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Sample records for activities including anti-cancer

  1. Geldanamycin and its anti-cancer activities.

    PubMed

    Fukuyo, Yayoi; Hunt, Clayton R; Horikoshi, Nobuo

    2010-04-01

    Geldanamycin is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that manifests anti-cancer activity through the inhibition of HSP90-chaperone function. The HSP90 molecular chaperone is expressed at high levels in a wide variety of human cancers including melanoma, leukemia, and cancers in colon, prostate, lung, and breast. In cancer cells dependent upon mutated and/or over-expressed oncogene proteins, HSP90 is thought to have a critical role in regulating the stability, folding, and activity of HSP90-associated proteins, so-called "client proteins". These client proteins include the growth-stimulating proteins and kinases that support malignant transformation. Recently, oncogenic activating BRAF mutants have been identified in variety of cancers where constitutive activation of the MEK/ERK MAPK signaling pathway is the key for tumorigenesis, and they have been shown to be client proteins for HSP90. Accordingly, HSP90 inhibition can suppress certain cancer-causing client proteins and therefore represents an important therapeutic target. The molecular mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effect of HSP90 inhibition is complicated. Geldanamycin and its derivatives have been shown to induce the depletion of mutationally-activated BRAF through several mechanisms. In this review, we will describe the HSP90-inhibitory mechanism, focusing on recent progress in understanding HSP90 chaperone structure-function relationships, the identification of new HSP90 client proteins and the development of HSP90 inhibitors for clinical applications.

  2. Tanshinones: Sources, Pharmacokinetics and Anti-Cancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Peixin; Ye, Min; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2012-01-01

    Tanshinones are a class of abietane diterpene compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen or Tanshen in Chinese), a well-known herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Since they were first identified in the 1930s, more than 40 lipophilic tanshinones and structurally related compounds have been isolated from Danshen. In recent decades, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the isolation, identification, synthesis and pharmacology of tanshinones. In addition to the well-studied cardiovascular activities, tanshinones have been investigated more recently for their anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we update the herbal and alternative sources of tanshinones, and the pharmacokinetics of selected tanshinones. We discuss anti-cancer properties and identify critical issues for future research. Whereas previous studies have suggested anti-cancer potential of tanshinones affecting multiple cellular processes and molecular targets in cell culture models, data from in vivo potency assessment experiments in preclinical models vary greatly due to lack of uniformity of solvent vehicles and routes of administration. Chemical modifications and novel formulations had been made to address the poor oral bioavailability of tanshinones. So far, human clinical trials have been far from ideal in their design and execution for the purpose of supporting an anti-cancer indication of tanshinones. PMID:23202971

  3. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice

    PubMed Central

    Fridlender, Marcelo; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70–95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early nineteenth century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next two decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin, and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity. PMID:26483815

  4. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice.

    PubMed

    Fridlender, Marcelo; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70-95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early nineteenth century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next two decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin, and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity. PMID:26483815

  5. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice.

    PubMed

    Fridlender, Marcelo; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70-95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early nineteenth century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next two decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin, and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity.

  6. Anti-cancer activity of bromelain nanoparticles by oral administration.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Patnaik, Soma; Srivastava, Amit K; Mudiam, Mohan K R; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Panda, Amulya K; Pant, Aditya B; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2014-12-01

    Oral administration of anti-cancer drugs is an effective alternative to improve their efficacy and reduce undesired toxicity. Bromelain (BL) is known as an effective anti-cancer phyto-therapeutic agent, however, its activity is reduced upon oral administration. In addressing the issue, BL was encapsulated in Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to formulate nanoparticles (NPs). Further, the NPs were coated with Eudragit L30D polymer to introduce stability against the gastric acidic conditions. The resultant coated NPs were characterized for BL entrapment, proteolytic activity and mean particle size. The stability and release pattern of NPs were evaluated under simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) pH conditions. Cytotoxicity studies carried out in human cell lines of diverse origin have shown significant dose advantage (-7-10 folds) with NPs in reducing the IC50 values compared with free BL. The cellular uptake of NPs in MCF-7, HeLa and Caco-2 cells monolayer was significantly enhanced several folds as compared to free BL. Altered expression of marker proteins associated with apoptosis and cell death (P53, P21, Bcl2, Bax) also confirmed the enhanced anti-carcinogenic potential of formulated NPs. Oral administration of NPs reduced the tumor burden of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice and also increased their life-span (160.0 ± 5.8%) when compared with free BL (24 ± 3.2%). The generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of apoptosis and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential in EAC cells treated with NPs confirmed the suitability of Eudragit coated BL-NPs as a promising candidate for oral chemotherapy.

  7. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of C-ring-functionalized prodigiosin analogues.

    PubMed

    Regourd, Jasmine; Ali, Adeeb Al-Sheikh; Thompson, Alison

    2007-04-01

    Prodigiosin is the parent member of the 4-methoxypyrrolyldipyrromethene family of natural products and is known for its anti-cancer activity. A new series of analogues was synthesized, incorporating pendent functional esters and beta-carbonyl substituents on the C-ring. The beta-carbonyl group allowed for the facile isolation of the prodigiosenes, and the pendent esters allow for further derivatization. The novel prodigiosenes generally retain the anti-cancer activity of prodigiosin in 60 human cell lines derived from nine cancer cell types, with neither the conjugated beta-carbonyl group, as either ketone or ester, nor the pendent ester significantly reducing the anti-cancer activity of the core skeleton.

  8. Exploring the Anti-Cancer Activity of Novel Thiosemicarbazones Generated through the Combination of Retro-Fragments: Dissection of Critical Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Rasko, Nathalie; Potůčková, Eliška; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Musiol, Robert; Małecki, Jan G.; Sajewicz, Mieczysław; Ratuszna, Alicja; Muchowicz, Angelika; Gołąb, Jakub; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Richardson, Des R.; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) are an interesting class of ligands that show a diverse range of biological activity, including anti-fungal, anti-viral and anti-cancer effects. Our previous studies have demonstrated the potent in vivo anti-tumor activity of novel TSCs and their ability to overcome resistance to clinically used chemotherapeutics. In the current study, 35 novel TSCs of 6 different classes were designed using a combination of retro-fragments that appear in other TSCs. Additionally, di-substitution at the terminal N4 atom, which was previously identified to be critical for potent anti-cancer activity, was preserved through the incorporation of an N4-based piperazine or morpholine ring. The anti-proliferative activity of the novel TSCs were examined in a variety of cancer and normal cell-types. In particular, compounds 1d and 3c demonstrated the greatest promise as anti-cancer agents with potent and selective anti-proliferative activity. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the chelators that utilized “soft” donor atoms, such as nitrogen and sulfur, resulted in potent anti-cancer activity. Indeed, the N,N,S donor atom set was crucial for the formation of redox active iron complexes that were able to mediate the oxidation of ascorbate. This further highlights the important role of reactive oxygen species generation in mediating potent anti-cancer activity. Significantly, this study identified the potent and selective anti-cancer activity of 1d and 3c that warrants further examination. PMID:25329549

  9. Alloimmune Activation Promotes Anti-Cancer Cytotoxicity after Rat Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A.; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor. PMID:24651497

  10. Alloimmune activation promotes anti-cancer cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Slits, Florence; Orci, Lorenzo A; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) results in a specific condition where the immune response is potentially directed against both allogeneic and cancer antigens. We have investigated the level of anti-cancer immunity during allogeneic immune response. Dark Agouti-to-Lewis and Lewis-to-Lewis rat liver transplantations were performed and the recipients anti-cancer immunity was analysed at the time of alloimmune activation. The occurrence of rejection in the allogeneic recipients was confirmed by a shorter survival (p<0.01), increased liver function tests (p<0.01), the presence of signs of rejection on histology, and a donor-specific ex vivo mixed lymphocyte reaction. At the time of alloimmune activation, blood mononuclear cells of the allogeneic group demonstrated increased anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), which was related to an increased natural killer (NK) cell frequency (p<0.05) and a higher monocyte/macrophage activation level (p<0.01). Similarly, liver NK cell anti-cancer cytotoxicity (p<0.005), and liver monocyte/macrophage activation levels (p<0.01) were also increased. The alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity was mediated through the NKG2D receptor, whose expression was increased in the rejected graft (p<0.05) and on NK cells and monocyte/macrophages. NKG2D ligands were expressed on rat HCC cells, and its inhibition prevented the alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity. Although waiting for in vivo validation, alloimmune-associated cytotoxicity after rat liver transplantation appears to be linked to increased frequencies and levels of activation of NK cells and monocyte/macrophages, and is at least in part mediated through the NKG2D receptor.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and anti-cancer activity of a peptide nucleolipid bioconjugate.

    PubMed

    Rana, Niki; Huang, Suiying; Patel, Pradeepkumar; Samuni, Uri; Sabatino, David

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis, characterization and anti-cancer activity of a novel peptide nucleolipid bioconjugate is reported in this study. The prerequisite 5'-carboxy derived nucleolipid was synthesized following a five-step solution-phase approach and then coupled to the cytotoxic D-(KLAKLAK)2 sequence by solid-phase bioconjugation. The biophysical and structural properties of the peptide-nucleolipid bioconjugate were evaluated and compared to the peptide controls. These characterization studies revealed that the amphiphilic peptides favored helical-type secondary structures and well-defined nanoparticle formulations that were found to be contributive towards their biological activity. The peptide-nucleolipid bioconjugate displayed greater lethality in comparison to the native D-(KLAKLAK)2AK sequence when treated within the human A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line. Thus, the amphiphilic peptide-nucleolipid forms a new class of anti-cancer peptides that may be developed into promising leads in the fight against cancer.

  12. [Vitamin D anti-cancer activities: observations, doubts and certainties].

    PubMed

    Castronovo, C; Castronovo, V; Nikkels, A; Peulen, O

    2015-10-01

    The importance of vitamin D in bone and phosphocalcic status is well recognized by the scientific and medical communities; however, recently identified properties of this cholesterol derived molecule, such as immunomodulator and anticancer activities, are yet discussed. Actually, the debate is not so much about the new vitamin D properties, but rather about the optimal concentration required to reach these properties. The difficulty in determining the norms is rendered even more complex by the existence of a vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism. The body pool of this vitamin depends essentially on its endogenous synthesis, but also on its dietary intakes. Many epidemiological studies interested in Vitamin D serum level and cancer suggest a relation between low Vitamin D level and cancer risk, especially in breast and colon adenocarcinomas. In vitro, many studies showed, in different human and animal malignant cell lines, that this molecule exerts anticancer activities: it induces apoptosis and cell differentiation as well as it inhibits proliferation and angiogenesis. This review tries to update the current knowledge on vitamin D and, more particularly, the potential interest of this molecule in cancer prevention and management.

  13. Diterpenes from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis): Defining their potential for anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Petiwala, Sakina M; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2015-10-28

    Recently, rosemary extracts standardized to diterpenes (e.g. carnosic acid and carnosol) have been approved by the European Union (EU) and given a GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Incorporation of rosemary into our food system and through dietary selection (e.g. Mediterranean Diet) has increased the likelihood of exposure to diterpenes in rosemary. In consideration of this, a more thorough understanding of rosemary diterpenes is needed to understand its potential for a positive impact on human health. Three agents in particular have received the most attention that includes carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol with promising results of anti-cancer activity. These studies have provided evidence of diterpenes to modulate deregulated signaling pathways in different solid and blood cancers. Rosemary extracts and the phytochemicals therein appear to be well tolerated in different animal models as evidenced by the extensive studies performed for approval by the EU and the FDA as an antioxidant food preservative. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies performed with carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol describing their mechanism of action in different cancers.

  14. Systematic repurposing screening in xenograft models identifies approved drugs with novel anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Roix, Jeffrey J; Harrison, S D; Rainbolt, Elizabeth A; Meshaw, Kathryn R; McMurry, Avery S; Cheung, Peter; Saha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10-15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity.

  15. Improving both aqueous solubility and anti-cancer activity by assessing progressive lead optimization libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Li, Fei; Wu, Ling; Wang, Wenyi; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Qiu; Zhou, Hongyu; Yan, Bing

    2015-05-01

    Thiazolidinone compounds 1-3 are lead compounds that have cytoselective toxicity toward non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and drug-resistant NSCLC cells while showing low toxicity to normal human fibroblasts (NHFB). However, this class of compounds generally has a very low aqueous solubility (∼0.1 μg/ml). In order to improve both solubility and anti-cancer activity, we designed and synthesized two lead-optimization libraries and investigated these libraries using simultaneous high-throughput solubility and cytotoxicity assays. By all-around modifications on R(1), R(2) and R(3) substitutions, consecutive library synthesis, and testing, we improved the aqueous solubility (5-fold improvement in solubility, from 0.1 to 0.5 μg/ml) and anti-cancer activity (10-fold improvement in EC50 from 0.72-0.98 μM to 0.08-0.16 μM) in the new lead thiazolidinone compound 31.

  16. Design, synthesis and anti-cancer activity evaluation of podophyllotoxin-norcantharidin hybrid drugs.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong-Wei; Qiu, Han-Yue; Hu, Cui; Sun, Wen-Xue; Yang, Rong-Wu; Qi, Jin-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Gui-Hua; Yang, Yong-Hua

    2016-07-15

    In this study, we designed and synthesized eighteen podophyllotoxin-norcantharidin hybrid drugs which could exhibit more potent anti-cancer activity than the parent drugs. Through the anti-proliferation assay, the most potent anti-cancer agent was screened out, namely Q9 (IC50=0.88±0.18μM against MCF-7 cell line), and it showed lower cytotoxicity against non-cancer cells, human embryonic kidney cells (293T) (IC50=54.38±3.78μM). Additionally, based on the flow cytometry analysis result, it can cause a remarkable cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells more significantly than podophyllotoxin or norcantharidin per se. Moreover, the expression of cell cycle relative protein CDK1 was up regulated while a protein required for mitotic initiation, Cyclin B1 was down regulated. Furthermore, according to the confocal microscopy observation results, it was shown that Q9 was a potent tubulin polymerization inhibitor and the effect is comparable to that of colchicine. For further investigation on the aforementioned mechanisms, we performed western blot experiments, thus finding the increase of the cleavage of PARP. Consistent with these new findings, molecular docking observations suggested that compound Q9 could be developed as a potential anticancer agent. PMID:27262599

  17. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of covalent conjugates of artemisinin and a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Oh, Steve; Kim, Byung Ju; Singh, Narendra P; Lai, Henry; Sasaki, Tomikazu

    2009-02-01

    Artemisinin, a natural product isolated from Artemisia annua L., shows a unique anti-cancer activity by an iron dependent mechanism. Artemisinin was covalently conjugated to a transferrin-receptor targeting peptide, HAIYPRH that binds to a cavity on the surface of transferrin receptor. This enables artemisinin to be co-internalized with receptor-bound transferrin. The iron released from transferrin can activate artemisinin to generate toxic radical species to kill cells. The artemisinin-peptide conjugates showed potent anti-cancer activity against Molt-4 leukemia cells with a significantly improved cancer/normal cells selectivity. PMID:18838215

  18. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar S; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, S M

    2013-01-01

    " Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  19. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  20. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Murillo L; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J; Bordallo, Heloisa N

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  1. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  2. Polyethylenimine-cyclodextrin-tegafur conjugate shows anti-cancer activity and a potential for gene delivery*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qi-da; Fan, Hui; Lou, Wei-jian; Wang, Qing-qing; Tang, Gu-ping

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylenimine-cyclodextrin-tegafur (PEI-CyD-tegafur) conjugate was synthesized as a novel multifunctional prodrug of tegafur for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic agent tegafur and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter plasmid DNA. Conjugation of tegafur to PEI-CyD via chemical linkage was characterized by 1H NMR spectrometry and ultraviolet (UV) spectrometry. PEI-CyD-tegafur was able to condense plasmid DNA into complexes of around 150 nm with positive charge at the N/P ratio of 25, in accordance with electron microscopy observation of compact and monodisperse nanoparticles. The results of in vitro experiments showed enhanced cytotoxicity and considerable transfection efficiency in B16F10 cell line. Therefore, PEI-CyD-tegafur may have great potential as a co-delivery system with anti-cancer activity and potential for gene delivery. PMID:21887847

  3. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DOE PAGES

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigatemore » the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.« less

  4. Anti-cancer activity of the cholesterol exporter ABCA1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bradley; Land, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Summary The ABCA1 protein mediates the transfer of cellular cholesterol across the plasma membrane to apolipoprotein A-I. Loss-of-function mutations in the ABCA1 gene induce Tangier disease and familial hypoalphalipoproteinemia, both cardio-vascular conditions characterized by abnormally low levels of serum cholesterol, increased cholesterol in macrophages and subsequent formation of vascular plaque. Increased intra-cellular cholesterol levels are also frequently found in cancer cells. Here we demonstrate anti-cancer activity of ABCA1 efflux function, which is compromised following inhibition of ABCA1 gene expression by oncogenic mutations or cancer-specific ABCA1 loss-of-function mutations. In concert with elevated cholesterol synthesis found in cancer cells, ABCA1 deficiency allows for increased mitochondrial cholesterol, inhibits release of mitochondrial cell death-promoting molecules and thus facilitates cancer cell survival, overall suggesting that elevated mitochondrial cholesterol is essential to the cancer phenotype. PMID:22981231

  5. Tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity: Potential role of tannins in cancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan Sane, Mukta Subhash; Gupta, Chanchal

    2011-03-15

    Doxorubicin, an anthracycline antibiotic, is widely used in the treatment of various solid tumors including breast cancer. However, its use is limited due to a variety of toxicities including cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of tannic acid, a PARG/PARP inhibitor and an antioxidant, on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 embryonic rat heart myoblasts and its anti-cancer activity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells as well as in DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals. Doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity was assessed by measurement of heart weight, plasma LDH level and histopathology. Bcl-2, Bax, PARP-1 and p53 expression were examined by western blotting. Our results show that tannic acid prevents activation of PARP-1, reduces Bax and increases Bcl-2 expression in H9c2 cells, thus, preventing doxorubicin-induced cell death. Further, it reduces the cell viability of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, increases p53 expression in mammary tumors and shows maximum tumor volume reduction, suggesting that tannic acid potentiates the anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that tannic acid ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity and potentiates its anti-cancer activity both in vitro (H9c2 and MDA-MB-231 cells) as well as in in vivo model of DMBA-induced mammary tumor animals.

  6. p21 induction plays a dual role in anti-cancer activity of ursolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xudong; Song, Xinhua; Yin, Shutao; Zhao, Chong; Fan, Lihong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of G1 arrest and apoptosis by ursolic acid is associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) protein p21 in multiple types of cancer cells. However, the functional role of p21 induction in G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and the mechanisms of p21 induction by ursolic acid have not been critically addressed. In the current study, we demonstrated that p21 played a mediator role in G1 cell cycle arrest by ursolic acid, whereas p21-mediated up-regulation of Mcl-1 compromised apoptotic effect of ursolic acid. These results suggest that p21 induction plays a dual role in the anti-cancer activity of ursolic acid in terms of cell cycle and apoptosis regulation. p21 induction by ursolic acid was attributed to p53 transcriptional activation. Moreover, we found that ursolic acid was able to inhibit murine double minute-2 protein (MDM2) and T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK), the two negative regulator of p53, which in turn contributed to ursolic acid-induced p53 activation. Our findings provided novel insights into understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in response to ursolic acid exposure. PMID:26582056

  7. Anti-cancer activity of withaferin A in B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    McKenna, M K; Gachuki, B W; Alhakeem, S S; Oben, K N; Rangnekar, V M; Gupta, R C; Bondada, S

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide from the plant, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) used in Ayurvedic medicine, has been found to be valuable in the treatment of several medical ailments. WA has been found to have anticancer activity against various solid tumors, but its effects on hematological malignancies have not been studied in detail. WA strongly inhibited the survival of several human and murine B cell lymphoma cell lines. Additionally, in vivo studies with syngeneic-graft lymphoma cells suggest that WA inhibits the growth of tumor but does not affect other proliferative tissues. We demonstrate that WA inhibits the efficiency of NF-κB nuclear translocation in diffuse large B cell lymphomas and found that WA treatment resulted in a significant decrease in protein levels involved in B cell receptor signaling and cell cycle regulation. WA inhibited the activity of heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 as reflected by a sharp increase in Hsp70 expression levels. Hence, we propose that the anti-cancer effects of WA in lymphomas are likely due to its ability to inhibit Hsp90 function and subsequent reduction of critical kinases and cell cycle regulators that are clients of Hsp90. PMID:26020511

  8. Anti-cancer, anti-diabetic and other pharmacologic and biological activities of penta-galloyl-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Hagerman, Ann E.; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-01-01

    1, 2, 3, 4, 6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose (PGG) is a polyphenolic compound highly enriched in a number of medicinal herbals. Several in vitro and a handful of in vivo studies have shown that PGG exhibits multiple biological activities which implicate a great potential for PGG in the therapy and prevention of several major diseases including cancer and diabetes. Chemically and functionally, PGG appears to be distinct from its constituent gallic acid or tea polyphenols. For anti-cancer activity, three published in vivo preclinical cancer model studies with PGG support promising efficacy to selectively inhibit malignancy without host toxicity. Potential mechanisms include anti-angiogenesis, anti-proliferative actions through inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis and S-phase arrest and also G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis, anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. Putative molecular targets include p53, Stat3, Cox-2, VEGFR1, AP-1, SP-1, Nrf-2 and MMP-9. For anti-diabetic activity, PGG and analogues appear to improve glucose uptake. However, very little is known about the absorption, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of PGG, nor its toxicity profile. The lack of large quantity of highly pure PGG has been a bottleneck limiting in vivo validation of cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacies in clinically relevant models. PMID:19575286

  9. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of 1,4-disubstituted imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines.

    PubMed

    Thigulla, Yadagiri; Akula, Mahesh; Trivedi, Prakruti; Ghosh, Balaram; Jha, Mukund; Bhattacharya, Anupam

    2016-01-21

    The synthesis and anti-cancer activity evaluation of fused imidazoquinoline compounds is reported in this paper. Yb(OTf)3 has been utilized as a catalyst for the synthesis of 1,4-diaryl substituted imidazo[4,5-c]quinolines via a modified Pictet-Spengler approach. The desired imidazole ring was synthesized from imines using TosMIC (toluenesulfonylmethyl isocyanide) and subsequently functionalized at the C-4 position yielding an imidazoquinoline skeleton. Importantly, the final step was carried out without the aid of any prefunctionalization to obtain the resultant compounds in good yields. The synthesized compounds, when screened for anti-cancer activity, revealed the highest activity with 4-(2-bromophenyl)-1-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinoline (IC50: 103.3 μM). PMID:26592542

  10. [Preparation and anti-cancer activity in vitro of curcumin loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticle].

    PubMed

    He, Li-li; Gu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    This paper is to prepare curcumin (Cur) loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticle (Cur-MSN), evaluate its release behavior and anti-cancer activity in vitro. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) was prepared by polymerization method and Cur-MSN was obtained using solvent evaporation method and impregnation centrifugation method. The preparation method was optimized using entrapment efficiency (EE) and loading efficiency (LE) as indexes. Cur-MSN was characterized with scanning electron microscope and its particle size and zeta potential were determined. Finally, in vitro release behavior in 0.2% SDS solution and its cell-killing effect on HeLa cells were also evaluated. The Cur-MSN prepared with process optimization method was round and uniform and exhibited typical mesoporous characterization. The mean particle size and Zeta potential of Cur-MSN were 75.8 nm and -30.1 mV, respectively. EE and LE of three batches of Cur-MSN were (72.55 ± 2.01)% and (16.21 ± 1.12)%, respectively. In vitro release behavior of Cur-MSN showed a sustained release profile with 83.5% cumulative release within 96 h. The killing effect of Cur-MSN on HeLa cells was dose-dependent with IC50 of 19.40 mg x L(-1), which was similar to that of Cur. PMID:27071254

  11. Biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles for enhancement of anti-cancer activities of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Zhang, Jia; Zu, Yu-Jiao; Nie, Shu-Fang; Cao, Jun; Wang, Qian; Nie, Shao-Ping; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Xie, Ming-Yong; Wang, Shu

    2015-09-01

    Many phytochemicals show promise in cancer prevention and treatment, but their low aqueous solubility, poor stability, unfavorable bioavailability, and low target specificity make administering them at therapeutic doses unrealistic. This is particularly true for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and genistein. There is an increasing interest in developing novel delivery strategies for these natural products. Liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles. Those nanoparticles can increase the stability and solubility of phytochemicals, exhibit a sustained release property, enhance their absorption and bioavailability, protect them from premature enzymatic degradation or metabolism, prolong their circulation time, improve their target specificity to cancer cells or tumors via passive or targeted delivery, lower toxicity or side-effects to normal cells or tissues through preventing them from prematurely interacting with the biological environment, and enhance anti-cancer activities. Nanotechnology opens a door for developing phytochemical-loaded nanoparticles for prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:26412423

  12. Biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles for enhancement of anti-cancer activities of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Zhang, Jia; Zu, Yu-Jiao; Nie, Shu-Fang; Cao, Jun; Wang, Qian; Nie, Shao-Ping; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Xie, Ming-Yong; Wang, Shu

    2015-09-01

    Many phytochemicals show promise in cancer prevention and treatment, but their low aqueous solubility, poor stability, unfavorable bioavailability, and low target specificity make administering them at therapeutic doses unrealistic. This is particularly true for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and genistein. There is an increasing interest in developing novel delivery strategies for these natural products. Liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles. Those nanoparticles can increase the stability and solubility of phytochemicals, exhibit a sustained release property, enhance their absorption and bioavailability, protect them from premature enzymatic degradation or metabolism, prolong their circulation time, improve their target specificity to cancer cells or tumors via passive or targeted delivery, lower toxicity or side-effects to normal cells or tissues through preventing them from prematurely interacting with the biological environment, and enhance anti-cancer activities. Nanotechnology opens a door for developing phytochemical-loaded nanoparticles for prevention and treatment of cancer.

  13. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins

    PubMed Central

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceteddisease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute anew family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of “mechanism-effect” and “effect-mechanism” relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins. PMID:25324469

  14. Computer-aided discovery of biological activity spectra for anti-aging and anti-cancer olive oil oleuropeins.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Santangelo, Elvira; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Micol, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Ariza, Xavier; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; García, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with common conditions, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The type of multi-targeted pharmacological approach necessary to address a complex multifaceted disease such as aging might take advantage of pleiotropic natural polyphenols affecting a wide variety of biological processes. We have recently postulated that the secoiridoids oleuropein aglycone (OA) and decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DOA), two complex polyphenols present in health-promoting extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), might constitute a new family of plant-produced gerosuppressant agents. This paper describes an analysis of the biological activity spectra (BAS) of OA and DOA using PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software. PASS can predict thousands of biological activities, as the BAS of a compound is an intrinsic property that is largely dependent on the compound's structure and reflects pharmacological effects, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of action, and specific toxicities. Using Pharmaexpert, a tool that analyzes the PASS-predicted BAS of substances based on thousands of "mechanism-effect" and "effect-mechanism" relationships, we illuminate hypothesis-generating pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and targets that might underlie the anti-aging/anti-cancer activities of the gerosuppressant EVOO oleuropeins.

  15. Anti-cancer activity of curcumin loaded nanoparticles in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Khan, Sheema; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Neeraj; Ganju, Aditya; Balakrishna, Swati; Gupta, Brij K.; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer disease in men in the Unites States and its management remains challenge in everyday oncology practice. Thus, advanced therapeutic strategies are required to treat prostate cancer patients. Curcumin (CUR) is a promising anticancer agent for various cancer types. The objective of this study was to evaluate therapeutic potential of novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)- CUR nanoparticles (PLGA-CUR NPs) for prostate cancer treatment. Our results indicate that PLGA-CUR NPs efficiently internalize in prostate cancer cells and release biologically active CUR in cytosolic compartment of cells for effective therapeutic activity. Cell proliferation (MTS), clonogenic, and Western blot analyses reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs can effectively inhibit proliferation and colony formation ability of prostate cancer cells than free CUR. PLGA-CUR NPs showed superior tumor regression compared to CUR in xenograft mice. Further investigations reveal that PLGA-CUR NPs inhibit nuclear β-catenin and AR expression in cells and in tumor xenograft tissues. It also suppresses STAT3 and AKT phosphorylation and leads to apoptosis via inhibition of key anti-apoptotic proteins, MCL-1, Bcl-xL and caused induction of PARP cleavage. Additionally, PLGA-CUR NPs significant downregulation of oncogenic miR21 and up-regulation of miR-205 was observed with PLGA-CUR NPs treatment as determined by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses. A superior anti-cancer potential was attained with PSMA antibody conjugated PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer cells and a significant tumor targeting of 131I labelled PSMA antibody was achieved with PLGA-CUR NPs in prostate cancer xenograft mice model. In conclusion, PLGA-CUR NPs can significantly accumulate and exhibit superior anticancer activity in prostate cancer. PMID:25028336

  16. Glycyrrhetinic Acid and Its Derivatives: Anti-Cancer and Cancer Chemopreventive Properties, Mechanisms of Action and Structure- Cytotoxic Activity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhsh, Ali; Iranshahy, Milad; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer properties of liquorice have been attributed, at least in part, to glycyrrhizin (GL). However, GL is not directly absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract. It is hydrolyzed to 18-β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), the pharmacologically active metabolite, by human intestinal microflora. GA exhibits remarkable cytotoxic and anti-tumor properties. The pro-apoptotic targets and mechanisms of action of GA have been extensively studied over the past decade. In addition, GA is an inexpensive and available triterpene with functional groups (COOH and OH) in its structure, which make it an attractive lead compound for medicinal chemists to prepare a large number of analogues. To date, more than 400 cytotoxic derivatives have been prepared on the basis of GA scaffold, including 128 cytotoxic derivatives with IC50 values less than 30 µM. Researchers have also succeeded in synthesizing very potent cytotoxic derivatives with IC50s ≤ 1 µM. Studies have shown that the introduction of a double bound at the C1-C2 position combined with an electronegative functional group, such as CN, CF3 or iodine at C2 position, and the oxidation of the hydroxyl group of C3 to the carbonyl group, significantly increased cytotoxicity. This review describes the cytotoxic and anti-tumor properties of GA and its derivatives, targets and mechanisms of action and provides insight into the structure-activity relationship of GA derivatives.

  17. The chain length of biologically produced (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acid affects biological activity and structure of anti-cancer peptides.

    PubMed

    Szwej, Emilia; Devocelle, Marc; Kenny, Shane; Guzik, Maciej; O'Connor, Stephen; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Radivojevic, Jelena; Maslak, Veselin; Byrne, Annete T; Gallagher, William M; Zulian, Qun Ren; Zinn, Manfred; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2015-06-20

    Conjugation of DP18L peptide with (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, derived from the biopolymer polyhydroxyalkanoate, enhances its anti-cancer activity (O'Connor et al., 2013. Biomaterials 34, 2710-2718). However, it is unknown if other (R)-3-hydroxyalkanoic acids (R3HAs) can enhance peptide activity, if chain length affects enhancement, and what effect R3HAs have on peptide structure. Here we show that the degree of enhancement of peptide (DP18L) anti-cancer activity by R3HAs is carbon chain length dependent. In all but one example the R3HA conjugated peptides were more active against cancer cells than the unconjugated peptides. However, R3HAs with 9 and 10 carbons were most effective at improving DP18L activity. DP18L peptide variant DP17L, missing a hydrophobic amino acid (leucine residue 4) exhibited lower efficacy against MiaPaCa cells. Circular dichroism analysis showed DP17L had a lower alpha helix content and the conjugation of any R3HA ((R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic acid to (R)-3-hydroxydodecanoic acid) to DP17L returned the helix content back to levels of DP18L. However (R)-3-hydroxyhexanoic did not enhance the anti-cancer activity of DP17L and at least 7 carbons were needed in the R3HA to enhance activity of D17L. DP17L needs a longer chain R3HA to achieve the same activity as DP18L conjugated to an R3HA. As a first step to assess the synthetic potential of polyhydroxyalkanoate derived R3HAs, (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid was synthetically converted to (±)3-chlorodecanoic acid, which when conjugated to DP18L improved its antiproliferative activity against MiaPaCa cells.

  18. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  19. Re-engineering Cytochrome P450 2B11dH for Enhanced Metabolism of Several Substrates Including the Anti-cancer Prodrugs Cyclophosphamide and Ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Chen, Chong S.; Waxman, David J.; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R.; Kumar, Santosh

    2007-01-01

    Based on recent directed evolution of P450 2B1, six P450 2B11 mutants at three positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed P450 2B11dH and characterized for enzyme catalysis using five substrates. Mutant I209A demonstrated a 3.2-fold enhanced kcat/Km for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcourmarin O-deethylation, largely due to a dramatic decrease in Km (0.72 vs. 18 μM). I209A also demonstrated enhanced selectivity for testosterone 16β-hydroxylation over 16α-hydroxylation. In contrast, V183L showed a 4-fold increased kcat for 7-benzyloxyresorufin debenzylation and a 4.7-fold increased kcat/Km for testosterone 16α-hydroxylation. V183L also displayed a 1.7-fold higher kcat/Km than P450 2B11dH with the anti-cancer prodrugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, resulting from a ~4-fold decrease in Km. Introduction of the V183L mutation into full-length P450 2B11 did not enhance the kcat/Km. Overall, the re-engineered P450 2B11dH enzymes exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency with several substrates including the anti-cancer prodrugs. PMID:17254539

  20. Algae extracts and methyl jasmonate anti-cancer activities in prostate cancer: choreographers of ‘the dance macabre’

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is an overwhelmingly increasing trend of analysis of naturally occurring ingredients in treatment of prostate cancer. Substantial fraction of information has been added that highlights activity at various levels and steps of deregulated cellular proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis. Among such ingredients, algae extracts and jasmonates are documented to have anti-cancer activity in vitro and in vivo and induce growth inhibition in cancer cells, while leaving the non-transformed cells intact. In this short review we outline systematically, how these ingredients predispose prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. PMID:23181808

  1. In vitro anti-cancer activity of two ethno-pharmacological healing plants from Guatemala Pluchea odorata and Phlebodium decumanum.

    PubMed

    Gridling, Manuela; Stark, Nicole; Madlener, Sibylle; Lackner, Andreas; Popescu, Ruxandra; Benedek, Birgit; Diaz, Rene; Tut, Foster M; Nha Vo, Thanh Phuong; Huber, Daniela; Gollinger, Michaela; Saiko, Philipp; Ozmen, Ali; Mosgoeller, Wilhelm; De Martin, Rainer; Eytner, Ruth; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Grusch, Michael; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Kopp, Brigitte; Frisch, Richard; Krupitza, Georg

    2009-04-01

    Many traditional healing plants successfully passed several hundred years of empirical testing against specific diseases and thereby demonstrating that they are well tolerated in humans. Although quite a few ethno-pharmacological plants are applied against a variety of conditions there are still numerous plants that have not been cross-tested in diseases apart from the traditional applications. Herein we demonstrate the anti-neoplastic potential of two healing plants used by the Maya of the Guatemala/Belize area against severe inflammatory conditions such as neuritis, rheumatism, arthritis, coughs, bruises and tumours. Phlebodium decumanum and Pluchea odorata were collected, dried and freeze dried, and extracted with five solvents of increasing polarity. We tested HL-60 and MCF-7 cells, the inhibition of proliferation and the induction of cell death were investigated as hallmark endpoints to measure the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs. Western blot and FACS analyses elucidated the underlying mechanisms. While extracts of P. decumanum showed only moderate anti-cancer activity and were therefore not further analysed, particularly the dichloromethane extract of P. odorata inhibited the cell cycle in G2-M which correlated with the activation of checkpoint kinase 2, and down-regulation of Cdc25A and cyclin D1 as well as inactivation of Erk1/2. In HL-60 and MCF-7 cells this extract was a very strong inducer of cell death activating caspase-3 followed by PARP signature type cleavage. The initiating death trigger was likely the stabilization of microtubules monitored by the rapid acetylation of alpha-tubulin, which was even more pronounced than that triggered by taxol. The dichloromethane extract of P. odorata contains apolar constituents which inhibit inflammatory responses and exhibit anti-cancer activity. The strong proapoptotic potential warrants further bioassay-guided fractionation to discover and test the active principle(s). PMID:19287970

  2. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica A.; Jones, Amy J.; Avery, Vicky M.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D.M.; Ng, Susanna S.; Fairlie, David P.; Adams, Tina S.; Andrews, Katherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat®), romidepsin (Istodax®) and belinostat (Beleodaq®), are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10–200 nM), while only romidepsin was active at sub-μM concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM). The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4. PMID:26199860

  3. Separation of glycine-rich proteins from sea hare eggs and their anti-cancer activity against U937 leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Won-Suck; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Heo, Soo-Jin; Cho, Moonjae; Fernando, I P Shanura; Kang, Nalae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the anti-cancer effects of Sea hare eggs (SE) in U937 cells and its major active components. The aqueous extract of SE (ASE), which contained the highest protein content, dose-dependently inhibited the cancer cell's growth (IC50 value, 10.42 ± 0.5 µg/mL). Additionally, ASE markedly caused DNA damage by inducing apoptotic body formation, DNA fragmentation, and accumulation of sub-G1 DNA contents. ASE induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and 9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by regulating the expression of Bcl-2/Bax. Moreover, among its molecular weight fractions, the > 30 kDa fraction showed the highest cell-growth-inhibitory effects, which was inhibited by heat treatment. Furthermore, the > 30 kDa fraction had markedly higher glycine content than the ASE. The presence of two protein bands at around 16 and 32 kDa was identified. In addition, two fractions, F1 and F2, were obtained using anion-exchange chromatography, with the F1 having an improved cell-growth-inhibitory effect than the > 30 kDa fraction. Taken together, these results suggest that the ASE contains glycine-rich proteins, including the active 16 and 32 kDa proteins, which account for its anti-cancer effects by inducing apoptosis via regulation of the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:27366143

  4. B-9-3, a novel β-carboline derivative exhibits anti-cancer activity via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Abdelkader; Song, Jing; Xiao, Feiyang; Shang, Jing

    2014-02-01

    Peganum harmala L is an important medicinal plant that has been used from ancient time due to its alkaloids rich of ß-carbolines. Harmane is a naturally occurring ß-carboline extracted from Peganum harmala L, that exhibits a wide range of biological, psychopharmacological, and toxicological actions. The synthesis of novel derivatives with high anti-cancer activity and less side effects is necessary. In the present study, B-9-3-a semi-synthetic compound that is formed of two harmane molecules bound by a butyl group-showed a strong anti-cancer activity against a human lung cancer cell line, a human breast cancer cell line, and a human colorectal carcinoma cell line. B-9-3 anti-proliferative effect followed a similar pattern in the three cell lines. This pattern includes a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis, or necroptosis as confirmed by Hoechst staining, flow cytometry and western blot analyses, and the inhibition of cancer cells migration that was shown to be dependent on the drug׳s concentration as well. Moreover, B-9-3 inhibited tube formation in human umbilical vascular endothelial cell line (HUVEC), which indicates an anti-angiogenesis activity in vitro. In summary, B-9-3, a semi-synthetic derivative of ß-carboline, has an anti-proliferative effect against tumor cells via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration.

  5. Separation of glycine-rich proteins from sea hare eggs and their anti-cancer activity against U937 leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Won-Suck; Ahn, Ginnae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Heo, Soo-Jin; Cho, Moonjae; Fernando, I. P. Shanura; Kang, Nalae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the anti-cancer effects of Sea hare eggs (SE) in U937 cells and its major active components. The aqueous extract of SE (ASE), which contained the highest protein content, dose-dependently inhibited the cancer cell's growth (IC50 value, 10.42 ± 0.5 µg/mL). Additionally, ASE markedly caused DNA damage by inducing apoptotic body formation, DNA fragmentation, and accumulation of sub-G1 DNA contents. ASE induced apoptosis by activating caspase-3 and 9 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by regulating the expression of Bcl-2/Bax. Moreover, among its molecular weight fractions, the > 30 kDa fraction showed the highest cell-growth-inhibitory effects, which was inhibited by heat treatment. Furthermore, the > 30 kDa fraction had markedly higher glycine content than the ASE. The presence of two protein bands at around 16 and 32 kDa was identified. In addition, two fractions, F1 and F2, were obtained using anion-exchange chromatography, with the F1 having an improved cell-growth-inhibitory effect than the > 30 kDa fraction. Taken together, these results suggest that the ASE contains glycine-rich proteins, including the active 16 and 32 kDa proteins, which account for its anti-cancer effects by inducing apoptosis via regulation of the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:27366143

  6. Enhancing Cell Nucleus Accumulation and DNA Cleavage Activity of Anti-Cancer Drug via Graphene Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Wu, Congyu; Zhou, Xuejiao; Han, Ting; Xin, Xiaozhen; Wu, Jiaying; Zhang, Jingyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2013-01-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) maintain the intrinsic layered structural motif of graphene but with smaller lateral size and abundant periphery carboxylic groups, and are more compatible with biological system, thus are promising nanomaterials for therapeutic applications. Here we show that GQDs have a superb ability in drug delivery and anti-cancer activity boost without any pre-modification due to their unique structural properties. They could efficiently deliver doxorubicin (DOX) to the nucleus through DOX/GQD conjugates, because the conjugates assume different cellular and nuclear internalization pathways comparing to free DOX. Also, the conjugates could enhance DNA cleavage activity of DOX markedly. This enhancement combining with efficient nuclear delivery improved cytotoxicity of DOX dramatically. Furthermore, the DOX/GQD conjugates could also increase the nuclear uptake and cytotoxicity of DOX to drug-resistant cancer cells indicating that the conjugates may be capable to increase chemotherapy efficacy of anti-cancer drugs that are suboptimal due to the drug resistance. PMID:24092333

  7. Structures of Phytosterols and Triterpenoids with Potential Anti-Cancer Activity in Bran of Black Non-Glutinous Rice

    PubMed Central

    Suttiarporn, Panawan; Chumpolsri, Watcharapong; Mahatheeranont, Sugunya; Luangkamin, Suwaporn; Teepsawang, Somsuda; Leardkamolkarn, Vijittra

    2015-01-01

    Structures of some bioactive phytochemicals in bran extract of the black rice cv. Riceberry that had demonstrated anti-cancer activity in leukemic cell line were investigated. After saponification with potassium hydroxide, separation of the unsaponified fraction by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) resulted in four sub-fractions that had a certain degree of anti-proliferation against a mouse leukemic cell line (WEHI-3 cell), this being IC50 at 24 h ranging between 2.80–467.11 μg/mL. Further purification of the bioactive substances contained in these four sub-fractions was performed by normal-phase HPLC. Structural characterization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) resulted in, overall, the structures of seven phytosterols and four triterpenoids. Four phytosterols, 24-methylene-ergosta-5-en-3β-ol, 24-methylene-ergosta-7-en-3β-ol, fucosterol, and gramisterol, along with three triterpenoids, cycloeucalenol, lupenone, and lupeol, were found in the two sub-fractions that showed strong anti-leukemic cell proliferation (IC50 = 2.80 and 32.89 μg/mL). The other sterols and triterpenoids were campesterol, stigmasterol, β-sitosterol and 24-methylenecycloartanol. Together with the data from in vitro biological analysis, we suggest that gramisterol is a significant anti-cancer lead compound in Riceberry bran extract. PMID:25756784

  8. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship study on anti-cancer activity of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives against human lung cancer A549 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sehyeon; Choi, Min Ji; Kim, Minju; Lee, Sunhoe; Lee, Jinsung; Lee, Seok Joon; Cho, Haelim; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Jae Yeol

    2015-03-01

    A series of 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives with anti-cancer activities against human lung cancer A549 cells were subjected to three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies using the comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) approaches. The most potent compound, 1 was used to align the molecules. As a result, the best prediction was obtained with CoMSIA combined the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, hydrogen bond donor, and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (q2 = 0.720, r2 = 0.897). This model was validated by an external test set of 6 compounds giving satisfactory predictive r2 value of 0.923 as well as the scrambling stability test. This model would guide the design of potent 3,4-dihydroquinazoline derivatives as anti-cancer agent for the treatment of human lung cancer.

  9. The angular structure of ONC201, a TRAIL pathway-inducing compound, determines its potent anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, Christina Leah; Pottorf, Richard S.; Nallaganchu, Bhaskara Rao; Olson, Gary L.; Dicker, David T.; Allen, Joshua E.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified TRAIL-inducing compound 10 (TIC10), also known as NSC350625 or ONC201, from a NCI chemical library screen as a small molecule that has potent anti-tumor efficacy and a benign safety profile in preclinical cancer models. The chemical structure that was originally published by Stahle, et. al. in the patent literature was described as an imidazo[1,2-a]pyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivative. The NCI and others generally accepted this as the correct structure, which was consistent with the mass spectrometry analysis outlined in the publication by Allen et. al. that first reported the molecule's anticancer properties. A recent publication demonstrated that the chemical structure of ONC201 material from the NCI is an angular [3,4-e] isomer of the originally disclosed, linear [4,3-d] structure. Here we confirm by NMR and X-ray structural analysis of the dihydrochloride salt form that the ONC201 material produced by Oncoceutics is the angular [3,4-e] structure and not the linear structure originally depicted in the patent literature and by the NCI. Similarly, in accordance with our biological evaluation, the previously disclosed anti-cancer activity is associated with the angular structure and not the linear isomer. Together these studies confirm that ONC201, produced by Oncoceutics or obtained from the NCI, possesses an angular [3,4-e] structure that represents the highly active anti-cancer compound utilized in prior preclinical studies and now entering clinical trials in advanced cancers. PMID:25587031

  10. Discovery of Compound A – a selective activator of the glucocorticoid receptor with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lesovaya, Ekaterina; Yemelyanov, Alexander; Swart, Amanda C.; Swart, Pieter; Haegeman, Guy; Budunova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are among the most effective anti-inflammatory drugs, and are widely used for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, chronic treatment with glucocorticoids results in multiple side effects. Thus, there was an intensive search for selective glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activators (SEGRA), which retain therapeutic potential of glucocorticoids, but with fewer adverse effects. GR regulates gene expression by transactivation (TA), by binding as homodimer to gene promoters, or transrepression (TR), via diverse mechanisms including negative interaction between monomeric GR and other transcription factors. It is well accepted that metabolic and atrophogenic effects of glucocorticoids are mediated by GR TA. Here we summarized the results of extensive international collaboration that led to discovery and characterization of Compound A (CpdA), a unique SEGRA with a proven “dissociating” GR ligand profile, preventing GR dimerization and shifting GR activity towards TR both in vitro and in vivo. We outlined here the unusual story of compound's discovery, and presented a comprehensive overview of CpdA ligand properties, its anti-inflammatory effects in numerous animal models of inflammation and autoimmune diseases, as well as its anti-cancer effects. Finally, we presented mechanistic analysis of CpdA and glucocorticoid effects in skin, muscle, bone, and regulation of glucose and fat metabolism to explain decreased CpdA side effects compared to glucocorticoids. Overall, the results obtained by our and other laboratories underline translational potential of CpdA and its derivatives for treatment of inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:26436695

  11. Ursolic acid exerts anti-cancer activity by suppressing vaccinia-related kinase 1-mediated damage repair in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Hoon; Ryu, Hye Guk; Lee, Juhyun; Shin, Joon; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Jung, Hoe-Youn; Kim, Ye Seul; Lyu, Ha-Na; Oh, Eunji; Baek, Nam-In; Choi, Kwan-Yong; Yoon, Ho Sup; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Many mitotic kinases have been targeted for the development of anti-cancer drugs, and inhibitors of these kinases have been expected to perform well for cancer therapy. Efforts focused on selecting good targets and finding specific drugs to target are especially needed, largely due to the increased frequency of anti-cancer drugs used in the treatment of lung cancer. Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) is a master regulator in lung adenocarcinoma and is considered a key molecule in the adaptive pathway, which mainly controls cell survival. We found that ursolic acid (UA) inhibits the catalytic activity of VRK1 via direct binding to the catalytic domain of VRK1. UA weakens surveillance mechanisms by blocking 53BP1 foci formation induced by VRK1 in lung cancer cells, and possesses synergistic anti-cancer effects with DNA damaging drugs. Taken together, UA can be a good anti-cancer agent for targeted therapy or combination therapy with DNA damaging drugs for lung cancer patients. PMID:26412148

  12. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  13. Tanshinones and diethyl blechnics with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen)

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hongwei; Sun, Wen; Zhao, Jianping; Wu, Xiaxia; Lu, Jin-Jian; Chen, Xiuping; Xu, Qiong-ming; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Yang, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Four novel compounds (1–4) as well as fourteen reported compounds (5–18) were isolated and purified from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen). The structures of novel compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS data, etc. The anti-inflammatory properties of all the compounds on RAW264.7 macrophages and their cytotoxicity on H1299 and Bel-7402 cell lines coupled with a structure-activity relationship (SAR) were investigated. Compound 4 demonstrated the best anti-inflammatory activity and was chosen for further research. Compound 4 greatly suppressed secretion of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated by LPS. Additionally, the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB was attenuated after treatment with compound 4 in vitro. Compound 4 was able to dramatically inhibit LPS-induced activation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 and remarkably disrupted the TLR4 dimerization in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. Thus, the new compound 4 suppressed LPS-induced inflammation partially is due to the blocking TLR4 dimerization. In addition, the anti-cancer activity investigation indicated that most of isolated compounds exhibited cytotoxicity and the SAR analysis showed that the intact D ring was indispensable and unsaturated D ring played vital role. PMID:27666387

  14. Tanshinones and diethyl blechnics with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongwei; Sun, Wen; Zhao, Jianping; Wu, Xiaxia; Lu, Jin-Jian; Chen, Xiuping; Xu, Qiong-Ming; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Yang, Shilin

    2016-09-01

    Four novel compounds (1–4) as well as fourteen reported compounds (5–18) were isolated and purified from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen). The structures of novel compounds were determined by 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS data, etc. The anti-inflammatory properties of all the compounds on RAW264.7 macrophages and their cytotoxicity on H1299 and Bel-7402 cell lines coupled with a structure-activity relationship (SAR) were investigated. Compound 4 demonstrated the best anti-inflammatory activity and was chosen for further research. Compound 4 greatly suppressed secretion of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the RAW264.7 macrophages stimulated by LPS. Additionally, the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB was attenuated after treatment with compound 4 in vitro. Compound 4 was able to dramatically inhibit LPS-induced activation of JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 and remarkably disrupted the TLR4 dimerization in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophages. Thus, the new compound 4 suppressed LPS-induced inflammation partially is due to the blocking TLR4 dimerization. In addition, the anti-cancer activity investigation indicated that most of isolated compounds exhibited cytotoxicity and the SAR analysis showed that the intact D ring was indispensable and unsaturated D ring played vital role.

  15. Purification of a dimeric arginine deiminase from Enterococcus faecium GR7 and study of its anti-cancerous activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kaur, Rajinder

    2016-09-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI, E.C 3.5.3.6) - a key enzyme of ADI pathway of Enterococcus faecium GR7 was purified to homogeneity. A sequential purification strategy involving ammonium sulfate fractionation, molecular sieve followed by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration was applied to the crude culture filtrate to obtain a pure enzyme preparation. The enzyme was purified with a fold of 16.92 and showed a final specific activity of 76.65IU/mg with a 49.17% yield. The dimeric ADI has a molecular mass of about 94,364.929Da, and comprises of hetrodimers of 49.1kDa and 46.5kDa as determined by MALDI-TOF and PAGE analysis. To assess anti-cancerous activity of ADI by MTT assay was carried out against cancer cell lines (MCF-7, Sp2/0-Ag14 and Hep-G2). Purified ADI exhibited the most profound antiproliferative activity against Hep-G2 cells; with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.95μg/ml. Purified ADI from E. faecium GR7 was observed to induce apoptosis in the Hep-G2 cells by DNA fragmentation assay. Our findings suggest the possibility of a future use of ADI from E. faecium GR7 as a potential anticancer drug.

  16. In vitro analysis of the anti-cancer activity of mitoxantrone loaded on magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwon-Jai; An, Jeung Hee; Chun, Je-Ran; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Park, Woo-Yoon; Shin, Jae-Soo; Kim, Dong-Hee; Bahk, Young Yil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the anti-tumor activity of mitoxantrone loaded on magnetic nanoparticles (MTMP) was examined using DU145 prostate cancer cells. Composite nanoparticles with an average size of 20 nm were prepared using a chemical co-precipitation technique. The MTMP nanoparticles were cytotoxic to DU145 cells and inhibited cell proliferation. The expression levels of apoptosis related proteins in DU145 cells, including PARP and caspase 3, were increased after MTMP treatment. In this study, the therapeutic potential of MTMP in targeted-therapy against prostate cancer was demonstrated and MTMP was more effective when coupled to drug delivery vehicle than pure mitoxantrone.

  17. Azaindole derivatives are inhibitors of microtubule dynamics, with anti-cancer and anti-angiogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Prudent, Renaud; Vassal-Stermann, Émilie; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Mollaret, Marjorie; Viallet, Jean; Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Martinez, Anne; Barette, Caroline; Pillet, Catherine; Valdameri, Glaucio; Soleilhac, Emmanuelle; Di Pietro, Attilio; Feige, Jean-Jacques; Billaud, Marc; Florent, Jean-Claude; Lafanechère, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Drugs targeting microtubules are commonly used for cancer treatment. However, the potency of microtubule inhibitors used clinically is limited by the emergence of resistance. We thus designed a strategy to find new cell-permeable microtubule-targeting agents. Experimental Approach Using a cell-based assay designed to probe for microtubule polymerization status, we screened a chemical library and identified two azaindole derivatives, CM01 and CM02, as cell-permeable microtubule-depolymerizing agents. The mechanism of the anti-tumour effects of these two compounds was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. Key Results CM01 and CM02 induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and exerted potent cytostatic effects on several cancer cell lines including multidrug-resistant (MDR) cell lines. In vitro experiments revealed that the azaindole derivatives inhibited tubulin polymerization and competed with colchicines for this effect, strongly indicating that tubulin is the cellular target of these azaindole derivatives. In vivo experiments, using a chicken chorioallantoic xenograft tumour assay, established that these compounds exert a potent anti-tumour effect. Furthermore, an assay probing the growth of vessels out of endothelial cell spheroids showed that CM01 and CM02 exert anti-angiogenic activities. Conclusions and Implications CM01 and CM02 are reversible microtubule-depolymerizing agents that exert potent cytostatic effects on human cancer cells of diverse origins, including MDR cells. They were also shown to inhibit angiogenesis and tumour growth in chorioallantoic breast cancer xenografts. Hence, these azaindole derivatives are attractive candidates for further preclinical investigations. PMID:23004938

  18. Anti cancer activity on Graviola, an exciting medicinal plant extract vs various cancer cell lines and a detailed computational study on its potent anti-cancerous leads.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jeno; Gnanam, R; Jayadeepa, R M; Arul, L

    2013-01-01

    Nature is the world's best chemist: Many naturally occurring compounds have very complicated structures that present great challenges to chemists wishing to determine their structures or replicate them. The plant derived herbal compounds have a long history of clinical use, better patient tolerance and acceptance. Their high ligand binding affinity to the target introduce the prospect of their use in chemo preventive applications; in addition they are freely available natural compounds that can be safely used to prevent various ailments. Plants became the basis of traditional medicine system throughout the world for thousands of years and continue to provide mankind with new remedies. Here, we present a research study on a medicinal plant, Graviola, a native of North America but rarely grown in India. It has a wide potent anticancerous agents coined as Acetogenins which play a key role towards many varieties of cancer, Acetogenins are potent inhibitors of NADH oxidase of the plasma membranes of cancer cells. Potent leads were taken for the study through literature survey, major types of cancer targets were identified, the natureceuticals and the cancer protein were subjected to docking analysis, further with the help of the dock score and other descriptor properties top ranked molecules were collected, commercial drug was also selected and identified as a Test compound for the study. Later, the phytochemicals were subjected to toxicity analysis. Those screened compounds were then considered for active site analysis and to find the best binding site for the study. R Programming library was used to find the best leads. Phytochemicals such as Anonaine, Friedelin, Isolaureline, Annonamine, Anomurine, Kaempferol, Asimilobine, Quercetin, Xylopine were clustered and the highly clustered compounds such as Annonamine , Kaempferol termed to be a potential lead for the study. Further study on experimental analysis may prove the potentiality of these compounds. In the

  19. Molecular docking based screening of novel designed chalcone series of compounds for their anti-cancer activity targeting EGFR kinase domain

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chennu Maruthi Malya Prasada; Yejella, Rajendra Prasad; Rehman, Rehman Shaik Abdul; Basha, Syed Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) are critical for the growth of many tumors and expressed at high levels in about one third of epithelial cancers. Hence, blockade of the binding sites for EGFR has been hypothesized as an effective anti-cancer therapy. Chalcone derivative compounds have been shown to be highly effective anti-cancer agents, however there are still so many novel derivatives possible, one of which might get us the best targeted EGFR inhibitor. In this effort directed towards the discovery of novel, potent anti-tumor agents for the treatment of cancer, in the present study a library of novel chalcone series of compounds has been designed and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity targeting EGFR kinase domain using various computational approaches. Among the twenty five novel designed chalcone series of compounds, all of them have found to be successfully docking inside the active binding domain of EGFR receptor target with a binding energy in a range of -6.10 to -9.25 Kcal/mol with predicted IC50 value range of 33.50 micor molar to 164.66 nano molar respectively. On the other hand, calculated 2DQSAR molecular descriptor properties of the compounds showed promising ADME parameters and found to be well in compliance with Lipinski׳s rule of five. Among all the twenty five compounds tested, compound 21 ((2E)-3-(anthracen-9-yl)-1-phenylprop-2-2n-1- one) was found to be the best lead like molecule with a binding energy of -9.25 kcal/mol with predicted IC50 value of 164.66 nano molar. Conclusively, novel designed compound 21 of the present study have shown promising anti-cancer potential worth considering for further evaluations. PMID:26339147

  20. Synthesis of isatin thiosemicarbazones derivatives: In vitro anti-cancer, DNA binding and cleavage activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Amna Qasem; Teoh, Siang Guan; Salhin, Abdussalam; Eltayeb, Naser Eltaher; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Majid, A. M. S. Abdul

    New derivatives of thiosemicarbazone Schiff base with isatin moiety were synthesized L1-L6. The structures of these compounds were characterized based on the spectroscopic techniques. Compound L6 was further characterized by XRD single crystal. The interaction of these compounds with calf thymus (CT-DNA) exhibited high intrinsic binding constant (kb = 5.03-33.00 × 105 M-1) for L1-L3 and L5 and (6.14-9.47 × 104 M-1) for L4 and L6 which reflect intercalative activity of these compounds toward CT-DNA. This result was also confirmed by the viscosity data. The electrophoresis studies reveal the higher cleavage activity of L1-L3 than L4-L6. The in vitro anti-proliferative activity of these compounds against human colon cancer cell line (HCT 116) revealed that the synthesized compounds (L3, L6 and L2) exhibited good anticancer potency.

  1. The anti-cancer effects of carotenoids and other phytonutrients resides in their combined activity.

    PubMed

    Linnewiel-Hermoni, Karin; Khanin, Marina; Danilenko, Michael; Zango, Gabriel; Amosi, Yaara; Levy, Joseph; Sharoni, Yoav

    2015-04-15

    Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly associated with reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer. It is now accepted that the actions of any specific phytonutrient alone do not explain the observed health benefits of diets rich in fruits and vegetables as nutrients that were taken alone in clinical trials did not show consistent preventive effects. The considerable cost and complexity of such clinical trials requires prudent selection of combinations of ingredients rather than single compounds. Indeed, synergistic inhibition of prostate and mammary cancer cell growth was evident when using combinations of low concentrations of various carotenoids or carotenoids with retinoic acid and the active metabolite of vitamin-D. In this study we aimed to develop simple and sensitive in vitro methods which provide information on potent combinations suitable for inclusion in clinical studies for cancer prevention. We, thus, used reporter gene assays of the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and of the electrophile/antioxidant response element (EpRE/ARE) transcription system. We found that combinations of several carotenoids (e.g., lycopene, phytoene and phytofluene), or carotenoids and polyphenols (e.g., carnosic acid and curcumin) and/or other compounds (e.g., vitamin E) synergistically inhibit the androgen receptor activity and activate the EpRE/ARE system. The activation of EpRE/ARE was up to four fold higher than the sum of the activities of the single ingredients, a robust hallmark of synergy. Such combinations can further be tested in the more complex in vivo models and human studies.

  2. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity of naturally occurring 2,5-diketopiperazines.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Adriano; Costante, Roberto; Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Mathieu, Veronique; Kiss, Robert; Epifano, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    Three naturally occurring oxyprenylated diketopiperazines were synthesized and preliminarily tested as growth inhibitory agents in vitro against various cancer cell lines. The compounds were tested on six human cancer cell lines with different sensitivity to proapoptotic stimuli using the MTT colorimetric assay. The data revealed that of the chemicals under study only deoxymicelianamide (11) displayed the highest activity, recording mean IC50 growth inhibitory values ranging from 2 to 23 μM. A comparative study with the non-geranylated saturated derivative of (11) revealed the importance of the presence of the geranyloxy side chain and the exocyclic 2,5-DPK double bond moiety for the observed activity.

  3. Ascophyllan functions as an adjuvant to promote anti-cancer effect by dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Okimura, Takasi; Xu, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Oda, Tatsuya; Kwak, Minseok; Yu, Qing; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that ascophyllan, a sulfated polysaccharide purified from brown alga, has immune-activating effects. In this study, we evaluated ascophyllan as an adjuvant for its therapeutic and preventive effect on tumor in a mouse melanoma model. Ascophyllan induced migration of DCs to spleen and tumor-draining lymph node (drLN) in a mouse B16 melanoma model. Moreover, ascophyllan induced activation of dendritic cells (DCs), and promoted IFN-γ- and TNF-α-producing Th1 immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. In addition, treatment with a combination of ascophyllan and ovalbumin (OVA) in the tumor-bearing mice promoted proliferation of OVA-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells and migration of those cells into the tumor, consequently inhibiting the tumor growth. Immunization with the combination of ascophyllan and OVA caused enhanced OVA-specific antibody production and memory T cell responses compared to OVA immunization alone, and almost completely prevented B16-OVA tumor growth upon subsequent tumor challenge. Finally, the combination of ascophyllan and OVA prevented B16-OVA tumor invasion and metastasis into the liver. Thus, these results demonstrate that ascophyllan can function as an adjuvant to induce DC activation, antigen specific CTL activation, Th1 immune response and antibody production, and hence may be useful as a therapeutic and preventive tumor vaccine. PMID:27008707

  4. Anti-cancer activity of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes co-modified with transferrin and folic acid.

    PubMed

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Salzano, Giusseppina; Sarisozen, Can; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-specific drug delivery represents an attractive approach to prevent undesirable side-effects and increase the accumulation of the drug in the tumor. Surface modification of nanoparticles such as liposomes with targeting moieties specific to the up-regulated receptors on the surface of tumor cells thus represents an effective strategy. Furthermore, since this receptor expression can be heterogeneous, using a dual-combination of targeting moieties may prove advantageous. With this in mind, the anti-cancer activity of PEGylated doxorubicin-loaded liposomes targeted with folic acid (F), transferrin (Tf) or both (F+Tf) was evaluated. The dual-targeted liposomes showed a 7-fold increase in cell association compared to either of the single-ligand targeted ones in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell monolayers. The increased penetration and cell association of the dual-targeted liposomes were also demonstrated using HeLa cell spheroids. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the doxorubicin liposomes (LD) was then evaluated using HeLa and A2780-ADR ovarian carcinoma cell monolayers. In both these cell lines, the (F+Tf) LD showed significantly higher cytotoxic effects than the untargeted, or single-ligand targeted liposomes. In a HeLa xenograft model in nude mice, compared to the untreated group, though the untargeted LD showed 42% tumor growth inhibition, both the (F) LD and (F+Tf) LD showed 75% and 79% tumor growth inhibition respectively. These results thus highlight that though the dual-targeted liposomes represent an effective cytotoxic formulation in the in vitro setting, they were equally effective as the folic acid-targeted liposomes in reducing tumor burden in the more complex in vivo setting in this particular model. PMID:27264717

  5. Dinoxin B, A Novel Withanolide from Datura innoxia Leaf with specific Anti-cancer Activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new withanolide, dinoxin B (12,21-dihydroxy-1-oxowitha-2,6,24-trienolide-27-O-'-D-glucopyranoside) (1), was isolated from a methanol extract of Datura innoxia Mill. leaves, using bioassay guided fractionation. The structure was determined by spectroscopic techniques, including 1H, 13C-NMR, and 2D...

  6. Anti-cancer activities of pH- or heat-modified pectin

    PubMed Central

    Leclere, Lionel; Cutsem, Pierre Van; Michiels, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Despite enormous efforts that have been made in the search for novel drugs and treatments, cancer continues to be a major public health problem. Moreover, the emergence of resistance to cancer chemotherapy often prevents complete remission. Researchers have thus turned to natural products mainly from plant origin to circumvent resistance. Pectin and pH- or heat-modified pectin have demonstrated chemopreventive and antitumoral activities against some aggressive and recurrent cancers. The focus of this review is to describe how pectin and modified pectin display these activities and what are the possible underlying mechanisms. The failure of conventional chemotherapy to reduce mortality as well as serious side effects make natural products, such as pectin-derived products, ideal candidates for exerting synergism in combination with conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:24115933

  7. The natural products parthenolide and andrographolide exhibit anti-cancer stem cell activity in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Ellen J; Williams, John T; Huynh, Daniel T; Iannotti, Michael J; Han, Changho; Barrios, Francis J; Kendall, Stephen; Glackin, Carlotta A; Colby, David A; Kirshner, Julia

    2011-06-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy where nearly all patients succumb to a relapse. The current preclinical models of MM target the plasma cells, constituting the bulk of the tumor, leaving the cancer stem cells to trigger a relapse. Utilizing a three-dimensional tissue culture system where cells were grown in extracellular matrix designed to reconstruct human bone marrow, we tested the anti-multiple myeloma cancer stem cell (MM-CSC) potential of two natural product inhibitors of nuclear factor κB (NFκB). Here we show that parthenolide and andrographolide are potent anti-MM-CSC agents. Both natural products demonstrated preferential toxicity toward MM-CSCs over non-tumorigenic MM cells. Addition of the bone marrow stromal compartment abrogated andrographolide activity while having no effect on parthenolide cytoxicity. This is the first report of a natural product with anti-CSC activity in myeloma, suggesting that it has the potential to improve the survival of patients with MM by eliminating the relapse-causing MM-CSCs. PMID:21417826

  8. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 μM, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  9. Water soluble polysaccharides from Spirulina platensis: extraction and in vitro anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Forouzan; Samavati, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Polysaccharides from Spirulina platensis algae (SP) were extracted by ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure. The optimal conditions for ultrasonic extraction of SP were determined by response surface methodology. The four parameters were, extraction time (X1), extraction temperature (X2), ultrasonic power (X3) and the ratio of water to raw material (X4), respectively. The experimental data obtained were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation. The optimum conditions were extraction time of 25 min, extraction temperature 85°C, ultrasonic power 90 W and ratio of water to raw material 20 mL/g. Under these optimal conditions, the experimental yield was 13.583±0.51%, well matched with the predicted models with the coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.9971. Then, we demonstrated that SP polysaccharides had strong scavenging activities in vitro on DPPH and hydroxyl radicals. Overall, SP may have potential applications in the medical and food industries. PMID:25583023

  10. Anti-Cancer Activities of Tea Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate in Breast Cancer Patients under Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Wan, X.; Li, J.; Liu, K.; Wang, F.; Liu, K.; Liu, Q.; Yang, C.; Yu, P.; Huang, Y.; Wang, S.; Jiang, P.; Qu, Z.; Luan, J.; Duan, H.; Zhang, L.; Hou, A.; Jin, S.; Hsieh, T-C; Wu, E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that administration of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol present in abundance in widely consumed tea, inhibits cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis in breast cancer patients. EGCG in 400 mg capsules was orally administered three times daily to breast cancer patients undergoing treatment with radiotherapy. Parameters related to cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis were analyzed while blood samples were collected at different time points to determine efficacy of the EGCG treatment. Compared to patients who received radiotherapy alone, those given radiotherapy plus EGCG for an extended time period (two to eight weeks) showed significantly lower serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and reduced activation of metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase-2 (MMP9/MMP2). Addition of sera obtained from patients treated with combination of radiotherapy and EGCG feeding for 2–8 weeks to in vitro cultures of highly-metastatic human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the following significant changes: (1) suppression of cell proliferation and invasion; (2) arrest of cell cycles at the G0/G1 phase; (3) reduction of activation of MMP9/MMP2, expressions of Bcl-2/Bax, c-Met receptor, NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of Akt. MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to 5–10 µM EGCG also showed significant augmentation of the apoptosis inducing effects of γ-radiation, concomitant with reduced NF-κB protein level and AKT phosphorylation. These results provide hitherto unreported evidence that EGCG potentiated efficacy of radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, and raise the possibility that this tea polyphenol has potential to be a therapeutic adjuvant against human metastatic breast cancer. PMID:22280355

  11. Design, Synthesis and In Vitro Cell-based Evaluation of the Anti-cancer Activities of Hispolon Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, Leticia P.; White, Jason; Mulabagal, Vanisree; Lee, Crystal; Gana, Theophilus J.; Egiebor, Nosa O.; Subbaraju, Gottumukkala V.; Tiwari, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Phytochemicals play an important role in cancer therapy. Hispolon and 26 of its analogs (9 known and 17 new) were synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activities in a panel of six independent human cancer cell lines using the in vitro cell-based MTT assay. Among the hispolon analogs tested, Compound VA-2, the most potent overall, produced its most significant effect in the colon cancer cell lines HCT-116 (IC50 1.4±1.3 μM) and S1 (IC50 1.8±0.9 μM) compared to its activity in the normal HEK293/pcDNA3.1 cell line (IC50 15.8±3.7 μM; p<0.01 for each comparison). Based on our results, VA-2 was about 9- to 11-times more potent in colon cancer cells and 2- to 3-times more potent in prostate cancer cells compared to HEK293/pcDNA3.1 cells. Morphological analysis of VA-2 showed significant reduction of cell number, while the cells’ sizes were also markedly increased and were obvious at 68 h of treatment with 1 μM in HCT-116 (colon) and PC-3 (prostate) cancer cells. A known analog, Compound VA-4, prepared by simple modifications on the aromatic functional groups of hispolon, inhibited prostate and colon cancer cell lines with IC50 values < 10 μM. In addition, hispolon isoxazole and pyrazole analogs, VA-7 and VA-15 (known), respectively, have shown significant activity with the mean IC50 values in the range 3.3 to 10.7 μM in all the cancer cell lines tested. Activity varied among the analogs in which aromatic functional groups and β-diketone functional groups are modified. But the activity of analogs VA-16 to VA-27 was completely lost when the side chain double-bond was hydrogenated indicating the crucial role of this functionality for anticancer activity. Furthermore, many of the compounds synthesized were not substrates for the ABCB1-transporter, the most common cause of multidrug resistance in anti-cancer drugs, suggesting they may be more effective anticancer agents. PMID:25842364

  12. Anti-Cancer Activity of New Designer Hydrogen Sulfide-Donating Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is likely to join nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) as the third gaseous transmitter, influencing an array of intracellular signaling cascades. Thus, H2S is implicated in numerous physiological processes and in the pathology of various diseases. Recent Advances: H2S-donating agents that liberate H2S slowly either alone or in combination with NO, the so-called NOSH compounds, are being synthesized, and these have been shown to have great potential against cancer. Critical Issues: An accurate determination of H2S levels is challenging. H2S and NO share many similar actions; do these similarities act to potentiate each other? Since many actions of H2S appear to be mediated through inhibition of inflammation and Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells is a central player in this scenario, does S-nitrosylation of this transcription factor by NO affect its S-sulfhydration by H2S and vice versa? Future Directions: Deciphering the molecular targets of these novel hybrid agents and having genetically engineered animals should help us move toward targeted therapeutic applications. Human safety data with these new hybrids is essential. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 831–846. PMID:23581880

  13. Maitake Pro4X has anti-cancer activity and prevents oncogenesis in BALBc mice.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Deamicis, Agustina; Alonso, Eliana; Brie, Belén; Braico, Diego Aguilera; Balogh, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the immune tolerance induced by the tumoral microenvironment is fundamental to prevent cancer development or to treat cancer patients using immunotherapy. Actually, there are investigations about "addressed-drugs" against cancer cells without affecting normal cells. It could be ideal to find selective and specific compounds that only recognize and destroy tumor cells without damaging the host normal cells. For thousands of years, mushrooms have been used for medicinal purposes because of their curative properties. D-Fraction, an extract of Maitake (from the edible Grifola frondosa mushroom), rich in β-glucans, exert notable effects in the immune system. Until now, some published articles suggest that Maitake D-Fraction could have anti-tumoral activity, prevent oncogenesis and metastasis in some tumor types. However, there are no clear data about Maitake D-Fraction action on breast cancer prevention and its exact molecular mechanisms are not yet elucidated. The experiments were performed employing 25 female BALBc mice that were treated with and without Maitake D-Fraction Pro4X or Maitake Standard for 15 days by daily intraperitoneal injection. After treatment period, all mice were implanted with murine tumor cells LM3 to induce mammary tumorigenesis. Animals were checked weekly and killed after 46 days of LM3 transplant; percentage of cancer prevention, rate of tumor growing, and overall survival were determined. Under dissection, the internal organs were evaluated histologically and genetically by RT-PCR. We found that 5 mg/kg per day of Maitake D-Fraction Pro4X, administered dairy during 15 days to BALBc mice was able to block more than 60% breast cancer development. However, Maitake Standard prevents oncogenesis in 26% to respect control. In this work, we found that Maitake D-Fraction Pro4X, administered to BALBc mice, prevents breast carcinogenesis, block tumor invasiveness, reduce angiogenesis, and increase

  14. Synthesis, Nitric Oxide Release, and Anti-Leukemic Activity of Glutathione-Activated Nitric Oxide Prodrugs: Structural Analogues of PABA/NO, an Anti-Cancer Lead Compound

    PubMed Central

    Chakrapani, Harinath; Wilde, Thomas C.; Citro, Michael L.; Goodblatt, Michael M.; Keefer, Larry K.; Saavedra, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Diazeniumdiolate anions and their prodrug forms are reliable sources of nitric oxide (NO) that have generated interest as promising therapeutic agents. A number of structural analogues of O2-(2,4-dinitro-5-(4-(N-methylamino)benzoyloxy)phenyl) 1-(N,N-dimethylamino)diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PABA/NO), an anti-cancer lead compound that is designed to release NO upon activation by glutathione, were prepared. The nitric oxide release patterns of these O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diazeniumdiolates in the presence of glutathione were tested and it was found that in the absence of competing pathways, these compounds release nearly quantitative amounts of NO. The ability of PABA/NO and its structural analogues to inhibit human leukemia cell proliferation was determined and it was found that compounds releasing elevated amounts of NO displayed superior cytotoxic effects. PMID:18060792

  15. Impedimetric DNA-biosensor for the study of anti-cancer action of mitomycin C: comparison between acid and electroreductive activation.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Amini, Maryam; Rezaei, Behzad

    2014-09-15

    An electrochemical protocol is described for direct monitoring of anti-cancer properties of MMC. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, a pretreated pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and poly(diallyldimethylmmonium chloride), PDDA, decorated with ds-DNA was employed in this study to identify DNA damages induced by MMC. The change in charge transfer resistance after incubation of the DNA-biosensor in MMC solution for a known time was used as indication of DNA damage. It was found that MMC did not interact with DNA. As MMC does not inherently possess any anti-cancer activity, it is, therefore, necessary to activate it by either of two ways: activation in acidic media or electrochemical activation. Incubation of DNA-modified electrode in activated MMC led to alterations in DNA and changes in its electrochemical properties (which forms the theme of the present study). Acid and electroreductive MMC activations were compared and different adducts were subsequently generated, suggesting that the drug can bind to DNA in more than one way. Impedance spectroscopy was used for the first time as a novel technique for detecting DNA-drug adducts. PMID:24747202

  16. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery.

  17. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K. P

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer. PMID:26927179

  18. Eugenia jambolana (Java Plum) Fruit Extract Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity against Early Stage Human HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells and Colon Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charepalli, Venkata; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vadde, Ramakrishna; Walia, Suresh; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Vanamala, Jairam K P

    2016-02-26

    The World Health Organization predicts over a 70% increase in cancer incidents in developing nations over the next decade. Although these nations have limited access to novel therapeutics, they do have access to foods that contain chemopreventive bioactive compounds such as anthocyanins, and as such, consumption of these foods can be encouraged to combat cancer. We and others have previously characterized the anti-colon cancer properties of dietary anthocyanins from different sources. Eugenia jambolana (Java plum) is a tropical medicinal fruit rich in anthocyanins, however, its anti-colon cancer properties are not well characterized. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that colon cancer stem cells (colon CSCs) promote resistance to chemotherapy, relapse of tumors and contribute to poor prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) characterize the anthocyanin profile of Java plum using HPLC-MS; and 2) determine the anti-proliferative (cell counting and MTT) and pro-apoptotic (TUNEL and caspase 3/7 glo assay) properties of Java plum fruit extract (JPE) using HCT-116 colon cancer cell line and colon CSCs (positive for CD 44, CD 133 and ALDH1b1 markers). HPLC-MS analysis showed that JPE contains a variety of anthocyanins including glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. JPE anthocyanins suppressed (p < 0.05) proliferation in HCT-116 cells and elevated (p < 0.05) apoptosis in both HCT-116 cells and colon CSCs. JPE also suppressed the stemness in colon CSCs as evaluated using colony formation assay. These results warrant further assessment of the anti-cancer activity of JPE, and its molecular mechanisms using pre-clinical models of colon cancer.

  19. Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic cancer due to abrogation of the DNA origin activation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Huggett, Matthew T.; Tudzarova, Slavica; Proctor, Ian; Loddo, Marco; Keane, Margaret G.; Stoeber, Kai; Williams, Gareth H.; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cdc7 is a serine/threonine kinase which is responsible for the ‘firing’ of replication origins leading to initiation of DNA replication. Inhibition or depletion of Cdc7 in normal cells triggers a DNA origin activation checkpoint causing a reversible G1 arrest. Here we investigate Cdc7 as a novel therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. Experimental design Cdc7 target validation was performed by immunoexpression profiling in a cohort of 73 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma including 24 controls. Secondly Cdc7 kinase was targeted in Capan-1 and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cell line models using either an siRNA against Cdc7 or alternatively a small molecule inhibitor (SMI) of Cdc7 (PHA-767491). Results Cdc7 was significantly overexpressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign pancreatic tissue (median LI 34.3% vs. 1.3%; P<0.0001). Cdc7 knockdown using siRNA in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells resulted in marked apoptotic cell death when compared with control cells. A prominent sub-G1 peak was seen on flow cytometry (sub-G1 51% vs. 3% and 45% vs. 0.7% in Capan-1 and PANC-1 cells, respectively). Annexin V labelling confirmed apoptosis in 64% vs. 11% and 75% vs. 8%, respectively. Western blotting showed cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3 and presence of γH2A.X. TUNEL assay showed strong staining in treated cells. These results were mirrored following Cdc7 kinase inhibition with PHA-767491. Conclusions Our findings show that Cdc7 is a potent anti-cancer target in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and that Cdc7 immunoexpression levels might be used as a companion diagnostic to predict response to therapeutic siRNAs or SMIs directed against this kinase. PMID:26921250

  20. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:27145869

  1. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-01-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:27145869

  2. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-05-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents.

  3. Coadministration of the FNIII14 Peptide Synergistically Augments the Anti-Cancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs by Activating Pro-Apoptotic Bim

    PubMed Central

    Akari, Shougo; Otsuka, Kazuki; Fujita, Motomichi; Itagaki, Keisuke; Takizawa, You-ichi; Orita, Hiroaki; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Taira, Jyunichi; Hayashi, Ryo; Kodama, Hiroaki; Fukai, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance mediated by the interaction of tumor cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM), commonly referred to as cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), has been observed not only in hematopoietic tumor cells but also in solid tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that a 22-mer peptide derived from fibronectin, FNIII14, can inhibit cell adhesion through the inactivation of β1 integrin; when coadministered with cytarabine, FNIII14 completely eradicates acute myelogenous leukemia by suppressing CAM-DR. In this study, we show that our FNIII14 peptide also enhances chemotherapy efficacy in solid tumors. Coadministration of FNIII14 synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and aclarubicin in mammary tumor and melanoma cells, respectively. The solid tumor cell chemosensitization induced by FNIII14 is dependent upon the upregulation and activation of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bim. Furthermore, the metastasis of tumor cells derived from ventrally transplanted mammary tumor grafts is suppressed by the coadministration of FNIII14 and doxorubicin. These results suggest that the coadministration of our FNIII14 peptide with chemotherapy could achieve efficient solid tumor eradication by increasing chemosensitivity and decreasing metastasis. The major causes of tumor recurrence are the existence of chemotherapy-resistant primary tumor cells and the establishment of secondary metastatic lesions. As such, coadministering FNIII14 with anti-cancer drugs could provide a promising new approach to improve the prognosis of patients with solid tumors. PMID:27622612

  4. Coadministration of the FNIII14 Peptide Synergistically Augments the Anti-Cancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Drugs by Activating Pro-Apoptotic Bim.

    PubMed

    Iyoda, Takuya; Nagamine, Yumi; Nakane, Yoshitomi; Tokita, Yuya; Akari, Shougo; Otsuka, Kazuki; Fujita, Motomichi; Itagaki, Keisuke; Takizawa, You-Ichi; Orita, Hiroaki; Owaki, Toshiyuki; Taira, Jyunichi; Hayashi, Ryo; Kodama, Hiroaki; Fukai, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance mediated by the interaction of tumor cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM), commonly referred to as cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR), has been observed not only in hematopoietic tumor cells but also in solid tumor cells. We have previously demonstrated that a 22-mer peptide derived from fibronectin, FNIII14, can inhibit cell adhesion through the inactivation of β1 integrin; when coadministered with cytarabine, FNIII14 completely eradicates acute myelogenous leukemia by suppressing CAM-DR. In this study, we show that our FNIII14 peptide also enhances chemotherapy efficacy in solid tumors. Coadministration of FNIII14 synergistically enhances the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and aclarubicin in mammary tumor and melanoma cells, respectively. The solid tumor cell chemosensitization induced by FNIII14 is dependent upon the upregulation and activation of the pro-apoptotic protein, Bim. Furthermore, the metastasis of tumor cells derived from ventrally transplanted mammary tumor grafts is suppressed by the coadministration of FNIII14 and doxorubicin. These results suggest that the coadministration of our FNIII14 peptide with chemotherapy could achieve efficient solid tumor eradication by increasing chemosensitivity and decreasing metastasis. The major causes of tumor recurrence are the existence of chemotherapy-resistant primary tumor cells and the establishment of secondary metastatic lesions. As such, coadministering FNIII14 with anti-cancer drugs could provide a promising new approach to improve the prognosis of patients with solid tumors. PMID:27622612

  5. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—mebendazole as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole, a well-known anti-helminthic drug in wide clinical use, has anti-cancer properties that have been elucidated in a broad range of pre-clinical studies across a number of different cancer types. Significantly, there are also two case reports of anti-cancer activity in humans. The data are summarised and discussed in relation to suggested mechanisms of action. Based on the evidence presented, it is proposed that mebendazole would synergise with a range of other drugs, including existing chemotherapeutics, and that further exploration of the potential of mebendazole as an anti-cancer therapeutic is warranted. A number of possible combinations with other drugs are discussed in the Appendix. PMID:25075217

  6. Induction of BCL2-Interacting Killer, BIK, is Mediated for Anti-Cancer Activity of Curcumin in Human Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yue; Gao, Hang; Callaghan, Michael U.; Fribley, Andrew M.; Garshott, Danielle M.; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Zeng, Qinghua; Li, Yu-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring diarylheptanoid curcumin (CUR), a principal component of the Asian spice turmeric, has been shown to have anti-cancer effects in many tumor types. However, a detailed mechanism regarding CUR induced tumor cell killing remain to be comprehensively explored. Using two head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines FaDu (hypopharyngeal) and Cal27 (tongue), we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which CUR levies the cytotoxic effect. We found that CUR induced upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bik, down-regulation of survival signaling by AKT and NF-κB prior to the induction of the caspase-cascade reduction of cell proliferation, are primary mechanisms of CUR-induced cell death, thus providing insights into the anti-tumor activity of CUR in HNSCC cells. PMID:25767602

  7. Anti-cancer scopes and associated mechanisms of Scutellaria extract and flavonoid wogonin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracts of Scutellaria species have been used in Eastern traditional medicine as well in the Americas for the treatment of several human ailments, including cancer. Crude extracts or flavonoids derived from Scutellaria have been scientifically studied for potential anti-cancer activity using in vit...

  8. Anti-cancer activity and mutagenic potential of novel copper(II) quinolinone Schiff base complexes in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Duff, Brian; Thangella, Venkat Reddy; Creaven, Bernadette S; Walsh, Maureen; Egan, Denise A

    2012-08-15

    This study determined the cytotoxic, cyto-selective and mutagenic potential of novel quinolinone Schiff base ligands and their corresponding copper(II) complexes in human-derived hepatic carcinoma cells (Hep-G2) and non-malignant human-derived hepatic cells (Chang). Results indicated that complexation of quinolinone Schiff bases with copper served to significantly enhance cytotoxicity. Here, the complex of (7E)-7-(3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzylideamino)-4-methylquinolin-2(1H)-one (TV117-FM) exhibited the lowest IC(50) value (17.9 μM) following 96 h continuous exposure, which was comparable to cisplatin (15.0 μM). However, results revealed that TV117-FM lacked cytoselectivity over non-malignant cells. Additionally, the complex was minimally effluxed from cells via Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and was shown to be non-mutagenic in the Standard Ames test. Furthermore, BrdU incorporation assays showed that it was capable of inhibiting DNA synthesis in a concentrationand time-dependent manner. However, inhibition was not as a consequence of DNA intercalation, as illustrated in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Interestingly, it was shown that the ligand was capable of inhibiting the action of topoisomerase II, but this was lost following complexation. This indicated that the mechanism of action of the novel copper(II) complex was different from that of the parent ligand and suggests that TV117-FM may have a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Studies are currently underway to elucidate the exact in vitro mechanism of action of this novel, metal-based anti-cancer agent.

  9. Anti-Cancer Properties of the Naturally Occurring Aphrodisiacs: Icariin and Its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium (family Berberidaceae), commonly known as Horny Goat Weed or Yin Yang Huo, is commonly used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-rheumatic and anti-cancer agent in traditional herbal formulations in Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. The major bioactive compounds present within this plant include icariin, icaritin and icariside II. Although it is best known for its aphrodisiac properties, scientific and pharmacological studies suggest it possesses broad therapeutic capabilities, especially for enhancing reproductive function and osteoprotective, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, anti-inflammatory and immunoprotective effects. In recent years, there has been great interest in scientific investigation of the purported anti-cancer properties of icariin and its derivatives. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies suggests these compounds demonstrate anti-cancer activity against a wide range of cancer cells which occurs through various mechanisms such as apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis and immunomodulation. Of note, they are efficient at targeting cancer stem cells and drug-resistant cancer cells. These are highly desirable properties to be emulated in the development of novel anti-cancer drugs in combatting the emergence of drug resistance and overcoming the limited efficacy of current standard treatment. This review aims to summarize the anti-cancer mechanisms of icariin and its derivatives with reference to the published literature. The currently utilized applications of icariin and its derivatives in cancer treatment are explored with reference to existing patents. Based on the data compiled, icariin and its derivatives are shown to be compounds with tremendous potential for the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27445824

  10. Anti-Cancer Properties of the Naturally Occurring Aphrodisiacs: Icariin and Its Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui-Li; Chan, Kok-Gan; Pusparajah, Priyia; Saokaew, Surasak; Duangjai, Acharaporn; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium (family Berberidaceae), commonly known as Horny Goat Weed or Yin Yang Huo, is commonly used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-rheumatic and anti-cancer agent in traditional herbal formulations in Asian countries such as China, Japan, and Korea. The major bioactive compounds present within this plant include icariin, icaritin and icariside II. Although it is best known for its aphrodisiac properties, scientific and pharmacological studies suggest it possesses broad therapeutic capabilities, especially for enhancing reproductive function and osteoprotective, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, anti-inflammatory and immunoprotective effects. In recent years, there has been great interest in scientific investigation of the purported anti-cancer properties of icariin and its derivatives. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies suggests these compounds demonstrate anti-cancer activity against a wide range of cancer cells which occurs through various mechanisms such as apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis and immunomodulation. Of note, they are efficient at targeting cancer stem cells and drug-resistant cancer cells. These are highly desirable properties to be emulated in the development of novel anti-cancer drugs in combatting the emergence of drug resistance and overcoming the limited efficacy of current standard treatment. This review aims to summarize the anti-cancer mechanisms of icariin and its derivatives with reference to the published literature. The currently utilized applications of icariin and its derivatives in cancer treatment are explored with reference to existing patents. Based on the data compiled, icariin and its derivatives are shown to be compounds with tremendous potential for the development of new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27445824

  11. In vitro anti-cancer activities of Job's tears (Coix lachryma-jobi Linn.) extracts on human colon adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Manosroi, Aranya; Sainakham, Mathukorn; Chankhampan, Charinya; Manosroi, Worapaka; Manosroi, Jiradej

    2016-03-01

    The whole seed (W), endosperm (E) and hull (H) of five cultivars of Job's tears (Coix lachryma-jobi Linn. var. ma-yuen Stapf) including Thai Black Phayao, Thai Black Loei, Laos Black Loei, Laos White Loei and Laos Black Luang Phra Bang were processed before solvent extraction by non-cooking, roasting, boiling and steaming Each part of the Job's tears was extracted by the cold and hot process by refluxing with methanol and hexane. The total of 330 extracts included 150 methanol extracts and 180 hexane extracts were investigated for anti-proliferative activity on human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (HT-29) by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. The extracts which gave high anti-proliferative activity were tested for apoptotic activity by acridine orange and ethidium bromide double staining and anti-oxidative activities including free radical scavenging and lipid peroxidation inhibition activities. The extract from the hull of Thai Black Loei roasted before extracting by hot methanol (M-HTBL-R2) showed the highest anti-proliferative activity on HT-29 with the IC50 values of 11.61 ± 0.95 μg/ml, while the extract from the non-cooked hull of Thai Black Loei by cold methanol extraction (M-HTBL-N1) gave the highest apoptosis (8.17 ± 1.18%) with no necrosis. In addition, M-HTBL-R2 and M-HTBL-N1 indicated free radical scavenging activity at the SC50 values of 0.48 ± 0.12 and 2.47 ± 1.15 mg/ml, respectively. This study has demonstrated the anti-colorectal cancer potential of the M-HTBL-R2 and M-HTBL-N1 extracts. PMID:26981007

  12. Validating Aurora B as an anti-cancer drug target.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Fiona; Gascoigne, Karen E; Eyers, Patrick A; Hartmuth, Sonya; Crafter, Claire; Foote, Kevin M; Keen, Nicholas J; Taylor, Stephen S

    2006-09-01

    The Aurora kinases, a family of mitotic regulators, have received much attention as potential targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics. Several Aurora kinase inhibitors have been described including ZM447439, which prevents chromosome alignment, spindle checkpoint function and cytokinesis. Subsequently, ZM447439-treated cells exit mitosis without dividing and lose viability. Because ZM447439 inhibits both Aurora A and B, we set out to determine which phenotypes are due to inhibition of which kinase. Using molecular genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity phenocopies ZM447439. Furthermore, a novel ZM compound, which is 100 times more selective for Aurora B over Aurora A in vitro, induces identical phenotypes. Importantly, inhibition of Aurora B kinase activity induces a penetrant anti-proliferative phenotype, indicating that Aurora B is an attractive anti-cancer drug target. Using molecular genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we also probe the role of Aurora A kinase activity. We show that simultaneous repression of Aurora A plus induction of a catalytic mutant induces a monopolar phenotype. Consistently, another novel ZM-related inhibitor, which is 20 times as potent against Aurora A compared with ZM447439, induces a monopolar phenotype. Expression of a drug-resistant Aurora A mutant reverts this phenotype, demonstrating that Aurora A kinase activity is required for spindle bipolarity in human cells. Because small molecule-mediated inhibition of Aurora A and Aurora B yields distinct phenotypes, our observations indicate that the Auroras may present two avenues for anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:16912073

  13. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Van Kanegan, Michael J.; Dunn, Denise E.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D.; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H.; Newman, Robert A.; Lo, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0–4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0–4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  14. Anti-Cancer Potential of a Novel SERM Ormeloxifene

    PubMed Central

    Gara, Rishi Kumar; Sundram, Vasudha; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Jaggi, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Ormeloxifene is a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) that is used as an oral contraceptive. Recent studies have shown its potent anti-cancer activities in breast, head and neck, and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Several in vivo and clinical studies have reported that ormeloxifene possesses an excellent therapeutic index and has been well-tolerated, without any haematological, biochemical or histopathological toxicity, even with chronic administration. A reasonably long period of time and an enormous financial commitment are required to develop a lead compound into a clinically approved anti-cancer drug. For these reasons and to circumvent these obstacles, ormeloxifene is a promising candidate on a fast track for the development or repurposing established drugs as anti-cancer agents for cancer treatment. The current review summarizes recent findings on ormeloxifene as an anti-cancer agent and future prospects of this clinically safe pharmacophore. PMID:23895678

  15. In vitro investigation of the potential immunomodulatory and anti-cancer activities of black pepper (Piper nigrum) and cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum).

    PubMed

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Carr, Ronald I

    2010-04-01

    Although the immunomodulatory effects of many herbs have been extensively studied, research related to possible immunomodulatory effects of various spices is relatively scarce. Here, the potential immunomodulatory effects of black pepper and cardamom are investigated. Our data show that black pepper and cardamom aqueous extracts significantly enhance splenocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent, synergistic fashion. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments reveal that black pepper and cardamom significantly enhance and suppress, respectively, T helper (Th)1 cytokine release by splenocytes. Conversely, Th2 cytokine release by splenocytes is significantly suppressed and enhanced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Experimental evidence suggests that black pepper and cardamom extracts exert pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Consistently, nitric oxide production by macrophages is significantly augmented and reduced by black pepper and cardamom, respectively. Remarkably, it is evident that black pepper and cardamom extracts significantly enhance the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, indicating their potential anti-cancer effects. Our findings strongly suggest that black pepper and cardamom exert immunomodulatory roles and antitumor activities, and hence they manifest themselves as natural agents that can promote the maintenance of a healthy immune system. We anticipate that black pepper and cardamom constituents can be used as potential therapeutic tools to regulate inflammatory responses and prevent/attenuate carcinogenesis.

  16. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min Hye; Kim, Jinwoong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2014-04-01

    Natural products are rich sources of gene modulators that may be useful in prevention and treatment of cancer. Recently, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a target of action against diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural agents have been reported to play a pivotal role in regulation of NAG-1 through multiple transcriptional mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to review the NAG-1 modulators derived from natural products including plants, marine organisms, and microorganisms. Plant extracts belonging to the families of Fabaceae (Astragalus membranaceus), Ranunculaceae (Coptis chinensis), Menispermaceae (Coscinium fenestratum), Umbelliferae (Pleurospermum kamtschaticum), Lamiaceae (Marubium vulgare), and Rosaceae (Prunus serotina) increased the protein expression of NAG-1 in human colon cancer or hepatocarcinoma cells. Phytochemicals in the class of flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, and 2'-hydroxyflavanone), isoflavonoids (formononetin and genistein), catechins (epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate), stilbenoids (resveratrol and pinosylvin), phenolics (6-gingerol), phloroglucinols (rottlerin and aspidin PB), terpenoids (18 α-glycyrrhetinic acid, platycodin D, pseudolaric acid B, and xanthorrhizol), alkaloids (berberine, capsaicin, and indole-3-carbinol), lignans (isochaihulactone), anthraquinones (damnacanthal), and allyl sulfides (diallyl disulfide) elicited NAG-1 overexpression in various cancer cells. Pectenotoxin-2 from marine organisms and prodigiosin and anisomycin from microorganisms were also reported as NAG-1 modulators. Several transcription factors including EGR-1, p53, ATF-3, Sp1 and PPARγ were involved in natural products-induced NAG-1 transcriptional signaling pathway. PMID:24530873

  17. Anti-cancer Activity of Osmanthus matsumuranus Extract by Inducing G2/M Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Hep G2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Soojung; Park, Hyun-Jin; Oh, You Na; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Byung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osmanthus matsumuranus, a species of Oleaceae, is found in East Asia and Southeast Asia. The bioactivities of O. matsumuranus have not yet been fully understood. Here, we studied on the molecular mechanisms underlying anti-cancer effect of ethanol extract of O. matsumuranus (EEOM). Methods: Inhibitory effect of EEOM on cell growth and proliferation was determined by WST assay in various cancer cells. To investigate the mechanisms of EEOM-mediated cytotoxicity, HepG2 cells were treated with various concentration of EEOM and analyzed the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction by flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and DNA fragmentation. Results: EEOM showed the cytotoxic activities in a dose-dependent manner in various cancer cell lines but not in normal cells, and HepG2 cells were most susceptible to EEOM-induced cytotoxicity. EEOM induced G2/M arrest in HepG2 cells associated with decreased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cyclin A and cylcin B, and increased expression of phospho-checkpoint kinase 2, p53 and CDK inhibitor p21. Immunofluorescence staining showed that EEOM-treated HepG2 increased doublet nuclei and condensed actin, resulting in cell rounding. Furthermore, EEOM-mediated apoptosis was determined by Annexin V staining, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. EEOM caused upregulation of FAS and Bax, activation of caspase-3, -8, -9, and fragmentation of poly ADP ribose polymerase. Conclusions: These results suggest that EEOM efficiently inhibits proliferation of HepG2 cells by inducing both G2/M arrest and apoptosis via intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, and EEOM may be used as a cancer chemopreventive agent in the food or nutraceutical industry. PMID:26734586

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  19. Anthracycline antibiotics non-covalently incorporated into the block copolymer micelles: in vivo evaluation of anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, E. V.; Dorodnych, T. Y.; Klinskii, E. Y.; Kliushnenkova, E. N.; Shemchukova, O. B.; Goncharova, O. N.; Arjakov, S. A.; Alakhov, V. Y.; Kabanov, A. V.

    1996-01-01

    The chemosensitising effects of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly-(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers (Pluronic) in multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been described recently (Alakhov VY, Moskaleva EY, Batrakova EV, Kabanov AV 1996, Biocon. Chem., 7, 209). This paper presents initial studies on in vivo evaluation of Pluronic copolymers in the treatment of cancer. The anti-tumour activity of epirubicin (EPI) and doxorubicin (DOX), solubilised in micelles of Pluronic L61, P85 and F108, was investigated using murine leukaemia P388 and daunorubicin-sensitive Sp2/0 and -resistant Sp2/0(DNR) myeloma cells grown subcutaneously (s.c.). The study revealed that the lifespan of the animals and inhibition of tumour growth were considerably increased in mice treated with drug/copolymer compositions compared with animals treated with the free drugs. The anti-tumour activity of the drug/copolymer compositions depends on the concentration of the copolymer and its hydrophobicity, as determined by the ratio of the lengths of hydrophilic PEO and hydrophobic PPO segments. The data suggest that higher activity is associated with more hydrophobic copolymers. In particular, a significant increase in lifespan (T/C> 150%) and tumour growth inhibition (> 90%) was observed in animals with Sp2/0 tumours with EPI/P85 and DOX/L61 compositions. The effective doses of these compositions caused inhibition of Sp2/0 tumour growth and complete disappearance of tumour in 33-50% of animals. Future studies will focus on the evaluation of the activity of Pluronic-based compositions against human drug-resistant tumours. PMID:8932333

  20. Synthesis and anti-cancer activity evaluation of novel prenylated and geranylated chalcone natural products and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Meng; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jiang; Yang, Zhao-Liang; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Yang, Yao; Shen, Di; Lu, Kui; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Yao, Qing-Wei; Zhang, Yong-Min; Teng, Yu-Ou; Peng, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Four natural chalcones bearing prenyl or geranyl groups, i.e., bavachalcone (1a), xanthoangelol (1b), isobavachalcone (1c), and isoxanthoangelol (1d) were synthesized by using a regio-selective iodination and the Suzuki coupling reaction as key steps. The first total synthesis of isoxanthoangelol (1d) was achieved in 36% overall yield. A series of diprenylated and digeranylated chalcone analogs were also synthesized by alkylation, regio-selective iodination, aldol condensation, Suzuki coupling and [1,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement. The structures of the 11 new derivatives were confirmed by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and HRMS. The anticancer activity of these new chalcone derivatives against human tumor cell line K562 were evaluated by MTT assay in vitro. SAR studies suggested that the 5'-prenylation/geranylation of the chalcones significantly enhance their cytotoxic activity. Among them, Bavachalcone (1a) displayed the most potent cytotoxic activity against K562 with IC50 value of 2.7 μM. The morphology changes and annexin-V/PI staining studies suggested that those chalcone derivatives inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells by inducing apoptosis. PMID:25590864

  1. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level

    PubMed Central

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-01-01

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED. PMID:24694892

  2. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-01

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  3. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer.

  4. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-Gingerol in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, Madan L.B.; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  5. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  6. Functional nanoemulsion-hybrid lipid nanocarriers enhance the bioavailability and anti-cancer activity of lipophilic diferuloylmethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lili; Wan, Kun; Hu, Xueyuan; Zhang, Yonghong; Yan, Zijun; Feng, Jiao; Zhang, Jingqing

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the enhanced physicochemical characteristics, in vitro release behavior, anti-lung cancer activity, gastrointestinal absorption, in vivo bioavailability and bioequivalence of functional nanoemulsion-hybrid lipid nanocarriers containing diferuloylmethane (DNHLNs). The DNHLNs were first fabricated by loading water-in-oil nanoemulsions into hybrid lipid nanosystems using nanoemulsion-thin film-sonication dispersion technologies. The in situ absorption and in vitro and in vivo kinetic features of DNHLNs were measured using an in situ unidirectional perfusion method, a dynamic dialysis method and a plasma concentration-time profile-based method, respectively. The cytotoxic effects of DNHLNs in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were examined using MTT colorimetric analysis. The absorptive constants and permeabilities of DNHLNs in four gastrointestinal sections increased by 1.43-3.23 times and by 3.10-7.76 times that of diferuloylmethane (DIF), respectively. The relative bioavailability of DNHLNs to free DIF was 855.02%. DNHLNs inhibited cancer cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DNHLNs markedly improved the absorption and bioavailability of DIF after oral administration. DNHLNs had stronger inhibitory effects on the viability of A549 cells than that of free DIF. DNHLNs might be potentially promising nanocarriers for DIF delivery via the oral route to address unmet clinical needs.

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic properties and potential anti-cancerous activities of four unsaturated bis-norcantharimides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shuang-Shuang; Shi, Yan; Ma, Xiao-Na; Xing, Dian-Xiang; Liu, Lian-Dong; Liu, Yun; Zhao, Yun-Xue; Sui, Qi-Cheng; Tan, Xue-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Four unsaturated norcantharimide (UNCI) dimers were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-QTOF-MS, FT/IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR as well as single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition, theoretical studies have been investigated to compare with the experimental findings. Introduction of various lengths of single bond link chains provides high conformational flexibility and thus unusual molecular and crystal structures for dimers. Two of the four dimers twist into helicate, but crystallize into centrosymmetric lattice; one adopts approximately centrosymmetric conformer, but packs into non-centrosymmetric polar space group (P21). Moreover, in vitro cytotoxic activities of four UNCI dimers and their corresponding saturated NCI dimers were evaluated. All four UNCI dimers are inactive and one NCI dimer shows modest cytotoxicity. These findings were compared with the relevant results in literature. It is found that the antitumor properties of UNCI/NCI dimers depend mainly on the length of link chains (the longer chain, the higher therapeutic efficacy) and have relationship with the double bond, which requires more experimental support.

  8. Production of anti-cancer agent using microbial biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Roh, Changhyun; Kang, ChanKyu

    2014-01-01

    Microbial biotransformation is a great model system to produce drugs and biologically active compounds. In this study, we elucidated the fermentation and production of an anti-cancer agent from a microbial process for regiospecific hydroxylation of resveratrol. Among the strains examined, a potent strain showed high regiospecific hydroxylation activity to produce piceatannol. In a 5 L (w/v 3 L) jar fermentation, this wild type Streptomyces sp. in the batch system produced 205 mg of piceatannol (i.e., 60% yields) from 342 mg of resveratrol in 20 h. Using the product, an in vitro anti-cancer study was performed against a human cancer cell line (HeLa). It showed that the biotransformed piceatannol possessed a significant anticancer activity. This result demonstrates that a biotransformation screening method might be of therapeutic interest with respect to the identification of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25325153

  9. A journey under the sea: the quest for marine anti-cancer alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rita; Darwiche, Nadine; Gali-Muhtasib, Hala

    2011-01-01

    The alarming increase in the global cancer death toll has fueled the quest for new effective anti-tumor drugs thorough biological screening of both terrestrial and marine organisms. Several plant-derived alkaloids are leading drugs in the treatment of different types of cancer and many are now being tested in various phases of clinical trials. Recently, marine-derived alkaloids, isolated from aquatic fungi, cyanobacteria, sponges, algae, and tunicates, have been found to also exhibit various anti-cancer activities including anti-angiogenic, anti-proliferative, inhibition of topoisomerase activities and tubulin polymerization, and induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity. Two tunicate-derived alkaloids, aplidin and trabectedin, offer promising drug profiles, and are currently in phase II clinical trials against several solid and hematologic tumors. This review sheds light on the rich array of anti-cancer alkaloids in the marine ecosystem and introduces the most investigated compounds and their mechanisms of action. PMID:22113577

  10. Anti-cancer natural products isolated from chinese medicinal herbs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a number of natural products isolated from Chinese herbs have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress angiogenesis, retard metastasis and enhance chemotherapy, exhibiting anti-cancer potential both in vitro and in vivo. This article summarizes recent advances in in vitro and in vivo research on the anti-cancer effects and related mechanisms of some promising natural products. These natural products are also reviewed for their therapeutic potentials, including flavonoids (gambogic acid, curcumin, wogonin and silibinin), alkaloids (berberine), terpenes (artemisinin, β-elemene, oridonin, triptolide, and ursolic acid), quinones (shikonin and emodin) and saponins (ginsenoside Rg3), which are isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs. In particular, the discovery of the new use of artemisinin derivatives as excellent anti-cancer drugs is also reviewed. PMID:21777476

  11. [Review about mechanisms of anti-cancer of Solanum nigrum].

    PubMed

    An, Lei; Tang, Jin-tian; Liu, Xin-min; Gao, Nan-nan

    2006-08-01

    This paper gave a brief introduction of the effect of Solanum nigrum on anti-cancer. The experimental results showed that the total alkaloid isolated from S. nigrum interfered structure and function of tumor cell membrane, disturbed the synthesis of DNA and RNA, changed the cell cycle distribution, so that total alkaloids could play in inhibabition to tumor cells, while the glycoprotein (150 x 10(3)) isolated from S. nigrum might have shown anti-cancer abilities by blocking the anti-apoptotic pathway of NF-kappaB, activating caspase cascades reaction and increasing the production of nitric oxide. PMID:17048560

  12. Evidence for anti-cancer properties of blueberries: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah A; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2013-10-01

    Blueberries are amongst the most commonly consumed berries in the United States. Berries in general are rich in phenolic compounds, which are known for their high antioxidant capacity. Specifically, evidence from in vitro, in vivo and a few clinical studies suggest that blueberries and their active constituents show promise as effective anti-cancer agents, both in the form of functional foods and as nutritional supplements. Some of the mechanisms by which blueberries have been shown to prevent carcinogenesis include inhibition of the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, oxidative stress and products of oxidative stress such as DNA damage, inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. This review will focus on the preclinical and clinical evidence that supports blueberries as an anti-cancer fruit, as well as expressing the need for more preclinical studies and the conduction of clinical studies with respect to the cancer preventive ability of blueberries.

  13. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neuzil, Jiri; Dong, Lan-Feng; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, Stephen J

    2013-05-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as an intriguing target for anti-cancer drugs, inherent to vast majority if not all types of tumours. Drugs that target mitochondria and exert anti-cancer activity have become a focus of recent research due to their great clinical potential (which has not been harnessed thus far). The exceptional potential of mitochondria as a target for anti-cancer agents has been reinforced by the discouraging finding that even tumours of the same type from individual patients differ in a number of mutations. This is consistent with the idea of personalised therapy, an elusive goal at this stage, in line with the notion that tumours are unlikely to be treated by agents that target only a single gene or a single pathway. This endows mitochondria, an invariant target present in all tumours, with an exceptional momentum. This train of thoughts inspired us to define a class of anti-cancer drugs acting by way of mitochondrial 'destabilisation', termed 'mitocans'. In this communication, we define mitocans (many of which have been known for a long time) and classify them into several classes based on their molecular mode of action. We chose the targets that are of major importance from the point of view of their role in mitochondrial destabilisation by small compounds, some of which are now trialled as anti-cancer agents. The classification starts with targets at the surface of mitochondria and ending up with those in the mitochondrial matrix. The purpose of this review is to present in a concise manner the classification of compounds that hold a considerable promise as potential anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Astemizole: an old anti-histamine as a new promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    García-Quiroz, Janice; Camacho, Javier

    2011-03-01

    Mortality-to-incidence ratio in cancer patients is extremely high, positioning cancer as a major cause of death worldwide. Despite hundreds of clinical trials for anti-cancer drugs that are currently in progress, most clinical trials for novel drug treatments fail to pass Phase I. However, previously developed drugs with novel anti-tumor properties offer a viable and cost-effective alternative to fight cancer. Histamine favors the proliferation of normal and malignant cells. Several anti-histamine drugs, including astemizole, can inhibit tumor cell proliferation. Astemizole has gained enormous interest since it also targets important proteins involved in cancer progression, namely, ether à-go-go 1 (Eag1) and Eag-related gene (Erg) potassium channels. Furthermore, Eag1 is thought to be an important marker and a therapeutic target for several different cancers. Astemizole inhibits Eag1 and Erg channel activity, and in cells expressing the Eag1 channel it decreases tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. It should be noted that some cardiovascular side effects have been reported for astemizole in a few rare cases. Nevertheless, astemizole stands as a very promising anti-cancer tool because it displays several anti-proliferative mechanisms, may serve as the basis to synthesize new anti-cancer agents, and has been previously administered clinically. In this review we will summarize the main findings relating to histamine and anti-histamines in cancer cell proliferation focusing on astemizole targets (Eag1 and Erg channels), and its anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. We will also describe the side effects of astemizole and discuss proposals to overcome such effects in cancer patients. Finally, we will remark on the relevance of developing novel astemizole-related compounds. PMID:21443504

  15. Fucoidan extract enhances the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongyuan; Teruya, Kiichiro; Yoshida, Toshihiro; Eto, Hiroshi; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2013-01-09

    Fucoidan, a fucose-rich polysaccharide isolated from brown alga, is currently under investigation as a new anti-cancer compound. In the present study, fucoidan extract (FE) from Cladosiphon navae-caledoniae Kylin was prepared by enzymatic digestion. We investigated whether a combination of FE with cisplatin, tamoxifen or paclitaxel had the potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatment. These co-treatments significantly induced cell growth inhibition, apoptosis, as well as cell cycle modifications in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. FE enhanced apoptosis in cancer cells that responded to treatment with three chemotherapeutic drugs with downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. The combination treatments led to an obvious decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK and Akt in MDA-MB-231 cells, but increased the phosphorylation of ERK in MCF-7 cells. In addition, we observed that combination treatments enhanced intracellular ROS levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in breast cancer cells, suggesting that induction of oxidative stress was an important event in the cell death induced by the combination treatments.

  16. Fusarium proliferatum, an endophytic fungus from Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook.f, produces rohitukine, a chromane alkaloid possessing anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Zuehlke, Sebastian; Priti, Vaidyanathan; Ramesha, Bheemanahally Thimmappa; Shweta, Singh; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Vasudeva, Ramesh; Santhoshkumar, Thankayyan Retnabai; Spiteller, Michael; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan

    2012-02-01

    Rohitukine is a chromane alkaloid possessing anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and immuno-modulatory properties. The compound was first reported from Amoora rohituka (Meliaceae) and later from Dysoxylum binectariferum (Meliaceae) and Schumanniophyton problematicum (Rubiaceae). Flavopiridol, a semi-synthetic derivative of rohitukine is a potent CDK inhibitor and is currently in Phase III clinical trials. In this study, the isolation of an endophytic fungus, Fusarium proliferatum (MTCC 9690) from the inner bark tissue of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook.f (Meliaceae) is reported. The endophytic fungus produces rohitukine when cultured in shake flasks containing potato dextrose broth. The yield of rohitukine was 186 μg/100 g dry mycelial weight, substantially lower than that produced by the host tissue. The compound from the fungus was authenticated by comparing the LC-HRMS and LC-HRMS/MS spectra with those of the reference standard and that produced by the host plant. Methanolic extract of the fungus was cytotoxic against HCT-116 and MCF-7 human cancer cell lines (IC(50) = 10 μg/ml for both cancer cell lines).

  17. Discovery of anti-cancer activity for benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones: Very strong correlation to pleurotin and thioredoxin reductase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Martin; Coyle, Robert; Kavanagh, Paul; Berezin, Andrey A; Lo Re, Daniele; Zissimou, Georgia A; Koutentis, Panayiotis A; Carty, Michael P; Aldabbagh, Fawaz

    2016-08-15

    The thioredoxin (Trx)-thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) system plays a key role in maintaining the cellular redox balance with Trx being over-expressed in a number of cancers. Inhibition of TrxR is an important strategy for anti-cancer drug discovery. The natural product pleurotin is a well-known irreversible inhibitor of TrxR. The cytotoxicity data for benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones showed very strong correlation (Pearson correlation coefficients ∼0.8) to pleurotin using National Cancer Institute COMPARE analysis. A new 3-CF3 substituted benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one gave submicromolar inhibition of TrxR, although the parent compound 1,3-diphenylbenzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one was more cytotoxic against cancer cell lines. Benzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-ones exhibited different types of reversible inhibition of TrxR, and cyclic voltammetry showed characteristic quasi-reversible redox processes. Cell viability studies indicated strong dependence of cytotoxicity on substitution at the 6-position of the 1,3-diphenylbenzo[1,2,4]triazin-7-one ring. PMID:27290691

  18. Interaction of doxorubicin with a regulatory element of hmga1 and its in vitro anti-cancer activity associated with decreased HMGA1 expression.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Md Zahid; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2014-12-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) non-histone chromatin protein is known as an architectural transcription factor that regulates transcription of various genes. HMGA1 is highly expressed in almost all human cancers and considered as a potent tumor marker. Because of its association with cancers, hmga1 is considered as a critical target for anti-cancer drugs. In the present study, we report interaction of doxorubicin (DOX) with a short deoxyoligonucleotide (-1917 to -1940) within a regulatory element of hmga1 and its subsequent effect on expression of HMGA1 in breast cancer MCF7 cells. Binding of DOX to DNA was found to be strong (K(a), 5.2 × 10(5)M(-1)) and thermodynamically favorable by both negative enthalpy (ΔH, -8.1 ± 0.25 kcal M(-1)) and positive entropy changes (TΔS, 21.1 ± 5.2 kcal M(-1)) at 20 °C. A significant increase in melting temperature of DNA in presence of DOX by +10 °C was accompanied by substantial quenching of fluorescence of DOX (∼ 85%) at 595 nm and hypochromic change (∼ 40%) at 500 nm absorption spectra of DOX along with a bathochromic shift of ∼ 5 nm. Reduced expression of HMGA1 by ∼ 60% both at mRNA and protein level and associated cell death in presence of DOX was observed in breast cancer cells. Therefore, hmga1 is a promising chemotherapeutic target in treating human malignancies. PMID:25313540

  19. Interaction of doxorubicin with a regulatory element of hmga1 and its in vitro anti-cancer activity associated with decreased HMGA1 expression.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Md Zahid; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2014-12-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) non-histone chromatin protein is known as an architectural transcription factor that regulates transcription of various genes. HMGA1 is highly expressed in almost all human cancers and considered as a potent tumor marker. Because of its association with cancers, hmga1 is considered as a critical target for anti-cancer drugs. In the present study, we report interaction of doxorubicin (DOX) with a short deoxyoligonucleotide (-1917 to -1940) within a regulatory element of hmga1 and its subsequent effect on expression of HMGA1 in breast cancer MCF7 cells. Binding of DOX to DNA was found to be strong (K(a), 5.2 × 10(5)M(-1)) and thermodynamically favorable by both negative enthalpy (ΔH, -8.1 ± 0.25 kcal M(-1)) and positive entropy changes (TΔS, 21.1 ± 5.2 kcal M(-1)) at 20 °C. A significant increase in melting temperature of DNA in presence of DOX by +10 °C was accompanied by substantial quenching of fluorescence of DOX (∼ 85%) at 595 nm and hypochromic change (∼ 40%) at 500 nm absorption spectra of DOX along with a bathochromic shift of ∼ 5 nm. Reduced expression of HMGA1 by ∼ 60% both at mRNA and protein level and associated cell death in presence of DOX was observed in breast cancer cells. Therefore, hmga1 is a promising chemotherapeutic target in treating human malignancies.

  20. Theobroma cacao: Review of the Extraction, Isolation, and Bioassay of Its Potential Anti-cancer Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Baharum, Zainal; Akim, Abdah Md; Hin, Taufiq Yap Yun; Hamid, Roslida Abdul; Kasran, Rosmin

    2016-01-01

    Plants have been a good source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years; an impressive number of modern drugs used for treating human diseases are derived from natural sources. The Theobroma cacao tree, or cocoa, has recently garnered increasing attention and become the subject of research due to its antioxidant properties, which are related to potential anti-cancer effects. In the past few years, identifying and developing active compounds or extracts from the cocoa bean that might exert anti-cancer effects have become an important area of health- and biomedicine-related research. This review provides an updated overview of T. cacao in terms of its potential anti-cancer compounds and their extraction, in vitro bioassay, purification, and identification. This article also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques described and reviews the processes for future perspectives of analytical methods from the viewpoint of anti-cancer compound discovery. PMID:27019680

  1. Theobroma cacao: Review of the Extraction, Isolation, and Bioassay of Its Potential Anti-cancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Baharum, Zainal; Akim, Abdah Md; Hin, Taufiq Yap Yun; Hamid, Roslida Abdul; Kasran, Rosmin

    2016-02-01

    Plants have been a good source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years; an impressive number of modern drugs used for treating human diseases are derived from natural sources. The Theobroma cacao tree, or cocoa, has recently garnered increasing attention and become the subject of research due to its antioxidant properties, which are related to potential anti-cancer effects. In the past few years, identifying and developing active compounds or extracts from the cocoa bean that might exert anti-cancer effects have become an important area of health- and biomedicine-related research. This review provides an updated overview of T. cacao in terms of its potential anti-cancer compounds and their extraction, in vitro bioassay, purification, and identification. This article also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques described and reviews the processes for future perspectives of analytical methods from the viewpoint of anti-cancer compound discovery. PMID:27019680

  2. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer.

  3. Anti-cancer effect of ursolic acid activates apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Wen-Tao; Yu, Da-Peng; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Wang, Pei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid is a type of pentacyclic triterpene compound with multiple pharmacological activities including cancer resistance, protection from liver injury, antisepsis, anti-inflammation and antiviral activity. The present study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid. Ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis and its pro-apoptotic mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Cell Counting kit-8 assays, flow cytometric analysis and analysis of caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity were used to estimate the anticancer effect of ursolic acid on DU145 prostate cancer cells. The protein expression of cytochrome c, rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and cofilin-1 were examined using western blot analysis. In the present study, ursolic acid significantly suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis, as well as increasing caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities of DU145 cells. Furthermore, cytoplasmic and mitochondrial cytochrome c protein expression was significantly activated and suppressed, respectively, by ursolic acid. Ursolic acid significantly suppressed the ROCK/PTEN signaling pathway and inhibited cofilin-1 protein expression in DU145 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the anticancer effect of ursolic acid activates cell apoptosis through ROCK/PTEN mediated mitochondrial translocation of cofilin-1 in prostate cancer. PMID:27698874

  4. The Chromone Alkaloid, Rohitukine, Affords Anti-Cancer Activity via Modulating Apoptosis Pathways in A549 Cell Line and Yeast Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Safia; Kamil, Mohd; Jadiya, Pooja; Sheikh, Saba; Haque, Ejazul; Nazir, Aamir; Lakshmi, Vijai; Mir, Snober S.

    2015-01-01

    The field of cancer research and treatment has made significant progress, yet we are far from having completely safe, efficient and specific therapies that target cancer cells and spare the healthy tissues. Natural compounds may reduce the problems related to cancer treatment. Currently, many plant products are being used to treat cancer. In this study, Rohitukine, a natural occurring chromone alkaloid extracted from Dysoxylum binectariferum, was investigated for cytotoxic properties against budding yeast as well as against lung cancer (A549) cells. We endeavored to specifically study Rohitukine in S. cerevisiae in the context of MAPK pathways as yeast probably represents the experimental model where the organization and regulation of MAPK pathways are best understood. MAPK are evolutionarily conserved protein kinases that transfer extracellular signals to the machinery controlling essential cellular processes like growth, migration, differentiation, cell division and apoptosis. We aimed at carrying out hypothesis driven studies towards targeting the important network of cellular communication, a critical process that gets awry in cancer. Employing mutant strains of genetic model system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae encodes five MAPKs involved in control of distinct cellular responses such as growth, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Our study involves gene knockouts of Slt2 and Hog1 which are functional homologs of human ERK5 and mammalian p38 MAPK, respectively. We performed cytotoxicity assay to evaluate the effect of Rohitukine on cell viability and also determined the effects of drug on generation of reactive oxygen species, induction of apoptosis and expression of Slt2 and Hog1 gene at mRNA level in the presence of drug. The results of this study show a differential effect in the activity of drug between the WT, Slt2 and Hog1 gene deletion strain indicating involvement of MAPK pathway. Further, we investigated Rohitukine induced cytotoxic

  5. Nanopharmaceutical Approach for Enhanced Anti-cancer Activity of Betulinic Acid in Lung-cancer Treatment via Activation of PARP: Interaction with DNA as a Target

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayeeta; Samadder, Asmita; Das, Sreemanti; Paul, Avijit; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the relative efficacies of a derivative of betulinic acid (dBA) and its poly (lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA) nano-encapsulated form in A549 lung cancer cells in vivo and in co-mutagen [sodium arsenite (SA) + benzo]undefined[a]pyrene (BaP)]-induced lung cancer in mice in vivo. Methods: dBA was loaded with PLGA nanoparticles by using the standard solvent displacement method. The sizes and morphologies of nano-dBA (NdBA) were determined by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their intracellular localization was verified by using confocal microscopy. The binding and interaction of NdBA with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) as a target were analyzed by using conventional circular dichroism (CD) and melting temperature (Tm) profile data. Apoptotic signalling cascades in vitro and in vivo were studied by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); the ability of NdBA to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was also examined. The stage of cell cycle arrest was confirmed by using a fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) data analysis. Results: The average size of the nanoparticles was ~ 110 nm. Confocal microscopy images confirmed the presence of NdBA in the cellular cytoplasm. The bio-physical properties of dBA and NdBA ascertained from the CD and the Tm profiles revealed that NdBA had greater interaction with the target DNA than dBA did. Both dBA and NdBA arrested cell proliferation at G0/G1, NdBA showing the greater effect. NdBA also induced a greater degree of cytotoxicity in A549 cells, but it had an insignificant cytotoxic effect in normal L6 cells. The results of flow cytometric, cytogenetial and histopathological studies in mice revealed that NdBA caused less nuclear condensation and DNA damage than dBA did. TEM images showed the presence of NdBA in brain samples of NdBA fed mice, indicating its ability to cross the BBB. Conclusion: Thus, compared to dBA, NdBA appears to have greater chemoprotective

  6. Influence of Ecological Factors on the Production of Active Substances in the Anti-Cancer Plant Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Yin, Dongxue; Zhao, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    The quality of traditional Chinese herbal medicine, which plays a very important role in the health system of China, is determined by the active substances produced by the plants. The type, content, and proportion of these substances may vary depending on ecological factors in areas where the plants are grown. Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying, an endangered plant species with great medical value, was investigated in eight production locations representative of its natural geographical distribution range in China. The correlation between the contents of the active ingredients extracted from the roots and rhizomes of S. hexandrum and the ecological factors were evaluated step-by-step using a series of computational biology methodologies. The results showed that ecological factors had significant effects on the contents but not on the types of the active ingredients in eight production locations. The primary ecological factors influencing the active substances included the annual average precipitation, July mean temperature, frost-free period, sunshine duration, soil pH, soil organic matter, and rapidly available potassium in the soil. The annual average precipitation was the most important determinant factor and was significantly and negatively correlated with the active ingredient contents (P < 0.001). In contrast, organic matter was the most important limiting factor and was significantly and positively correlated with the active substances. These ecological factors caused 98.13% of the total geographical variation of the active ingredient contents. The climate factors contributed more to the active ingredient contents than did the soil factors. It was concluded that from the view of the contents of the secondary metabolites and ecological factors of each growing location, in Jingyuan, Ningxia Province, and Yongdeng, Gansu Province, conditions were favorable to the production of podophyllotoxin and lignans, whereas in Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, and

  7. Influence of ecological factors on the production of active substances in the anti-cancer plant Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Yin, Dongxue; Zhao, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    The quality of traditional Chinese herbal medicine, which plays a very important role in the health system of China, is determined by the active substances produced by the plants. The type, content, and proportion of these substances may vary depending on ecological factors in areas where the plants are grown. Sinopodophyllum hexandrum (Royle) T.S. Ying, an endangered plant species with great medical value, was investigated in eight production locations representative of its natural geographical distribution range in China. The correlation between the contents of the active ingredients extracted from the roots and rhizomes of S. hexandrum and the ecological factors were evaluated step-by-step using a series of computational biology methodologies. The results showed that ecological factors had significant effects on the contents but not on the types of the active ingredients in eight production locations. The primary ecological factors influencing the active substances included the annual average precipitation, July mean temperature, frost-free period, sunshine duration, soil pH, soil organic matter, and rapidly available potassium in the soil. The annual average precipitation was the most important determinant factor and was significantly and negatively correlated with the active ingredient contents (P < 0.001). In contrast, organic matter was the most important limiting factor and was significantly and positively correlated with the active substances. These ecological factors caused 98.13% of the total geographical variation of the active ingredient contents. The climate factors contributed more to the active ingredient contents than did the soil factors. It was concluded that from the view of the contents of the secondary metabolites and ecological factors of each growing location, in Jingyuan, Ningxia Province, and Yongdeng, Gansu Province, conditions were favorable to the production of podophyllotoxin and lignans, whereas in Shangri-La, Yunnan Province, and

  8. A pilot study of fiberscopy-guided local injection of anti-cancer drugs bound to carbon particles for control of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, A; Hirata, Y; Takahashi, T

    1998-04-01

    Rectal cancer patients with contra-indicatory risks may not be able to undergo surgery. In these cases the preferred treatment is chemotherapy. The present dosage formulation, consisting of an anti-cancer drug bound to activated carbon particles, was designed to deliver the anti-cancer drug at high concentration selectively to the injection site as well as to the regional lymph nodes and to improve survival of mice bearing cancer with nodal metastases, as compared to the same dose of aqueous anti-cancer drug in animal experiments. The present clinical trial includes two patients with histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum and who had risks contra-indicating surgery. Carbon particles adsorbing anti-cancer drugs totaling 400 mg of methotrexate and 32 mg of mitomycin C in one patient and 100 mg of methotrexate and 8 mg of mitomycin C in another patient were injected into the cancer tissue under guidance of a colono-fiberscope. The rectal cancers were successfully reduced in size and controlled over 2 years or 6 months until the patients died from other causes. Side effect was mild. Local injection of this dosage formulation will be useful for the control of rectal cancer in patients who cannot undergo surgery. PMID:9635928

  9. Anti-Cancer Effects of Xanthones from Pericarps of Mangosteen

    PubMed Central

    Akao, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Iinuma, Munekazu; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Mangosteen, Garcinia mangostana Linn, is a tree found in South East Asia, and its pericarps have been used as traditional medicine. Phytochemical studies have shown that they contain a variety of secondary metabolites, such as oxygenated and prenylated xanthones. Recent studies revealed that these xanthones exhibited a variety of biological activities containing anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer effects. We previously investigated the anti-proliferative effects of four prenylated xanthones from the pericarps; α-mangostin, β-mangostin, γ-mangostin, and methoxy-β-mangostin in various human cancer cells. These xanthones are different in the number of hydroxyl and methoxy groups. Except for methoxy-β-mangostin, the other three xanthones strongly inhibited cell growth at low concentrations from 5 to 20 μM in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells. Our recent study focused on the mechanism of α-mangostin-induced growth inhibition in DLD-1 cells. It was shown that the anti-proliferative effects of the xanthones were associated with cell-cycle arrest by affecting the expression of cyclins, cdc2, and p27; G1 arrest by α-mangostin and β-Mangostin, and S arrest by γ-mangostin. α-Mangostin found to induce apoptosis through the activation of intrinsic pathway following the down-regulation of signaling cascades involving MAP kinases and the serine/threonine kinase Akt. Synergistic effects by the combined treatment of α-mangostin and anti-cancer drug 5-FU was to be noted. α-Mangostin was found to have a cancer preventive effect in rat carcinogenesis bioassay and the extract from pericarps, which contains mainly α-mangostin and γ-mangostin, exhibited an enhancement of NK cell activity in a mouse model. These findings could provide a relevant basis for the development of xanthones as an agent for cancer prevention and the combination therapy with anti-cancer drugs. PMID:19325754

  10. Reengineered tricyclic anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Kastrinsky, David B; Sangodkar, Jaya; Zaware, Nilesh; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Dhawan, Neil S; Narla, Goutham; Ohlmeyer, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The phenothiazine and dibenzazepine tricyclics are potent neurotropic drugs with a documented but underutilized anti-cancer side effect. Reengineering these agents (TFP, CPZ, CIP) by replacing the basic amine with a neutral polar functional group (e.g., RTC-1, RTC-2) abrogated their CNS effects as demonstrated by in vitro pharmacological assays and in vivo behavioral models. Further optimization generated several phenothiazines and dibenzazepines with improved anti-cancer potency, exemplified by RTC-5. This new lead demonstrated efficacy against a xenograft model of an EGFR driven cancer without the neurotropic effects exhibited by the parent molecules. Its effects were attributed to concomitant negative regulation of PI3K-AKT and RAS-ERK signaling. PMID:26372073

  11. The In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Cancer Activities of a Standardized Quassinoids Composition from Eurycoma longifolia on LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kind Leng; Chan, Kit Lam; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Low, Bin Seng; Ma, Hai Qiu; Wong, Pooi Fong

    2015-01-01

    Quassinoids are a group of diterpenoids found in plants from the Simaroubaceae family. They are also the major bioactive compounds found in Eurycoma longifolia which is commonly used as traditional medicine in South East Asia to treat various ailments including sexual dysfunction and infertility. These uses are attributed to its ability to improve testosterone level in men. Chronic consumption of E. longifolia extracts has been reported to increase testosterone level in men and animal model but its effect on prostate growth remains unknown. Therefore, the present study investigates the effects of a standardized total quassinoids composition (SQ40) containing 40% of the total quassinoids found in E. longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. SQ40 inhibited LNCaP cell growth at IC50 value of 5.97 μg/mL while the IC50 on RWPE-1 human prostate normal cells was 59.26 μg/mL. SQ40 also inhibited 5α-dihydrotestosterone-stimulated growth in LNCaP cells dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of SQ40 in anchorage-independent growth of LNCaP cells was also demonstrated using soft agar assay. SQ40 suppressed LNCaP cell growth via G0/G1 phase arrest which was accompanied by the down-regulation of CDK4, CDK2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3 and up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 protein levels. SQ40 at higher concentrations or longer treatment duration can cause G2M growth arrest leading to apoptotic cell death as demonstrated by the detection of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in LNCaP cells. Moreover, SQ40 also inhibited androgen receptor translocation to nucleus which is important for the transactivation of its target gene, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and resulted in a significant reduction of PSA secretion after the treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal injection of 5 and 10 mg/kg of SQ40 also significantly suppressed the LNCaP tumor growth on mouse xenograft model. Results from the present study suggest that the standardized total quassinoids composition from E

  12. Optimization of the anti-cancer activity of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway inhibitor PITENIN-1: switching a thiourea with 1,2,3-triazole

    PubMed Central

    Kommagalla, Yadagiri; Cornea, Sinziana; Riehle, Robert; Torchilin, Vladimir; Degterev, Alexei; Ramana, Chepuri V.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported encouraging in vitro and in vivoanti-cancer activity of N-((3-chloro-2-hydroxy-5-nitrophenyl)carbamothioyl)benzamide (termed PITENIN-1). In the current work, we describe the structure-activity relationship study of PIT-1 series, based on the replacement of central thiourea unit with a 1,2,3-triazole, which leads to increased liver microsomal stability, drug likeness and toxicity towards cancer cells. PMID:25505943

  13. Composition and anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities of Artemisia herba-alba, Ruta chalpensis L. and Peganum harmala L.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Daycem; Sghaier, Rabiaa Manel; Amouri, Sameh; Laouini, Dhafer; Hamdi, Mokhtar; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-05-01

    In this study, biological activities of methanolic extracts from Artemisia herba-alba, Ruta chalpensis L. and Peganum harmala L. plants, collected in Centre of Tunisia, were investigated. Results showed an important phenolic composition of Artemisia herba-alba (123.95±4.3g GAE/kg of dry mass). The extract of this plant showed, using different antioxidant assays (DPPH, ABTS and AAPH/linoleic acid methods) and an IFN-γ/LPS induced RAW 264.7 murine macrophages' assay, the highest antioxidant (IC50 (DPPH assay) 20.64±0.84mg/L) and anti-inflammatory (72% inhibition at 150mg/L) activities, respectively. Excepting Peganum harmala L. extract, the two other extracts showed a high anticancer activity against several cell lines (human bladder carcinoma RT112, human laryngeal carcinoma Hep2 and human myelogenous leukemia K562), for A. herba-laba IC50=81.59±4.4, 59.05±3.66 and 90.96mg/L respectively, but not on normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All these biological activities are well correlated with the phenolic contents of these extracts. These findings demonstrate the remarkable potential of these plants as valuable source of antioxidants with exhibit original and interesting anti-inflammatory and anticancer capacities.

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of isomeric methoxy substitutions on anti-cancer indolyl-pyridinyl-propenones: Effects on potency and mode of activity.

    PubMed

    Trabbic, Christopher J; George, Sage M; Alexander, Evan M; Du, Shengnan; Offenbacher, Jennifer M; Crissman, Emily J; Overmeyer, Jean H; Maltese, William A; Erhardt, Paul W

    2016-10-21

    Certain indolyl-pyridinyl-propenone analogues kill glioblastoma cells that have become resistant to conventional therapeutic drugs. Some of these analogues induce a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death called methuosis, while others primarily cause microtubule disruption. Ready access to 5-indole substitution has allowed characterization of this position to be important for both types of mechanisms when a simple methoxy group is present. We now report the syntheses and biological effects of isomeric methoxy substitutions on the indole ring. Additionally, analogues containing a trimethoxyphenyl group in place of the pyridinyl moiety were evaluated for anticancer activity. The results demonstrate that the location of the methoxy group can alter both the potency and the mechanism of cell death. Remarkably, changing the methoxy from the 5-position to the 6-position switched the biological activity from induction of methuosis to disruption of microtubules. The latter may represent a prototype for a new class of mitotic inhibitors with potential therapeutic utility.

  15. Identification of novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-cancer activities via ER-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taelim; Kim, Hye-In; An, Ji-Young; Lee, Jun; Lee, Na-Rae; Heo, Jinyuk; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Jihyun; Lee, Yong Sup; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Nam-Jung

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a series of bis(4-hydroxy)benzophenone oxime ether derivatives such as 12c, 12e and 12h were identified as novel estrogen receptor (ER) agonists that have additional and complementary anti-proliferative activities via ER-independent mechanism in cancer cells. These compounds are expected to overcome the therapeutic limitation of existing ER agonists such as estradiol and tamoxifen, which have been known to induce the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26905830

  16. Recent advances in the discovery of heparanase inhibitors as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Ma, Shutao

    2016-10-01

    Heparanase, an only endo-β-d-glucuronidase capable of cleaving heparan sulfate (HS) side chains at specific sites, contributes to remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and releasing of HS-linked growth factors, cytokines and signaling proteins. In addition, heparanase also plays an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, indicating that it is a promising target for the development of antitumor drugs. Recent progress leads to three classes of heparanase inhibitors, including active analogs of endogenous substance, synthetic small molecule compounds and natural products. In this review, following an outline on the heparanase structure and function, an overview of the advancement of heparanase inhibitors as novel and potent anti-cancer agents will be given, especially introducing various existing heparanase inhibitors, as well as their inhibitory activities and mechanisms of action.

  17. Recent advances in the discovery of heparanase inhibitors as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Ma, Shutao

    2016-10-01

    Heparanase, an only endo-β-d-glucuronidase capable of cleaving heparan sulfate (HS) side chains at specific sites, contributes to remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and releasing of HS-linked growth factors, cytokines and signaling proteins. In addition, heparanase also plays an indispensable role in tumor angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, indicating that it is a promising target for the development of antitumor drugs. Recent progress leads to three classes of heparanase inhibitors, including active analogs of endogenous substance, synthetic small molecule compounds and natural products. In this review, following an outline on the heparanase structure and function, an overview of the advancement of heparanase inhibitors as novel and potent anti-cancer agents will be given, especially introducing various existing heparanase inhibitors, as well as their inhibitory activities and mechanisms of action. PMID:27240275

  18. Profound Activity of the Anti-cancer Drug Bortezomib against Echinococcus multilocularis Metacestodes Identifies the Proteasome as a Novel Drug Target for Cestodes

    PubMed Central

    Stadelmann, Britta; Aeschbacher, Denise; Huber, Cristina; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Joachim; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A library of 426 FDA-approved drugs was screened for in vitro activity against E. multilocularis metacestodes employing the phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI) assay. Initial screening at 20 µM revealed that 7 drugs induced considerable metacestode damage, and further dose-response studies revealed that bortezomib (BTZ), a proteasome inhibitor developed for the chemotherapy of myeloma, displayed high anti-metacestodal activity with an EC50 of 0.6 µM. BTZ treatment of E. multilocularis metacestodes led to an accumulation of ubiquinated proteins and unequivocally parasite death. In-gel zymography assays using E. multilocularis extracts demonstrated BTZ-mediated inhibition of protease activity in a band of approximately 23 kDa, the same size at which the proteasome subunit beta 5 of E. multilocularis could be detected by Western blot. Balb/c mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes were used to assess BTZ treatment, starting at 6 weeks post-infection by intraperitoneal injection of BTZ. This treatment led to reduced parasite weight, but to a degree that was not statistically significant, and it induced adverse effects such as diarrhea and neurological symptoms. In conclusion, the proteasome was identified as a drug target in E. multilocularis metacestodes that can be efficiently inhibited by BTZ in vitro. However, translation of these findings into in vivo efficacy requires further adjustments of treatment regimens using BTZ, or possibly other proteasome inhibitors. PMID:25474446

  19. FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic and DFT studies of anti-cancer active molecule N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-Alanine - Glycine ethyl ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, T. S.; Kenny, Peter T. M.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2015-06-01

    FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra of N-{(meta-ferrocenyl) Benzoyl} - L-alanine - glycine ethyl ester were recorded in solid phase. The optimized molecular geometry, the vibrational wavenumbers, the infrared intensities and the Raman scattering intensities were calculated by using density functional method(B3LYP) with 6-31G(d, p) basis set. Vibrational assignment of the molecule was done by using potential energy distribution analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis, Mulliken charge analysis and HOMO-LUMO energy were used to elucidate the reasons for intra molecular charge transfer. Docking studies were conducted to predict its anticancer activity.

  20. Anti-cancer activity of an osthole derivative, NBM-T-BMX-OS01: targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Chiu, Pei-Ting; Ho, Shiau-Jing; Wang, Chi-Han; Chi, Chih-Chin; Huang, Yu-Han; Lee, Cheng-Feng; Li, Ying-Shiuan; Ou, George; Hsu, Ming-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis occurs during tissue growth, development and wound healing. It is also required for tumor progression and represents a rational target for therapeutic intervention. NBM-T-BMX-OS01 (BMX), derived from the semisynthesis of osthole, an active ingredient isolated from Chinese herb Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cuss., was recently shown to enhance learning and memory in rats. In this study, we characterized the anti-angiogenic activities of NBM-T-BMX-OS01 (BMX) in an effort to develop novel inhibitors to suppress angiogenesis and tumor growth. BMX inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration and endothelial tube formation in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs). BMX also attenuated VEGF-induced microvessel sprouting from aortic rings ex vivo and reduced HCT116 colorectal cancer cells-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, BMX inhibited the phosphorylation of VEGFR2, FAK, Akt and ERK in HUVECs exposed to VEGF. BMX was also shown to inhibit HCT116 cell proliferation and to suppress the growth of subcutaneous xenografts of HCT116 cells in vivo. Taken together, this study provides evidence that BMX modulates vascular endothelial cell remodeling and leads to the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. These results also support the role of BMX as a potential drug candidate and warrant the clinical development in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24312323

  1. Antioxidant Activities and Anti-Cancer Cell Proliferation Properties of Natsuhaze (Vaccinium oldhamii Miq.), Shashanbo (V. bracteatum Thunb.) and Blueberry Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hirotoshi; Kunitake, Hisato; Kawasaki-Takaki, Ryoko; Nishiyama, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Masao; Komatsu, Haruki; Yukizaki, Chizuko

    2013-01-01

    Antioxidants are abundant in blueberries, and while there are many studies concerning the bioactive compound of fruit, it is only recently that the wild Vaccinium species has attracted attention for their diverse and abundant chemical components. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioactive compounds of blueberry cultivars and wild species found in Japan. Among the five extracts of the Vaccinium species, Natsuhaze (Vaccinium oldhamii Miq.) was found to be the most effective at inhibiting the growth of HL-60 human leukemia cells in vitro. Although all ethanol extracts showed a growth inhibitory effect on HL-60 cells, the degree of the effects differed among the species. The extract of Natsuhaze induced apoptotic bodies and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the HL-60 cells. Of the extracts tested, that of Natsuhaze contained the largest amount of total polyphenols and showed the greatest antioxidant activity, but the anthocyanin content of Natsuhaze was similar to that of rabbiteye blueberry (V. virgatum Ait.). The results showed that total polyphenols contributed to the high antioxidant activity and growth inhibitory effect on HL-60 human leukemia cells of Natsuhaze extract. PMID:27137366

  2. In-vitro immunomodulatory and anti-cancerous activities of biotransformed products of Dianabol through Azadirachta indica and its molecular docking studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant Biotransformation is one of the tools for structural modifications of the organic substrate of low, moderate or high biological value utilizing plant cultured cells, these modifications of organic structures may lead to biologically augmented products and which may be ultimately substantial in cure or improvement of various morbidities and diseases. Results Azadirachta indica A. Juss. suspension culture was employed for the biotransformation of dianabol (1) for the first time, and two metabolites, 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androst-1-en-3-one (2), and 17β-hydroxy-17α-methyl-5α-androstan-3-one (3) were obtained. Conclusions Most important aspect of this work was the evaluation of metabolite 2, which strongly and differentially suppressed [not affecting whole blood and human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN)] the phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T-cell proliferation (IC50: <10.33 μM), and also found to inhibit IL-2 production (IC50: 16.89 ± 1.32) unlike metabolite 3 and compound 1. Compound 2 also exhibited anticancer activity against lung cancer cell line; NCI-H460, it moderately inhibited the growth of cancer cells (22.5 ± 4.15 μM). Furthermore, a good correlation between the predicted binding energies of the compounds acquired by the FlexX program and the experimental affinities were speculated upon interacting with IL-2 protein during molecular docking studies. PMID:24764465

  3. Curcumin loaded poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanoparticles from gelled ionic liquid--in vitro cytotoxicity and anti-cancer activity in SKOV-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sathish Sundar Dhilip; Surianarayanan, Mahadevan; Vijayaraghavan, R; Mandal, Asit Baran; MacFarlane, D R

    2014-01-23

    The main focus of this study is to encapsulate hydrophobic drug curcumin in hydrophilic polymeric core such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) [PHEMA] nanoparticles from gelled ionic liquid (IL) to improve its efficacy. We have achieved 26.4% drug loading in a biocompatible hydrophilic polymer. Curcumin loaded PHEMA nanoparticles (C-PHEMA-NPs) were prepared by nano-precipitation method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and free from aggregation. The size and zeta potential of prepared C-PHEMA-NPs were about 300 nm and -33.4 mV respectively. C-PHEMA-NPs were further characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy which confirmed the existence of curcumin in the nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry studies revealed that curcumin present in the PHEMA nanoparticles were found to be amorphous in nature. The anticancer activity of C-PHEMA-NPs was measured in ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3) in vitro, and the results revealed that the C-PHEMA-NPs had better tumor cells regression activity than free curcumin. Flow cytometry showed the significant reduction in G0/G1 cells after treatment with C-PHEMA-NPs and molecular level of apoptosis were also studied using western blotting. Toxicity of PHEMA nanoparticles were studied in zebrafish embryo model and results revealed the material to be highly biocompatible. The present study demonstrates the curcumin loaded PHEMA nanoparticles have potential therapeutic values in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24012589

  4. GCN2 Protein Kinase Is Required to Activate Amino Acid Deprivation Responses in Mice Treated with the Anti-cancer Agent l-Asparaginase*

    PubMed Central

    Bunpo, Piyawan; Dudley, Allison; Cundiff, Judy K.; Cavener, Douglas R.; Wek, Ronald C.; Anthony, Tracy G.

    2009-01-01

    Asparaginase depletes circulating asparagine and glutamine, activating amino acid deprivation responses (AADR) such as phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (p-eIF2) leading to increased mRNA levels of asparagine synthetase and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β homologous protein (CHOP) and decreased mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. The objectives of this study were to assess the role of the eIF2 kinases and protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum resident kinase (PERK) in controlling AADR to asparaginase and to compare the effects of asparaginase on mTORC1 to that of rapamycin. In experiment 1, asparaginase increased hepatic p-eIF2 in wild-type mice and mice with a liver-specific PERK deletion but not in GCN2 null mice nor in GCN2-PERK double null livers. In experiment 2, wild-type and GCN2 null mice were treated with asparaginase (3 IU per g of body weight), rapamycin (2 mg per kg of body weight), or both. In wild-type mice, asparaginase but not rapamycin increased p-eIF2, p-ERK1/2, p-Akt, and mRNA levels of asparagine synthetase and CHOP in liver. Asparaginase and rapamycin each inhibited mTORC1 signaling in liver and pancreas but maximally together. In GCN2 null livers, all responses to asparaginase were precluded except CHOP mRNA expression, which remained partially elevated. Interestingly, rapamycin blocked CHOP induction by asparaginase in both wild-type and GCN2 null livers. These results indicate that GCN2 is required for activation of AADR to asparaginase in liver. Rapamycin modifies the hepatic AADR to asparaginase by preventing CHOP induction while maximizing inhibition of mTORC1. PMID:19783659

  5. Anti-cancer drugs interfere with intracellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2009-09-01

    (Neuro-)toxicity of metal and metal compounds is frequently highlighted. While specific metals or metal compounds are essential for cellular function, other metals are toxic and/or carcinogens. Metals can trigger accidental cell death in the form of necrosis, or activate programmed cell death in the form of apoptosis. The aim of anti-cancer therapy is induction of apoptosis in tumor cells. Therefore, there is an interesting twist in the toxicity of metals and metal compounds (e.g., arsenic trioxide, cisplatin); since they have a higher specificity to induce apoptosis in cancer cells (possibly due to the high turnover in these cells) they are used to cure some forms of cancer. A body of evidence suggests that second messengers, such as modulations in the intracellular calcium concentration, could be involved in metals induced toxicity as well as in the beneficial effects shown by anti-cancer drugs. Here we review the influence on calcium homeostasis induced by some metallic compounds: cisplatin, arsenic trioxide and trimethyltin chloride.

  6. Cu(II) complexes with co-planar [Cu(II)(N-N)(HIMC⁻)], their anti-cancer activities, ΔG, ΔE and solid luminescence.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Feng; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Guo

    2014-04-14

    [Cu(II)(phen)(HIMC(-))(H2O)]·[Cu(II)(phen)(HIMC(-))(NO3(-))]·NO3(-)·H2O (1) and [Cu(II)(2,2'-bipy)(HIMC(-))]·NO3(-)·xH2O (2) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine, HIMC(-) = 1H-imidazole-4-carboxylate acid anion) have been synthesized at 180 °C, of which the HIMC(-) is produced by an in situ decarboxylation from H3IDC (1H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid) in a one-pot hydrothermal reaction. The anticancer activity experiments in vitro show that 1 exhibited excellent activities against A549, Bel-7402 and HCT-8 cancer cells and is even better than the clinical anticancer drug 5-Fu (5-fluorouracil), while 2 shows little response toward the cancer cells. The single crystal X-ray diffraction indicated that complex 1 possess a co-planar [Cu(II)(N-N)(HIMC(-))] coordination geometry. The IR, elemental analysis and solid-state luminescent spectra of complexes 1 and 2 indicated that the composition of these two complexes are similar, whereas the 2,2'-bipy in complex 2 replaced phen in complex 1. The calculation by the Gaussian 03 program illustrated that the decrease in the energy gaps between π*-π from the free to the coordinated ligand for 2,2'-bipy and phen (ΔE) are 5.3 eV to 4.0 eV and 4.8 eV to 4.5 eV separately, and the relative changes of the Gibbs free energies (ΔG) for complex 1 and 2 decomposing into free Cu(2+) and ligands are about 0 kcal mol(-1) and 7 kcal mol(-1) respectively, which revealed that it is more stable when 2,2'-bipy is coordinated with Cu(II) than phen, and 1 is easier to disassociate into free Cu(2+) than 2. By relating the ΔE, ΔG, luminescent qualities and anticancer toxicities of the complexes with their composition, it can be concluded that both Cu(II) and their coordinated ligands are responsible for the inhibition against cancer cells. PMID:24519174

  7. Anti-Cancer Activity of Solanum nigrum (AESN) through Suppression of Mitochondrial Function and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ying-Jang; Tai, Chen-Jei; Wang, Chia-Woei; Choong, Chen-Yen; Lee, Bao-Hong; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Tai, Cheng-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the main approach for treating advanced and recurrent carcinoma, but the clinical performance of chemotherapy is limited by relatively low response rates, drug resistance, and adverse effects that severely affect the quality of life of patients. An association between epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and chemotherapy resistance has been investigated in recent studies. Our recent studies have found that the aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum (AESN) is a crucial ingredient in some traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating various types of cancer patients and exhibits antitumor effects. We evaluated the suppression of EMT in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. The mitochondrial morphology was investigated using Mitotracker Deep-Red FM stain. Our results indicated that AESN markedly inhibited cell viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest mediated by activation of caspase-3 and production of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, mitochondrial fission was observed in MCF-7 breast cancer cells treated with AESN. In addition to elevation of E-cadherin, downregulations of ZEB1, N-cadherin, and vimentin were found in AESN-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results suggested that AESN could inhibit EMT of MCF-7 breast cancer cells mediated by attenuation of mitochondrial function. AESN could be potentially beneficial in treating breast cancer cells, and may be of interest for future studies in developing integrative cancer therapy against proliferation, metastasis, and migration of breast cancer cells. PMID:27136519

  8. [A case of lung cancer complicated with active non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) infection successfully treated with anti-cancer agents and anti-NTM agents].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yu; Ishii, Satoru; Hirano, Satoshi; Takeda, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2011-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease was referred to our hospital with dyspnea on exertion and general fatigue. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed a nodular shadow with pleural indentation in the left S(1+2), left pleural effusion, and a thick-walled cavitary lesion due to pulmonary MAC disease in the right S1. A biopsy specimen of the nodule in the left S(1+2) revealed adenocarcinoma, which various examinations confirmed to be stage IV lung adenocarcinoma (T2aN0M1a) complicated with active pulmonary MAC disease. Anti-non-tuberculous mycobacteriosis (NTM) chemotherapy consisting of rifampicin, ethambutol, clarithromycin and streptomycin was administered to treat the pulmonary MAC disease, and the lung cancer was then treated with 4 courses of carboplatin/pemetrexed. This improved the patient's pulmonary MAC disease, and the lung cancer went into partial remission without severe adverse effects. Although a more detailed analysis of the drug interaction is required, we concluded that a combination of anti-NTM and carboplatin/pemetrexed chemotherapy was safe and effective. PMID:22171491

  9. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-08-21

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  10. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27610018

  11. Nanovectors for anti-cancer drug delivery in the treatment of advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Chung-Tzu; Selim, Julie H; Tsai, James Y; Hsueh, Chung-Tsen

    2016-01-01

    Liposome, albumin and polymer polyethylene glycol are nanovector formulations successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery. There are significant differences in pharmacokinetics, efficacy and toxicity between pre- and post-nanovector modification. The alteration in clinical pharmacology is instrumental for the future development of nanovector-based anticancer therapeutics. We have reviewed the results of clinical studies and translational research in nanovector-based anti-cancer therapeutics in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, including nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel and nanoliposomal irinotecan. Furthermore, we have appraised the ongoing studies incorporating novel agents with nanomedicines in the treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  12. Structure Identification and Anti-Cancer Pharmacological Prediction of Triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yanyan; Qiao, Liansheng; Wu, Lingfang; Sun, Xuefei; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xin; Chen, Wenjing; Liang, Wenyi; Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Lanzhen

    2016-01-01

    Ganoderma triterpenes (GTs) are the major secondary metabolites of Ganoderma lucidum, which is a popularly used traditional Chinese medicine for complementary cancer therapy. In the present study, systematic isolation, and in silico pharmacological prediction are implemented to discover potential anti-cancer active GTs from G. lucidum. Nineteen GTs, three steroids, one cerebroside, and one thymidine were isolated from G. lucidum. Six GTs were first isolated from the fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, including 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid methyl ester (1), 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (2), 3β,7β,15α,28-tetrahydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (3), ganotropic acid (4), 26-nor-11,23-dioxo-5α-lanost-8-en-3β,7β,15α,25-tetrol (5) and (3β,7α)-dihydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien- 11-one (6). (4E,8E)-N-d-2'-hydroxypalmitoyl-l-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-spingodienine (7), and stigmasta-7,22-dien-3β,5α,6α-triol (8) were first reported from the genus Ganodema. By using reverse pharmacophoric profiling of the six GTs, thirty potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets were identified and utilized to construct their ingredient-target interaction network. Then nineteen high frequency targets of GTs were selected from thirty potential targets to construct a protein interaction network (PIN). In order to cluster the pharmacological activity of GTs, twelve function modules were identified by molecular complex detection (MCODE) and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The results indicated that anti-cancer effect of GTs might be related to histone acetylation and interphase of mitotic cell cycle by regulating general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5) and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2), respectively. This research mode of extraction, isolation, pharmacological prediction, and PIN analysis might be beneficial to rapidly predict and discover pharmacological activities of novel compounds

  13. Structure Identification and Anti-Cancer Pharmacological Prediction of Triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yanyan; Qiao, Liansheng; Wu, Lingfang; Sun, Xuefei; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xin; Chen, Wenjing; Liang, Wenyi; Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Lanzhen

    2016-05-21

    Ganoderma triterpenes (GTs) are the major secondary metabolites of Ganoderma lucidum, which is a popularly used traditional Chinese medicine for complementary cancer therapy. In the present study, systematic isolation, and in silico pharmacological prediction are implemented to discover potential anti-cancer active GTs from G. lucidum. Nineteen GTs, three steroids, one cerebroside, and one thymidine were isolated from G. lucidum. Six GTs were first isolated from the fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, including 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid methyl ester (1), 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (2), 3β,7β,15α,28-tetrahydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (3), ganotropic acid (4), 26-nor-11,23-dioxo-5α-lanost-8-en-3β,7β,15α,25-tetrol (5) and (3β,7α)-dihydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien- 11-one (6). (4E,8E)-N-d-2'-hydroxypalmitoyl-l-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-spingodienine (7), and stigmasta-7,22-dien-3β,5α,6α-triol (8) were first reported from the genus Ganodema. By using reverse pharmacophoric profiling of the six GTs, thirty potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets were identified and utilized to construct their ingredient-target interaction network. Then nineteen high frequency targets of GTs were selected from thirty potential targets to construct a protein interaction network (PIN). In order to cluster the pharmacological activity of GTs, twelve function modules were identified by molecular complex detection (MCODE) and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The results indicated that anti-cancer effect of GTs might be related to histone acetylation and interphase of mitotic cell cycle by regulating general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5) and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2), respectively. This research mode of extraction, isolation, pharmacological prediction, and PIN analysis might be beneficial to rapidly predict and discover pharmacological activities of novel compounds.

  14. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  15. Synthesis of structurally diverse benzosuberene analogues and their biological evaluation as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Tanpure, Rajendra P; George, Clinton S; Strecker, Tracy E; Devkota, Laxman; Tidmore, Justin K; Lin, Chen-Ming; Herdman, Christine A; Macdonough, Matthew T; Sriram, Madhavi; Chaplin, David J; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G

    2013-12-15

    Diversely functionalized, fused aryl-alkyl ring systems hold a prominent position as well-established molecular frameworks for a variety of anti-cancer agents. The benzosuberene (6,7 fused, also referred to as dihydro-5H-benzo[7]annulene and benzocycloheptene) ring system has emerged as a valuable molecular core component for the development of inhibitors of tubulin assembly, which function as antiproliferative anti-cancer agents and, in certain cases, as vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). Both a phenolic-based analogue (known as KGP18, compound 39) and its corresponding amine-based congener (referred to as KGP156, compound 45), which demonstrate strong inhibition of tubulin assembly (low micromolar range) and potent cytotoxicity (picomolar range for KGP18 and nanomolar range for KGP156) are noteworthy examples of such benzosuberene-based compounds. In order to extend the structure-activity relationship (SAR) knowledge base related to benzosuberene anti-cancer agents, a series of eleven analogues (including KGP18) were prepared in which the methoxylation pattern on the pendant aryl ring as well as functional group incorporation on the fused aryl ring were varied. The synthetic approach to these compounds featured a sequential Wittig olefination, reduction, Eaton's reagent-mediated cyclization strategy to achieve the core benzosuberone intermediate, and represented a higher-yielding synthesis of KGP18 (which we prepared previously through a ring-expansion strategy). Incorporation of a fluorine or chlorine atom at the 1-position of the fused aryl ring or replacement of one of the methoxy groups with hydrogen (on the pendant aryl ring of KGP18) led to benzosuberene analogues that were both strongly inhibitory against tubulin assembly (IC50 approximately 1.0 μM) and strongly cytotoxic against selected human cancer cell lines (for example, GI50=5.47 nM against NCI-H460 cells with fluoro-benzosuberene analogue 37). A water-soluble phosphate prodrug salt of KGP18

  16. Anti-cancer effects of traditional Korean wild vegetables in complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Mok; Yu, Kwang-Won; Cho, Sung-Dae; Cheong, Sun Hee; Kwon, Ki Han

    2016-02-01

    This research study explored the anti-cancer effects of natural materials in South Korea. Although South Korea has a long history of traditional medicine, many natural materials of South Korea have not yet been introduced to the rest of the world because of language barriers and inconsistent study conditions. In the past 3 years, 56 papers introducing 56 natural materials, which have anti-cancer effects, have been published by scientists in South Korea. Further, these studies have introduced five kinds of natural materials presented in research papers that were written in Korean and are therefore virtually unknown overseas. The anti-cancer effects were confirmed by 2-3 cancer markers in the majority of the studies, with the most common targets being breast cancer cells and gastric cancer cells. These cancers have the greatest incidence in South Korea. The natural materials studied not only exhibit anti-cancer activity but also display anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-diabetic activities. They have not yet been used for the direct treatment of disease but have potential as medicinal materials for alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of many modern diseases. Many natural materials of South Korea are already known all over the world, and with this study, we hope to further future research to learn more about these natural medicines. PMID:26860801

  17. Anti-cancer effects of traditional Korean wild vegetables in complementary and alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyun-Mok; Yu, Kwang-Won; Cho, Sung-Dae; Cheong, Sun Hee; Kwon, Ki Han

    2016-02-01

    This research study explored the anti-cancer effects of natural materials in South Korea. Although South Korea has a long history of traditional medicine, many natural materials of South Korea have not yet been introduced to the rest of the world because of language barriers and inconsistent study conditions. In the past 3 years, 56 papers introducing 56 natural materials, which have anti-cancer effects, have been published by scientists in South Korea. Further, these studies have introduced five kinds of natural materials presented in research papers that were written in Korean and are therefore virtually unknown overseas. The anti-cancer effects were confirmed by 2-3 cancer markers in the majority of the studies, with the most common targets being breast cancer cells and gastric cancer cells. These cancers have the greatest incidence in South Korea. The natural materials studied not only exhibit anti-cancer activity but also display anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress, and anti-diabetic activities. They have not yet been used for the direct treatment of disease but have potential as medicinal materials for alternative and complementary medicine for the treatment of many modern diseases. Many natural materials of South Korea are already known all over the world, and with this study, we hope to further future research to learn more about these natural medicines.

  18. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Tamimi, Yahya; Al-Kindi, Mohamed A.; Burney, Ikram

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. Methods: This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF)-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Results: Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Conclusion: Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:27226907

  19. The critical roles of miR-21 in anti-cancer effects of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Xu, Tiefeng; Chen, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Curcumin is a well-known phytochemical that has various anti-cancer effects. Although it has been demonstrated that curcumin can inhibit multiple signalling pathways, the exact mechanisms for its demonstrated anti-cancer effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that curcumin may affect cancer initiation and progression through regulating microRNAs (miRs). In this review, we focus on the roles of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in the anti-cancer effects of curcumin and regulatory mechanisms for the effects of curcumin on miR-21. MiR-21 mediates various effects of curcumin on cancer cells including proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis and anti-cancer drug resistance. Several downstream pathways of miR-21 have been identified including phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt), programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and NF-κB pathways. Curcumin decreases miR-21 levels through both increasing miR-21 exosome exclusion from the cells and inhibiting the transcription of the miR-21 gene in the cells by binding to its promoter. PMID:26734640

  20. The critical roles of miR-21 in anti-cancer effects of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Xu, Tiefeng; Chen, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Curcumin is a well-known phytochemical that has various anti-cancer effects. Although it has been demonstrated that curcumin can inhibit multiple signalling pathways, the exact mechanisms for its demonstrated anti-cancer effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that curcumin may affect cancer initiation and progression through regulating microRNAs (miRs). In this review, we focus on the roles of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in the anti-cancer effects of curcumin and regulatory mechanisms for the effects of curcumin on miR-21. MiR-21 mediates various effects of curcumin on cancer cells including proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis and anti-cancer drug resistance. Several downstream pathways of miR-21 have been identified including phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt), programmed cell death protein 4 (PDCD4) and NF-κB pathways. Curcumin decreases miR-21 levels through both increasing miR-21 exosome exclusion from the cells and inhibiting the transcription of the miR-21 gene in the cells by binding to its promoter.

  1. miR-217 and CAGE form feedback loop and regulates the response to anti-cancer drugs through EGFR and HER2

    PubMed Central

    Han, Minho; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA array analysis revealed that miR-217 expression was decreased in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3MR cancer cells. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, was predicted as a target of miR-217. Luciferase activity and ChIP assays revealed a negative feedback relationship between CAGE and miR-217. miR-217 and CAGE oppositely regulated the response to anti-cancer drugs such as taxol, gefitinib and trastuzumab, an inhibitor of HER2. miR-217 negatively regulated the tumorigenic, metastatic, angiogenic, migration and invasion potential of cancer cells. The xenograft of Malme3MR cells showed an increased expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE and miR-217 inhibitor regulated the expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE showed interactions with EGFR and HER2 and regulated the in vivo sensitivity to trastuzumab. The down-regulation of EGFR or HER2 enhanced the sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs. CAGE showed direct regulation of HER2 and was necessary for the interaction between EGFR and HER2 in Malme3MR cells. miR-217 inhibitor induced interactions of CAGE with EGFR and HER2 in Malme3M cells. The inhibition of EGFR by CAGE-binding GTGKT peptide enhanced the sensitivity to gefitinib and trastuzumab and prevented interactions of EGFR with CAGE and HER2. Our results show that miR-217-CAGE feedback loop serves as a target for overcoming resistance to various anti-cancer drugs, including EGFR and HER2 inhibitors. PMID:26863629

  2. A magnetic anti-cancer compound for magnet-guided delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Haruki; Umemura, Masanari; Kurotani, Reiko; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Sato, Itaru; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Sato, Motohiko; Hirata, Kunio; Singh, David J.; Masuda, Takatsugu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Urano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Keiichiro; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Mamoru; Inoue, Seiichi; Aoki, Ichio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Research on controlled drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy has focused mainly on ways to deliver existing anti-cancer drug compounds to specified targets, e.g., by conjugating them with magnetic particles or encapsulating them in micelles. Here, we show that an iron-salen, i.e., μ-oxo N,N'- bis(salicylidene)ethylenediamine iron (Fe(Salen)), but not other metal salen derivatives, intrinsically exhibits both magnetic character and anti-cancer activity. X-Ray crystallographic analysis and first principles calculations based on the measured structure support this. It promoted apoptosis of various cancer cell lines, likely, via production of reactive oxygen species. In mouse leg tumor and tail melanoma models, Fe(Salen) delivery with magnet caused a robust decrease in tumor size, and the accumulation of Fe(Salen) was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Fe(Salen) is an anti-cancer compound with magnetic property, which is suitable for drug delivery and imaging. We believe such magnetic anti-cancer drugs have the potential to greatly advance cancer chemotherapy for new theranostics and drug-delivery strategies. PMID:25779357

  3. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel 2-thiophen-5-yl-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogues as inhibitors of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation: Their possible utilization as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Giri, Rajan S; Thaker, Hardik M; Giordano, Tony; Williams, Jill; Rogers, Donna; Vasu, Kamala K; Sudarsanam, Vasudevan

    2010-04-01

    In an attempt to discover novel inhibitors of NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation utilizing the concept of chemical lead based medicinal chemistry and bioisosterism a series of 2-(2,3-disubstituted-thiophen-5-yl)-3H-quinazolin-4-one analogs was designed. A facile and simple route for the synthesis of the designed molecules was developed. Synthesized molecules were evaluated for their activity as inhibitors towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation in a cell line report-based assay. This series provides us with a substantial number of compounds inhibiting the activity of NF-kappaB and/or AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. These compounds also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity in in vivo models of inflammation and cancer. The 4-pyridyl group is found to be the most important pharmacophore on the third position of thiophene ring for inhibiting NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation. The relationships between the activities shown by these compounds in the in vivo and in vitro models have been established by using FVB transgenic mice model. These results suggest the suitability of the designed molecular framework as a potential scaffold for the design of molecules with inhibitory activity towards NF-kappaB and AP-1 mediated transcriptional activation, which may also exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. This series of molecules warrants further study to explore their potential as therapies for use in chronic inflammatory conditions and cancer. Development of the synthetic protocol for the synthesis of this series of molecules, biological activities and a structure-activity relationship (SAR) have been discussed herein.

  4. Anti-cancer agents counteracting tumor glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Granchi, Carlotta

    2012-01-01

    Can we consider cancer as a “metabolic disease”? Tumors are the result of a metabolic selection, forming tissues composed of heterogeneous cells that generally express an overactive metabolism as a common feature. In fact, cancer cells have to deal with increased needs for both energy and biosynthetic intermediates, in order to support their growth and invasiveness. However, their high proliferation rate often generates regions that are not sufficiently oxygenated. Therefore, their carbohydrate metabolism has to rely mostly on a glycolytic process that is uncoupled from oxidative phosphorylation. This metabolic switch, also known as the “Warburg Effect”, constitutes a fundamental adaptation of the tumor cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumor glycolysis may constitute an attractive target for cancer therapy. This approach has often raised concerns that anti-glycolytic agents may cause serious side effects on normal cells. Actually, the key for a selective action against cancer cells can be found in their hyperbolic addiction to glycolysis, which may be exploited to generate new anti-cancer drugs showing minimal toxicity. In fact, there is growing evidence that supports many glycolytic enzymes and transporters as suitable candidate targets for cancer therapy. Herein we review some of the most relevant anti-glycolytic agents that have been investigated so far for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22684868

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-wall carbon nanotube–paclitaxel complex as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemvand, Fariba; Biazar, Esmaeil; Tavakolifard, Sara; Khaledian, Mohammad; Rahmanzadeh, Saeid; Momenzadeh, Daruosh; Afroosheh, Roshanak; Zarkalami, Faezeh; Shabannezhad, Marjan; Hesami Tackallou, Saeed; Massoudi, Nilofar; Heidari Keshel, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to design multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) anti-cancer drug and investigate its anti-cancerous efficacy of human gastric cancer. Background: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) represent a novel nano-materials applied in various fields such as drug delivery due to their unique chemical properties and high drug loading. Patients and methods: In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pre-functionalized covalently with a paclitaxel (PTX) as an anti-cancer drug and evaluated by different analyses including, scanning electron microscope (SEM), particle size analyzer and cellular analyses. Results: A well conjugated of anti-cancer drug on the carbon nanotube surfaces was shown. This study demonstrates that the MWCN-PTX complex is a potentially useful system for delivery of anti-cancer drugs. The flow cytometry, CFU and MTT assay results have disclosed that MWCNT/PTXs might promote apoptosis in MKN-45 gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Conclusion: According to results, our simple method can be designed a candidate material for chemotherapy. It has presented a few bio-related applications including, their successful use as a nano-carriers for drug transport. PMID:27458512

  6. When Ubiquitin Meets NF-κB: A trove for anti-cancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, the studies on ubiquitination in regulating transcription factor NF-κB activation have elucidated the expanding role of ubiquitination in modulating cellular events by non-proteolytic mechanisms, as well as by proteasomal degradation. The significance of ubiquitination has also been recognized in regulating gene transcription, epigenetic modifications, kinase activation, DNA repair and subcellular translocation. This progress has been translated into novel strategies for developing anti-cancer therapeutics, exemplified by the success of the first FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor drug Bortezomib. Here we discuss the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and how it is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling pathways in response to a variety of stimuli. We also focus on the recent progress of anti-cancer drug development targeting various steps of ubiquitination process, and the potential of these drugs in cancer treatment as related to their impact on NF-κB activation. PMID:23151140

  7. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  8. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  9. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  10. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  11. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  12. Anti-Cancer Vaccines — A One-Hit Wonder?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Justin K.H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against common bacterial and viral diseases has helped prevent millions of deaths worldwide. More recently, the concept of vaccination has been developed into a potentially novel strategy to treat and prevent cancer formation, progression, and spread. Over the past few years, a handful of anti-cancer vaccines have been licensed and approved for use in clinical practice, thus providing a breakthrough in the field. However, the path has not always been easy, with many hurdles that have had to be overcome in order to reach this point. Nevertheless, with more anti-cancer vaccines currently in development, there is still hope that they can eventually become routine tools used in the treatment and prevention of cancer in the future. This review will discuss in detail both types of anti-cancer vaccine presently used in clinical practice — therapeutic and preventive — before considering some of the more promising anti-cancer vaccines that are currently in development. Finally, the issue of side effects and the debate surrounding the overall cost-effectiveness of anti-cancer vaccines will be examined. PMID:25506282

  13. Anti-cancer vaccines - a one-hit wonder?

    PubMed

    Liu, Justin K H

    2014-12-01

    Immunization against common bacterial and viral diseases has helped prevent millions of deaths worldwide. More recently, the concept of vaccination has been developed into a potentially novel strategy to treat and prevent cancer formation, progression, and spread. Over the past few years, a handful of anti-cancer vaccines have been licensed and approved for use in clinical practice, thus providing a breakthrough in the field. However, the path has not always been easy, with many hurdles that have had to be overcome in order to reach this point. Nevertheless, with more anti-cancer vaccines currently in development, there is still hope that they can eventually become routine tools used in the treatment and prevention of cancer in the future. This review will discuss in detail both types of anti-cancer vaccine presently used in clinical practice - therapeutic and preventive - before considering some of the more promising anti-cancer vaccines that are currently in development. Finally, the issue of side effects and the debate surrounding the overall cost-effectiveness of anti-cancer vaccines will be examined.

  14. From T cell "exhaustion" to anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Verdeil, Grégory; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Murray, Timothy; Speiser, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    The immune system has the potential to protect from malignant diseases for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, spontaneous immune responses are often inefficient. Significant effort is required to develop reliable, broadly applicable immunotherapies for cancer patients. A major innovation was transplantation with hematopoietic stem cells from genetically distinct donors for patients with hematologic malignancies. In this setting, donor T cells induce long-term remission by keeping cancer cells in check through powerful allogeneic graft-versus-leukemia effects. More recently, a long awaited breakthrough for patients with solid tissue cancers was achieved, by means of therapeutic blockade of T cell inhibitory receptors. In untreated cancer patients, T cells are dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell "exhaustion". Nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, indicating that many T cells are not entirely and irreversibly exhausted but can be mobilized to become highly functional. Novel antibody therapies that block inhibitory receptors can lead to strong activation of anti-tumor T cells, mediating clinically significant anti-cancer immunity for many years. Here we review these new treatments and the current knowledge on tumor antigen-specific T cells.

  15. 78 FR 30270 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...-counter pharmaceutical products, including: Anti-cancer; anti-diabetic and immunosuppressive medicaments... Production Activity, Janssen Ortho LLC (Pharmaceutical Products Production), Gurabo, Puerto Rico The Puerto Rico Trade and Export Company, grantee of FTZ 61, submitted a notification of proposed...

  16. Liposomal delivery systems for anti-cancer analogues of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Koudelka, Stepan; Turanek Knotigova, Pavlina; Masek, Josef; Prochazka, Lubomir; Lukac, Robert; Miller, Andrew D; Neuzil, Jiri; Turanek, Jaroslav

    2015-06-10

    Pro-apoptotic analogues of vitamin E (VE) exert selective anti-cancer effect on various animal cancer models. Neither suitable formulation of α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), representative semi-synthetic VE analogue ester, nor suitable formulations of the other VE analogues for clinical application have been reported yet. The major factor limiting the use of VE analogues is their low solubility in aqueous solvents. Due to the hydrophobic character of VE analogues, liposomes are predetermined as suitable delivery system. Liposomal formulation prevents undesirable side effects of the drug, enhances the drug biocompatibility, and improves the drug therapeutic index. Liposomal formulations of VE analogues especially of α-TOS and α-tocopheryl ether linked acetic acid (α-TEA) have been developed. The anti-cancer effect of these liposomal VE analogues has been successfully demonstrated in pre-clinical models in vivo. Present achievements in: (i) preparation of liposomal formulations of VE analogues, (ii) physico-chemical characterization of these developed systems and (iii) testing of their biological activity such as induction of apoptosis and evaluation of anti-cancer effect are discussed in this review. PMID:25861728

  17. Immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties of triptolide: A mini review

    PubMed Central

    Ziaei, Samira; Halaby, Reginald

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Triptolide, the active component of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F has been used to treat autoimmune and inflammatory conditions for over two hundred years in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the processes through which triptolide exerts immunosuppression and anti-inflammation are not understood well. In this review, we discuss the autoimmune disorders and inflammatory conditions that are currently treated with triptolide. Triptolide also possesses anti-tumorigenic effects. We discuss the toxicity of various triptolide derivatives and offer suggestions to improve its safety. This study also examines the clinical trials that have investigated the efficacy of triptolide. Our aim is to examine the mechanisms that are responsible for the immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects of triptolide. Materials and Methods: The present review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature with respect to the immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties of triptolide. Results: Triptolide possesses immunosuppressive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. Conclusion: Triptolide can be used alone or in combination with existing therapeutic modalities as novel treatments for autoimmune disorders, cancers, and for immunosuppression. PMID:27222828

  18. Occupational exposure to anti-cancer drugs: A review of effects of new technology.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nitin; Yiannakis, Dennis; Turner, Andrew; Sewell, Graham J

    2014-08-01

    Because anti-cancer drugs are non-selective, they affect both cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Being carcinogenic and mutagenic, many anticancer drugs therefore present a major health risk to healthcare staff working with them. This paper reviews the means by which exposure to anti-cancer drugs in the workplace may be monitored, assessed and reduced. Both biological monitoring, using non-selective methods or compound-selective methods, and environmental monitoring have provided information on the nature and degree of exposure in the workplace. Pharmaceutical isolators, used for the compounding of cytotoxic IV infusions and the preparation of injectable drugs, provide a physical barrier between pharmacists and cytotoxic drugs and reduce direct exposure. However, the interior of isolators and the contents thereof (e.g. infusion bags and syringes) are readily contaminated by aerosols and spillages and afford a secondary source of exposure to pharmacists, nurses and cleaning staff. Closed system transfer devices (CSTDs), designed to prohibit the transfer of contaminants into the working environment during drug transfer between the vial and syringe, have been successful in further reducing, but not eliminating surface contamination. Given that the number of patients requiring treatment with chemotherapeutic agents is predicted to increase, further efforts to reduce occupational exposure to anti-cancer drugs, including the refinement and wider use of CTSDs, are recommended.

  19. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  20. Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of Euphorbia tirucalli Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Benjamin; Vuong, Quan V.; Chalmers, Anita C.; Goldsmith, Chloe D.; Bowyer, Michael C.; Scarlett, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Euphorbia tirucalli is a succulent shrub or small tree that is native to the African continent, however, it is widely cultivated across the globe due to its use in traditional medicines to treat ailments, ranging from scorpion stings to HIV. Recent studies have identified compounds present in the latex of the plant, including a range of bi- and triterpenoids that exhibit bioactivity, including anticancer activity. This study aimed to optimize water extraction conditions for high-yield total phenolic content recovery, to prepare methanol and aqueous extracts from the aerial sections of the plant, and to test the phytochemical, antioxidant, and anti-cancer properties of these extracts. Water extraction of total phenolic compounds (TPC) was optimized across a range of parameters including temperature, extraction time, and plant mass-to-solvent ratio. The water extract of the E. tirucalli powder was found to contain TPC of 34.01 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents)/g, which was approximately half that of the methanol extract (77.33 mg GAE/g). The results of antioxidant assays showed a uniform trend, with the methanol extract’s antioxidant reducing activity exceeding that of water extracts, typically by a factor of 2:1. Regression analysis of the antioxidant assays showed the strongest correlation between extract TPC and antioxidant activity for the ABTS (2,2-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) methods. The methanol extract also showed greater growth inhibition capacity towards the MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell line. These data suggest that further investigations are required to confirm the source of activity within the E. tirucalli leaf and stems for potential use in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26783950

  1. Mitochondrial chaperones may be targets for anti-cancer drugs

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NCI have found that a mitochondrial chaperone protein, TRAP1, may act indirectly as a tumor suppressor as well as a novel target for developing anti-cancer drugs. Chaperone proteins, such as TRAP1, help other proteins adapt to stress, but sc

  2. Anti-cancer properties of anthraquinones from rhubarb.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Lu, Guodong; Shen, Han-Ming; Chung, Maxey C M; Ong, Choon Nam

    2007-09-01

    Rhubarb has been used as a traditional Chinese medicine since ancient times and today it is still present in various herbal preparations. In this review the toxicological and anti-neoplastic potentials of the main anthraquinones from Rhubarb, Rheum palmatum, will be highlighted. It is interesting to note that although the chemical structures of various anthraquinones in this plant are similar, their bioactivities are rather different. The most abundant anthraquinone of rhubarb, emodin, was capable of inhibiting cellular proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and prevention of metastasis. These capabilities are reported to act through tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C (PKC), NF-kappa B (NF-kappaB), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades. Aloe-emodin is another major component in rhubarb found to have anti-tumor properties. Its anti-proliferative property has been demonstrated to be through the p53 and its downstream p21 pathway. Our recent proteomic study also suggests that the molecular targets of these two anthraquinones are different. However, both components were found to be able to potentiate the anti-proliferation of various chemotherapeutic agents. Rhein is the other major rhubarb anthraquinone, although less well studied. This compound could effectively inhibit the uptake of glucose in tumor cells, caused changes in membrane-associated functions and led to cell death. Interestingly, all three major rhubarb anthraquinones were reported to have in vitro phototoxic. This re-evaluation of an old remedy suggests that several bioactive anthraquinones of rhubarb possess promising anti-cancer properties and could have a broad therapeutic potential.

  3. The anti-cancer charm of flavonoids: a cup-of-tea will do!

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Buratovich, Michael

    2007-06-01

    Hormone-dependent cancers of the breast, prostate and colon have, in the past decade, become the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Billions of dollars have been, and still are being spent to study cancers like these, and, in the past three decades, thanks to work by thousands of dedicated scientists, tremendous advancements in the understanding and treatment of cancer have been made. Nevertheless, as there is no sure-fire cure for a variety of cancers to date, natural protection against cancer has been receiving a great deal of attention lately not only from cancer patients but, surprisingly, from physicians as well. Phytoestrogens, plant-derived secondary metabolites, are diphenolic substances with structural similarity to naturally-occurring human steroid hormones. Phytoestrogens are normally divided into three main classes: flavonoids, coumestans and lignans. Flavonoids are found in almost all plant families in the leaves, stems, roots, flowers and seeds of plants and are among the most popular anti-cancer candidates. Flavonoidic derivatives have a wide range of biological actions such as antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antiallergic activities. Some of these benefits are explained by the potent antioxidant effects of flavonoids, which include metal chelation and free-radical scavenging activities. Patent applications regarding flavonoids range from protocols for extraction and purification from natural resources and the establishment of various biological activities for these extracts to novel methods for the production and isolation of flavonoids with known biological activities. This review will bring the reader up to date on the current knowledge and research available in the field of flavonoids and hormone-dependent cancers, and many of the submitted patents that exploit flavonoids.

  4. Copper and conquer: copper complexes of di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Chan; Fouani, Leyla; Jansson, Patric J; Wooi, Danson; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Lok, Hiu Chuen; Kovačević, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal required by organisms to perform a number of important biological processes. Copper readily cycles between its reduced Cu(i) and oxidised Cu(ii) states, which makes it redox active in biological systems. This redox-cycling propensity is vital for copper to act as a catalytic co-factor in enzymes. While copper is essential for normal physiology, enhanced copper levels in tumours leads to cancer progression. In particular, the stimulatory effect of copper on angiogenesis has been established in the last several decades. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that copper affects tumour growth and promotes metastasis. Based on the effects of copper on cancer progression, chelators that bind copper have been developed as anti-cancer agents. In fact, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone compounds, namely the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones that bind copper, have shown great promise in terms of their anti-cancer activity. These agents have a unique mechanism of action, in which they form redox-active complexes with copper in the lysosomes of cancer cells. Furthermore, these agents are able to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) and act as potent anti-oncogenic agents through their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor protein, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1). This review provides an overview of the metabolism and regulation of copper in normal physiology, followed by a discussion of the dysregulation of copper homeostasis in cancer and the effects of copper on cancer progression. Finally, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer agents targeting copper are discussed.

  5. Copper and conquer: copper complexes of di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Chan; Fouani, Leyla; Jansson, Patric J; Wooi, Danson; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Lok, Hiu Chuen; Kovačević, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-09-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal required by organisms to perform a number of important biological processes. Copper readily cycles between its reduced Cu(i) and oxidised Cu(ii) states, which makes it redox active in biological systems. This redox-cycling propensity is vital for copper to act as a catalytic co-factor in enzymes. While copper is essential for normal physiology, enhanced copper levels in tumours leads to cancer progression. In particular, the stimulatory effect of copper on angiogenesis has been established in the last several decades. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that copper affects tumour growth and promotes metastasis. Based on the effects of copper on cancer progression, chelators that bind copper have been developed as anti-cancer agents. In fact, a novel class of thiosemicarbazone compounds, namely the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones that bind copper, have shown great promise in terms of their anti-cancer activity. These agents have a unique mechanism of action, in which they form redox-active complexes with copper in the lysosomes of cancer cells. Furthermore, these agents are able to overcome P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR) and act as potent anti-oncogenic agents through their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor protein, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1). This review provides an overview of the metabolism and regulation of copper in normal physiology, followed by a discussion of the dysregulation of copper homeostasis in cancer and the effects of copper on cancer progression. Finally, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of action of anti-cancer agents targeting copper are discussed. PMID:27334916

  6. DNA binding and anti-cancer activity of redox-active heteroleptic piano-stool Ru(II), Rh(III), and Ir(III) complexes containing 4-(2-methoxypyridyl)phenyldipyrromethene.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Pandey, Rampal; Sharma, Gunjan; Prasad, Ritika; Koch, Biplob; Srikrishna, Saripella; Li, Pei-Zhou; Xu, Qiang; Pandey, Daya Shankar

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of four novel heteroleptic dipyrrinato complexes [(η(6)-arene)RuCl(2-pcdpm)] (η(6)-arene = C6H6, 1; C10H14, 2) and [(η(5)-C5Me5)MCl(2-pcdpm)] (M = Rh, 3; Ir, 4) containing a new chelating ligand 4-(2-methoxypyridyl)-phenyldipyrromethene (2-pcdpm) have been described. The complexes 1-4 have been fully characterized by various physicochemical techniques, namely, elemental analyses, spectral (ESI-MS, IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV/vis) and electrochemical studies (cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV)). Structures of 3 and 4 have been determined crystallographically. In vitro antiproliferative and cytotoxic activity of these complexes has been evaluated by trypan blue exclusion assay, cell morphology, apoptosis, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) fluorescence staining, and DNA fragmentation assay in Dalton lymphoma (DL) cell lines. Interaction of 1-4 with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) has also been supported by absorption titration and electrochemical studies. Our results suggest that in vitro antitumor activity of 1-4 lies in the order 2 > 1 > 4 > 3. PMID:23477351

  7. The renaissance of polypharmacology in the development of anti-cancer therapeutics: Inhibition of the "Triad of Death" in cancer by Di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Patric J; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lane, Darius J R; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Seebacher, Nicole A; Fouani, Leyla; Sahni, Sumit; Merlot, Angelica M; Richardson, Des R

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is a disease that is a "moving target", since as the condition progresses, the molecular targets change and evolve. Moreover, due to clonal selection, a specific anti-cancer drug with one molecular target may only be effective for a limited time period before drug resistance results and the agent becomes ineffective. Hence, the concept of an anti-tumor therapeutic exhibiting polypharmacology can be highly advantageous, rather than a therapeutic obstacle. A novel class of agents possessing these desirable properties are the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones, which bind iron and copper to affect a variety of critical molecular targets in tumors. In fact, these compounds possess multiple properties that enable them to overcome the "triad of death" in cancer, namely: primary tumor growth, drug resistance and metastasis. In fact, at the molecular level, their potent anti-oncogenic activity includes: up-regulation of the metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1; up-regulation of the tumor suppressor, PTEN; down-regulation of the proto-oncogene, cyclin D1; inhibition of the rate-limiting step in DNA synthesis catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase; and the inhibition of multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, e.g., Ras/MAPK signaling, protein kinase B (AKT)/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, ROCK/pMLC2, etc. This Perspective article discusses the advantages of incorporating polypharmacology into anti-cancer drug design using the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazones as a pertinent example. PMID:26318762

  8. Nutrition: An Anti-Cancer Diet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Denise; Siwolop, Sana

    1984-01-01

    Presents seven dietary guidelines on ways to reduce the risk of contracting cancer, discussing scientific evidence supporting the guidelines. Includes a list of foods indicating possible role in cancer, sources, recommendations related to amount/frequency of intake, and hazards of megadoses. Foods cited include fats, vitamins, alcohol, caffeine,…

  9. Recent Development in Carbohydrate Based Anti-cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhaojun; Huang, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    The development of carbohydrate based anti-cancer vaccines is of high current interests. Herein, the latest development in this exciting field is reviewed. After a general introduction about tumor associated carbohydrate antigens and immune responses, the review is focused on the various strategies that have been developed to enhance the immunogenecity of these antigens. The results from animal studies and clinical trials are presented. PMID:22468019

  10. Phenethyl Isothiocyanate: A comprehensive review of anti-cancer mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Wright, Stephen E.; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence suggests a strong inverse relationship between dietary intake of cruciferous vegetables and the incidence of cancer. Among other constituents of cruciferous vegetables, isothiocyanates (ITC) are the main bioactive chemicals present. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is present as gluconasturtiin in many cruciferous vegetables with remarkable anti-cancer effects. PEITC is known to not only prevent the initiation phase of carcinogenesis process but also to inhibit the progression of tumorigenesis. PEITC targets multiple proteins to suppress various cancer-promoting mechanisms such as cell proliferation, progression and metastasis. Pre-clinical evidence suggests that combination of PEITC with conventional anti-cancer agents is also highly effective in improving overall efficacy. Based on accumulating evidence, PEITC appears to be a promising agent for cancer therapy and is already under clinical trials for leukemia and lung cancer. This is the first review which provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of PEITC as a future anti-cancer agent. PMID:25152445

  11. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS) from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yong; Hao, Jiejie; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lang, Yinzhi; Fan, Fei; Cai, Chao; Li, Guoyun; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Guangli

    2016-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS) was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS), which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 activity in LLC cells. Meanwhile, LFCS suppressed the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and downregulated the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) level. Furthermore, LFCS significantly suppressed the activation of ERK1/2/p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway, which played a prime role in expression of MMPs. All of these data indicate LFCS may be used as anti-cancer drug candidates and deserve further study. PMID:27187337

  12. In Vivo Anti-Cancer Mechanism of Low-Molecular-Weight Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate (LFCS) from Sea Cucumber Cucumaria frondosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yong; Hao, Jiejie; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Lang, Yinzhi; Fan, Fei; Cai, Chao; Li, Guoyun; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Guangli

    2016-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (LFCS) was prepared from native fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS), which was extracted and isolated from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa, and the anti-cancer mechanism of LFCS on mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) was investigated. The results showed that LFCS remarkably inhibited LLC growth and metastasis in a dose-dependent manner. LFCS induced cell cycle arrest by increasing p53/p21 expression and apoptosis through activation of caspase-3 activity in LLC cells. Meanwhile, LFCS suppressed the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and downregulated the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) level. Furthermore, LFCS significantly suppressed the activation of ERK1/2/p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway, which played a prime role in expression of MMPs. All of these data indicate LFCS may be used as anti-cancer drug candidates and deserve further study.

  13. Logical design of an anti-cancer agent targeting the plant homeodomain in Pygopus2.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ferdausi; Yamaguchi, Keiichi; Fukuoka, Mayuko; Elhelaly, Abdelazim Elsayed; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2016-09-01

    Pygopus2 (Pygo2) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is required for β-catenin mediated transcription. Plant homeodomain (PHD) finger in Pygo2 intercalates the methylated histone 3 (H3K4me) tail and HD1 domain of BCL9 that binds to β-catenin. Thus, PHD finger may be a potential target for the logical design of an anti-cancer drug. Here, we found that Spiro[2H-naphthol[1,2-b]pyran-2,4'-piperidine]-1'ethanol,3,4-dihydro-4-hydroxy-α-(6-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)) termed JBC117 interacts with D339, A348, R356, V376 and A378 in PHD corresponding to the binding sites with H3K4me and/or HD1, and has strong anti-cancer effects. For colon (HCT116) and lung (A549) cancer cell lines, IC50 values were 2.6 ± 0.16 and 3.3 ± 0.14 μM, respectively, while 33.80 ± 0.15 μM for the normal human fibroblast cells. JBC117 potently antagonized the cellular effects of β-catenin-dependent activity and also inhibited the migration and invasion of cancer cells. In vivo studies showed that the survival time of mice was significantly prolonged by the subcutaneous injection of JBC117 (10 mg/kg/day). In conclusion, JBC117 is a novel anti-cancer lead compound targeting the PHD finger of Pygo2 and has a therapeutic effect against colon and lung cancer.

  14. Study of Malformin C, a Fungal Source Cyclic Pentapeptide, as an Anti-Cancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Wing; Gullen, Elizabeth A.; Yu, Zhe; Wei, Ying; Wang, Lihui; Zeiss, Caroline; Beck, Amanda; Cheng, Ee-Chun; Wu, Chunfu; Cheng, Yung-Chi; Zhang, Yixuan

    2015-01-01

    Malformin C, a fungal cyclic pentapeptide, has been claimed to have anti-cancer potential, but no in vivo study was available to substantiate this property. Therefore, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate its anti-cancer effects and toxicity. Our studies showed Malformin C inhibited Colon 38 and HCT 116 cell growth dose-dependently with an IC50 of 0.27±0.07μM and 0.18±0.023μM respectively. This inhibition was explicated by Malformin C’s effect on G2/M arrest. Moreover, we observed up-regulated expression of phospho-histone H2A.X, p53, cleaved CASPASE 3 and LC3 after Malformin C treatment, while the apoptosis assay indicated an increased population of necrotic and late apoptotic cells. In vivo, the pathological study exhibited the acute toxicity of Malformin C at lethal dosage in BDF1 mice might be caused by an acute yet subtle inflammatory response, consistent with elevated IL-6 in the plasma cytokine assay. Further anti-tumor and toxicity experiments proved that 0.3mg/kg injected weekly was the best therapeutic dosage of Malformin C in Colon 38 xenografted BDF1 mice, whereas 0.1mg/kg every other day showed no effect with higher resistance, and 0.9mg/kg per week either led to fatal toxicity in seven-week old mice or displayed no advantage over 0.3mg/kg group in nine-week old mice. Overall, we conclude that Malformin C arrests Colon 38 cells in G2/M phase and induces multiple forms of cell death through necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy. Malformin C has potent cell growth inhibition activity, but the therapeutic index is too low to be an anti-cancer drug. PMID:26540166

  15. HSP70-based anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Guzhova, Irina V.; Margulis, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heat shock protein 70, (Hsp70) constitutes a powerful system of cytoprotection in all organisms studied to date. Exerting such activity, Hsp70 rescues cancer cells from antitumor therapy, posing a great challenge for oncologists. In contrast to its protective action, Hsp70 was found to be released from cancer cells, prompting cytotoxic lymphocytes to target and kill the tumor. A great number of vaccines have been developed on the basis of the ability of Hsp70 to present tumor antigen or to elevate the sensitivity of cancer cells to cytotoxic lymphocytes. In this commentary, we consider novel data on the employment of pure Hsp70 in the therapy of glioma and melanoma malignancies. We show that intratumorally delivered Hsp70 penetrates cancer cells and pulls its intracellular analog outside of the cell. This displacement may activate cells, constituting both innate and adaptive immunity. In vivo delivery of Hsp70 was found to inhibit tumor growth and to extend survival. The technology of intratumoral injection of pure Hsp70 passed through preclinical trials and was investigated in clinics for children with brain cancer; the results show the safety and feasibility of a new approach. PMID:27294301

  16. Influence of B-ring modifications on proton affinity, transmembrane anion transport and anti-cancer properties of synthetic prodigiosenes.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Estelle; Rastogi, Soumya; Thompson, Alison; Davis, Jeffery T

    2014-10-14

    Prodigiosin is the parent compound of the tripyrrolic natural products known as the prodigiosenes. Some of these natural products and their synthetic analogs show anti-cancer, immunosuppressive and antimicrobial actions, amongst other biological activities. One mechanism put forth to explain their biological activity is that since prodigiosenes are typically protonated at physiological pH they can alter intracellular pH via HCl co-transport (or Cl(-)/OH(-) exchange) across cell membranes. In this study we synthesized a series of prodigiosene analogs with different -O-aryl substituents attached to the B-ring of the tripyrrolic skeleton. NMR studies showed that these analogs can exist as a mixture of two stable α and β conformers in acidic solution, and that both conformers can bind anions in solution. We found that the electronic nature of the O-aryl substituent on the B-ring influences the rate at which these prodigiosenes catalyze transmembrane anion transport, i.e. the prodigiosenes with the higher pKa had greater Cl(-)/NO3(-) exchange rates. Four of the synthetic prodigiosenes were tested for their in vitro anti-cancer activities in the NCI60 human tumour panel. Despite their promising in vitro anti-cancer activity (GI50 values ranging from 18 to 74 nM), there was no evidence that this activity is influenced by the extent of protonation of these synthetic prodigiosenes.

  17. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  18. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Yang, Gwang-Mo; Kim, Kyeongseok; Saha, Subbroto Kumar; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. PMID:27657126

  19. Tumorsphere as an effective in vitro platform for screening anti-cancer stem cell drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Che-Hsin; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Wang, Bing-Yen; Chang, Wen-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a sub-population of cells within cancer tissues with tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis properties. CSCs also have been considered as the main cause of cancer recurrence. Targeting CSCs have been suggested as the key for successful treatment against cancer. Tumorsphere cultivation is based on culturing cancer cells onto ultralow attachment surface in serum-free media under the supplementation with growth factors such as epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Tumorsphere cultivation is widely used to analyze the self-renewal capability of CSCs and to enrich these cells from bulk cancer cells. This method also provides a reliable platform for screening potential anti-CSC agents. The in vitro anti-proliferation activity of potential agents selected from tumorsphere assay is more translatable into in vivo anti-tumorigenic activity compared with general monolayer culture. Tumorsphere assay can also measure the outcome of clinical trials for potential anti-cancer agents. In addition, tumorsphere assay may be a promising strategy in the innovation of future cancer therapeutica and may help in the screening of anti-cancer small-molecule chemicals. PMID:26527320

  20. Synthesis and anti-cancer screening of novel heterocyclic-(2H)-1,2,3-triazoles as potential anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Penthala, Narsimha Reddy; Madhukuri, Leena; Thakkar, Shraddha; Madadi, Nikhil Reddy; Lamture, Gauri; Eoff, Robert L.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    trans-Cyanocombretastatin A-4 (trans-CA-4) analogues have been structurally modified to afford their more stable CA-4-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole analogues. Fifteen novel, stable 4-heteroaryl-5-aryl-(2H)-1,2,3-triazole CA-4 analogues (8a–i, 9 and 11a–e) were evaluated for anti-cancer activity against a panel of 60 human cancer cell lines. These analogues displayed potent cytotoxic activity against both hematological and solid tumor cell lines with GI50 values in the low nanomolar range. The most potent compound, 8a, was a benzothiophen-2-yl analogue that incorporated a 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl moiety connected to the (2H)-1,2,3-triazole ring system. Compound 8a exhibited GI50 values of <10 nM against 80% of the cancer cell lines in the panel. Three triazole analogues, 8a, 8b and 8g, showed particularly potent growth inhibition against the triple negative Hs578T breast cancer cell line with GI50 values of 10.3 nM, 66.5 nM and 20.3 nM, respectively. Molecular docking studies suggest that these compounds bind to the same hydrophobic pocket at the interface of α- and β-tubulin that is occupied by colchicine and cis-CA-4, and are stabilized by Van der Waals’ interactions with surrounding amino acid residues. Compound 8a was found to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.7 µM. The potent cytotoxicity of these novel compounds and their inhibition of tubulin dynamics make these triazole analogues promising candidates for development as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27066215

  1. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—nitroglycerin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG), a drug that has been in clinical use for more than a century, has a range of actions which make it of particular interest in an oncological setting. It is generally accepted that the main mechanism of action of NTG is via the production of nitric oxide (NO), which improves cardiac oxygenation via multiple mechanisms including improved blood flow (vasodilation), decreased platelet aggregation, increased erythrocyte O2 release and decreased mitochondrial utilization of oxygen. Its vasoactive properties mean that it has the potential to exploit more fully the enhanced permeability and retention effect in delivering anti-cancer drugs to tumour tissues. Moreover NTG can reduce HIF-1α levels in hypoxic tumour tissues and this may have anti-angiogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-efflux effects. Additionally NTG may enhance anti-tumour immunity. Pre-clinical and clinical data on these anti-cancer properties of NTG are summarised and discussed. While there is evidence of a positive action as a monotherapy in prostate cancer, there are mixed results in NSCLC where initially positive results have yet to be fully replicated. Based on the evidence presented, a case is made that further exploration of the clinical benefits that may accrue to cancer patients is warranted. Additionally, it is proposed that NTG may synergise with a number of other drugs, including other repurposed drugs, and these are discussed in the supplementary material appended to this paper. PMID:26435741

  2. Strigolactone analogs act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Laufer, Dana; Grivas, Christopher F; Shaknof, Julia; Sananes, Amiram; Bier, Ariel; Ben-Harosh, Shani; Belausov, Eduard; Johnson, Michael D; Artuso, Emma; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Ola; Prandi, Cristina; Khalaila, Isam; Pines, Mark; Yarden, Ronit I; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones. Previously, we found that analogs of SLs induce growth arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds also inhibited the growth of breast cancer stem cell enriched-mammospheres with increased potency. Furthermore, strigolactone analogs inhibited growth and survival of colon, lung, prostate, melanoma, osteosarcoma and leukemia cancer cell lines. To further examine the anti-cancer activity of SLs in vivo, we have examined their effects on growth and viability of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts model either alone or in combination with paclitaxel. We show that strigolactone act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model. In addition we show that SLs affect the integrity of the microtubule network and therefore may inhibit the migratory phenotype of the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines that were examined. PMID:26192476

  3. Mitochondrial apoptosis contributes to the anti-cancer effect of Smilax glabra Roxb.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yujing; Su, Yahui; Qu, Like; Xu, Shuo; Meng, Lin; Cai, Shao-Qing; Shou, Chengchao

    2011-11-30

    Smilax glabra Roxb. (SGR), a member of the Smilacaceae family and a rhizome of the Liliaceae plant, has shown anti-inflammation and detoxification properties, and a few studies reported its anti-cancer effect. In this study, we showed that SGR inhibited growth of human breast cancer cell line MCF7, colon carcinoma cell line HT-29, and gastric cancer cell line BGC-823 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SGR could inhibit tumor growth of HT-29 in Balb/c nude mice and murine hepatoma H22 cells in ICR mice. SGR elicited apoptotic cell death, as confirmed by DNA ladder formation, changes in nuclear morphology, and the increased FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. Permeabilization of mitochondrial membrane (MMP), production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), elevation of intracellular [Ca(2+)], relocation of cytochrome c, and the activation of caspase-3 were found to be associated with the initiation of apoptosis by SGR treatment. Using microarray analysis, we found the changes in expression profiles of genes related to apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle control in the cells treated with SGR. Our results demonstrated the mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis by which SGR exerts the anti-cancer effect. PMID:21920417

  4. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  5. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Characterization of Covalent Adducts of DNA with Anti-cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Catherine; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic activities of many anticancer and antibacterial drugs arise from their interactions with nucleic acid substrates. Some of these ligands interact with DNA in a way that causes conformational changes or damage to the nucleic acid targets, ultimately altering recognition by key DNA-specific enzymes, interfering with DNA transcription or prohibiting replication, and terminating cell growth and proliferation. The design and synthesis of ligands that bind to nucleic acids remains a dynamic field in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical research. The quest for more selective and efficacious DNA-interactive anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has likewise catalyzed the need for sensitive analytical methods that can provide structural information about the nature of the resulting DNA adducts and provide insight into the mechanistic pathways of the DNA/drug interactions and the impact on the cellular processes in biological systems. This review focuses on the array of tandem mass spectrometric strategies developed and applied for characterization of covalent adducts formed between DNA and anti-cancer ligands. PMID:23150278

  6. Knockdown of delta-5-desaturase promotes the anti-cancer activity of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid and enhances the efficacy of chemotherapy in colon cancer cells expressing COX-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Pinjing; Yang, Zhongyu; Yan, Changhui; Guo, Bin; Qian, Steven Y.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX), commonly overexpressed in cancer cells, is a major lipid peroxidizing enzyme that metabolizes polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3s and ω-6s). The COX-catalyzed free radical peroxidation of arachidonic acid (ω-6) can produce deleterious metabolites (e.g. 2-series prostaglandins) that are implicated in cancer development. Thus, COX inhibition has been intensively investigated as a complementary therapeutic strategy for cancer. However, our previous study has demonstrated that a free radical-derived by product (8-hydroxyoctanoic acid) formed from COX-catalyzed peroxidation of dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA, the precursor of arachidonic acid) can inhibit colon cancer cell growth. We thus hypothesize that the commonly overexpressed COX in cancer (~90% of colon cancer patients) can be taken advantage to suppress cell growth by knocking down delta-5-desaturase (D5D, a key enzyme that converts DGLA to arachidonic acid). In addition, D5D knockdown along with DGLA supplement may enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. After knocking down D5D in HCA-7 colony 29 cells and HT-29 cells (human colon cancer cell lines with high and low COX levels, respectively), the antitumor activity of DGLA was significantly enhanced along with the formation of a threshold range (~0.5–1.0 µM) of 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid. In contrast, DGLA treatment did not inhibit cell growth when D5D was not knocked down and only limited amount of 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid was formed. D5D knockdown along with DGLA treatment also enhanced the cytotoxicities of various chemotherapeutic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil, regorafenib, and irinotecan, potentially through the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins, e.g. p53 and caspase 9. For the first time, we have demonstrated that the overexpressed COX in cancer cells can be utilized in suppressing cancer cell growth. This finding may provide a new option besides COX inhibition to optimize cancer therapy. The outcome of this translational

  7. Development and Validation of a Fast and Optimized Screening Method for Enhanced Production of Secondary Metabolites Using the Marine Scopulariopsis brevicaulis Strain LF580 Producing Anti-Cancer Active Scopularide A and B

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Annemarie; Paun, Linda; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Kempken, Frank; Labes, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Natural compounds from marine fungi are an excellent source for the discovery and development of new drug leads. The distinct activity profiles of the two cyclodepsipeptides scopularide A and B against cancer cell lines set their marine producer strain Scopulariopsis brevicaulis LF580 into the focus of the EU project MARINE FUNGI. One of the main goals was the development of a sustainable biotechnological production process for these compounds. The secondary metabolite production of strain LF580 was optimized by random mutagenesis employing UV radiation. For a fast and reliable detection of the intracellular secondary metabolite production level, a miniaturized bioactivity-independent screening method was developed, as the random mutagenesis yielded a large number of mutants to be analysed quantitatively and none of the existing hyphenated bioassay-dependent screening systems could be applied. The method includes decreased cultivation volume, a fast extraction procedure as well as an optimized LC-MS analysis. We show that deviation could be specifically reduced at each step of the process: The measuring deviation during the analysis could be minimized to 5% and technical deviation occurring in the downstream part to 10–15%. Biological variation during the cultivation process still has the major influence on the overall variation. However, the approach led to a 10-fold reduction of time and similar effects on costs and effort compared to standard reference screening methods. The method was applied to screen the UV-mutants library of Scopulariopsis brevicaulis LF580. For validation purposes, the occurring variations in the miniaturized scale were compared to those in the classical Erlenmeyer flask scale. This proof of concept was performed using the wild type strain and 23 randomly selected mutant strains. One specific mutant strain with an enhanced production behavior could be obtained. PMID:25079364

  8. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  9. Carboxyamidotriazole inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in cancer cells and exerts synergistic anti-cancer effect with glycolysis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui; Guo, Lei; Li, Juan; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Xiaoli; Chen, Chen; Chen, Wei; Ye, Caiying; Zhang, Dechang

    2016-01-28

    Targeting cancer cell metabolism is a promising strategy against cancer. Here, we confirmed that the anti-cancer drug carboxyamidotriazole (CAI) inhibited mitochondrial respiration in cancer cells for the first time and found a way to enhance its anti-cancer activity by further disturbing the energy metabolism. CAI promoted glucose uptake and lactate production when incubated with cancer cells. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in cancer cells was inhibited by CAI, and the decrease in the activity of the respiratory chain complex I could be one explanation. The anti-cancer effect of CAI was greatly potentiated when being combined with 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). The cancer cells treated with the combination of CAI and 2-DG were arrested in G2/M phase. The apoptosis and necrosis rates were also increased. In a mouse xenograft model, this combination was well tolerated and retarded the tumor growth. The impairment of cancer cell survival was associated with significant cellular ATP decrease, suggesting that the combination of CAI and 2-DG could be one of the strategies to cause dual inhibition of energy pathways, which might be an effective therapeutic approach for a broad spectrum of tumors.

  10. Mechanism of the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by the anti-cancer agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT): Activation of PERK/eIF2α, IRE1α, ATF6 and calmodulin kinase.

    PubMed

    Merlot, Angelica M; Shafie, Nurul H; Yu, Yu; Richardson, Vera; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R

    2016-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a major role in the synthesis, maturation and folding of proteins and is a critical calcium (Ca(2+)) reservoir. Cellular stresses lead to an overwhelming accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER, leading to ER stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the stressful tumor microenvironment, the UPR maintains ER homeostasis and enables tumor survival. Thus, a novel strategy for cancer therapeutics is to overcome chronically activated ER stress by triggering pro-apoptotic pathways of the UPR. Considering this, the mechanisms by which the novel anti-cancer agent, Dp44mT, can target the ER stress response pathways were investigated in multiple cell-types. Our results demonstrate that the cytotoxic chelator, Dp44mT, which forms redox-active metal complexes, significantly: (1) increased ER stress-associated pro-apoptotic signaling molecules (i.e., p-eIF2α, ATF4, CHOP); (2) increased IRE1α phosphorylation (p-IRE1α) and XBP1 mRNA splicing; (3) reduced expression of ER stress-associated cell survival signaling molecules (e.g., XBP1s and p58(IPK)); (4) increased cleavage of the transcription factor, ATF6, which enhances expression of its downstream targets (i.e., CHOP and BiP); and (5) increased phosphorylation of CaMKII that induces apoptosis. In contrast to Dp44mT, the iron chelator, DFO, which forms redox-inactive iron complexes, did not affect BiP, p-IRE1α, XBP1 or p58(IPK) levels. This study highlights the ability of a novel cancer therapeutic (i.e., Dp44mT) to target the pro-apoptotic functions of the UPR via cellular metal sequestration and redox stress. Assessment of ER stress-mediated apoptosis is fundamental to the understanding of the pharmacology of chelation for cancer treatment.

  11. Multifunctional liposomes for enhanced anti-cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcao, Claudio Borges

    2011-12-01

    with half of the concentration needed for G3139 alone in CL to reduce the cell viability by 40%. Also, it was found greater apoptotic signal in cells treated with CLs containing D-(KLAKLAK)2/G3139 complexes than CLs with G3139 only. In vivo, D-(KLAKLAK) 2/G3139 complexes in CL significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the saline treated group, through apoptosis induction. However, the mechanism involved in cell death by apoptosis seems to be independent of reduction of bcl-2 protein levels. PEG2000 at 1% mol could significantly reduce activity of PCL formulation towards B16(F10) cells compared to CLs. After pre-incubation at pH 7.4, PCL and pH-PCL had decreased activity compared to CL towards B16(F10) cells. After pre-incubation at pH 5.0, while CL and PCL had the same activity with the cells as in neutral pH, pH-PCL formulation had its PEG cleaved and its cytotoxicity was restored against the melanoma cells. Thus, D-(KLAKLAK)2/G3139 complexes in CL had enhanced anti-cancer therapy, through apoptosis, than G3139 alone in CL in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, PCL and pH-PCL particles obtained can have a prolonged blood residence time, and, once a tumor tissue is reached, pH-PCL can have its cytotoxicity restored because of hydrolysis of cleavable PEG at a lowered pH.

  12. Development of a Novel Anti-HIF-1α Screening System Coupled with Biochemical and Biological Validation for Rapidly Selecting Potent Anti-Cancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Madu, Chikezie; Masters, Jordan; Lu, Andrew; Li, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the American women. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment seen in solid tumors is critical for tumor cell survival and growth. The activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), an important master transcriptional factor that is induced and stabilized by intratumoral hypoxia, stimulates a group of HIF-1α-regulated genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), leading tumor cells towards malignant progression. Therefore, a promising therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is to target HIF-1α. The goal of this project was to develop and validate a screening system coupled with secondary screen/validation process that has the capability to screen large numbers of potential anti-cancer small-molecule compounds based on their anti-HIF-1α activities. Breast cancer MDA-231 cells were used as the model to select potent anti-HIF-1α compounds by their abilities to inhibit transactivation of a VEGF promoter fused to a luciferase reporter gene under hypoxia. Positive compounds were then validated by a series of assays that confirm compounds' anti-HIF-1α activities including measurement of HIF-1α downstream VEGF gene expression and angiogenic ability of BCa cells. Results of our pilot screening demonstrate that this prototype screening coupled with validation system can effectively select highly potent anti-HIF-1α agents from the compound library, suggesting that this prototype screen system has the potential to be developed into a high-throughput screen (HTS) coupled with automated validation process for the screening and identification of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs based on anti-HIF-1α mechanism.

  13. Development of a Novel Anti-HIF-1α Screening System Coupled with Biochemical and Biological Validation for Rapidly Selecting Potent Anti-Cancer Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Madu, Chikezie; Masters, Jordan; Lu, Andrew; Li, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the American women. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment seen in solid tumors is critical for tumor cell survival and growth. The activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), an important master transcriptional factor that is induced and stabilized by intratumoral hypoxia, stimulates a group of HIF-1α-regulated genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), leading tumor cells towards malignant progression. Therefore, a promising therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is to target HIF-1α. The goal of this project was to develop and validate a screening system coupled with secondary screen/validation process that has the capability to screen large numbers of potential anti-cancer small-molecule compounds based on their anti-HIF-1α activities. Breast cancer MDA-231 cells were used as the model to select potent anti-HIF-1α compounds by their abilities to inhibit transactivation of a VEGF promoter fused to a luciferase reporter gene under hypoxia. Positive compounds were then validated by a series of assays that confirm compounds' anti-HIF-1α activities including measurement of HIF-1α downstream VEGF gene expression and angiogenic ability of BCa cells. Results of our pilot screening demonstrate that this prototype screening coupled with validation system can effectively select highly potent anti-HIF-1α agents from the compound library, suggesting that this prototype screen system has the potential to be developed into a high-throughput screen (HTS) coupled with automated validation process for the screening and identification of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs based on anti-HIF-1α mechanism. PMID:24847382

  14. Nannocystin A: an Elongation Factor 1 Inhibitor from Myxobacteria with Differential Anti-Cancer Properties.

    PubMed

    Krastel, Philipp; Roggo, Silvio; Schirle, Markus; Ross, Nathan T; Perruccio, Francesca; Aspesi, Peter; Aust, Thomas; Buntin, Kathrin; Estoppey, David; Liechty, Brigitta; Mapa, Felipa; Memmert, Klaus; Miller, Howard; Pan, Xuewen; Riedl, Ralph; Thibaut, Christian; Thomas, Jason; Wagner, Trixie; Weber, Eric; Xie, Xiaobing; Schmitt, Esther K; Hoepfner, Dominic

    2015-08-24

    Cultivation of myxobacteria of the Nannocystis genus led to the isolation and structure elucidation of a class of novel cyclic lactone inhibitors of elongation factor 1. Whole genome sequence analysis and annotation enabled identification of the putative biosynthetic cluster and synthesis process. In biological assays the compounds displayed anti-fungal and cytotoxic activity. Combined genetic and proteomic approaches identified the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) as the primary target for this compound class. Nannocystin A (1) displayed differential activity across various cancer cell lines and EEF1A1 expression levels appear to be the main differentiating factor. Biochemical and genetic evidence support an overlapping binding site of 1 with the anti-cancer compound didemnin B on EF-1α. This myxobacterial chemotype thus offers an interesting starting point for further investigations of the potential of therapeutics targeting elongation factor 1. PMID:26179970

  15. Metformin may function as anti-cancer agent via targeting cancer stem cells: the potential biological significance of tumor-associated miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S; Ali, Shadan; Zaiem, Feras; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2014-06-01

    Metformin is one of the most used diabetic drugs for the management of type II diabetes mellitus (DM) in the world. Increased numbers of epidemiological and clinical studies have provided convincing evidence supporting the role of metformin in the development and progression of a variety of human tumors including breast and pancreatic cancer. Substantial pre-clinical evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental studies strongly suggests that metformin has an anti-cancer activity mediated through the regulation of several cell signaling pathways including activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and other direct and indirect mechanisms; however, the detailed mechanism(s) has not yet been fully understood. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has gained significant attention in recent years due its identification and defining its clinical implications in many different tumors including breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. In this review, we will discuss the protective role of metformin in the development of breast and pancreatic cancers. We will further discuss the role of metformin as an anti-cancer agent, which is in part mediated through targeting CSCs. Finally, we will discuss the potential role of metformin in the modulation of tumor-associated or CSC-associated microRNAs (miRNAs) as part of the novel mechanism of action of metformin in the development and progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. PMID:25333034

  16. Metformin may function as anti-cancer agent via targeting cancer stem cells: the potential biological significance of tumor-associated miRNAs in breast and pancreatic cancers

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S.; Ali, Shadan; Zaiem, Feras

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most used diabetic drugs for the management of type II diabetes mellitus (DM) in the world. Increased numbers of epidemiological and clinical studies have provided convincing evidence supporting the role of metformin in the development and progression of a variety of human tumors including breast and pancreatic cancer. Substantial pre-clinical evidence from in vitro and in vivo experimental studies strongly suggests that metformin has an anti-cancer activity mediated through the regulation of several cell signaling pathways including activation of AMP kinase (AMPK), and other direct and indirect mechanisms; however, the detailed mechanism(s) has not yet been fully understood. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) has gained significant attention in recent years due its identification and defining its clinical implications in many different tumors including breast cancer and pancreatic cancer. In this review, we will discuss the protective role of metformin in the development of breast and pancreatic cancers. We will further discuss the role of metformin as an anti-cancer agent, which is in part mediated through targeting CSCs. Finally, we will discuss the potential role of metformin in the modulation of tumor-associated or CSC-associated microRNAs (miRNAs) as part of the novel mechanism of action of metformin in the development and progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. PMID:25333034

  17. [Multifaceted Intervention to Explore the Appropriate Time of Anti-Cancer Treatment Cessation].

    PubMed

    Morita, Tatsuya; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Chikako

    2016-07-01

    When anti-cancer treatment should be ended is very controversial. This reviewprovides a narrative summary of recent empirical studies about the potential association between the timing of anti-cancer treatment cessation and patient quality of death and dying. Furthermore, we propose a multifaceted intervention model for Japanese oncology patients based on the evidence available. PMID:27431627

  18. Silibinin meglumine, a water-soluble form of milk thistle silymarin, is an orally active anti-cancer agent that impedes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cufí, Sílvia; Bonavia, Rosa; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Visa, Joana; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Joven, Jorge; Micol, Vicente; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-10-01

    Silibinin is the primary active constituent of a crude extract (silymarin) from milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) seeds. We explored the ability of an oral milk thistle extract formulation that was enriched with a water-soluble form of silibinin complexed with the amino-sugar meglumine to inhibit the growth of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) mouse xenografts. As a single agent, oral silibinin meglumine notably decreased the overall volumes of NSCLC tumors as efficiently as did the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) gefitinib. Concurrent treatment with silibinin meglumine impeded the regrowth of gefitinib-unresponsive tumors, resulting in drastic tumor growth prevention. Because the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is required by a multiplicity of mechanisms of resistance to EGFR TKIs, we evaluated the ability of silibinin meglumine to impede the EMT in vitro and in vivo. Silibinin-meglumine efficiently prevented the loss of markers associated with a polarized epithelial phenotype as well as the de novo synthesis of proteins associated with the mesenchymal morphology of transitioning cells. Our current findings with this non-toxic, orally active, and water-soluble silibinin formulation might facilitate the design of clinical trials to test the administration of silibinin meglumine-containing injections, granules, or beverages in combination with EGFR TKIs in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC.

  19. Afzelin exhibits anti-cancer activity against androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 prostate cancer cells through the inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, KAI-CHANG; SUN, JIAN-MEI; SHEN, JIAN-GUO; JIN, JI-ZHONG; LIU, FENG; XU, XIAO-LIN; CHEN, LIN; LIU, LIN-TAO; LV, JIA-JU

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer presents high occurrence worldwide. Medicinal plants are a major source of novel and potentially therapeutic molecules; therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the possible anti-prostate cancer activity of afzelin, a flavonol glycoside that was previously isolated from Nymphaea odorata. The effect of afzelin on the proliferation of androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 cells was evaluated by performing a water soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay. In addition, the effect of afzelin on the cell cycle of the LNCaP and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines was evaluated. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of afzelin on the kinases responsible for the regulation of actin organization. Afzelin was identified to inhibit the proliferation of LNCaP and PC3 cells, and block the cell cycle in the G0 phase. The anticancer activity of afzelin in these cells was determined to be due to inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1 expression. Thus, the in vitro efficacy of afzelin against prostate cancer is promising; however, additional studies on different animal models are required to substantiate its anticancer potential. PMID:26622852

  20. Expanding the Activity of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 against Surface-Anchored Metalloproteinases by the Replacement of Its C-Terminal Domain: Implications for Anti-Cancer Effects.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing Xian; Rapti, Magdalini; Tsigkou, Anastasia; Lee, Meng Huee

    2015-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the endogenous inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs). TIMP molecules are made up of two domains: an N-terminal domain that associates with the catalytic cleft of the metalloproteinases (MP) and a smaller C-terminal domain whose role in MP association is still poorly understood. This work is aimed at investigating the role of the C-terminal domain in MP selectivity. In this study, we replaced the C-terminal domain of TIMP-1 with those of TIMP-2, -3 and -4 to create a series of "T1:TX" chimeras. The affinity of the chimeras against ADAM10, ADAM17, MMP14 and MMP19 was investigated. We can show that replacement of the C-terminal domain by those of other TIMPs dramatically increased the affinity of TIMP-1 for some MPs. Furthermore, the chimeras were able to suppress TNF-α and HB-EGF shedding in cell-based setting. Unlike TIMP-1, T1:TX chimeras had no growth-promoting activity. Instead, the chimeras were able to inhibit cell migration and development in several cancer cell lines. Our findings have broadened the prospect of TIMPs as cancer therapeutics. The approach could form the basis of a new strategy for future TIMP engineering. PMID:26308720

  1. Expanding the Activity of Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 against Surface-Anchored Metalloproteinases by the Replacement of Its C-Terminal Domain: Implications for Anti-Cancer Effects

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jing Xian; Rapti, Magdalini; Tsigkou, Anastasia; Lee, Meng Huee

    2015-01-01

    Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are the endogenous inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs). TIMP molecules are made up of two domains: an N-terminal domain that associates with the catalytic cleft of the metalloproteinases (MP) and a smaller C-terminal domain whose role in MP association is still poorly understood. This work is aimed at investigating the role of the C-terminal domain in MP selectivity. In this study, we replaced the C-terminal domain of TIMP-1 with those of TIMP-2, -3 and -4 to create a series of “T1:TX” chimeras. The affinity of the chimeras against ADAM10, ADAM17, MMP14 and MMP19 was investigated. We can show that replacement of the C-terminal domain by those of other TIMPs dramatically increased the affinity of TIMP-1 for some MPs. Furthermore, the chimeras were able to suppress TNF-α and HB-EGF shedding in cell-based setting. Unlike TIMP-1, T1:TX chimeras had no growth-promoting activity. Instead, the chimeras were able to inhibit cell migration and development in several cancer cell lines. Our findings have broadened the prospect of TIMPs as cancer therapeutics. The approach could form the basis of a new strategy for future TIMP engineering. PMID:26308720

  2. Use of bacteria in anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Rachel M; Green, Jeffrey; Lewis, Claire E

    2006-01-01

    While a number of valid molecular targets have been discovered for tumours over the past decade, finding an effective way of delivering therapeutic genes specifically to tumours has proved more problematic. A variety of viral and non-viral delivery vehicles have been developed and applied in anti-cancer gene therapies. However, these suffer from either inefficient and/or short-lived gene transfer to target cells, instability in the bloodstream and inadequate tumour targeting. Recently, various types of non-pathogenic obligate anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria have been shown to infiltrate and selectively replicate within solid tumours when delivered systemically. This has prompted the development of cancer gene therapy protocols that use such bacteria as gene delivery vehicles. Here, we review the evidence for the success of these in pre-clinical models and clinical trials, as single modality treatments and in combination with conventional cancer therapies.

  3. Chromatin-modifying agents in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Carole; Florean, Cristina; Schnekenburger, Michael; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic alterations are involved in every step of carcinogenesis. The development of chromatin-modifying agents (CMAs) has provided the ability to fight cancer by reversing these alterations. Currently, four CMAs have been approved for cancer treatment; two DNA demethylating agents and two deacetylase inhibitors. A number of promising CMAs are undergoing clinical trials in several cancer types. Moreover, already approved CMAs are still under clinical investigation to improve their efficacy and to extend their use to a broader panel of cancers. Combinatorial treatments with CMAs are already considered a promising strategy to improve clinical benefits and to limit side effects. The real mechanisms by which these CMAs allow the improvement and remission of patients are still obscure. A deeper analysis of the molecular features expressed by responding patients should be performed to reveal this information. In this review, we focus on clinical trials with CMAs, discussing the success and the pitfalls of this new class of anti-cancer drugs.

  4. Evolutionarily stable anti-cancer therapies by autologous cell defection

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Game theory suggests an anti-cancer treatment based on the use of modified cancer cells that disrupt cooperation within the tumor. Cancer cells are harvested from the patient, the genes for the production of essential growth factors are knocked out in vitro and the cells are then reinserted in the tumor, where they lead to its collapse. Background and objectives: Current anti-cancer drugs and treatments based on gene therapy are prone to the evolution of resistance, because cancer is a process of clonal selection: resistant cell lines have a selective advantage and therefore increase in frequency, eventually conferring resistance to the whole tumor and leading to relapse. An effective treatment must be evolutionarily stable, that is, immune to the invasion of resistant mutant cells. This study shows how such a treatment can be achieved by autologous cell therapy using modified cancer cells, knocked out for genes coding for diffusible factors like growth factors. Methodology: The evolutionary dynamics of a population of cells producing diffusible factors are analyzed using a nonlinear public goods game in a structured population in which the interaction neighborhood and the update neighborhood are decoupled. The analysis of the dynamics of the system reveals what interventions can drive the population to a stable equilibrium in which no diffusible factors are produced. Results: A treatment based on autologous knockout cell therapy can be designed to lead to the spontaneous collapse of a tumor, without targeting directly the cancer cells, their growth factors or their receptors. Critical parameters that can make the therapy effective are identified. Concepts from evolutionary game theory and mechanism design, some of which are counterintuitive, can be adopted to optimize the treatment. Conclusions and implications: Although it shares similarities with other approaches based on gene therapy and RNA interference, the method suggested here is evolutionarily stable under

  5. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. Methods HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. Results 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer

  6. Turning tumor-promoting copper into an anti-cancer weapon via high-throughput chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Jiao, P; Qi, M; Frezza, M; Dou, Q P; Yan, B

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn "cancer-promoting" copper into anti-cancer agents.

  7. Turning Tumor-Promoting Copper into an Anti-Cancer Weapon via High-Throughput Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, F.; Jiao, P.; Qi, M.; Frezza, M.; Dou, Q.P.; Yan, B.

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential element for multiple biological processes. Its concentration is elevated to a very high level in cancer tissues for promoting cancer development through processes such as angiogenesis. Organic chelators of copper can passively reduce cellular copper and serve the role as inhibitors of angiogenesis. However, they can also actively attack cellular targets such as proteasome, which plays a critical role in cancer development and survival. The discovery of such molecules initially relied on a step by step synthesis followed by biological assays. Today high-throughput chemistry and high-throughput screening have significantly expedited the copper-binding molecules discovery to turn “cancer-promoting” copper into anti-cancer agents. PMID:20586723

  8. Time to use a dose of Chloroquine as an adjuvant to anti-cancer chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Steve

    2016-01-15

    Chloroquine, a drug used for over 80 years to treat and prevent malaria and, more recently, to treat autoimmune diseases, is very safe but has a plethora of dose-dependent effects. By increasing pH in acidic compartments it inhibits for example lysosomal enzymes. In the context of cancer, Chloroquine was found to have direct effects on different types of malignancies that could potentiate chemotherapies. For example, the anti-malaria drug may inhibit both the multidrug-resistance pump and autophagy (mechanisms that tumor cells may use to resist chemotherapies), intercalate in DNA and enhance the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in cells or solid cancer tissues. However, these activities were mostly demonstrated at high doses of Chloroquine (higher than 10mg/kg or 10mg/l i.e. ca. 31μM). Nevertheless, it was reported that daily uptake of clinically acceptable doses (less than 10mg/kg) of Chloroquine in addition to chemo-radio-therapy increases the survival of glioblastoma patients (Sotelo et al., 2006; Briceno et al., 2007). However, the optimal dose and schedule of this multi-active drug with respect to chemotherapy has never been experimentally determined. The present article reviews the several known direct and indirect effects of different doses of Chloroquine on cancer and how those effects may indicate that a fine tuning of the dose/schedule of Chloroquine administration versus chemotherapy may be critical to obtain an adjuvant effect of Chloroquine in anti-cancer treatments. We anticipate that the appropriate (time and dose) addition of Chloroquine to the standard of care may greatly and safely potentiate current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:26687632

  9. miR-30a Regulates the Expression of CAGE and p53 and Regulates the Response to Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Deokbum; Kim, Hyuna; Kim, Youngmi; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the role of miR-217 in anti-cancer drug-resistance. miRNA array and miRNA hybridization analysis predicted miR-30a-3p as a target of miR-217. miR-30a-3p and miR-217 formed a negative feedback loop and regulated the expression of each other. Ago1 immunoprecipitation and co-localization analysis revealed a possible interaction between miR-30a-3p and miR-217. miR-30a-3p conferred resistance to anti-cancer drugs and enhanced the invasion, migration, angiogenic, tumorigenic, and metastatic potential of cancer cells in CAGE-dependent manner. CAGE increased the expression of miR-30a-3p by binding to the promoter sequences of miR-30a-3p, suggesting a positive feedback loop between CAGE and miR-30a-3p. miR-30a-3p decreased the expression of p53, which showed the binding to the promoter sequences of miR-30a-3p and CAGE in anti-cancer drug-sensitive cancer cells. Luciferase activity assays showed that p53 serves as a target of miR-30a. Thus, the miR-30a-3p-CAGE-p53 feedback loop serves as a target for overcoming resistance to anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26912082

  10. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    PubMed

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms in anti-cancer actions of bioactive food components – the implications in cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Stefanska, B; Karlic, H; Varga, F; Fabianowska-Majewska, K; Haslberger, AG

    2012-01-01

    The hallmarks of carcinogenesis are aberrations in gene expression and protein function caused by both genetic and epigenetic modifications. Epigenetics refers to the changes in gene expression programming that alter the phenotype in the absence of a change in DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, which include amongst others DNA methylation, covalent modifications of histone tails and regulation by non-coding RNAs, play a significant role in normal development and genome stability. The changes are dynamic and serve as an adaptation mechanism to a wide variety of environmental and social factors including diet. A number of studies have provided evidence that some natural bioactive compounds found in food and herbs can modulate gene expression by targeting different elements of the epigenetic machinery. Nutrients that are components of one-carbon metabolism, such as folate, riboflavin, pyridoxine, cobalamin, choline, betaine and methionine, affect DNA methylation by regulating the levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine, a methyl group donor, and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, which is an inhibitor of enzymes catalyzing the DNA methylation reaction. Other natural compounds target histone modifications and levels of non-coding RNAs such as vitamin D, which recruits histone acetylases, or resveratrol, which activates the deacetylase sirtuin and regulates oncogenic and tumour suppressor micro-RNAs. As epigenetic abnormalities have been shown to be both causative and contributing factors in different health conditions including cancer, natural compounds that are direct or indirect regulators of the epigenome constitute an excellent approach in cancer prevention and potentially in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:22536923

  12. SWCNT-Polymer Nanocomplexes for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withey, Paul; Momin, Zoya; Bommoju, Anvesh; Hoang, Trung; Rashid, Bazlur

    2015-03-01

    Utilization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as more effective drug-delivery agents are being considered due to their ability to easily cross cell membranes, while their high aspect ratio and large surface area provide multiple attachment sites for biocompatible drug complexes. However, excessive bundling of pristine SWCNTs caused by strong attractive Van der Walls forces between CNT sidewalls is a major obstacle. We have successfully dispersed SWCNTs with both polyvinyl alcohol and Pluronic biocompatible polymers, and attached anti-cancer drugs Camptothecin (CPT) and Doxorubicin to form non-covalent CNT-polymer-drug conjugates in aqueous solution. Polymeric dispersion of SWCNTs by both polymers is confirmed by clearly identifiable near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence emission peaks of individual (7,5) and (7,6) nanotubes, and drug attachment to form complete complexes verified by UV-Vis spectroscopy. These complexes, with varying SWCNT and drug concentrations, were tested for effectiveness by exposing them to a line of human embryonic kidney cancer cells and analyzed for cell viability. Preliminary results indicate significant improvement in drug effectiveness on the cancer cells, with more successful internalization due to unaltered SWCNTs as the drug carriers. Supported by the UHCL Faculty Research Support Fund.

  13. Death receptors as targets for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Kerstin; Cordier, Stefanie M; Walczak, Henning

    2008-01-01

    Human tumour cells are characterized by their ability to avoid the normal regulatory mechanisms of cell growth, division and death. The classical chemotherapy aims to kill tumour cells by causing DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, as many tumour cells posses mutations in intracellular apoptosis-sensing molecules like p53, they are not capable of inducing apoptosis on their own and are therefore resistant to chemotherapy. With the discovery of the death receptors the opportunity arose to directly trigger apoptosis from the outside of tumour cells, thereby circumventing chemotherapeutic resistance. Death receptors belong to the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily, with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-1, CD95 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-R1 and -R2 being the most prominent members. This review covers the current knowledge about these four death receptors, summarizes pre-clinical approaches engaging these death receptors in anti-cancer therapy and also gives an overview about their application in clinical trials conducted to date. PMID:19210756

  14. OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES AS ANTI-CANCER THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Experimental Immunology is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize anti-cancer oligodeoxynucleotides.  

  15. Antibody–drug conjugates as novel anti-cancer chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christina; Brown, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Over the past couple of decades, antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) have revolutionized the field of cancer chemotherapy. Unlike conventional treatments that damage healthy tissues upon dose escalation, ADCs utilize monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to specifically bind tumour-associated target antigens and deliver a highly potent cytotoxic agent. The synergistic combination of mAbs conjugated to small-molecule chemotherapeutics, via a stable linker, has given rise to an extremely efficacious class of anti-cancer drugs with an already large and rapidly growing clinical pipeline. The primary objective of this paper is to review current knowledge and latest developments in the field of ADCs. Upon intravenous administration, ADCs bind to their target antigens and are internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis. This facilitates the subsequent release of the cytotoxin, which eventually leads to apoptotic cell death of the cancer cell. The three components of ADCs (mAb, linker and cytotoxin) affect the efficacy and toxicity of the conjugate. Optimizing each one, while enhancing the functionality of the ADC as a whole, has been one of the major considerations of ADC design and development. In addition to these, the choice of clinically relevant targets and the position and number of linkages have also been the key determinants of ADC efficacy. The only marketed ADCs, brentuximab vedotin and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), have demonstrated their use against both haematological and solid malignancies respectively. The success of future ADCs relies on improving target selection, increasing cytotoxin potency, developing innovative linkers and overcoming drug resistance. As more research is conducted to tackle these issues, ADCs are likely to become part of the future of targeted cancer therapeutics. PMID:26182432

  16. Antiradical activity of gallic acid included in lipid interphases.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, C L; Frías, M A; Cutro, A C; Nazareno, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are well known as antioxidant agents and by their effects on the hydration layers of lipid interphases. Among them, gallic acid and its derivatives are able to decrease the dipole potential and to act in water as a strong antioxidant. In this work we have studied both effects on lipid interphases in monolayers and bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. The results show that gallic acid (GA) increases the negative surface charges of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and decreases the dipole potential of the lipid interphase. As a result, positively charged radical species such as ABTS(+) are able to penetrate the membrane forming an association with GA. These results allow discussing the antiradical activity (ARA) of GA at the membrane phase which may be taking place in water spaces between the lipids.

  17. Dynamic modeling of bone metastasis, microenvironment and therapy: Integrating parathyroid hormone (PTH) effect, anti-resorptive and anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Rui Moura; Lemos, João Miranda; Alho, Irina; Valério, Duarte; Ferreira, Arlindo R; Costa, Luís; Vinga, Susana

    2016-02-21

    Bone is a common site for the development of metastasis, as its microenvironment provides the necessary conditions for the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Several mathematical models to describe the bone remodeling process and how osteoclasts and osteoblasts coupled action ensures bone homeostasis have been proposed and further extended to include the effect of cancer cells. The model proposed here includes the influence of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) as capable of triggering and regulating the bone remodeling cycle. It also considers the secretion of PTH-related protein (PTHrP) by cancer cells, which stimulates the production of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by osteoblasts that activates osteoclasts, increasing bone resorption and the subsequent release of growth factors entrapped in the bone matrix, which induce tumor growth, giving rise to a self-perpetuating cycle known as the vicious cycle of bone metastases. The model additionally describes how the presence of metastases contributes to the decoupling between bone resorption and formation. Moreover, the effects of anti-cancer and anti-resorptive treatments, through chemotherapy and the administration of bisphosphonates or denosumab, are also included, along with their corresponding pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). The simulated models, available at http://sels.tecnico.ulisboa.pt/software/, are able to describe bone remodeling cycles, the growth of bone metastases and how treatment can effectively reduce tumor burden on bone and prevent loss of bone strength.

  18. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Adam A.; Amzallag, Arnaud; Pruteanu-Malinici, Iulian; Baniya, Subash; Cooper, Zachary A.; Piris, Adriano; Hargreaves, Leeza; Igras, Vivien; Frederick, Dennie T.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Haber, Daniel A.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Wargo, Jennifer A.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Benes, Cyril H.; Fisher, David E.

    2015-01-01

    A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR) and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations. PMID:26461489

  19. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa

    PubMed Central

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies. PMID:25859300

  20. Usnic acid: a non-genotoxic compound with anti-cancer properties.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Margareth; O'Neill, Mary A; Murray, Karen E; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide S; Carneiro-Leão, Ana Maria A; Thompson, Alastair M; Appleyard, Virginia C L

    2005-09-01

    The majority of human tumors bear inactive p53 or cellular factors that down-regulate the expression and activity of the p53 network. Therefore, finding therapies that are effective in such tumors is of great interest. Usnic acid, a normal component of lichens, showed activity against the wild-type p53 breast cancer cell line MCF7 as well as the non-functional p53 breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the lung cancer cell line H1299 (null for p53). In MCF7 cells treated with usnic acid, although there was an accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins, the transcriptional activity of p53 remained unaffected. We also found that there was no phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 after treatment of MCF7 cells with usnic acid, suggesting that the oxidative stress and disruption of the normal metabolic processes of cells triggered by usnic acid does not involve DNA damage. The property of usnic acid as a non-genotoxic anti-cancer agent that works in a p53-independent manner makes it a potential candidate for novel cancer therapy.

  1. Oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinases as molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Sala, Elisa; Tartari, Carmen J; Puttini, Miriam; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    Deregulated activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) is a frequent event underlying malignant transformation in many types of cancer. The formation of oncogenic fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) resulting from genomic rearrangements, represents a common mechanism by which kinases escape the strict controls that normally regulate their expression and activation. FTKs are typically composed of an N-terminal dimerisation domain, provided by the fusion partner protein, fused to the kinase domain of receptor or non-receptor tyrosine kinases (non-RTKs). Since FTKs do not contain extracellular domains, they share many characteristics with non-RTKs in terms of their properties and approaches for therapeutic targeting. FTKs are cytoplasmic or sometimes nuclear proteins, depending on the normal distribution of their fusion partner. FTKs no longer respond to ligand and are instead constitutively activated by dimerisation induced by the fusion partner. Unlike RTKs, FTKs cannot be targeted by therapeutic antibodies, instead they require agents that can cross the cell membrane as with non-RTKs. Here we review the PTKs known to be expressed as FTKs in cancer and the strategies for molecularly targeting these FTKs in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18045055

  2. Cardio-protective and anti-cancer therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Hammad; Ahmad, Asif; Masud, Tariq; Kaleem, Muhammad

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa is the miraculous plant having a lot of nutritional and medicinal benefits, and attracts large number of nutrition and pharmacological researchers. N. sativa seed composition shows that it is the blessing of nature and it contains and many bioactive compounds like thymoquinone, α-hederin, alkaloids, flavonoids, antioxidants, fatty acids many other compounds that have positive effects on curing of different diseases. Several medicinal properties of N. sativa like its anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antioxidant activities and many others are well acknowledged. However, this article focuses on activity of N. sativa against cardiovascular diseases and cancer. For gathering required data the authors went through vast number of articles using search engines like Science direct, ELSEVIER, Pub Med, Willey on Line Library and Google scholar and the findings were classified on the basis of relevance of the topic and were reviewed in the article. N. sativa is rich source of different biologically active compounds and is found effective in controlling number of cardiovascular diseases and various cancers both in vivo and in vitro studies.

  3. Targeting Cytochrome P450 Enzymes: A New Approach in Anti-cancer Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Robert D.; Njar, Vincent C.O.

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) represent a large class of heme-containing enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of multitudes of substrates both endogenous and exogenous. Until recently, however, CYPs have been largely overlooked in cancer drug development, acknowledged only for their role in Phase I metabolism of chemotherapeutics. The first successful strategy targeting CYP enzymes in cancer therapy was the development of potent inhibitors of CYP19 (aromatase) for the treatment of breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors ushered in a new era in hormone ablation therapy for estrogen dependent cancers, and have paved the way for similar strategies (i.e. inhibition of CYP17) that combat androgen dependent prostate cancer. Identification of CYPs involved in the inactivation of anti-cancer metabolites of Vitamin D3 and Vitamin A has triggered development of agents that target these enzymes as well. The discovery of the over-expression of exogenous metabolizing CYPs, such as CYP1B1, in cancer cells has roused interest in the development of inhibitors for chemoprevention and of prodrugs designed to be activated by CYPs only in cancer cells. Finally, the expression of CYPs within tumors has been utilized in the development of bioreductive molecules that are activated by CYPs only under hypoxic conditions. This review offers the first comprehensive analysis of strategies in drug development that either inhibit or exploit CYP enzymes for the treatment of cancer. PMID:17544277

  4. Differential effects of anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis drugs on liver cystatin

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aaliya; Priyadarshini, Medha; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Aatif, Mohammad; Amin, Fakhra; Tabrez, Shams; Zaher, Galila F.; Bano, Bilqees

    2014-01-01

    The drug–protein interaction has been the subject of increasing interest over the decades. In the present communication, the interaction of liver cystatin with anti-cancer (adriamycin) and anti-hepatitis (adevofir dipivoxil) drugs was studied by thiol-protease inhibitory assay, UV absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD). A static type of quenching was observed between the protein and the drug molecules. Binding constant (Ka) of adriamycin to liver cystatin (LC) was found to be 1.08 × 106 M−1. Moreover, binding site number was found to be 2. Importantly, cystatin loses its activity in the presence of adriamycin. However, intrinsic fluorescence studies in the presence of adevofir dipivoxil showed enhancement in the fluorescence intensity suggesting that binding of adevofir to LC caused unfolding of the protein. The unfolding of the test protein was also accompanied by significant loss of inhibitory activity. CD spectroscopy result showed, both adriamycin and adevofir dipivoxil caused perturbation in the secondary structure of liver cystatin. The possible implications of these results will help in combating drug induced off target effects. PMID:25561887

  5. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:24793775

  6. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  7. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-01-01

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls. PMID:27213923

  8. Antitumor activity of fermented noni exudates (fNE) and its fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Noni (Morinda citrifolia) has been extensively used in folk medicine by Polynesians for over 2000 years and recent studies have shown that noni has a wide spectrum of therapeutic activities including inhibition of angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory effects, and anti-cancer activities. We recently repor...

  9. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming; Xiao, Yinghong; Zhou, Ninglin

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. PMID:26838897

  10. Structural characterization of a broccoli polysaccharide and evaluation of anti-cancer cell proliferation effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lishan; Cao, Jingjing; Chen, Wenrong

    2015-08-01

    Broccoli is a widely consumed vegetable with abundant amount of nutrients, which bring numerous beneficial effects on human health. The structural information of water-soluble polysaccharides in broccoli was eludicated for the first time in this work. A purified polysaccharide fraction (BPCa) was obtained by column chromatography. It comprised of arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal), rhamnose (Rha) with a molar ratio of 5.3:0.8:1.0. Nuclear magnetic resonnance spectra data revealed that α-L-1,5-Araf and α-L-1,3,5-Araf are present in the backbone, while α-L-Araf terminal was attended in side chain. α-L-1,2-Rhap was found to be linked to α-L-1,5-Araf in heteronuclear multiple bond correlation spectra. The presences of β-D-1,4-Galp and α-D-1,4-GalpA were also detected. Furthermore, BPCa showed significant anti-cancer cell proliferation activities against HepG2, Siha and MDA-MB-231 carcinoma cell lines. The results indicated that BPCa had a good potential to be applied as functional food additives.

  11. The Anti-Cancer Property of Proteins Extracted from Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Chaw-Sen; Khoo, Boon-Yin; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. belongs to the Asteraceae Family. The plant is a well-known traditional herb in South East Asia and it is widely used to treat inflammation, kidney discomfort, high cholesterol level, diabetic, cancer and high blood pressure. Our earlier study showed the presence of valuable plant defense proteins, such as peroxidase, thaumatin-like proteins and miraculin in the leaf of G. procumbens. However, the effects of these defense proteins on cancers have never been determined previously. In the present study, we investigated the bioactivity of gel filtration fractionated proteins of G. procumbens leaf extract. The active protein fraction, SN-F11/12, was found to inhibit the growth of a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, at an EC50 value of 3.8 µg/mL. The mRNA expressions of proliferation markers, Ki67 and PCNA, were reduced significantly in the MDA-MB-23 cells treated with SN-F11/12. The expression of invasion marker, CCL2, was also found reduced in the treated MDA-MB-231 cells. All these findings highlight the anti-cancer property of SN-F11/12, therefore, the proteins in this fraction can be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23874655

  12. The anti-cancer property of proteins extracted from Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Hew, Chaw-Sen; Khoo, Boon-Yin; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2013-01-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. belongs to the Asteraceae Family. The plant is a well-known traditional herb in South East Asia and it is widely used to treat inflammation, kidney discomfort, high cholesterol level, diabetic, cancer and high blood pressure. Our earlier study showed the presence of valuable plant defense proteins, such as peroxidase, thaumatin-like proteins and miraculin in the leaf of G. procumbens. However, the effects of these defense proteins on cancers have never been determined previously. In the present study, we investigated the bioactivity of gel filtration fractionated proteins of G. procumbens leaf extract. The active protein fraction, SN-F11/12, was found to inhibit the growth of a breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, at an EC50 value of 3.8 µg/mL. The mRNA expressions of proliferation markers, Ki67 and PCNA, were reduced significantly in the MDA-MB-23 cells treated with SN-F11/12. The expression of invasion marker, CCL2, was also found reduced in the treated MDA-MB-231 cells. All these findings highlight the anti-cancer property of SN-F11/12, therefore, the proteins in this fraction can be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23874655

  13. Overcoming EMT-associated resistance to anti-cancer drugs via Src/FAK pathway inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Catherine; Nicholes, Katrina; Bustos, Daisy; Lin, Eva; Song, Qinghua; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Settleman, Jeff

    2014-09-15

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and has been associated with cancer metastasis and drug resistance. For example, in EGFR mutated non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), EMT has been associated with acquired resistance to the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib. Moreover, "EGFR-addicted" cancer cell lines induced to undergo EMT become erlotinib-resistant in vitro. To identify potential therapeutic vulnerabilities specifically within these mesenchymal, erlotinib-resistant cells, we performed a small molecule screen of ~200 established anti-cancer agents using the EGFR mutant NSCLC HCC827 cell line and a corresponding mesenchymal derivative line. The mesenchymal cells were more resistant to most tested agents; however, a small number of agents showed selective growth inhibitory activity against the mesenchymal cells, with the most potent being the Abl/Src inhibitor, dasatinib. Analysis of the tyrosine phospho-proteome revealed several Src/FAK pathway kinases that were differentially phosphorylated in the mesenchymal cells, and RNAi depletion of the core Src/FAK pathway components in these mesenchymal cells caused apoptosis. These findings reveal a novel role for Src/FAK pathway kinases in drug resistance and identify dasatinib as a potential therapeutic for treatment of erlotinib resistance associated with EMT. PMID:25193862

  14. Translational approaches targeting the p53 pathway for anti-cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor blocks cancer development by triggering apoptosis or cellular senescence in response to oncogenic stress or DNA damage. Consequently, the p53 signalling pathway is virtually always inactivated in human cancer cells. This unifying feature has commenced tremendous efforts to develop p53-based anti-cancer therapies. Different strategies exist that are adapted to the mechanisms of p53 inactivation. In p53-mutated tumours, delivery of wild-type p53 by adenovirus-based gene therapy is now practised in China. Also, remarkable progress has been made in the development of p53-binding drugs that can rescue and reactivate the function of mutant or misfolded p53. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses that are designed to specifically replicate in and kill p53-defective cells. Inactivation of wt-p53 frequently results from dysregulation of MDM2, an E3 ligase that regulates p53 levels. Small-molecule drugs that inhibit the interaction of MDM2 and p53 and block p53 degradation are currently tested in clinical trials. This survey highlights the recent developments that attempt to modulate the function of p53 and outlines strategies that are being investigated for pharmacological intervention in the p53 pathway. PMID:21718309

  15. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly H.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  16. Optimal design of active and semi-active suspensions including time delays and preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac', A.; Youn, I.

    1993-10-01

    Several control laws for active and semi-active suspension based on a linear half car model are derived and investigated. The strategies proposed take full advantage of the fact that the road input to the rear wheels is a delayed version of that to the front wheels, which in turn can be obtained either from the measurements of the front wheels and body motions or by direct preview of road irregularities if preview sensors are available. The suspension systems are optimized with respect to ride comfort, road holding and suspension rattle space as expressed by the mean-square-values of body acceleration (including effects of heave and pitch), tire deflections and front and rear suspension travels. The optimal control laws that minimize the given performance index and include passivity constraints in the semi-active case are derived using calculus of variation. The optimal semi-active suspension becomes piecewise linear, varying between passive and fully active systems and combinations of them. The performances of active and semi-active systems with and without preview were evaluated by numerical simulation in the time and frequency domains. The results show that incorporation of time delay between the front and rear axles in controller design improves the dynamic behavior of the rear axle and control of body pitch motion, while additional preview improves front wheel dynamics and body heave.

  17. The anti-cancer effects of poi (Colocasia esculenta) on colonic adenocarcinoma cells In vitro.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Reitzenstein, Jonathan E; Liu, Jessie; Jadus, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    Hawaiians tend to have lower incidence rates of colorectal cancer and it was hypothesized that this may be due to ethnic differences in diet, specifically, their consumption of poi, a starchy paste made from the taro (Colocasia esulenta L.) plant corm. Soluble extracts of poi were incubated at 100 mg/mL in vitro for antiproliferative activity against the rat YYT colon cancer cell line. (3)H-thymidine incorporation studies were conducted to demonstrate that the poi inhibited the proliferation of these cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. The greatest suppression of YYT colon cancer growth occurred when 25% concentration was used. When poi was incubated with the YYT cells after 2 days, the YYT cells underwent apoptotic changes as evidenced by a positive terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) stain. Poi enhanced the proliferation of normal mouse splenocyte control cells, suggesting that poi is not simply toxic to all cells but even has a positive immunostimulatory role. By flow cytometry, T cells (CD4+ and CD8+) were predominantly activated by the poi. Although numerous factors can contribute to the risk of colon cancer, perhaps poi consumption may contribute to the lower colon cancer rates among Hawaiians by two distinct mechanisms. First, by inducing apoptosis within colon cancer cells; second, by non-specifically activating lymphocytes, which in turn can lyse cancerous cells. Our results suggest for the first time that poi may have novel tumor specific anti-cancer activities and future research is suggested with animal studies and human clinical trials.

  18. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX. PMID:26184238

  19. Anti-cancer and other bioactivities of Korean Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) and its major pyranocoumarin compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Li, Li; Jiang, Cheng; Xing, Chengguo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lü, Junxuan

    2012-12-01

    Korean Angelica gigas Nakai (AGN) is a major medicinal herb used in Asian countries such as Korea and China. Traditionally, its dried root has been used to treat anemia, pain, infection and articular rheumatism in Korea, most often through boiling in water to prepare the dosage forms. The pyranocoumarin compound decursin and its isomer decursinol angelate (DA) are the major chemical components in the alcoholic extracts of the root of AGN. The in vitro anti-tumor activities of decursin and/or DA against prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, bladder cancer, sarcoma, myeloma and leukemia have been increasingly reported in the past decade whereas the in vivo efficacy in mouse models was established only for a few organ sites. Preliminary pharmacokinetic studies by us and others in rodent models indicated that decursinol (DOH), which has much less in vitro direct anticancer activities by itself, is the major and rapid in vivo hydrolysis metabolite of both decursin and DA. Besides decursin, DA and DOH, other chemical components in AGN such as polysaccharides and polyacetylenes have been reported to exert anti-cancer and anti-inflammation activities as well. We systematically reviewed the published literature on the anti-cancer and other bio-activities effects of AGN extract and decursin, DA and DOH, as well as other chemicals identified from AGN. Although a number of areas are identified that merit further investigation, one critical need is first-in-human studies of the pharmacokinetics of decursin/DA to determine whether humans differ from rodents in absorption and metabolism of these compounds.

  20. Luteolin, an emerging anti-cancer flavonoid, poisons eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Arnab Roy; Sharma, Shalini; Mandal, Suparna; Goswami, Anindya; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2002-01-01

    Luteolin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, is abundant in our daily dietary intake. It exhibits a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties, but little is known about its biochemical targets other than the fact that it induces topoisomerase II-mediated apoptosis. In the present study, we show that luteolin completely inhibits the catalytic activity of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I at a concentration of 40 microM, with an IC50 of 5 microM. Preincubation of enzyme with luteolin before adding a DNA substrate increases the inhibition of the catalytic activity (IC50=0.66 microM). Treatment of DNA with luteolin before addition of topoisomerase I reduces this inhibitory effect. Subsequent fluorescence tests show that luteolin not only interacts directly with the enzyme but also with the substrate DNA, and intercalates at a very high concentration (>250 microM) without binding to the minor groove. Direct interaction between luteolin and DNA does not affect the assembly of the enzyme-DNA complex, as evident from the electrophoretic mobility-shift assays. Here we show that the inhibition of topoisomerase I by luteolin is due to the stabilization of topoisomerase-I DNA-cleavable complexes. Hence, luteolin is similar to camptothecin, a class I inhibitor, with respect to its ability to form the topoisomerase I-mediated 'cleavable complex'. But, unlike camptothecin, luteolin interacts with both free enzyme and substrate DNA. The inhibitory effect of luteolin is translated into concanavalin A-stimulated mouse splenocytes, with the compound inducing SDS-K+-precipitable DNA-topoisomerase complexes. This is the first report on luteolin as an inhibitor of the catalytic activity of topoisomerase I, and our results further support its therapeutic potential as a lead anti-cancer compound that poisons topoisomerases. PMID:12027807

  1. Osmium(VI) complexes as a new class of potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wen-Xiu; Man, Wai-Lun; Cheung, Myra Ting-Wai; Sun, Raymond Wai-Yin; Shu, Yuan-Lan; Lam, Yun-Wah; Che, Chi-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2011-02-21

    A nitridoosmium(VI) complex [Os(VI)(N)(sap)(OH(2))Cl] (H(2)sap = N-salicylidene-2-aminophenol) displays prominent in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer properties, induces S- and G2/M-phase arrest and forms a stable adduct with dianionic 5'-guanosine monophosphate.

  2. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  3. A ferromagnetic compound with anti-cancer proeprties for controlled drug delivery and imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Eguchi, Haruki; Hirata, Kunio; Kurotani, Reiko; Singh, David J.; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Umemura, Masanari; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Masuda, Takatsugu; Amemiya, Naoyuki; et al

    2015-03-17

    New anticancer agents and modalities for their use are of great interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of anti-cancer properties in salen derivatives. We found that an iron salen derivative, i.e., [Fe(salen)]2O, displays ferromagnetic order above room temperature and shows spontaneous field-dependent magnetization and hysteresis. Understanding of this magnetic property is provided by first-principles calculations based on structures obtained by X-ray crystallography. [Fe(salen)]2O exhibited potent anti-cancer properties against various cancer cell types and was readily attracted by even moderate-strength permanent magnets in vitro. We demonstrated that the delivery of [Fe(salen)]2O to melanoma tissues transplanted into the tails of micemore » using a permanent magnet leads to a robust decrease in tumor size. The local accumulation of [Fe(salen)]2O was visualized by MRI. Thus, [Fe(salen)]2O acted as an anti-cancer and MRI contrast compound that has a pharmacological effect that is delivered in a controlled manner, suggesting new strategies for anti-cancer drug development.« less

  4. A ferromagnetic compound with anti-cancer proeprties for controlled drug delivery and imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Eguchi, Haruki; Hirata, Kunio; Kurotani, Reiko; Singh, David J.; Fukumura, Hidenobu; Umemura, Masanari; Hoshino, Yujiro; Lee, Jin; Masuda, Takatsugu; Amemiya, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Sato, Itaru; Feng, Xianfeng; Sato, Motohiko; Inoue, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Aoki, Ichio; Tanigaki, Katsumi; Sato, Mamoru; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-17

    New anticancer agents and modalities for their use are of great interest. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of anti-cancer properties in salen derivatives. We found that an iron salen derivative, i.e., [Fe(salen)]2O, displays ferromagnetic order above room temperature and shows spontaneous field-dependent magnetization and hysteresis. Understanding of this magnetic property is provided by first-principles calculations based on structures obtained by X-ray crystallography. [Fe(salen)]2O exhibited potent anti-cancer properties against various cancer cell types and was readily attracted by even moderate-strength permanent magnets in vitro. We demonstrated that the delivery of [Fe(salen)]2O to melanoma tissues transplanted into the tails of mice using a permanent magnet leads to a robust decrease in tumor size. The local accumulation of [Fe(salen)]2O was visualized by MRI. Thus, [Fe(salen)]2O acted as an anti-cancer and MRI contrast compound that has a pharmacological effect that is delivered in a controlled manner, suggesting new strategies for anti-cancer drug development.

  5. Molecular biology of cancer-associated fibroblasts: can these cells be targeted in anti-cancer therapy?

    PubMed

    Gonda, Tamas A; Varro, Andrea; Wang, Timothy C; Tycko, Benjamin

    2010-02-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the non-neoplastic stromal compartment in most solid cancers plays an active role in tumor proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the most abundant cell types in the tumor stroma, and these cells are pro-tumorigenic. Evidence that CAFs are epigenetically and possibly also genetically distinct from normal fibroblasts is beginning to define these cells as potential targets of anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the cell-of-origin and molecular biology of CAFs, arguing that such knowledge provides a rational basis for designing therapeutic strategies to coordinately and synergistically target both the stromal and malignant epithelial component of human cancers.

  6. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  7. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S.; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  8. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-08-19

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols.

  9. Curcumin-enhanced chemosensitivity of FDA-approved platinum (II)-based anti-cancer drugs involves downregulation of nuclear endonuclease G and NF-κB as well as induction of apoptosis and G2/M arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ti; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Su, Chun-Li

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin, an active natural compound in turmeric and curry, has been reported to exhibit anti-cancer effect. Cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are used to treat various types of cancers. However, acquired resistance and toxicities are observed. Here, the addition of curcumin significantly increased cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer drugs on human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells, producing synergistic (cisplatin and carboplatin) and additivity (oxaliplatin) effects. Treatments in combination with curcumin resulted in a significantly increased induction of apoptosis and occurrence of G2/M arrest. Nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), EndoG and NF-κB were elevated by anti-cancer drugs, suggesting the involvement of AIF and EndoG. The addition of curcumin suppressed nuclear AIF and EndoG and reversed anti-cancer drugs-induced NF-κB expression, suggesting the association of EndoG and NF-κB in curcumin-enhanced chemosensitivity. Therefore, the intake of foods rich in curcumin or curcumin-containing supplements should be taken into consideration for patients receiving chemotherapy to optimize the outcome of treatments.

  10. Targeting DNA repair, DNA metabolism and replication stress as anti-cancer strategies.

    PubMed

    Puigvert, Jordi Carreras; Sanjiv, Kumar; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapies targeting and damaging the DNA have been extensively used in the last 50 years since the discovery of nitrogen mustards, antimetabolites and platin agents. The use of these drugs is often limited by dose-limiting side effects related to their poor specificity. In recent years, much effort has been put on the discovery and development of compounds that would exploit defects in DNA repair in cancer cells such as Wee1, Chk1 or PARP1 inhibitors. However, not all cancers respond to these inhibitors. Recently, new developments towards specifically targeting broader characteristics of cancer such as replication stress (RS) and lost redox homeostasis have emerged. Oncogenes induce proliferation signals, which also result in replication-associated DNA damage, i.e. RS. Our knowledge into overall causes of RS, lesions produced and how these are signalled in cells to activate cell cycle checkpoints is evolving. Inhibition of ATR, which would normally keep non-deleterious levels of RS, induces intolerable RS levels for cancer cells. Interestingly, links between replication and transcription appear to underlie RS along with a reduction of the dNTP pool. Remarkably, sanitization of the dNTP pool by MutT homologue 1, impeding incorporation of oxidized dNTPs into the DNA, seems to be crucial for cancer cell survival. In this minireview we present an overview of current and novel strategies to target DNA repair and exploit DNA damage to treat cancer. We present the current models for cancer-associated RS as well as cancer phenotypic lethality. Both strategies are poised to better target cancer cells and reduce side effects. PMID:26507796

  11. The Cockayne syndrome group B DNA repair protein as an anti-cancer target.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Mani, S; Kandimalla, E R; Yu, D; Agrawal, S; States, J C; Bregman, D B

    2001-12-01

    Cells from individuals with Cockayne syndrome (CS) have a defect in transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR), which rapidly corrects certain DNA lesions located on the transcribed strand of active genes. Despite this DNA repair defect, individuals with CS (of which there are two complementation groups, CSA and CSB) do not demonstrate an elevated incidence of cancer. Recently, we demonstrated that disruption of the CSB gene reduces the spontaneous tumor rate in cancer predisposed Ink4a/ARF-/- mice as well as causing their embryo fibroblasts to proliferate more slowly and be more sensitive to UV-induced apoptosis. In the present study we characterized phosphorothioate backbone antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AOs) that reduced the levels of CSB mRNA in A2780/CP70 ovarian carcinoma cells. The AOs caused the cells to proliferate more slowly and made them more sensitive to either cisplatin or oxaliplatin. The AOs also enhanced the cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide and gamma-radiation, both of which can induce oxidative DNA lesions, which are subject to TCR. The AOs did not potentiate the cytotoxicity of topotecan, which induces DNA strand breaks. Chemically modified () AOs (MBOs) targeting CSB were able to potentiate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin against A2780/CP70 tumor xenografts formed in nude mice. The MBOs enabled a non-toxic (3 mg/kg) dose of cisplatin to have the same degree of anti-tumor efficacy as a more toxic (5 mg/kg) cisplatin dose. Collectively, these results suggest that the CSB gene product may be viewed as an anti-cancer target. PMID:11713576

  12. Activation of human T-helper/inducer cell, T-cytotoxic/suppressor cell, B-cell, and natural killer (NK)-cells and induction of NK cell activity against K562 chronic myeloid leukemia cells with modified citrus pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Modified citrus pectin (MCP) is known for its anti-cancer effects and its ability to be absorbed and circulated in the human body. In this report we tested the ability of MCP to induce the activation of human blood lymphocyte subsets including T-helper/inducer cell, Tcytotoxic/suppres...

  13. HDAC Inhibitors as Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Cristabelle; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun

    2015-01-01

    Malignant growth of cells is a condition characterized by unchecked cellular proliferation, genetic instability and epigenetic dysregulation. Up-regulated HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) enzyme activity is associated with a closed chromatin assembly and subsequent gene repression, forming a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. Novel therapeutics are now targeting the zinc containing HDAC enzymes for treating various types of cancers. Recently, a spate of drugs acting via HDAC inhibition have been undergoing clinical trials and several patents present exciting molecules like PCI-24781 (Abexinostat), ITF- 2357 (Givinostat); MS-275 (Entinostat), MGCD 0103 (Mocetinostat), LBH-589 (Panobinostat), FK228 (Romidepsin), PXD-101 (Belinostat) and Valproic Acid to be used as alternatives or adjuvants to traditional chemotherapeutics. However, only three HDAC inhibitors have acquired FDA approval till date. Recently, PXD-101 obtained FDA approval for the treatment of Refractory or Relapsed Peripheral T cell lymphoma. The current article reviews patents that have introduced novel molecules that are HDAC isoform specific, superior to first generation HDAC inhibitors like SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) and TSA (Trichostatin A) and can be modified structurally to reduce toxic side effects and increase specificity. These molecules can combine the best characteristics of an ideal HDAC inhibiting drug either as monotherapy or in combinatorial therapy for cancer treatment thus, indicating promise to be included in the next generation of target specific HDAC inhibiting drugs.

  14. Lichen secondary metabolites in Flavocetraria cucullata exhibit anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and suppression of tumorigenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yoon, Somy; Yang, Yi; Lee, Ho-Bin; Oh, Soonok; Jeong, Min-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Yee, Sung-Tae; Crişan, Florin; Moon, Cheol; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2014-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms which produce distinct secondary metabolic products. In the present study, we tested the cytotoxic activity of 17 lichen species against several human cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer activity. We found that among 17 lichens species, F. cucullata exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity in several human cancer cells. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the acetone extract of F. cucullata contains usnic acid, salazinic acid, Squamatic acid, Baeomycesic acid, d-protolichesterinic acid, and lichesterinic acid as subcomponents. MTT assay showed that cancer cell lines were more vulnerable to the cytotoxic effects of the extract than non-cancer cell lines. Furthermore, among the identified subcomponents, usnic acid treatment had a similar cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines but with lower potency than the extract. At a lethal dose, treatment with the extract or with usnic acid greatly increased the apoptotic cell population and specifically activated the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, using sub-lethal doses, extract and usnic acid treatment decreased cancer cell motility and inhibited in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials. In these cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and phosphor-Akt, while phosphor-c-Jun and phosphor-ERK1/2 levels were only marginally affected. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of the extract is more potent than that of usnic acid alone. Taken together, F. cucullata and its subcomponent, usnic acid together with additional component, exert anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of EMT. PMID:25360754

  15. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  16. The Applications of Targeting Anti-Cancer Agents in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Yu, Yan; Zhao, Dai-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer targeting drugs appear to be a new and powerful "weapon" for cancer therapies. These targeting drugs are directed against specific molecules that are over-expressed or where certain unique factors are aberrantly expressed either in cancer cells or in diseased cell sites. Compared with traditional chemotherapeutic drugs, these targeting drugs have the advantages of high specificity, efficacy and less side effects. Target therapy is a breakthrough and revolutionary advance in the field of cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and metastasis and the mutation of tyrosine kinases is also strongly associated with cancer progression. Thus, in this review, we will discuss the advances in the development of targeting anti-cancer drugs by narrowing it down to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptors belonging to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases and angiogenic inhibitors. It will also address concerns for drug resistance and adverse events.

  17. Controlled release of an anti-cancer drug from DNA structured nano-films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Younghyun; Lee, Jong Bum; Hong, Jinkee

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the generation of systemically releasable anti-cancer drugs from multilayer nanofilms. Nanofilms designed to drug release profiles in programmable fashion are promising new and alternative way for drug delivery. For the nanofilm structure, we synthesized various unique 3-dimensional anti cancer drug incorporated DNA origami structures (hairpin, Y, and X shaped) and assembled with peptide via layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. The key to the successful application of these nanofilms requires a novel approach of the influence of DNA architecture for the drug release from functional nano-sized surface. Herein, we have taken first steps in building and controlling the drug incorporated DNA origami based multilayered nanostructure. Our finding highlights the novel and unique drug release character of LbL systems in serum condition taken full advantages of DNA origami structure. This multilayer thin film dramatically affects not only the release profiles but also the structure stability in protein rich serum condition.

  18. Viscum Album Var Hot Water Extract Mediates Anti-cancer Effects through G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest in SK-Hep1 Human Hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Joseph Flores; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lumbera, Wenchie Marie Lara; Hwang, Seong Gu

    2015-01-01

    Viscum album var (VAV) also known as mistletoe, has long been categorized as a traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In addition to its immunomodulating activities, mistletoe has also been used in the treatment of chronic hepatic disorders in China and Korea. There are numerous reports showing that VAV possesses anti-cancer effects, however influence on human hepatocarcinoma has never been elucidated. In the present study, hot water extracts of VAV was evaluated for its potential anti-cancer effect in vitro. SK-Hep1 cells were treated with VAV (50-400 ug/ml) for both 24 and 48 hours then cell viability was measured by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8). Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure the proportion of SK-Hep1 in the different stages of cell cycle. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were conducted to measure expression of cell cycle arrest related genes and proteins respectively. VAV dose dependently inhibited the proliferation of SK-Hep1 cells without any cytotoxicity with normal Chang liver cell (CCL-13). Flow cytometry analysis showed that VAV extract inhibited the cell cycle of SK-Hep1 cells via G1 phase arrest. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis both revealed that cyclin dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) and cyclin D1 gene expression were significantly down regulated while p21 was upregulated dose dependently by VAV treatment. Combined down regulation of Cdk2, Cyclin D1 and up regulation of p21 can result in cell death. These results indicate that VAV showed evidence of anti-cancer activity through G1 phase cell cycle arrest in SK-Hep1 cells. PMID:26434853

  19. Microbead analysis of cell binding to immobilized lectin. Part II: Quantitative kinetic profile assay for possible identification of anti-infectivity and anti-cancer reagents.

    PubMed

    Ghazarian, Anasheh; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2014-10-01

    There has been a re-emergence of the use of lectins in a variety of therapeutic venues. In addition lectins are often responsible for the binding of pathogens to cells and for cancer cell clumping that increases their escape from body defenses. It is important to define precisely the activity of inhibitors of lectin-binding that may be used in anti-infection and anti-cancer therapeutics. Here we describe a kinetic assay that measures the activity of saccharide inhibitors of lectin binding using a model system of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and lectin (Concanavalin A, Con A) derivatized agarose microbeads that mimics pathogen-cell binding. We show that old methods (part I of this study) used to identify inhibitor activity using only one sugar concentration at one time point can easily provide wrong information about inhibitor activity. We assess the activity of 4 concentrations of 10 saccharides at 4 different times in 400 trials and statistically evaluate the results. We show that d-melezitose is the best inhibitor of yeast binding to the lectin microbeads. These results, along with physical chemistry studies, provide a solid foundation for the development of drugs that may be useful in anti-infectivity and anti-cancer therapeutics.

  20. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Quantification of cell viability and rapid screening anti-cancer drug utilizing nanomechanical fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shangquan; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Xiarong; Liang, Xin M; Gao, Dayong; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2016-03-15

    Cancer is a serious threat to human health. Although numerous anti-cancer drugs are available clinically, many have shown toxic side effects due to poor tumor-selectivity, and reduced effectiveness due to cancers rapid development of resistance to treatment. The development of new highly efficient and practical methods to quantify cell viability and its change under drug treatment is thus of significant importance in both understanding of anti-cancer mechanism and anti-cancer drug screening. Here, we present an approach of utilizing a nanomechanical fluctuation based highly sensitive microcantilever sensor, which is capable of characterizing the viability of cells and quantitatively screening (within tens of minutes) their responses to a drug with the obvious advantages of a rapid, label-free, quantitative, noninvasive, real-time and in-situ assay. The microcantilever sensor operated in fluctuation mode was used in evaluating the paclitaxel effectiveness on breast cancer cell line MCF-7. This study demonstrated that the nanomechanical fluctuations of the microcantilever sensor are sensitive enough to detect the dynamic variation in cellular force which is provided by the cytoskeleton, using cell metabolism as its energy source, and the dynamic instability of microtubules plays an important role in the generation of the force. We propose that cell viability consists of two parts: biological viability and mechanical viability. Our experimental results suggest that paclitaxel has little effect on biological viability, but has a significant effect on mechanical viability. This new method provides a new concept and strategy for the evaluation of cell viability and the screening of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26406457

  2. Direct evidence of mitochondrial G-quadruplex DNA by using fluorescent anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Zi-Fu; Wang, Chiung-Lin; Hsu, Tsu-Ning; Li, Pei-Tzu; Chen, Chin-Tin; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lou, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2015-12-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is a promising target for anti-cancer treatment. In this paper, we provide the first evidence supporting the presence of G4 in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of live cells. The molecular engineering of a fluorescent G4 ligand, 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium) carbazole diiodide (BMVC), can change its major cellular localization from the nucleus to the mitochondria in cancer cells, while remaining primarily in the cytoplasm of normal cells. A number of BMVC derivatives with sufficient mitochondrial uptake can induce cancer cell death without damaging normal cells. Fluorescence studies of these anti-cancer agents in live cells and in isolated mitochondria from HeLa cells have demonstrated that their major target is mtDNA. In this study, we use fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to verify the existence of mtDNA G4s in live cells. Bioactivity studies indicate that interactions between these anti-cancer agents and mtDNA G4 can suppress mitochondrial gene expression. This work underlines the importance of fluorescence in the monitoring of drug-target interactions in cells and illustrates the emerging development of drugs in which mtDNA G4 is the primary target. PMID:26487635

  3. A selective ATP-competitive sphingosine kinase inhibitor demonstrates anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    Pitman, Melissa R.; Powell, Jason A.; Coolen, Carl; Moretti, Paul A.B.; Zebol, Julia R.; Pham, Duyen H.; Finnie, John W.; Don, Anthony S.; Ebert, Lisa M.; Bonder, Claudine S.; Gliddon, Briony L.; Pitson, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic balance of cellular sphingolipids, the sphingolipid rheostat, is an important determinant of cell fate, and is commonly deregulated in cancer. Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a signaling molecule with anti-apoptotic, pro-proliferative and pro-angiogenic effects, while conversely, ceramide and sphingosine are pro-apoptotic. The sphingosine kinases (SKs) are key regulators of this sphingolipid rheostat, and are attractive targets for anti-cancer therapy. Here we report a first-in-class ATP-binding site-directed small molecule SK inhibitor, MP-A08, discovered using an approach of structural homology modelling of the ATP-binding site of SK1 and in silico docking with small molecule libraries. MP-A08 is a highly selective ATP competitive SK inhibitor that targets both SK1 and SK2. MP-A08 blocks pro-proliferative signalling pathways, induces mitochondrial-associated apoptosis in a SK-dependent manner, and reduces the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma tumours in a mouse xenograft model by both inducing tumour cell apoptosis and inhibiting tumour angiogenesis. Thus, this selective ATP competitive SK inhibitor provides a promising candidate for potential development as an anti-cancer therapy, and also, due to its different mode of inhibition to other known SK inhibitors, both validates the SKs as targets for anti-cancer therapy, and represents an important experimental tool to study these enzymes. PMID:25788259

  4. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes) in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases) as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database) supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology. PMID:20015360

  5. Optimizing drug development of anti-cancer drugs in children using modelling and simulation

    PubMed Central

    van Hasselt, Johan GC; van Eijkelenburg, Natasha KA; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan HM; Huitema, Alwin DR

    2013-01-01

    Modelling and simulation (M&S)-based approaches have been proposed to support paediatric drug development in order to design and analyze clinical studies efficiently. Development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population is particularly challenging due to ethical and practical constraints. We aimed to review the application of M&S in the development of anti-cancer drugs in the paediatric population, and to identify where M&S-based approaches could provide additional support in paediatric drug development of anti-cancer drugs. A structured literature search on PubMed was performed. The majority of identified M&S-based studies aimed to use population PK modelling approaches to identify determinants of inter-individual variability, in order to optimize dosing regimens and to develop therapeutic drug monitoring strategies. Prospective applications of M&S approaches for PK-bridging studies have scarcely been reported for paediatric oncology. Based on recent developments of M&S in drug development there are several opportunities where M&S could support more informative bridging between children and adults, and increase efficiency of the design and analysis of paediatric clinical trials, which should ultimately lead to further optimization of drug treatment strategies in this population. PMID:23216601

  6. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination.

  7. Targeting IAPs as an approach to anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christopher S

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis is an essential process for embryonic and lymphocyte development, immune system modulation and tissue homeostasis. Defects in apoptotic signaling often lead to diseases of immune deficiency, neurodegeneration and cancer [1, 2]. In the cancer arena, these defects may contribute to the establishment and growth of tumors. Moreover, many cytotoxic chemotherapies act in part by activating these apoptotic networks. Occasionally apoptotic pathways are activated, however key players downstream of initiation are inhibited by negative regulators that have been dysregulated by the diseased state of the cell. Removal of these barriers to apoptosis signaling, it has been rationalized, could restore cell death in diseased cells while sparing those that are not primed for programmed cell death. Additionally, the subversion of these death evading mechanisms may re-sensitize cells that have developed resistance to chemotherapies in this manner. The importance of apoptosis as a maintenance process, and the promise that restoring this signaling could mean in treating cancer has placed many targets on the front line of oncology research. Approaches are being developed that will activate death receptor pathways, synthetically activate caspases, restore the activity of tumor suppressor genes such as p53, and counteract the effects of anti-apoptotic factors. Among these approaches, small molecules are in clinical trials against several anti-apoptotic players, namely the Bcl-2 and IAP proteins. This review will focus on the efforts being advanced against the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAP), the chemical matter of the inhibitors and the biology emerging from this research.

  8. Chemistry of potent anti-cancer compounds, amphidinolides.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, T K; Das, S

    2001-08-01

    Amphidinolides A-V represent a family of cytotoxic marine natural products with diverse structural features and pronounced biological activities. Kobayashi and his research group have been reporting over the years the discoveries of these remarkable molecules, one after another, since 1986 when the first report of the series appeared. Thanks to their perseverance and painstaking research, the family is still expanding. The unique structural features and biological activity profiles of these macrolides have obviously attracted the attention of organic chemists worldwide. The total syntheses of three members of the family, amphidinolides J, K and P, have already been achieved. This review tries to chronicle the fascinating chemistries of amphidinolides, studies on the syntheses of some of these molecules and their biological activity profiles. PMID:12678763

  9. Screening of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes for the Ginsenoside Compound K In Vitro: An Efficient Anti-Cancer Substance Originating from Panax Ginseng

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiu-Xian; Peng, Shi-Fang; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Peng, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Wei; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (CK), a rare ginsenoside originating from Panax Ginseng, has been found to possess unique pharmacological activities specifically as anti-cancers. However, the role of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in the metabolism of CK is unclear. In this study, we screened the CYPs for the metabolism of CK in vitro using human liver microsomes (HLMs) or human recombinant CYPs. The results showed that CK inhibited the enzyme activities of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 in the HLMs. The Km and Vmax values of CK were 84.20±21.92 μM and 0.28±0.04 nmol/mg protein/min, respectively, for the HLMs; 34.63±10.48 μM and 0.45±0.05 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP2C9; and 27.03±5.04 μM and 0.68±0.04 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP3A4. The IC50 values were 16.00 μM and 9.83 μM, and Ki values were 14.92 μM and 11.42μM for CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, respectively. Other human CYP isoforms, including CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP2C19, showed minimal or no effect on CK metabolism. The results suggested that CK was a substrate and also inhibitors for both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. Patients using CK in combination with therapeutic drugs that are substrates of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 for different reasons should be careful, although the inhibiting potency of CK is much poorer than that of enzyme-specific inhibitors. PMID:26845774

  10. Screening of Drug Metabolizing Enzymes for the Ginsenoside Compound K In Vitro: An Efficient Anti-Cancer Substance Originating from Panax Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian; Chen, Dan; Lin, Xiu-Xian; Peng, Shi-Fang; Xiao, Mei-Fang; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Peng, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Wei; Ouyang, Dong-Sheng; Chen, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside compound K (CK), a rare ginsenoside originating from Panax Ginseng, has been found to possess unique pharmacological activities specifically as anti-cancers. However, the role of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in the metabolism of CK is unclear. In this study, we screened the CYPs for the metabolism of CK in vitro using human liver microsomes (HLMs) or human recombinant CYPs. The results showed that CK inhibited the enzyme activities of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 in the HLMs. The Km and Vmax values of CK were 84.20±21.92 μM and 0.28±0.04 nmol/mg protein/min, respectively, for the HLMs; 34.63±10.48 μM and 0.45±0.05 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP2C9; and 27.03±5.04 μM and 0.68±0.04 nmol/nmol P450/min, respectively, for CYP3A4. The IC50 values were 16.00 μM and 9.83 μM, and Ki values were 14.92 μM and 11.42μM for CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, respectively. Other human CYP isoforms, including CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP2C19, showed minimal or no effect on CK metabolism. The results suggested that CK was a substrate and also inhibitors for both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. Patients using CK in combination with therapeutic drugs that are substrates of CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 for different reasons should be careful, although the inhibiting potency of CK is much poorer than that of enzyme-specific inhibitors.

  11. Casting light on molecular events underlying anti-cancer drug treatment: what can be seen from the proteomics point of view?

    PubMed

    Kraljevic, Sandra; Sedic, Mirela; Scott, Mike; Gehrig, Peter; Schlapbach, Ralph; Pavelic, Kresimir

    2006-12-01

    Regardless of continuous advances in technology and expansion of the knowledge in the field of genomic information, cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death in developed countries for many reasons, including non-selectiveness of commonly used anti-cancer drugs that often influence non-specific rather than tumour-specific targets. As cancer cells are characterized by the ability to divide and multiply in an uncontrolled manner whereby a set of specific proteins modulate cell division processes, proteomics seems to be a suitable tool for seeking out molecular mediators of anti-cancer drugs action and resistance, thus improving chemotherapy outcome. This review will focus on the recent knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer drugs response revealed by the proteomics tools. In addition, we will touch upon the effects of "gene drugs" with p53 and p21(waf1/cip1) genes on the protein complement of tumour cells assessed by the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry. Such studies could substantially contribute to further drug optimization prior to its clinical use and represent an important but still small step in the long way of drug discovery. However, fluctuations in protein expression, distribution, posttranslational modifications, interactions, functions and compartmentalization make it difficult to use exclusively expression proteomics data without putting it in broader biological context. Thus, the challenge today is to shift from the identification of drug response and disease biomarkers to more time-consuming process of revealing the biochemical mechanism that connects a specific protein with a disease or cellular response to a drug.

  12. Bioavailability Challenges Associated with Development of Anti-Cancer Phenolics

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Hu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Phenolics including many polyphenols and flavonoids have the potentials to become chemoprevention and chemotherapy agents. However, poor bioavailability limits their biological effects in vivo. This paper reviews the factors that affect phenolics absorption and their bioavailabilities from the points of view of their physicochemical properties and disposition in the gastrointestinal tract. The up-to-date research data suggested that solubility and metabolism are the primary reasons that limit phenolic aglycones’ bioavailability although stability and poor permeation may also contribute to the poor bioavailabilities of the glycosides. Future investigations should further optimize phenolics’ bioavailabilities and realize their chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects in vivo. PMID:20370701

  13. Curcumin AntiCancer Studies in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Leongito, Maddalena; Piccirillo, Mauro; Giudice, Aldo; Pivonello, Claudia; de Angelis, Cristina; Granata, Vincenza; Palaia, Raffaele; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. Surgical resection remains the only curative therapeutic treatment for this disease, although only the minority of patients can be resected due to late diagnosis. Systemic gemcitabine-based chemotherapy plus nab-paclitaxel are used as the gold-standard therapy for patients with advanced PC; although this treatment is associated with a better overall survival compared to the old treatment, many side effects and poor results are still present. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for treatment of advanced PC. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has anticancer effects against different types of cancer, including PC, by modulating many molecular targets. Regarding PC, in vitro studies have shown potent cytotoxic effects of curcumin on different PC cell lines including MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3. In addition, in vivo studies on PC models have shown that the anti-proliferative effects of curcumin are caused by the inhibition of oxidative stress and angiogenesis and are due to the induction of apoptosis. On the basis of these results, several researchers tested the anticancer effects of curcumin in clinical trials, trying to overcome the poor bioavailability of this agent by developing new bioavailable forms of curcumin. In this article, we review the results of pre-clinical and clinical studies on the effects of curcumin in the treatment of PC. PMID:27438851

  14. Curcumin AntiCancer Studies in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Leongito, Maddalena; Piccirillo, Mauro; Giudice, Aldo; Pivonello, Claudia; de Angelis, Cristina; Granata, Vincenza; Palaia, Raffaele; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. Surgical resection remains the only curative therapeutic treatment for this disease, although only the minority of patients can be resected due to late diagnosis. Systemic gemcitabine-based chemotherapy plus nab-paclitaxel are used as the gold-standard therapy for patients with advanced PC; although this treatment is associated with a better overall survival compared to the old treatment, many side effects and poor results are still present. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for treatment of advanced PC. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated that curcumin, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has anticancer effects against different types of cancer, including PC, by modulating many molecular targets. Regarding PC, in vitro studies have shown potent cytotoxic effects of curcumin on different PC cell lines including MiaPaCa-2, Panc-1, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3. In addition, in vivo studies on PC models have shown that the anti-proliferative effects of curcumin are caused by the inhibition of oxidative stress and angiogenesis and are due to the induction of apoptosis. On the basis of these results, several researchers tested the anticancer effects of curcumin in clinical trials, trying to overcome the poor bioavailability of this agent by developing new bioavailable forms of curcumin. In this article, we review the results of pre-clinical and clinical studies on the effects of curcumin in the treatment of PC. PMID:27438851

  15. ADAM10 as a target for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marcia L; Stoeck, Alexander; Yan, Wenbo; Dempsey, Peter J

    2008-02-01

    There is a great unmet medical need in the area of cancer treatment. A potential therapeutic target for intervention in cancer is ADAM10. ADAM10 is a disintegrin-metalloproteinase that processes membrane bound proteins from the cell surface to yield soluble forms. Pharmaceutical companies are actively seeking out inhibitors of ADAM10 for treatments in cancer as the enzyme is known to release the ErbB receptor, HER2/ErbB2 from the cell membrane, an event that is necessary for HER2 positive tumor cells to proliferate. ADAM10 is also capable of processing betacellulin indicating that an inhibitor could be used against EGFR/ErbB1 and/or HER4/ErbB4 receptor positive tumor cells that are betacellulin-dependent. ADAM10 is the principle sheddase for several other molecules associated with cancer proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration such as Notch, E-cadherin, CD44 and L1 adhesion molecule indicating that targeting ADAM10 with specific inhibitors could be beneficial.

  16. Human recombinant RNASET2: A potential anti-cancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Roiz, Levava; Smirnoff, Patricia; Lewin, Iris; Shoseyov, Oded; Schwartz, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The roles of cell motility and angiogenetic processes in metastatic spread and tumor aggressiveness are well established and must be simultaneously targeted to maximize antitumor drug potency. This work evaluated the antitumorigenic capacities of human recombinant RNASET2 (hrRNASET2), a homologue of the Aspergillus niger T2RNase ACTIBIND, which has been shown to display both antitumorigenic and antiangiogenic activities. hrRNASET2 disrupted intracellular actin filament and actin-rich extracellular extrusion organization in both CT29 colon cancer and A375SM melanoma cells and induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of A375SM cell migration. hrRNASET2 also induced full arrest of angiogenin-induced tube formation and brought to a three-fold lower relative HT29 colorectal and A375SM melanoma tumor volume, when compared to Avastin-treated animals. In parallel, mean blood vessel counts were 36.9% lower in hrRNASET2-vs. Avastin-treated mice and survival rates of hrRNASET2-treated mice were 50% at 73 days post-treatment, while the median survival time for untreated animals was 22 days. Moreover, a 60-day hrRNASET2 treatment period reduced mean A375SM lung metastasis foci counts by three-fold when compared to untreated animals. Taken together, the combined antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic capacities of hrRNASET2, seemingly arising from its direct interaction with intercellular and extracellular matrices, render it an attractive anticancer therapy candidate. PMID:27014725

  17. Encapsulation in nanoparticles improves anti-cancer efficacy of carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Prabha, Swayam

    2014-08-01

    Poor cellular uptake contributes to high dose requirement and limited therapeutic efficacy of the platinum-based anticancer drug carboplatin. Delivery systems that can improve the cellular accumulation of carboplatin will, therefore, likely improve its therapeutic potential. The objective of this study was to evaluate nanoparticles composed of the biodegradable polymer, poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide), for carboplatin delivery to tumor cells. Carboplatin-loaded nanoparticles were formulated by double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. Nanoparticles demonstrated sustained release of carboplatin over 7 days. Cellular uptake of carboplatin encapsulated in nanoparticles was several fold higher than that with free carboplatin in A549 (lung) and MA148 (ovarian) tumor cells. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that encapsulation of carboplatin in nanoparticles resulted in a remarkable reduction in the IC50 of carboplatin in several cell lines (up to 280-fold in some cells). Confocal microscopic analysis revealed the presence of carboplatin nanoparticles in several cellular compartments including lysosomes, cytoplasm, and the nucleus. These results demonstrate an enhanced cellular uptake of carboplatin through encapsulation in PLGA nanoparticles and suggest that improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced toxicity may be achieved with this approach.

  18. Surface functionalization of liposomes with proteins and carbohydrates for use in anti-cancer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Virginia M.

    Liposomes can be used to exploit the altered biology of cancer thereby increasing delivery of liposome-associated anti-cancer drugs. In this dissertation, I explore methods that utilize the unique cancer expression of the polymeric glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan (HA) and the HA receptor CD44 to target liposomes to tumors, using liposomes functionalized with proteins or oligosaccharides on their surface. To make it easier to prepare protein-functionalized liposomes, a non-covalent protein/liposome association method based upon metal chelation/his 6 interaction was devised and characterized. I evaluated non-covalent attachment of the prodrug converting enzyme yeast cytosine deaminase, the far-red fluorescent protein mKate, two antigens ovalbumin and the membrane proximal region of an HIV GAG and hyaluronidase, a HA-degrading enzyme. In Chapter 2, I describe the synthesis of hyaluronan-oligosaccharide (HA-O) lipid conjugates and their incorporation into liposomes to target CD44-overexpressing cancer cells. HA-O ligands of defined-length, up to 10 monosaccharides, were attached to lipids via various linkers by reductive amination. The HA-lipids were easily incorporated into liposomes but did not mediate binding of liposomes to CD44 overexpressing cells. In Chapter 3, I evaluate the capacity of tris-NTA-Ni-lipids incorporated within a liposome bilayer to associate with his6-tagged proteins. Tris-NTA-lipids of differing structures and avidities were used to associate yeast cytosine deaminase and mKate to the surface of liposomes. Two tris-NTA-lipids and a mono-NTA lipid associated his-tagged proteins to a 1:1 molar ratio in solution. The proteins remained active while associated with the liposome surface. When challenged in vitro with fetal calf serum, tris-NTA-containing liposomes retained his-tagged proteins longer than mono-NTA. However, the tris-NTA/his6 interaction was found to be in a dynamic state; free yeast cytosine deaminase rapidly competed with pre-bound m

  19. In vivo interaction of anti-cancer drugs with misonidazole or metronidazole: methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil and adriamycin.

    PubMed Central

    Tannock, I. F.

    1980-01-01

    I have studied the effects on growth of two tumours in mice and on host toxicity, of combining Misonidazole (MISO) or Metronidazole (METRO) with Methotrexate (MTX)-5-fluorouracil (FU) or Adriamycin (ADR). The nitroimidazoles alone had no effect on the growth of either tumour, but MISO (1 mg/g) led to a small increase in delay to regrowth of the 16/C mammary carcinoma but not the KHT fibrosarcoma, when given after X-irradiation. MTX was active only against the KHT tumour, and growth delay was not increased by the addition of MISO or METRO. FU delayed growth of both tumours, and growth delay was increased slightly by single-dose MISO. ADR was active only against the 16/C tumour, and delay to regrowth was increased by adding MISO. Host toxicity assessed by death and loss of body weight was much greater when MISO or METRO were added to MTX, and a little greater when they were added to FU. ADR plus MISO caused no deaths and no greater loss of body weight than ADR alone. The addition of MISO to treatment with anticancer drugs led to a slightly greater and more prolonged myelosuppression. METRO and MISO increase the anti-tumour effects of some anti-cancer drugs, but may also increase host toxicity. Nitroimidazoles should be used with caution in combination with chemotherapy. PMID:7459220

  20. Utilizing hydrogen sulfide as a novel anti-cancer agent by targeting cancer glycolysis and pH imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Z-W; Teo, X-Y; Tay, E Y-W; Tan, C-H; Hagen, T; Moore, P K; Deng, L-W

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many disparate studies have reported the ambiguous role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cell survival. The present study investigated the effect of H2S on the viability of cancer and non-cancer cells. Experimental Approach Cancer and non-cancer cells were exposed to H2S [using sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) and GYY4137] and cell viability was examined by crystal violet assay. We then examined cancer cellular glycolysis by in vitro enzymatic assays and pH regulator activity. Lastly, intracellular pH (pHi) was determined by ratiometric pHi measurement using BCECF staining. Key Results Continuous, but not a single, exposure to H2S decreased cell survival more effectively in cancer cells, as compared to non-cancer cells. Slow H2S-releasing donor, GYY4137, significantly increased glycolysis, leading to overproduction of lactate. H2S also decreased anion exchanger and sodium/proton exchanger activity. The combination of increased metabolic acid production and defective pH regulation resulted in an uncontrolled intracellular acidification, leading to cancer cell death. In contrast, no significant intracellular acidification or cell death was observed in non-cancer cells. Conclusions and Implications Low and continuous exposure to H2S targets metabolic processes and pH homeostasis in cancer cells, potentially serving as a novel and selective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:24827113

  1. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media.

  2. [Response of Pharmaceutical Companies to the Crisis of Post-Marketing Clinical Trials of Anti-Cancer Agents -- Results of Questionnaires to Pharmaceutical Companies].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshifusa

    2016-04-01

    Investigator-oriented post-marketing clinical trials of anti-cancer agents are faced to financial crisis due to drastic decrease in research-funds from pharmaceutical companies caused by a scandal in 2013. In order to assess the balance of research funds between 2012 and 2014, we made queries to 26 companies manufacturing anti-cancer agents, and only 10 of 26 responded to our queries. Decrease in the fund was observed in 5 of 10, no change in 1, increase in 3 and no answer in 1. Companies showed passive attitude to carry out doctor-oriented clinical trials of off-patent drugs or unapproved drugs according to advanced medical care B program, though some companies answered to proceed approved routines of these drugs if clinical trials showed good results. Most companies declined to make comments on the activity of Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), but some insisted to produce good corroboration between AMED and pharmaceutical companies in order to improve the quality of trials. Further corroboration must be necessary for this purpose among researchers, governmental administrative organs, pharmaceutical companies, patients' groups, and mass-media. PMID:27220801

  3. Transportation of Berberine into HepG2, HeLa and SY5Y Cells: A Correlation to Its Anti-Cancer Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu-Nong; Liang, Yin-Wen; Feng, Tian-Shi; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Hao; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Lei, Fan; Ding, Yi; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The anti-cancer activities of berberine (BBR) have been reported extensively in various cancer cell lines. However, the minimal inhibitory concentrations of BBR varied greatly among different cell lines and very few studies have been devoted to elucidate this aspect. In this study, we employed three cancer cell lines, HepG2, HeLa and SY5Y, to compare the transportation and distribution of BBR. HPLC results demonstrated that BBR was capable of penetrating all the cell lines whereas the cumulative concentrations were significantly different. HepG2 cells accumulated higher level of BBR for longer duration than the other two cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed the BBR binding site on P-glycoprotein 1 (P-gp). In addition, we elucidated that BBR regulated P-gp at both mRNA and protein levels. BBR induced the transcription and translation of P-gp in HeLa and SY5Y cells, whereas BBR inhibited P-gp expression in HepG2 cells. Further study showed that BBR regulates P-gp expression depending on different mechanisms (or affected by different factors) in different cell lines. To summarize, our study has revealed several mechanistic aspects of BBR regulation on P-gp in different cancer cell lines and might shed some useful insights into the use of BBR in the anti-cancer drug development. PMID:25402492

  4. Evaluation of the toxic effects of four anti-cancer drugs in plant bioassays and its potency for screening in the context of waste water reuse for irrigation.

    PubMed

    Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre; Kern, Deivid Ismael; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Anti-cancer drugs are compounds that are of high environmental relevance because of their lack of specific mode of action. They can be extremely harmful to living organisms even at low concentrations. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of four frequently used anti-cancer drugs against plant seedlings, namely Cyclophosphamide (CP), Methotrexate (MTX), 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Imatinib (IM). The phytotoxicity experiments were performed with Lactuca sativa seedlings whereas cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity investigations were performed with the well-established Allium cepa assays. MTX was the most phytotoxic compound, followed by 5-FU, CP and IM. Significant differences in the Mitotic Indexes (MI) were observed in three of the studied compounds (MTX, 5-FU and CP), indicating potential cytotoxic activity of these substances. Chromosome aberrations were registered in cells that were exposed to 5-FU, CP and IM. All the four compounds caused the formation of micronucleated cells indicating mutagenic potential. Besides, the assays performed with MTX samples presented a high number of cell apoptosis (cell death). Although it is unlikely that the pharmaceuticals concentrations measured in the environment could cause lethal effects in plants, the obtained results indicate that these compounds may affect the growth and normal development of these plants. So, both tests can constitute important tools for a fast screening of environmental contamination e.g. in the context of the reuse of treated wastewater and biosolids of agricultural purpose.

  5. Enhanced intracellular accumulation of a non-nucleoside anti-cancer agent via increased uptake of its valine ester prodrug through amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Eun-Young; Shim, Won-Sik; Chang, Ji-Eun; Chong, Saeho; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon known as multiple-drug resistance, whereby anti-cancer agents are expelled from cancer cells, makes it necessary to develop methods that will reliably increase the accumulation of anti-cancer agents within cancer cells. To accomplish this goal, a new model compound, Val-SN-38, was synthesized by introducing valine to SN-38, an active ingredient of irinotecan. Val-SN-38 improved intracellular accumulation approximately 5-fold in MCF7 cells, compared with SN-38, and rather than changes in membrane permeability, the amino acid transporter ATB(0,+) played a role, whereas the dipeptide transporter PEPT1 did not. Other sodium-dependent amino acid transporters, namely ATA1, ATA2, and ASCT2, were unexpectedly involved in the uptake of Val-SN-38 as well. The efflux of Val-SN-38 by major efflux transporters was variably changed, but not significantly. In summary, the enhanced accumulation of Val-SN-38 in cancer cells was due to augmented uptake via various amino acid transporters. The results of the present study make a compelling argument in favour of a prodrug concept that can improve intracellular accumulation and take advantage of amino acid transporters without significantly inducing multiple-drug resistance.

  6. Anti-cancer glycosidase inhibitors from natural products: a computational and molecular modelling perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashona; Mhlongo, Ndumiso; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of computational tools in pharmaceutics has proven an effectual strategy in creating harmony between the physical and chemical aspects of proteins and potential inhibitors. This is achieved by bringing to life the three dimensional retrospect of biological systems, which takes into consideration computational approaches such as quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics to facilitate drug design and discovery. In this work, we aim to provide a summary of the computational aspects of naturally derived anti-cancer inhibitors targeting the enzyme family of glycosidases. Our study offers insight into the evolution of drug discovery, molecular modelling and molecular binding modes of natural product inhibitors associated with glycosidase enzymes. PMID:25706917

  7. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  8. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James R; Koretke, Kristin K; Birkeland, Marian L; Sanseau, Philippe; Patrick, Denis R

    2004-01-01

    Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In this study, we found that

  9. An in vivo large-scale chemical screening platform using Drosophila for anti-cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Lee F.; Schlosser, Tanja; Manning, Samuel A.; Parisot, John P.; Street, Ian P.; Richardson, Helena E.; Humbert, Patrick O.; Brumby, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-cancer drug development involves enormous expenditure and risk. For rapid and economical identification of novel, bioavailable anti-tumour chemicals, the use of appropriate in vivo tumour models suitable for large-scale screening is key. Using a Drosophila Ras-driven tumour model, we demonstrate that tumour overgrowth can be curtailed by feeding larvae with chemicals that have the in vivo pharmacokinetics essential for drug development and known efficacy against human tumour cells. We then develop an in vivo 96-well plate chemical screening platform to carry out large-scale chemical screening with the tumour model. In a proof-of-principle pilot screen of 2000 compounds, we identify the glutamine analogue, acivicin, a chemical with known activity against human tumour cells, as a potent and specific inhibitor of Drosophila tumour formation. RNAi-mediated knockdown of candidate acivicin target genes implicates an enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis, CTP synthase, as a possible crucial target of acivicin-mediated inhibition. Thus, the pilot screen has revealed that Drosophila tumours are glutamine-dependent, which is an emerging feature of many human cancers, and has validated the platform as a powerful and economical tool for in vivo chemical screening. The platform can also be adapted for use with other disease models, thus offering widespread applications in drug development. PMID:22996645

  10. Nano-curcumin prepared via supercritical: Improved anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer efficacy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Zhi; Li, Gang; Chen, Yufeng; He, Xiaowen; Chen, Aizheng; Li, Jiashen; Lin, Xiaofen; Zhi, Min; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2015-12-30

    Curcumin (CM) possesses multiple biological activities. However, poor water solubility and low bioavailability limit its application in biomedical fields. CM nanoparticles (NPs) (230-240nm) were prepared by solution-enhanced dispersion via supercritical CO2 (SEDS) (22-22.5MPa pressure, 31-32.5°C temperature) and its biological functions were evaluated in this study. The Minimum inhibitory concentration of CM NPs against S. aureus (∼250μg/mL) was lower than CM-DMSO (∼500μg/mL). Meanwhile, CM NPs showed effective anti-oxidant ability at a concentration raging from 125 to 2000μg/mL. CM NPs showed time-dependent intracellular internalization ability, resulting in an enhanced anti-cancer effect on colorectal cancer cells (HCT116), and the mechanism could be explained by cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase associated with inducing apoptotic cells. Moreover, CM NPs exhibited reduced cytotoxicity on normal cells (NCM460) compared to CM-DMSO and 5-Fu. In conclusion, CM NPs prepared via SEDS showed potentials in biomedical applications.

  11. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  12. Stable polymer micelle systems as anti-cancer drug delivery carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yi

    2005-07-01

    Several temporarily stable polymer micelle systems that might be used as ultrasonic-activated drug delivery carriers were synthesized and investigated. These polymeric micelle systems were PlurogelRTM, Tetronic RTM, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n). In previous work in our lab, Pruitt et al. developed a stabilized drug carrier named PlurogelRTM [5, 6]. Unfortunately, the rate of the successful PlurogelRTM synthesis was only about 30% by simply following Pruitt's process. In this work, this rate was improved to 60% by combining the process of adding 0.15 M NaCl and/or 10 mul/ml n-butanol and by preheating the solution before polymerization. TetronicsRTM were proved not to be good candidates to form temporarily stable polymeric micelle system by polymerizing interpenetrating networks inside their micelle cores. Tetronic micelle systems treated by this process still were not stable at concentrations below their critical micelle concentration (CMC). Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine micelle-like nanoparticles were developed and characterized. When the N,N-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) was from 0.2 wt% to 0.75 wt% of the mass of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), diameters of the nanoparticles at 40°C were less than 150 nm. The cores of the nanoparticles were hydrophobic enough to sequester 1,6-diphenylhexatriene (DPH) and the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). Nanoparticles with 0.5 wt% BAC stored at room temperature in 0.002 mg/ml solutions were stable for up to two weeks. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate n) micelle systems were synthesized and characterized. The degree of polymerization of lactate side group, n, was 3 or 5. The copolymers with N-isopropylacrylamide:2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-lactate3: poly(ethylene oxide) (NIPAAm:HEMA-lactate 3:PEO) ratios of

  13. Biofortification of oilseed Brassica juncea with the anti-cancer compound glucoraphanin by suppressing GSL-ALK gene family

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Rehna; Bisht, Naveen C.

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are amino acids derived secondary metabolites, invariably present in Brassicales, which have huge health and agricultural benefits. Sulphoraphane, the breakdown product of glucosinolate glucoraphanin is known to posses anti-cancer properties. AOP (2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases) or GSL-ALK enzyme catalyzes the conversion of desirable glucoraphanin to deleterious gluconapin and progoitrin, which are present in very high amounts in most of the cultivable Brassica species including Brassica juncea. In this study we showed that B. juncea encodes four functional homologs of GSL-ALK gene and constitutive silencing of GSL-ALK homologs resulted in accumulation of glucoraphanin up to 43.11 μmoles g−1 DW in the seeds with a concomitant reduction in the anti-nutritional glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin content was found remarkably high in leaves as well as sprouts of the transgenic lines. Transcript quantification of high glucoraphanin lines confirmed significant down-regulation of GSL-ALK homologs. Growth and other seed quality parameters of the transgenic lines did not show drastic difference, compared to the untransformed control. High glucoraphanin lines also showed higher resistance towards stem rot pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Our results suggest that metabolic engineering of GSL-ALK has huge potential for enriching glucoraphanin content, and improve the oil quality and vegetable value of Brassica crops. PMID:26657321

  14. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-10-08

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner.

  15. In vitro discovery of promising anti-cancer drug combinations using iterative maximisation of a therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Kashif, M.; Andersson, C.; Hassan, S.; Karlsson, H.; Senkowski, W.; Fryknäs, M.; Nygren, P.; Larsson, R.; Gustafsson, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro-based search for promising anti-cancer drug combinations may provide important leads to improved cancer therapies. Currently there are no integrated computational-experimental methods specifically designed to search for combinations, maximizing a predefined therapeutic index (TI) defined in terms of appropriate model systems. Here, such a pipeline is presented allowing the search for optimal combinations among an arbitrary number of drugs while also taking experimental variability into account. The TI optimized is the cytotoxicity difference (in vitro) between a target model and an adverse side effect model. Focusing on colorectal carcinoma (CRC), the pipeline provided several combinations that are effective in six different CRC models with limited cytotoxicity in normal cell models. Herein we describe the identification of the combination (Trichostatin A, Afungin, 17-AAG) and present results from subsequent characterisations, including efficacy in primary cultures of tumour cells from CRC patients. We hypothesize that its effect derives from potentiation of the proteotoxic action of 17-AAG by Trichostatin A and Afungin. The discovered drug combinations against CRC are significant findings themselves and also indicate that the proposed strategy has great potential for suggesting drug combination treatments suitable for other cancer types as well as for other complex diseases. PMID:26392291

  16. Biofortification of oilseed Brassica juncea with the anti-cancer compound glucoraphanin by suppressing GSL-ALK gene family.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rehna; Bisht, Naveen C

    2015-01-01

    Glucosinolates are amino acids derived secondary metabolites, invariably present in Brassicales, which have huge health and agricultural benefits. Sulphoraphane, the breakdown product of glucosinolate glucoraphanin is known to posses anti-cancer properties. AOP (2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases) or GSL-ALK enzyme catalyzes the conversion of desirable glucoraphanin to deleterious gluconapin and progoitrin, which are present in very high amounts in most of the cultivable Brassica species including Brassica juncea. In this study we showed that B. juncea encodes four functional homologs of GSL-ALK gene and constitutive silencing of GSL-ALK homologs resulted in accumulation of glucoraphanin up to 43.11 μmoles g(-1) DW in the seeds with a concomitant reduction in the anti-nutritional glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin content was found remarkably high in leaves as well as sprouts of the transgenic lines. Transcript quantification of high glucoraphanin lines confirmed significant down-regulation of GSL-ALK homologs. Growth and other seed quality parameters of the transgenic lines did not show drastic difference, compared to the untransformed control. High glucoraphanin lines also showed higher resistance towards stem rot pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Our results suggest that metabolic engineering of GSL-ALK has huge potential for enriching glucoraphanin content, and improve the oil quality and vegetable value of Brassica crops. PMID:26657321

  17. Toward Repurposing Metformin as a Precision Anti-Cancer Therapy Using Structural Systems Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Thomas; Dider, Shihab; Han, Weiwei; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming; Xie, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, a drug prescribed to treat type-2 diabetes, exhibits anti-cancer effects in a portion of patients, but the direct molecular and genetic interactions leading to this pleiotropic effect have not yet been fully explored. To repurpose metformin as a precision anti-cancer therapy, we have developed a novel structural systems pharmacology approach to elucidate metformin’s molecular basis and genetic biomarkers of action. We integrated structural proteome-scale drug target identification with network biology analysis by combining structural genomic, functional genomic, and interactomic data. Through searching the human structural proteome, we identified twenty putative metformin binding targets and their interaction models. We experimentally verified the interactions between metformin and our top-ranked kinase targets. Notably, kinases, particularly SGK1 and EGFR were identified as key molecular targets of metformin. Subsequently, we linked these putative binding targets to genes that do not directly bind to metformin but whose expressions are altered by metformin through protein-protein interactions, and identified network biomarkers of phenotypic response of metformin. The molecular targets and the key nodes in genetic networks are largely consistent with the existing experimental evidence. Their interactions can be affected by the observed cancer mutations. This study will shed new light into repurposing metformin for safe, effective, personalized therapies. PMID:26841718

  18. Possibility as an anti-cancer drug of astemizole: Evaluation of arrhythmogenicity by the chronic atrioventricular block canine model.

    PubMed

    Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yuji; Cao, Xin; Wada, Takeshi; Ando, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    Since astemizole in an oral dose of 50 mg/kg/day was recently reported to exert anti-cancer effect in mice, we evaluated its proarrhythmic potential using the atrioventricular block dogs in order to clarify its cardiac safety profile. An oral dose of 3 mg/kg prolonged the QT interval without affecting the QTc (n = 4), whereas that of 30 mg/kg increased the short-term variability of repolarization and induced premature ventricular contractions in each animal, resulting in the onset of torsade de pointes in 1 animal (n = 4). Thus, proarrhythmic dose of astemizole would be lower than anti-cancer one, limiting its re-profiling as an anti-cancer drug. PMID:27262902

  19. Down-regulation of some miRNAs by degrading their precursors contributes to anti-cancer effect of mistletoe lectin-I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Na; Zhang, Hua-Dong; Zhi, Run; Yuan, Shou-Jun

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Mistletoe lectin-I (ML-I), the main anti-cancer component of mistletoe extracts, was originally thought to act exclusively on 28S rRNA. Here, we investigate the down-regulating effect and mechanism of CM-1, an ML-I isolated from Chinese mistletoe, on some miRNAs. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The anti-cancer effects of CM-1 were assessed in vitro and in vivo in colorectal cancer cells. The miRNAs down-regulated by CM-1 were identified by miRNA microarray assay and validated by qRT-PCR analysis. The suppression of host gene transcription or by degradation of precursors was determined by qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assays respectively. The qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the expression of their target gene and related downstream effector. Cell proliferation was assayed in stably transfected HEK-293 cells with different levels of these miRNAs. KEY RESULTS CM-1 showed prominent anti-neoplastic activity towards CLY and HT-29 cells both in vitro and in vivo. The miR-135a&b were the miRNAs most down-regulated by CM-1. Their host gene transcription was largely up-regulated, while their precursors were degraded directly by CM-1. The expression of their target gene adenomatous polyposis coli and the phosphorylation of related effector β-catenin were both significantly up-regulated. The IC50 values of CM-1 on derivative HEK-293 cells with high miR-135a&b levels were 2–4 times lower than that of control cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CM-1 down-regulated some miRNAs by degrading their precursors, which contributes to its prominent anti-cancer activity. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Rushworth, pp. 346–348 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01075.x PMID:20955366

  20. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities, and Bibliography. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.; Long, Alison T.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population matters. The document describes 15 class sessions which integrate information for sociology, anthropology, psychology, biology, animal behavior, and education. Topics include the history of human…

  1. 76 FR 10385 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation, DHS FORM 0700-01, DHS FORM 0700-02, DHS FORM 0700-03...: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition Policy...

  2. Hair cell toxicity in anti-cancer drugs: evaluating an anti-cancer drug library for independent and synergistic toxic effects on hair cells using the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshinobu; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2011-12-01

    Inner ear hair cell loss is the most common pathology seen after ototoxic drug injury. While certain drugs such as aminoglycosides and cisplatin are well-known to have dramatic ototoxic effects, it is probable that there are other drugs that cause occult degrees of hair cell loss and lesser degrees of hearing loss. Anti-cancer drugs are particularly strong candidates due to their general cytotoxicity. We have screened a library of 88 anti-cancer drugs (National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drugs Set) for drugs that damage hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line. The screen identified four out of five known ototoxic drugs. The screen also identified four out of seven suspected ototoxic drugs (drugs that have isolated case reports of patients developing hearing loss after administration). Five additional drugs with no known ototoxicity were identified as potentially novel ototoxins. Additional dose-response curves were performed to evaluate relative toxicity. Since anti-cancer drugs are often used clinically in combination, we also performed dose-response curves for a variety of anti-cancer drug combinations and demonstrated synergistic toxicity in five out of ten drug combinations that we tested. These findings support the use of the zebrafish lateral line as a screening tool to detect ototoxic effects in drugs and also suggest that ototoxicity should be considered in terms of drug regimens rather than individual drugs.

  3. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications. PMID:27334142

  4. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  5. Extracellular control of intracellular drug release for enhanced safety of anti-cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qian; Qi, Haixia; Long, Ziyan; Liu, Shang; Huang, Zhen; Zhang, Junfeng; Wang, Chunming; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The difficulty of controlling drug release at an intracellular level remains a key challenge for maximising drug safety and efficacy. We demonstrate herein a new, efficient and convenient approach to extracellularly control the intracellular release of doxorubicin (DOX), by designing a delivery system that harnesses the interactions between the system and a particular set of cellular machinery. By simply adding a small-molecule chemical into the cell medium, we could lower the release rate of DOX in the cytosol, and thereby increase its accumulation in the nuclei while decreasing its presence at mitochondria. Delivery of DOX with this system effectively prevented DOX-induced mitochondria damage that is the main mechanism of its toxicity, while exerting the maximum efficacy of this anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent. The present study sheds light on the design of drug delivery systems for extracellular control of intracellular drug delivery, with immediate therapeutic implications.

  6. Marine algal natural products with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For their various bioactivities, biomaterials derived from marine algae are important ingredients in many products, such as cosmetics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases. This mini-review comprehensively compares the bioactivities and biological functions of biomaterials from red, green, brown, and blue-green algae. The anti-oxidative effects and bioactivities of several different crude extracts of algae have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Natural products derived from marine algae protect cells by modulating the effects of oxidative stress. Because oxidative stress plays important roles in inflammatory reactions and in carcinogenesis, marine algal natural products have potential for use in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23724847

  7. The role of mesenchymal stem cells in anti-cancer drug resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Houthuijzen, J M; Daenen, L G M; Roodhart, J M L; Voest, E E

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the tumour microenvironment has a very important role in tumour progression and drug resistance. Many different cell types within the tumour stroma have an effect on tumour progression either in a positive or in a negative way. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a distinct population of cells that have been linked with tumour growth. Mesenchymal stem cells can home to tumours where they modulate the immune system and facilitate tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recent studies have shown that MSCs also have an important role in the resistance to various anti-cancer drugs. This mini-review provides an overview of the functional properties of MSCs in tumour progression and drug resistance. PMID:22596239

  8. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  9. Anti-cancer gallotannin penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose is a nanomolar inhibitor of select mammalian DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Jinhui; Pugliese, Angelo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lü, Junxuan

    2010-10-15

    Penta-1,2,3,4,6-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (PGG) has been shown by us and others to inhibit the in vivo growth of human prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts in athymic nude mice and mouse lung cancer allograft in syngenic mice without evident adverse effect on their body weight. We observed a rapid inhibition of DNA synthesis in S-phase cells in PGG-exposed cancer cells and in PGG-treated isolated nuclei. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that PGG inhibits DNA replicative synthesis through a direct inhibition of one or more DNA polymerases (pols). Using purified pols, we show that PGG exhibited a selective inhibition against the activities of B-family replicative pols (alpha, delta and epsilon) and Y-family (eta, iota and kappa) of bypass synthesis pols, and the inhibitory effect of PGG on pol alpha was the strongest with IC(50) value of 13 nM. PGG also inhibited pol beta, but the potency was an order of magnitude less than against pol alpha. PGG inhibition of pol alpha and kappa activity was non-competitive with respect to the DNA template-primer and the dNTP substrate; whereas it inhibited pol beta competitively. Docking simulation on pol beta, which is the only mammalian pol with solved crystal structure, suggests several favorable interactions with the catalytic pocket/binding site for the incoming dNTP. These results support PGG as a novel inhibitor of select families of mammalian pols by distinct mechanisms, and suggest that the potent pol inhibition may contribute to its anti-cancer efficacy.

  10. Specific repression of mutant K-RAS by 10-23 DNAzyme: Sensitizing cancer cell to anti-cancer therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.-H.; Wang, T.-H.; Au, L.-C.

    2009-01-09

    Point mutations of the Ras family are frequently found in human cancers at a prevalence rate of 30%. The most common mutation K-Ras(G12V), required for tumor proliferation, survival, and metastasis due to its constitutively active GTPase activity, has provided an ideal target for cancer therapy. 10-23 DNAzyme, an oligodeoxyribonucleotide-based ribonuclease consisting of a 15-nucleotide catalytical domain flanked by two target-specific complementary arms, has been shown to effectively cleave the target mRNA at purine-pyrimidine dinucleotide. Taking advantage of this specific property, 10-23 DNAzyme was designed to cleave mRNA of K-Ras(G12V)(GGU {yields} GUU) at the GU dinucleotide while left the wild-type (WT) K-Ras mRNA intact. The K-Ras(G12V)-specific 10-23 DNAzyme was able to reduce K-Ras(G12V) at both mRNA and protein levels in SW480 cell carrying homozygous K-Ras(G12V). No effect was observed on the WT K-Ras in HEK cells. Although K-Ras(G12V)-specific DNAzymes alone did not inhibit proliferation of SW480 or HEK cells, pre-treatment of this DNAzyme sensitized the K-Ras(G12V) mutant cells to anti-cancer agents such as doxorubicin and radiation. These results offer a potential of using allele-specific 10-23 DNAzyme in combination with other cancer therapies to achieve better effectiveness on cancer treatment.

  11. Novel epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) analogs activate AMP-activated protein kinase pathway and target cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Pamu, Sreedhar; Cui, Qiuzhi; Chan, Tak Hang; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical monitor of cellular energy status and also controls processes related to tumor development, including cell cycle progression, protein synthesis, cell growth and survival. Therefore AMPK as an anti-cancer target has received intensive attention recently. It has been reported that the anti-diabetic drug metformin and some natural compounds, such as quercetin, genistein, capsaicin and green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), can activate AMPK and inhibit cancer cell growth. Indeed, natural products have been the most productive source of leads for the development of anti-cancer drugs but perceived disadvantages, such as low bioavailability and week potency, have limited their development and use in the clinic. In this study we demonstrated that synthetic EGCG analogs 4 and 6 were more potent AMPK activators than metformin and EGCG. Activation of AMPK by these EGCG analogs resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, down-regulation of mTOR pathway, and suppression of stem cell population in human breast cancer cells. Our findings suggest that novel potent and specific AMPK activators can be discovered from natural and synthetic sources that have potential to be used for anti-cancer therapy in the clinic. PMID:22459208

  12. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer.

  13. Dr. Josef Steiner Cancer Research Prize Lecture: the role of physiological cell death in neoplastic transformation and in anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Strasser, A

    1999-05-17

    Cell death is a physiological process which is required for normal development and existence of multi-cellular organisms. Physiological cell death, or apoptosis, is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Abnormalities in this process are implicated as a cause or contributing factor in a variety of diseases. Inhibition of apoptosis can promote neoplastic transformation, particularly in combination with dysregulated cell-cycle control, and can influence the response of tumour cells to anti-cancer therapy. Molecular biological and biochemical approaches are used to find missing cell-death regulators and to define signalling cascades, while experiments in genetically modified mice will identify the essential function of these molecules. Discoveries from cell death research should provide clues for designing therapies for a variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders, auto-immunity and cancer. PMID:10225436

  14. Histone Deacetylase-3/CAGE Axis Targets EGFR Signaling and Regulates the Response to Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyuna; Kim, Youngmi; Goh, Hyeonjung; Jeoung, Dooil

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported the role of miR-326-HDAC3 loop in anti-cancer drug-resistance. CAGE, a cancer/testis antigen, regulates the response to anti-cancer drug-resistance by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-200b. Studies investigating the relationship between CAGE and HDAC3 revealed that HDAC3 negatively regulated the expression of CAGE. ChIP assays demonstrated the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences of CAGE. However, CAGE did not affect the expression of HDAC3. We also found that EGFR signaling regulated the expressions of HDAC3 and CAGE. Anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cell lines show an increased expression of pEGFRY845. HDAC3 was found to negatively regulate the expression of pEGFRY845. CAGE showed an interaction and co-localization with EGFR. It was seen that miR-326, a negative regulator of HDAC3, regulated the expression of CAGE, pEGFRY845, and the interaction between CAGE and EGFR. miR-326 inhibitor induced the binding of HDAC3 to the promoter sequences in anti-cancer drug-resistant Malme3MR cells, decreasing the tumorigenic potential of Malme3MR cells in a manner associated with its effect on the expression of HDAC3, CAGE and pEGFRY845. The down-regulation of HDAC3 enhanced the tumorigenic, angiogenic and invasion potential of the anti-cancer drug-sensitive Malme3M cells in CAGE-dependent manner. Studies revealed that PKCδ was responsible for the increased expression of pEGFRY845 and CAGE in Malme3MR cells. CAGE showed an interaction with PKCδ in Malme3MR cells. Our results show that HDAC3-CAGE axis can be employed as a target for overcoming resistance to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26883907

  15. Active seat suspension for a small vehicle: considerations for control system including observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Hiroyuki; Shiino, Hiroshi; Oshinoya, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa; Ozaki, Koichi; Ogino, Hirohiko

    2007-12-01

    We have examined the improvement of ride quality and the reduction of riding fatigue brought about by the active control of the seat suspension of small vehicles such as one-seater electric automobiles. A small active seat suspension, which is easy to install, was designed and manufactured for one-seater electric automobiles. For the actuator, a maintenance-free voice coil motor used as a direct drive was adopted. For fundamental considerations, we designed a one-degree-of-freedom model for the active seat suspension system. Then, we designed a disturbance cancellation control system that includes the observer for a two-degree-of-freedom model. In an actual driving test, a test road, in which the concavity and convexity of an actual road surface were simulated using hard rubber, was prepared and the control performance of vertical vibrations of the seat surface during driving was examined. As a result, in comparison with the one-degree-of-freedom control system, it was confirmed that the control performance was improved by the two-degree-of-freedom control system that includes the observer.

  16. A role for cytochrome b5 in the in vivo disposition of anti-cancer and cytochrome P450 probe drugs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Colin J.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Finn, Robert D.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; Kapelyukh, Yury; Wolf, C. Roland

    2014-01-01

    The role of microsomal cytochrome b5 (Cyb5) in defining the rate of drug metabolism and disposition has been intensely debated for several decades. Recently we described mouse models involving the hepatic or global deletion of Cyb5, demonstrating its central role in in vivo drug disposition. We have now used the cytochrome b5 complete null (BCN) model to determine the role of Cyb5 in the metabolism of ten pharmaceuticals metabolised by a range of cytochrome P450s, including five anti-cancer drugs, in vivo and in vitro. The extent to which metabolism was significantly affected by the absence of Cyb5 was substrate-dependent, with AUC increased (75-245%), and clearance decreased (35-72%), for phenacetin, metoprolol and chlorzoxazone. Tolbutamide disposition was not significantly altered by Cyb5 deletion, while for midazolam clearance was decreased by 66%. The absence of Cyb5 had no effect on gefitinib and paclitaxel disposition, while significant changes in the in vivo pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide were measured (Cmax and terminal half-life increased 55% and 40%, respectively), tamoxifen (AUClast and Cmax increased 370% and 233%, respectively) and anastrozole (AUC and terminal half-life increased 125% and 62%, respectively; clearance down 80%). These data from provide strong evidence that both hepatic and extra-hepatic Cyb5 levels are an important determinant of in vivo drug disposition catalysed by a range of cytochrome P450s, including currently-prescribed anti-cancer agents, and that individuality in Cyb5 expression could be a significant determinant in rates of drug disposition in man. PMID:24115751

  17. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-10-13

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent.

  18. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  19. Improved Chemotherapeutic Activity by Morus alba Fruits through Immune Response of Toll-Like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Yoon; Kim, Seon Beom; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Park, Hyun; Kim, Sung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Morus alba L. fruits have long been used in traditional medicine by many cultures. Their medicinal attributes include cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective and immunomodulatory actions. However, their mechanism of macrophage activation and anti-cancer effects remain unclear. The present study investigated the molecular mechanisms of immune stimulation and improved chemotherapeutic effect of M. alba L. fruit extract (MFE). MFE stimulated the production of cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumoricidal properties of macrophages. MFE activated macrophages through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKinase) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways downstream from toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. MFE was shown to exhibit cytotoxicity of CT26 cells via the activated macrophages, even though MFE did not directly affect CT26 cells. In a xenograft mouse model, MFE significantly enhanced anti-cancer activity combined with 5-fluorouracil and markedly promoted splenocyte proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and IFN-γ production. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody levels were significantly increased. These results indicate the indirect anti-cancer activity of MFE through improved immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling. M. alba L. fruit extract might be a potential anti-tumor immunomodulatory candidate chemotherapy agent. PMID:26473845

  20. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals.

  1. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals. PMID:24184688

  2. Production of anti-cancer triterpene (betulinic acid) from callus cultures of different Ocimum species and its elicitation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Harshita; Pandey, Pallavi; Singh, Sailendra; Gupta, Ruby; Banerjee, Suchitra

    2015-03-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic triterpenoid, is gaining unmatched attention owing to its unique anti-cancer activity with selective melanoma growth inhibition without damaging normal cells. It is also well-known for its multifaceted pharmacokinetics, entailing antibacterial, antimalarial, anti-HIV and antioxidant merits. Considering the escalating demand with diminishing bioresource of this molecule, the present study was undertaken that revealed the untapped potentials of Ocimum calli, contrasting to that in the in vitro derived leaves, as effective production alternative of BA in three out of four tested species (i.e. Ocimum basilicum, Ocimum kilimandscharicum, Ocimum sanctum excluding Ocimum grattisimum). Callus inductions were obtained in all the four species with different 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D)/α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) concentrations with kinetin. Notably, 2,4-D favoured maximum callus growth in all whereas NAA proved beneficial for the highest metabolite yield in the calli of each BA-producing species. The O. basilicum calli demonstrated the maximum growth (growth index (GI) 678.7 ± 24.47) and BA yield (2.59 ± 0.55 % dry weight [DW]), whereas those in O. kilimandscharicum (GI 533.33 ± 15.87; BA 1.87 ± 0.6 % DW) and O. sanctum (GI 448 ± 16.07; BA 0.39 ± 0.12 % DW) followed a descending order. The O. gratissimum calli revealed minimum growth (GI 159 ± 13.25) with no BA accumulation. Elicitation with methyl jasmonate at 200-μM concentration after 48-h exposure doubled the BA yield (5.10 ± 0.18 % DW) in NAA-grown O. basilicum calli compared to that in the untreated counterpart (2.61 ± 0.19 % DW), which further enthused its future application. PMID:25308098

  3. Plants as sources of airborne bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Constantinidou, H A; Barchet, W R; Upper, C D

    1982-11-01

    Vertical wind shear and concentration gradients of viable, airborne bacteria were used to calculate the upward flux of viable cells above bare soil and canopies of several crops. Concentrations at soil or canopy height varied from 46 colony-forming units per m over young corn and wet soil to 663 colony-forming units per m over dry soil and 6,500 colony-forming units per m over a closed wheat canopy. In simultaneous samples, concentrations of viable bacteria in the air 10 m inside an alfalfa field were fourfold higher than those over a field with dry, bare soil immediately upwind. The upward flux of viable bacteria over alfalfa was three- to fourfold greater than over dry soil. Concentrations of ice nucleation-active bacteria were higher over plants than over soil. Thus, plant canopies may constitute a major source of bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria, in the air.

  4. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  5. Phytochemical Analysis and Anti-cancer Investigation of Boswellia serrata Bioactive Constituents In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanaa H; Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A; Hassan, Amal Z; Kotob, Soheir E

    2015-01-01

    presence of pent-2-ene-1,4-dione, 2-methyl- levulinic acid methyl ester, 3,5- dimethyl- 1- hexane, methyl-1-methylpentadecanoate, 1,1- dimethoxy cyclohexane, 1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene and 17a-hydroxy-17a-cyano, preg-4-en-3-one. GC/MS analysis of volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin revealed the presence of sabinene (19.11%), terpinen-4-ol (14.64%) and terpinyl acetate (13.01%) as major constituents. The anti-cancer effect of two extracts (1 and 2) and four fractions (I, II, III and IV) as well as volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin on HepG2 and HCT 116 cell lines was investigated using SRB assay. Regarding HepG2 cell line, extracts 1 and 2 elicited the most pronounced cytotoxic activity with IC50 values equal 1.58 and 5.82 μg/mL at 48 h, respectively which were comparable to doxorubicin with an IC50 equal 4.68 μg/mL at 48 h. With respect to HCT 116 cells, extracts 1 and 2 exhibited the most obvious cytotoxic effect; with IC50 values equal 0.12 and 6.59 μg/mL at 48 h, respectively which were comparable to 5-fluorouracil with an IC50 equal 3.43 μg/ mL at 48 h. In conclusion, total extracts, fractions and volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin proved their usefulness as cytotoxic mediators against HepG2 and HCT 116 cell lines with different potentiality (extracts > fractions > volatile oil). In the two studied cell lines the cytotoxic acivity of each of extract 1 and 2 was comparable to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil, respectively. Extensive in vivo research is warranted to explore the precise molecular mechanisms of these bioactive natural products in cytotoxicity against HCC and CRC cells. PMID:26514509

  6. Stability and activity of alcohol dehydrogenases in W/O-microemulsions: enantioselective reduction including cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlich, B; Berger, H; Lade, M; Schomäcker, R

    2000-12-20

    Microemulsions provide an interesting alternative to classical methods for the conversion of less water-soluble substrates by alcohol dehydrogenase, but until now stability and activity were too low for economically useful processes. The activity and stability of the enzymes are dependent on the microemulsion composition, mostly the water and the surfactant concentration. Therefore, it is necessary to know the exact phase behavior of a given microemulsion reaction system and the corresponding enzyme behavior therein. Because of their economic and ecologic suitability polyethoxylated fatty alcohols were investigated concerning their phase behavior and their compatibility with enzymes in ternary mixtures. The phase behavior of Marlipal O13-60 (C13EO6 in industrial quality)/cyclohexane/water and its effect on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase from Yeast (YADH) and horse liver (HLADH) and the carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR) is presented in this study. Beside the macroscopic phase behavior of the reaction system, the viscosity of the system indicates structural changes of aggregates in the microemulsion. The changes of the enzyme activities with the composition are discussed on the basis of transitions from reverse micelles to swollen reverse micelles and finally, the transition to the phase separation. The formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii was used for the NADH-regeneration during reduction reactions. While the formate dehydrogenase did not show any kinetic effect on the microemulsion composition, the other enzymes show significant changes of activity and stability varying the water or surfactant concentration of the microemulsion. Under certain conditions, stability could be maintained with HLADH for several weeks. Successful experiments with semi-batch processes including cofactor regeneration and product separation were performed.

  7. Investigation of the biological and anti-cancer properties of ellagic acid-encapsulated nano-sized metalla-cages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhishek; Park, Dae Won; Kwon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Yong Joon; Kim, Taegeun; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2015-01-01

    Three new large hexanuclear metalla-prisms 9-11 incorporating 1,3, 5-tris(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)benzene (tpeb) 4 and one of the dinuclear arene ruthenium clips [Ru2(p-iPrC6H4Me)2(OO∩OO)][CF3SO3]2 (OO∩OO =2,5-dioxydo-1,4-benzoquinonato [dobq] 1, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinonato (donq) 2, and 6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-naphthacenedionato [dotq] 3), which encapsulate the guest molecule ellagic acid (2,3,7,8-tetrahydroxy-chromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione, 5) were prepared. All complexes were isolated as triflate salts in good yields and were fully characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The photophysical properties of these metalla-prisms were also investigated. Compounds 9 and 10 showed potent antioxidant activity, but 10 had the superior ORACPE value (1.30 ± 0.020). Ellagic acid (5) and compound 11 showed weaker activity than that of Trolox. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the metalla-prism compounds exhibit anticancer properties in vitro. Compound 10 inhibited the growth of all cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations, with the highest cytotoxicity observed against A549 human lung cancer cells (IC50 =25.9 μM). However, these compounds had a lower anti-cancer activity than that of doxorubicin. In a tumoricidal assay, ellagic acid (5) and compound 10 induced cytotoxicity in tumor cells, while doxorubicin did not. While free ellagic acid had no effect on the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted protein, the encapsulated metalla-prism 10 stimulated granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and reduced regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted protein expression in the RAW264.7 macrophage line. Our results show that ellagic acid encapsulated in metalla-prisms inhibited cancer cells via the modulation of mRNA induction and protein expression levels of the granulocyte-colony stimulating

  8. Investigation of the biological and anti-cancer properties of ellagic acid-encapsulated nano-sized metalla-cages

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Abhishek; Park, Dae Won; Kwon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Yong Joon; Kim, Taegeun; Kim, Inhye; Kang, Se Chan; Chi, Ki-Whan

    2015-01-01

    Three new large hexanuclear metalla-prisms 9–11 incorporating 1,3, 5-tris(pyridin-4-ylethynyl)benzene (tpeb) 4 and one of the dinuclear arene ruthenium clips [Ru2(p-iPrC6H4Me)2(OO∩OO)][CF3SO3]2 (OO∩OO =2,5-dioxydo-1,4-benzoquinonato [dobq] 1, 5,8-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthaquinonato (donq) 2, and 6,11-dihydroxy-5,12-naphthacenedionato [dotq] 3), which encapsulate the guest molecule ellagic acid (2,3,7,8-tetrahydroxy-chromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione, 5) were prepared. All complexes were isolated as triflate salts in good yields and were fully characterized by 1H NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The photophysical properties of these metalla-prisms were also investigated. Compounds 9 and 10 showed potent antioxidant activity, but 10 had the superior ORACPE value (1.30±0.020). Ellagic acid (5) and compound 11 showed weaker activity than that of Trolox. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that the metalla-prism compounds exhibit anticancer properties in vitro. Compound 10 inhibited the growth of all cancer cell lines at micromolar concentrations, with the highest cytotoxicity observed against A549 human lung cancer cells (IC50 =25.9 μM). However, these compounds had a lower anti-cancer activity than that of doxorubicin. In a tumoricidal assay, ellagic acid (5) and compound 10 induced cytotoxicity in tumor cells, while doxorubicin did not. While free ellagic acid had no effect on the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted protein, the encapsulated metalla-prism 10 stimulated granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and reduced regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted protein expression in the RAW264.7 macrophage line. Our results show that ellagic acid encapsulated in metalla-prisms inhibited cancer cells via the modulation of mRNA induction and protein expression levels of the granulocyte-colony stimulating

  9. H2S Donor, S-Propargyl-Cysteine, Increases CSE in SGC-7901 and Cancer-Induced Mice: Evidence for a Novel Anti-Cancer Effect of Endogenous H2S?

    PubMed Central

    MA, Kaium; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Chun-hua; Duan, Jun-Li; Tan, Benny K-H.; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2011-01-01

    Background S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC), an H2S donor, is a structural analogue of S-allycysteine (SAC). It was investigated for its potential anti-cancer effect on SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells and the possible mechanisms that may be involved. Methods and Findings SPRC treatment significantly decreased cell viability, suppressed the proliferation and migration of SPRC-7901 gastric cancer cells, was pro-apoptotic as well as caused cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase. In an in vivo study, intra-peritoneal injection of 50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg of SPRC significantly reduced tumor weights and tumor volumes of gastric cancer implants in nude mice, with a tumor growth inhibition rate of 40–75%. SPRC also induced a pro-apoptotic effect in cancer tissues and elevated the expressions of p53 and Bax in tumors and cells. SPRC treatment also increased protein expression of cystathione-γ-lyase (CSE) in cells and tumors, and elevated H2S levels in cell culture media, plasma and tumoral CSE activity of gastric cancer-induced nude mice by 2, 2.3 and 1.4 fold, respectively. Most of the anti-cancer functions of SPRC on cells and tumors were significantly suppressed by PAG, an inhibitor of CSE activity. Conclusions Taken together, the results of our study provide insights into a novel anti-cancer effect of H2S as well as of SPRC on gastric cancer through inducing the activity of a new target, CSE. PMID:21738579

  10. Anti-metastatic therapy by urinary trypsin inhibitor in combination with an anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H.; Shinohara, H.; Gotoh, J.; Fujie, M.; Fujishiro, S.; Terao, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have demonstrated that urinary trypsin inhibitor (UTI) purified from human urine is able to inhibit lung metastasis of mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells in experimental and spontaneous metastasis models. In this study, we have investigated whether UTI in combination with an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, can prevent tumour metastasis and show an enhanced therapeutic effect. Subcutaneous (s.c.) implantation of 3LL cells (1 x 10(6) cells) in the abdominal wall of C57BL/6 female mice resulted in macroscopic lung metastasis within 21 days. Microscopic lung metastasis was established by day 14 after tumour cell inoculation, and surgical treatment alone after this time resulted in no inhibition of lung metastasis. The number of lung tumour colonies in the group of mice which received surgery at day 21 was greater than in mice which had tumours left in situ (P = 0.0017). Surgical treatment on day 7, followed by UTI administration (s.c.) for 7 days, led to a decrease in lung metastasis compared with untreated animals. A significant inhibition of the formation of pulmonary metastasis was obtained with daily s.c. injections of UTI for 7 days immediately after tumour cell inoculation. UTI administration did not affect the primary tumour size at the time of operation. In addition, etoposide treatment alone led to a smaller primary tumours and yielded reduction of the formation of lung metastasis in the group of mice which received surgery at day 14 (P = 0.0026). Even in mice which received surgical treatment on day 14, followed by the combination of UTI (500 micrograms per mouse, days 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20) with etoposide (40 mg kg-1, days 14, 18 and 22), there was significant reduction of the formation of lung metastasis (P = 0.0001). Thus, the combination of an anti-metastatic agent with an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, might provide a therapeutically promising basis for anti-metastatic therapy. PMID:7577458

  11. The EMT-activator ZEB1 induces bone metastasis associated genes including BMP-inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Kerstin; Preca, Bogdan-Tiberius; Brummer, Tilman; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion, dissemination and metastasis is triggered by an aberrant activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), often mediated by the transcription factor ZEB1. Disseminating tumor cells must acquire specific features that allow them to colonize at different organ sites. Here we identify a set of genes that is highly expressed in breast cancer bone metastasis and activated by ZEB1. This gene set includes various secreted factors, e.g. the BMP-inhibitor FST, that are described to reorganize the bone microenvironment. By inactivating BMP-signaling, BMP-inhibitors are well-known to induce osteolysis in development and disease. We here demonstrate that the expression of ZEB1 and BMP-inhibitors is correlated with bone metastasis, but not with brain or lung metastasis of breast cancer patients. In addition, we show that this correlated expression pattern is causally linked, as ZEB1 induces the expression of the BMP-inhibitors NOG, FST and CHRDL1 both by directly increasing their gene transcription, as well as by indirectly suppressing their reduction via miR-200 family members. Consequently, ZEB1 stimulates BMP-inhibitor mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that ZEB1 is not only driving EMT, but also contributes to the formation of osteolytic bone metastases in breast cancer. PMID:25973542

  12. PMA-SiO2 catalyzed synthesis of indolo[2,3-c]quinolines as potent anti cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Srihari, P; Padmabhavani, B; Ramesh, S; Bharath Kumar, Y; Singh, Ashita; Ummanni, R

    2015-06-01

    PMA-SiO2 catalyzed Pictet-Spengler reaction of aryl amine linked to C-3 of the indole and the aryl aldehydes was achieved. In the series of the synthesized compounds, 6b, 10b and 12b were found to be cytotoxic against prostate, lung, breast and cervical cancer cell lines selectively with no significant effect on the growth of the control fibroblast cell line NIH3T3. Further determining their cytotoxic potential we found that 10b and 12b show cell cycle arrest in DU145 prostate cancer cells indicating a role in cell cycle progression. Both the molecules showed effect on decreased phosphorylation of NF-κB on serine 536 residue which is strongly implicated in many different types of cancers. Taken together, the series of indoloquinolines elicit potent anti-cancer potential providing a mean for developing novel indoloquinoline based anti-cancer agents. PMID:25933593

  13. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  14. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Neil Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-16

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  15. Anti-cancer evaluation of quercetin embedded PLA nanoparticles synthesized by emulsified nanoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjeev K; Patel, Dinesh K; Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga P; Maiti, Pralay; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to synthesize quercetin (Qt) embedded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (PLA-Qt) and to evaluate anti-cancer efficacy of PLA-Qt by using human breast cancer cells. PLA-Qt were synthesized by using novel emulsified nanoprecipitation technique with varying dimension of 32 ± 8 to 152 ± 9 nm of PLA-Qt with 62 ± 3% (w/w) entrapment efficiency by varying the concentration of polymer, emulsifier, drug and preparation temperature. The dimension of PLA-Qt was measured through transmission electron microscopy indicating larger particle size at higher concentration of PLA. The release rate of Qt from PLA-Qt was found to be more sustained for larger particle dimension (152 ± 9 nm) as compared to smaller particle dimension (32 ± 8 nm). Interaction between Qt and PLA was verified through spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Delayed diffusion and stronger interaction in PLA-Qt caused the sustained delivery of Qt from the polymer matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity study indicate the killing of ∼ 50% breast cancer cells in two days at 100 μg/ml of drug concentration while the ∼ 40% destruction of cells require 5 days for PLA-Qt (46 ± 6 nm; 20mg/ml of PLA). Thus our results propose anticancer efficacy of PLA-Qt nanoparticles in terms of its sustained release kinetics revealing novel vehicle for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25701491

  16. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  17. Assessment of antimicrobial (host defense) peptides as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Susan; Hoskin, David W; Hilchie, Ashley L

    2014-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial (host defense) peptides (CAPs) are able to kill microorganisms and cancer cells, leading to their consideration as novel candidate therapeutic agents in human medicine. CAPs can physically associate with anionic membrane structures, such as those found on cancer cells, causing pore formation, intracellular disturbances, and leakage of cell contents. In contrast, normal cells are less negatively-charged and are typically not susceptible to CAP-mediated cell death. Because the interaction of CAPs with cells is based on charge properties rather than cell proliferation, both rapidly dividing and quiescent cancer cells, as well as multidrug-resistant cancer cells, are targeted by CAPs, making CAPS potentially valuable as anti-cancer agents. CAPs often exist as families of peptides with slightly different amino acid sequences. In addition, libraries of synthetic peptide variants based on naturally occurring CAP templates can be generated in order to improve upon their action. High-throughput screens are needed to quickly and efficiently assess the suitability of each CAP variant. Here we present the methods for assessing CAP-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells (suspension and adherent) and untransformed cells (measured using the tritiated thymidine-release or MTT assay), and for discriminating between cell death caused by necrosis (measured using lactate dehydrogenase- or (51)Cr-release assays), or apoptosis and necrosis (single-stranded DNA content measured by flow cytometry). In addition the clonogenic assay, which assesses the ability of single transformed cells to multiply and produce colonies, is described.

  18. MicroRNAs Used in Combination with Anti-Cancer Treatments Can Enhance Therapy Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mognato, Maddalena; Celotti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a recently discovered class of small non-coding RNAs, constitute a promising approach to anti-cancer treatments when they are used in combination with other agents. MiRNAs are evolutionarily conserved non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression by binding to the complementary sequence in the 3’-untranslated region (UTR) of target genes. MiRNAs typically suppress gene expression by direct association with target transcripts, thus decreasing the expression levels of target proteins. The delivery to cells of synthetic miRNAs that mimic endogenous miRNA targeting genes involved in the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) can perturb the process, making cells more sensitive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This review examines how cells respond to combined therapy and it provides insights into the role of miRNAs in targeting the DDR repair pathway when they are used in combination with chemical compounds or ionizing radiation to enhance cellular sensitivity to treatments. PMID:26156420

  19. Structural characterization and anti-cancerous potential of gallium bioactive glass/hydrogel composites.

    PubMed

    Keenan, T J; Placek, L M; Coughlan, A; Bowers, G M; Hall, M M; Wren, A W

    2016-11-20

    A bioactive glass series (0.42SiO2-0.10Na2O-0.08CaO-(0.40-X)ZnO-(X)Ga2O3) was incorporated into carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/dextran (Dex) hydrogels in three different amounts (0.05, 0.10, and 0.25m(2)), and the resulting composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS-NMR). Composite extracts were also evaluated in vitro against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. TEM confirmed glass distribution throughout the composites, although some particle agglomeration was observed. DSC revealed that glass composition and content did have small effects on both Tg and Tm. MAS-NMR revealed that both CMC and Dex were successfully functionalized, that cross-linking occurred, and that glass addition did slightly alter bonding environments. Cell viability analysis suggested that extracts of the glass and composites with the largest Ga-content significantly decreased MG-63 osteosarcoma viability after 30days. This study successfully characterized this composite series, and demonstrated their potential for anti-cancerous applications. PMID:27561520

  20. Structural characterization and anti-cancerous potential of gallium bioactive glass/hydrogel composites.

    PubMed

    Keenan, T J; Placek, L M; Coughlan, A; Bowers, G M; Hall, M M; Wren, A W

    2016-11-20

    A bioactive glass series (0.42SiO2-0.10Na2O-0.08CaO-(0.40-X)ZnO-(X)Ga2O3) was incorporated into carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)/dextran (Dex) hydrogels in three different amounts (0.05, 0.10, and 0.25m(2)), and the resulting composites were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and (13)C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS-NMR). Composite extracts were also evaluated in vitro against MG-63 osteosarcoma cells. TEM confirmed glass distribution throughout the composites, although some particle agglomeration was observed. DSC revealed that glass composition and content did have small effects on both Tg and Tm. MAS-NMR revealed that both CMC and Dex were successfully functionalized, that cross-linking occurred, and that glass addition did slightly alter bonding environments. Cell viability analysis suggested that extracts of the glass and composites with the largest Ga-content significantly decreased MG-63 osteosarcoma viability after 30days. This study successfully characterized this composite series, and demonstrated their potential for anti-cancerous applications.

  1. Anti-cancer evaluation of quercetin embedded PLA nanoparticles synthesized by emulsified nanoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjeev K; Patel, Dinesh K; Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga P; Maiti, Pralay; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to synthesize quercetin (Qt) embedded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (PLA-Qt) and to evaluate anti-cancer efficacy of PLA-Qt by using human breast cancer cells. PLA-Qt were synthesized by using novel emulsified nanoprecipitation technique with varying dimension of 32 ± 8 to 152 ± 9 nm of PLA-Qt with 62 ± 3% (w/w) entrapment efficiency by varying the concentration of polymer, emulsifier, drug and preparation temperature. The dimension of PLA-Qt was measured through transmission electron microscopy indicating larger particle size at higher concentration of PLA. The release rate of Qt from PLA-Qt was found to be more sustained for larger particle dimension (152 ± 9 nm) as compared to smaller particle dimension (32 ± 8 nm). Interaction between Qt and PLA was verified through spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Delayed diffusion and stronger interaction in PLA-Qt caused the sustained delivery of Qt from the polymer matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity study indicate the killing of ∼ 50% breast cancer cells in two days at 100 μg/ml of drug concentration while the ∼ 40% destruction of cells require 5 days for PLA-Qt (46 ± 6 nm; 20mg/ml of PLA). Thus our results propose anticancer efficacy of PLA-Qt nanoparticles in terms of its sustained release kinetics revealing novel vehicle for the treatment of cancer.

  2. Colorectal carcinoma: Importance of colonic environment for anti-cancer response and systemic immunity.

    PubMed

    Vannucci, Luca; Stepankova, Renata; Grobarova, Valeria; Kozakova, Hana; Rossmann, Pavel; Klimesova, Klara; Benson, Veronika; Sima, Petr; Fiserova, Anna; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2009-12-01

    The intestinal environment is considered to play an important role both in colorectal tumor development and in the evolution and modulation of mucosal immunity. Studies in animals reared in germ-free (GF, without any intestinal microflora) versus conventional (CV, with regular microflora in bowel) conditions can aid in clarifying the influence of bacteria on carcinogenesis and anti-cancer immune responses in situ. The lower incidence of colon cancers and better immunological parameters in GF animals versus CV ones after chemically-induced carcinogenesis raises questions about specific characteristics of the immunological networks in each respective condition. Different levels of tolerance/regulatory mechanisms in the GF versus CV animals may influence the development of immune responses not only at the level of mucosal, but also at the systemic, immunity. We hypothesize that GF animals can better recognize and respond to evolving neoplasias in the bowel as a consequence of their less-tolerogenic immunity (i.e., due to their more limited exposure to antigens to become tolerated against at the intestinal level). In this paper, we review the role of bacteria in modulating gut environment and mucosal immunity, their importance in cancer development, and aspects of immune regulation (both at local and systemic level) that can be modified by bacterial microflora. Lastly, the use of GF animals in comparison with conventionally-raised animals is proposed as a suitable and potent model for understanding the inflammatory network and its effect on cancer immunity especially during colorectal cancer development.

  3. Spectral and structural studies of the anti-cancer drug Flutamide by density functional theoretical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, G.; Sundaraganesan, N.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive screening of the more recent DFT theoretical approach to structural analysis is presented in this section of theoretical structural analysis. The chemical name of 2-methyl-N-[4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-propanamide is usually called as Flutamide (In the present study it is abbreviated as FLT) and is an important and efficacious drug in the treatment of anti-cancer resistant. The molecular geometry, vibrational spectra, electronic and NMR spectral interpretation of Flutamide have been studied with the aid of density functional theory method (DFT). The vibrational assignments of the normal modes were performed on the basis of the PED calculations using the VEDA 4 program. Comparison of computational results with X-ray diffraction results of Flutamide allowed the evaluation of structure predictions and confirmed B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as accurate for structure determination. Application of scaling factors for IR and Raman frequency predictions showed good agreement with experimental values. This is supported the assignment of the major contributors of the vibration modes of the title compound. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions leading to its bioactivity, charge delocalization have been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. NMR chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The comparison of measured FTIR, FT-Raman, and UV-Visible data to calculated values allowed assignment of major spectral features of the title molecule. Besides, Frontier molecular orbital analyze was also investigated using theoretical calculations.

  4. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  5. Reducing Both Pgp Overexpression and Drug Efflux with Anti-Cancer Gold-Paclitaxel Nanoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Zhou, Xiaofei; Zhou, Hongyu; Jia, Jianbo; Li, Liwen; Zhai, Shumei; Yan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administrations of anti-cancer drugs to patients often induce drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (Pgp) facilitates an efficient drug efflux, preventing cellular accumulation of drugs and causing multi-drug resistance (MDR). In this study, we developed a gold-paclitaxel nanoconjugate system to overcome MDR. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were conjugated with β-cyclodextrin enclosing paclitaxel (PTX) molecules and PEG molecules. GNP conjugates were effectively endocytosed by both drug-sensitive human lung cancer H460 cells and Pgp-overexpressed drug-resistant H460PTX cells. Compared with PTX, PGNPs did not induce the Pgp overexpression in drug-sensitive H460 cells after long-term treatment and also avoided being pumped out of cells by overexpressed Pgp molecules in H460PTX with a 17-fold lower EC50 compared to PTX. Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry further confirmed that fluorescent labeled PGNPs (f-PGNPs) maintained a high cellular PTX level in both H460 and H460PTX cells. These results demonstrated that nano-drug conjugates were able to avoid the development of drug resistance in sensitive cells and evade Pgp-mediated drug resistance and to maintain a high cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cancer cells. These findings exemplify a powerful nanotechnological approach to the long-lasting issue of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance. PMID:27467397

  6. Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography of Response to Anti-cancer Therapy in a Xenograft Tumor Model.

    PubMed

    Chamming's, Foucauld; Le-Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Fitoussi, Victor; Redheuil, Alban; Assayag, Franck; Pidial, Laetitia; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Cuénod, Charles-André; Fournier, Laure S

    2016-04-01

    Our objective was to determine if supersonic shear wave elastography (SSWE) can detect changes in stiffness of a breast cancer model under therapy. A human invasive carcinoma was implanted in 22 mice. Eleven were treated with an anti-angiogenic therapy and 11 with glucose for 24 d. Tumor volume and stiffness were assessed during 2 wk before treatment and 0, 7, 12, 20 and 24 d after the start of therapy using SSWE. Pathology was assessed after 12 and 24 d of treatment. We found that response to therapy was associated with early softening of treated tumors only, resulting in a significant difference from non-treated tumors after 12 d of treatment (p = 0.03). On pathology, large areas of necrosis were observed at 12 d in treated tumors. Although treatment was still effective, treated tumors subsequently stiffened during a second phase of the treatment (days 12-24), with a small amount of necrosis observed on pathology on day 24. In conclusion, SSWE was able to measure changes in the stiffness of tumors in response to anti-cancer treatment. However, stiffness changes associated with good response to treatment may change over time, and increased stiffness may also reflect therapy efficacy. PMID:26746382

  7. Silica Nanospheres: Hollow Structure Improved Anti-Cancer Immunity of Mesoporous Silica Nanospheres In Vivo (Small 26/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Ito, Atsuo; Yoshiyuki, Kazuko; Sogo, Yu; Watanabe, Yohei; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuji, Noriko M

    2016-07-01

    Hollow and non-hollow mesoporous silica nanospheres are synthesized and used for cancer vaccine adjuvants by X. Wang, A. Ito, N. M. Tsuji, and co-workers on page 3510. The hollow structure of mesoporous silica nanospheres significantly promotes cellular uptake of a model cancer antigen by macrophage-like cells in vitro, improves anti-cancer immunity, and increases CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations in splenocytes of mice in vivo. PMID:27383037

  8. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  9. Active control of environmental noise, VIII: increasing the response to primary source changes including unpredictable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Atmoko, H.; Vuksanovic, B.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional adaptive cancellation systems using traditional transverse finite impulse response (FIR) filters, together with least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithms, well known in active noise control, are slow to adapt to primary source changes. This makes them inappropriate for cancelling rapidly changing noise, including unpredictable noise such as speech and music. Secondly, the cancelling structures require considerable computational processing effort to adapt to primary source and plant changes, particularly for multi-channel systems. This paper describes methods to increase the adaptive speed to primary source changes in large enclosed spaces and outdoor environments. A method is described that increases the response to time varying periodic noise using traditional transverse FIR filters. Here a multi-passband filter, with individual variable adaptive step sizes for each passband is automatically adjusted according to the signal level in each band. This creates a similar adaptive response for all frequencies within the total pass-band, irrespective of amplitude, minimizing the signal distortion and increasing the combined adaptive speed. Unfortunately, there is a limit to the adaptive speed using the above method as classical transverse FIR filters have a finite adaptive speed given by the stability band zero bandwidth. For rapidly changing periodic noise and unpredictable non-stationary noise, a rapid to instantaneous response is required. In this case the on-line adaptive FIR filters are dispensed with and replaced by a time domain solution that gives virtually instantaneous cancellation response (infinite adaptive speed) to primary source changes, and is computationally efficient.

  10. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  11. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  12. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  13. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  14. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  15. Synthesis and antitumor activity of a series of osmium(VI) nitrido complexes bearing quinolinolato ligands.

    PubMed

    Tang, Quan; Ni, Wen-Xiu; Leung, Chi-Fai; Man, Wai-Lun; Lau, Kenneth King-Kwan; Liang, Yimin; Lam, Yun-Wah; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Peng, Shie-Ming; Liu, Gui-Jian; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2013-11-01

    A series of osmium(VI) nitrido complexes supported by quinolinolato ligands have been prepared and they exhibit promising in vitro anti-cancer activities. These results establish that Os(VI)≡N is a potentially versatile and promising platform for the design of a variety of high-valent anti-cancer drugs.

  16. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Huong Le, Mai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Quang Duong, Tuan; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Tran, Dai Lam; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50-100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa).

  17. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Huong Le, Mai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Quang Duong, Tuan; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Tran, Dai Lam; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50–100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa).

  18. Synthesis, structural investigations, and anti-cancer activity of new methyl indole-3-carboxylate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemyjska, Maria; Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Truszkowski, Paweł

    2012-10-01

    Two new methyl indole-3-carboxylate derivatives: methyl 1-(3'-indolylmethane)-indole-3-carboxylate (1), and methyl 1-(1'-benzenosulfonyl-3'-indolylmethane)-indole-3-carboxylate (2) were synthesized. They are interesting as the analogs of 3,3'-diindolylmethane, which is intensively tested as a potent antitumor agent. Their solid-state structure was characterized using 13C CP/MAS NMR or X-ray diffraction measurements. Molecular modeling was used as a help in the structure elucidation. The solid-state NMR spectroscopy showed only one stable conformer of 1, but the X-ray diffraction results indicate that compound 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with two molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. Both compounds inhibited the growth of melanoma, renal and breast cancers cell lines.

  19. Increasing anti-cancer activity with longer tether lengths of group 9 Cp* complexes.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Stephanie J; Lord, Rianne M; Basri, Aida M; Allison, Simon J; Phillips, Roger M; Blacker, A John; McGowan, Patrick C

    2016-04-28

    Here in, we report the cytotoxicity of both rhodium and iridium functionalised Cp* analogues of the [Cp*MCl2]2 dimers. The functionalised dimers contain a hydroxy tethered arm of differing carbon length. These show promising IC50 values when tested against HT-29, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis human cancer cell lines, with the cytotoxicity improving proportionally with an increase in carbon tether length of the Cp* ring. The most promising results are seen for the 14-carbon Cp* tethered rhodium () and iridium () complexes, which show up to a 24-fold increase in IC50 compared to the unfunctionalised [Cp*MCl2]2 dimer. All complexes were potent inhibitors of purified thioredoxin reductase suggesting that disruption of cellular anti-oxidant function is one potential mechanism of action.

  20. Inhibition on Proteasome β1 Subunit Might Contribute to the Anti-Cancer Effects of Fangchinoline in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-Xing; Liu, Miao; Hu, Li-Hong; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Qu, Xiao-Bo; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Fangchinoline is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae S. Moore. Fangchinoline and its structure analogue, tetrandrine, exhibited direct binding affinity with recombinant human proteasome β1 subunit and also inhibited its activity in vitro. In cultured prostate PC-3 cells and LnCap cells, fangchinoline could dose-dependently inhibit cell proliferation and caspase-like activity of cellular proteasome which was mediated by proteasome β1 subunit. The inhibitive effect of fangchinoline on caspase-like activity of proteasome was also observed in purified human erythrocyte 20S proteasome. In PC-3 cells, fangchinoline induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. Treatment of PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice with fangchinoline inhibited tumor growth, induced apoptosis and also caused decrease in proteasome activities in tumor xenografts. Dose-dependent and time-dependent accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and important proteasome substrates such as p27, Bax and IκB-α were observed in fangchinoline-treated cells. Over-expression of proteasome β1 subunit by plasmid transfection increased sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxicity of fangchinoline while knockdown of proteasome β1 subunit ameliorated cytotoxicity of fangchinoline in PC-3 cells. Results of the present study suggested that proteasome inhibition was involved in the anti-cancer effects of fangchinoline. Fangchinoline and its structure analogues might be new natural proteasome inhibitors targeting β1 subunit. PMID:26512898

  1. Inhibition on Proteasome β1 Subunit Might Contribute to the Anti-Cancer Effects of Fangchinoline in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Lu, Yu; Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-Xing; Liu, Miao; Hu, Li-Hong; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Qu, Xiao-Bo; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Fangchinoline is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae S. Moore. Fangchinoline and its structure analogue, tetrandrine, exhibited direct binding affinity with recombinant human proteasome β1 subunit and also inhibited its activity in vitro. In cultured prostate PC-3 cells and LnCap cells, fangchinoline could dose-dependently inhibit cell proliferation and caspase-like activity of cellular proteasome which was mediated by proteasome β1 subunit. The inhibitive effect of fangchinoline on caspase-like activity of proteasome was also observed in purified human erythrocyte 20S proteasome. In PC-3 cells, fangchinoline induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. Treatment of PC-3 tumor-bearing nude mice with fangchinoline inhibited tumor growth, induced apoptosis and also caused decrease in proteasome activities in tumor xenografts. Dose-dependent and time-dependent accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and important proteasome substrates such as p27, Bax and IκB-α were observed in fangchinoline-treated cells. Over-expression of proteasome β1 subunit by plasmid transfection increased sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxicity of fangchinoline while knockdown of proteasome β1 subunit ameliorated cytotoxicity of fangchinoline in PC-3 cells. Results of the present study suggested that proteasome inhibition was involved in the anti-cancer effects of fangchinoline. Fangchinoline and its structure analogues might be new natural proteasome inhibitors targeting β1 subunit. PMID:26512898

  2. Using Assistive Technology Adaptations To Include Students with Learning Disabilities in Cooperative Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a process for integrating technology adaptations for students with learning disabilities into cooperative-learning activities in terms of three components: (1) selecting adaptations; (2) monitoring use of adaptations during cooperative-learning activities; and (3) evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. Barriers to and support systems…

  3. An inverse docking approach for identifying new potential anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Grinter, Sam Z; Liang, Yayun; Huang, Sheng-You; Hyder, Salman M; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2011-04-01

    Inverse docking is a relatively new technique that has been used to identify potential receptor targets of small molecules. Our docking software package MDock is well suited for such an application as it is both computationally efficient, yet simultaneously shows adequate results in binding affinity predictions and enrichment tests. As a validation study, we present the first stage results of an inverse-docking study which seeks to identify potential direct targets of PRIMA-1. PRIMA-1 is well known for its ability to restore mutant p53's tumor suppressor function, leading to apoptosis in several types of cancer cells. For this reason, we believe that potential direct targets of PRIMA-1 identified in silico should be experimentally screened for their ability to inhibit cancer cell growth. The highest-ranked human protein of our PRIMA-1 docking results is oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), which is part of the cholesterol synthetic pathway. The results of two followup experiments which treat OSC as a possible anti-cancer target are promising. We show that both PRIMA-1 and Ro 48-8071, a known potent OSC inhibitor, significantly reduce the viability of BT-474 and T47-D breast cancer cells relative to normal mammary cells. In addition, like PRIMA-1, we find that Ro 48-8071 results in increased binding of p53 to DNA in BT-474 cells (which express mutant p53). For the first time, Ro 48-8071 is shown as a potent agent in killing human breast cancer cells. The potential of OSC as a new target for developing anticancer therapies is worth further investigation.

  4. Loading of Gemcitabine on chitosan magnetic nanoparticles increases the anti-cancer efficacy of the drug.

    PubMed

    Parsian, Maryam; Unsoy, Gozde; Mutlu, Pelin; Yalcin, Serap; Tezcaner, Aysen; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2016-08-01

    Targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs increase the efficacy, while decreasing adverse effects. Among various delivery systems, chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CsMNPs) gained attention with their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity and targetability under magnetic field. This study aimed to increase the cellular uptake and efficacy of Gemcitabine. CsMNPs were synthesized by in situ co-precipitation and Gemcitabine was loaded onto the nanoparticles. Nanoparticle characterization was performed by TEM, FTIR, XPS, and zeta potential. Gemcitabine release and stability was analyzed. The cellular uptake was shown. Cytotoxicity of free-Gemcitabine and Gem-CsMNPs were examined on SKBR and MCF-7 breast cancer cells by XTT assay. Gemcitabine loading was optimized as 30µM by spectrophotometric analyses. Drug release was highest (65%) at pH 4.2, while it was 8% at pH 7.2. This is a desired release characteristic since pH of tumor-tissue and endosomes are acidic, while the blood-stream and healthy-tissues are neutral. Peaks reflecting the presence of Gemcitabine were observed in FTIR and XPS. At neutral pH, zeta potential increased after Gemcitabine loading. TEM images displayed, Gem-CsMNPs were 4nm with uniform size-distribution and have spherical shape. The cellular uptake and targetability of CsMNPs was studied on MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. IC50 value of Gem-CsMNPs was 1.4 fold and 2.6 fold lower than free-Gem on SKBR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines respectively, indicating the increased efficacy of Gemcitabine when loaded onto nanoparticles. Targetability by magnetic field, stability, size distribution, cellular uptake and toxicity characteristics of CsMNPs in this study provides a useful targeted delivery system for Gemcitabine in cancer therapy. PMID:27181067

  5. miR-326-histone deacetylase-3 feedback loop regulates the invasion and tumorigenic and angiogenic response to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Kim, Hyuna; Park, Hyunmi; Park, Deokbum; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2014-10-01

    Histone modification is known to be associated with multidrug resistance phenotypes. Cancer cell lines that are resistant or have been made resistant to anti-cancer drugs showed lower expression levels of histone deacetylase-3 (HDAC3), among the histone deacetylase(s), than cancer cell lines that were sensitive to anti-cancer drugs. Celastrol and Taxol decreased the expression of HDAC3 in cancer cell lines sensitive to anti-cancer drugs. HDAC3 negatively regulated the invasion, migration, and anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. HDAC3 conferred sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. TargetScan analysis predicted miR-326 as a negative regulator of HDAC3. ChIP assays and luciferase assays showed a negative feedback loop between HDAC3 and miR-326. miR-326 decreased the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs, and the miR-326 inhibitor increased the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs. miR-326 enhanced the invasion and migration potential of cancer cells. The miR-326 inhibitor negatively regulated the tumorigenic, metastatic, and angiogenic potential of anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cells. HDAC3 showed a positive feedback loop with miRNAs such as miR-200b, miR-217, and miR-335. miR-200b, miR-217, and miR-335 negatively regulated the expression of miR-326 and the invasion and migration potential of cancer cells while enhancing the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs. TargetScan analysis predicted miR-200b and miR-217 as negative regulators of cancer-associated gene, a cancer/testis antigen, which is known to regulate the response to anti-cancer drugs. HDAC3 and miR-326 acted upstream of the cancer-associated gene. Thus, we show that the miR-326-HDAC3 feedback loop can be employed as a target for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  6. Survivin knockdown increased anti-cancer effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Md. Motarab; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2012-08-01

    network formation ability of cells was significantly inhibited by survivin silencing and completely by combination of survivin silencing and EGCG treatment. Collectively, survivin silencing potentiated anti-cancer effects of EGCG in human malignant neuroblastoma cells having survivin overexpression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG controlled growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin knockdown induced neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination therapy inhibited invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis as well. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So, combination therapy showed multiple anti-cancer mechanisms in neuroblastoma.

  7. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  8. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values. PMID:23082579

  9. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values.

  10. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  11. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  12. Inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway by the curcumin analog, 3,5-Bis(2-pyridinylmethylidene)-4-piperidone (EF31): anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Anlys; Moore, Terry W.; Hu, Fang; Brown, Andrew P.; Sun, Aiming; Liotta, Dennis C.; Snyder, James P.; Yoon, Younghyoun; Shim, Hyunsuk; Marcus, Adam I.; Miller, Andrew H.; Pace, Thaddeus W. W.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a key signaling molecule in the elaboration of the inflammatory response. Data indicate that curcumin, a natural ingredient of the curry spice turmeric, acts as a NF-κB inhibitor and exhibits both anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Curcumin analogues with enhanced activity on the NF-κB and other inflammatory signaling pathways have been developed including the synthetic monoketone compound termed 3,5-Bis(2-fluorobenzylidene)-4-piperidone (EF24). 3,5-Bis(2-pyridinylmethylidene)-4-piperidone (EF31) is a structurally-related curcumin analogue whose potency for NF-κB inhibition has yet to be determined. To examine the activity of EF31 compared to EF24 and curcumin, mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with EF31, EF24, curcumin (1–100µM) or vehicle (DMSO 1%) for 1 hour. NF-κB pathway activity was assessed following treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1µg/mL). EF31 (IC50 ~5µM) exhibited significantly more potent inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB DNA binding compared to both EF24 (IC50~35µM) and curcumin (IC50 >50µM). In addition, EF31 exhibited significantly greater inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation as well as the induction of downstream inflammatory mediators including pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA and protein (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6). Regarding the mechanism of these effects on NF-κB activity, EF31 (IC50~1.92µM) exhibited significantly greater inhibition of IκB kinase β compared to EF24 (IC50~131µM). Finally, EF31 demonstrated potent toxicity in NF-κB-dependent cancer cell lines while having minimal and reversible toxicity in RAW264.7 macrophages. These data indicate that EF31 is a more potent inhibitor of NF-κB activity than either EF24 or curcumin while exhibiting both anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. Thus, EF31 represents a promising curcumin analogue for further therapeutic development. PMID:22197802

  13. Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education: Modifying Net/Wall Games to Include Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Luciana; Tracy, Julia F.; Taliaferro, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of students with disabilities in higher education settings has presented challenges for instructors with regards to appropriate inclusion. Concerning physical activity courses in higher education, instructors may not have the knowledge or resources to make modifications and accommodations that will ultimately result in…

  14. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test.

  15. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Methods: Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA…

  16. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population concerns. Designed to educate general college audiences, it is also intended for use as a preservice course for teachers. In addition, the course can be modified for high school students. The course…

  17. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  18. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  19. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  20. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  1. Backyards and Butterflies: Ways to Include Children with Disabilities in Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Doreen; And Others

    This sourcebook is designed for children, parents, and families, detailing ideas for outdoor play and learning activities, with emphasis on involving children with disabilities in outdoor play. A rural perspective permeates the guide, although each chapter contains ideas for making outdoor environments more accessible and safer for all children,…

  2. Beyond Right or Wrong: Challenges of Including Creative Design Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore challenges encountered by K-12 educators in establishing classroom cultures that support creative learning activities with the Scratch programming language. Providing opportunities for students to understand and to build capacities for creative work was described by many of the teachers that we interviewed as a central…

  3. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  4. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... relations purposes, including E-commerce (mail ordering through the Internet): Provided, That Credit-Back...-Back is requested. (e) The following requirements shall apply to Credit-Back for all promotional... and Canada, paragraph (e)(5) of this section shall also apply. (2) The clear and evident purpose...

  5. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Carlson, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially unique set of clinical characteristics compared with other aminoglycosides. This study assessed the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of plazomicin against 15 clinical isolates as well as three reference strains representing Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis. These data were compared with those obtained for six other aminoglycosides and two aminocyclitols. Plazomicin and gentamicin were the only drugs demonstrating bactericidal activity towards two of the three Brucella spp., whilst plazomicin was the only drug exhibiting bactericidal activity against B. suis. This is the first study to assess the bactericidal nature of plazomicin against Brucella spp. in vitro. PMID:25459738

  6. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP.

  7. Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) is involved in the anti-cancer mechanism of dovitinib in human multiple myeloma IM-9 cells.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae Jung; Lee, Yura; Bae, Kyoung Jun; Byun, Byung Jin; Kim, Soon Ae; Kim, Jiyeon

    2016-07-01

    Traf2- and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK) is a member of the germinal center kinase family. TNIK was first identified as a kinase that is involved in regulating cytoskeletal organization in many types of cells, and it was recently proposed as a novel therapeutic target in several types of human cancers. Although previous studies suggest that TNIK plays a pivotal role in cancer cell survival and prognosis, its function in hematological cancer cell survival has not been investigated. Here we investigated the relationship between TNIK function and cell viability in multiple myeloma IM-9 cells using TNIK small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection and dovitinib treatment. Treatment of IM-9 cells with TNIK siRNA and dovitinib treatment reduced cell proliferation. The ATP competing kinase assay and western blot analysis showed that dovitinib strongly inhibited both the interaction of TNIK with ATP (K i, 13 nM) and the activation of Wnt signaling effectors such as β-catenin and TCF4. Dovitinib also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in IM-9 cells without significant cytotoxicity in PBMCs. Our results provide new evidence that TNIK may be involved in the proliferation of multiple myeloma IM-9 cells and in the anti-cancer activity of dovitinib via inhibition of the endogenous Wnt signaling pathway.

  8. Screening the yeast genome for energetic metabolism pathways involved in a phenotypic response to the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Paweł; Jurkiewicz, Paweł; Cal-Bąkowska, Magdalena; Ko, Young H.; Pedersen, Peter L.; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    In this study the detailed characteristic of the anti-cancer agent 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model is described, with the emphasis on its influence on energetic metabolism of the cell. It shows that 3-BP toxicity in yeast is strain-dependent and influenced by the glucose-repression system. Its toxic effect is mainly due to the rapid depletion of intracellular ATP. Moreover, lack of the Whi2p phosphatase results in strongly increased sensitivity of yeast cells to 3-BP, possibly due to the non-functional system of mitophagy of damaged mitochondria through the Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway. Single deletions of genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers result in multiple effects after 3-BP treatment. However, it can be concluded that activity of the pentose phosphate pathway is necessary to prevent the toxicity of 3-BP, probably due to the fact that large amounts of NADPH are produced by this pathway, ensuring the reducing force needed for glutathione reduction, crucial to cope with the oxidative stress. Moreover, single deletions of genes encoding the TCA cycle enzymes and mitochondrial carriers generally cause sensitivity to 3-BP, while totally inactive mitochondrial respiration in the rho0 mutant resulted in increased resistance to 3-BP. PMID:26862728

  9. Functional characterization and anti-cancer action of the clinical phase II cardiac Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor istaroxime: in vitro and in vivo properties and cross talk with the membrane androgen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alevizopoulos, Konstantinos; Dimas, Konstantinos; Papadopoulou, Natalia; Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Tsapara, Anna; Alkahtani, Saad; Honisch, Sabina; Prousis, Kyriakos C.; Alarifi, Saud; Calogeropoulou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    Sodium potassium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase) is a validated pharmacological target for the treatment of various cardiac conditions. Recent published data with Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors suggest a potent anti-cancer action of these agents in multiple indications. In the present study, we focus on istaroxime, a Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor that has shown favorable safety and efficacy properties in cardiac phase II clinical trials. Our experiments in 22 cancer cell lines and in prostate tumors in vivo proved the strong anti-cancer action of this compound. Istaroxime induced apoptosis, affected the key proliferative and apoptotic mediators c-Myc and caspase-3 and modified actin cystoskeleton dynamics and RhoA activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, istaroxime was capable of binding to mAR, a membrane receptor mediating rapid, non-genomic actions of steroids in prostate and other cells. These results support a multi-level action of Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitors in cancer cells and collectively validate istaroxime as a strong re-purposing candidate for further cancer drug development. PMID:27027435

  10. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  11. Phytophthora infestans Has a Plethora of Phospholipase D Enzymes Including a Subclass That Has Extracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Harold J. G.; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  12. Phytophthora infestans has a plethora of phospholipase D enzymes including a subclass that has extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  13. DNA strand breaks induced by nuclear hijacking of neuronal NOS as an anti-cancer effect of 2-methoxyestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Gorska, Magdalena; Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Zmijewski, Michal; Gammazza, Antonella Marino; Cappello, Francesco; Wnuk, Maciej; Gorzynik, Monika; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Daca, Agnieszka; Lewinska, Anna; Wozniak, Michal

    2015-01-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2-ME) is a physiological metabolite of 17β-estradiol. At pharmacological concentrations, 2-ME inhibits colon, breast and lung cancer in tumor models. Here we investigated the effect of physiologically relevant concentrations of 2-ME in osteosarcoma cell model. We demonstrated that 2-ME increased nuclear localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, resulting in nitro-oxidative DNA damage. This in turn caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells. We suggest that 2-ME is a naturally occurring hormone with potential anti-cancer properties. PMID:25972363

  14. LGR5 expressing cells of hair follicle as potential targets for antibody mediated anti-cancer laser therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Boris V.

    2013-02-01

    Near infrared laser immunotherapy becomes now a new promising research field to cure the patients with cancers. One of the critical limitation in medical application of this treatment is availability of the specific markers for delivery of laser-sensitive nanoparticles. When coupled to antibodies to the cancer stem cells markers these nanoparticles may be delivered to the cancer tissue and mediate the laser induced thermolysis of the cancer stem cells that initiate and drive growth of cancer. This paper addresses the Lgr5 cell surface marker mediating the Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction as a potential target for anti-cancer laser immunotherapy of skin cancers.

  15. Development of an Optimized Protocol for NMR Metabolomics Studies of Human Colon Cancer Cell Lines and First Insight from Testing of the Protocol Using DNA G-Quadruplex Ligands as Novel Anti-Cancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lauri, Ilaria; Savorani, Francesco; Iaccarino, Nunzia; Zizza, Pasquale; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Novellino, Ettore; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Randazzo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The study of cell lines by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy metabolomics represents a powerful tool to understand how the local metabolism and biochemical pathways are influenced by external or internal stimuli. In particular, the use of adherent mammalian cells is emerging in the metabolomics field in order to understand the molecular mechanism of disease progression or, for example, the cellular response to drug treatments. Hereto metabolomics investigations for this kind of cells have generally been limited to mass spectrometry studies. This study proposes an optimized protocol for the analysis of the endo-metabolome of human colon cancer cells (HCT116) by NMR. The protocol includes experimental conditions such as washing, quenching and extraction. In order to test the proposed protocol, it was applied to an exploratory study of cancer cells with and without treatment by anti-cancer drugs, such as DNA G-quadruplex binders and Adriamycin (a traditional anti-cancer drug). The exploratory NMR metabolomics analysis resulted in NMR assignment of all endo-metabolites that could be detected and provided preliminary insights about the biological behavior of the drugs tested. PMID:26784246

  16. A Methodology for Post Operational Clean Out of a Highly Active Facility Including Solids Behaviour - 12386

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Michael J.; Ward, Tracy R.; Maxwell, Lisa J.

    2012-07-01

    The Highly Active Liquor Evaporation and Storage (HALES) plant at Sellafield handles acidic fission product containing liquor with typical activities of the order of 18x10{sup 9} Bq/ml. A strategy experimental feedback approach has been used to establish a wash regime for the Post Operational Clean Out (POCO) of the oldest storage tanks for this liquor. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for removal of acid insoluble fission product precipitates. Ammonium carbamate and sodium carbonate yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. The proposed wash reagents provide dissolution of caesium phosphomolybdate (CPM) and zirconium molybdate (ZM) solid phases but yields a fine, mobile precipitate of metal carbonates from the Highly Active Liquor (HAL) supernate. Addition of nitric acid to the wash effluent can cause CPM to precipitate where there is sufficient caesium and phosphorous available. Where they are not present (from ZM dissolution) the nitric acid addition initially produces a nitrate precipitate which then re-dissolves, along with the metal carbonates, to give a solid-free solution. The different behaviour of the two solids during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing the rheology of ZM sediments through doping with tellurium or particular organic acids. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for the POCO of HALES Oldside HASTs. AC and SC both yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. However, the different behaviour of the two principle HAL solids, CPM and ZM, during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing its rheology through doping with tellurium or certain

  17. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  18. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  19. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  20. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X.; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipids are well known for their membrane forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  1. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth.

  2. Modeling the development of biofilm density including active bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Laspidou, Chrysi S; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    We present the unified multi-component cellular automaton (UMCCA) model, which predicts quantitatively the development of the biofilm's composite density for three biofilm components: active bacteria, inert or dead biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances. The model also describes the concentrations of three soluble organic components (soluble substrate and two types of soluble microbial products) and oxygen. The UMCCA model is a hybrid discrete-differential mathematical model and introduces the novel feature of biofilm consolidation. Our hypothesis is that the fluid over the biofilm creates pressures and vibrations that cause the biofilm to consolidate, or pack itself to a higher density over time. Each biofilm compartment in the model output consolidates to a different degree that depends on the age of its biomass. The UMCCA model also adds a cellular automaton algorithm that identifies the path of least resistance and directly moves excess biomass along that path, thereby ensuring that the excess biomass is distributed efficiently. A companion paper illustrates the trends that the UMCCA model is able to represent and shows a comparison with experimental results. PMID:15276752

  3. Ozone control of biological activity during Earth's history, including the KT catastrophe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    There have been brief periods since the beginning of the Cambrian some 600 m.y. ago when mass extinctions destroyed a significant fraction of living species. The most widely studied of these events is the catastrophe at the KT boundary that ended the long dominance of the dinosaurs. In addition to mass extinctions, there is another profound discontinuity in the history of Earth's biota, the explosion of life at the end of the Precambrian era which is an episode that is not explained well at all. For some 3 b.y. before the Cambrian, life had been present on Earth, but maintained a low level of activity which is an aspect of the biota that is puzzling, especially during the last two-thirds of that period. During the last 2 b.y. before the Cambrian, conditions at the Earth's surface were suitable for a burgeoning of the biota, according to most criteria: the oceans neither boiled nor were fozen solid during this time, and the atmosphere contained sufficient O for the development of animals. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that mass extinctions and the lackluster behavior of the Precambrian biota share a common cause: an inadequate amount of ozone in the atmosphere.

  4. Radio Properties of Low Redshift Broad Line Active Galactic Nuclei Including Multiple Component Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafter, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the radio properties of a low redshift (z < 0.35) sample of 8434 broad line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey after correlating the optical sources with radio sources in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey. We find that 10% of our sample has radio emission < 4" away from the optical counterpart (core-only sources), and 1% has significant extended emission that must be taken into account when calculating the total radio luminosity (multi-component sources). Association of the extended radio emission is established by the proximity to the optical source, physical connection of jets and lobes, or large scale symmetry like in classic FRIIs. From these data we find an FRI/FRII luminosity dividing line like that found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974), where we use our core-only sources as proxies for FRIs, and our multi-component sources for the FRIIs. We find a bimodal distribution for the radio loudness (R = L(radio)/L(opt)) where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the multi-component extended sources, compared with no evidence for bimodality when just the core-only sources are used. We also find that a log(R) value of 1.75 is well suited to separate the FRIs from the FRIIs, and that the R bimodality seen here is really a manifestation of the FRI/FRII break originally found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974). We find modest trends in the radio loud fraction as a function of Eddington ratio and black hole mass, where the fraction of RL AGNs decreases with increasing Eddington ratio, and increases when the black hole mass is above 2 x 108 solar masses.

  5. 1H NMR detection of mobile lipids as a marker for apoptosis: The case of anti-cancer drug-loaded liposomes and polymeric micelles

    PubMed Central

    Musacchio, T.; Toniutti, M.; Kautz, R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    2009-01-01

    Cultured cancer cells undergoing apoptosis show an increase in the NMR signal at a chemical shift of 1.3 ppm (-CH2-) corresponding to the so-called “mobile lipids” (ML) originating from the mobile acyl chains in triacylglycerides. A single NMR spectrum can provide an overview of the cellular metabolic changes caused by anticancer drugs providing qualitative and quantitative information on cellular metabolites. With this in mind, we studied the appearance of ML resonance in BT-20 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells after their exposure to paclitaxel-loaded liposomes and polymeric micelles as a method to follow the apoptotic activity initiated by drug-loaded pharmaceutical nanocarriers. BT-20 and MCF-7 cells were incubated with 1.5 μg/mL paclitaxel–loaded liposomes or micelles for 24, 48 and 72 hrs in DMEM medium. Empty liposomes and micelles and untreated cells were used as controls. The progression of apoptosis induced in cancer cells by drug-loaded nanocarriers was readily detectable by NMR with a markedly increased area of the ML peak at 1.3 ppm. The presence of liposome- and micelle-forming materials did not induce or interfere with the increase in ML signals. Thus, the use of NMR for the detection of ML as a marker of apoptosis can be successfully applied to the study of pharmacological effects of anti-cancer drugs loaded into pharmaceutical nanocarriers. PMID:19737025

  6. Preparation and characterization of some gold nanometric compounds with simple organic materials as precursor: Spectroscopic, biological and anti-cancer assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta, Aly H.; El-Shenawy, Ahmed I.; Refat, Moamen S.; Elsabawy, Khaled M.

    2013-05-01

    This study reports the synthesis of the gold nano-particles assembly mediated by some amino acids, such as ornithine (Orn), isoleucine (i-Leu), serine (Ser) and histidine (His). The structural characterization of [Au2(AA)2(Cl)2]2+Cl2 (where AA = Orn, i-Leu, Ser and His) compounds were done by using elemental analysis, molar conductance, FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) spectroscopy. It has been found from the elemental analysis, spectroscopic and the thermal studies that the amino acids ligand behaves as bidentate ligand forming chelates with 1:1 (metal:ligand) stoichiometry. The molar conductance measurements of the complexes in DMSO indicate that the complexes are electrolyte. The thermal decomposition mechanisms were discussed for compounds Orn, i-Leu, Ser and His and occurred in two consecutive steps. The TG curves of the gold(III) compounds suggest the loss of the ligands (Orn, i-Leu, Ser and His) within two steps, with probable formation of a gold free metal. The biological and anti-cancer activities (Breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7-cell line) of the nano-sized complexes have also been studied.

  7. Gentio-oligosaccharides from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 dextransucrase as prebiotics and as a supplement for functional foods with anti-cancer properties.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Damini; Goyal, Arun

    2015-02-01

    Gentio-oligosaccharides (GnOS) were synthesized by the acceptor reaction of dextransucrase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL B-1426 with gentiobiose and sucrose. GnOS were purified by gel permeation chromatography using a Bio-Gel P-2 column and identified by mass spectrometry. The purified GnOS (degree of polymerization ≥3) were investigated for their in vitro prebiotic and cytotoxic activity. GnOS exhibited a significantly lower degree of digestibility of 18.1% by simulated human gastric juice (pH 1.0) and 7.1% by human α-amylase (pH 7.0) after 6 h, whereas inulin, a standard prebiotic, showed 39.7% and 12.8% of digestibility, respectively. The prebiotic score showed that GnOS significantly supported the growth of probiotics such as Bifidobacterium infantis and Lactobacillus acidophilus and was comparable to that of inulin. The selective inhibitory effect of GnOS on human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cells revealed its potential as an anti-cancer agent that can serve as a functional food additive for the benefit of human health. PMID:25524369

  8. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  9. Nano-mechanical Phenotype as a Promising Biomarker to Evaluate Cancer Development, Progression, and Anti-cancer Drug Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeun

    2016-06-01

    Since various bio-mechanical assays have been introduced for studying mechanical properties of biological samples, much progress has been made in cancer biology. It has been noted that enhanced mechanical deformability can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis. The relation between mechanical compliances and the metastatic potential of cancer cells has been suggested to be a promising prognostic marker. Although it is yet to be conclusive about its clinical application due to the complexity in the tissue integrity, the nano-mechanical compliance of human cell samples has been evaluated by several groups as a promising marker in diagnosing cancer development and anticipating its progression. In this review, we address the mechanical properties of diverse cancer cells obtained by atomic force microscopy-based indentation experiments and reiterate prognostic relations between the nano-mechanical compliance and cancer progression. We also review the nano-mechanical responses of cancer cells to the anti-cancer drug treatment in order to interrogate a possible use of nano-mechanical compliance as a means to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs.

  10. Nano-mechanical Phenotype as a Promising Biomarker to Evaluate Cancer Development, Progression, and Anti-cancer Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeun

    2016-01-01

    Since various bio-mechanical assays have been introduced for studying mechanical properties of biological samples, much progress has been made in cancer biology. It has been noted that enhanced mechanical deformability can be used as a marker for cancer diagnosis. The relation between mechanical compliances and the metastatic potential of cancer cells has been suggested to be a promising prognostic marker. Although it is yet to be conclusive about its clinical application due to the complexity in the tissue integrity, the nano-mechanical compliance of human cell samples has been evaluated by several groups as a promising marker in diagnosing cancer development and anticipating its progression. In this review, we address the mechanical properties of diverse cancer cells obtained by atomic force microscopy-based indentation experiments and reiterate prognostic relations between the nano-mechanical compliance and cancer progression. We also review the nano-mechanical responses of cancer cells to the anti-cancer drug treatment in order to interrogate a possible use of nano-mechanical compliance as a means to evaluate the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:27390735

  11. Technology whitespaces India should focus: a comparative anti-cancer patent rational analysis of Indian and international public funded universities.

    PubMed

    Dara, Ajay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2015-01-01

    The article reported an in-depth comparative technology analysis of 1708 Anti-cancer patents from top 20 international universities and leading 10 Indian public funded organization and research institutes. The study segregated pioneer universities vs. technologies used in the field of Anticancer research at a level of drug discovery, development, diagnosis and treatment, which are illustrated in the form of novel substantive patent landscape maps. The reported competitive intelligent maps identified genetics, composition and synthetic compounds as dominating technologies; followed by natural extracts, combination and drug delivery systems as upcoming technologies. The least number of patents were reported by surgical apparatus, targeted therapy and animal models. In addition, the study analysed the key technologies followed by Indian universities in comparison to the international universities, to identify the overlooked technologies by the Indian public funded institutes. In an ever changing competitive world, it is essential for every university to have their own research plan and thrust areas; but at the same time, it is equally important for any organisation to have an idea of their competitor's research plan as well. So, the article suggested Indian institutes to focus on the latest emerging Anti-cancer technology trends, which are in practice by the international universities. Concurrently, this study may be a landmark indication for Indian public funded universities and institutes, calling for a U-turn from their traditional approaches.

  12. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending…

  13. Development of an oregano-based ointment with anti-microbial activity including activity against methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Eng, William; Norman, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance has prompted a search for new compounds with anti-microbial activity. In the authors' previous study, oregano extract was identified as one of the most potent anti-microbial compounds. The disk diffusion method was employed to assess the degree of inhibition against various microorganisms, and the bacteriostatic or bactericidal mechanism of action. Disk diffusion studies showed that oregano was found to be bacteriostatic for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, (MRSA) but bacteriocidal for seven other microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa could not be inhibited by oregano. An ointment consisting of 1-10% oregano could inhibit most organisms except for Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris, which required 20% and Pseudomonas which could not be inhibited even at the highest concentration of 80%. Oregano extracts can be formulated into an ointment that shows broad antimicrobial activity. Additional testing to assess tissue toxicity and other adverse reactions would be needed prior to human testing.

  14. In Vitro Characterization of the Pharmacological Properties of the Anti-Cancer Chelator, Bp4eT, and Its Phase I Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Potůčková, Eliška; Roh, Jaroslav; Macháček, Miloslav; Sahni, Sumit; Stariat, Ján; Šesták, Vít; Jansová, Hana; Hašková, Pavlína; Jirkovská, Anna; Vávrová, Kateřina; Kovaříková, Petra; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.; Šimůnek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have a high iron requirement and many experimental studies, as well as clinical trials, have demonstrated that iron chelators are potential anti-cancer agents. The ligand, 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT), demonstrates both potent anti-neoplastic and anti-retroviral properties. In this study, Bp4eT and its recently identified amidrazone and semicarbazone metabolites were examined and compared with respect to their anti-proliferative activity towards cancer cells (HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia, MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma, HCT116 human colon carcinoma and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma), non-cancerous cells (H9c2 neonatal rat-derived cardiomyoblasts and 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts) and their interaction with intracellular iron pools. Bp4eT was demonstrated to be a highly potent and selective anti-neoplastic agent that induces S phase cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Both semicarbazone and amidrazone metabolites showed at least a 300-fold decrease in cytotoxic activity than Bp4eT towards both cancer and normal cell lines. The metabolites also lost the ability to: (1) promote the redox cycling of iron; (2) bind and mobilize iron from labile intracellular pools; and (3) prevent 59Fe uptake from 59Fe-labeled transferrin by MCF-7 cells. Hence, this study demonstrates that the highly active ligand, Bp4eT, is metabolized to non-toxic and pharmacologically inactive analogs, which most likely contribute to its favorable pharmacological profile. These findings are important for the further development of this drug candidate and contribute to the understanding of the structure-activity relationships of these agents. PMID:26460540

  15. In Vitro Characterization of the Pharmacological Properties of the Anti-Cancer Chelator, Bp4eT, and Its Phase I Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Potůčková, Eliška; Roh, Jaroslav; Macháček, Miloslav; Sahni, Sumit; Stariat, Ján; Šesták, Vít; Jansová, Hana; Hašková, Pavlína; Jirkovská, Anna; Vávrová, Kateřina; Kovaříková, Petra; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Richardson, Des R; Šimůnek, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells have a high iron requirement and many experimental studies, as well as clinical trials, have demonstrated that iron chelators are potential anti-cancer agents. The ligand, 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT), demonstrates both potent anti-neoplastic and anti-retroviral properties. In this study, Bp4eT and its recently identified amidrazone and semicarbazone metabolites were examined and compared with respect to their anti-proliferative activity towards cancer cells (HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia, MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma, HCT116 human colon carcinoma and A549 human lung adenocarcinoma), non-cancerous cells (H9c2 neonatal rat-derived cardiomyoblasts and 3T3 mouse embryo fibroblasts) and their interaction with intracellular iron pools. Bp4eT was demonstrated to be a highly potent and selective anti-neoplastic agent that induces S phase cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial depolarization and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Both semicarbazone and amidrazone metabolites showed at least a 300-fold decrease in cytotoxic activity than Bp4eT towards both cancer and normal cell lines. The metabolites also lost the ability to: (1) promote the redox cycling of iron; (2) bind and mobilize iron from labile intracellular pools; and (3) prevent 59Fe uptake from 59Fe-labeled transferrin by MCF-7 cells. Hence, this study demonstrates that the highly active ligand, Bp4eT, is metabolized to non-toxic and pharmacologically inactive analogs, which most likely contribute to its favorable pharmacological profile. These findings are important for the further development of this drug candidate and contribute to the understanding of the structure-activity relationships of these agents. PMID:26460540

  16. Anti-Cancer Effect of Lambertianic Acid by Inhibiting the AR in LNCaP Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Eun-Ok; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Lambertianic acid (LA) is known to have anti-allergic and antibacterial effects. However, the anticancer activities and mechanism of action of LA have not been investigated. Therefore, the anticancer effects and mechanism of LA are investigated in this study. LA decreased not only AR protein levels, but also cellular and secretory levels of PSA. Furthermore, LA inhibited nuclear translocation of the AR induced by mibolerone. LA suppressed cell proliferation by inducing G1 arrest, downregulating CDK4/6 and cyclin D1 and activating p53 and its downstream molecules, p21 and p27. LA induced apoptosis and the expression of related proteins, including cleaved caspase-9 and -3, c-PARP and BAX, and inhibited BCl-2. The role of AR in LA-induced apoptosis was assessed by using siRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that LA exerts the anticancer effect by inhibiting AR and is a valuable therapeutic agent in prostate cancer treatment. PMID:27399684

  17. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  18. Potential roles of longan flower and seed extracts for anti-cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Cheng; Chung, Yuan-Chiang; Hsu, Chih-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenol-rich plants are known to possess benefits to human health. Recent studies have revealed that many Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) are rich sources of polyphenols and exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and these TCMs have been shown experimentally to overcome some chronic diseases, including cancer. Longan flowers and seeds, two TCMs traditionally used for relieving pain and urinary diseases, have been revealed in our recent reports and other studies to possess rich amounts of polyphenolic species and exhibit strong anti-oxidant activity, and these could be applied for the treatment of diabetes and cancer. Herein, we review the recent findings regarding the benefits of these two TCMs in the treatment of human cancer and the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of both substances. PMID:24520538

  19. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  20. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  1. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  2. Anti-cancer effect of metformin by suppressing signaling pathway of HER2 and HER3 in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyoung; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Chungyeul; Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Aeree

    2016-05-01

    Development of new therapeutic strategies is becoming increasingly important to overcome tamoxifen resistance. Recently, much interest has been focused on anti-tumor effects of metformin commonly used to treat type II diabetes. Increased protein expression and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family is a possible mechanism involved in tamoxifen resistance. Since HER2/HER3 heterodimers are able to induce strong downstream signaling and activate various biological responses such as cellular proliferation and growth, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of metformin by inhibition of signaling pathway via downregulation of HER2 and HER3 using tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (TR MCF-7) cells. Compared to MCF-7 cells, TR MCF-7 cells showed increased expression of EGFR, HER2, and HER3, and metformin inhibited the expression of these proteins in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Metformin inhibited activation of HER2 (Tyr1248)/HER3 (Tyr1289)/Akt (Ser473) as well as cell proliferation and colony formation by estrogenic promotion in MCF-7 and TR MCF-7 cells. Known as a HER3 ligand, heregulin (HRG)-β1-induced phosphorylation of HER2, HER3 and Akt, and protein interaction of HER2/HER3 and colony formation were inhibited by metformin in both cells. Consistent with the results in the two cell lines, we identified that metformin inhibited HER2/HER3/Akt signaling axis activated by HRG-β1 using the HER2 and HER3-overexpressing breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. Lastly, lapatinib-induced HER3 upregulation was significantly inhibited by treatment of metformin in HER3 siRNA-transfected TR MCF-7 cells. These data suggest that metformin might overcome tamoxifen resistance through the inhibition of expression and signaling of receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 and HER3. PMID:26581908

  3. Anti-cancer effect of metformin by suppressing signaling pathway of HER2 and HER3 in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyoung; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Chungyeul; Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Aeree

    2016-05-01

    Development of new therapeutic strategies is becoming increasingly important to overcome tamoxifen resistance. Recently, much interest has been focused on anti-tumor effects of metformin commonly used to treat type II diabetes. Increased protein expression and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family is a possible mechanism involved in tamoxifen resistance. Since HER2/HER3 heterodimers are able to induce strong downstream signaling and activate various biological responses such as cellular proliferation and growth, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of metformin by inhibition of signaling pathway via downregulation of HER2 and HER3 using tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 (TR MCF-7) cells. Compared to MCF-7 cells, TR MCF-7 cells showed increased expression of EGFR, HER2, and HER3, and metformin inhibited the expression of these proteins in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Metformin inhibited activation of HER2 (Tyr1248)/HER3 (Tyr1289)/Akt (Ser473) as well as cell proliferation and colony formation by estrogenic promotion in MCF-7 and TR MCF-7 cells. Known as a HER3 ligand, heregulin (HRG)-β1-induced phosphorylation of HER2, HER3 and Akt, and protein interaction of HER2/HER3 and colony formation were inhibited by metformin in both cells. Consistent with the results in the two cell lines, we identified that metformin inhibited HER2/HER3/Akt signaling axis activated by HRG-β1 using the HER2 and HER3-overexpressing breast cancer cell line SK-BR-3. Lastly, lapatinib-induced HER3 upregulation was significantly inhibited by treatment of metformin in HER3 siRNA-transfected TR MCF-7 cells. These data suggest that metformin might overcome tamoxifen resistance through the inhibition of expression and signaling of receptor tyrosine kinase HER2 and HER3.

  4. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  5. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  6. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  7. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  8. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  9. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  10. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  11. The anti-cancer agent guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane: Ensuing energetic and oxidative stress implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L.; Tudella, Valeria G.

    2011-06-15

    Guttiferone-A (GA) is a natural occurring polyisoprenylated benzophenone with cytotoxic action in vitro and anti-tumor action in rodent models. We addressed a potential involvement of mitochondria in GA toxicity (1-25 {mu}M) toward cancer cells by employing both hepatic carcinoma (HepG2) cells and succinate-energized mitochondria, isolated from rat liver. In HepG2 cells GA decreased viability, dissipated mitochondrial membrane potential, depleted ATP and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In isolated rat-liver mitochondria GA promoted membrane fluidity increase, cyclosporine A/EGTA-insensitive membrane permeabilization, uncoupling (membrane potential dissipation/state 4 respiration rate increase), Ca{sup 2+} efflux, ATP depletion, NAD(P)H depletion/oxidation and ROS levels increase. All effects in cells, except mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, as well as NADPH depletion/oxidation and permeabilization in isolated mitochondria, were partly prevented by the a NAD(P)H regenerating substrate isocitrate. The results suggest the following sequence of events: 1) GA interaction with mitochondrial membrane promoting its permeabilization; 2) mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation; 3) NAD(P)H oxidation/depletion due to inability of membrane potential-sensitive NADP{sup +} transhydrogenase of sustaining its reduced state; 4) ROS accumulation inside mitochondria and cells; 5) additional mitochondrial membrane permeabilization due to ROS; and 6) ATP depletion. These GA actions are potentially implicated in the well-documented anti-cancer property of GA/structure related compounds. - Graphical abstract: Guttiferone-A permeabilizes mitochondrial membrane and induces cancer cell death Display Omitted Highlights: > We addressed the involvement of mitochondria in guttiferone (GA) toxicity toward cancer cells. > GA promoted membrane permeabilization, membrane potential dissipation, NAD(P)H depletion, ROS accumulation and ATP depletion. > These actions

  12. Development of LSPR and SPR sensor for the detection of an anti-cancer drug for chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Sandy Shuo; Bolduc, Olivier R.; Colin, Damien Y.; Pelletier, Joelle N.; Masson, Jean-François

    2012-03-01

    The anti-cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) as a strong inhibitor of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) has been studied in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) competitive binding assays with folic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles (FA AuNP). The latter with a diameter of 15 nm were prepared in a simple step with sequential characterization using UV-Vis, FTIR, and Raman. A LSPR competitive binding assay between different concentrations of MTX and FA AuNP for hDHFR in solution was designed to quantify MTX by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Sensitivity of the assay was optimized with respect to both concentrations of the enzyme and FA. The detection and quantification of spiked MTX was demonstrated in phosphate buffer saline and in fetal bovine serum accompanied by solid-phase extraction treatment of the serum. In addition, this assay could also provide as a screening tool for potential inhibitors of hDHFR. In another perspective, MTX was measured in a competitive binding assay with FA AuNP for histidine-tagged hDHFR immobilized on a SPR sensitive surface. In this case, FA AuNP offer a secondary amplification of the analytical response which is indirectly proportional to the concentration of MTX. This alternative approach could contribute to the realization of direct detection of MTX in complex biological fluids. A comparison of characteristics and analytical parameters such as sensitivity, dynamic range and limit of detection between the LSPR and SPR sensing platforms will also be presented. Both assays offer potential in tackling real biological samples for the purpose of monitoring and validating anti-cancer drug levels in human serum during chemotherapy.

  13. Optimization of Aqueous Biphasic Tumor Spheroid Microtechnology for Anti-Cancer Drug Testing in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Atefi, Ehsan; Luker, Gary D.; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are three-dimensional clusters of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics of poorly perfused tumors and hence present a relevant model for testing the efficacy of anti-cancer compounds. The use of spheroids for drug screening is hindered by technological complexities for high throughput generation of consistent size spheroids individually addressable by drug compounds. Here we present and optimize a simple spheroid technology based on the use of an aqueous two-phase system. Cancer cells confined in a drop of the denser aqueous dextran phase are robotically dispensed into a microwell containing the immersion aqueous polyethylene glycol phase. Cells remain within the drop and form a viable spheroid, without a need for any external stimuli. The size of resulting spheroids is sensitive to volume variations of dispensed drops from the air displacement pipetting head of a commercial liquid handling robot. Therefore, we parametrically optimize the process of dispensing of dextran phase drops. For a given cell density, this optimization reproducibly generates consistent size spheroids in standard 96-well plates. In addition, we evaluate the use of a commercial biochemical assay to examine cellular viability of cancer cell spheroids. Spheroids show a dose-dependent response to cisplatin similar to a monolayer culture. However unlike their two-dimensional counterpart, spheroids exhibit resistance to paclitaxel treatment. This technology, which uses only commercially-available reagents and equipment, can potentially expedite anti-cancer drug discovery. Although the use of robotics makes the ATPS spheroid technology particularly useful for drug screening applications, this approach is compatible with simpler liquid handling techniques such as manual micropipetting and offers a straightforward method of 3D cell culture in research laboratories. PMID:25221631

  14. Inhibition of Pediatric Glioblastoma Tumor Growth by the Anti-Cancer Agent OKN-007 in Orthotopic Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho de Souza, Patricia; Mallory, Samantha; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Li, Xiao-Nan; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Fung, Kar-Ming; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas (pGBM), although rare, are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, with tumors essentially refractory to existing treatments. Here, we describe the use of conventional and advanced in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess a novel orthotopic xenograft pGBM mouse (IC-3752GBM patient-derived culture) model, and to monitor the effects of the anti-cancer agent OKN-007 as an inhibitor of pGBM tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry support data is also presented for cell proliferation and tumor growth signaling. OKN-007 was found to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.05) and increase animal survival (p<0.05) in all OKN-007-treated mice compared to untreated animals. In a responsive cohort of treated animals, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease tumor volumes (p<0.0001), increase survival (p<0.001), and increase diffusion (p<0.01) and perfusion rates (p<0.05). OKN-007 also significantly reduced lipid tumor metabolism in responsive animals [(Lip1.3 and Lip0.9)-to-creatine ratio (p<0.05)], as well as significantly decrease tumor cell proliferation (p<0.05) and microvessel density (p<0.05). Furthermore, in relationship to the PDGFRα pathway, OKN-007 was able to significantly decrease SULF2 (p<0.05) and PDGFR-α (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α) (p<0.05) immunoexpression, and significantly increase decorin expression (p<0.05) in responsive mice. This study indicates that OKN-007 may be an effective anti-cancer agent for some patients with pGBMs by inhibiting cell proliferation and angiogenesis, possibly via the PDGFRα pathway, and could be considered as an additional therapy for pediatric brain tumor patients. PMID:26248280

  15. [Anti-cancer properties epigallocatechin-gallate contained in green tea].

    PubMed

    Donejko, Magdalena; Niczyporuk, Marek; Galicka, Elżbieta; Przylipiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-16

    Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies point to the possibility of using green tea's catechins in chemoprevention of cancer. Recent studies show the inhibitory effects of epigallocatechin gallate on the growth of existing tumors including breast cancer, skin cancer and gastrointestinal tract cancers. Another mode of action of biologically active compounds in green tea involves inhibiting the neoplastic process. All these mechanisms may be useful in prevention and inhibition of the cancer processes (initiation, promotion and progress) by the consumption of green tea. However, clinical studies show contradictory results. Several independent factors, such as the temperature of the beverage, the duration of consumption, the amount of consumed tea and the diet used by the analyzed group, have a decisive effect on the final effect of plant polyphenols on the process of carcinogenesis.  

  16. Isolation, biology and chemistry of the disorazoles: new anti-cancer macrodiolides

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Chad D.; Wipf, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The disorazoles comprise a family of 29 closely related macrocyclic polyketides isolated in 1994 from the fermentation broth of the gliding myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum. Disorazoles A1, E and C1 have shown exceptional biological activities toward inhibiting the proliferation of human cancer cell lines in picomolar and nanomolar concentrations through the disruption of microtubule polymerization. This review gives a brief introduction describing the biosynthesis and the significance of the disorazoles as a new class of microtubulin disruptors. Another portion of the review focuses on the biology of the disorazoles, specifically disorazole A1 and C1, and their antiproliferative efficacy against animal and human tumor cell lines, as well as the available SAR data. The majority of the discussion addresses synthetic efforts, including partial syntheses of various disorazoles and a summary of the total synthesis of disorazole C1. PMID:19387496

  17. IGF-1R as an anti-cancer target—trials and tribulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen X.; Sharon, Elad

    2013-01-01

    Type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) has long been recognized for its role in tumorigenesis and growth, but only recently have the tools for targeting the IGF pathway become available. More than 10 IGF/IGF-1R inhibitors have entered clinical trials, and these belong to three main classes: (1) monoclonal antibodies against IGF-1R, (2) monoclonal antibodies against IGF-1R ligands (IGF-1 and IGF-2), and (3) IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitors. These IGF-1R–targeting agents share common effects on IGF-1R signaling but differ in mechanisms of action, spectrum of target inhibition, and pharmacological features. Clinical activity of IGF-1R inhibitors has been demonstrated with sustained responses in a small number of patients with select tumor types, such as Ewing sarcoma and thymoma. However, many large clinical trials involving patients with adult tumors, including non–small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, and pancreatic cancer, failed to show clinical benefit in the overall patient population. Possible reasons for failure include the complexity of the IGF-1R/insulin receptor system and parallel growth and survival pathways, as well as a lack of patient selection markers. While IGF-1R remains a valid target for selected tumor types, identification of predictive markers and rational combinations will be critical to success in future development. PMID:23601239

  18. Anti-cancer effects of novel flavonoid vicenin-2 as a single agent and in synergistic combination with docetaxel in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagaprashantha, Lokesh Dalasanur; Vatsyayan, Rit; Singhal, Jyotsana; Fast, Spence; Roby, Rhonda; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S

    2011-11-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the efficacy of novel flavonoid vicenin-2 (VCN-2), an active constituent of the medicinal herb Ocimum Sanctum Linn or Tulsi, as a single agent and in combination with docetaxel (DTL) in carcinoma of prostate (CaP). VCN-2 effectively induced anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic effect in CaP cells (PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness or p53 status. VCN-2 inhibited EGFR/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway along with decreasing c-Myc, cyclin D1, cyclin B1, CDK4, PCNA and hTERT in vitro. VCN-2 reached a level of 2.6±0.3μmol/l in serum after oral administration in mice which reflected that VCN-2 is orally absorbed. The i.v. administration of docetaxel (DTL), current drug of choice in androgen-independent CaP, is associated with dose-limiting toxicities like febrile neutropenia which has lead to characterization of alternate routes of administration and potential combinatorial regimens. In this regard, VCN-2 in combination with DTL synergistically inhibited the growth of prostate tumors in vivo with a greater decrease in the levels of AR, pIGF1R, pAkt, PCNA, cyclin D1, Ki67, CD31, and increase in E-cadherin. VCN-2 has been investigated for radioprotection and anti-inflammatory properties. This is the first study on the anti-cancer effects of VCN-2. In conclusion, our investigations collectively provide strong evidence that VCN-2 is effective against CaP progression along with indicating that VCN-2 and DTL co-administration is more effective than either of the single agents in androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  19. Human Lipocalin-Type Prostaglandin D Synthase-Based Drug Delivery System for Poorly Water-Soluble Anti-Cancer Drug SN-38.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Masatoshi; Inoue, Haruka; Kohno, Masaki; Saito, Mayu; Tsuge, Syogo; Shimizu, Shota; Ishida, Atsuko; Ishibashi, Osamu; Inui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily, which is composed of secretory transporter proteins, and binds a wide variety of small hydrophobic molecules. Using this function, we have reported the feasibility of using L-PGDS as a novel drug delivery vehicle for poorly water-soluble drugs. In this study, we show the development of a drug delivery system using L-PGDS, one that enables the direct clinical use of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), a poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug. In the presence of 2 mM L-PGDS, the concentration of SN-38 in PBS increased 1,130-fold as compared with that in PBS. Calorimetric experiments revealed that L-PGDS bound SN-38 at a molecular ratio of 1:3 with a dissociation constant value of 60 μM. The results of an in vitro growth inhibition assay revealed that the SN-38/L-PGDS complexes showed high anti-tumor activity against 3 human cancer cell lines, i.e., Colo201, MDA-MB-231, and PC-3 with a potency similar to that of SN-38 used alone. The intravenous administration of SN-38/L-PGDS complexes to mice bearing Colo201 tumors showed a pronounced anti-tumor effect. Intestinal mucositis, which is one of the side effects of this drug, was not observed in mice administered SN-38/L-PGDS complexes. Taken together, L-PGDS enables the direct usage of SN-38 with reduced side effects.

  20. Anti-cancer effect of bee venom toxin and melittin in ovarian cancer cells through induction of death receptors and inhibition of JAK2/STAT3 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Miran; Park, Mi Hee; Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; An, Byeong Jun; Song, Ho Sueb; Han, Sang Bae; Kim, Jang Heub; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether bee venom and melittin, a major component of bee venom, inhibit cell growth through enhancement of death receptor expressions in the human ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and PA-1. Bee venom (1–5 μg/ml) and melittin (0.5–2 μg/ml) inhibited the growth of SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cells by the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Consistent with apoptotic cell death, expression of death receptor (DR) 3 and DR6 was increased in both cancer cells, but expression of DR4 was increased only in PA-1 cells. Expression of DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, 8, and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 cells. Expression of cleaved caspase-3 was increased in SKOV3, but cleaved caspase-8 was increased in PA-1 cells. Moreover, deletion of DR3, DR4, and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed bee venom and melittin-induced cell growth inhibitory effect as well as down regulation of STAT3 by bee venom and melittin in SKOV3 and PA-1 ovarian cancer cell. These results suggest that bee venom and melittin induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian cancer cells through enhancement of DR3, DR4, and DR6 expression and inhibition of STAT3 pathway. -- Highlights: ► Some studies have showed that bee venom and/or melittin have anti-cancer effects. ► We found that bee venom and melittin inhibited cell growth in ovarian cancer cells. ► Bee venom and melittin induce apoptosis in SKOV3 and PA-1.

  1. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents. PMID:20132536

  2. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-clarithromycin as an anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Van Nuffel, An Mt; Sukhatme, Vidula; Pantziarka, Pan; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Bouche, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a well-known macrolide antibiotic available as a generic drug. CAM is traditionally used for many types of bacterial infections, treatment of Lyme disease and eradication of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori. Extensive preclinical and clinical data demonstrate a potential role for CAM to treat various tumours in combination with conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action underlying the anti-tumour activity of CAM are multiple and include prolonged reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, autophagy inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Here, we present an overview of the current preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) and clinical evidence supporting the role of CAM in cancer. Overall these findings justify further research with CAM in many tumour types, with multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), and lung cancer having the highest level of evidence. Finally, a series of proposals are being made to further investigate the use of CAM in clinical trials which offer the greatest prospect of clinical benefit to patients. PMID:25729426

  3. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—clarithromycin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Van Nuffel, An MT; Sukhatme, Vidula; Pantziarka, Pan; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Bouche, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a well-known macrolide antibiotic available as a generic drug. CAM is traditionally used for many types of bacterial infections, treatment of Lyme disease and eradication of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori. Extensive preclinical and clinical data demonstrate a potential role for CAM to treat various tumours in combination with conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action underlying the anti-tumour activity of CAM are multiple and include prolonged reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, autophagy inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Here, we present an overview of the current preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) and clinical evidence supporting the role of CAM in cancer. Overall these findings justify further research with CAM in many tumour types, with multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), and lung cancer having the highest level of evidence. Finally, a series of proposals are being made to further investigate the use of CAM in clinical trials which offer the greatest prospect of clinical benefit to patients. PMID:25729426

  4. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of a Siderophore Cephalosporin, S-649266, against Enterobacteriaceae Clinical Isolates, Including Carbapenem-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Kohira, Naoki; West, Joshua; Ito, Akinobu; Ito-Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Rio; Sato, Takafumi; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2015-11-16

    S-649266 is a novel siderophore cephalosporin antibiotic with a catechol moiety on the 3-position side chain. Two sets of clinical isolate collections were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of S-649266 against Enterobacteriaceae. These sets included 617 global isolates collected between 2009 and 2011 and 233 β-lactamase-identified isolates, including 47 KPC-, 49 NDM-, 12 VIM-, and 8 IMP-producers. The MIC90 values of S-649266 against the first set of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates were all ≤1 μg/ml, and there were only 8 isolates (1.3%) among these 617 clinical isolates with MIC values of ≥8 μg/ml. In the second set, the MIC values of S-649266 were ≤4 μg/ml against 109 strains among 116 KPC-producing and class B (metallo) carbapenemase-producing strains. In addition, S-649266 showed MIC values of ≤2 μg/ml against each of the 13 strains that produced other types of carbapenemases such as SME, NMC, and OXA-48. The mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility of 7 class B carbapenemase-producing strains with MIC values of ≥16 μg/ml are uncertain. This is the first report to demonstrate that S-649266, a novel siderophore cephalosporin, has significant antimicrobial activity against Enterobacteriaceae, including strains that produce carbapenemases such as KPC and NDM-1.

  5. Activity of eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, including multidrug-resistant isolates, from New York City.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David; Quale, John

    2015-03-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 μg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 μg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 μg/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  6. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    PubMed

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use.

  7. Structure-activity relationships of benzhydrol derivatives based on 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) and their inhibitory activities on multiple myeloma cell growth via inactivation of the NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Takashi; Dodo, Kosuke; Ishikawa, Minoru; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Sagawa, Morihiko; Kizaki, Masahiro; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), which was isolated from the rhizomes of Zingiberaceae, exhibits various biological actions, including anti-inflammatory, anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and anti-cancer activities. ACA represents an attractive candidate for the treatment of many cancers. We herein examined the structure-activity relationships of ACA derivatives based on the benzhydrol skeleton in human leukemia cells (HL-60). Our results revealed that the ACA derivatives synthesized (ACA, 1, and 18) had inhibitory effects on the growth of multiple myeloma cells (IM-9 cells) by inactivating the NF-κB pathway.

  8. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  9. Gellan gum nanohydrogel containing anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs: a multi-drug delivery system for a combination therapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, Giorgia; Navarro, Gemma; Di Meo, Chiara; Matricardi, Pietro; Torchilin, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    During the last decades, it has become evident that inflammation plays a critical role in tumorigenesis: tumor microenvironment is largely orchestrated by inflammatory cells. In the present work, a novel gellan gum nanohydrogel system (NH) able to carry and deliver simultaneously anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs was developed. Prednisolone was chemically linked to the carboxylic groups of gellan gum to serve as a hydrophobic moiety promoting nanohydrogel formation, whereas paclitaxel was then physically entrapped in it. NH improved drug performances, acting as paclitaxel and prednisolone solubility enhancer and favoring the drug uptake in the cells. Moreover, NH allowed an increased cytotoxic effect in vitro on several types of cancer cells due to the synergistic effect of the combination of anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs. Thus, NH can be useful in a combination therapy that attacks both, malignant cells and tumor inflammatory components. PMID:24215783

  10. Identification of endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agents by antagonizing autophagy: a new potential strategy for identification of anti-cancer therapeutics in B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Emilia; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph; Jones, Jeffrey; Cole, Sara L; Zhang, Xiaoli; Byrd, John C; Johnson, Amy J

    2013-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a vital function in multiple cellular processes. There is a growing interest in developing therapeutic agents that can target the ER in cancer cells, inducing a stress response that leads to cell death. However, ER stress-inducing agents can also induce autophagy, a survival strategy of cancer cells. Therefore, by inhibiting autophagy we can increase the efficacy of the ER stress-inducing agents. Nelfinavir, a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitor with anti-cancer properties, can induce ER stress. Nelfinavir's effects on chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are yet to be elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that nelfinavir induces ER morphological changes and stress response, along with an autophagic protective strategy. Our data reveal that chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly increases nelfinavir cytotoxicity. These results identify a novel strategy potentially effective in CLL treatment, by repositioning two well-known drugs as a combinatorial therapy with anti-cancer properties.

  11. Chinese Anti-Cancer Association as a non-governmental organization undertakes systematic cancer prevention work in China

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer has become the first leading cause of death in the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Facing the increasing trend of cancer incidence and mortality, China issued and implemented “three-early (early prevention, early diagnosis and early treatment)” national cancer prevention plan. As the main body and dependence of social governance, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) take over the role of government in the field of cancer prevention and treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) made a research on cancer NGOs and civil society in cancer control and found that cancer NGOs in developing countries mobilize civil society to work together and advocate governments in their countries to develop policies to address the growing cancer burden. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Cancer Council Australia (CCA), and Malaysian cancer NGOs are the representatives of cancer NGOs in promoting cancer control. Selecting Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA) as an example in China, this article is to investigate how NGOs undertake systematic cancer prevention work in China. By conducting real case study, we found that, as a NGO, CACA plays a significant role in intensifying the leading role of government in cancer control, optimizing cancer outcomes, decreasing cancer incidence and mortality rates and improving public health. PMID:26361412

  12. The reduction of anti-cancer drug antagonism by the spatial protection of drugs with PLA-TPGS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guang-Rong; Feng, Si-Shen; Leong, David T

    2014-03-01

    Docetaxel (DCL) and tamoxifen (TAM) individually are potent drugs in the fight against breast cancer. However when used in combination, they become antagonistic because of differential metabolism of both drugs. We reasoned that by spatially protecting them from metabolizing enzymes with poly (lactide)-D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA-TPGS) nanoparticles (NPs), we might reduce this drug antagonism. We now report that the drug antagonism between DCL and TAM in MCF7 cell line, was significantly reduced when co-delivered in PLA-TPGS NPs. In addition, this effect of NPs attenuated at high drug concentrations. To investigate the role of NPs in the reduction of drug antagonism, we quantified cellular uptake of the fluorescent model drug coumarin 6 (C6) encapsulated in a rigorous permutation of drugs-nanoparticles ratios. NPs carrying C6 exhibited enhanced cellular uptake over their free C6 counterparts at correspondingly low drug concentrations. This led us to conclude that the reduction of drug antagonism by NPs is correlated to cellular uptake and being in NPs therefore protects both drugs until they are released intracellular for therapeutic anti-cancer effect. PMID:24439415

  13. Role of SNARE proteins in tumourigenesis and their potential as targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu

    2015-08-01

    The function of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in cellular trafficking, membrane fusion and vesicle release in synaptic nerve terminals is well characterised. Recent studies suggest that SNAREs are also important in the control of tumourigenesis through the regulation of multiple signalling and transportation pathways. The majority of published studies investigated the effects of knockdown/knockout or overexpression of particular SNAREs on the normal function of cells as well as their dysfunction in tumourigenesis promotion. SNAREs are involved in the regulation of cancer cell invasion, chemo-resistance, the transportation of autocrine and paracrine factors, autophagy, apoptosis and the phosphorylation of kinases essential for cancer cell biogenesis. This evidence highlights SNAREs as potential targets for novel cancer therapy. This is the first review to summarise the expression and role of SNAREs in cancer biology at the cellular level, their interaction with non-SNARE proteins and modulation of cellular signalling cascades. Finally, a strategy is proposed for developing novel anti-cancer therapeutics using targeted delivery of a SNARE-inactivating protease into malignant cells.

  14. A New Approach to Reduce Toxicities and to Improve Bioavailabilities of Platinum-Containing Anti-Cancer Nanodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Ye, Qing; Lu, Maggie; Lo, Ya-Chin; Hsu, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Hsiang; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Wang, Shian-Jy; Bain, Daniel J.; Ho, Chien

    2015-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) drugs are the most potent and commonly used anti-cancer chemotherapeutics. Nanoformulation of Pt drugs has the potential to improve the delivery to tumors and reduce toxic side effects. A major challenge for translating nanodrugs to clinical settings is their rapid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), hence increasing toxicities on off-target organs and reducing efficacy. We are reporting that an FDA approved parenteral nutrition source, Intralipid 20%, can help this problem. A dichloro (1, 2-diaminocyclohexane) platinum (II)-loaded and hyaluronic acid polymer-coated nanoparticle (DACHPt/HANP) is used in this study. A single dose of Intralipid (2 g/kg, clinical dosage) is administrated [intravenously (i. v.), clinical route] one hour before i.v. injection of DACHPt/HANP. This treatment can significantly reduce the toxicities of DACHPt/HANP in liver, spleen, and, interestingly, kidney. Intralipid can decrease Pt accumulation in the liver, spleen, and kidney by 20.4%, 42.5%, and 31.2% at 24-hr post nanodrug administration, respectively. The bioavailability of DACHPt/HANP increases by 18.7% and 9.4% during the first 5 and 24 hr, respectively. PMID:26039249

  15. Chinese Anti-Cancer Association as a non-governmental organization undertakes systematic cancer prevention work in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting

    2015-08-01

    Cancer has become the first leading cause of death in the world, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Facing the increasing trend of cancer incidence and mortality, China issued and implemented "three-early (early prevention, early diagnosis and early treatment)" national cancer prevention plan. As the main body and dependence of social governance, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) take over the role of government in the field of cancer prevention and treatment. American Cancer Society (ACS) made a research on cancer NGOs and civil society in cancer control and found that cancer NGOs in developing countries mobilize civil society to work together and advocate governments in their countries to develop policies to address the growing cancer burden. Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), Cancer Council Australia (CCA), and Malaysian cancer NGOs are the representatives of cancer NGOs in promoting cancer control. Selecting Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (CACA) as an example in China, this article is to investigate how NGOs undertake systematic cancer prevention work in China. By conducting real case study, we found that, as a NGO, CACA plays a significant role in intensifying the leading role of government in cancer control, optimizing cancer outcomes, decreasing cancer incidence and mortality rates and improving public health.

  16. Bridging the US and China together to conquer cancer: report of the 4th annual meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA).

    PubMed

    Yang, Wancai; Guan, Lingjie

    2012-07-01

    A global collaborative effort is pivotal to conquer cancer. Themed "Emerging role of China in global clinical development of novel anti-cancer drugs", the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) held its 4th annual meeting in Chicago on June 2, 2012, in conjunction with the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting to further bridge the US and China together to outsmart cancer. Although a young organization, USCACA has made significant contributions to this goal in the 3 years since its inception through extensive collaboration with academic organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, and governmental agencies. USCACA has engaged various stakeholders in developing translational and personalized medical strategies to facilitate new anti-cancer drug development and clinical trials in China. USCACA has initiated and implemented the USCACA-National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR) scholarship to encourage overseas returnees to continue cancer research in China. USCACA announced the Hengrui-USCACA scholarship to fund clinical trial staff from China to conduct the observation of early oncologic clinical trials in the US. During the annual meeting, distinguished panelists and the audience discussed the following critical topics:(1) oncologic translational research and early development capabilities in China;(2) novel chemical entity development and partnership with Chinese companies; and (3) Chinese participation in global anti-cancer drug development. USCACA will continue to promote collaborations among cancer researchers and clinicians in the US and China by engaging in more frequent communications and joint efforts across fields, disciplines, and countries, diligently working together toward curing and eliminating cancers. PMID:22739264

  17. Validation of a high throughput flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay including assessment of metabolic activation in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Christiansen, Joan; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2014-12-01

    Genotoxicity is an unacceptable property for new drug candidates and we employ three screening assays during the drug discovery process to identify genotoxicity early and optimize chemical series. One of these methods is the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay for which protocol optimizations have been described recently. Here, we report further validation of the assay in TK6 cells including assessment of metabolic activation. We first optimized assay conditions to allow for testing with and without metabolic activation in parallel in a 96-well plate format. Then, we tested a set of 48 compounds carefully selected to contain known in vivo genotoxins, nongenotoxins and drugs. Avoidance of irrelevant positives, a known issue with mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays, is important to prevent early deselection of potentially promising compounds. Therefore, we enriched the validation set with compounds that were previously reported to produce irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays. The resulting dataset was used to set the relevant cut-off values for scoring a compound positive or negative, such that we obtained an optimal balance of high sensitivity (88%) and high specificity (87%). Finally, we tested an additional set of 16 drugs to further probe assay performance and 14 of them were classified correctly. To our knowledge, the present study is the most comprehensive validation of the in vitro flow cytometric micronucleus assay and the first to report parallel assessment with metabolic activation in reasonable throughput. The assay allows for rapidly screening novel compounds for genotoxicity and is therefore well-suited for use in early drug discovery projects. Environ.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of Germanium(IV)-polyphenol complexes as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Pi, Jiang; Zeng, Jing; Luo, Jian-Jun; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Ji-Ye

    2013-05-15

    Germanium (Ge) is considered to play a key role in the pharmacological effects of some medicinal plants. Here, two new Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes were synthesized and measured for their potential biological activities. The results indicated that these Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes possessed great anti-oxidative activities, both showing stronger hydroxyl scavenging effects than their corresponding ligands. We also demonstrated the strong intercalating abilities of Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes into calf thymus-DNA molecules. In addition, these two Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes showed strong proliferative inhibition effect on HepG2 cancer cells. Moreover, the morphological changes in HepG2 cells induced by Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes were detected by atomic force microscopy. All these results collectively suggested that Ge(IV)-polyphenol complexes could be served as promising pharmacologically active substances against cancer treatment.

  19. Anti-Cancer Effect of Thiacremonone through Down Regulation of Peroxiredoxin 6

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Ran; Park, Mi Hee; Lee, Dong Hun; Cho, Seung Hee; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Jeong, Heon Sang; Kim, Youngsoo; Jung, Jae Kyung; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Kim, Nam Doo; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    Thiacremonone (2, 4-dihydroxy-2, 5-dimethyl-thiophene-3-one) is an antioxidant substance as a novel sulfur compound generated from High-Temperature-High-Pressure-treated garlic. Peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6) is a member of peroxidases, and has glutathione peroxidase and calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) activities. Several studies have demonstrated that PRDX6 stimulates lung cancer cell growth via an increase of glutathione peroxidase activity. A docking model study and pull down assay showed that thiacremonone completely fits on the active site (cys-47) of glutathione peroxidase of PRDX6 and interacts with PRDX6. Thus, we investigated whether thiacremonone inhibits cell growth by blocking glutathione peroxidase of PRDX6 in the human lung cancer cells, A549 and NCI-H460. Thiacremonone (0–50 μg/ml) inhibited lung cancer cell growth in a concentration dependent manner through induction of apoptotic cell death accompanied by induction of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53, but decrease of xIAP, cIAP and Bcl2 expression. Thiacremonone further inhibited glutathione peroxidase activity in lung cancer cells. However, the cell growth inhibitory effect of thiacremonone was not observed in the lung cancer cells transfected with mutant PRDX6 (C47S) and in the presence of dithiothreitol and glutathione. In an allograft in vivo model, thiacremonone (30 mg/kg) also inhibited tumor growth accompanied with the reduction of PRDX6 expression and glutathione peroxidase activity, but increased expression of cleaved caspase-3, -8, -9, Bax, p21 and p53. These data indicate that thiacremonone inhibits tumor growth via inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity of PRDX6 through interaction. These data suggest that thiacremonone may have potentially beneficial effects in lung cancer. PMID:24618722

  20. Selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE)--a novel class of anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kaushal; Cang, Shundong; Sekhri, Arunabh; Liu, Delong

    2014-10-15

    Dysregulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of proteins plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The nuclear export of proteins depends on the activity of transport proteins, exportins. Exportins belong to the karyopherin β superfamily. Exportin-1 (XPO1), also known as chromosomal region maintenance 1 (CRM1), mediates transport of around 220 proteins. In this review, we summarized the development of a new class of antitumor drugs, collectively known as selective inhibitors of nuclear export (SINE). KPT-330 (selinexor) as an oral agent is showing activities in early clinical trials in both solid tumors and hematological malignancies.

  1. Quinoxaline Nucleus: A Promising Scaffold in Anti-cancer Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Alessandra C; Mendonça Nogueira, Thais C; de Souza, Marcus V N

    2016-01-01

    Heterocyclic compounds are a class of substances, which play a critical role in modern drug discovery being incorporated in the structure of a large variety of drugs used in many different types of diseases. Quinoxaline is an important heterocyclic nucleus with a wide spectrum of biological activities, and recently much attention has been found on anticancer drug discovery based on this class. Owing to the importance of this system, the aim of this review is to provide an update on the synthesis and anticancer activity of quinoxaline derivatives covering articles published between 2010 and 2015.

  2. Anti-tumor activities of active ingredients in Compound Kushen Injection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; You, Rong-li; Qin, Wen-jie; Hai, Li-na; Fang, Ming-jing; Huang, Guo-hua; Kang, Rui-xia; Li, Ming-hua; Qiao, Yu-feng; Li, Jian-wei; Li, An-ping

    2015-01-01

    Kushen (Radix Sophorae Flavescentis) has a long history of use for the treatment of tumors, inflammation and other diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) is a mixture of natural compounds extracted from Kushen and Baituling (Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae). The main principles of CKI are matrine (MT) and oxymatrine (OMT) that exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-viral, anti-fibrotic and cardiovascular protective effects. Recent evidence shows that these compounds also produce anti-cancer actions, such as inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest, accelerating apoptosis, restraining angiogenesis, inducing cell differentiation, inhibiting cancer metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, and preventing or reducing chemotherapy- and/or radiotherapy-induced toxicity when combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. In this review, we summarize recent progress in studying the anti-cancer activities of MT, OMT and CKI and their potential molecular targets, which provide clues and references for further study. PMID:25982630

  3. Anti-tumor activities of active ingredients in Compound Kushen Injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; You, Rong-li; Qin, Wen-jie; Hai, Li-na; Fang, Ming-jing; Huang, Guo-hua; Kang, Rui-xia; Li, Ming-hua; Qiao, Yu-feng; Li, Jian-wei; Li, An-ping

    2015-06-01

    Kushen (Radix Sophorae Flavescentis) has a long history of use for the treatment of tumors, inflammation and other diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. Compound Kushen Injection (CKI) is a mixture of natural compounds extracted from Kushen and Baituling (Rhizoma Smilacis Glabrae). The main principles of CKI are matrine (MT) and oxymatrine (OMT) that exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, anti-viral, anti-fibrotic and cardiovascular protective effects. Recent evidence shows that these compounds also produce anti-cancer actions, such as inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, inducing cell cycle arrest, accelerating apoptosis, restraining angiogenesis, inducing cell differentiation, inhibiting cancer metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, and preventing or reducing chemotherapy- and/or radiotherapy-induced toxicity when combined with chemotherapeutic drugs. In this review, we summarize recent progress in studying the anti-cancer activities of MT, OMT and CKI and their potential molecular targets, which provide clues and references for further study. PMID:25982630

  4. Histone lysine methyltransferases as anti-cancer targets for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Ming-wei

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational epigenetic modification of histones is controlled by a number of histone-modifying enzymes. Such modification regulates the accessibility of DNA and the subsequent expression or silencing of a gene. Human histone methyltransferases (HMTs)constitute a large family that includes histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) and histone/protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There is increasing evidence showing a correlation between HKMTs and cancer pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of representative HKMTs, including their biological and biochemical properties as well as the profiles of small molecule inhibitors for a comprehensive understanding of HKMTs in drug discovery. PMID:27397541

  5. Synthesis and Investigation of Novel Spiro-isoxazolines as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Das, Prasanta; Omollo, Ann O.; Sitole, Lungile J.; McClendon, Eric; Valente, Edward J.; Raucher, Drazen; Walker, Leslie R.; Hamme, Ashton T.

    2015-01-01

    A series of structurally diverse 4-bromo spiro-isoxazolines possessing a variety of aromatic and aliphatic substituents at the 3 position, were synthesized through a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition followed by intramolecular cyclization of a pendant hydroxyl or carboxylic acid group. The biochemical antiproliferative activity was evaluated in vitro by using two breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and two prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) using the MTT viability assay, and the IC50 values were obtained. Spiro-isoxazoline derivatives bearing a p-chloro or an o-dichloro aromatic substituent at the 3-position of the isoxazoline showed considerable antitumor activities in all four cell lines with IC50 value ranging from 43μM to 56μM. PMID:25821250

  6. Recent progress in the identification of BRAF inhibitors as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    El-Nassan, Hala Bakr

    2014-01-24

    The "RAS/BRAF/MEK/ERK" pathway has been associated with human cancers due to the frequent oncogenic mutations identified in its members. In particular, BRAF is mutated at high frequency in many cancers especially melanoma. This mutation leads to activation of the MAPK signaling pathway, inducing uncontrolled cell proliferation, and facilitating malignant transformation. All these facts make BRAF an ideal target for antitumor therapeutic development. Many BRAF inhibitors have been discovered during the last decade and most of them exhibit potent antitumor activity especially on tumors that harbor BRAF(V600E) mutations. Some of these compounds have entered clinical trials and displayed encouraged results. The present review highlights the progress in identification and development of BRAF inhibitors especially during the last five years.

  7. Dendritic Cells in Oncolytic Virus-Based Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youra; Clements, Derek R.; Sterea, Andra M.; Jang, Hyun Woo; Gujar, Shashi A.; Lee, Patrick W. K.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that have a notable role in the initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the context of cancer, appropriately activated DCs can induce anti-tumor immunity by activating innate immune cells and tumor-specific lymphocytes that target cancer cells. However, the tumor microenvironment (TME) imposes different mechanisms that facilitate the impairment of DC functions, such as inefficient antigen presentation or polarization into immunosuppressive DCs. These tumor-associated DCs thus fail to initiate tumor-specific immunity, and indirectly support tumor progression. Hence, there is increasing interest in identifying interventions that can overturn DC impairment within the TME. Many reports thus far have studied oncolytic viruses (OVs), viruses that preferentially target and kill cancer cells, for their capacity to enhance DC-mediated anti-tumor effects. Herein, we describe the general characteristics of DCs, focusing on their role in innate and adaptive immunity in the context of the TME. We also examine how DC-OV interaction affects DC recruitment, OV delivery, and anti-tumor immunity activation. Understanding these roles of DCs in the TME and OV infection is critical in devising strategies to further harness the anti-tumor effects of both DCs and OVs, ultimately enhancing the efficacy of OV-based oncotherapy. PMID:26690204

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of polymeric gold glyco-conjugates as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Marya; Mamba, Saul; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Darkwa, James; Kumar, Piyush; Narain, Ravin

    2013-06-19

    The antitumor activity of organo-gold compounds is a focus of research from the past two decades. A variety of gold stabilizing ligands such as vitamins and xanthanes have been prepared and explored for their 'chelating effect' as well as for their antitumor activity. Dithiocarbamates (DTC) compounds and their metallic conjugates have been well explored for their antiproliferative activities. In this study, glycopolymer based DTC-conjugates are prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) and subsequently modified with gold(I) phosphine. These polymer-DTC derivatives and their gold compounds are tested for their in vitro toxicity in both normal and cancer cell lines. The Au(I) phosphine conjugated cationic glycopolymers of 10 kDa and 30 kDa are evaluated for their cytotoxicity profiles using MTT assay. Au(I) compounds are well-known for their mitochondrial toxicity, hence hypoxic cell lines bearing unusually enlarged mitochondria are subjected to these anticancer compounds. It is concluded that these polymeric DTC derivatives and their gold conjugates indeed show higher accumulation as well as cytotoxicity to cancer cells under hypoxic conditions in comparison to the normoxic ones. Hypoxic MCF-7 cells showed significant sensitivity toward the low molecular weight (10 kDa) glycopolymer-Au(I) complexes. PMID:23631753

  9. Anti-Cancer Efficacy of Paclitaxel Loaded in pH Triggered Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; He, Bin; Pan, Dayi; Luo, Kui; Yi, Qiangying; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    Smart liposomes that are responsive to the microenvironment of tumor tissue have been utilized to enhance chemotherapeutic efficiency. Here, we reported a novel liposome called Trojan horse liposome, which has a pH response, to enhance drug accumulation in tumor sites and intercellular uptake. L-lysine was used as a linker to connect 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride (DMA) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) to yield a DSPE-Lys-DMA (DLD) lipid. The pH-responsive DLD was mixed with other commercially available lipids to form liposomes. The size, morphology and zeta potential of the DLD liposomes (DLD-Lip) were measured. Paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded in the liposomes. The release profile, cellular uptake, in vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of the PTX-loaded liposomes were investigated. The results showed that the mean diameter of the liposomes was less than 200 nm. The zeta potential of the liposomes was negative at pH 7.4. However, it was transferred to positive at weak acidic pH values with the cleavage of DMA amide. The charge reversion of DMA in acidic environments facilitated the cellular internalization and endosome escape of DLD-Lip, which inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cancer cells in vitro. The pH-responsive "Trojan horse"-like liposomes also exhibited efficient anticancer activity in the xenograft breast cancer model in vivo. PMID:27301174

  10. Report: investigation of anti-cancer effects of cherry in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ogur, Recai; Istanbulluoglu, Hakan; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Barla, Asli; Tekbas, Omer Faruk; Oztas, Emin

    2014-05-01

    Cherry (Prunus Cerasus) is still one of the most popular preserve in Turkish cuisine. Cherry has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory-related symptoms. Recent researches have proved that cherry is a valuable natural source of some important bioactive compounds in human health preservation. Evidence suggests that, cherry consumption may decrease the risk of chronic diseases and cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of cherry on breast cancer cells lines, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) level and certain multidrug-resistant bacteria. The cancer cell proliferation activity and analysis of apoptotic-necrotic cells was evaluated by using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and scoring of apoptotic cell nuclei. Measurement of ADMA and the minimum inhibitory concentration was accomplished by HPLC and the micro dilution broth method. The results showed that, extracts of cherry exhibit anti-proliferative activity in mammary adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) & mouse mammary tumor cell (4T1) breast cancer cells lines as well as induction of apoptosis, lower ADMA concentrations in cell cultures treated with cherry extract and antibacterial effects against certain multidrug-resistant bacteria in vitro. These findings may open new horizons for traditional anti-inflammatory product as prophylactic-therapeutic agent from cancer, cardiovascular diseases and multidrug-resistant infections. PMID:24811821

  11. Discovery of Inhibitors for the Ether Lipid-Generating Enzyme AGPS as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Piano, Valentina; Benjamin, Daniel I; Valente, Sergio; Nenci, Simone; Marrocco, Biagina; Mai, Antonello; Aliverti, Alessandro; Nomura, Daniel K; Mattevi, Andrea

    2015-11-20

    Dysregulated ether lipid metabolism is an important hallmark of cancer cells. Previous studies have reported that lowering ether lipid levels by genetic ablation of the ether lipid-generating enzyme alkyl-glycerone phosphate synthase (AGPS) lowers key structural and oncogenic ether lipid levels and alters fatty acid, glycerophospholipid, and eicosanoid metabolism to impair cancer pathogenicity, indicating that AGPS may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer. In this study, we have performed a small-molecule screen to identify candidate AGPS inhibitors. We have identified several lead AGPS inhibitors and have structurally characterized their interactions with the enzyme and show that these inhibitors bind to distinct portions of the active site. We further show that the lead AGPS inhibitor 1a selectively lowers ether lipid levels in several types of human cancer cells and impairs their cellular survival and migration. We provide here the first report of in situ-active pharmacological tools for inhibiting AGPS, which may provide chemical scaffolds for future AGPS inhibitor development for cancer therapy.

  12. Exploiting the Fanconi Anemia Pathway for Targeted Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ukhyun; Kim, Hyungjin

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability, primarily caused by faulty DNA repair mechanisms, drives tumorigenesis. Therapeutic interventions that exploit deregulated DNA repair in cancer have made considerable progress by targeting tumor-specific alterations of DNA repair factors, which either induces synthetic lethality or augments the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The study of Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare inherited blood disorder and cancer predisposition syndrome, has been instrumental in understanding the extent to which DNA repair defects contribute to tumorigenesis. The FA pathway functions to resolve blocked replication forks in response to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs), and accumulating knowledge of its activation by the ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway has provided promising therapeutic opportunities for cancer treatment. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of FA pathway regulation and its potential application for designing tailored therapeutics that take advantage of deregulated DNA ICL repair in cancer. PMID:26194820

  13. Stabilization of EphA2 dimers as a novel anti-cancer strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Deo; Ahmed, Fozia; Salloto, Matt; Hristova, Kalina

    We have recently shown that EphA2 receptors exist in a monomer-dimer equilibrium in the absence of ligand. The monomers promote tumorigenic activity and thus a therapeutic strategy that minimizes the monomer population may be beneficial in the clinic. The YSA peptide is an EphA2-targeting peptide that effectively delivers anticancer agents to cancer tumors. The quantitative measurements of the dimerization of EphA2 receptors in the presence of these peptides using quantitative spectral Forster resonance transfer (QS-FRET) methodology in conjunction with two-photon microscopy that has been developed recently in our lab suggests that this peptide stabilizes the EphA2 dimers. Thus, such peptides that stabilize the EphA2 dimers may be used for the treatment of some cancers that overexpress EphA2.

  14. Study on the interactions between anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin and DNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Leipeng; Liu, Ruisi; Xu, Fengjie; Zu, Yuangang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    Oxaliplatin is one of the most important anticancer drugs at present. However, the mechanism of action of oxaliplatin is still controversial. In this study, the interactions between oxaliplatin and a plasmid DNA have been studied so as to reveal the structural basis of its activity. The structural characteristic of pUC19 DNA (2ng/μL) incubated with 100μmol/L and 1000μmol/L of oxaliplatin for the different time on a freshly cleaved highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). High resolution AFM observation indicated that oxaliplatin can induce pUC19 DNA molecules change from the extended conformation to the entangled structures with many nodes, and finally to the compact particles. The present AFM results provide structural evidence about the interactions between oxaliplatin and circular duplex DNA containing multiple targets.

  15. Pulmonary targeting microparticulate camptothecin delivery system: anti-cancer evaluation in a rat orthotopic lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Piyun; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Kutscher, Hilliard L.; Gao, Dayuan; Sundara Rajan, Sujata; Hu, Peidi; Laskin, Debra L.; Stein, Stanley; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Large (>6 µm) rigid microparticles (MPs) become passively entrapped within the lungs following intravenous injection making them an attractive and highly efficient alternative to inhalation for pulmonary delivery. In the current studies, PEGylated 6 μm polystyrene MPs with multiple copies of the norvaline (Nva) α-amino acid prodrug of camptothecin (CPT) were prepared. Surface morphology was characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT was released from the CPT-Nva-MPs over 24 hours in rat plasma at 37°C. In vivo CPT plasma concentrations were low (~1 ng/mL or less) and constant over a period of 4 days after a single intravenous injection of CPT-Nva-MPs as compared to high but short-lived systemic exposures after an IV injection of free CPT. This suggests that sustained local CPT concentrations were achieved in the lung after administration of the MP delivery system. Anti-cancer efficacy was evaluated in an orthotopic lung cancer animal model and compared to a bolus injection of CPT. Animals receiving either free CPT (2 mg/kg) or CPT-Nva-MPs (0.22 mg/kg CPT, 100 mg/kg MPs) were found to have statistically significant smaller areas of lung cancer (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively) than untreated animals. In addition, 40% of the animals receiving CPT-Nva-MPs were found to be free of cancer. The CPT dose using targeted MPs was ten fold lower than after IV injection of free CPT but was more effective in reducing the amount of cancerous areas. In conclusion, CPT-Nva-MPs were able to achieve effective local lung and low systemic CPT concentrations at a dose that was ten times lower than systemically administered CPT resulting in a significant improvement in anticancer efficacy in an orthotopic rat model of lung cancer. PMID:19966540

  16. Statins as anti-cancer therapy; Can we translate preclinical and epidemiologic data into clinical benefit?

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kwang; Yousaf, Muhammad; Malecek, Mary-Kate; Carneiro, Benedito; Chandra, Sunandana; Kaplan, Jason; Kalyan, Aparna; Sassano, Antonella; Platanias, Leonidas C; Giles, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Sta