) derived from the sun-photometer belonging to the AERONET network at Limassol city were used complementary in order to support our analysis.

  19. Ground-based and airborne measurements of the Mount St. Helens stratospheric effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Shortly after the 18 May eruption, a series of airborne lidar flights were made over the Eastern United States. During the same period, ground-based systems were activated throughout the world. The available worldwide lidar data is put together in a consistent set. These data show the dispersion of material at different altitudes during the early global circuits. The material in the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere was very patchy in horizontal extent with backscattering ratio values over the east coast of the United States greater than 100 at the ruby wavelength of 0.6943. Two wavelength ratios and depolarization values for the material in the lower stratosphere (12 to 18 km) appear to have returned to the pre-18 May values within a month after the eruption and this indicated a rapid conversion to spherical shapes and normal indices of refraction. The material above 20 km moved slowly westward while most of the ejecta moved eastward at various speeds and directions which varied considerably with altitude. The westward material was detected first by the Japanese lidar system and then subsequently by the European and American ground-based systems. It circuited the globe in about 60 days. An airborne lidar flight in early September across the continental United States showed the layers to have homogenized considerably one broad layer between about 14 and 21 km peaking at 18 to 19 km and another more intermittent thin layer between 21 and 22 km. The ruby peak backscattering ratio of the broad layer was between 1.3 and 1.5.

  20. Multidisciplinary Approach for Earthquake Atmospheric Precursors Validation by Joint Satellite and Ground Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, D. P.; Pulinets, S. A.; Hattori, K.; Liu, J. G.; Parrot, M.; Kafatos, M.; Yang, T. F.; Jhuang, H.; Taylor, P.; Ohyama, K.; Kon, S.

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that there were electromagnetic (EM) effects in the atmosphere/ionosphere caused by some strong earthquakes. Several major earthquakes are accompanied by an intensification of the vertical transport of charged aerosols in the lower atmosphere. These processes lead to the generation of external electric currents in specific regions of the atmosphere and the modifications, by DC electric fields, in the ionosphere-atmosphere electric circuit. Our methodology of integrated satellite terrestrial framework (ISTF) is based on the use of multi-sensor data and a cross-correlation between ground and satellite observations to record any atmospheric thermal anomalies and ionospheric perturbations associated with these activities. We record thermal infrared data from the Aqua, GOES, POES satellites and DEMETER provides space plasma variations related to the growth of the DC electric field. Simultaneously we continuously monitor ground-based multi-parameter GPS/TEC, ion concentration, radon, and magnetic field array data. We integrate these joint observations into the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model. The significance of this combined satellite and ground-based analysis is that it permits us to generate hindcasts of historical seismicity in Japan, Taiwan (2003-2009) and recent catastrophic events in Italy (M6.3, 2009), Haiti (M7.0, 2010) and Chile (M8.8, 2010). This joint analysis of ground and satellite data during the time of major earthquakes has shown the presence of persistent anomalies in the atmosphere over regions of maximum stress (along plate boundaries), and are not of meteorological origin, since they are stationary over the same region. Our approach provides the framework for a multidisciplinary validation of earthquake precursors and we are looking forward to validating this approach over high seismicity regions.

  1. Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Estimates with Ground-based Radar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Moazamigoodarzi, Saber; Langston, Carrie; Arthur, Ami

    2015-04-01

    The uncertainty structure of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is largely unknown at fine spatiotemporal scales near the radar measurement scale (1-km/5-min). By using the WSR-88D radar network and rain gauge datasets across the conterminous US, an investigation of this subject has been carried out within the framework of the NOAA/NSSL ground radar-based Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor. Probability distributions of precipitation rates are computed instead of deterministic values using a model quantifying the relation between radar reflectivity and the corresponding "true" precipitation. The probabilistic model considers multiple sources of error in radar QPE as well as the impacts of correction algorithms on the radar signal. Ensembles of reflectivity-to-rain rate relationships accounting explicitly for rain typology were derived at a 5-min/1-km scale. This approach preserves the fine space/time sampling properties of the radar and conditions probabilistic QPE on the rain rate and precipitation type when computing probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimates (PQPE). The model components were estimated on the basis of a 1-year-long data sample. This PQPE model provides the basis for precipitation probability maps and the generation of radar precipitation ensembles. Maps of the precipitation exceedance probability for specific thresholds (e.g. precipitation return periods) are demonstrated. Precipitation probability maps are accumulated to the hourly time scale and compare positively to the deterministic QPE. This approach to PQPE can readily apply to other systems including space-based passive and active sensor algorithms.

  2. Observation of coastal fogs using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, J. I.; Yum, S. S.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, Y. H.; Cho, C. H.; Oh, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    Fog is the cloud of which the base is at the earth surface. Because of severely reduced visibility when fog is present, on-road traffics, maritime transport and aircraft operations are often hampered by fog occurrence. Therefore, accurate prediction of fog has been of high priority in traffic safety. The first step towards the accurate prediction of fog would be to detect the fog formation and monitor the evolution of fog in a continuous manner so that we can better characterize the fog formation mechanism. However, observing the evolution of fog has been difficult due to its nature of local meteorological scale and the lack of proper measurement of such scale. In situ measurements can provide us the most accurate data, but these measurements are limited to a very small spatial coverage. Satellite remote sensing can cover a wider spatial scale but detailed structure cannot be detected, In contrast, ground based remote sensing has advantages in spatial and temporal coverages. Here we present the data measured using a suite of ground based remote sensing instruments at the National Center for Intensive Observation of severe weather (NCIO), located at a southern coastal rural town of Boseong, Korea (34.76 ̊ N, 127.16 ̊ E), which include a scanning Ka-band cloud radar, wind profiler, microwave radiometer, ceilometer and lidar. Analysis of these data will be complemented by the basic meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction) data measured at 11 different altitudes on a 300m meteorological observation tower installed at NCIO. With the sea to the south, the hilly topographical setting to the north, and the ragged coastal line in between, fog formation mechanisms in this region are expected to be very complex. Our eventual goal is to obtain an insight on the formation mechanisms of the coastal fogs in this region through the analysis of these comprehensive dataset. Some preliminary results from this effort will be presented at the

  3. Ground-based remote sensing of thin clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Zhao, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a method for using interferometer measurements of downwelling thermal radiation to retrieve the properties of single-layer clouds. Cloud phase is determined from ratios of thermal emission in three "micro-windows" at 862.5 cm-1, 935.8 cm-1, and 988.4 cm-1 where absorption by water vapour is particularly small. Cloud microphysical and optical properties are retrieved from thermal emission in the first two of these micro-windows, constrained by the transmission through clouds of primarily stratospheric ozone emission at 1040 cm-1. Assuming a cloud does not approximate a blackbody, the estimated 95% confidence retrieval errors in effective radius re, visible optical depth τ, number concentration N, and water path WP are, respectively, 10%, 20%, 38% (55% for ice crystals), and 16%. Applied to data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programme (ARM) North Slope of Alaska - Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, retrievals show general agreement with both ground-based microwave radiometer measurements of liquid water path and a method that uses combined shortwave and microwave measurements to retrieve re, τ and N. Compared to other retrieval methods, advantages of this technique include its ability to characterise thin clouds year round, that water vapour is not a primary source of retrieval error, and that the retrievals of microphysical properties are only weakly sensitive to retrieved cloud phase. The primary limitation is the inapplicability to thicker clouds that radiate as blackbodies and that it relies on a fairly comprehensive suite of ground based measurements.

  4. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Bennartz, R.; Kulie, M. S.; Merrelli, A. J.; Shupe, M. D.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive datasets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliments past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland from 2010-2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the four years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  5. Nutritional status assessment in semiclosed environments: ground-based and space flight studies in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Rice, B. L.; Nillen, J. L.; Gillman, P. L.; Block, G.

    2001-01-01

    Adequate nutrition is critical during long-term spaceflight, as is the ability to easily monitor dietary intake. A comprehensive nutritional status assessment profile was designed for use before, during and after flight. It included assessment of both dietary intake and biochemical markers of nutritional status. A spaceflight food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed to evaluate intake of key nutrients during spaceflight. The nutritional status assessment protocol was evaluated during two ground-based closed-chamber studies (60 and 91 d; n = 4/study), and was implemented for two astronauts during 4-mo stays on the Mir space station. Ground-based studies indicated that the FFQ, administered daily or weekly, adequately estimated intake of key nutrients. Chamber subjects maintained prechamber energy intake and body weight. Astronauts tended to eat 40--50% of WHO-predicted energy requirements, and lost >10% of preflight body mass. Serum ferritin levels were lower after the chamber stays, despite adequate iron intake. Red blood cell folate concentrations were increased after the chamber studies. Vitamin D stores were decreased by > 40% on chamber egress and after spaceflight. Mir crew members had decreased levels of most nutritional indices, but these are difficult to interpret given the insufficient energy intake and loss of body mass. Spaceflight food systems can provide adequate intake of macronutrients, although, as expected, micronutrient intake is a concern for any closed or semiclosed food system. These data demonstrate the utility and importance of nutritional status assessment during spaceflight and of the FFQ during extended-duration spaceflight.

  6. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-15

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 gm–2 or less, themore » cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. As a result, this measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.« less

  7. Microwave signatures of ice hydrometeors from ground-based observations above Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Claire; Bennartz, Ralf; Kulie, Mark S.; Merrelli, Aronne J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.

    2016-04-01

    Multi-instrument, ground-based measurements provide unique and comprehensive data sets of the atmosphere for a specific location over long periods of time and resulting data compliment past and existing global satellite observations. This paper explores the effect of ice hydrometeors on ground-based, high-frequency passive microwave measurements and attempts to isolate an ice signature for summer seasons at Summit, Greenland, from 2010 to 2013. Data from a combination of passive microwave, cloud radar, radiosonde, and ceilometer were examined to isolate the ice signature at microwave wavelengths. By limiting the study to a cloud liquid water path of 40 g m-2 or less, the cloud radar can identify cases where the precipitation was dominated by ice. These cases were examined using liquid water and gas microwave absorption models, and brightness temperatures were calculated for the high-frequency microwave channels: 90, 150, and 225 GHz. By comparing the measured brightness temperatures from the microwave radiometers and the calculated brightness temperature using only gas and liquid contributions, any residual brightness temperature difference is due to emission and scattering of microwave radiation from the ice hydrometeors in the column. The ice signature in the 90, 150, and 225 GHz channels for the Summit Station summer months was isolated. This measured ice signature was then compared to an equivalent brightness temperature difference calculated with a radiative transfer model including microwave single-scattering properties for several ice habits. Initial model results compare well against the 4 years of summer season isolated ice signature in the high-frequency microwave channels.

  8. Ground based mobile isotopic methane measurements in the Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughn, B. H.; Rella, C.; Petron, G.; Sherwood, O.; Mielke-Maday, I.; Schwietzke, S.

    2014-12-01

    Increased development of unconventional oil and gas resources in North America has given rise to attempts to monitor and quantify fugitive emissions of methane from the industry. Emission estimates of methane from oil and gas basins can vary significantly from one study to another as well as from EPA or State estimates. New efforts are aimed at reconciling bottom-up, or inventory-based, emission estimates of methane with top-down estimates based on atmospheric measurements from aircraft, towers, mobile ground-based vehicles, and atmospheric models. Attributing airborne measurements of regional methane fluxes to specific sources is informed by ground-based measurements of methane. Stable isotopic measurements (δ13C) of methane help distinguish between emissions from the O&G industry, Confined Animal Feed Operations (CAFO), and landfills, but analytical challenges typically limit meaningful isotopic measurements to individual point sampling. We are developing a toolbox to use δ13CH4 measurements to assess the partitioning of methane emissions for regions with multiple methane sources. The method was applied to the Denver-Julesberg Basin. Here we present data from continuous isotopic measurements obtained over a wide geographic area by using MegaCore, a 1500 ft. tube that is constantly filled with sample air while driving, then subsequently analyzed at slower rates using cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS). Pressure, flow and calibration are tightly controlled allowing precise attribution of methane enhancements to their point of collection. Comparisons with point measurements are needed to confirm regional values and further constrain flux estimates and models. This effort was made in conjunction with several major field campaigns in the Colorado Front Range in July-August 2014, including FRAPPÉ (Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment), DISCOVER-AQ, and the Air Water Gas NSF Sustainability Research Network at the University of Colorado.

  9. Probabilistic precipitation rate estimates with ground-based radar networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Moazamigoodarzi, Saber; Langston, Carrie; Arthur, Ami

    2015-03-01

    The uncertainty structure of radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is largely unknown at fine spatiotemporal scales near the radar measurement scale. By using the WSR-88D radar network and gauge data sets across the conterminous US, an investigation of this subject has been carried out within the framework of the NOAA/NSSL ground radar-based Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) QPE system. A new method is proposed and called PRORATE for probabilistic QPE using radar observations of rate and typology estimates. Probability distributions of precipitation rates are computed instead of deterministic values using a model quantifying the relation between radar reflectivity and the corresponding "true" precipitation. The model acknowledges the uncertainty arising from many factors operative at the radar measurement scale and from the correction algorithm. Ensembles of reflectivity-to-precipitation rate relationships accounting explicitly for precipitation typology were derived at a 5 min/1 km scale. This approach conditions probabilistic quantitative precipitation estimates (PQPE) on the precipitation rate and type. The model components were estimated on the basis of a 1 year long data sample over the CONUS. This PQPE model provides the basis for precipitation probability maps and the generation of radar precipitation ensembles. Maps of the precipitation exceedance probability for specific thresholds (e.g., precipitation return periods) are computed. Precipitation probability maps are accumulated to the hourly time scale and compare favorably to the deterministic QPE. As an essential property of precipitation, the impact of the temporal correlation on the hourly accumulation is examined. This approach to PQPE can readily apply to other systems including space-based passive and active sensor algorithms.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Degradation Data Used for Ground-Based Durability Projection of Insulation on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Dever, Joyce A.; Hodermarsky, Janet C.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-based environmental durability tests have indicated that exposing materials in accelerated tests to known spacecraft mission degradation sources predicted by an environmental model does not simulate the extent of damage that occurs in the space environment. The reasons for this may include the complex nature of the space environment, which is not simulated completely in any ground-based facility, the extreme differences in exposure rates in space and in ground tests, and inaccuracies in environmental models. One approach to overcoming the difficulties in simulating the space environment using ground-based testing is to calibrate the facility using data from actual space-exposed materials to determine exposure levels required to replicate degraded properties observed in space. Research was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a ground-to-space correlation method that determines the durability of Teflon-based insulation for the International Space Station (ISS) by using data obtained in a ground facility and degraded Teflon thermal insulation retrieved from the Hubble Space Telescope.

  11. Estimating surface visibility at Hong Kong from ground-based LIDAR, sun photometer and operational MODIS products.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad I; Nichol, Janet E; Wang, Jun; Campbell, James R; Chan, Pak W

    2013-09-01

    Hong Kong's surface visibility has decreased in recent years due to air pollution from rapid social and economic development in the region. In addition to deteriorating health standards, reduced visibility disrupts routine civil and public operations, most notably transportation and aviation. Regional estimates of visibility solved operationally using available ground and satellite-based estimates of aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution may prove more effective than standard reliance on a few existing surface visibility monitoring stations. Previous studies have demonstrated that such satellite measurements correlate well with near-surface optical properties, despite these sensors do not consider range-resolved information and indirect parameterizations necessary to solve relevant parameters. By expanding such analysis to include vertically resolved aerosol profile information from an autonomous ground-based lidar instrument, this work develops six models for automated assessment of surface visibility. Regional visibility is estimated using co-incident ground-based lidar, sun photometer visibility meter and MODerate-resolution maging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth data sets. Using a 355 nm extinction coefficient profile solved from the lidar MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) is scaled down to the surface to generate a regional composite depiction of surface visibility. These results demonstrate the potential for applying passive satellite depictions of broad-scale aerosol optical properties together with a ground-based surface lidar and zenith-viewing sun photometer for improving quantitative assessments of visibility in a city such as Hong Kong. PMID:24151685

  12. Zero-Gravity Locomotion Simulators: New Ground-Based Analogs for Microgravity Exercise Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, Gail P.; DeWitt, John K.; Cavanagh, Peter R.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Gilkey, Kelly M.

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining health and fitness in crewmembers during space missions is essential for preserving performance for mission-critical tasks. NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) provides space exploration exercise hardware and monitoring requirements that lead to devices that are reliable, meet medical, vehicle, and habitat constraints, and use minimal vehicle and crew resources. ECP will also develop and validate efficient exercise prescriptions that minimize daily time needed for completion of exercise yet maximize performance for mission activities. In meeting these mission goals, NASA Glenn Research Center (Cleveland, OH, USA), in collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, Ohio, USA), has developed a suite of zero-gravity locomotion simulators and associated technologies to address the need for ground-based test analog capability for simulating in-flight (microgravity) and surface (partial-gravity) exercise to advance the health and safety of astronaut crews and the next generation of space explorers. Various research areas can be explored. These include improving crew comfort during exercise, and understanding joint kinematics and muscle activation pattern differences relative to external loading mechanisms. In addition, exercise protocol and hardware optimization can be investigated, along with characterizing system dynamic response and the physiological demand associated with advanced exercise device concepts and performance of critical mission tasks for Exploration class missions. Three zero-gravity locomotion simulators are currently in use and the research focus for each will be presented. All of the devices are based on a supine subject suspension system, which simulates a reduced gravity environment by completely or partially offloading the weight of the exercising test subject s body. A platform for mounting treadmill is positioned perpendicularly to the test subject. The Cleveland Clinic Zero-g Locomotion Simulator (ZLS) utilizes a

  13. Using Assistive Technology Adaptations To Include Students with Learning Disabilities in Cooperative Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a process for integrating technology adaptations for students with learning disabilities into cooperative-learning activities in terms of three components: (1) selecting adaptations; (2) monitoring use of adaptations during cooperative-learning activities; and (3) evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. Barriers to and support systems…

  14. Interest Inventory. [Includes Academic Interest Measure, Pupil Activity Inventory, and Semantic Differential].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    This Interest Inventory contains three inventories: Academic Interest Measure (AIM), Pupil Activity Inventory (PAI), and Semantic Differential test (SD). The AIM measures six subscales of academic interests; the PAI measures non-school activities in science; and the SD measures attitudes toward science and physics. The inventories are designed for…

  15. Validation of the OMI-TOMS and OMI-DOAS total ozone column data using ground-based observations over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mingliang; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of total ozone column derived from Ozone Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with two algorithms: OMI Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (OMI-TOMS) and OMI Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OMI-DOAS), compared to ground-based Brewer and Dobson spectrophotometers located at eight China stations from July 2009 to December 2013, including Xianghe, Kunming, Mt.Waliguan, Lhasa, Taipei, Chengkung, Cape D'Aguilar and Longfengshan. Results showed that the agreement between OMI ozone data and ground-based measurements is excellent. Total ozone columns from both OMI-TOMS and OMI-DOAS data are on average about 1.5% lower than ground-based data. For both OMI ozone data products the SZA dependence of the mean relative differences (RD) between satellite data and the ground-based data is relative obvious when the SZA is larger than 50°. Similar to the SZA, the satellite view zenith angle (VZA) dependence of the mean relative differences (RD) between satellite and ground is relatively markedly when the VZA is smaller than 10° in eight stations. Finally, the dependence of the mean relative differences (RD) (-4.28% to 0.818%) between OMI-DOAS data and ground-based data for the total ozone column is remarkable. While for OMI-TOMS data the dependence is not obvious (the RD value varies from -3.30% to -0.676%).

  16. Scope of Jovian lightning observation by ground-based and spacecraft instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Nakajima, K.

    2009-12-01

    It is suggested by recent observational and theoretical studies that the thunderstorms, i.e., strong moist convective clouds in Jupiter’s atmosphere are very important not only as an essential ingredient of meteorology of Jupiter but also as a potentially very useful “probe” of the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. We would propose the lightning observation with properly designed optical device onboard Jovian system orbiter and with the ground-based telescope. Based on detailed analysis of cloud motions by Galileo orbiter, Gierasch et al. proposed that the thunderstorms can produce the small scale eddies and ultimately drive the belt/zone structure. Moreover, the belt zone structure helps the development of thunderstorms in the belt region in accordance with observation; the belt/zone structure and thunderstorms may be in a symbiotic relation. This framework is a refined version of shallow origin theory, but, although it is a very fantastic idea, quantitative verification remains to be done. Most recent numerical modeling by our group calculated all three types of cloud, i.e., H2O, NH3, and, NH4SH. One of the most important findings is the existence of distinct, quasi-periodic temporal variation of the convective cloud activity; explosion of cloud activity extending all over the computational domain occurs separated by quiet period of order of 10 days. Another surprising finding is that the period of the active/break cycle is roughly proportional to the amount of condensable component in the sub-cloud layer. This strong correspondence between the deep volatile abundance and temporal variability of cloud convection implies a new method to probe the deep atmosphere. We believe JGO with other optical equipments especially for atmospheric spectral imaging is the ideal platform for the lightning detector. Comparing quantitative lightning activity with ambient cloud motion and

  17. Uplink Array Demonstration with Ground-Based Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addario, L.; Proctor, R.; Trinh, J.; Sigman, E.; Yamamoto, C.

    2009-02-01

    A set of small, separately steerable reflector antennas has been used as a transmitting phased array for the purpose of demonstrating techniques that can be used in a larger array to serve the future uplink transmission needs of NASA's Deep Space Network. We envision an operational array with 100 or more antennas that could generate the order of 1 TW of effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP). The demonstration is a small-scale version of this with five antennas and about 1 MW of EIRP. Each antenna has a 1.2-m-diameter aperture and a 2-W power amplifier, and the array operates in the 14.0- to 14.5-GHz communication satellite band. The main technical challenge for an uplink array is to ensure that the carrier phases of the signals from all antenna elements are aligned when the signals arrive at the receiver on a distant spacecraft. This requires a method of phase calibration. In the demonstration, we have shown that active receivers attached to the Earth near the array can be used as calibration targets. Measurements made at these receivers have been successfully used to calculate the phase adjustment needed at each antenna to achieve the desired alignment, even though the destination spacecraft is in a direction and at a distance very different from that of the calibrator. When the calculated adjustments are applied at the antennas, the combined power at a spacecraft has been shown to be within 1 dB of that expected for perfect alignment. Commercial satellites in geostationary Earth orbit were used for these tests. Other objectives of the demonstration, all successfully accomplished, include: (1) Show that a new and simple electronics architecture, specifically designed for phase and delay stability, can implement all functions of NASA deep space uplinks at low cost, supporting mass production for large arrays. (2) Show that phase alignment can be maintained for at least a few hours without recalibration. In fact, stability over several days has been demonstrated

  18. Cockpit display of ground-based weather data during thunderstorm research flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Bruce D.; Brown, Philip W.; Wunschel, Alfred J., Jr.; Stickle, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated system for providing ground-based cockpit display, transmitting to an aircraft, upon request via VHF radio, important ground-based thunderstorm data such as radar precipitation reflectivity contours, aircraft ground track, and cloud-to-ground lightning locations. Examples of the airborne X-band weather radar display and the ground-based display are presented for two different missions during the NASA Storm Hazards Program. In spite of some limitation, the system was found to be helpful in the selection of the route of flight, the general ground track to be used, and, occasionally, in clarifying the location of a specific cell of interest.

  19. Analysis of Correlation between Ionospheric Spatial Gradients and Space Weather Intensity under Nominal Conditions for Ground-Based Augmentation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.

    2013-12-01

    Ground-Based Augmentation Systems (GBAS) support aircraft precision approach and landing by providing differential GPS corrections to aviation users. For GBAS applications, most of ionospheric errors are removed by applying the differential corrections. However, ionospheric correction errors may exist due to ionosphere spatial decorrelation between GBAS ground facility and users. Thus, the standard deviation of ionosphere spatial decorrelation (σvig) is estimated and included in the computation of error bounds on user position solution. The σvig of 4mm/km, derived for the Conterminous United States (CONUS), bounds one-sigma ionospheric spatial gradients under nominal conditions (including active, but not stormy condition) with an adequate safety margin [1]. The conservatism residing in the current σvig by fixing it to a constant value for all non-stormy conditions could be mitigated by subdividing ionospheric conditions into several classes and using different σvig for each class. This new concept, real-time σvig adaptation, will be possible if the level of ionospheric activity can be well classified based on space weather intensity. This paper studies correlation between the statistics of nominal ionospheric spatial gradients and space weather indices. The analysis was carried out using two sets of data collected from Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS) Network; 9 consecutive (nominal and ionospherically active) days in 2004 and 19 consecutive (relatively 'quiet') days in 2010. Precise ionospheric delay estimates are obtained using the simplified truth processing method and vertical ionospheric gradients are computed using the well-known 'station pair method' [2]. The remaining biases which include carrier-phase leveling errors and Inter-frequency Bias (IFB) calibration errors are reduced by applying linear slip detection thresholds. The σvig was inflated to overbound the distribution of vertical ionospheric gradients with the required confidence

  20. Intracellular activity of clinical concentrations of phenothiazines including thioridiazine against phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Amaral, Leonard

    2002-07-01

    The effect of thioridazine (TZ) was studied on the killing activity of human peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages (HPBMDM) and of human macrophage cell line THP-1 at extracellular concentrations below those achievable clinically. These macrophages have nominal killing activity against bacteria and therefore, would not influence any activity that the compounds may have against intracellular localised Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicated that whereas TZ has an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the strains of S. aureus of 18, 0.1 mg/l of TZ in the medium completely inhibits the growth of S. aureus that has been phagocytosed by macrophages. The latter concentration was non-toxic to macrophages, did not cause cellular expression of activation marker CD69 nor induction of CD3+ T cell production of IFN-gamma, but blocked cellular proliferation and down-regulated the production of T cell-derived cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-5). These results suggest that TZ induces intracellular bactericidal activities independent of the capacity to generate Type 1 responses against S. aureus. PMID:12127709

  1. Potential Application of NASA Aerospace Technology to Ground-Based Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.; Welch, Gerard E.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Brown, Gerald V.

    2000-01-01

    A review of some of the basic gas turbine technology being developed at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, which may have the potential to be applied to ground-based systems, is presented in this paper. Only a sampling of the large number of research activities underway at the Glenn Research Center can be represented here. The items selected for presentation are those that may lead to increased power and efficiency, reduced cycle design time and cost, improved thermal design, reduced fatigue and fracture, reduced mechanical friction and increased operating margin. The topic of improved material will be presented in this conference and shall not be discussed here. The topics selected for presentation are key research activities at the Glenn Center of Excellence on Turbo-machinery. These activities should be of interest and utility to this ISABE (International Symposium on Air Breathing Engines) Special Forum on Aero-Derivative Land-Based Gas Turbines and to the power industry.

  2. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  3. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  4. Development of a Ground-Based Analog to the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, Nathaniel J.; Scott-Pandorf, M. M.; Caldwell, E.; DeWitt, J.K.; Fincke, R.; Peters, B.T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA and Wyle engineers constructed a Horizontal Exercise Fixture (HEF) that was patented in 2006. Recently modifications were made to HEF with the goal of creating a device that mimics squat exercise on the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) and can be used by bed rest subjects who must remain supine during exercise. This project posed several engineering challenges, such as how best to reproduce the hip motions (we used a sled that allowed hip motion in the sagittal plane), how to counterweight the pelvis against gravity (we used a pulley and free-weight mechanism), and how to apply large loads (body weight plus squat load) to the shoulders while simultaneously supporting the back against gravity (we tested a standard and a safety bar that allowed movement in the subject s z-axis, both of which used a retractable plate for back support). METHODS An evaluation of the HEF was conducted with human subjects (3F, 3M), who performed sets of squat exercises of increasing load from 10-repetition maximum (RM) up to 1-RM. Three pelvic counterweight loads were tested along with each of the two back-support squat bars. Data collection included 3-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF), muscle activation (EMG), body motion (video-based motion capture), and subjective comments. These data were compared with previous ground-based ARED study data. RESULTS All subjects in the evaluation were able to perform low- to high-loading squats on the HEF. Four of the 6 subjects preferred a pelvic counterweight equivalent to 60 percent of their body weight. Four subjects preferred the standard squat bar, whereas 2 female subjects preferred the safety bar. EMG data showed muscle activation in the legs and low back typical of squat motion. GRF trajectories and eccentric-concentric loading ratios were similar to ARED. CONCLUSION: Squat exercise performed on HEF approximated squat exercise on ARED.

  5. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Methods: Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA…

  6. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  7. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test. PMID:12637206

  8. Backyards and Butterflies: Ways to Include Children with Disabilities in Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Doreen; And Others

    This sourcebook is designed for children, parents, and families, detailing ideas for outdoor play and learning activities, with emphasis on involving children with disabilities in outdoor play. A rural perspective permeates the guide, although each chapter contains ideas for making outdoor environments more accessible and safer for all children,…

  9. Beyond Right or Wrong: Challenges of Including Creative Design Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore challenges encountered by K-12 educators in establishing classroom cultures that support creative learning activities with the Scratch programming language. Providing opportunities for students to understand and to build capacities for creative work was described by many of the teachers that we interviewed as a central…

  10. Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education: Modifying Net/Wall Games to Include Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Luciana; Tracy, Julia F.; Taliaferro, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of students with disabilities in higher education settings has presented challenges for instructors with regards to appropriate inclusion. Concerning physical activity courses in higher education, instructors may not have the knowledge or resources to make modifications and accommodations that will ultimately result in…

  11. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population concerns. Designed to educate general college audiences, it is also intended for use as a preservice course for teachers. In addition, the course can be modified for high school students. The course…

  12. A novel peptide inhibitor of classical and lectin complement activation including ABO incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Clifford T.; Pallera, Haree K.; Sharp, Julia A.; Woltmann, Jon L.; Qian, Shizhi; Hair, Pamela S.; van der Pol, Pieter; van Kooten, Cees; Thielens, Nicole M.; Lattanzio, Frank A.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous experiments from our laboratories have identified peptides derived from the human astrovirus coat protein (CP) that bind C1q and mannose binding lectin (MBL) inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, respectively. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the function of these coat protein peptides (CPPs) in an in vitro model of complement-mediated disease (ABO incompatibility), preliminarily assess their in vivo complement suppression profile and develop more highly potent derivatives of these molecules. E23A, a 30 amino acid CPP derivative previously demonstrated to inhibit classical pathway activation was able to dose-dependently inhibit lysis of AB erythrocytes treated with mismatched human O serum. Additionally, when injected into rats, E23A inhibited the animals’ serum from lysing antibody-sensitized erythrocytes, providing preliminary in vivo functional evidence that this CPP can cross the species barrier to inhibit serum complement activity in rodents. A rational drug design approach was implemented to identify more potent CPP derivatives, resulting in the identification and characterization of a 15 residue peptide (Polar Assortant (PA)), which demonstrated both superior inhibition of classical complement pathway activation and robust binding to C1q collagen-like tails. PA also inhibited ABO incompatibility in vitro and demonstrated in vivo complement suppression up to 24 hours post-injection. CPP’s ability to inhibit ABO incompatibility in vitro, proof of concept in vivo inhibitory activity in rats and the development of the highly potent PA derivative set the stage for preclinical testing of this molecule in small animal models of complement-mediated disease. PMID:22906481

  13. An Updated Review of Interventions that Include Promotion of Physical Activity for Adult Men.

    PubMed

    Bottorff, Joan L; Seaton, Cherisse L; Johnson, Steve T; Caperchione, Cristina M; Oliffe, John L; More, Kimberly; Jaffer-Hirji, Haleema; Tillotson, Sherri M

    2015-06-01

    The marked disparity in life expectancy between men and women suggests men are a vulnerable group requiring targeted health promotion programs. As such, there is an increasing need for health promotion strategies that effectively engage men with their health and/or illness management. Programs that promote physical activity could significantly improve the health of men. Although George et al. (Sports Med 42(3):281, 30) reviewed physical activity programs involving adult males published between 1990 and 2010, developments in men's health have prompted the emergence of new sex- and gender-specific approaches targeting men. The purpose of this review was to: (1) extend and update the review undertaken by George et al. (Sports Med 42(3):281, 30) concerning the effectiveness of physical activity programs in males, and (2) evaluate the integration of gender-specific influences in the content, design, and delivery of men's health promotion programs. A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and the SPORTDiscus databases for articles published between January 2010 and August 2014 was conducted. In total, 35 studies, involving evaluations of 31 programs, were identified. Findings revealed that a variety of techniques and modes of delivery could effectively promote physical activity among men. Though the majority of programs were offered exclusively to men, 12 programs explicitly integrated gender-related influences in male-specific programs in ways that recognized men's interests and preferences. Innovations in male-only programs that focus on masculine ideals and gender influences to engage men in increasing their physical activity hold potential for informing strategies to promote other areas of men's health. PMID:25430599

  14. Long-Term and Transient Variability of the Low Ionosphere from Very Low Frequency Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Jean Pierre

    2012-07-01

    At least three regions are forming the lower part of the ionosphere: the transient C-region at sunrise, the D-region during daytime and the bottom E-region at nighttime. These regions are accessible only through rocket in situ measurements and radio sounding techniques from the ground. Contrary to the upper layers, any prediction is difficult in the low ionosphere because of its important time variability, and its complex chemistry. In this work we will review the time variability of the low ionosphere on different timescales as deduced from Very Low Frequency ground based observations. Long-term variations are essentially due to the solar activity cycle and the solar rotation, and these variations reflect level changes of the ionizing Lyman-alpha radiation. On shorter transient timescales, solar flares and geomagnetic disturbances affect the low ionosphere when large amount of solar X-ray photons and/or particles are injected and deposit their energy at altitudes between 70 and 30 km. Then, the monitoring the low ionosphere regions may be used as an indirect and efficient tool to study space weather conditions. The transient time variability of the low ionosphere can also originate from below, that is due to the neutral atmosphere dynamics, which also includes meteorological phenomena. Then planetary and gravity waves can penetrate the lower ionosphere. To a lower extent, tidal oscillations and acoustic waves may affect the lowermost part of the ionosphere, although experimental researches in these domains are necessary. Finally, lightning induced perturbations of the low ionosphere will be discussed, and, these include sprites, transient gamma-ray flashes (TGF), blue elves and Lightning Precipitation Events (LPE).

  15. Comparisons between Ground-Based Photometry and Space-Based Measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G.; Cookson, A.; Dobias, J.; Walton, S.

    2005-05-01

    We will review the usefulness of ground-based full-disk photometry in conjunction with space-based measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). It is known that sunspots and faculae cause changes in the TSI. These features need to be modeled using ground-based photometry and their effects removed in order to search for possible other causes of TSI variation. Work to date has shown that approximately 94% of the variance in TSI can be explained by sunspots and faculae/network. Since ground-based photometry is carried out daily, it can help identify anomalies in space-based TSI measurements. Finally, ground-based photometry can help in tying together TSI measurements from different spacecraft that have different native irradiance scales. This work has been partially supported by grants from NASA and NSF.

  16. Evaluation of a ground based manned demonstration as a milestone in CELSS development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The requirements for a ground based manned controlled ecological life support system demonstration are summarized for the following: nutrition and food processing, food production, waste processing, systems engineering and modeling, and ecology-systems safety.

  17. Assessing ground-based counts of nestling bald eagles in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, M.R.; Hatfield, J.S.; Lindquist, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence that the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) productivity survey in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness of northeastern Minnesota may have underestimated the number of nestlings during 1986-1988. Recommendations are provided to achieve more accurate ground-based counts. By conducting ground-based observations for up to 1 hour/nest, an accurate count of the number of bald eagle nestlings can be obtained. If nests are only observed for up to 30 minutes/nest, an accurate determination of nest success can be made. The effort that managers put into counts should be based on the intended use of the productivity data. If small changes in mean productivity would trigger management action, the less acurate ground-based counts should be conducted with caution. Prior to implementing ground-based counts, a study like ours should estimate bias associated with different survey procedures and the observation time needed to achieve accurate results.

  18. Application of ground-based LIDAR for gully investigation in agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed scientific investigation of gullies in agricultural fields requires accurate topographic information with adequate temporal and spatial resolution. New technologies, such as ground-based LIDAR systems, are capable of generating datasets with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The spatia...

  19. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  20. FORTRAN program for analyzing ground-based radar data: Usage and derivations, version 6.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Whitmore, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    A postflight FORTRAN program called 'radar' reads and analyzes ground-based radar data. The output includes position, velocity, and acceleration parameters. Air data parameters are also provided if atmospheric characteristics are input. This program can read data from any radar in three formats. Geocentric Cartesian position can also be used as input, which may be from an inertial navigation or Global Positioning System. Options include spike removal, data filtering, and atmospheric refraction corrections. Atmospheric refraction can be corrected using the quick White Sands method or the gradient refraction method, which allows accurate analysis of very low elevation angle and long-range data. Refraction properties are extrapolated from surface conditions, or a measured profile may be input. Velocity is determined by differentiating position. Accelerations are determined by differentiating velocity. This paper describes the algorithms used, gives the operational details, and discusses the limitations and errors of the program. Appendices A through E contain the derivations for these algorithms. These derivations include an improvement in speed to the exact solution for geodetic altitude, an improved algorithm over earlier versions for determining scale height, a truncation algorithm for speeding up the gradient refraction method, and a refinement of the coefficients used in the White Sands method for Edwards AFB, California. Appendix G contains the nomenclature.

  1. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  2. Predictors of sprint start speed: the effects of resistive ground-based vs. inclined treadmill training.

    PubMed

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Brent, Jensen L; Divine, Jon G; Hewett, Timothy E

    2007-08-01

    There is currently no consensus with regard to the most effective method to train for improved acceleration, or with regard to which kinematic variable provides the greatest opportunity for improvement in this important performance characteristic. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of resistive ground-based speed training and incline treadmill speed training on speed-related kinematic measures and sprint start speed. The hypothesis tested was that incline treadmill training would improve sprint start time, while the ground-based resistive training would not. Corollary hypotheses were that treadmill training would increase stride frequency and ground-based training would not affect kinematics during the sprint start. Thirty-one high school female soccer players (15.7 +/- 0.5 years) were assigned to either treadmill (n = 17) or ground-based (n = 14) training groups and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. The treadmill group utilized incline speed training on a treadmill, while the ground-based group utilized partner band resistance ground-based techniques. Three-dimensional motion analysis was used (4.5 m mark) before and after training to quantify kinematics during the fastest of 3 recorded sprint starts (9.1 m). Both groups decreased average sprint start time from 1.75 +/- 0.12 to 1.68 +/- 0.08 seconds (p < 0.001). Training increased stride frequency (p = 0.030) but not stride length. After training, total vertical pelvic displacement and stride length predicted 62% of the variance in sprint start time for the resistive ground-based group, while stride length and stride frequency accounted for 67% prediction of the variance in sprint start time for the treadmill group. The results of this study indicate that both incline treadmill and resistive ground-based training are effective at improving sprint start speed, although they potentially do so through differing mechanisms. PMID:17685716

  3. Airborne and ground based CCN spectral characteristics: Inferences from CAIPEEX - 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Mercy; Prabha, Thara V.; Malap, Neelam; Resmi, E. A.; Murugavel, P.; Safai, P. D.; Axisa, Duncan; Pandithurai, G.; Dani, K.

    2016-01-01

    A first time comprehensive study of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and associated spectra from both airborne and ground campaigns of the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX) conducted over the rain shadow region of Western Ghats during September and October 2011 is illustrated. Observations of CCN spectra during clean, polluted and highly polluted conditions indicated significant differences between airborne and ground observations. Vertical variation of CCN concentration is illustrated from airborne observations in the clean, polluted and highly polluted conditions with different air mass characteristics. The cloud base CCN number concentrations are three times less than that of the surface measurements at different supersaturations. Diurnal variations of the ground based CCN number concentration and activation diameter showed bimodality. Atmospheric mixing in the wet conditions is mainly through mechanical mixing. The dry conditions favored convective mixing and were dominated by more CCN than the wet conditions. New particle formation and growth events have been observed and were found more often on days with convective mixing. The average critical activation diameter (at 0.6% SS) observed at the ground is approximately 60 nm and availability of a large number of particles below this limit was due to the new particle formation. Observations give convincing evidence that the precipitable water and liquid water path is inversely proportional to surface CCN number concentration, and this relationship is largely dictated by the meteorological conditions.

  4. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. M.; Manyin, M.; Negri, A.

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world s population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025,60% of the world s population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause- effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  5. Evidence of Urban Precipitation Anomalies from Satellite and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Manyin, M.; Negri, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Urbanization is one of the extreme cases of land use change. Most of world's population has moved to urban areas. Although currently only 1.2% of the land is considered urban, the spatial coverage and density of cities are expected to rapidly increase in the near future. It is estimated that by the year 2025, 60% of the world's population will live in cities. Human activity in urban environments also alters weather and climate processes. However, our understanding of urbanization on the total Earth-weather-climate system is incomplete. Recent literature continues to provide evidence that anomalies in precipitation exist over and downwind of major cities. Current and future research efforts are actively seeking to verify these literature findings and understand potential cause-effect relationships. The novelty of this study is that it utilizes rainfall data from multiple satellite data sources (e.g. TRMM precipitation radar, TRMM-geosynchronous-rain gauge merged product, and SSM/I) and ground-based measurements to identify spatial anomalies and temporal trends in precipitation for cities around the world. Early results will be presented and placed within the context of weather prediction, climate assessment, and societal applications.

  6. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  7. Phytophthora infestans Has a Plethora of Phospholipase D Enzymes Including a Subclass That Has Extracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Harold J. G.; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  8. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phymatotrichum, or cotton root rot (CRR), is a fungus currently affecting broadleaf crops including cotton in the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. The ability of CRR to lie dormant in the soil for several years tends to negate the effects of crop rotation, and it remains a problem for cotton...

  9. Evaluation of school-based dental health activities including fluoride mouth-rinsing in Hiraizumi, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohara, S; Kawaguchi, Y; Shinada, K; Sasaki, Y

    2000-06-01

    School-based dental health activities conducted in Hiraizumi over the past 20 years have remarkably improved the dental health status of schoolchildren. For example, DMFT index of 12-year-old children decreased to 1.5 in 1998, one-half that of the national average. School dental health activities, which were focused on dental health education, resulted in an increase of filled teeth rates, a decrease in the number of missing teeth, and a decline in incisor caries (1979-1986). In addition, the introduction of a school-based fluoride mouth-rinsing program (1986 - ) showed a positive effect on the prevention of dental caries; a significant decrease was observed in the overall prevalence of dental caries, particularly in the molars. In Japan it seems advantageous to promote the dental health of schoolchildren by school-based programs that combine dental health examination, dental health education and fluoride mouth-rinsing program. Especially, to prevent dental caries in the mandibular first molars more effectively, it is recommended to start fluoride mouth-rinsing at age 5. PMID:12160185

  10. Comparing ECMWF UV Processor and Aerosol Scheme with Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnulyte, V.; Lindfors, A. V.; Pitkänen, M. R. A.; Lehtinen, K. E.; Morcrette, J. J.; Arola, A. T.

    2014-12-01

    The ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) system offers an alternative approach to provide global UV data products which can support environmental assessments of UV radiation, biological and photochemical impact studies, and to contribute to the global climatology of UV radiation. The ECMWF model includes the effect of aerosols as a part of its radiation transfer calculations. During the first steps of the development of the UV processor, an aerosol climatology was used. In the latest version, however, prognostic aerosols have been coupled with the UV processor which, as a result, provides information about the global UV radiation and can be an alternative to satellite observations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ECMWF UV/aerosol optical depth (AOD) model against ground-based measurements and further develop the UV Processor. The ECMWF shortwave radiative transfer scheme provides the UV radiation at the surface for wavelengths between 280 and 400nm. However, for this analysis, the wavelength ranges 290-320 (UVB) and 320-340 (UVA) were used. This is the first time when a global model such as the ECMWF is evaluated for the performance of AOD at a UV wavelength. The results show that the MACC system generally provides a good representation of the AOD on a monthly basis, showing a realistic seasonal cycle. The model is mostly able to capture major dust load events and also the peak months of biomass burning correctly. When comparing hourly AOD values, the model-measurement agreement is better for biomass burning (CC = 0.90) and dust sites (CC = 0.77) than for urban sites (CC = 0.70). All sites included in the study show a relative mean bias at 340 nm smaller than that at 500 nm, indicating a strong wavelength-dependence in the performance of the AOD in the MACC system. Validating the UV Processor, in all the UV validation sites, the model-measurement ratio decreased with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA). This effect is larger for UVB

  11. First geophysical observations in Sahara by ground-based Lidar and CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuesta, J.; Edouart, D.; Flamant, P. H.; Flamant, C.

    2006-12-01

    Saharan dust 3D spatial distribution and optical/microphysical properties are essential in understanding of Saharan desert radiative budget. Dust properties influence Saharan heat low deepening which, in turn, is believed to affect climate, particularly the West African Monsoon. Moreover, the Saharan desert regroups the world largest dust sources. In order to improve our current knowledge on Saharan dust as well as Saharan heat low dynamics, a new synergetic approach of a ground-based platform TReSS (Transportable Remote Sensing Station) and CALIPSO satellite has been implemented. TReSS has been deployed in Tamanrasset (Algeria) from February to November 2006, in the framework of the AMMA experience. TReSS is an autonomous and high-performance system designed to observe radiative and structural properties of aerosol layers and clouds, as well as atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics. The TReSS payload includes a multi-wavelength elastic/Raman backscatter Mini-Lidar, a sun-photometer and two IR radiometers. Retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles includes several new techniques. Firstly, a new "Two-stream" lidar inversion method has been developed which independently retrieves aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients profiles, therefore providing the proportionality coefficient or "lidar ratio" with altitude. Observations of two opposite-aiming backscatter lidar systems are combined: CALIOP (CALIPSO) and the Mini-Lidar (TReSS). This presentation provides a comparison between Two-stream inverted CALIPSO level 1 data and climatological data. Secondly, nexus between aerosol vertical distribution and optical/microphysical properties is investigated through a new "Lidar & Almucantar synergy" method. It combines vertical information contained in backscatter Lidar soundings and column-integrated aerosol optical/microphysical properties retrieved by sun photometer "Almucantar" inversion. This new algorithm provides a unique

  12. A Methodology for Post Operational Clean Out of a Highly Active Facility Including Solids Behaviour - 12386

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Michael J.; Ward, Tracy R.; Maxwell, Lisa J.

    2012-07-01

    The Highly Active Liquor Evaporation and Storage (HALES) plant at Sellafield handles acidic fission product containing liquor with typical activities of the order of 18x10{sup 9} Bq/ml. A strategy experimental feedback approach has been used to establish a wash regime for the Post Operational Clean Out (POCO) of the oldest storage tanks for this liquor. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for removal of acid insoluble fission product precipitates. Ammonium carbamate and sodium carbonate yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. The proposed wash reagents provide dissolution of caesium phosphomolybdate (CPM) and zirconium molybdate (ZM) solid phases but yields a fine, mobile precipitate of metal carbonates from the Highly Active Liquor (HAL) supernate. Addition of nitric acid to the wash effluent can cause CPM to precipitate where there is sufficient caesium and phosphorous available. Where they are not present (from ZM dissolution) the nitric acid addition initially produces a nitrate precipitate which then re-dissolves, along with the metal carbonates, to give a solid-free solution. The different behaviour of the two solids during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing the rheology of ZM sediments through doping with tellurium or particular organic acids. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for the POCO of HALES Oldside HASTs. AC and SC both yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. However, the different behaviour of the two principle HAL solids, CPM and ZM, during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing its rheology through doping with tellurium or certain

  13. A Methodology for Evaluating the Fidelity of Ground-Based Flight Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeyada, Y.; Hess, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to model the manner in which pilots perceive and utilize visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular cues in a ground-based flight simulator. The study was part of a larger research effort which has the creation of a methodology for determining flight simulator fidelity requirements as its ultimate goal. The study utilized a closed-loop feedback structure of the pilot/simulator system which included the pilot, the cockpit inceptor, the dynamics of the simulated vehicle and the motion system. With the exception of time delays which accrued in visual scene production in the simulator, visual scene effects were not included in this study. The NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator was used in a simple, single-degree of freedom rotorcraft bob-up/down maneuver. Pilot/vehicle analysis and fuzzy-inference identification were employed to study the changes in fidelity which occurred as the characteristics of the motion system were varied over five configurations i The data from three of the five pilots that participated in the experimental study were analyzed in the fuzzy inference identification. Results indicate that both the analytical pilot/vehicle analysis and the fuzzyinference identification can be used to reflect changes in simulator fidelity for the task examined.

  14. A Methodology for Evaluating the Fidelity of Ground-Based Flight Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeyada, Y.; Hess, R. A.

    1999-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was undertaken to model the manner in which pilots perceive and utilize visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular cues in a ground-based flight simulator. The study was part of a larger research effort which has the creation of a methodology for determining flight simulator fidelity requirements as its ultimate goal. The study utilized a closed-loop feedback structure of the pilot/simulator system which included the pilot, the cockpit inceptor, the dynamics of the simulated vehicle and the motion system. With the exception of time delays which accrued in visual scene production in the simulator, visual scene effects were not included in this study. The NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator was used in a simple, single-degree of freedom rotorcraft bob-up/down maneuver. Pilot/vehicle analysis and fuzzy-inference identification were employed to study the changes in fidelity which occurred as the characteristics of the motion system were varied over five configurations. The data from three of the five pilots that participated in the experimental study were analyzed in the fuzzy-inference identification. Results indicate that both the analytical pilot/vehicle analysis and the fuzzy-inference identification can be used to reflect changes in simulator fidelity for the task examined.

  15. Satellite to Ground-based LIDAR Comparisons using MPLNET Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, T.A.; Belcher, L.; Campbell, J.; Spinhirne, J.; Welton, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    The Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) is a network of ground-based lidar systems that provide continuous long-term observations of aerosol and cloud properties at approximately 10 different locations around the globe. Each site in the network uses an elastic scattering lidar co-located with a sunphotometer to provide data products of aerosol optical physical properties. Data products from sites are available on a next-day basis from the MPLNET website. Expansion of the network is based on partnering with research groups interested in joining MPLNET. Results have contributed to a variety of studies including aerosol transport studies and satellite calibration and validation efforts. One of the key motivations for MPLNET is to contribute towards the calibration and validation of satellite-based lidars such as GLAS/ICESAT and CALIPSO. MPLNET is able to provide comparison to several of the key aerosol and cloud CALIPSO data products including: layer height and thickness, optical depth, backscatter and extinction profiles, and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio.

  16. AQUARIUS, the next generation mid-IR detector for ground-based astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Derek; Finger, Gert; Jakob, Gerd; Eschbaumer, Siegfried; Mehrgan, Leander; Meyer, Manfred; Steigmeier, Joerg

    2012-07-01

    ESO has recently funded the development of the AQUARIUS detector at Raytheon Vision Systems, a new mega-pixel Si:As Impurity Band Conduction array for use in ground based astronomical applications at wavelengths between 3 - 28 μm. The array has been designed to have low noise, low dark current, switchable gain and be read out at very high frame rates. It has 64 individual outputs capable of pixel read rates of 3MHz, implying continuous data-rates in excess of 300 Mbytes/second. It is scheduled for deployment into the VISIR instrument at the VLT in 2012, for next generation VLTI instruments and base-lined for METIS, the mid-IR candidate instrument for the E-ELT. A new mid-IR test facility has been developed for AQUARIUS detector development which includes a low thermal background cryostat, high speed cryogenic pre-amplification and high speed data acquisition and detector operation at 5K. We report on all the major performance aspects of this new detector including conversion gain, read noise, dark generation rate, linearity, well capacity, pixel operability, low frequency noise, persistence and electrical cross-talk. We describe the many possible readout modes of this detector and their application. We also report on external issues with the operation of these detectors at such low temperatures. Finally we report on the electronic developments required to operate such a detector at the required high data rates and in a typical mid-IR instrument.

  17. A New Network Modeling Tool for the Ground-based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, B. J.; Chael, E. P.; Young, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Network simulations have long been used to assess the performance of monitoring networks to detect events for such purposes as planning station deployments and network resilience to outages. The standard tool has been the SAIC-developed NetSim package. With correct parameters, NetSim can produce useful simulations; however, the package has several shortcomings: an older language (FORTRAN), an emphasis on seismic monitoring with limited support for other technologies, limited documentation, and a limited parameter set. Thus, we are developing NetMOD (Network Monitoring for Optimal Detection), a Java-based tool designed to assess the performance of ground-based networks. NetMOD's advantages include: coded in a modern language that is multi-platform, utilizes modern computing performance (e.g. multi-core processors), incorporates monitoring technologies other than seismic, and includes a well-validated default parameter set for the IMS stations. NetMOD is designed to be extendable through a plugin infrastructure, so new phenomenological models can be added. Development of the Seismic Detection Plugin is being pursued first. Seismic location and infrasound and hydroacoustic detection plugins will follow. By making NetMOD an open-release package, it can hopefully provide a common tool that the monitoring community can use to produce assessments of monitoring networks and to verify assessments made by others.

  18. Sounding rocket/ground-based observation campaign to study Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Otsuka, Yuichi; Abe, Takumi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Bernhardt, Paul; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki; Larsen, Miguel; Saito, Akinori; Pfaff, Robert; Ishisaka, Keigo

    2012-07-01

    An observation campaign is under preparation. It is to launch sounding rockets S-520-27 and S-310-42 from Uchinoura Space Center of JAXA, while ground-based instruments measure waves in the ionosphere. The main purpose of the study is to reveal seeding mechanism of Medium-Scale Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (MSTID). The MSTID is enhanced in the summer nighttime of the mid-latitude ionosphere. The MSTID is not only a simple reflection of atmospheric waves to the ionosphere, but includes complicated processes including the electromagnetic coupling of the F- and E-regions, and inter-hemisphere coupling of the ionosphere. We will measure ionospheric parameters such as electron density and electric fields together with neutral winds in the E- and F-regions. TMA and Lithium release experiment will be conducted with S-310-42 and S-520-27 rockets, respectively. The observation campaign is planned in summer 2012 or 2013. In the presentation we will overview characteristics of MSTID, and show plan and current status of the project. We also touch results from the sounding rocket S-520-26 that was launched on January 12, 2012. We will show results of the rocket-ground dual-band beacon experiment.

  19. Steady-state analysis of activated sludge processes with a settler model including sludge compression.

    PubMed

    Diehl, S; Zambrano, J; Carlsson, B

    2016-01-01

    A reduced model of a completely stirred-tank bioreactor coupled to a settling tank with recycle is analyzed in its steady states. In the reactor, the concentrations of one dominant particulate biomass and one soluble substrate component are modelled. While the biomass decay rate is assumed to be constant, growth kinetics can depend on both substrate and biomass concentrations, and optionally model substrate inhibition. Compressive and hindered settling phenomena are included using the Bürger-Diehl settler model, which consists of a partial differential equation. Steady-state solutions of this partial differential equation are obtained from an ordinary differential equation, making steady-state analysis of the entire plant difficult. A key result showing that the ordinary differential equation can be replaced with an approximate algebraic equation simplifies model analysis. This algebraic equation takes the location of the sludge-blanket during normal operation into account, allowing for the limiting flux capacity caused by compressive settling to easily be included in the steady-state mass balance equations for the entire plant system. This novel approach grants the possibility of more realistic solutions than other previously published reduced models, comprised of yet simpler settler assumptions. The steady-state concentrations, solids residence time, and the wastage flow ratio are functions of the recycle ratio. Solutions are shown for various growth kinetics; with different values of biomass decay rate, influent volumetric flow, and substrate concentration. PMID:26476681

  20. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  1. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments including activation energies and mathematical modeling of methyl halide dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, O.; Prager, M.; Grimm, H.; Buchsteiner, A.; Wischnewski, A.

    2007-09-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were carried out using the multichopper time-of-flight spectrometer V3 at the Hahn-Meitner Institut, Germany and the backscattering spectrometer at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. Activation energies for CH3X, X =F, Cl, Br, and I, were obtained. In combination with results from previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments the data were taken to describe the dynamics of the halides in terms of two different models, the single particle model and the coupling model. Coupled motions of methyl groups seem to explain the dynamics of the methyl fluoride and chloride; however, the coupling vanishes with the increase of the mass of the halide atom in CH3Br and CH3I.

  2. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  3. Investigation of otolith responses using ground based vestibular research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correia, Manning J.; TABARACCI

    1989-01-01

    The general goal was to examine tilt sensitivity of horizontal semicircular canal afferents. Computer programs were tested which controlled the short axis centrifuge at the Vestibular Research Facility, acquired action potentials and produced data reduction analyses including histograms and gain and phase calculations. A pre-amplifier was also developed for the acquisition of action potentials. The data were gathered that can be used to contribute toward the understanding of the tilt sensitivity of semicircular canal afferents in the unanesthetized gerbil preparation.

  4. Ground-based astronomical instrument for planetary protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Richard L.; Bennett, Dave; Bold, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    Planetary protection consists of the measurement and characterization of near-earth objects including earth threatening asteroids and earth orbiting debris. The Lockheed Martin STAR Labs in Palo Alto California is developing new astronomical instruments for use in planetary protection. The observation of asteroids is standard for astronomical facilities and there are available instruments designed with this specific science mission in mind. Orbital debris observation and characterization has a somewhat different set of requirements and includes large fields of view with simultaneous spectro-polarimetric data on multiple closely spaced objects. Orbital debris is comprised of spent rocket bodies, rocket fairing covers, paint chips, various satellite components, debris from satellite collisions and explosions and nonoperational satellites. The debris is present in all orbital planes from Low Earth orbit out to the geosynchronous graveyard orbit. We concentrate our effort on the geosynchronous and nearby orbits. This is because typical groundbased astronomical telescopes are built to track at sidereal rates and not at the 1 degree per second rates that are required to track low earth orbiting objects. The orbital debris materials include aluminum, mylar, solar cell materials, composite matrix material and other materials that are used in the fabrication of satellites and launch vehicles. These materials typically have spectral features in different wavebands than asteroids which are mostly composed of materials with molecular absorption bands such as in H2O. This will drive an orbital debris material identification instrument to wavebands and resolutions that are typically not used in asteroid observations.

  5. Strategies for Ground Based Testing of Manned Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Jeff; Peacock, Mike; Gill, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    Integrated testing (such as Multi-Element Integrated Test (MEIT)) is critical to reducing risks and minimizing problems encountered during assembly, activation, and on-orbit operation of large, complex manned spacecraft. Provides the best implementation of "Test Like You Fly:. Planning for integrated testing needs to begin at the earliest stages of Program definition. Program leadership needs to fully understand and buy in to what integrated testing is and why it needs to be performed. As Program evolves and design and schedules mature, continually look for suitable opportunities to perform testing where enough components are together in one place at one time. The benefits to be gained are well worth the costs.

  6. BENEFITS OF GROUND-BASED PHOTOMETRIC FOLLOW-UP FOR TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANETS DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER AND CoRoT

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, Knicole D.; Ford, Eric B.

    2009-09-20

    Currently, over 40 transiting planets have been discovered by ground-based photometric surveys, and space-based missions such as Kepler and CoRoT are expected to detect hundreds more. Follow-up photometric observations from the ground will play an important role in constraining both orbital and physical parameters for newly discovered planets, especially those with small radii (R{sub p} {approx}< 4R{sub +}) and/or intermediate-to-long orbital periods (P{approx}> 30 days). Here, we simulate transit light curves (LCs) from Kepler-like photometry and ground-based observations in the near-infrared (NIR) to determine how jointly modeling space-based and ground-based LCs can improve measurements of the transit duration and planet-star radius ratio. We find that adding observations of at least one ground-based transit to space-based observations can significantly improve the accuracy for measuring the transit duration and planet-star radius ratio of small planets (R{sub p} {approx}< 4R{sub +}) in long-period ({approx}1 year) orbits, largely thanks to the reduced effect of limb darkening in the NIR. We also demonstrate that multiple ground-based observations are needed to gain a substantial improvement in the measurement accuracy for small planets with short orbital periods ({approx}3 days). Finally, we consider the role that higher ground-based precisions will play in constraining parameter measurements for typical Kepler targets. Our results can help inform the priorities of transit follow-up programs (including both primary and secondary transit of planets discovered with Kepler and CoRoT), leading to improved constraints for transit durations, planet sizes, and orbital eccentricities.

  7. Ground-Based Investigations with the Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsworth, Ronald L.; Mattison, Edward; Vessot, Robert F. C.

    2001-01-01

    The room temperature hydrogen maser is an active atomic oscillator used as a high-frequency-stability local oscillator for radio astronomy, metrology, and spacecraft navigation, and in tests of fundamental physics. The cryogenic hydrogen maser (CHM) operates at 0.5 K, employing superfluid helium-coated walls to store the masing hydrogen atoms. We are investigating whether the CHM may provide better frequency stability than the room temperature hydrogen maser: one to three orders of magnitude improvement may be possible because of greatly reduced thermal noise and larger signal power. Exceptional frequency stability will be required for spacecraft tracking in future deep-space missions, for space-based tests of relativity and gravitation, and for local (i.e., flywheel) oscillators used with absolute frequency standards such as laser-cooled atomic fountains and linear ion traps. These new devices are passive high-resolution frequency discriminators. Alone, they cannot function as superior atomic clocks; their effective operation depends on being integrated with an active local oscillator with excellent short term stability - such as that possible with the CHM.

  8. Integration between ground based and satellite SAR data in landslide mapping: The San Fratello case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardi, Federica; Frodella, William; Ciampalini, Andrea; Bianchini, Silvia; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Gigli, Giovanni; Fanti, Riccardo; Moretti, Sandro; Basile, Giuseppe; Casagli, Nicola

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of the integration of PSI (Persistent Scatterer Interferometry) and GB-InSAR (Ground-based Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) for landslide hazard mitigation was evaluated for mapping and monitoring activities of the San Fratello landslide (Sicily, Italy). Intense and exceptional rainfall events are the main factors that triggered several slope movements in the study area, which is susceptible to landslides, because of its steep slopes and silty-clayey sedimentary cover. In the last three centuries, the town of San Fratello was affected by three large landslides, developed in different periods: the oldest one occurred in 1754, damaging the northeastern sector of the town; in 1922 a large landslide completely destroyed a wide area in the western hillside of the town. In this paper, the attention is focussed on the most recent landslide that occurred on 14 February 2010: in this case, the phenomenon produced the failure of a large sector of the eastern hillside, causing severe damages to buildings and infrastructures. In particular, several slow-moving rotational and translational slides occurred in the area, making it suitable to monitor ground instability through different InSAR techniques. PS-InSAR™ (permanent scatterers SAR interferometry) techniques, using ERS-1/ERS-2, ENVISAT, RADARSAT-1, and COSMO-SkyMed SAR images, were applied to analyze ground displacements during pre- and post-event phases. Moreover, during the post-event phase in March 2010, a GB-InSAR system, able to acquire data continuously every 14 min, was installed collecting ground displacement maps for a period of about three years, until March 2013. Through the integration of space-borne and ground-based data sets, ground deformation velocity maps were obtained, providing a more accurate delimitation of the February 2010 landslide boundary, with respect to the carried out traditional geomorphological field survey. The integration of GB-InSAR and PSI techniques proved to

  9. Ground-based VLBI observations of orbiters and landers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimo, G.; Duev, D.; Molera Calves, G.; Bocanegra Bohamon, T.; Pogrebenko, S.; Gurvits, L.

    2015-10-01

    Phase referencing near-field VLBI observations and radial Doppler measurements of spacecraft provide ultra-precise estimates of spacecraft state vectors. These measurements can be used for a variety of scientific applications, both fundamental and applied, including planetary science, improvement of ephemerides, ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems, gravimetry, spacecraft orbit determination, and fundamental physics. Precise determination of the lateral position of spacecraft on the celestial sphere is the main deliverable of the Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE). This technique is complementary to radio science experiments and addresses those areas of spacecraft mission science objectives that require accurate estimation of spacecraft state vector.

  10. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  11. Ozone control of biological activity during Earth's history, including the KT catastrophe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    There have been brief periods since the beginning of the Cambrian some 600 m.y. ago when mass extinctions destroyed a significant fraction of living species. The most widely studied of these events is the catastrophe at the KT boundary that ended the long dominance of the dinosaurs. In addition to mass extinctions, there is another profound discontinuity in the history of Earth's biota, the explosion of life at the end of the Precambrian era which is an episode that is not explained well at all. For some 3 b.y. before the Cambrian, life had been present on Earth, but maintained a low level of activity which is an aspect of the biota that is puzzling, especially during the last two-thirds of that period. During the last 2 b.y. before the Cambrian, conditions at the Earth's surface were suitable for a burgeoning of the biota, according to most criteria: the oceans neither boiled nor were fozen solid during this time, and the atmosphere contained sufficient O for the development of animals. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that mass extinctions and the lackluster behavior of the Precambrian biota share a common cause: an inadequate amount of ozone in the atmosphere.

  12. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  13. Ground-based tests of JEM-EUSO components at the Telescope Array site, "EUSO-TA"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    We are conducting tests of optical and electronics components of JEMEUSO at the Telescope Array site in Utah with a ground-based "EUSO-TA" detector. The tests will include an engineering validation of the detector, cross-calibration of EUSO-TA with the TA fluorescence detector and observations of air shower events. Also, the proximity of the TA's Electron Light Source will allow for convenient use of this calibration device. In this paper, we report initial results obtained with the EUSO-TA telescope.

  14. Satellite-Model-Ground-based Inter-Comparisons (WG-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AERO-SAT is an international consortium of experts on aerosol remote sensing from ground and space. This initiative was established in 2013 (1) to accelerate the exchange of ideas and concepts and (2) to elevate the capabilities of satellite sensorsretrieval (aerosol) products, which are needed to constrain aerosol processing in and assist in evaluations of global modeling. The main goal of the meeting is to substantiate and invigorate the five AEROSAT working groups. On each of those five topics dedicated working groups are building up and will report on their initial activities followed by further related presentations and ample time for discussions. Organizers of the meeting held September 27-28, 2014 would like to post the presentations to a website.

  15. Automated Ground-based Time-lapse Camera Monitoring of West Greenland ice sheet outlet Glaciers: Challenges and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J.; Lewinter, A.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring Greenland outlet glaciers using remotely sensed data has drawn a great attention in earth science communities for decades and time series analysis of sensory data has provided important variability information of glacier flow by detecting speed and thickness changes, tracking features and acquiring model input. Thanks to advancements of commercial digital camera technology and increased solid state storage, we activated automatic ground-based time-lapse camera stations with high spatial/temporal resolution in west Greenland outlet and collected one-hour interval data continuous for more than one year at some but not all sites. We believe that important information of ice dynamics are contained in these data and that terrestrial mono-/stereo-photogrammetry can provide theoretical/practical fundamentals in data processing along with digital image processing techniques. Time-lapse images over periods in west Greenland indicate various phenomenon. Problematic is rain, snow, fog, shadows, freezing of water on camera enclosure window, image over-exposure, camera motion, sensor platform drift, and fox chewing of instrument cables, and the pecking of plastic window by ravens. Other problems include: feature identification, camera orientation, image registration, feature matching in image pairs, and feature tracking. Another obstacle is that non-metric digital camera contains large distortion to be compensated for precise photogrammetric use. Further, a massive number of images need to be processed in a way that is sufficiently computationally efficient. We meet these challenges by 1) identifying problems in possible photogrammetric processes, 2) categorizing them based on feasibility, and 3) clarifying limitation and alternatives, while emphasizing displacement computation and analyzing regional/temporal variability. We experiment with mono and stereo photogrammetric techniques in the aide of automatic correlation matching for efficiently handling the enormous

  16. Differences in Lifestyles Including Physical Activity According to Sexual Orientation among Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    YOON, Jin-Ho; SO, Wi-Young

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the present study was to examine differences in lifestyle factors such as physical activity among homosexual (gay or lesbian), bisexual, and heterosexual Korean adolescents. Methods The sample consisted of 74,186 adolescents from grades 7—12 (ages 12—18) who participated in the 8th annual Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey in 2012. Of this sample, only 11,829 provided enough information regarding their romantic and sexual experiences to define them as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or heterosexual. From this information, males were divided into gay (n = 323), bisexual (n = 243), and heterosexual (n = 6,501) groups, and females were divided into lesbian (n = 208), bisexual (n = 113), and heterosexual (n = 4,441) groups. Differences in lifestyle factors according to sexual orientation were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Results Males showed significant differences by sexual orientation group in terms of frequency of smoking (P = 0.029), alcohol consumption (P < 0.001), muscular strength exercises (P = 0.020), and walking for at least 10 minutes per week (P < 0.001). Females showed significant differences by sexual orientation group in terms of frequency of smoking (P < 0.001), alcohol consumption (P < 0.001), vigorous physical exercise (P < 0.001), moderate physical exercise (P < 0.001), and muscular strength exercises (P < 0.001), as well as for self-reported mental stress (P < 0.001). Conclusion We concluded those gay and bisexual males and lesbian and bisexual females had significant lifestyle differences as compared with heterosexual adolescents. This effect was stronger for females than for males. PMID:26060636

  17. RADIO PROPERTIES OF LOW-REDSHIFT BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI INCLUDING EXTENDED RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Rafter, Stephen E.; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Wiita, Paul J.

    2011-03-15

    We present a study of the extended radio emission in a sample of 8434 low-redshift (z < 0.35) broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. To calculate the jet and lobe contributions to the total radio luminosity, we have taken the 846 radio core sources detected in our previous study of this sample and performed a systematic search in the FIRST database for extended radio emission that is likely associated with the optical counterparts. We found that 51 out of 846 radio core sources have extended emission (>4'' from the optical AGN) that is positively associated with the AGN, and we have identified an additional 12 AGNs with extended radio emission but no detectable radio core emission. Among these 63 AGNs, we found 6 giant radio galaxies, with projected emission exceeding 750 kpc in length, and several other AGNs with unusual radio morphologies also seen in higher redshift surveys. The optical spectra of many of the extended sources are similar to those of typical broad-line radio galaxy spectra, having broad H{alpha} emission lines with boxy profiles and large M{sub BH}. With extended emission taken into account, we find strong evidence for a bimodal distribution in the radio-loudness parameter R ({identical_to}{nu}{sub radio} L{sub radio}/{nu}{sub opt} L{sub opt}), where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the extended sources, with a dividing line at log(R) {approx}1.75. This dividing line ensures that these are indeed the most radio-loud AGNs, which may have different or extreme physical conditions in their central engines when compared to the more numerous radio-quiet AGNs.

  18. Comparison of glyoxal, BrO, and IO vertical profiles derived from both ground-based and airborne MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean; Volkamer, Rainer; Baidar, Sunil; Dix, Barbara; Koenig, Theodore; Ortega, Ivan; Sinreich, Roman; van Roozendael, Michel; Hendrick, Francois; Kinnison, Doug

    2015-04-01

    The information content of ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals is assessed by collocated aircraft measurements for a ship MAX-DOAS setup over the Eastern tropical Pacific Ocean (TORERO RF17), and a mountain-top MAX-DOAS setup at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (CONTRAST RF17). During both case studies the CU airborne MAX-DOAS (AMAX-DOAS) instrument aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft measured profiles of glyoxal, BrO, and IO with 12-20 degrees of freedom and up to 500 m vertical resolution. The TORERO field campaign took place in 2012, while CONTRAST in 2014; both campaigns covered the months of January and February. Additional measurements aboard the aircraft helped to provide information/validation of the AMAX-DOAS derived profiles, such as in-situ water vapor from the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL), in-situ hydrocarbon measurements from the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), and aerosol information constrained by the Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS). The AMAX-DOAS profiles are compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS inversions. The latter explores the effect of using either the measured differential slant column density (dSCD) or SCD as input to the optimal estimation inversion, where SCD = dSCD + SCD_ref. SCD_ref is the residual column amount of the trace gas contained within the reference spectrum. For the AMAX-DOAS data, the values of SCD_ref were actively minimized, while SCD_ref is usually unknown for ground-based MAX-DOAS retrievals. In absence of independent measurements to constrain SCD_ref, the current state-of-the-art with ground-based MAX-DOAS applications is to use dSCDs as input to the inversion. Here we assess the effect of uncertain SCD_ref for ground-based MAX-DOAS profiles in form of a sensitivity study. Additionally for the ground-based data, different methods are compared for the determination of SCD_ref: 1) the collocated aircraft profiles described above present the opportunity to forward calculate the SCD

  19. On the weighting of SABER temperature profiles for comparison with ground based hydroxyl rotational temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, William; Mulligan, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Kinetic temperature profiles are retrieved from limb-emission radiance measurements of CO2 at 15 and 4.3 um by the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite. Profiles extend from about 20-120km and measurements are available since the spacecraft launch in Dec-2001. Hydroxyl (6-2) band rotational temperatures are measured using a ground-based scanning spectrometer at Davis station, Antarctica (68°S, 78°E). Measurements are available each year since 1995 on nights between early February and late October, when the sun is more than 6° below the horizon. In order to compare temperatures from these two instruments we must derive hydroxyl layer equivalent temperatures for the SABER profiles using a weighting function which represents the hydroxyl layer profile. In this study, we examine a number of different weighting profiles to determine the best equivalent to hydroxyl nightly average temperatures at Davis. These profiles include (1) the customary Gaussian peaked at 87km and width 8km [Baker and Stair, 1988 :Physica Scripta. 37 611-622], (2) the layer profile derived from WINDIIUARS hydroxyl height profiles [She and Lowe, 1998 :JASTP 60, 1573-1583], (3) layer profiles derived from the hydroxyl volume emission rate (VER) from the SABER OH-B channel at 1.6um, which contains the Meinel OH(4-2) and OH(5-3) bands and (4) a Gaussian fitted to the SABER hydroxyl VER peak. The comparison is made with approximately 2500 SABER retrievals from overpasses within 500km of Davis station, and with solar zenith angle >97°, which have coincident hydroxyl temperature measurements over the 8 winters between 2002 and 2009. Due to the satellite 60 day yaw cycle the sampling over Davis has occurred in approximately the same three time intervals each year; between days 75-140, 196-262 and 323-014, however the latter interval is entirely rejected on the solar zenith

  20. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development...

  1. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development...

  2. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development...

  3. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development...

  4. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... creation and economic development activities? (a) A Tribe may conduct job market assessments within its NEW Program. These might include the following: (1) Consultation with the Tribe's economic development...

  5. Space power by ground-based laser transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for providing power to space vehicles consists of using high-power CW lasers on the ground to beam power to photovoltaic receivers in space. Such large lasers could be located at cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations, and use large mirrors with adaptive optical correction to reduce the beam spread due to diffraction or atmospheric turbulence. This can result in lower requirements for battery storage, due to continuous illumination of arrays even during periods of shadow by the earth, and higher power output, due to the higher efficiency of photovoltaic arrays under laser illumination compared to solar and the ability to achieve higher intensities of illumination. Applications include providing power for satellites during eclipse, providing power to resurrect satellites which are failing due to solar array degradation, powering orbital transfer vehicles or lunar transfer shuttles, and providing night power to a solar array on the moon.

  6. Kepler Ground-Based Photometry Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Timothy M.; Latham, D.; Howell, S.; Everett, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report on our efforts to evaluate the feasibility of using the 4-Shooter CCD camera on the 48-inch reflector at the Whipple Observatory to carry out a multi-band photometric survey of the Kepler target region. We also include recommendations for future work. We were assigned 36 nights with the &hooter during 2003 for this feasibility study. Most of the time during the first two dozen nights was dedicated to the development of procedures, test exposures, and a reconnaissance across the Kepler field. The final 12 nights in September and October 2003 were used for "production" observing in the middle of the Kepler field using the full complement of seven filters (SDSS u, g, r, i, z, plus our special Gred and D51 intermediate-band filters). Nine of these 12 nights were clear and photometric, and production observations were obtained at 109 pointings, corresponding to 14.6 square degrees.

  7. Shape memory alloys for astronomical instrumentation: space and ground-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Zanetti, F.; Passaretti, F.; Villa, E.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2012-09-01

    This paper wants to illustrate possible applications of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) as functional devices for space and ground based application in Instrumentations for Astronomy. Thermal activated Shape Memory Alloys are materials able to recover their original shape, after an external deformation, if heated above a characteristic temperature. If the recovery of the shape is completely or partially prevented by the presence of constraints, the material can generate recovery stress. Thanks to this feature, these materials can be positively exploited in Smart Structures if properly embedded into host materials. Some technological processes developed for an ecient use of SMA-based actuators embedded in smart structures tailored to astronomical instrumentation will be presented here. Some possible modeling approaches of the actuators behavior will be addressed taking into account trade- offs between detailed analysis and overall performance prediction as a function of the computational time. The Material characterization procedure adopted for the constitutive laws implementation will be described as well. Deformable composite mirrors,1 opto-mechanical mounting with superelastic kinematic behavior and damping of launch loads onto optical element2 are feasible applications that will be deeply investigated in this paper.

  8. First measurements of the indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, G.; Eberhard, W. L.; Lane, D. E.; Previdi, M.

    2002-12-01

    We demonstrate first measurements of the aerosol indirect effect using ground-based remote sensors at a continental US site. The response of a cloud to changes in the aerosol loading is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud drop effective radius for a relative change in aerosol extinction under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path. This is done in a single column of air at a temporal resolution of 20 s (spatial resolution of ~100 m). Cloud drop effective radius is derived from a cloud radar, microwave radiometer, and where applicable, a surface measurement of the accumulation mode aerosol concentration. Aerosol extinction is measured below cloud base by a Raman lidar. The method differs from satellite remote-sensing measurements of the indirect effect in that it samples at scales appropriate to cloud drop activation, i.e., the large eddy scale, and is therefore process-based, rather than statistically-based. The method is demonstrated for non-precipitating ice-free clouds at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site. Strengths and weaknesses of the approach are discussed and recommendations are made for measurement strategies that will improve our ability to quantify this important climatic effect.

  9. Compact mid-infrared DIAL lidar for ground-based and airborne pipeline monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtiarev, Egor V.; Geiger, Allen R.; Richmond, Richard D.

    2003-04-01

    We report the progress in the development of a compact mid-infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for ground-based and airborne monitoring of leaks in natural gas pipeline systems. This sensor, named Lidar II, weighs approximately 30 kg (70 lbs) and occupies a volume of 0.08 m3 (3.5 ft3). Lidar II can be used on the ground in a topographic mode or in a look-down mode from a helicopter platform. The 10-Hz pulse repetition rate and burst-mode averaging currently limit the airborne inspection speed to 30 km/h. The Lidar II laser transmitter employs an intracavity optical parametric oscillator. Wavelength tuning is accomplished through two mechanisms: a servo-controlled crystal rotation for slow and broad-band tuning and a fast piezo-activated wavelength shifter for on-line/off-line switching in less than 10 ms. The sensor operates in the 3.2-3.5-μm band with the primary focus on hydrocarbons and volatile organics. In the pipeline inspection work, the two main targets are methane and ethane, the latter chemical being important in preventing false positives. Initial results of Lidar II testing on actual pipeline leaks are reported. To supplement the mapping capabilities of Lidar II with range-resolved information, a short-range (less than 300 m) aerosol backscatter lidar is currently under development.

  10. FINDING EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE USING GROUND-BASED HIGH-DISPERSION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Snellen, I. A. G.; Le Poole, R.; Brogi, M.; Birkby, J.; De Kok, R. J.

    2013-02-20

    Exoplanet observations promise one day to unveil the presence of extraterrestrial life. Atmospheric compounds in strong chemical disequilibrium would point to large-scale biological activity just as oxygen and methane do in the Earth's atmosphere. The cancellation of both the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin missions means that it is unlikely that a dedicated space telescope to search for biomarker gases in exoplanet atmospheres will be launched within the next 25 years. Here we show that ground-based telescopes provide a strong alternative for finding biomarkers in exoplanet atmospheres through transit observations. Recent results on hot Jupiters show the enormous potential of high-dispersion spectroscopy to separate the extraterrestrial and telluric signals, making use of the Doppler shift of the planet. The transmission signal of oxygen from an Earth-twin orbiting a small red dwarf star is only a factor of three smaller than that of carbon monoxide recently detected in the hot Jupiter {tau} Booetis b, albeit such a star will be orders of magnitude fainter. We show that if Earth-like planets are common, the planned extremely large telescopes can detect oxygen within a few dozen transits. Ultimately, large arrays of dedicated flux-collector telescopes equipped with high-dispersion spectrographs can provide the large collecting area needed to perform a statistical study of life-bearing planets in the solar neighborhood.

  11. Ionospheric scintillations at Guilin detected by GPS ground-based and radio occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yuhua

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of ionospheric scintillations with S4 ⩾ 0.2 was studied using GPS measurements at Guilin, China (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly. The results are presented for data collected from January 2009 to March 2010. The results show that nighttime amplitude scintillations only took place in February and March of the considered years, while daytime amplitude scintillations occurred in August and December of 2009. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, TEC (Total Electron Content) depletions, and ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations always took place simultaneously for most of the GPS satellites which appeared over Guilin in different azimuth directions. Ground-based GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively. Moreover, strong daytime amplitude scintillations may be associated with the plasma density enhancements in ionospheric E region caused by the Perseid and Geminid meteor shower activities.

  12. The Palomar kernel-phase experiment: testing kernel phase interferometry for ground-based astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Benjamin; Tuthill, Peter; Hinkley, Sasha; Ireland, Michael J.; Greenbaum, Alexandra; Latyshev, Alexey; Monnier, John D.; Martinache, Frantz

    2016-01-01

    At present, the principal limitation on the resolution and contrast of astronomical imaging instruments comes from aberrations in the optical path, which may be imposed by the Earth's turbulent atmosphere or by variations in the alignment and shape of the telescope optics. These errors can be corrected physically, with active and adaptive optics, and in post-processing of the resulting image. A recently developed adaptive optics post-processing technique, called kernel-phase interferometry, uses linear combinations of phases that are self-calibrating with respect to small errors, with the goal of constructing observables that are robust against the residual optical aberrations in otherwise well-corrected imaging systems. Here, we present a direct comparison between kernel phase and the more established competing techniques, aperture masking interferometry, point spread function (PSF) fitting and bispectral analysis. We resolve the α Ophiuchi binary system near periastron, using the Palomar 200-Inch Telescope. This is the first case in which kernel phase has been used with a full aperture to resolve a system close to the diffraction limit with ground-based extreme adaptive optics observations. Excellent agreement in astrometric quantities is found between kernel phase and masking, and kernel phase significantly outperforms PSF fitting and bispectral analysis, demonstrating its viability as an alternative to conventional non-redundant masking under appropriate conditions.

  13. Monitoring aseismic surface creep along the North Anatolian Fault (Turkey) using ground-based LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, V.; Altunel, E.; Cakir, Z.

    2011-04-01

    We studied the surface creep along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), one of the most seismically active structures of the eastern Mediterranean, by using a ground-based light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system at the Ismetpasa and Destek sections. Aseismic surface creep has been known to exist at Ismetpasa since the 1970s, but it has not been previously reported for the Destek site. Three manmade walls across the fault were monitored for 3 yrs between June 2007 and November 2009 using LIDAR. The surveys revealed that a significant amount of aseismic strain is being continuously released along these sections of the NAF: 6.8-10.0 ± 4.0 mm/yr and 9.1-10.1 ± 4.0 mm/yr at two sites near Ismetpasa and 6.0-7.2 ± 4.0 mm/yr at Destek. Despite this, these fault segments are still capable of generating large earthquakes since 50-70% of the yearly slip (i.e., 20-25 mm/yr) still accumulates on the fault, as was demonstrated by the well-known 20th century earthquake sequence of 1939-1999.

  14. Ground-based spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric gas composition near Saint Petersburg (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyev, Yury; Virolainen, Yana; Makarova, Maria; Poberovsky, Anatoly; Polyakov, Alexander; Ionov, Dmitry; Osipov, Sergey; Imhasin, Hamud

    2016-05-01

    Since early 2009, high-resolution solar absorption spectra have been recorded at the Peterhof station (59.88°N, 29.82°E) of Saint Petersburg State University located in the suburbs of St. Petersburg. Measurements are made with the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) system, which consists of Bruker IFS 125HR instrument (with maximum spectral resolution of 0.005 cm-1) and self-designed solar tracker. We derived total column (TC) of a dozen of atmospheric gases from recorded spectra and performed the error analysis of these retrievals. Furthermore, we analysed the temporal variability of the important climatically active gases, such as H2O, CH4, O3, CO, and NO2 near St. Petersburg and compared our retrievals with independent ground-based and satellite data, as well as with the results of EMAC model numerical simulations. Currently, the results of our measurements and the measuring system are under validation for entering the international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC).

  15. Activity of tigecycline tested against a global collection of Enterobacteriaceae, including tetracycline-resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Fritsche, Thomas R; Strabala, Patty A; Sader, Helio S; Dowzicky, Michael J; Jones, Ronald N

    2005-07-01

    Steadily increasing resistance among the Enterobacteriaceae to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole has compromised the utility of these commonly used antimicrobial classes for many community- or hospital-acquired infections. The development of tigecycline, the sentinel representative of a novel class of broad-spectrum agents (the glycylcyclines), represents an important milestone in addressing this critical need. Resistance to tigecycline might be expected to occur via the same mechanisms that produce tetracycline resistance; however, tigecycline remains stable and largely unaffected by the commonly occurring efflux and ribosomal protection resistance mechanisms. In this study, an international collection of Enterobacteriaceae (11327 isolates; 32.8% tetracycline-resistant) from global surveillance studies (2000-2004) were evaluated against tigecycline and other comparator antimicrobials. Although the most active agents were the carbapenems and aminoglycosides (97.5-99.7% susceptible), tigecycline displayed high potency (MIC50 and MIC90, 0.25 and 1 microg/mL) with 95.7% of all strains being inhibited at < or =2 microg/mL. Despite higher MIC values observed with Serratia spp. and Proteae, between 90.5% and 97.5% of isolates were inhibited by < or =4 microg/mL of tigecycline. Tetracycline-resistant populations demonstrated only modest decreases in potency to tigecycline, which appeared to be species-dependent (up to 2-fold only for Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., and Panteoa agglomerans; and up to 4-fold for Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., and Citrobacter spp.). Among E. coli (263 isolates) and Klebsiella spp. (356) that meet recognized screening definitions for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production, 100.0% and 94.4% were inhibited by tigecycline at 2 microg/mL, respectively. These findings confirm that tigecycline exhibits potency, breadth of spectrum, and stability to the

  16. Observation of Passive and Explosive Emissions at Stromboli with a Ground-based Hyperspectral TIR Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smekens, J. F.; Mathieu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific imaging techniques have progressed at a fast pace in the recent years, thanks in part to great improvements in detector technology, and through our ability to process large amounts of complex data using sophisticated software. Broadband thermal cameras are ubiquitously used for permanent monitoring of volcanic activity, and have been used in a multitude of scientific applications, from tracking ballistics to studying the thermal evolution lava flow fields and volcanic plumes. In parallel, UV cameras are now used at several volcano observatories to quantify daytime sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions at very high frequency. In this work we present the results the first deployment of a ground-based Thermal Infrared (TIR) Hyperspectral Imaging System (Telops Hyper-Cam LW) for the study of passive and explosive volcanic activity at Stromboli volcano, Italy. The instrument uses a Michelson spectrometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry to produce hyperspectral datacubes of a scene (320x256 pixels) in the range 7.7-11.8 μm, with a spectral resolution of up to 0.25 cm-1 and at frequencies of ~10 Hz. The activity at Stromboli is characterized by explosions of small magnitude, often containing significant amounts of gas and ash, separated by periods of quiescent degassing of 10-60 minutes. With our dataset, spanning about 5 days of monitoring, we are able to detect and track temporal variations of SO2 and ash emissions during both daytime and nighttime. It ultimately allows for the quantification of the mass of gas and ash ejected during and between explosive events. Although the high price and power consumption of the instrument are obstacles to its deployment as a monitoring tool, this type of data sets offers unprecedented insight into the dynamic processes taking place at Stromboli, and could lead to a better understanding of the eruptive mechanisms at persistently active systems in general.

  17. Ground-based follow-up of Solar System objects detected by Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillot, W.; Carry, B.; Berthier, J.; David, P.; Devillepoix, H.; Hestroffer, D.

    2014-07-01

    In the frame of the DPAC consortium preparing the Gaia mission, a specific follow-up activity has been set up in order to ensure best scientific return related to solar-system-object (SSO) science. This activity encompasses a system of alerts for newly detected objects provided by CNES, the French data center in charge of the Solar System data processing, and IMCCE, to organize and publish the alerts, and to retrieve the objects astrometry and feed the Minor Planet Center database. We are expecting in particular the detection of new near-Earth objects (NEO) at low solar elongation, or even inner-Earth objects. Owing to its observing mode, the satellite will not be able to monitor these objects after discovery and they could be lost. It is thus important to consolidate and improve their orbital parameters. This is the objective of the SSO ground-based follow-up. Once the objective is reached, it is possible to update the auxiliary database of orbital elements used within the Gaia data reduction pipeline for identifying the known SSOs and to allow Gaia to subsequently identify these objects properly during its mission. In order to reach these goals we have carried out two main activities: -- We have developed a pipeline for processing the Gaia raw data that will be received, and for disseminating only the topocentric data useful for observers in an automatized way -- We have set up a worldwide network of observing stations, the Gaia-FUN-SSO network (shortly described at https://www.imcce.fr/gaia-fun-sso/). At this date, 55 observing sites have registered and many participants have already contributed to several training campaigns for NEO observations. We will describe both activities and we will give preliminary results regarding the Gaia Solar System alerts, depending on the status of the triggering system during this early stage of the mission.

  18. Ground based observations of the Cascades2 sounding rocket ionosphere - characterization and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Dahlgren, H.; Ivchenko, N. V.; Nicolls, M. J.; Lynch, K. A.; Mella, M. R.; Kintner, P. M.; Lundberg, E. T.; Lessard, M.; Jones, S.

    2009-12-01

    In support of the Cascades2 program (see Lynch et al. this session) multiple ground-based observatories were recording the auroral conditions on March 20, 2009. In addition to standard all-sky cameras at Poker Flat, Fort Yukon, Kaktovik and Toolik Lake, and meridian spectrographs at Poker Flat, Fort Yukon and Kaktovik, two sets of narrow-field cameras were deployed to Kaktovik and Toolik Lake specifically for the experiment. The Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) was collecting ion and electron density, temperature and velocity profiles in the upleg region of the rocket trajectory. The geomagnetic conditions on March 20, 2009 showed very low activity prior to 10 UT, with a single narrowly defined arc nearly overhead at Fort Yukon (magnetic latitude ~67.3). At 10:15 the arc intensified, and split and showed increased activity with the active arcs drifting northward of Kaktovik (magnetic latitude ~70.8) as the rocket payload overflew the region at 11:10 to 11:15 UT. The increased activity produced only moderate currents with the ground magnetometers at Kaktovik and Fort Yukon recording 150 nT deflection in H. For a significant portion of the flight the rocket overflies a region where arcs are often not aligned along magnetic E-W which is consistent with alfvenic aurora associated with Poleward Boundary Intensifications. We present the characteristics of the ionosphere and auroral emissions along the trajectory of the rocket and how they correlate to the precipitation data recorded by the Cascades2 payload.

  19. Light Pollution: A Threat to Ground-based Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D. R.

    1999-09-01

    Light pollution that accompanies population growth has reduced the effectiveness of several world class observing sites and threatens most others in the world. Recent decades have seen an activist approach to dealing with light pollution issues, led by a few members of the astronomical community. The principal tool for combating light pollution is the local outdoor lighting ordinance designed to protect dark skies by requiring some combination of: a) shielding outdoor lighting so that none of the light is emitted above the horizontal plane, 2) encouraging the use of "astronomy friendly" light sources such as low pressure sodium, and 3) limiting the total amount of outdoor light that is produced. Such measures have been effective in the past, however, in some areas, development is rapidly moving close to world-class observatories; the Canoa Ranch development near Mt. Hopkins in southern Arizona is the most recent highly visible example. More effective measures are needed to protect existing sites in the future. The astronomical community needs to become more aware of the increasing threat to many prime observing sites and become more active in developing effective programs for preserving the dark sky. This is needed not only for the benefit of our profession but also for preserving the heritage of the night sky for future generations.

  20. Ground-Based Correction of Remote-Sensing Spectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alder-Golden, Steven M.; Rochford, Peter; Matthew, Michael; Berk, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Software has been developed for an improved method of correcting for the atmospheric optical effects (primarily, effects of aerosols and water vapor) in spectral images of the surface of the Earth acquired by airborne and spaceborne remote-sensing instruments. In this method, the variables needed for the corrections are extracted from the readings of a radiometer located on the ground in the vicinity of the scene of interest. The software includes algorithms that analyze measurement data acquired from a shadow-band radiometer. These algorithms are based on a prior radiation transport software model, called MODTRAN, that has been developed through several versions up to what are now known as MODTRAN4 and MODTRAN5 . These components have been integrated with a user-friendly Interactive Data Language (IDL) front end and an advanced version of MODTRAN4. Software tools for handling general data formats, performing a Langley-type calibration, and generating an output file of retrieved atmospheric parameters for use in another atmospheric-correction computer program known as FLAASH have also been incorporated into the present soft-ware. Concomitantly with the soft-ware described thus far, there has been developed a version of FLAASH that utilizes the retrieved atmospheric parameters to process spectral image data.

  1. Ground-Based IR Spectroscopy of Mercury for Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing measurements of the Moon and Mercury in the thermal infrared have been plagued with problems due to atmospheric absorption and other effects. Controversial results have been discussed by Nash et al. and by Salisbury et al.. We have developed a technique to obtain thermal infrared spectra of Mercury together with solar and sky spectra in the 8-13 micrometer region suitable for determining the presence or absence of mineralogical features. High-resolution (0.05 cm(exp -1) between data points) spectra were obtained during daylight using the Fourier Transform Spectrograph (FTS) at the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope Facility at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona. The reduced data were independent of any model of the transmission of the Earth's atmosphere and rest on a calibration using sky spectra along the same line-of-sight through the atmosphere as the actual Mercury raw spectrum. This method can be applied at all solar elongation angles including small elongation angles (5 deg or less). The basic sequence and the technique are robust.

  2. Ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Eddy; Stremme, Wolfgang; Bezanilla, Alejandro; Baylon, Jorge; Grutter, Michel; Blumenstock, Thomas; Hase, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Altzomoni is a high altitude station in central Mexico (19.12 N, 98.65 W, 4000 m a.s.l.) for continuous measurements of various atmospheric parameters. It is located within the Izta-Popo National Park and is operated remotely from the UNAM campus. Since May 2012, high resolution solar absorption spectra have been recorded from this site using a FTIR from Bruker (HR120/5) equipped with MCT, InSb and InGaAs detectors and various optical filters. In this contribution we present a detailed description of the measurement site and the instrumental set-up including a record of the instrumental line-shapes (modulation efficiency and phase error) obtained from cell measurements and analyzed with the LINEFIT code. A preliminary analysis of almost two years of spectra recorded at the Altzomoni site resulting in profile retrievals of four NDACC gases O3, CO, HF and HCl is presented. The retrieval code PROFFIT is used and the Averaging Kernels and an error analysis are used to describe the quality of the measurements. The annual cycles in the time series of O3 and CO are presented and discussed, as well as some examples of anomalies due to volcanic gas emissions of HF and HCl are shown. The presented work is part of an effort to certify this station as part of the NDACC international network.

  3. Multisatellite and ground-based observations of transient ULF waves

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Takahashi, K.; Erlandson, R.E. ); Luehr, H. ); Marklund, G.T.; Block, L.P.; Blomberg, L.G. ); Lepping, R.P. )

    1989-03-01

    A unique alignment of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE and Viking satellites with respect to the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross has provided an opportunity to study transient ULF pulsations associated with variations in solar wind plasma density observed by the IMP 8 satellite. These observations were acquired during a relatively quiet period on April 24, 1986, during the Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study (PROMIS) period. An isolated 4-mHz (4-min period) pulsation was detected on the ground which was associated with transverse magnetic field oscillations observed by Viking at a {approximately} 2-R{sub E} altitude above the auroral zone and by CCE at {approximately} 8-R{sub E} in the equatorial plane on nearly the same flux tube. CCE detected a compressional oscillation in the magnetic field with twice the period ({approximately} 10 min) of the transverse waves, and with a waveform nearly identical to an isolated oscillation in the solar wind plasma density measured by IMP 8. The authors conclude that the isolated 10-min oscillation in solar wind plasma density produced magnetic field compression oscillations inside the magnetosphere at the same frequency which also enhanced resonant oscillations at approximately twice the frequency that were already present. The ground magnetic field variations are due to ionospheric Hall currents driven by the electric field of the standing Alfven waves. The time delay between surface and satellite data acquired at different local times supports the conclusion that the periodic solar wind density variation excites a tailward traveling large-scale magnetosphere wave train which excites local field line resonant oscillations. They conclude that these transient magnetic field variations are not associated with magnetic field reconnection or flux transfer events.

  4. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for aiding air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting scheduled arrival times at a metering fix was developed and tested in a real time simulation. The automation aid, referred to as the ground based 4-D descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent-point and speed-profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is used by the air traffic controller to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. A joint simulation was conducted using a piloted simulator and an advanced concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the DA automation aid from both the pilot's and the air traffic controller's perspectives. The results of the piloted simulation are examined. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller issued descent advisories along standard curved path arrival routes, and were able to achieve an arrival time precision of + or - 20 sec at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of the algorithm to improve the predictive accuracy. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for the concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  5. Dust absorption over the ``Great Indian Desert'' inferred using ground-based and satellite remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, K. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.; Srinivasan, J.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Mineral dust is the single largest contributor of natural aerosols over land. Dust aerosols exhibit high variability in their radiative effects because their composition varies locally. This arises because of the regional distinctiveness of the soil characteristics as well as the accumulation of other aerosol species, such as black carbon, on dust while airborne. To accurately estimate the climate impact of dust, spatial and temporal distribution of its radiative properties are essential. However, this is poorly understood over many regions of the world, including the Indian region. In this paper, infrared (IR) radiance (10.5-12.5 μm) acquired from METEOSAT-5 satellite (˜5-km resolution) is used to retrieve dust aerosol characteristics over the "Great Indian Desert" and adjacent regions. The infrared radiance depression on account of the presence of dust in the atmosphere has been used as an index of dust load, called the Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI). Simultaneous, ground-based spectral optical depths estimated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (using a multiwavelength solar radiometer) are used along with the IDDI to infer the dust absorption. The inferred single scattering albedo of dust was in the range of 0.88-0.94. We infer that dust over the Indian desert is of more absorbing nature (compared with African dust). Seasonally, the absorption is least in summer and most in winter. The large dust absorption leads to lower atmospheric warming of 0.7-1.2 K day-1.

  6. Perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the lower ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmetieva, N. V.; Grigoriev, G. I.; Tolmacheva, A. V.

    We present a new perspective ground-based method for diagnostics of the ionosphere and atmosphere parameters. The method uses one of the numerous physical phenomena observed in the ionosphere illuminated by high-power radio waves. It is a generation of the artificial periodic irregularities (APIs) in the ionospheric plasma. The APIs were found while studying the effects of ionospheric high-power HF modification. It was established that the APIs are formed by a standing wave that occurs due to interference between the upwardly radiated radio wave and its reflection off the ionosphere. The API studies are based upon observation of the Bragg backscatter of the pulsed probe radio wave from the artificial periodic structure. Bragg backscatter occurs if the spatial period of the irregularities is equal to half a wavelength of the probe signal. The API techniques makes it possible to obtain the following information: the profiles of electron density from the lower D-region up to the maximum of the F-layer; the irregular structure of the ionosphere including split of the regular E-layer, the sporadic layers; the vertical velocities in the D- and E-regions of the ionosphere; the turbulent velocities, turbulent diffusion coefficients and the turbopause altitude; the neutral temperatures and densities at the E-region altitudes; the parameters of the internal gravity waves and their spectral characteristics; the relative concentration of negative oxygen ions in the D-region. Some new results obtained by the API technique are discussed .

  7. TeV γ-ray astronomy with ground-based air-shower arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2016-07-01

    The TeV energy band is a very exciting window into the origin of high energy cosmic radiation, particle acceleration, and the annihilation of dark matter particles. Above a few hundred GeV, ground-based experiments of very large effective areas open a new domain to study extragalactic sources at intermediate redshifts, galaxy clusters, gamma ray bursts, AGN and their flaring states, extended sources and galactic diffuse emission, and to indirect searches for dark matter. In particular, ground arrays of particle detectors -that operate with high duty cycles and large fields of view- can extend to multi-TeV energies the measurements made with experiments on satellites, and complement the observations done with air Cherenkov telescopes on the ground. Key science goals of ground arrays include performing unbiased all-sky surveys, monitoring of transient events from known (and unknown) sources, and detecting extended regions of diffuse emission. In this paper, the status and most recent results from ARGO-YBJ, Tibet AS, HAWC, and LHAASO are presented.

  8. An over view of ground-based electromagnetic observations addressed to seismo- electromagnetism in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, T.

    2007-12-01

    Almost all through the human history, electromagnetic (EM) phenomena associated with earthquakes (EQ) have been repeatedly reported. Especially 1995 Kobe earthquake brought a great impact to the earthquake prediction studies in Japan. After this devastating event, Science and Technology Agency (STA) decided to initiate five year programs of Earthquake Frontier Program which included RIKEN/NASDA's subprograms. Both subprograms addressed to the short-term earthquake prediction research by using the electromagnetic methods, and the main objective was to attain comprehensive understanding of the pre-, co- and post seismic EM phenomena related to EQs. Both projects produced many appraisable results. However, there is still a long way to go, physics of DC to ULF/ELF signal generation/transmission and so on. We now consider that EQ related EM signals may be classified into two major groups. One is EM signals supposedly emitted from the focal zone and the other is anomalous transmission of EM waves over the epicentral region. Of-course, to establish the science of seismo-EM phenomena, we need continued efforts to collect and accumulate more data on one hand and to advance basic physics on the other. In the presentation, we briefly summarize the current status of ground-based EM measurements from ULF to VHF ranges in Japan (DC-ULF geoelectric potential difference, ULF, ELF and VLF three-component magnetic, VLF, LF and VHF anomalous transmission of radio waves, etc.) and propose the future direction (tactics) of EQ- related EM study in Japan.

  9. Ground-based remote sensing of thin clouds in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, T. J.; Zhao, C.

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a method for using interferometer measurements of downwelling thermal radiation to retrieve the properties of single-layer clouds. Cloud phase is determined from ratios of thermal emission in three "micro-windows" where absorption by water vapor is particularly small. Cloud microphysical and optical properties are retrieved from thermal emission in two micro-windows, constrained by the transmission through clouds of stratospheric ozone emission. Assuming a cloud does not approximate a blackbody, the estimated 95% confidence retrieval errors in effective radius, visible optical depth, number concentration, and water path are, respectively, 10%, 20%, 38% (55% for ice crystals), and 16%. Applied to data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) North Slope of Alaska - Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA-AAO) site near Barrow, Alaska, retrievals show general agreement with ground-based microwave radiometer measurements of liquid water path. Compared to other retrieval methods, advantages of this technique include its ability to characterize thin clouds year round, that water vapor is not a primary source of retrieval error, and that the retrievals of microphysical properties are only weakly sensitive to retrieved cloud phase. The primary limitation is the inapplicability to thicker clouds that radiate as blackbodies.

  10. Optical Properties of Aerosols from Long Term Ground-Based Aeronet Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tanre, D.; Smirnov, A.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Dubovik, O.; Lavenu, F.; Abuhassen, N.; Chatenet, B.

    1999-01-01

    AERONET is an optical ground-based aerosol monitoring network and data archive supported by NASA's Earth Observing System and expanded by federation with many non-NASA institutions including AEROCAN (AERONET CANada) and PHOTON (PHOtometrie pour le Traiteinent Operatonnel de Normalisation Satellitaire). The network hardware consists of identical automatic sun-sky scanning spectral radiometers owned by national agencies and universities purchased for their own monitoring and research objectives. Data are transmitted hourly through the data collection system (DCS) on board the geostationary meteorological satellites GMS, GOES and METEOSAT and received in a common archive for daily processing utilizing a peer reviewed series of algorithms thus imposing a standardization and quality control of the product data base. Data from this collaboration provides globally distributed near real time observations of aerosol spectral optical depths, aerosol size distributions, and precipitable water in diverse aerosol regimes. Access to the AERONET data base has shifted from the interactive program 'demonstrat' (reserved for PI's) to the AERONET homepage allowing faster access and greater development for GIS object oriented retrievals and analysis with companion geocoded data sets from satellites, LIDAR and solar flux measurements for example. We feel that a significant yet under utilized component of the AERONET data base are inversion products made from hourly principal plane and almucanter measurements. The current inversions have been shown to retrieve aerosol volume size distributions. A significant enhancement to the inversion code has been developed and is presented in these proceedings.

  11. A case for using ground-based thermal inertia measurements to detect Martian caves.

    PubMed

    Groemer, Gernot; Foresta, Luca; Turetschek, Thomas; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Frischauf, Norbert; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ragonig, Christoph; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sams, Sebastian; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Soucek, Alexander; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Stumptner, Willibald; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Martian caves are regarded as one of the most interesting locations in which to search for life on the planet. Data obtained during the MARS2013 expedition at Hamar Laghdad Ridge in the Tafilalt region of Morocco indicate that even small cavities can display thermal behavior that is characteristic for caves. For example, temperature in a cavity equaled 14°C±0.1°C before sunrise, which was higher than the temperature of the ambient air (10°C±0.1°C) and proximate rocks (9°C±0.1°C) at the same time. Within 30 min after sunrise, when the temperature of surrounding rocks corresponded to 15°C, this thermal relationship reversed. Measurements were conducted under simulated spaceflight conditions, including near-real-time interpretation of data that were acquired in a complex flight planning environment. We conclude that using ground-based thermal contrast measurements, in 7-14 μm band before and after sunset, is an effective method for Mars astronauts to identify caves, possibly superior to usage of space-based or ground-penetrating data. PMID:24823802

  12. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization Using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Peter R.; Poyneer, Lisa; Barrett, Harrison; Frazin, Richard; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gładysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jérôme; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Pearson, Iain; Perrin, Marshall; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012. PMID:26347393

  13. Synergy between ground-based remote sensing systems in microphysical analysis of cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V.; Reichardt, J.; Görsdorf, Ulrich; Reigert, Andrew; Leinweber, R.; Lehmann, Volker

    2014-10-01

    A broad suite of ground-based remote sensing instruments of the Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg, Germany, is combined for the first time to synergistically analyze cirrus cloud microphysics, including a Raman lidar, a Ka band cloud radar and a 5ff tilted ceilometer. 84 days of cirrus cloud measurements have been selected to study the correlation between, and the dependences of, the different measured variables. The presented study investigates the effect of the spatial orientation and the shape of solid cloud particles on particle optical properties and their relation to wind and turbulence parameters. A sensitive indicator of particle spatial orientation is the particle depolarization ratio (PDR). When ice crystals are horizontally aligned, mirror reflections can occur, which is evidenced by low PDR if observed with a vertically pointing Raman lidar. Observations are grouped according to the prevailing weather condition. It is found that on some days PDR is constant for long time periods. Interestingly, during warm fronts the PDR is generally small (<0.2), while during cold fronts it is high (> 0.4). Moreover, the mean lidar ratio of cirrus with high PDR is about 20 sr, two times larger than of cirrus with low PDR. Similar dependences on PDR have been found for the particle extinction coefficient, and for the backscatter coefficient from the tilted ceilometer, but for the Raman lidar backscatter coefficient in perpendicular polarization the opposite behavior is observed.

  14. Estimating regional auroral electron energy deposition using ground-based optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Conde, M.; Ahrns, M. J.; Bristow, W.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Two key parameters for understanding the coupling between the magnetosphere and the thermosphere/ionosphere in polar regions are the characteristic energy and the total energy flux of precipitating auroral electrons. Ionization due to precipitating electrons modifies the ionospheric electron density profile and thereby the height-dependent conductivity in a complex manner in both time and space. Global or regional thermospheric dynamics models typically rely on empirical models (Ovation) or low-resolution global EUV imagery (POLAR) for electron precipitation input which smear out the mesoscale detail of the location and timing of auroral arcs. We have developed a method for measuring the time-dependent auroral electron energy deposition over a several-hundred km range with 25 km resolution using a combination of two ground-based optical instruments - a scanning-doppler imager observing green-line temperatures and a filtered all-sky imager measuring the N2+ first negative emission at 427.8 nm. We will discuss the details of the method, and show several examples including those from the MICA sounding rocket experiment as well as several events from the AMISR PINOT campaign. We will also show comparisons with alternate optical and radar techniques, compare our estimated energy flux to those from Ovation, and discuss limitations and advantages of the technique when examining mesoscale dynamics in the auroral zone.

  15. Development of ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system in Wuhan and its first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Yang, Guobin; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu; Gu, Xudong; Zhou, Chen; Wang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    A new digital low-frequency receiver system has been developed at Wuhan University for sensitive reception of low-latitude broadband Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves originating from either natural or artificial sources. These low-frequency radio waves are useful for ionospheric remote sensing, geospace environment monitoring, and submarine communications. This paper presents the principle and architecture of the system framework, including magnetic loop antenna design, low-noise analog front-end and digital receiver with data sampling and transmission. A new structure is adopted in the analog front end to provide high common-mode rejection and to reduce interference. On basis of field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and Universal Serial Bus (USB) architecture, the digital receiver is developed along with time keeping and synchronization module. The validity and feasibility of the self-developed ground-based ELF/VLF receiver system is evaluated by first results of experimental data that show the temporal variation of broadband ELF/VLF wave spectral intensity in Wuhan (30.54 °N, 114.37 °E). In addition to the acquisition of VLF transmitter signals at various frequencies, tweek atmospherics are also clearly captured to occur at multiple modes up to n = 6.

  16. Error reduction and modeling for hexapod positioners of secondary mirrors for large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneed, Ryan C.; Keas, Paul J.

    2014-08-01

    The positioning requirements for secondary mirrors and instruments for large ground-based telescopes are becoming increasingly challenging. Modern telescope designs, such as LSST and TMT, are specifying repeatability and/or absolute accuracy limits below 10 μm and 10 μrad for the hexapod positioning systems generally used for these applications. Hexapod error sources, including lead screw pitch variations, windup, backlash, friction, thermal expansion, compliance, sensing, and joint node location uncertainties, are examined along with methods for reducing or eliminating these errors by mechanical means or through calibration. Alternative sensing approaches are discussed and their relative benefits are evaluated. Finally, a model-based design approach is presented for conducting initial design trade studies, assessing technical risk, predicting achievable performance, establishing subsystem and component requirements, and tracking positioning error budgets through the entire development process. A parametric actuator model and its initial results are described, and testing approaches are outlined to identify key model parameters and verify subsystem and component performance.

  17. New efforts using helicopter-borne and ground based electromagnetics for mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, U.; Siemon, B.; Noell, U.; Gutzmer, J.; Spitzer, K.; Becken, M.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the last decades mineral resources, especially rare earth elements, gained a steadily growing importance in industry and therefore as well in exploration. New targets for mineral investigations came into focus and known sources have been and will be revisited. Since most of the mining for mineral resources in the past took place in the upper hundred metres below surface new techniques made deeper mining economically feasible. Consequently, mining engineers need the best possible knowledge about the full spatial extent of prospective geological structures, including their maximum depths. Especially in Germany and Europe, politics changed in terms not to rely only on the global mineral trade market but on national resources, if available. BGR and partners therefore started research programs on different levels to evaluate and develop new technologies on environmental friendly, non-invasive spatial exploration using airborne and partly ground-based electromagnetic methods. Mining waste heaps have been explored for valuable residual minerals (research project ROBEHA), a promising tin bearing ore body is being explored by airborne electromagnetics (research project E3) and a new airborne technology is aimed at to be able to reach investigation depths of about 1 km (research project DESMEX). First results of the projects ROBEHA and E3 will be presented and the project layout of DESMEX will be discussed.

  18. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter; Frazin, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We propose a formal comparison of techniques using a blind data challenge with an evaluation of performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012

  19. An integrated transportation and operations comparison of space and ground based OTV's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.; Rehder, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of space vs. ground basing of orbital transfer vehicles (OTV). The comparison was done assuming an 11-year mission model beginning in 1995 and averaging over 100 MT of payloads per year to GEO. When analyzed from a total transportation standpoint, the launch system employed had the greatest impact on the basing mode comparison. A launch fleet consisting of both a basic STS and a Shuttle derivative cargo vehicle provided the least cost. Only a small advantage (3%) was found in flight performance for the space based (SB) OTV once it incorporated the necessary provisions for space debris protection and on-orbit maintenance. Propellant storage and transfer losses associated with the SB OTV amounted to 12% of the actual flight propellant requirement. Turnaround of the SB OTV required a crew of 3 and 40% duty cycle. The life cycle cost comparison including all involved space elements indicated less than a 10% difference between basing modes. The SB OTV however is judged to provide more flexibility in launch manifesting, simplified recovery operations and greater potential for improvement.

  20. An integrated transportation and operations comparison of space and ground based OTV's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. E.; Rehder, J. J.

    1981-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a comparison of space vs. ground basing of orbital transfer vehicles (OTV). The comparison was done assuming an 11-year mission model beginning in 1995 and averaging over 100 MT of payloads per year to GEO. When analyzed from a total transportation standpoint, the launch system employed had the greatest impact on the basing mode comparison. A launch fleet consisting of both a basic STS and a Shuttle derivative cargo vehicle provided the least cost. Only a small advantage (3%) was found in flight performance for the space based (SB) OTV once it incorporated the necessary provisions for space debris protection and on-orbit maintenance. Propellant storage and transfer losses associated with the SB OTV amounted to 12% of the actual flight propellant requirement. Turnaround of the SB OTV required a crew of 3 and 40% duty cycle. The life cycle cost comparison including all involved space elements indicated less than a 10% difference between basing modes. The SB OTV however is judged to provide more flexibility in launch manifesting, simplified recovery operations and greater potential for improvement.

  1. On Advanced Estimation Techniques for Exoplanet Detection and Characterization using Ground-Based Coronagraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Peter R.; Frazin, Richard; Barrett, Harrison; Caucci, Luca; Devaney, Nicholas; Furenlid, Lars; Gladysz, Szymon; Guyon, Olivier; Krist, John; Maire, Jerome; Marois, Christian; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; Mugnier, Laurent; Perrin, Marshall; Poyneer, Lisa; Pueyo, Laurent; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Remi

    2012-01-01

    The direct imaging of planets around nearby stars is exceedingly difficult. Only about 14 exoplanets have been imaged to date that have masses less than 13 times that of Jupiter. The next generation of planet-finding coronagraphs, including VLT-SPHERE, the Gemini Planet Imager, Palomar P1640, and Subaru HiCIAO have predicted contrast performance of roughly a thousand times less than would be needed to detect Earth-like planets. In this paper we review the state of the art in exoplanet imaging, most notably the method of Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI), and we investigate the potential of improving the detectability of faint exoplanets through the use of advanced statistical methods based on the concepts of the ideal observer and the Hotelling observer. We provide a formal comparison of techniques through a blind data challenge and evaluate performance using the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) and Localization ROC (LROC) curves. We place particular emphasis on the understanding and modeling of realistic sources of measurement noise in ground-based AO-corrected coronagraphs. The work reported in this paper is the result of interactions between the co-authors during a week-long workshop on exoplanet imaging that was held in Squaw Valley, California, in March of 2012.

  2. [Choice of plant light status for space greenhouse: results of ground-based experience].

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Iu A

    2000-01-01

    To decide on the light status of plants in space greenhouse, a theoretical study was undertaken to correlate specific productivity of space greenhouse with illumination characteristics including vertical PAR flux density (I), photoperiod (tau), and crop leaf index (L). It was demonstrated that in pace with I the daily productivity per a volume unit tended to monotonously approach maximum at I = Ip, whereas the greenhouse energy efficiency ME peaked at I = IE, IK < IE < IP, where IK is a compensation point of the light curve of crop photosynthesis. Proposed are compromise criteria to optimize illumination as a maximum of linear combination of MV and ME and coefficients which account for the cost of a space station volume unit and a unit of board power supply, and as maximum of product Q = MV.ME. Experimental results serve as the basis for a technique for determination of the best, by the Q criterion, light status parameters for three types of space greenhouses: research growth chamber for synchronous cultivation of leaf mustard, wheat growth chamber with fixed crop density, and green conveyer for cultivation of Brassica pekinensis (Lour Rupor). For the last mentioned Q effective I and tau values differed with the conveyer step. The technique allows design of ground-based experiments aimed at determination of the most effective light status of space-grown crops. PMID:10732194

  3. Ground-based observations of uranus and neptune using CCD instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.A.

    1985-07-01

    The author verifies that with the help of charge-coupled devices (CCD) great progress is being made in ground-based astronomical observations, including the study of the remote giant planets Uranus and Neptune. In reading the CCD the top row of pixels (potential wells) is moved into the sequential (shift) reading register; after this each row (line) of pixels moves its electrons upward (in each column) until the bottom row is cleared. This process is repeated for each row until the device is interrogated sequentially. The use of CCD detectors for purposes of image acquisition and spectroscopy has already found wide popularity at astronomical observatories, and soon it will spread to space research. The first known attempts to use CCD to obtain astronomical images was made by the author and his colleagues in April 1976. The result was the first observations of structure on the dark disk of Uranus. In general, the more refined the mathematical provision, the more information can be extracted from the images or spectra.

  4. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending…

  5. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  6. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Y.; Li, Z.; Xu, H.; Chen, X.; Li, K.; Lv, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and mixing status of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurement. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of aerosol or have some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it investigate aerosol information by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduce a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to real measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing states of aerosol particles on aerosol composition retrieval.

  7. Retrieval of aerosol composition using ground-based remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2016-04-01

    The chemical composition and mixing states of ambient aerosol are the main factors deciding aerosol microphysical and optical properties, and thus have significant impacts on regional or global climate change and air quality. Traditional approaches to detect atmospheric aerosol composition include sampling with laboratory analysis and in-situ measurements. They can accurately acquire aerosol components, however, the sampling or air exhausting could change the status of ambient aerosol or lead to some mass loss. Additionally, aerosol is usually sampled at the surface level so that it is difficult to detect the columnar aerosol properties. Remote sensing technology, however, can overcome these problems because it is able to detect aerosol information of entire atmosphere by optical and microphysical properties without destructing the natural status of ambient aerosol. This paper introduces a method to acquire aerosol composition by the remote sensing measurements of CIMEL CE318 ground-based sun-sky radiometer. A six component aerosol model is used in this study, including one strong absorbing component Black Carbon (BC), two partly absorbing components Brown Carbon (BrC) and Mineral Dust (MD), two scattering components Ammonia Sulfate-like (AS) and Sea Salt (SS), and Aerosol Water uptake (AW). Sensitivity analysis are performed to find the most sensitive parameters to each component and retrieval method for each component is accordingly developed. Different mixing models such as Maxwell-Garnett (MG), Bruggeman (BR) and Volume Average (VA) are also studied. The residual minimization method is used by comparing remote sensing measurements and simulation outputs to find the optimization of aerosol composition (including volume fraction and mass concentration of each component). This method is applied to measurements obtained from Beijing site under different weather conditions, including polluted haze, dust storm and clean days, to investigate the impacts of mixing

  8. Volcano geodesy at Santiaguito using ground-based cameras and particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Anderson, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Lees, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The active Santiaguito dome in Guatemala is an exceptional field site for ground-based optical observations owing to the bird's-eye viewing perspective from neighboring Santa Maria Volcano. From the summit of Santa Maria the frequent (1 per hour) explosions and continuous lava flow effusion may be observed from a vantage point, which is at a ~30 degree elevation angle, 1200 m above and 2700 m distant from the active vent. At these distances both video cameras and SLR cameras fitted with high-power lenses can effectively track blocky features translating and uplifting on the surface of Santiaguito's dome. We employ particle image velocimetry in the spatial frequency domain to map movements of ~10x10 m^2 surface patches with better than 10 cm displacement resolution. During three field campaigns to Santiaguito in 2007, 2009, and 2012 we have used cameras to measure dome surface movements for a range of time scales. In 2007 and 2009 we used video cameras recording at 30 fps to track repeated rapid dome uplift (more than 1 m within 2 s) of the 30,000 m^2 dome associated with the onset of eruptive activity. We inferred that the these uplift events were responsible for both a seismic long period response and an infrasound bimodal pulse. In 2012 we returned to Santiaguito to quantify dome surface movements over hour-to-day-long time scales by recording time lapse imagery at one minute intervals. These longer time scales reveal dynamic structure to the uplift and subsidence trends, effusion rate, and surface flow patterns that are related to internal conduit pressurization. In 2012 we performed particle image velocimetry with multiple cameras spatially separated in order to reconstruct 3-dimensional surface movements.

  9. Satellite and ground-based observations of a fading transpolar arc

    SciTech Connect

    Pellinen, R.J.; Koskinen, H.E.J.; Pulkkinen, T.I. ); Murphree, J.S. ); Rostoker, G. ); Opgenoorth, H.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Satellite and ground-based observations of the end phase of a transpolar arc event on September 25, 1986, are presented. The event was recorded by the UV imager of the Viking spacecraft during the time period from 2000 to 2110 UT. The transpolar arc was formed during a period of more than one hour of northward directed interplanetary magnetic field B{sub Z}. The arc started to fade when the IMF turned southward and a localized brightening of the auroral oval west of its nightside foot point was observed. Within a few minutes the activation was strongly enhanced. Magnetic disturbances below the activation were relatively weak, but at the EISCAT magnetometer stations a counterclockwise rotating equivalent current system, which can be interpreted as due to an upward directed filamentary field-aligned current, was observed to last about 10 min. The magnetic disturbance was fairly stable and did not move across the magnetometer chain during its existence. EISCAT observed a clear enhancement of E region electron density after 2100 UT, which was not associated with hard precipitation, as indicated by the absence of riometer absorption over Scandinavia. The EISCAT scan data on ionospheric horizontal ion drift velocity showed a localized region of eastward drift just north of Tromsoe, in agreement with the magnetometer recordings. Also the postmidnight auroral oval was brightened in a wide longitudinal range, and a weak westward current was observed flowing in the ionosphere by Soviet magnetometers below the bright region of the oval. Though the magnetic signatures below the activation west of the foot point indicate a cablelike upward field-aligned current, the authors do not interpret the phenomenon as a substorm.

  10. Multipath impact on ground-based global positioning system range measurements: Aspects of measurement, modeling, and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, G. J.; Holland, E. A.

    1994-07-01

    Multiple mechanisms propagation paths (multipath) can be the most important error source in ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measurement of range to the satellites. This multipath error, arising from a combination of the direct path and reflections from objects relatively close to the receiving antenna, can at times exceed the ionospheric delay error, which the two-frequency (1228 and 1575 MHz) GPS signal format is designed to measure and correct. GPS multipath can seriously degrade Differential GPS (DGPS) navigation, geodetic measurements, ionospheric monitoring, and other GPS applications, yet the source of the problem may not be evident without the use of specialized tests. Several techniques have been proposed to reduce the effects of GPS multipath; these include: improved receiver technology, specialized antenna designs, and various modeling or filtering approaches. This paper illustrates the nature of the two-frequency GPS multipath problem with measurement data from typical ground-based installations, exhibiting variation in multipath conditions, ranging from low to quite high for the varying geometries of the available satellite tracks. Leading mitigation techniques are reviewed, with emphasis on multipath modeling. A new simple modeling approach currently being studied by Phillips Laboratory is discussed. This technique takes advantage of the daily repetition of the GPS observation geometry from a ground station to create a 'multipath template' specific to each satellite pass, and reduce multipath effects on successive days. Data is presented showing significant improvement in a severe multipath environment and contrasting the effectiveness of this approach with all-sky modeling techniques. Mitigation techniques for GPS multipath show potential to enable GPS ground-based range and ionospheric measurement to greatly reduce errors at low elevation angles, leading to improved accuracy and wider coverage area capability.

  11. Comparison of Coordinated Satellite and Ground-based X-Band Radar Collections for the Retrieval of Snow Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeb, E. J.; Marshall, H.; LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Deems, J. S.; Landry, C.

    2012-12-01

    In many regions of the world, snow is a major source of runoff contributing to human existence/sustenance, agriculture, and industry. The uncertainties in quantifying snow mass at both spatial and temporal scales have limited the vital management of this significant component to the global water cycle. With the sensitivity of radar backscatter to physical properties of snow at higher frequencies and the availability of high resolution commercial satellite imaging radars at X-Band frequencies (e.g. 9.6 GHz), snow experiments have been conducted to examine these relationships at finer spatial and temporal scales. For the past several winters, satellite radar acquisitions (at X-Band with co- and cross-polarizations) have been coordinated with ground-based radar collections within a well-instrumented southwestern Colorado basin exhibiting a wide range of snow conditions. Snow-free satellite radar collections (at X-Band with the same viewing geometry) have also been acquired to separate the backscatter contributions of the snow volume from the underlying background target. Ancillary data sets including ground-based LiDAR-derived snow depths and scientific snow pit sampling are also incorporated into the analysis. Despite the fact that it may not be possible to retrieve snow water equivalent from multi-polarization X-Band frequency alone, preliminary results of these comparisons are shown where the ground-based radar transects overlap the satellite radar coverage. Snow parameters such as saturated surface or internal snow layers, snow surface and stratigraphic roughness, and grain size variations may be of particular interest.

  12. Comparison of ground-based and space flight energy expenditure and water turnover in middle-aged healthy male US astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Gretebeck, R. J.; Schoeller, D. A.; Davis-Street, J.; Socki, R. A.; Gibson, E. K.

    1997-01-01

    Energy requirements during space flight are poorly defined because they depend on metabolic-balance studies, food disappearance, and dietary records. Water turnover has been estimated by balance methods only. The purpose of this study was to determine energy requirements and water turnover for short-term space flights (8-14 d). Subjects were 13 male astronauts aged 36-51 y with normal body mass indexes (BMIs). Total energy expenditure (TEE) was determined during both a ground-based period and space flight and compared with the World Health Organization (WHO) calculations of energy requirements and dietary intake. TEE was not different for the ground-based and the space-flight periods (12.40 +/- 2.83 and 11.70 +/- 1.89 MJ/d, respectively), and the WHO calculation using the moderate activity correction was a good predictor of TEE during space flight. During the ground-based period, energy intake and TEE did not differ, but during space flight energy intake was significantly lower than TEE; body weight was also less at landing than before flight. Water turnover was lower during space flight than during the ground-based period (2.7 +/- 0.6 compared with 3.8 +/- 0.5 L/d), probably because of lower fluid intakes and perspiration loss during flight. This study confirmed that the WHO calculation can be used for male crew members' energy requirements during short space flights.

  13. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-05-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.0 ozone and NO2, respectively. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground-based

  14. Validation of ACE and OSIRIS ozone and NO2 measurements using ground-based instruments at 80° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Strong, K.; Batchelor, R. L.; Bernath, P. F.; Brohede, S.; Boone, C.; Degenstein, D.; Daffer, W. H.; Drummond, J. R.; Fogal, P. F.; Farahani, E.; Fayt, C.; Fraser, A.; Goutail, F.; Hendrick, F.; Kolonjari, F.; Lindenmaier, R.; Manney, G.; McElroy, C. T.; McLinden, C. A.; Mendonca, J.; Park, J.-H.; Pavlovic, B.; Pazmino, A.; Roth, C.; Savastiouk, V.; Walker, K. A.; Weaver, D.; Zhao, X.

    2012-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infra-Red Imager System (OSIRIS) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) have been taking measurements from space since 2001 and 2003, respectively. This paper presents intercomparisons between ozone and NO2 measured by the ACE and OSIRIS satellite instruments and by ground-based instruments at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), which is located at Eureka, Canada (80° N, 86° W) and is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). The ground-based instruments included in this study are four zenith-sky differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments, one Bruker Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) and four Brewer spectrophotometers. Ozone total columns measured by the DOAS instruments were retrieved using new Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) guidelines and agree to within 3.2%. The DOAS ozone columns agree with the Brewer spectrophotometers with mean relative differences that are smaller than 1.5%. This suggests that for these instruments the new NDACC data guidelines were successful in producing a homogenous and accurate ozone dataset at 80° N. Satellite 14-52 km ozone and 17-40 km NO2 partial columns within 500 km of PEARL were calculated for ACE-FTS Version 2.2 (v2.2) plus updates, ACE-FTS v3.0, ACE-MAESTRO (Measurements of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) v1.2 and OSIRIS SaskMART v5.0x ozone and Optimal Estimation v3.0 NO2 data products. The new ACE-FTS v3.0 and the validated ACE-FTS v2.2 partial columns are nearly identical, with mean relative differences of 0.0 ± 0.2% for ozone and -0.2 ± 0.1% for v2.2 minus v3.3 NO2. Ozone columns were constructed from 14-52 km satellite and 0-14 km ozonesonde partial columns and compared with the ground-based total column measurements. The satellite-plus-sonde measurements agree with the ground-based ozone total

  15. Electron precipitation zones around major ground-based VLF signal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inan, U. S.; Chang, H. C.; Helliwell, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The spatial distribution of electron precipitation induced by VLF signals from ground-based transmitters is determined by using a test particle computer model of the gyroresonant wave-particle interaction (Inan et al., 1982). The results are presented as contours of energy flux on a map of the region around each transmitter. It is shown that the size of the precipitation zones is a strong function of the geographic location of the transmitter, as well as its radiated power and operating frequency. In general, the precipitation zones are much wider in longitude than in latitude and are oriented along lines of constant geomagnetic latitude. Assuming backscatter and/or wave echoing, precipitation zones around the points that are magnetically conjugate to the sources are also estimated. The results presented can be used to interpret satellite- or ground-based measurements of the precipitation induced by ground-based VLF transmitters.

  16. BigBOSS: The Ground-Based Stage IV BAO Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, David; Bebek, Chris; Heetderks, Henry; Ho, Shirley; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Mostek, Nick; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perlmutter, Saul; Roe, Natalie; Sholl, Michael; Smoot, George; White, Martin; Dey, Arjun; Abraham, Tony; Jannuzi, Buell; Joyce, Dick; Liang, Ming; Merrill, Mike; Olsen, Knut; Salim, Samir

    2009-04-01

    The BigBOSS experiment is a proposed DOE-NSF Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with an all-sky galaxy redshift survey. The project is designed to unlock the mystery of dark energy using existing ground-based facilities operated by NOAO. A new 4000-fiber R=5000 spectrograph covering a 3-degree diameter field will measure BAO and redshift space distortions in the distribution of galaxies and hydrogen gas spanning redshifts from 0.2< z< 3.5. The Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit (DETF FoM) for this experiment is expected to be equal to that of a JDEM mission for BAO with the lower risk and cost typical of a ground-based experiment.

  17. PhotoSpec - Ground-based Remote Sensing of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, K.; Frankenberg, C.; Seibt, U.; Hurlock, S. C.; Pivovaroff, A.; Stutz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence (SIF) emitted from vegetation can be used as a constraint for photosynthetic activity and is now observable on a global scale from space. However, many issues on a leaf-to-canopy scale remain poorly understood, such as influences on the SIF signal of environmental conditions, water stress, or radiation. Here, we report on the development and characterization of a novel ground-based spectrometer system for measuring SIF from natural ecosystems (http://www.kiss.caltech.edu/study/photosynthesis/technology.html). The instrumental set-up, requirements, and measurement technique are based on decades of experience using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), an established method to measure atmospheric trace gases. The instrument consists of three thermally stabilized commercial spectrometers that are linked to a 2D scanning telescope unit via optical fiber bundles. The spectrometers cover an SIF retrieval wavelength range at high spectral resolution (670 - 780 nm, 0.1 nm FWHM), but also provide moderate resolution spectra (400 - 800 nm, 1.5 nm FWHM) in order to retrieve vegetation indices and the photochemical reflectance index (PRI). In addition to the instrumental set-up, we will show initial results of test and field measurements with the new instrument that examine the diurnal cycle of the SIF signal of different California native and non-native plants and its correlation with CO2 fluxes. Observations were made under different environmental conditions, variable water and nutrient stress, and with different viewing geometries. We also used concurrent observations by a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor and a portable chlorophyll fluorometer (PAM) to link the SIF signal to plant metabolism and carbon cycling under a range of environmental conditions.

  18. Deep WFPC2 and Ground-Based Imaging of a Complete Sample of 3C Quasars and Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, Susan E.; Stockton, Alan

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of an HST and ground-based imaging study of a complete 3C sample of zeta approx. equal to 1 sources, comprising 5 quasars and 5 radio galaxies. We have observed all of the sample in essentially line-free bands at rest-frame 0.33 micrometers with WFPC2 and in rest-frame 1 micrometer images from the ground; we have also observed most of the sample in narrow-band filters centered on [O II]. We resolve continuum structure around all of our quasars in the high-resolution WFPC2 images, and in four of the five ground-based K' images. All of the quasars have some optical continuum structure that is aligned with the radio axis. In at least 3 of these cases, some of this optical structure is directly coincident with a portion of the radio structure, including optical counterparts to radio jets in 3C212 and 3C245 and an optical counterpart to a radio lobe in 3C2. These are most likely due to optical synchrotron radiation, and the radio and optical spectral indices in the northern lobe of 3C2 are consistent with this interpretation. The fact that we see a beamed optical synchotron component in the quasars but not in the radio galaxies complicates both the magnitude and the alignment comparisons. Nonetheless, the total optical and K' flux densities of the quasar hosts are consistent with those of the radio galaxies within the observed dispersion in our sample. The distributions of K' flux densities of both radio galaxies and quasar hosts exhibit similar mean and dispersion to that found for other radio galaxies at this redshift, and the average host galaxy luminosity is equivalent to, or a little fainter than, L*. The formal determination of the alignment in the optical and infrared in the two subsamples yields no significant difference between the radio galaxy and quasar subsamples, and the quasars 3C 196 and 3C 336 have aligned continuum and emission-line structure that is probably not due to beamed optical synchrotron emission. Very blue and/or edge

  19. Development of a Portable, Ground-based Ozone Lidar Instrument for Tropospheric Ozone Research and Educational Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chyba, Thomas; Zemker, Thomas; Fishman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research project is to develop a portable, eye-safe, ground-based ozone lidar instrument specialized for ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements in the troposphere. This research project directly supports the goal of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise to understand the distribution and budget of tropospheric ozone (objective 1.5 of the Earth Science Strategic Enterprise Plan, 1998-2002). It can participate in ground validation experiments for TES, a tropospheric ozone satellite mission due to be launched in 2002. It can also be utilized for correlative ground measurements in future GTE (Global Tropospheric Experiment) and space-based ozone lidar missions, such as ORACLE. Multiple ground-based ozone lidar systems would improve the data obtained through current ozone-sonde networks. This prototype instrument could to serve as the basic unit for these and other future monitoring projects requiring multi-instrument networks, such as that proposed for the Global Tropospheric Ozone Project (GTOP). GTOP is currently being formulated by a scientific panel of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project to meet its goal to better understand the processes that control the global distribution of tropospheric ozone. In order for the lidar to be widely deployed in networks, it must be fairly easy to use and maintain as well as being cost-competitive with a ground station launching ozonesondes several times a day. A second 2-year grant to continue this effort with students participating in ground tests and system improvements has been awarded by the Office of Equal Employment Opportunities (OEOP). This project also supports existing NASA lidar missions through its development of advanced, compact lidar technology. Innovations in both transmitters and receivers have been made in this project. Finally, this system could be modified in the future to probe more deeply into the stratosphere. This could be accomplished by increasing the

  20. Consistent interpretation of ground based and GOME BrO slant column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. W.; Bovensmann, H.; Kaiser, J. W.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    Model computations of slant column densities (SCD) enable the comparison between ground based and satellite based absorption measurements of scattered light and are therefore a good basis to investigate the presence of tropospheric BrO amounts. In this study ground based zenith sky and GOME nadir measurements of BrO SCD are compared with simulations for the 19-21 March 1997 at Ny-Ålesund. The vertical columns of tropospheric BrO amounts are estimated to be in the range 4 ±0.8 ∗ 10 13 [molecules/cm 2] for the investigated period and location.

  1. Status of advanced ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, K. L.; Akutsu, T.; Dwyer, S.; Puppo, P.

    2015-05-01

    Ground-based laser interferometers for gravitational-wave (GW) detection were first constructed starting 20 years ago and as of 2010 collection of several years’ worth of science data at initial design sensitivities was completed. Upgrades to the initial detectors together with construction of brand new detectors are ongoing and feature advanced technologies to improve the sensitivity to GWs. This conference proceeding provides an overview of the common design features of ground-based laser interferometric GW detectors and establishes the context for the status updates of each of the four gravitational-wave detectors around the world: Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, GEO 600 and KAGRA.

  2. Behavior of stem cells under outer-space microgravity and ground-based microgravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Li, Liang; Chen, Jianling; Wang, Jinfu

    2015-06-01

    With rapid development of space engineering, research on life sciences in space is being conducted extensively, especially cellular and molecular studies on space medicine. Stem cells, undifferentiated cells that can differentiate into specialized cells, are considered a key resource for regenerative medicine. Research on stem cells under conditions of microgravity during a space flight or a ground-based simulation has generated several excellent findings. To help readers understand the effects of outer space and ground-based simulation conditions on stem cells, we reviewed recent studies on the effects of microgravity (as an obvious environmental factor in space) on morphology, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of stem cells. PMID:25712570

  3. Isolated nighttime substorms and morning geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations from ground-based and satellite (THEMIS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, K.; Uspensky, M. V.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Dubyagin, S. V.; Vlasov, A. A.

    2013-09-01

    The analysis results of a complex of phenomena that were developing in the evening and morning magnetospheric and ionospheric sectors during two events (January 18 and February 19, 2008) are presented. The analysis is based on the observation data in the magnetotail from the THEMIS satellites and ground-based observations in the morning (MIRACLE network) and nighttime (THEMIS ground-based network) sectors. The events with moderate substorms in the nighttime sector were preceded by strong geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations in the morning sector, the regime of which changed during the development of auroral disturbances. The substorms were accompanied by dipolizations in the magnetotail at distances of ~10 Re and unexpected jump-like fluxes of ˜200-keV electrons. The fluxes appeared within several minutes after a breakup at three central THEMIS satellites simultaneously spaced up to 1.7 Re. According with the ASC data at the NAL observatory (3 frames/min) and with the THEMIS network of ASC data, onset of auroral activations in the night and morning sectors occurred simultaneously. Probable reasons for the sudden suppression or intensification of Pc5 pulsations are discussed.

  4. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  5. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in July and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 July 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  6. Gaia-FUN-SSO: a network for ground-based follow-up observations of Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillot, W.; Carry, B.; Berthier, J.; David, P.; Hestroffer, D.; Rocher, P.

    2014-12-01

    Gaia-FUN-SSO (shortly described at https://www.imcce.fr/gaia-fun-sso/) is a ground-based network of observatories set up in the framework of the Gaia consortium (DPAC-CU4) for the follow-up of critical Solar System objects to be discovered from space by the Gaia satellite. Its goal is to retrieve from the ground a newly detected object and to complement the astrometry measurements carried out by Gaia to determine its heliocentric orbit. Data from both Gaia and the ground-based network will be sent to the Minor Planet Center, used to determine the orbit and thus to update the database of minor planet orbits, which is subsequently used by Gaia for the identification of moving objects. We are expecting the detection of many asteroids, mainly from the main belt, and also new near-Earth objects (NEO) at low solar elongation. Owing to the specific conditions of Gaia observations, we even expect the detection of objects whose orbit is fully contained within Earth's orbit (called inner-Earth or Atira asteroids). Several training campaigns have already been organized with the network and it is now able to enter in an operating mode when alerts will be triggered. We describe here the expected number of discoveries, the network, its activity, and the data processing of the central node of the network set in place for the operating mode.

  7. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  8. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  9. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include? 170.137 Section 170.137 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails...

  10. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  11. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  12. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  13. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  14. Lightning flash detection in Venus and Jupiter with spacecraft and ground-based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yukihiro; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamashita, Kozo; Sato, Mitsuteru

    2016-07-01

    operation of UVI, ultraviolet imager, on board Akatsuki, in order to capture the lightning flash, which might also happen in the ultraviolet range by CO2. It has been suggested for a decade that thunderstorms in Jupiter's atmosphere take important roles not only in the investigation of meteorology, which determines the large scale structures such as belt/zone and big ovals, but also in probing the water abundance of the deep atmosphere, which is crucial to constrain the behavior of volatiles in early solar system. Here we suggest making observation of thunderstorm activity using lightning flash detection, which was already confirmed by some spacecraft observation, and cloud imagery with JUICE spacecraft and ground-based telescopes. Observing H Balmer Alpha line (656.3nm), we could estimate the activities of thunderstorms quantitatively, which enables us to investigate the mechanism of large structure formation.

  15. Local ionospheric electron density reconstruction from simultaneous ground-based GNSS and ionosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankov, S. M.; Warnant, R.; Stegen, K.

    2009-04-01

    entire altitude range is a straightforward process. As a by-product of the described procedure, the value of the ionospheric slab thickness can be easily computed. To be able to provide forecast, additional information about the current solar and geomagnetic activity is needed. For the purpose, observations available in real time -- at the Royal Institute of Meteorology (RMI), the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB), and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) -- are used. Recently, a new hybrid model for estimating and predicting the local magnetic index K has been developed. This hybrid model has the advantage of using both, ground-based (geomagnetic field components) and space-based (solar wind parameters) measurements, which results in more reliable estimates of the level of geomagnetic activity - current and future. The described reconstruction procedure has been tested on actual measurements at the RMI Dourbes Geophysics Centre (coordinates: 50.1N, 4.6E) where a GPS receiver is collocated with a digital ionosonde (code: DB049, type: Lowell DGS 256). Currently, the nominal time resolution between two consecutive reconstructions is set to 15 minutes with a forecast horizon for each reconstruction of up to 60 minutes. Several applications are envisaged. For example, the ionospheric propagation delays can be estimated and corrected much easier if the electron density profile is available at a nearby location on a real-time basis. Also, both the input data and the reconstruction results can be used for validation purposes in ionospheric models, maps, and services. Recent studies suggest that such ionospheric monitoring systems can help research/services related to aircraft navigation, e.g. for development of the ‘ionospheric threat' methodology.

  16. Ground-based GPS monitoring at the Lusi eruption site and external perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husein, Alwi; Mazzini, Adriano; Hadi, Soffian; Santosa, Bagus; Charis, Muhammad; Irawan, Dwinata

    2016-04-01

    The Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 and since then has been continuously spewing hot mud over a surface of 7 km2 that is today framed by high containment dams. The shape of the eruption site constantly evolved during the last 9.5 years. After an initial cone-shaped morphology, the original ground level has been characterized by an overall progressive subsidence, typical at eruption sites, compensated by the continuous eruption of boiling mud breccia. Numerous external factors appear to influence the evolution of the Lusi morphology and its activity. Of particular interest is the interaction between the frequent seismicity, the activity of the neighboring volcanic arcs, the Watukosek fault system that intersects Lusi, that in turn alter the eruption activity and posture. In order to study the evolution of the Lusi system, we continuously monitor the area using a GPS ground-based method. The investigation is conducted ombining the data from a base station located ~5 km to the south of Lusi, coupled with several secondary benchmark stations scatterred just around the crater and the embankment that frames the eruption site. These data are complemented by rover GPS stations connected to the system. About 400-1000 point measurements are collected during each survey depending on the condition of the mud terrain. The collected data allows monitoring the evolution and the displacements occurring around the eruption site as well as the changes in mud erupted volumes and the related variations in flow rate. Results reveal that the ongoing subsidence and other significant morphological changes occurring at Lusi site are directly correlated with recorded seismic events as well as regional volcanic activity at various sites. During such events the normal gradual collapse trend is reversed and are observed lateral and/or vertical elevation increases resulting in several centimeters of dislocation during the analyzed time frame. This monitoring reveals that even

  17. The MaCWAVE/MIDAS rocket and ground-based measurements of polar summer dynamics: Overview and mean state structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Williams, B. P.; Lübken, F.-J.; Rapp, M.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Hoffmann, P.; Müllemann, A.; Baumgarten, G.; Schmidlin, F. J.; She, C.-Y.; Krueger, D. A.

    2004-10-01

    The MaCWAVE/MIDAS collaborative rocket and ground-based measurement programs were performed at the Andøya Rocket Range and the nearby ALOMAR observatory in northern Norway during July 2002. The summer component of the MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically) program was focused on gravity wave propagation, instability, and wave-wave and wave-mean flow interaction dynamics contributing to summer mesopause structure and variability. The MIDAS (Middle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure) program concentrated on small-scale dynamical and microphysical processes near the summer mesopause. Our merged program yielded a comprehensive data set comprising two ~12-hour rocket salvoes, including 25 MET rockets and 5 sounding rockets, ground-based lidar, radar, and balloon data, and coordinated overpasses of the TIMED satellite. This paper describes the measurement program and rationale, the mean state observed during the rocket salvoes, and evidence that the mean state structure during 2002 differed in important respects from previous years.

  18. Evaluation of Chemistry-Climate Model Results using Long-Term Satellite and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    Chemistry-climate models attempt to bring together our best knowledge of the key processes that govern the composition of the atmosphere and its response to changes in forcing. We test these models on a process by process basis by comparing model results to data from many sources. A more difficult task is testing the model response to changes. One way to do this is to use the natural and anthropogenic experiments that have been done on the atmosphere and are continuing to be done. These include the volcanic eruptions of El Chichon and Pinatubo, the solar cycle, and the injection of chlorine and bromine from CFCs and methyl bromide. The test of the model's response to these experiments is their ability to produce the long-term variations in ozone and the trace gases that affect ozone. We now have more than 25 years of satellite ozone data. We have more than 15 years of satellite and ground-based data of HC1, HN03, and many other gases. I will discuss the testing of models using long-term satellite data sets, long-term measurements from the Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) , long-term ground-based measurements of ozone.

  19. GravityCam: ground-based wide-field high-resolution imaging and high-speed photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominik, Martin; Mackay, Craig; Steele, Iain; Snodgrass, Colin; Hirsch, Michael; Gråe Jørgensen, Uffe; Hundertmark, Markus; Rebolo, Rafael; Horne, Keith; Bridle, Sarah; Sicardy, Bruno; Bramich, Daniel; Alsubai, Khalid

    2015-12-01

    The image blurring by the Earth's atmosphere generally poses a substantial limitation to ground-based observations. While opportunities in space are scarce, lucky imaging can correct over a much larger patch of sky and with much fainter reference stars. We propose the first of a new kind of versatile instruments, "GravityCam", composed of ~100 EMCCDs, that will open up two entirely new windows to ground-based astronomy: (1) wide-field high-resolution imaging, and (2) wide-field high-speed photometry. Potential applications include (a) a gravitational microlensing survey going 4 magnitudes deeper than current efforts, and thereby gaining a factor 100 in mass at the same sensitivity, which means probing down to Lunar mass or even below, (b) extra-solar planet hunting via transits in galactic bulge fields, with high time resolution well-suited for transit timing variation studies, (c) variable stars in crowded fields, with sensitivity to very short periods, (d) asteroseismology with many bright stars in one pointing, (e) serendipitous occultations of stars by small solar system bodies, giving access to the small end of the Kuiper Belt size distribution and potentially leading to the first detection of true Oort cloud objects, while predicted occultations at high time resolution can reveal atmospheres, satellites, or rings, (f) general data mining of the high-speed variable sky (down to 40 ms cadence).

  20. Ceftaroline versus isolates from animal bite wounds: comparative in vitro activities against 243 isolates, including 156 Pasteurella species isolates.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ellie J C; Citron, Diane M; Merriam, C Vreni; Tyrrell, Kerin L

    2012-12-01

    More than 5 million Americans are bitten by animals, usually dogs, annually. Bite patients comprise ∼1% of all patients who visit emergency departments (300,000/year), and approximately 10,000 require hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. Ceftaroline is the bioactive component of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, which is FDA approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), including those containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There are no in vitro data about the activity of ceftaroline against Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica, other Pasteurella spp., or other bite wound isolates. We therefore studied the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against 243 animal bite isolates. MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method according to CLSI guidelines. Comparator drugs included cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, azithromycin, doxycycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP). Ceftaroline was the most active agent against all 5 Pasteurella species, including P. multocida subsp. multocida and P. multocida subsp. septica, with a maximum MIC of ≤0.008 μg/ml; more active than ceftriaxone and ertapenem (MIC(90)s, ≤0.015 μg/ml); and more active than cefazolin (MIC(90), 0.5 μg/ml) doxycycline (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml), azithromycin (MIC(90), 0.5 μg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml), and SMX-TMP (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml). Ceftaroline was also very active against all S. aureus isolates (MIC(90), 0.125 μg/ml) and other Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species, with a maximum MIC of 0.125 μg/ml against all bite isolates tested. Ceftaroline has potential clinical utility against infections involving P. multocida, other Pasteurella species, and aerobic Gram-positive isolates, including S. aureus. PMID:23027193

  1. Ceftaroline versus Isolates from Animal Bite Wounds: Comparative In Vitro Activities against 243 Isolates, Including 156 Pasteurella Species Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Tyrrell, Kerin L.

    2012-01-01

    More than 5 million Americans are bitten by animals, usually dogs, annually. Bite patients comprise ∼1% of all patients who visit emergency departments (300,000/year), and approximately 10,000 require hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. Ceftaroline is the bioactive component of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, which is FDA approved for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), including those containing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There are no in vitro data about the activity of ceftaroline against Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida and Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica, other Pasteurella spp., or other bite wound isolates. We therefore studied the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against 243 animal bite isolates. MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method according to CLSI guidelines. Comparator drugs included cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, ampicillin-sulbactam, azithromycin, doxycycline, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SMX-TMP). Ceftaroline was the most active agent against all 5 Pasteurella species, including P. multocida subsp. multocida and P. multocida subsp. septica, with a maximum MIC of ≤0.008 μg/ml; more active than ceftriaxone and ertapenem (MIC90s, ≤0.015 μg/ml); and more active than cefazolin (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml) doxycycline (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml), azithromycin (MIC90, 0.5 μg/ml), ampicillin-sulbactam (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml), and SMX-TMP (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml). Ceftaroline was also very active against all S. aureus isolates (MIC90, 0.125 μg/ml) and other Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species, with a maximum MIC of 0.125 μg/ml against all bite isolates tested. Ceftaroline has potential clinical utility against infections involving P. multocida, other Pasteurella species, and aerobic Gram-positive isolates, including S. aureus. PMID:23027193

  2. Comparisons of Reflectivities from the TRMM Precipitation Radar and Ground-Based Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Wolff, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Given the decade long and highly successful Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), it is now possible to provide quantitative comparisons between ground-based radars (GRs) with the space-borne TRMM precipitation radar (PR) with greater certainty over longer time scales in various tropical climatological regions. This study develops an automated methodology to match and compare simultaneous TRMM PR and GR reflectivities at four primary TRMM Ground Validation (GV) sites: Houston, Texas (HSTN); Melbourne, Florida (MELB); Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ); and Darwin, Australia (DARW). Data from each instrument are resampled into a three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. The horizontal displacement during the PR data resampling is corrected. Comparisons suggest that the PR suffers significant attenuation at lower levels especially in convective rain. The attenuation correction performs quite well for convective rain but appears to slightly over-correct in stratiform rain. The PR and GR observations at HSTN, MELB and KWAJ agree to about 1 dB on average with a few exceptions, while the GR at DARW requires +1 to -5 dB calibration corrections. One of the important findings of this study is that the GR calibration offset is dependent on the reflectivity magnitude. Hence, we propose that the calibration should be carried out using a regression correction, rather than simply adding an offset value to all GR reflectivities. This methodology is developed towards TRMM GV efforts to improve the accuracy of tropical rain estimates, and can also be applied to the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement and other related activities over the globe.

  3. Exploring light rain in the trades as observed by satellite- and ground-based remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdanowitz, Jörg; Nuijens, Louise; Klepp, Christian; Stevens, Bjorn

    2013-04-01

    Satellite climatologies are usually expected to have difficulties to properly capture light rain from shallow marine clouds due to limited spatiotemporal resolution. In order to evaluate this, ground-based radar data from the RICO (Rain in Cumulus clouds over the Ocean) campaign is compared with rainfall estimates of three different satellite climatologies over the subtropical North Atlantic. In particular, these satellite products are the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and fluxes from Satellite data (HOAPS), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) and the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). Different footprint sizes and temporal resolutions among the used satellite products require an up-scaling of the data to facilitate a fair comparison. Apart from that, recent micro rain radar data from the Barbados Cloud Observatory (BCO) is analyzed to further explore the nature of light rain over the subtropical ocean at a higher temporal resolution. In the trades, the dominance of light rain, i.e. low rain intensities, is ubiquitous as previously observed in several field studies. However, some of them even seem to be conservative in their estimation of light rain contribution to total rainfall according to recent BCO measurements. For active and passive satellite sensors the light rain detection still remains a challenging task. However, as main result, satellite products showed to be partly able to resolve light rain events from shallow clouds during RICO. HOAPS detects most and GPCP least of them while TMPA performs similarly to HOAPS. But along a mean trade-wind trajectory starting at the Canaries, TMPA detects less light rainfall compared to HOAPS, especially in the Caribbean region. Currently collected ship-based rain data sets will be used to further evaluate the performance of HOAPS and TMPA over larger areas of the subtropical Atlantic.

  4. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  5. Soil moisture anomalies and convection: investigation using ground-based measurements at US Southern Great Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is one of the key factors modulating the atmospheric boundary layer and thus the climate system. In this study, we use ground-based measurements to investigate the mechanism by which soil moisture anomalies affect clouds and precipitation. From decade-long warm season observation by Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement at Southern Great Plains, we carefully select daytime weather regimes that are strongly coupled with land-surface processes such as clear-sky dry convection days, forced and active non-precipitating shallow cumuli days, and late-afternoon deep convective raining days (Zhang and Klein, 2010 and 2013). Based on this framework, we statistically assess: 1) the differences in soil moisture and surface heterogeneity between different convective regimes; and 2) the variances of the associated effects on surface and boundary layer meteorological conditions inside each convective regime. A specific question will be: under different soil moisture conditions, e.g. wet/dry, which convective weather regime will be favored and how this is related to large-scale environmental factors, such as free-troposphere stability and humidity? The answer to this question will improve our understanding of how soil moisture impacts boundary layer turbulence and thermodynamics, and influences the convection triggering and maintenance and their feedbacks on soil moisture, thus establish a link between soil moisture and convection at the process level. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675737

  6. Validation of NH3 satellite observations by ground-based FTIR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, Enrico; Palm, Mathias; Van Damme, Martin; Shephard, Mark; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Capps, Shannon; Clarisse, Lieven; Coheur, Pierre; Erisman, Jan Willem

    2016-04-01

    Global emissions of reactive nitrogen have been increasing to an unprecedented level due to human activities and are estimated to be a factor four larger than pre-industrial levels. Concentration levels of NOx are declining, but ammonia (NH3) levels are increasing around the globe. While NH3 at its current concentrations poses significant threats to the environment and human health, relatively little is known about the total budget and global distribution. Surface observations are sparse and mainly available for north-western Europe, the United States and China and are limited by the high costs and poor temporal and spatial resolution. Since the lifetime of atmospheric NH3 is short, on the order of hours to a few days, due to efficient deposition and fast conversion to particulate matter, the existing surface measurements are not sufficient to estimate global concentrations. Advanced space-based IR-sounders such as the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) enable global observations of atmospheric NH3 that help overcome some of the limitations of surface observations. However, the satellite NH3 retrievals are complex requiring extensive validation. Presently there have only been a few dedicated satellite NH3 validation campaigns performed with limited spatial, vertical or temporal coverage. Recently a retrieval methodology was developed for ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) instruments to obtain vertical concentration profiles of NH3. Here we show the applicability of retrieved columns from nine globally distributed stations with a range of NH3 pollution levels to validate satellite NH3 products.

  7. Initial Results from the DEEPWAVE Airborne and Ground-Based Measurement Program in New Zealand in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, Dave; Smith, Ron; Taylor, Mike; Doyle, Jim; Eckermann, Steve; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Rapp, Markus; Williams, Biff; Bossert, Katrina; Pautet, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    The deep-propagating gravity wave experiment (DEEPWAVE) was performed on and over New Zealand, Tasmania, the Tasman Sea, and the Southern Ocean with core airborne measurements extending from 5 June to 21 July 2014 and supporting ground-based measurements beginning in late May and extending beyond the airborne component. DEEPWAVE employed two aircraft, the NSF/NCAR GV and the German DLR Falcon. The GV carried the standard flight-level instruments, dropsondes, and the Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP). It also hosted new airborne lidar and imaging instruments built specifically to allow quantification of gravity waves (GWs) from sources at lower altitudes (e.g., orography, convection, jet streams, fronts, and secondary GW generation) throughout the stratosphere and into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The new GV lidars included a Rayleigh lidar measuring atmospheric density and temperature from ~20-60 km and a sodium resonance lidar measuring sodium density and temperature at ~75-100 km. An airborne Advanced Mesosphere Temperature Mapper (AMTM) was also developed for the GV, and together with additional IR "wing" cameras, imaged the OH airglow temperature and/or intensity fields extending ~900 km across the GV flight track. The DLR Falcon was equipped with its standard flight-level instruments and an aerosol Doppler lidar able to measure radial winds below the Falcon where aerosol backscatter was sufficient. Additional ground-based instruments included a 449 MHz boundary layer radar, balloons at multiple sites, two ground-based Rayleigh lidars, a second ground-based AMTM, a Fabry Perot interferometer measuring winds and temperatures at ~87 and 95 km, and a meteor radar measuring winds from ~80-100 km. DEEPWAVE performed 26 GV flights, 13 Falcon flights, and an extensive series of ground-based measurements whether or not the aircraft were flying. Together, these observed many diverse cases of GW forcing, propagation, refraction, and dissipation

  8. Comparing ECMWF UV processor and aerosol scheme with ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesnulyte, Vaida; Lindfors, Anders V.; Pitkänen, Mikko R. A.; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Benedetti, Angela; Arola, Antti

    2014-05-01

    The ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) system offers an alternative approach to provide global UV data products which can support environmental assessments of UV radiation, biological and photochemical impact studies, and to contribute to the global climatology of UV radiation. The ECMWF model includes the effect of aerosols as a part of its radiation transfer calculations. During the first steps of the development of the UV processor, an aerosol climatology was used. In the latest version, however, prognostic aerosols have been coupled with the UV processor which, as a result, provides information about the global UV radiation and can be an alternative to satellite observations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the ECMWF UV/aerosol optical depth (AOD) model against ground-based measurements and further develop the UV Processor. The data used for the study is MACC reanalysis AOD and UV intensities for the period 2003-2006. The evaluation was done by comparing the model data with measurements from EUVDB (European UV Database), NSF (National Science Foundation) and AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network). The ECMWF shortwave radiative transfer scheme provides the UV radiation at the surface for wavelengths between 280 and 400nm. However, for this analysis, the wavelength ranges 290-320 (UVB) and 320-340 (UVA) were used. This is the first time when a global model such as the ECMWF is evaluated for the performance of AOD at a UV wavelength. The results show that the MACC system generally provides a good representation of the AOD on a monthly basis, showing a realistic seasonal cycle. The model is mostly able to capture major dust load events and also the peak months of biomass burning correctly. When comparing hourly AOD values, the model-measurement agreement is better for biomass burning and dust sites than for urban sites, with an average correlation coefficient around 0.90 for biomass burning sites, around 0.77 for dust sites, and below 0

  9. E-beam accelerator cavity development for the ground-based free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, N. K.; Spalek, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing and developing four prototype accelerator cavities for high power testing on the Modular Component Technology Development (MCTD) test stand at Boeing. These cavities provide the basis for the e-beam accelerator hardware that will be used in the Ground Based Free Electron Laser (GBFEL) to be sited at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in New Mexico.

  10. Uncertainties in Instantaneous Rainfall Rate Estimates: Satellite vs. Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitai, E.; Huffman, G. J.; Goodrich, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution precipitation intensities are significant in many fields. For example, hydrological applications such as flood forecasting, runoff accommodation, erosion prediction, and urban hydrological studies depend on an accurate representation of the rainfall that does not infiltrate the soil, which is controlled by the rain intensities. Changes in the rain rate pdf over long periods are important for climate studies. Are our estimates accurate enough to detect such changes? While most evaluation studies are focusing on the accuracy of rainfall accumulation estimates, evaluation of instantaneous rainfall intensity estimates is relatively rare. Can a speceborne radar help in assessing ground-based radar estimates of precipitation intensities or is it the other way around? In this presentation we will provide some insight on the relative accuracy of instantaneous precipitation intensity fields from satellite and ground-based observations. We will examine satellite products such as those from the TRMM Precipitation Radar and those from several passive microwave imagers and sounders by comparing them with advanced high-resolution ground-based products taken at overpass time (snapshot comparisons). The ground based instantaneous rain rate fields are based on in situ measurements (i.e., the USDA/ARS Walnut Gulch dense rain gauge network), remote sensing observations (i.e., the NOAA/NSSL NMQ/Q2 radar-only national mosaic), and multi-sensor products (i.e., high-resolution gauge adjusted radar national mosaics, which we have developed by applying a gauge correction on the Q2 products).

  11. The Next Generation Ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.; CMB-S4 Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    This talk will review the goals and status of the community planning for the next generation ground-based CMB experiment, CMB-S4. Following the detection of CMB polarization in 2002, the current generation of ground-based experiments each fielding of order 1000 superconducting detectors (Stage II experiments) have led to the first detection of the much fainter lensing B-mode polarization signal and the most stringent constraints on the level of the B-mode signal from inflationary gravitational waves. We can expect significant advances in the next few years as the ongoing ground-based experiments deploy of order 10,000 detectors (Stage III). The CMB community is now planning an ambitious next generation (Stage IV) ground-based program with order of 500,000 detectors, CMB-S4, to achieve critical threshold crossing goals of 1) detecting or ruling out large field inflationary models, 2) determining the effective number and masses of the neutrinos, and 3) providing precision constraints on dark energy through its impact on structure formation.

  12. Ground-based thermal and multispectral imaging of limited irrigation crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based methods of remote sensing can be used as ground-truth for satellite-based remote sensing, and in some cases may be a more affordable means of obtaining such data. Plant canopy temperature has been used to indicate and quantify plant water stress. A field research study was conducted in ...

  13. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: Results from a three-year experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for disease detection and mapping which can maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of CRR (cotton root rot) treatments. Accurately mapping CRR could facilitate a much more economical solution than treating entire fields. Th...

  14. Evaluation of rotating-cylinder and piston-cylinder reactors for ground-based emulsion polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; El-Aasser, M. S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to apply ground-based emulsion polymerization reactor technology to improve the production of: monodisperse latex particles for calibration standards, chromatographic separation column packing, and medical research; and commercial latexes such as those used for coatings, foams, and adhesives.

  15. Solar cosmic ray effects in atmospheric chemistry evidenced from ground- based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, O.; Kasatkina, E.; Turyansky, V.

    Solar protons with a relatively soft energy spectrum (E<100 MeV) deposit most of their energy in the middle atmosphere above 20 km. Their influence on the atmospheric ozone and odd nitrogen has been studied in details. However, high-energy solar proton events (E>450 MeV) of Ground Level Event (GLE) type can penetrate below 30 km and cause neutron flow enhancement detected by ground-based neutron monitors. Atmospheric effects of such high-energy particles seem to be more pronounced and appeared variations of total content of some atmospheric parameters that can be detected by ground-based devices. It was shown earlier that some GLEs cause considerable ozone total content decreases (up to 25%), or so-called ozone "miniholes" at high latitudes. This work presents ground-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) total content made at Murmansk, Kola Peninsula (corrected geomagnetic latitude: 64.8) during and after GLE of 2 May 1998. Nitrogen dioxide was measured by zenith viewing spectrophotometer in wavelength region between 435-450 nm. An increase (about of 20%) in total column of NO2 has been recorded after 2 May 1998 GLE by this facility. Model calculations based on gas phase photochemical theory quantitatively agree with observations. In addition to satellite measurements the information obtained by ground-based devices will be helpful to study atmospheric effects of cosmic ray events. This work was supported by the RFBR grants 01-05-64850 and 01-05-26226).

  16. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: an update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for early detection and site-specific management of CRR (cotton root rot). Early detection could facilitate a more economical solution than those that might be used after plant infection had become more severe and widespread. ...

  17. Ground Based Reflectance Measurements of Arid Rangeland Vegetation Communities of the Southwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1997 a research program began using an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD-FR) spectroradiometer to collect ground based in situ radiance/reflectance measurements from vegetation communities typical of semiarid/arid rangelands of southwestern United States. Measurements were made after the spring (Ap...

  18. Analysis of global cloudiness. 2: Comparison of ground-based and satellite-based cloud climatologies

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, I.I.; Schlesinger, M.E. |

    1994-08-01

    Cloud climatologies are developed and intercompared for International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCO) (1983-1988), Meteor I (1971-1980), Meteor II (1979-1988), and Nimbus 7 (1979-1985) satellite observations, and for Berlyand and Strokina (1975, 1980) and Warren et al. (1986, 1988) ground-based observations. The satellite annual-mean, global- mean cloudiness, 0.57 +/- 0.05, is less than the ground-based value, 0.61 +/- 0.01, predominantly because of the low value for Nimbus 7. There is agreement between the satellite means of ISCCP, 0.62, and Meteor II, 0.61, and the ground-based means of Warren et al., 0.62, and Berlyand and Strokina, 0.60. Each satellite- and ground-based climatology shows that the hemispheric- mean cloudiness is larger in summer than that in winter in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Excluding Nimbus 7 observations, the zonal- mean cloudiness distributions for January, July, and July minus January display reasonably good agreement between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. In polar latitudes there is significant disagreement among the different climatologies, even in the sign of cloudiness changes from winter to summer. This evinces the need for special cloudiness experiments in polar regions, particularly in winter and summer.

  19. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  20. Comparison of ASTER, MASTER, and ground-based hyperspectral reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compares reflectance measured in the visible, near infrared, and short wave infrared wavelengths by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), MODIS/ASTER Airborne Simulator (MASTER), and ground based Analytical Spectral Devices Spectroradiometer (ASD) in a se...

  1. Plant diversity to support humans in a CELSS ground-based demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, J. M.; Hoff, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that influence the human nutritional requirements envisioned in a controlled ecological life support system ground-based demonstrator and on bioavailability experiments of Ca, Fe and Zn are discussed. The interrelationhip of protein and magnesium on Ca retention is also described.

  2. Modeling Basin-scale Runoffs with Precipitation Data from Ground-based Observations and Mesoscale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Yang, M.; Soong, R.; Hwang, S.

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the applicability of distributed basin-scale runoff modeling, driven by rainfall data from either ground-based observations or mesoscale simulations, in response to typhoons invading Taiwan. Typhoons Herb (1996) and Zeb (1998) were selected for calibrating the runoff parameters reflecting the landuse conditions in the basin and evaluating the applicability of observed and simulated rainfall data toward runoff estimations, respectively. Upstream basins of Reservoir Shihmen with a drainage area of 764 km2 and Reservoir Feitsui with a drainage area of 303 km2 were the domains of interest in this preliminary study. Ground-based observations of both stream flows and station rainfalls were collected in an hourly resolution. The mesoscale model,MM5, simulation for Herb was conducted in 4-nested grids with the finest resolution of 2.2 km and 2-nested grids with the finest resolution of 15 km for Zeb, and the time resolution for both cases was 5 minutes. Accumulated total rain was accommodated with terrain elevation in MM5 simulations and station data to provide areal rainfall distributions. While the ground-based observations were sparse and incapable of correctly representing areal rainfall characteristics, the MM5 simulated data may introduce great uncertainties in basin-scale hydrological applications. The experience learned from this study is expected to provide an applicable approach with both ground-based observations and mesoscale simulations in basin-scale runoff computations.

  3. Ground-Based Navigation and Dispersion Analysis for the Orion Exploration Mission 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D' Souza, Christopher; Holt, Greg; Zanetti, Renato; Wood, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the Orion Exploration Mission 1 Linear Covariance Analysis for the DRO mission using ground-based navigation. The Delta V statistics for each maneuver are presented. In particular, the statistics of the lunar encounters and the Entry Interface are presented.

  4. Ground-Based Remote Sensing of Water-Stressed Crops: Thermal and Multispectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ground-based methods of remote sensing can be used as ground-truthing for satellite-based remote sensing, and in some cases may be a more affordable means of obtaining such data. Plant canopy temperature has been used to indicate and quantify plant water stress. A field research study was conducted ...

  5. Methods for gully characterization in agricultural croplands using ground-based light detection and ranging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gullies constitute an important source of sediment from agricultural fields. In order to properly understand gully formation and evolution over time, as well as, sediment yield, detailed topographic representations of agricultural fields are required. New technologies such as ground-based Light Dete...

  6. Combined Spectral Index to Improve Ground-Based Estimates of Nitrogen Status in Dryland Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the single ratio Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and ground-based remote sensing for estimating crop yield potential and basing in-season nitrogen (N) fertilizer application. The NDVI is positively related to crop N status and leaf ar...

  7. The SMART Ground-based Remote Sensing for Terra/MODIS Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack; Barenbrug, M.; Lau, William K.-M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A ground-based remote sensing system - SMART (Surface Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) - was deployed during both the SAFARI-2000 and the ARREX-1999 dry season campaigns. The measurement site is the Skukuza airport. The operation period for 1999 is from August 16 to September 10. The main instruments include shortwave (approximately 0.28-2.8 micrometers) and longwave (approximately 4-50 micrometers) broadband radiometers, a shadow-band radiometer, a micro-pulse lidar, and a microwave radiometer. We also did some measurements of solar spectral flux by using an ASD spectrometer. The operation period for 2000 is from August 15 to September 22. This time we added a few new features to the SMART system: a solar tracker for direct and diffuse components of solar fluxes; the scanning capability to the microwave radiometer; a whole sky camera for documenting the sky conditions every minute; and a mini-weather station for atmospheric pressure, temperature, humidity, wind speed/direction. A surface SSFR (Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer) from NASA Ames also joined us for the measurements. This is a unique data set with reasonably long observational period and high accuracy. The data show good correlation with the local weather patterns. We also see diurnal change and some special events, such as fierce fires nearby. To quantify the surface radiative forcing of biomass burning aerosols, many pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and pyrheliometers measure the global, direct, and diffuse irradiance at the surface. These fluxes combining with the collocated optical thickness retrievals from sun photometer (or shadow-band radiometer), the solar radiative forcing, proportional to delta F/delta tau, can be investigated. Integrated with measurements of other instruments at the site, these data sets will serve as "ground truth" for the satellite measurements and modeling.

  8. Constraints on Mercury's Na Exosphere: Combined MESSENGER and Ground-Based Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouawad, Nelly; Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Potter, Andrew E.; McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; Benna, Mehdi; Naidu, Shantanu

    2010-01-01

    We have used observations of sodium emission obtained with the McMath-Pierce solar telescope and MESSENGER's Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) to constrain models of Mercury's sodium exosphere, The distribution of sodium in Mercury's exosphere during the period January 12-15. 2008. was mapped using the McMath-Pierce solar telescope with the 5" X 5" image slicer to observe the D-line emission. On January 14, 2008, the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel on MASCS sampled the sodium in Mercury's anti-sunward tail region. We find that the bound exosphere has an equivalent temperature of 900-1200 K, and that this temperature can be achieved if the sodium is ejected either by photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) with a 1200 K Maxwellian velocity distribution, or by thermal accommodation of a hotter source. We were not able to discriminate between the two assumed velocity distributions of the ejected particles for the PSD. but the velocity distributions require different values of the thermal accommodation coefficient and result in different upper limits on impact vaporization, We were able to place a strong constraint on the impact vaporization rate that results in the release of neutral Na atoms with an upper limit of 2.1 x 10(exp 6) sq cm/s, The variability of the week-long ground-based observations can be explained by variations in the sources, including both PSD and ion-enhanced PSD, as well as possible temporal enhancements in meteoroid vaporization. Knowledge of both dayside and anti-sunward tail morphologies and radiances are necessary to correctly deduce the exospheric source rates, processes, velocity distribution, and surface interaction.

  9. Characterization of Oribtal Debris via Hyper-Velocity Ground-Based Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Existing DoD and NASA satellite breakup models are based on a key laboratory-based test, Satellite Orbital debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT), which has supported many applications and matched on-orbit events involving older satellite designs reasonably well over the years. In order to update and improve the break-up models and the NASA Size Estimation Model (SEM) for events involving more modern satellite designs, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has worked in collaboration with the University of Florida to replicate a hypervelocity impact using a satellite built with modern-day spacecraft materials and construction techniques. The spacecraft, called DebriSat, was intended to be a representative of modern LEO satellites and all major designs decisions were reviewed and approved by subject matter experts at Aerospace Corporation. DebriSat is composed of 7 major subsystems including attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), electrical power system (EPS), payload, propulsion, telemetry tracking and command (TT&C), and thermal management. To reduce cost, most components are emulated based on existing design of flight hardware and fabricated with the same materials. All fragments down to 2 mm is size will be characterized via material, size, shape, bulk density, and the associated data will be stored in a database for multiple users to access. Laboratory radar and optical measurements will be performed on a subset of fragments to provide a better understanding of the data products from orbital debris acquired from ground-based radars and telescopes. The resulting data analysis from DebriSat will be used to update break-up models and develop the first optical SEM in conjunction with updates into the current NASA SEM. The characterization of the fragmentation will be discussed in the subsequent presentation.

  10. Joint Cassini, Galileo and Ground-Based Infrared Observations of Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, G.; Fisher, B.; Barnard, L.; Edberg, S.; Martin, T.; Spilker, L.; Tamppari, L.; Ustinov, E.; Harrington, J.; Conrath, B.; Gierasch, P.; Deming, D.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V.; Achterberg, R.; Bjoraker, G.; Brasunas, J.; Carlson, R.; Jennings, D.; Nixon, C.; Pearl, J.; Romani, P.; Samuelson, R.; Simon-Miller, A.; Smith, M.; Abbas, M.; Ade, P.; Barucci, A.; Bezard, B.; Courtin, R.; Coustenis, A.; Gautier, D.; Lellouch, E.; Marten, A.; Calcutt, S.; Irwin, P.; Read, P.; Taylor, F.; Owen, T.; Cesarsky, C.; Ferrari, C.; Meyer, J. P.; Travis, L.; Coradini, A.; Prangee, R.; Grossman, K.; Spencer, J.

    2001-11-01

    During the simultanous Galileo and Cassini encounter with Jupiter in December, 2000, and January, 2001, data on its atmosphere were obtained simultaneously by (1) Galileo's Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) at 27 microns, (2) Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) between 7 and 16 microns, and (3) ground-based imaging from the NASA IRTF between 5 and 24 microns. These data sets mapped temperature structure, minor and trace constituent abundances and the NH3 condensate cloud field. Features observed by the three sets of data included the Great Red Spot (GRS), the merged white oval ``BA'', and 5-micron hot spots. In addition, the IRTF data provided (a) contextual information for planetary-scale and regional phenomena, such as thermal waves and polar airmasses, as well as (b) a study of the evolution of various phenomena. The GRS remains the coldest feature in Jupiter's upper troposphere at temperate or equatorial latitudes, and it is consistent with an upwelling cyclonic vortex. A warm region remains semi-permanently associated with it to the south. Little thermal variability is detectable that can be associated with the 5-micron hot spots. Jupiter exhibits seasonal variability in its stratosphere, and the ``quasiquadrennial oscillation'' of the last 12 years dominates the time variability of the stratosphere. Greater than normal abundances of NH3 gas are associated with regions of substantial cloudiness. The meridional variability of zonally averaged para-H2 abundances is similar to that observed by Voyager IRIS at Jupiter; it is more abundant in the Great Red Spot than in surrouding regions. Implications of these and other observations will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA grants to JPL, GSFC and Cornell, as well as the Galileo and Cassini projects.

  11. Ground-based Detection and Analysis of the LCROSS Impact Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strycker, Paul D.; Chanover, N. J.; Miller, C.; Hamilton, R. T.; Hermalyn, B.; Suggs, R. M.

    2012-10-01

    We observed the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) lunar impact on 9 October 2009 using the Agile camera with a V filter on the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. We employed a principal component analysis (PCA) to filter out large-scale seeing effects and imperfections in image registration from a series of 0.5-second images spanning eight minutes centered on the Centaur upper stage impact time. After applying the PCA filter, we detected an evolving plume from approximately 5-35 seconds after impact. We validated our detection method by comparing the time-varying plume brightness profiles from the LCROSS plume to those extracted from a synthetic image sequence that included a simulated plume. We performed 3-D ballistic simulations of trial plumes, extracted images with the correct viewing geometry from these simulations at 0.5-second intervals, superimposed these onto a computer-generated lunar landscape, and added actual seeing conditions and noise sources. We then extracted synthetic plume brightness profiles with the identical PCA filtering algorithm used to extract the LCROSS plume and compared them to the LCROSS plume brightness profiles. This comparison confirmed that the maximum surface brightness of the LCROSS plume was below the reported 3-σ detection limit for unfiltered data of 9.5 magnitudes arcsec-2 at 4 km above the impact point (Chanover et al. 2011, JGR, 116, 8003). We generated two-part synthetic plumes consisting of a high-angle and low-angle component and compared brightness profiles of our synthetic plumes to our observed LCROSS plume to constrain the relative particle densities and initial velocities of the two components. The temporal evolution of the plume that we extracted from our ground-based observations of the LCROSS impact, combined with our ballistic modeling, provides insight into the plume dynamics. This has important implications for future lunar impact studies and

  12. Multiple ground-based and satellite observations of global Pi 2 magnetic pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Yumoto, K. ); Takahashi, K. ); Sakurai, T. ); Sutcliffe, P.R. ); Kokubun, S. ); Luehr, H. ); Saito, T. ); Kuwashima, M. ); Sato, N. )

    1990-09-01

    Four Pi 2 magnetic pulsations, observed on the ground at L = 1.2-6.9 in the interval from 2,300 UT on May 22 to 0300 UT on May 23, 1985, provide new evidence of a global nature of Pi 2 pulsations in the inner (L {approx lt} 7) region of the magnetosphere bounded by the plasma sheet during quiet geomagnetic conditions. In the present study, magnetic data have been collected from stations distributed widely both in local time and in latitude, including conjugate stations, and from the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft located in the magnetotail. On the basis of high time resolution magnetic field data, the following characteristics of Pi 2 have been established: horizontal components, H and D, of the Pi 2 oscillate nearly antiphase and in-phase, respectively, between the high- and low-altitude stations in the midnight southern hemisphere. Both the H and D components of the Pi 2 have nearly in-phase relationships between the nightside and the dayside stations at low latitude. The Pi 2 amplitude is larger at the high-latitude station and decreases toward lower latitudes. The dominant periods of the Pi 2 are nearly identical at all stations. Although a direct coincidence between spacecraft-observed and ground-based global Pi 2 events does not exist for these events, the Pi 2 events are believed to be a forced field line oscillation of global scale, coupled with the magnetospheric cavity resonance wave in the inner magnetosphere during the substorm expansive phase.

  13. Observing wind, aerosol particles, cloud and precipitation: Finland's new ground-based remote-sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; O'Connor, E. J.; Komppula, M.; Korhonen, K.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Wood, C. R.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Poikonen, A.; Karppinen, T.; Lonka, H.; Kurri, M.; Heinonen, J.; Moisseev, D.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Nordbo, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laurila, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.

    2013-08-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute, in collaboration with the University of Helsinki, has established a new ground-based remote-sensing network in Finland. The network consists of five topographically, ecologically and climatically different sites distributed from southern to northern Finland. The main goal of the network is to monitor air pollution and boundary layer properties in near real time, with a Doppler lidar and ceilometer at each site. In addition to these operational tasks, two sites are members of the Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS); a Ka-band Doppler cloud radar at Sodankylä will provide cloud retrievals within CloudNet, and a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, POLLYXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended), in Kuopio provides optical and microphysical aerosol properties through EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network to Establish an Aerosol Climatology). Three C-band weather radars are located in the Helsinki metropolitan area and are deployed for operational and research applications. We carried out two inter-comparison campaigns to investigate the Doppler lidar performance. The aims of the campaigns were to compare the backscatter coefficient and retrieved wind profiles, and to optimise the lidar sensitivity through adjusting the telescope focus and data-integration time to ensure enough signals in low-aerosol-content environments. The wind profiles showed good agreement between different lidars. However, due to inaccurate telescope focus setting and varying receiver sensitivity, backscatter coefficient profiles showed disagreement between the lidars. Harsh Finnish winters could pose problems, but, due to the built-in heating systems, low ambient temperatures had no, or only a minor, impact on the lidar operation: including scanning-head motion. However, accumulation of snow and ice on the lens has been observed, which can lead to formation of a water/ice layer thus attenuating the signal inconsistently

  14. Ground-based simulation of LEO environment: Investigations of a select LDEF material: FEP Teflon (trademark)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has produced a wealth of data on materials degradation in the low earth orbit (LEO) space environment and has conclusively shown that surface chemistry (as opposed to surface physics-sputtering) is the key to understanding and predicting the degradation of materials in the LEO environment. It is also clear that materials degradation and spacecraft contamination are closely linked and that the fundamental mechanisms responsible for this linking are in general not well understood especially in the area of synergistic effects. The study of the fundamental mechanisms underlying materials degradation in LEO is hampered by the fact that the degradation process itself is not observed during the actual exposure to the environment. Rather the aftermath of the degradation process is studied, i.e., the material that remains after exposure is observed and mechanisms are proposed to explain the observed results. The EOIM-3 flight experiment is an attempt to bring sophisticated diagnostic equipment into the space environment and monitor the degradation process in real time through the use of mass spectrometry. More experiments of this nature which would include surface sensitive diagnostics (Auger and photoelectron spectroscopes) are needed to truly unravel the basic chemical mechanisms involved in the materials degradation process. Since these in-space capabilities will most likely not be available in the near future, ground-based LEO simulation facilities employing sophisticated diagnostics are needed to further advance the basic understanding of the materials degradation mechanisms. The LEO simulation facility developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been used to investigate the atomic oxygen/vacuum ultraviolet (AO/VUV) enhanced degradation of FEP Teflon. The results show that photo-ejection of polymer fragments occur at elevated temperature (200 C), that VUV synergistic rare gas sputtering of polymer fragments occur even at

  15. Ground-Cover Measurements: Assessing Correlation Among Aerial and Ground-Based Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, D. Terrance; Cox, Samuel E.; Meikle, Tim; Zuuring, Hans R.

    2008-12-01

    Wyoming’s Green Mountain Common Allotment is public land providing livestock forage, wildlife habitat, and unfenced solitude, amid other ecological services. It is also the center of ongoing debate over USDI Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) adjudication of land uses. Monitoring resource use is a BLM responsibility, but conventional monitoring is inadequate for the vast areas encompassed in this and other public-land units. New monitoring methods are needed that will reduce monitoring costs. An understanding of data-set relationships among old and new methods is also needed. This study compared two conventional methods with two remote sensing methods using images captured from two meters and 100 meters above ground level from a camera stand (a ground, image-based method) and a light airplane (an aerial, image-based method). Image analysis used SamplePoint or VegMeasure software. Aerial methods allowed for increased sampling intensity at low cost relative to the time and travel required by ground methods. Costs to acquire the aerial imagery and measure ground cover on 162 aerial samples representing 9000 ha were less than 3000. The four highest correlations among data sets for bare ground—the ground-cover characteristic yielding the highest correlations (r)—ranged from 0.76 to 0.85 and included ground with ground, ground with aerial, and aerial with aerial data-set associations. We conclude that our aerial surveys are a cost-effective monitoring method, that ground with aerial data-set correlations can be equal to, or greater than those among ground-based data sets, and that bare ground should continue to be investigated and tested for use as a key indicator of rangeland health.

  16. A method for retrieving the cumulus entrainment rate from ground based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Timothy J.

    2011-12-01

    The entrainment of drier environmental air into cumulus clouds affects the impact that these clouds have on the environment by modifying their radiative, microphysical, and thermodynamic characteristics. Entrainment is a difficult parameter to observe directly, and heretofore has been obtained from occasional aircraft penetrations. To increase the number of cumulus entrainment rate observations under a wide range of atmospheric conditions, an algorithm for retrieving the cumulus entrainment rate from ground-based remote sensing observations has been developed. This algorithm, called the Entrainment Rate In Cumulus Algorithm (ERICA), uses the suite of instruments at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site of the United States Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility as inputs into a Gauss-Newton optimal estimation scheme. The forward model in this algorithm is the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), a cloud parcel model that treats entrainment as a series of discrete mixing events. Output from EMPM is used to calculate quantities that can be observed from the surface, including effective radius and liquid water path. The entrainment rate in EMPM is adjusted iteratively until the modeled output converges to the observations. Sensitivity testing and error and information content analysis show that ERICA is a robust method for obtaining accurate estimates of entrainment rate without the drawbacks of aircraft observations. Results from a three-month trial of ERICA show significant variability of the entrainment rate of clouds in a single day and from one day to the next. The mean value from this analysis corresponds well with prior knowledge of the entrainment rate.

  17. The GOME-2 total column ozone product: Retrieval algorithm and ground-based validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyola, D. G.; Koukouli, M. E.; Valks, P.; Balis, D. S.; Hao, N.; van Roozendael, M.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Zimmer, W.; Kiemle, S.; Lerot, C.; Lambert, J.-C.

    2011-04-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2) was launched on EUMESAT's MetOp-A satellite in October 2006. This paper is concerned with the retrieval algorithm GOME Data Processor (GDP) version 4.4 used by the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Monitoring (O3M-SAF) for the operational generation of GOME-2 total ozone products. GDP 4.4 is the latest version of the GDP 4.0 algorithm, which is employed for the generation of official Level 2 total ozone and other trace gas products from GOME and SCIAMACHY. Here we focus on enhancements introduced in GDP 4.4: improved cloud retrieval algorithms including detection of Sun glint effects, a correction for intracloud ozone, better treatment of snow and ice conditions, accurate radiative transfer modeling for large viewing angles, and elimination of scan angle dependencies inherited from Level 1 radiances. Furthermore, the first global validation results for 3 years (2007-2009) of GOME-2/MetOp-A total ozone measurements using Brewer and Dobson measurements as references are presented. The GOME-2/MetOp-A total ozone data obtained with GDP 4.4 slightly underestimates ground-based ozone by about 0.5% to 1% over the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere and slightly overestimates by around 0.5% over the middle latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere. Over high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, GOME-2 total ozone has almost no offset relative to Dobson readings, while over high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere GOME-2 exhibits a small negative bias below 1%. For tropical latitudes, GOME-2 measures on average lower ozone by 0% to 2% compared to Dobson measurements.

  18. Evaluation of Radar Vegetation Indices for Vegetation Water Content Estimation Using Data from a Ground-Based SMAP Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; O'Neill, Peggy; Cosh, Michael; Lang, Roger; Joseph, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation water content (VWC) is an important component of microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms. This paper aims to estimate VWC using L band active and passive radar/radiometer datasets obtained from a NASA ground-based Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) simulator known as ComRAD (Combined Radar/Radiometer). Several approaches to derive vegetation information from radar and radiometer data such as HH, HV, VV, Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI), HH/VV ratio, HV/(HH+VV), HV/(HH+HV+VV) and Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) are tested for VWC estimation through a generalized linear model (GLM). The overall analysis indicates that HV radar backscattering could be used for VWC content estimation with highest performance followed by HH, VV, MPDI, RVI, and other ratios.

  19. The Irregular Shape of (21) Lutetia as Determined from Ground-based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, A.; Carry, B.; Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Chapman, C. R.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Christou, J. C.; Dumas, C.; Weaver, H. A.; Rosetta OSIRIS Instument Team

    2010-12-01

    We report the results of our campaign to improve our understanding of the physical characteristics of asteroid (21) Lutetia ahead of the Rosetta flyby in 2010 July. This included measurements of shape, size, pole, density, and a search for satellites. We utilized primarily adaptive optics (AO) on large ground-based telescopes (Keck, Gemini, and VLT). We coordinated these efforts with HST observations (Weaver et al. 2010, A&A 518, A4), made in support of Rosetta’s ALICE UV spectrometer. Preliminary results were supplied to Rosetta mission teams in fall of 2009 to assist in planning for the mission. Observations and analyses were complete and submitted for publication before the flyby (Drummond et al. 2010, A&A, in press; Carry et al. 2010, A&A, in press). Using more than 300 AO images of Lutetia, which subtended only slightly more than two resolution-elements (0.10”) for these large telescopes, we were able to derive accurate size and shape information, as well as a pole and spin period. We modeled the size and shape using both a triaxial-ellipsoid model and a 3D radius-vector model. The radius-vector model used our new technique of multi-dataset inversion, called KOALA (for Knitted Occultation, Adaptive optics, and Lightcurve Analysis), in which we utilized not only our AO imaging, but also 50 lightcurves spanning 48 years. We combined the best aspects of each model to produce our best-estimate 3D shape model, a hybrid having ellipsoid-equivalent dimensions of 124 x 101 x 93 km (± 5 x 4 x 13 km) and effective diameter 105 ± 7 km. We found the spin axis of Lutetia to lie within 5 deg of [long, lat (52,-6)] or [RA DEC (52,+12)] and determined an improved sidereal period of 8.168270 ± 0.000001 h. We predicted the geometry of Lutetia during the flyby and showed that the southern hemisphere would be in seasonal shadow at that time. The model suggested the presence of several concavities and irregularities that may be associated with large impacts. The model

  20. New measurements of Venus winds with ground-based Doppler velocimetry at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, P.; Widemann, T.; Luz, D.; Peralta, J.; Berry, D. L.

    2012-04-01

    measurements made with the VMC camera onboard the Venus Express. We will present first results from this work, comparing with previous results by the CFHT/ESPaDOnS and VLT-UVES spectrographs (Machado et al., 2012), with Galileo fly-by measurements and with VEx nominal mission observations (Peralta et al., 2007, Luz et al., 2011). Acknowledgements: The authors acknowledge support from FCT through projects PTDC/CTE-AST/110702/2009 and PEst-OE/FIS/UI2751/2011. PM and TW also acknowledge support from the Observatoire de Paris. Lellouch, E., and Witasse, O., A coordinated campaign of Venus ground-based observations and Venus Express measurements, Planetary and Space Science 56 (2008) 1317-1319. Luz, D., et al., Venus's polar vortex reveals precessing circulation, Science 332 (2011) 577-580. Machado, P., Luz, D. Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., Witasse, O, Characterizing the atmospheric dynamics of Venus from ground-based Doppler velocimetry, Icarus, submitted. Peralta J., R. Hueso, A. Sánchez-Lavega, A reanalysis of Venus winds at two cloud levels from Galileo SSI images, Icarus 190 (2007) 469-477. Widemann, T., Lellouch, E., Donati, J.-F., 2008, Venus Doppler winds at Cloud Tops Observed with ESPaDOnS at CFHT, Planetary and Space Science, 56, 1320-1334.

  1. Comparing distinct ground-based lightning location networks covering the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Lotte; Leijnse, Hidde; Schmeits, Maurice; Beekhuis, Hans; Poelman, Dieter; Evers, Läslo; Smets, Pieter

    2015-04-01

    Lightning can be detected using a ground-based sensor network. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) monitors lightning activity in the Netherlands with the so-called FLITS-system; a network combining SAFIR-type sensors. This makes use of Very High Frequency (VHF) as well as Low Frequency (LF) sensors. KNMI has recently decided to replace FLITS by data from a sub-continental network operated by Météorage which makes use of LF sensors only (KNMI Lightning Detection Network, or KLDN). KLDN is compared to the FLITS system, as well as Met Office's long-range Arrival Time Difference (ATDnet), which measures Very Low Frequency (VLF). Special focus lies on the ability to detect Cloud to Ground (CG) and Cloud to Cloud (CC) lightning in the Netherlands. Relative detection efficiency of individual flashes and lightning activity in a more general sense are calculated over a period of almost 5 years. Additionally, the detection efficiency of each system is compared to a ground-truth that is constructed from flashes that are detected by both of the other datasets. Finally, infrasound data is used as a fourth lightning data source for several case studies. Relative performance is found to vary strongly with location and time. As expected, it is found that FLITS detects significantly more CC lightning (because of the strong aptitude of VHF antennas to detect CC), though KLDN and ATDnet detect more CG lightning. We analyze statistics computed over the entire 5-year period, where we look at CG as well as total lightning (CC and CG combined). Statistics that are considered are the Probability of Detection (POD) and the so-called Lightning Activity Detection (LAD). POD is defined as the percentage of reference flashes the system detects compared to the total detections in the reference. LAD is defined as the fraction of system recordings of one or more flashes in predefined area boxes over a certain time period given the fact that the reference detects at least one

  2. Coordinated use of ground-based auroral and high-precision LEO magnetic and electric field measurements to investigate auroral electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2008-12-01

    There are now dozens of sensitive All-Sky Imagers (ASIs) deployed in networks spanning latitudes from the subauroral zone into the polar cap and many hours of magnetic local time. These new networks are collecting data with unprecedented spatial coverage and temporal resolution and in numerous scientifically interesting wavelength ranges. As well, direct satellite overflights of ground-based images that were once rare occurrences are becoming increasingly commonplace. This talk will focus on the scientific opportunities afforded by the integrated use of ground-based auroral images and magnetic and electric field data from existing and planned LEO missions including CHAMP, Oersted, and Swarm. These opportunities include exploring the relationship between field-aligned current and Poynting flux and different types of aurora, as well as reducing spatio-temporal ambiguity in the in situ measurements.

  3. The Aries auroral modelling campaign - Characterization and modelling of an evening auroral arc observed from a rocket and a ground-based line of meridian scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. V.; Gattinger, R. L.; Creutzberg, F.; Harris, F. R.; Mcnamara, A. G.; Yau, A. W.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Mcdade, I. C.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the Aries experiments and results is presented with specific attention given to the tomographic analysis developed from ground-based photometric data. The instrumentation includes particle detectors, rocket photometers, plasma probes, and 1-deg meridian scanning photometers, and an all-sky TV system. The geophysical conditions during the observations are described including the auroral features and wavelengths, rocket trajectories, and the effectiveness of particle measurements. The tomographic inversion is explained with examples of rocket-photometer height data and contrasted with ground-based photometric data. The modeling techniques used to derive height profiles are described and indirectly compared to measured auroral intensities and intensity ratios. An enhancement of atomic oxygen is inferred from discrepancies with previous studies which confirm the difference between observed intensity ratios and modeled results.

  4. Analysis of stratospheric NO2 trends above Jungfraujoch using ground-based UV-visible, FTIR, and satellite nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; Bodeker, G. E.; Boersma, K. F.; Chipperfield, M. P.; De Mazière, M.; De Smedt, I.; Demoulin, P.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Kreher, K.; Lejeune, B.; Pinardi, G.; Servais, C.; Stübi, R.; van der A, R.; Vernier, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2012-05-01

    The trend in stratospheric NO2 column at the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) station of Jungfraujoch (46.5° N, 8.0° E) is assessed using ground-based FTIR and zenith-scattered visible sunlight SAOZ measurements over the period 1990 to 2009 as well as a composite satellite nadir data set constructed from ERS-2/GOME, ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY, and METOP-A/GOME-2 observations over the 1996-2009 period. To calculate the trends, a linear least squares regression model including explanatory variables for a linear trend, the mean annual cycle, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar activity, and stratospheric aerosol loading is used. For the 1990-2009 period, statistically indistinguishable trends of -3.7 ± 1.1%/decade and -3.6 ± 0.9%/decade are derived for the SAOZ and FTIR NO2 column time series, respectively. SAOZ, FTIR, and satellite nadir data sets show a similar decrease over the 1996-2009 period, with trends of -2.4 ± 1.1%/decade, -4.3 ± 1.4%/decade, and -3.6 ± 2.2%/decade, respectively. The fact that these declines are opposite in sign to the globally observed +2.5%/decade trend in N2O, suggests that factors other than N2O are driving the evolution of stratospheric NO2 at northern mid-latitudes. Possible causes of the decrease in stratospheric NO2 columns have been investigated. The most likely cause is a change in the NO2/NO partitioning in favor of NO, due to a possible stratospheric cooling and a decrease in stratospheric chlorine content, the latter being further confirmed by the negative trend in the ClONO2 column derived from FTIR observations at Jungfraujoch. Decreasing ClO concentrations slows the NO + ClO → NO2 + Cl reaction and a stratospheric cooling slows the NO + O3 → NO2 + O2 reaction, leaving more NOx in the form of NO. The slightly positive trends in ozone estimated from ground- and satellite-based data sets are also consistent with the decrease of NO2 through the NO2 + O3 → NO3 + O2 reaction. Finally

  5. Analysis of stratospheric NO2 trends above Jungfraujoch using ground-based UV-visible, FTIR, and satellite nadir observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick, F.; Mahieu, E.; Bodeker, G. E.; Boersma, K. F.; Chipperfield, M. P.; De Mazière, M.; De Smedt, I.; Demoulin, P.; Fayt, C.; Hermans, C.; Kreher, K.; Lejeune, B.; Pinardi, G.; Servais, C.; Stübi, R.; van der A, R.; Vernier, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2012-09-01

    The trend in stratospheric NO2 column at the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) station of Jungfraujoch (46.5° N, 8.0° E) is assessed using ground-based FTIR and zenith-scattered visible sunlight SAOZ measurements over the period 1990 to 2009 as well as a composite satellite nadir data set constructed from ERS-2/GOME, ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY, and METOP-A/GOME-2 observations over the 1996-2009 period. To calculate the trends, a linear least squares regression model including explanatory variables for a linear trend, the mean annual cycle, the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), solar activity, and stratospheric aerosol loading is used. For the 1990-2009 period, statistically indistinguishable trends of -3.7 ± 1.1% decade-1 and -3.6 ± 0.9% decade-1 are derived for the SAOZ and FTIR NO2 column time series, respectively. SAOZ, FTIR, and satellite nadir data sets show a similar decrease over the 1996-2009 period, with trends of -2.4 ± 1.1% decade-1, -4.3 ± 1.4% decade-1, and -3.6 ± 2.2% decade-1, respectively. The fact that these declines are opposite in sign to the globally observed +2.5% decade-1 trend in N2O, suggests that factors other than N2O are driving the evolution of stratospheric NO2 at northern mid-latitudes. Possible causes of the decrease in stratospheric NO2 columns have been investigated. The most likely cause is a change in the NO2/NO partitioning in favor of NO, due to a possible stratospheric cooling and a decrease in stratospheric chlorine content, the latter being further confirmed by the negative trend in the ClONO2 column derived from FTIR observations at Jungfraujoch. Decreasing ClO concentrations slows the NO + ClO → NO2 + Cl reaction and a stratospheric cooling slows the NO + O3 → NO2 + O2 reaction, leaving more NOx in the form of NO. The slightly positive trends in ozone estimated from ground- and satellite-based data sets are also consistent with the decrease of NO2 through the NO2 + O3 → NO3 + O2

  6. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, ground-based solar spectropolarimetry with a new fast imaging polarimeter. I. Prototype characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, F. A.; Feller, A.; Nagaraju, K.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Remote sensing of weak and small-scale solar magnetic fields is of utmost relevance when attempting to respond to a number of important open questions in solar physics. This requires the acquisition of spectropolarimetric data with high spatial resolution (~10-1 arcsec) and low noise (10-3 to 10-5 of the continuum intensity). The main limitations to obtain these measurements from the ground, are the degradation of the image resolution produced by atmospheric seeing and the seeing-induced crosstalk (SIC). Aims: We introduce the prototype of the Fast Solar Polarimeter (FSP), a new ground-based, high-cadence polarimeter that tackles the above-mentioned limitations by producing data that are optimally suited for the application of post-facto image restoration, and by operating at a modulation frequency of 100 Hz to reduce SIC. Methods: We describe the instrument in depth, including the fast pnCCD camera employed, the achromatic modulator package, the main calibration steps, the effects of the modulation frequency on the levels of seeing-induced spurious signals, and the effect of the camera properties on the image restoration quality. Results: The pnCCD camera reaches 400 fps while keeping a high duty cycle (98.6%) and very low noise (4.94 e- rms). The modulator is optimized to have high (>80%) total polarimetric efficiency in the visible spectral range. This allows FSP to acquire 100 photon-noise-limited, full-Stokes measurements per second. We found that the seeing induced signals that are present in narrow-band, non-modulated, quiet-sun measurements are (a) lower than the noise (7 × 10-5) after integrating 7.66 min, (b) lower than the noise (2.3 × 10-4) after integrating 1.16 min and (c) slightly above the noise (4 × 10-3) after restoring case (b) by means of a multi-object multi-frame blind deconvolution. In addition, we demonstrate that by using only narrow-band images (with low S/N of 13.9) of an active region, we can obtain one complete set of high

  7. Insights into Io’s volcanoes by combining ground-based and spacecraft data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.; Howell, Robert; Lopes, Rosaly

    2015-11-01

    combined to yield greater information into the nature of Io’s volcanism and we will discuss how ground-based observations during future missions can be optimized for the greatest scientific output.

  8. Ground-based microwave remote sensing of temperature inversions in the Bergen valley, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Tobias; Esau, Igor; Reuder, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The temperature profiles in the urbanized Bergen valley, Norway, are characterized by wintertime temperature inversions, which have a strong impact on the surface layer air quality in the city. We present the results from two years of vertical temperature profile measurements obtained with the ground-based microwave temperature profiler MTP-5HE and show the advantages of ground-based remote sensing with this instrument for the monitoring of atmospheric temperature inversions. From a subset of the final, filtered dataset we found that the mean difference between temperatures measured with the MTP-5HE and an automatic meteorological station (AMS) on a nearby mountain was as low as -0.03 ± 0.78 K during inversion free conditions and -0.06 ± 0.71 K during ground-based temperature inversions. The only selection criterion for this subset was a wind speed of more than 5 m/s and to ensure comparability between the location of the AMS and the central valley atmosphere. We found two regimes of ground-based inversions: Non-persistent inversions lasting shorter than 2 hours that are mostly thinner than 100 m and more persistent inversions often reaching 270 m above sea level. The height of the shorter inversions was consistent with the maximum height of inversions found in a previous study based on tethersonde measurements. Ground-based inversions mostly occurred during situations characterized by weak winds in the ERA-Interim reanalysis, to a large degree independent from wind direction. A distinct south-easterly tail in the ERA-Interim wind distribution with wind speeds as high as 16 m/s might have been connected to a wake effect from a nearby mountain. The strong channeling effect within the valley that was also found in previous studies was evident. The ground-based remote sensing was particularly useful for the monitoring of elevated temperature inversions between 170 m and 720 m above sea level. This kind of inversions has not been observed in this valley before. They

  9. Evaluation of Tropical Cirrus Cloud Properties Derived from ECMWF Model Output and Ground Based Measurements over Nauru Island

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Jakob, Christian

    2004-05-26

    Cirrus clouds play an important role both radiatively and dynamically in the tropics. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the formation and persistence of tropical cirrus is an important step in accurately predicting cirrus in forecast models. In this study, we compare ground-based measurements of cloud properties with those predicted by the ECMWF model at a location in the tropical western Pacific. Our comparisons of cloud height and optical depth over an 8 month time period indicate that the model and measurements agree relatively well. The ECMWF model predicts cirrus anvils associated with deep convection during convectively active periods, and also isolated cirrus events that are influenced by large-scale vertical ascent. We also show through examination of an upper tropospheric cirrus case that the model produces tropospheric waves that appear to influence the morphology and maintenance of the cirrus layer.

  10. Ground-based radiometric calibration of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) using in situ techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.

    2013-12-01

    Landsat 8 was successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on 11 February 2013, and was placed into the orbit previously occupied by Landsat 5. Landsat 8 is the latest platform in the 40-year history of the Landsat series of satellites, and it contains two instruments that operate in the solar-reflective and the thermal infrared regimes. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) is a pushbroom sensor that contains eight multispectral bands ranging from 400-2300 nm, and one panchromatic band. The spatial resolution of the multispectral bands is 30 m, which is similar to previous Landsat sensors, and the panchromatic band has a 15-m spatial resolution, which is also similar to previous Landsat sensors. The 12-bit radiometric resolution of OLI improves upon the 8-bit resolution of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) onboard Landsat 7. An important requirement for the Landsat program is the long-term radiometric continuity of its sensors. Ground-based vicarious techniques have been used for over 20 years to determine the absolute radiometric calibration of sensors that encompass a wide variety of spectral and spatial characteristics. This work presents the early radiometric calibration results of Landsat 8 OLI that were obtained using the traditional reflectance-based approach. University of Arizona personnel used five sites in Arizona, California, and Nevada to collect ground-based data. In addition, a unique set of in situ data were collected in March 2013, when Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 were observing the same site within minutes of each other. The tandem overfly schedule occurred while Landsat 8 was shifting to the WRS-2 orbital grid, and lasted only a few days. The ground-based data also include results obtained using the University of Arizona's Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS), which is an automated suite of instruments located at Railroad Valley, Nevada. The results presented in this work include a comparison to the L1T at

  11. Ground-Based Observations of Io's Volcanos in Support of the Galileo Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.; Dumas, C.; Vakil, D.

    1996-09-01

    We have obtained frequent 1.7--4.8 mu m observations of Io's volcanic thermal emission in 1995 and 1996, from the NASA IRTF on Mauna Kea and from Lowell Observatory. In 1995 there were several dramatic volcanic events, including major outbursts on the leading hemisphere in March and September 1995; one of Loki's periodic brightenings during the Fall of 1995, in the months before the Galileo Io flyby; and three high-temperature events of a few weeks' duration (in late March, July, and August) on the Jupiter-facing hemisphere. In contrast, intensive monitoring in 1996 has shown no bright volcanic events at all between early February and mid-August. High-quality IRTF observations in June 1996, near the time of the first Galileo images at the "G1" encounter, provided fluxes and locations for up to 11 faint hot spots on the Jupiter-facing hemisphere. Due to the loss of Galileo G1 NIMS and PPR Io observations, these and other ground-based observations provided our only information on Io's volcanic thermal emission at the time that the Galileo images were taken. Notable features of the volcanic emission at the G1 encounter included the following: (i) Loki's thermal emission was at the faint end of its normal range. Its 3.5 mu m flux was about 6 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) , compared to about 34 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) at the time of the Voyager 1 flyby (Pearl and Sinton 1982), and about 70 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) during the winter 1991 Loki brightening (Spencer et al. 1994). (ii) No 3.5 mu m emission was seen from Ra Patera, the site of a plume seen by Galileo, with an upper flux limit of about 1 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) . This suggests that the current Ra plume eruption is from a low-temperature source: cooler than 370 K for a source diameter of 20 km, for example. (iii) A small burst of thermal emission from Surt, with a 3.5 mu m flux of 5 GW mu m(-1) str(-1) , was seen in early and late June. Surt is not normally a site of detectable emission in groundbased observations, though it may have

  12. Summary of flight tests of an airborne lighting locator system and comparison with ground-based measurements of precipitation and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, B. D.; Crabill, N. L.

    1981-01-01

    Data from an airborne lightning locator system and data relating to storm intensity obtained by ground-based Doppler radars and the S-band research radar are presented. When comparing lightning locations from the airborne lightning locator system with ground-based Doppler radar measurements of reflectivity and spectrum width, the lightning locations tended to be further from the aircraft position than the Doppler radar contours, but at the same relative bearing from the aircraft as the Doppler contours. The results also show that convective storms generate little or no lightning for a significant part of their life cycle, but can produce at least moderate turbulence. Therefore, it is concluded that a lack of lightning activity cannot be accepted as an inference of a corresponding lack of other hazards to the flight of aircraft through convective storms.

  13. PICARD SOL, a new ground-based facility for long-term solar radius measurements: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Corbard, T.; Irbah, A.; Morand, F.; Ikhlef, R.; Renaud, C.; Hauchecorne, A.; Assus, P.; Chauvineau, B.; Crepel, M.; Dalaudier, F.; Djafer, D.; Fodil, M.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Poiet, G.

    2013-06-01

    PICARD SOL is the ground component of the PICARD mission and is operational since March 2011. A set of instruments including the replica of the space instrument and several atmospheric monitors was set up at Calern observatory in order to compare solar radius measured in space and on ground and to better understand and calibrate atmospheric effects on ground based measurements. SODISMII provides full disk images of the chromosphere and photosphere of the Sun in five narrow pass bands ranging from the near ultraviolet to the near infrared. Our preliminary results show a very good instrumental stability. After plate scale calibration using star doublet observations and corrections for atmospheric refraction, first estimates of the mean solar radius at the five wavelengths (393.37, 535.7, 607.1, 782.2, and 1025.0nm) are deduced from measurements recorded between May 2011 and December 2012.

  14. THE 1998 NOVEMBER 14 OCCULTATION OF GSC 0622-00345 BY SATURN. I. TECHNIQUES FOR GROUND-BASED STELLAR OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Joseph; French, Richard G. E-mail: rfrench@wellesley.ed

    2010-06-10

    On 1998 November 14, Saturn and its rings occulted the star GSC 0622-00345. We observed atmospheric immersion with NSFCAM at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Immersion occurred at 55.{sup 0}5 S planetocentric latitude. A 2.3 {mu}m, CH{sub 4}-band filter suppressed reflected sunlight. Atmospheric emersion and ring data were not successfully obtained. We describe our observation, light curve production, and timing techniques, including improvements in aperture positioning, removal of telluric scintillation effects, and timing. Many of these techniques are known within the occultation community, but have not been described in the reviewed literature. We present a light curve whose signal-to-noise ratio per scale height is 267, among the best ground-based signals yet achieved, despite a disadvantage of up to 8 mag in the stellar flux compared to prior work.

  15. Update of the ISTP Solar Maximum Mission: ISTP Project Scientist for Theory and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Building upon the numerous successes of the pre-solar maximum International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) mission, the ISTP Solar Maximum Mission is expected to produce new insights into global flow of energy, momentum, and mass, from the Sun, through the heliosphere, into the magnetosphere and to their final deposition in the terrestrial upper atmosphere/ionosphere system. Of particular interest is the determination of the geo-effectiveness of solar events, principally Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). Given the expected increased frequency and strength of CMEs during the Solar Maximum period, a major advance in our understanding of nature of the coupling of CMEs to the magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system is expected. The roles during this time of the various ISTP assets will be discussed. These assets will include the SOHO, Wind, Polar, and Geotail spacecraft, the ground-based observing networks and the theory tools.

  16. Activity of Eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, Including Multidrug-Resistant Isolates, from New York City

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David

    2014-01-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 μg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 μg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 μg/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  17. Ground-based total ozone column measurements and their diurnal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Abel A.

    2013-07-01

    Brewer spectrophotometers were set up in three tropical sites of South America (in the Bolivian Altiplano and seashore and biomass burning areas of Brazil) to measure the total ozone column (TOC). Only TOC measurements with uncertainties ≤1% (1σ) were considered. Typically, the standard deviation for the diurnal sets of measurements was predominantly ≤1% for two of these sites. The average variability in TOC ranged from 6.3 Dobson units (DU) to 16.8 DU, and the largest variability reached 54.3 DU. Comparisons between ground-based and satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) data showed good agreement with coefficients of determination ≤0.83. However, the quality of the ground-based measurements was affected by the weather condition, especially for one of the sites. Visual observation of the sky from the ground during the measurements with one of the Brewers added to the satellite data of reflectivity and aerosol index supports that statement.

  18. Solar cosmic ray effects in atmospheric chemistry evidenced from ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilov, O. I.; Kasatkina, E. A.; Turyansky, V. A.; Kyro, E.; Kivi, R.

    2003-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of nitrogen dioxide (N02) total content and photochemical modeling have been used to investigate the response of high-latitude atmosphere to solar proton events of Ground Level Event (GLE) type. Measurements of NO 2 were made at Murmansk, Kola Peninsula (corrected geomagnetic latitude: 64.8°) during and after GLE of 2 May 1998. Nitrogen dioxide was measured by zenith viewing spectrophotometer in wavelength range between 435 and 450 nm. An increase (about of 20%) in total column of N02 has been detected after 2 May 1998 GLE by this facility. Model calculations based on gas phase photochemical theory quantitatively agree with observations. These results demonstrate that information obtained from ground-based measurements is usable to study the atmospheric effects of high-energy solar protons in addition to satellite data.

  19. Networking ground-based images of Comet Halley during the Giotto encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, David; Perla, Israel; Meredith, Nigel P.; Green, James; Van Der Heijden, Nick

    1986-01-01

    During the period immediately before and after the European, Russian, and Japanese spacecraft encounters with Comet Halley in early March 1986, sequences of ground-based electronic images of the comet, obtained at Table Mountain Observatory (TMO), CA, were transmitted via the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) to the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC), and to University College London (UCL). During the 48-h period when the European Space Agency spacecraft Giotto was within the extended coma of Comet Halley, the ground-based images revealed that the comet displayed several spectacular near-nuclear and large-scale features. The TMO images provided a format for the interpretation of the unique in situ results obtained during the closest of the five spacecraft encounters with Comet Halley.

  20. Evaluating evaporation from field crops using airborne radiometry and ground-based meteorological data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, R. D.; Moran, M.S.; Gay, L.W.; Raymond, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne measurements of reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation were combined with ground-based measurements of incoming solar radiation, air temperature, windspeed, and vapor pressure to calculate instantaneous evaporation (LE) rates using a form of the Penman equation. Estimates of evaporation over cotton, wheat, and alfalfa fields were obtained on 5 days during a one-year period. A Bowen ratio apparatus, employed simultaneously, provided ground-based measurements of evaporation. Comparison of the airborne and ground techniques showed good agreement, with the greatest difference being about 12% for the instantaneous values. Estimates of daily (24 h) evaporation were made from the instantaneous data. On three of the five days, the difference between the two techniques was less than 8%, with the greatest difference being 25%. The results demonstrate that airborne remote sensing techniques can be used to obtain spatially distributed values of evaporation over agricultural fields. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.