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Sample records for activities including antiviral

  1. Antiviral activities of photoactive perylenequinones.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Imperial, V; Haugland, R P; Diwu, Z

    1997-02-01

    Nine perylenequinones (PQ), including some familiar naturally occurring pigments, were compared for their light-mediated antiviral efficacies. Calphostin C was the most active compound against the two target viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 and Sindbis virus. Hypocrellins A and B were also very active. However, three cercosporin-like PQ were substantially less active in spite of their high quantum yields of singlet oxygen, whereas phleichrome, another efficient singlet oxygen producer, showed no detectable antiviral activity. One other PQ, which was a very weak singlet oxygen producer, also showed no antiviral activity. None of the active compounds showed significant antiviral activity in the dark. Thus, for some groups of PQ there was correlation between quantum yield of singlet oxygen (1O2) and antiviral efficacy, but there are evidently other structural features of PQ that influence activity.

  2. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  3. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  4. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO.

  5. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  6. Antiviral activities of atractylon from Atractylodis Rhizoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Mai, Jing-Yin; Hou, Tian-Lu; Ping, Jian; Chen, Jian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodis Rhizoma is a traditional medicinal herb, which has antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic, anticancer, gastroprotective and neuroprotective activities. It is widely used for treating fever, cold, phlegm, edema and arthralgia syndrome in South-East Asian nations. In this study, 6 chemical compositions of Atractylodis Rhizoma were characterized by spectral analysis and their antiviral activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Among them, atractylon showed most significant antiviral activities. Atractylon treatment at doses of 10–40 mg/kg for 5 days attenuated influenza A virus (IAV)-induced pulmonary injury and decreased the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, but increased interferon-β (IFN-β) levels. Atractylon treatment upregulated the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 and IFN-β mRNA but downregulated nuclear factor-κB p65 protein expression in the lung tissues of IAV-infected mice. These results demonstrated that atractylon significantly alleviated IAV-induced lung injury via regulating the TLR7 signaling pathway, and may warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for IAV treatment. PMID:27600871

  7. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  8. Antiviral activities of coffee extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Ichinose, Masao; Uozaki, Misao; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Koyama, A Hajime

    2008-06-01

    Both hot water extracts of coffee grinds and instant coffee solutions inhibited the multiplication of herpes simplex virus type 1, a representative enveloped DNA virus, when they were added to the culture medium of the virus-infected cells at a dose of one fifth the concentration suitable for drinking. The antiherpetic activity was independent of the suppliers (companies) of the coffee grinds and of the locations where the coffee beans were produced. Further characterization revealed that there are two different mechanisms, by which the coffee extracts exert inhibitory activities on the virus infection; (1) a direct inactivation of the infectivity of virus particle (i.e., a virucidal activity) and (2) the inhibition of progeny infectious virus formation at the late stage of viral multiplication in the infected cells. Caffeine, but not quinic acid and chlorogenic acid, inhibited the virus multiplication to some extent, but none of them showed the virucidal activity, suggesting that other component(s) in the coffee extracts must play a role in the observed antiviral activity. In addition, the coffee extracts inhibited the multiplication of poliovirus, a non-enveloped RNA virus, but showed no virucidal effect on this virus.

  9. Phospholipid scramblase 1 potentiates the antiviral activity of interferon.

    PubMed

    Dong, Beihua; Zhou, Quansheng; Zhao, Ji; Zhou, Aimin; Harty, Ronald N; Bose, Santanu; Banerjee, Amiya; Slee, Roger; Guenther, Jeanna; Williams, Bryan R G; Wiedmer, Therese; Sims, Peter J; Silverman, Robert H

    2004-09-01

    Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)- and growth factor-inducible, calcium-binding protein that either inserts into the plasma membrane or binds DNA in the nucleus depending on its state of palmyitoylation. In certain hematopoietic cells, PLSCR1 is required for normal maturation and terminal differentiation from progenitor cells as regulated by select growth factors, where it promotes recruitment and activation of Src kinases. PLSCR1 is a substrate of Src (and Abl) kinases, and transcription of the PLSCR1 gene is regulated by the same growth factor receptor pathways in which PLSCR1 potentiates afferent signaling. The marked transcriptional upregulation of PLSCR1 by IFNs led us to explore whether PLSCR1 plays an analogous role in cellular responses to IFN, with specific focus on antiviral activities. Accordingly, human cells in which PLSCR1 expression was decreased with short interfering RNA were rendered relatively insensitive to the antiviral activity of IFNs, resulting in higher titers of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and encephalomyocarditis virus. Similarly, VSV replicated to higher titers in mouse PLSCR1(-/-) embryonic fibroblasts than in identical cells transduced to express PLSCR1. PLSCR1 inhibited accumulation of primary VSV transcripts, similar to the effects of IFN against VSV. The antiviral effect of PLSCR1 correlated with increased expression of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), including ISG15, ISG54, p56, and guanylate binding proteins. Our results suggest that PLSCR1, which is itself an ISG-encoded protein, provides a mechanism for amplifying and enhancing the IFN response through increased expression of a select subset of potent antiviral genes.

  10. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  11. Cationic phenylene ethynylene polymers and oligomers exhibit efficient antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Canady, Taylor D; Zhou, Zhijun; Tang, Yanli; Price, Dominique N; Bear, David G; Chi, Eva Y; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-07-01

    The antiviral activities of poly(phenylene ethynylene) (PPE)-based cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPE) and oligo-phenylene ethynylenes (OPE) were investigated using two model viruses, the T4 and MS2 bacteriophages. Under UV/visible light irradiation, significant antiviral activity was observed for all of the CPEs and OPEs; without irradiation, most of these compounds exhibited high inactivation activity against the MS2 phage and moderate inactivation ability against the T4 phage. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) reveal that the CPEs and OPEs exert their antiviral activity by partial disassembly of the phage particle structure in the dark and photochemical damage of the phage capsid protein under UV/visible light irradiation.

  12. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  13. Screening for antiviral activities of isolated compounds from essential oils.

    PubMed

    Astani, Akram; Reichling, Jürgen; Schnitzler, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Essential oil of star anise as well as phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes, for example, trans-anethole, eugenol, β-eudesmol, farnesol, β-caryophyllene and β-caryophyllene oxide, which are present in many essential oils, were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Antiviral activity was analyzed by plaque reduction assays and mode of antiviral action was determined by addition of the drugs to uninfected cells, to the virus prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells. Star anise oil reduced viral infectivity by >99%, phenylpropanoids inhibited HSV infectivity by about 60-80% and sesquiterpenes suppressed herpes virus infection by 40-98%. Both, star anise essential oil and all isolated compounds exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity by direct inactivation of free virus particles in viral suspension assays. All tested drugs interacted in a dose-dependent manner with herpesvirus particles, thereby inactivating viral infectivity. Star anise oil, rich in trans-anethole, revealed a high selectivity index of 160 against HSV, whereas among the isolated compounds only β-caryophyllene displayed a high selectivity index of 140. The presence of β-caryophyllene in many essential oils might contribute strongly to their antiviral ability. These results indicate that phenylpropanoids and sesquiterpenes present in essential oils contribute to their antiviral activity against HSV.

  14. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  15. Enhanced antiviral activity of acyclovir loaded into nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Roberta; Donalisio, Manuela; Bisazza, Agnese; Civra, Andrea; Ranucci, Elisabetta; Ferruti, Paolo; Lembo, David

    2012-01-01

    The activity of antivirals can be enhanced by their incorporation in nanoparticulate delivery systems. Peculiar polymeric nanoparticles, based on a β-cyclodextrin-poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) monoconjugate (β-CD-PACM), are proposed as acyclovir carriers. The experimental procedure necessary to obtain the acyclovir-loaded nanoparticles using the solvent displacement preparation method will be described in this chapter. Fluorescent labeled nanoparticles are prepared using the same method for cellular trafficking studies. The biocompatibility assays necessary to obtain safe nanoparticles are reported. Section 4 of this chapter describes the assessment of the antiviral activity of the acyclovir-loaded nanoparticles.

  16. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  17. Commensal Bacteria Calibrate the Activation Threshold of Innate Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Doering, Travis A.; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Paley, Michael A.; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L.; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity. PMID:22705104

  18. Quasispecies, error catastrophe, and the antiviral activity of ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Graci, Jason D; Cameron, Craig E

    2002-07-05

    Ribavirin is the first synthetic, broad-spectrum antiviral nucleoside. Despite its more than 30 year history, the mechanism of action of this compound remains unclear and somewhat controversial. Recent data suggest the possibility that the activity of ribavirin against RNA viruses is a reflection of incorporation of ribavirin into the viral genome. Because ribavirin incorporation is not specific, this event leads to lethal mutagenesis of the virus population. The data supporting this new proposal for the mechanism of action of ribavirin are reviewed herein. In addition, we discuss briefly the challenges that remain for development of lethal mutagenesis as an effective antiviral strategy.

  19. Antiviral Activities of Several Oral Traditional Chinese Medicines against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Ge, Miao; Wang, Hui-Qiang; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Li, Yu-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is still a serious threat to human health with significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of drug-resistant influenza viruses poses a great challenge to existing antiviral drugs. Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) may be an alternative to overcome the challenge. Here, 10 oral proprietary Chinese medicines were selected to evaluate their anti-influenza activities. These drugs exhibit potent inhibitory effects against influenza A H1N1, influenza A H3N2, and influenza B virus. Importantly, they demonstrate potent antiviral activities against drug-resistant strains. In the study of mechanisms, we found that Xiaoqinglong mixture could increase antiviral interferon production by activating p38 MAPK, JNK/SAPK pathway, and relative nuclear transcription factors. Lastly, our studies also indicate that some of these medicines show inhibitory activities against EV71 and CVB strains. In conclusion, the 10 traditional Chinese medicines, as kind of compound combination medicines, show broad-spectrum antiviral activities, possibly also including inhibitory activities against strains resistant to available antiviral drugs. PMID:26557857

  20. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  1. Screening of Australian medicinal plants for antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Semple, S J; Reynolds, G D; O'Leary, M C; Flower, R L

    1998-03-01

    Extracts of 40 different plant species used in the traditional medicine of the Australian Aboriginal people have been investigated for antiviral activity. The extracts have been tested for activity against one DNA virus, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and two RNA viruses, Ross River virus (RRV) and poliovirus type 1, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The most active extracts were the aerial parts of Pterocaulon sphacelatum (Asteraceae) and roots of Dianella longifolia var. grandis (Liliaceae), which inhibited poliovirus at concentrations of 52 and 250 microg/ml, respectively. The extracts of Euphorbia australis (Euphorbiaceae) and Scaevola spinescens (Goodeniaceae) were the most active against HCMV. Extracts of Eremophila latrobei subsp. glabra (Myoporaceae) and Pittosporum phylliraeoides var. microcarpa (Pittosporaceae) exhibited antiviral activity against RRV.

  2. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  3. Interferon-mediated antiviral activities of Angelica tenuissima Nakai and its active components.

    PubMed

    Weeratunga, Prasanna; Uddin, Md Bashir; Kim, Myun Soo; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Yoon, Ji-Eun; Ma, Jin Yeul; Kim, Hongik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Angelica tenuissima Nakai is a widely used commodity in traditional medicine. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted on the antiviral and immune-modulatory properties of an aqueous extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai. In the present study, we evaluated the antiviral activities and the mechanism of action of an aqueous extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, an effective dose of Angelica tenuissima Nakai markedly inhibited the replication of Influenza A virus (PR8), Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Coxsackie virus, and Enterovirus (EV-71) on epithelial (HEK293T/HeLa) and immune (RAW264.7) cells. Such inhibition can be described by the induction of the antiviral state in cells by antiviral, IFNrelated gene induction and secretion of IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, Angelica tenuissima Nakai treated BALB/c mice displayed higher survivability and lower lung viral titers when challenged with lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3, and H9N2). We also found that Angelica tenuissima Nakai can induce the secretion of IL-6, IFN-λ, and local IgA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of Angelica tenuissima Nakai treated mice, which correlating with the observed prophylactic effects. In HPLC analysis, we found the presence of several compounds in the aqueous fraction and among them; we evaluated antiviral properties of ferulic acid. Therefore, an extract of Angelica tenuissima Nakai and its components, including ferulic acid, play roles as immunomodulators and may be potential candidates for novel anti-viral/anti-influenza agents.

  4. Antiviral Activity of Myticin C Peptide from Mussel: an Ancient Defense against Herpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alejandro; Pereiro, Patricia; Costa, María M.; Dios, Sonia; Estepa, Amparo; Parra, Francisco; Figueras, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Little is known about the antiviral response in mollusks. As in other invertebrates, the interferon signaling pathways have not been identified, and in fact, there is a debate about whether invertebrates possess antiviral immunity similar to that of vertebrates. In marine bivalves, due to their filtering activity, interaction with putative pathogens, including viruses, is very high, suggesting that they should have mechanisms to address these infections. In this study, we confirmed that constitutively expressed molecules in naive mussels confer resistance in oysters to ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) when oyster hemocytes are incubated with mussel hemolymph. Using a proteomic approach, myticin C peptides were identified in both mussel hemolymph and hemocytes. Myticins, antimicrobial peptides that have been previously characterized, were constitutively expressed in a fraction of mussel hemocytes and showed antiviral activity against OsHV-1, suggesting that these molecules could be responsible for the antiviral activity of mussel hemolymph. For the first time, a molecule from a bivalve has shown antiviral activity against a virus affecting mollusks. Moreover, myticin C peptides showed antiviral activity against human herpes simplex viruses 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). In summary, our work sheds light on the invertebrate antiviral immune response with the identification of a molecule with potential biotechnological applications. IMPORTANCE Several bioactive molecules that have potential pharmaceutical or industrial applications have been identified and isolated from marine invertebrates. Myticin C, an antimicrobial peptide from the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) that was identified by proteomic techniques in both mussel hemolymph and hemocytes, showed potential as an antiviral agent against ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1), which represents a major threat to the oyster-farming sector. Both hemolymph from mussels and a myticin C peptide inhibited Os

  5. PEGylated recombinant human interferon-ω as a long-acting antiviral agent: structure, antiviral activity and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Yu, Changming; Wu, Ling; Fang, Ting; Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Jinlong; Yu, Ting; Fu, Ling; Chen, Wei; Hu, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant human interferon-ω (rhIFN-ω) exhibits a potent antiviral activity. Because of poor pharmacokinetics (PK) of rhIFN-ω, frequent dosing of rhIFN-ω is necessitated to achieve the sustained antiviral efficacy. PEGylation can efficiently improve the PK of rhIFN-ω while substantially decrease its bioactivity. The structure, antiviral activity and PK of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω were measured to establish their relationship with PEGylation sites, polyethylene glycol (PEG) mass and PEG structure. Accordingly, N-terminus and the lysine residues were selected as the PEGylation sites. PEGs with Mw of 20kDa and 40kDa were used to investigate the effect of PEG mass. Linear and branched PEGs were used to investigate the effect of PEG structure. PEGylation decreased the antiviral activity of rhIFN-ω and improved its PK. The PEGylation sites determine the bioactivity of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω and the conjugated PEG mass determines the PK. N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with 40kDa linear PEG maintains 21.7% of the rhIFN-ω antiviral activity with a half-life of 139.6h. Thus, N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with linear 40kDa PEG is a potential antiviral agent for long-acting treatment of the viral diseases.

  6. Antiviral activity of acidic polysaccharides from Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformi, a green alga, against an in vitro human influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Kido, Nobuo; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Yokochi, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    The extracts prepared from green algae are reported to possess a variety of biological activities including antioxidant, antitumor and antiviral activities. The acidic polysaccharide fraction from a green alga Coccomyxa gloeobotrydiformi (CmAPS) was isolated and the antiviral action on an in vitro infection of influenza A virus was examined. CmAPS inhibited the growth and yield of all influenza A virus strains tested, such as A/H1N1, A/H2N2, A/H3N2 and A/H1N1 pandemic strains. The 50% inhibitory concentration of CmAPS on the infection of human influenza A virus strains ranged from 26 to 70 µg/mL and the antiviral activity of CmAPS against influenza A/USSR90/77 (H1N1) was the strongest. The antiviral activity of CmAPS was not due to the cytotoxicity against host cells. The antiviral activity of CmAPS required its presence in the inoculation of virus onto MDCK cells. Pretreatment and post-treatment with CmAPS was ineffective for the antiviral activity. CmAPS inhibited influenza A virus-induced erythrocyte hemagglutination and hemolysis. Taken together, CmAPS was suggested to exhibit the anti-influenza virus activity through preventing the interaction of virus and host cells. The detailed antiviral activity of CmAPS is discussed.

  7. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  8. Design, synthesis and antiviral activity of novel quinazolinones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Wang, Mingxiao; Yao, Xue; Li, Yue; Tan, Juan; Wang, Lizhong; Qiao, Wentao; Geng, Yunqi; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a validated therapeutic target for antiviral drug design. However, the emergence of viral strains resistant to clinically studied IN inhibitors demands the discovery of novel inhibitors that are structurally as well as mechanistically different. Herein, a series of quinazolinones were designed and synthesized as novel HIV-1 inhibitors. The new synthetic route provides a practical method for the preparation of 5-hydroxy quinazolinones. Primary bioassay results indicated that most of the quinazolinones possess anti-HIV activity, especially for compound 11b with 77.5% inhibition rate at 10 μM emerged as a new active lead. Most of the synthesized compounds were also found to exhibit good anti-TMV activity, of which compo und 9a showed similar in vivo anti-TMV activity to commercial plant virucide Ribavirin. This work provides a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration and optimization of previously reported antiviral agents.

  9. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of Asplenium nidus, Phaleria macrocarpa and Eleusine indica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mariya Mohd; Ibrahim, Nazlina; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad

    2014-09-01

    Three local medicinal plants namely Asplenium nidus (langsuyar), Eleusine indica (sambau) and Phaleria macrocarpa (mahkota dewa) were screened for the cytotoxicity and antiviral activities. Six plant extracts were prepared including the aqueous and methanol extracts from A. nidus leaf and root, aqueous extract from dried whole plant of E. indica and methanol extract from P. macrocarpa fruits. Cytotoxicity screening in Vero cell line by MTT assay showed that the CC50 values ranged from 15 to 60 mg/mL thus indicating the safety of the extracts even at high concentrations. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by plaque reduction assay. The EC50 concentrations were between 3.2 to 47 mg/mL. The selectivity indices (SI = CC50/EC50) of each tested extracts ranged from 4.3 to 63.25 indicating the usefulness of the extracts as potential antiviral agents.

  10. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  11. Structural Requirements for the Antiviral Activity of the Human MxA Protein against Thogoto and Influenza A Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Patzina, Corinna; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-induced dynamin-like MxA protein has broad antiviral activity against many viruses, including orthomyxoviruses such as influenza A and Thogoto virus and bunyaviruses such as La Crosse virus. MxA consists of an N-terminal globular GTPase domain, a connecting bundle signaling element, and the C-terminal stalk that mediates oligomerization and antiviral specificity. We previously reported that the disordered loop L4 that protrudes from the compact stalk is a key determinant of antiviral specificity against influenza A and Thogoto virus. However, the role of individual amino acids for viral target recognition remained largely undefined. By mutational analyses, we identified two regions in the C-terminal part of L4 that contribute to an antiviral interface. Mutations in the proximal motif, at positions 561 and 562, abolished antiviral activity against orthomyxoviruses but not bunyaviruses. In contrast, mutations in the distal motif, around position 577, abolished antiviral activity against both viruses. These results indicate that at least two structural elements in L4 are responsible for antiviral activity and that the proximal motif determines specificity for orthomyxoviruses, whereas the distal sequence serves a conserved structural function. PMID:24448803

  12. Improving nucleoside diphosphate kinase for antiviral nucleotide analogs activation.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Schneider, Benoit; Chen, Yuxing; Giacomoni-Fernandes, Veronique; Mulard, Laurence; Morera, Solange; Janin, Joel; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Veron, Michel

    2002-10-18

    Antiviral nucleoside analog therapies rely on their incorporation by viral DNA polymerases/reverse transcriptase leading to chain termination. The analogs (3'-deoxy-3'-azidothymidine (AZT), 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (d4T), and other dideoxynucleosides) are sequentially converted into triphosphate by cellular kinases of the nucleoside salvage pathway and are often poor substrates of these enzymes. Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase phosphorylates the diphosphate derivatives of the analogs with an efficiency some 10(4) lower than for its natural substrates. Kinetic and structural studies of Dictyostelium and human NDP kinases show that the sugar 3'-OH, absent from all antiviral analogs, is required for catalysis. To improve the catalytic efficiency of NDP kinase on the analogs, we engineered several mutants with a protein OH group replacing the sugar 3'-OH. The substitution of Asn-115 in Ser and Leu-55 in His results in an NDP kinase mutant with an enhanced ability to phosphorylate antiviral derivatives. Transfection of the mutant enzyme in Escherichia coli results in an increased sensitivity to AZT. An x-ray structure at 2.15-A resolution of the Dictyostelium enzyme bearing the serine substitution in complex with the R(p)-alpha-borano-triphosphate derivative of AZT shows that the enhanced activity reflects an improved geometry of binding and a favorable interaction of the 3'-azido group with the engineered serine.

  13. [Griseochelin methyl ester, a new polyether derivative with antiviral activity].

    PubMed

    Tonew, E; Tonew, M; Graefe, U; Zöpel, P

    1988-10-01

    The methylester of griseochelin (1) is a new chemically-made antiviral derivate of the antibiotic griseochelin isolated from fermentations of Streptomyces griseus. It belongs to the polyether group and possesses antiviral activity against enveloped RNA and DNA viruses cultivated in chicken embryo cells (CEC), namely influenzavirus A/WSN, vesicularstomatitis virus (Indiana), vaccinia virus (Lister) and herpes simplex hominis virus type 1 (Kupka). The methylester of griseochelin failed to show virucidal effects on extracellular influenza vacciniavirus particles or to influence virus adsorption and penetration processes. The antibiotic in concentrations of 125-15 micrograms/ml inhibited the virus-induced cytopathic effect of the above mentioned viruses and caused over 90 per cent plaque reduction. Addition of 1 during a one-step growth cycle of influenzavirus A at 4 and 6 h p.i. resulted in complete suppression of virus multiplication at the control niveau of the virus yield accumulated to the same time point. A partial reversibility of the antiviral action against influenzavirus A could be achieved. Coxsackie A9 virus growth in human fibroblast cells was not affected by the inhibitor. Electron-optical observations showed a failure of the formation of the viral capside proteins of HSV type 1 at the second halftime of the replication cycle in CEC-infected and 1-treated cultures.

  14. Evaluation of Antiviral Activities of Four Local Malaysian Phyllanthus Species against Herpes Simplex Viruses and Possible Antiviral Target

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wee Chee; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analogues such as acyclovir are effective antiviral drugs against herpes simplex virus infections since its introduction. However, with the emergence of acyclovir-resistant HSV strains particularly in immunocompromised patients, there is a need to develop an alternative antiherpetic drug and plants could be the potential lead. In this study, the antiviral activity of the aqueous extract of four Phyllanthus species were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 in Vero cells by quantitative PCR. The protein expressions of untreated and treated infected Vero cells were studied by 2D-gel electrophoresis and Western blot. This is the first study that reported the antiviral activity of P. watsonii. P. urinaria was shown to demonstrate the strongest antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2, with SI >33.6. Time-of-addition studies suggested that the extract may act against the early infection stage and the replication stage. Protein expression studies indicated that cellular proteins that are involved in maintaining cytoskeletal structure could be potential target for development of antiviral drugs. Preliminary findings indicated that P. urinaria demonstrated potent inhibitory activity against HSV. Hence, further studies such as in vivo evaluation are required for the development of effective antiherpetic drug. PMID:24324358

  15. Synthesis and antiviral activity of azoles obtained from carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Barradas, José Sebastián; Errea, María Inés; D'Accorso, Norma B; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Talarico, Laura B; Damonte, Elsa B

    2008-09-22

    Herein we describe the synthesis of 1,2,4-triazolyl-3-thione;1,3,4-oxadiazole, and imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole derivatives from carbohydrates. The antiviral activity of these compounds was tested against Dengue and Junin virus (the etiological agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever). The 3-(p-bromobenzoyl)-5-(1,2-O-isopropylidene-3-O-methyl-alpha-d-xylofuranos-5-ulos-5-yl)imidazo[2,1-b]thiazole was able to inhibit the replication of both viruses in Vero cells at concentration significantly lower than the CC(50).

  16. Antiviral activity of hemolymph of Podalia against rubella virus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, N D; Mendonça, R Z; Oliveira, M I; Curti, S P; Barbosa, T F; Silva, P E; Taniwaki, N N; Tonelotto, M; Giovanni, D N S; Moraes, R H P; Figueiredo, C A

    2017-02-01

    Many active principles produced by animals, plants and microorganisms have been employed in the development of new drugs for the treatment of human diseases. Among animals known to produce pharmacologically active molecules that interfere in human cell physiology. Rubella virus (genus Rubivirus, family Togaviridae) is a single stranded RNA virus of positive genome polarity. Rubella virus infection of susceptible women during the first trimester of pregnancy often results in long-term virus persistence in the fetus causing multiple organ abnormalities. Potent antiviral activity against rubella virus (RV) has been observed in the hemolymph of Podalia sp. (Lepidoptera: Megalopygidae). This study evaluated the effect of hemolymph on RV infected Statens Serum Institute Rabbit Cornea (SIRC) cells. Results of cell viability and cell proliferation assays indicated that hemolymph was not toxic to cultured SIRC cells. Viral binding assay, antiviral assay, PCR, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy were used to demonstrate that hemolymph in post-treatment could inhibit the production of infectious RV particles. Specifically, hemolymph was found to inhibit RV adsorption to the SIRC cells.

  17. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  18. Novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives bearing benzothiazole scaffold: synthesis, characterization and antiviral activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shaoyong; Wei, Yanhong; Yang, Ziwen; Wang, Kaimei; Liang, Ying; Shi, Liqiao

    2013-09-15

    A series of novel cycloalkylthiophene-imine derivatives containing benzothiazole unit were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-viral activities. The bio-evaluation results indicated that some of the target compounds (such as 5g, 5i, 5u) exhibited good to moderate antiviral effect on CVB5, ADV7 and EV71 viruses, however, these compounds did not have inhibition activity against H1N1 virus. Especially, the compounds 4c and 4d also exhibited high antiviral activities, which provide a new and efficient approach to evolve novel multi-functional antiviral agents by rational integration of active pharmacophores.

  19. Broad spectrum antiviral activity for paramyxoviruses is modulated by biophysical properties of fusion inhibitory peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Augusto, Marcelo T.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Horvat, Branka; Palermo, Laura M.; Sanna, Giuseppina; Madeddu, Silvia; Huey, Devra; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Porotto, Matteo; Santos, Nuno C.; Moscona, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Human paramyxoviruses include global causes of lower respiratory disease like the parainfluenza viruses, as well as agents of lethal encephalitis like Nipah virus. Infection is initiated by viral glycoprotein-mediated fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Paramyxovirus viral fusion proteins (F) insert into the target cell membrane, and form a transient intermediate that pulls the viral and cell membranes together as two heptad-repeat regions refold to form a six-helix bundle structure that can be specifically targeted by fusion-inhibitory peptides. Antiviral potency can be improved by sequence modification and lipid conjugation, and by adding linkers between the protein and lipid components. We exploit the uniquely broad spectrum antiviral activity of a parainfluenza F-derived peptide sequence that inhibits both parainfluenza and Nipah viruses, to investigate the influence of peptide orientation and intervening linker length on the peptides’ interaction with transitional states of F, solubility, membrane insertion kinetics, and protease sensitivity. We assessed the impact of these features on biodistribution and antiviral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The engineering approach based on biophysical parameters resulted in a peptide that is a highly effective inhibitor of both paramyxoviruses and a set of criteria to be used for engineering broad spectrum antivirals for emerging paramyxoviruses. PMID:28344321

  20. A single nucleotide polymorphism of porcine MX2 gene provides antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keisuke; Tungtrakoolsub, Pullop; Morozumi, Takeya; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawahara, Manabu; Watanabe, Tomomasa

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MX2 gene affect its antiviral potential. MX proteins are known to suppress the multiplication of several viruses, including influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). In domestic animals possessing highly polymorphic genome, our previous research indicated that a specific SNP in chicken Mx gene was responsible for its antiviral function. However, there still has been no information about SNPs in porcine MX2 gene. In this study, we first conducted polymorphism analysis in 17 pigs of MX2 gene derived from seven breeds. Consequently, a total of 30 SNPs, of which 11 were deduced to cause amino acid variations, were detected, suggesting that the porcine MX2 is very polymorphic. Next, we classified MX2 into eight alleles (A1-A8) and subsequently carried out infectious experiments with recombinant VSVΔG*-G to each allele. In A1-A5 and A8, position 514 amino acid (514 aa) of MX2 was glycine (Gly), which did not inhibit VSV multiplication, whereas in A6 and A7, 514 aa was arginine (Arg), which exhibited the antiviral ability against VSV. These results demonstrate that a SNP at 514 aa (Gly-Arg) of porcine MX2 plays a pivotal role in the antiviral activity as well as that at 631 aa of chicken Mx.

  1. Further iinvestigations on the antiviral activities of medicinal plants of togo.

    PubMed

    Hudson, J B; Anani, K; Lee, M K; de Souza, C; Arnason, J T; Gbeassor, M

    2000-01-01

    Further studies were done on the antiviral activities of 10 species of Togolese medicinal plants, previously shown to possess activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV). The dominant activity in all cases was virucidal (direct inactivation of virus particles), although Adansonia digitata extracts also appeared to have intracellular antiviral activities as well, which could indicate the presence of multiple antiviral compounds, or a single compound with multiple actions. In the seven most active extracts, the anti-HSV activity was considerably enhanced by light, especially UVA (long wavelength UV), although they all showed "dark" antiviral activity as well. Thus, all the extracts contained antiviral photosensitizers. In all tests, the root-bark and leaf extracts of A. digitata were the most potent.

  2. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  3. Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705): Protection from Highly Lethal Inhalational Rift Valley Fever

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Amy L.; Powell, Diana S.; Bethel, Laura M.; Oury, Tim D.; Reed, Douglas S.; Hartman, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705), which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV). RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. Methodology/Principal Findings Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92%) survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. Conclusions/Significance Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug. PMID:24722586

  4. Pyruvate Carboxylase Activates the RIG-I-like Receptor-Mediated Antiviral Immune Response by Targeting the MAVS signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhongying; Zhou, Yaqin; Zhu, Shengli; Feng, Jian; Chen, Xueyuan; Liu, Shi; Peng, Nanfang; Yang, Xiaodan; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    When retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 protein (RIG-I)-like receptors sense viral dsRNA in the cytosol, RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are recruited to the mitochondria to interact with mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and initiate antiviral immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that the biotin-containing enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) plays an essential role in the virus-triggered activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling mediated by MAVS. PC contributes to the enhanced production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and PC knockdown inhibits the virus-triggered innate immune response. In addition, PC shows extensive antiviral activity against RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV), human enterovirus 71 (EV71), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Furthermore, PC mediates antiviral action by targeting the MAVS signalosome and induces IFNs and pro-inflammatory cytokines by promoting phosphorylation of NF-κB inhibitor-α (IκBα) and the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, as well as NF-κB nuclear translocation, which leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), including double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1). Our findings suggest that PC is an important player in host antiviral signaling. PMID:26906558

  5. The antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice, a widely-used Chinese herb

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqiang; Yang, Rui; Yuan, Bochuan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Licorice is a common herb which has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. More than 20 triterpenoids and nearly 300 flavonoids have been isolated from licorice. Recent studies have shown that these metabolites possess many pharmacological activities, such as antiviral, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and other activities. This paper provides a summary of the antiviral and antimicrobial activities of licorice. The active components and the possible mechanisms for these activities are summarized in detail. This review will be helpful for the further studies of licorice for its potential therapeutic effects as an antiviral or an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26579460

  6. Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stalder, Hans

    1977-01-01

    The current status of antiviral therapy is reviewed, including discussion of older approaches together with more recently developed chemotherapy. Following the introduction dealing with pathophysiological aspects of virus disease, the different approaches to antiviral therapy are presented. The reasons for the slow progress in antiviral therapy are discussed. These include: 1. the necessity of intracellular penetration of drugs acting on viral replication; 2. the severe toxicity of most antiviral drugs; 3. the narrow antiviral spectrum of most of these agents; 4. the difficulty of making a rapid etiological diagnosis in view of the necessity of starting (specific?) treatment early in the course of the disease; 5. the difficult evaluation of beneficial as compared with deleterious effects of antiviral therapy. After a detailed review of clinically tested substances, including immunoglobulins, synthetic antiviral drugs (amantadine, nucleoside analogs, thiosemicarbazones and photodynamic dyes) and interferon, a guide concerning indications and application of specific antiviral therapy is presented. Although at present there are few indications, clinicians should be aware of the (present and future) possibilities of antiviral therapy. PMID:341538

  7. The antiviral activity of tetrazole phosphonic acids and their analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D W; Naylor, M

    1985-01-01

    5-(Phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and a number of related tetrazoles have been prepared and their effects on the replication of Herpes Simplex Viruses-1 and -2 have been investigated as well as their abilities to inhibit the DNA polymerases induced by these viruses and the RNA transcriptase activity of influenza virus A. Contrary to an earlier report, 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was not an efficient inhibitor of the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in tissue culture. Analogues of 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole were also devoid of significant antiviral activity. Only 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and 5-(thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole inhibited the influenza virus transcriptase, and both were more effective as inhibitors than phosphonoacetic acid under the same conditions. The DNA polymerases induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2 were inhibited slightly by 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and to a lesser extent by its N-ethyl analogue and 3-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole. None of these compounds were as effective as phosphonoacetic acid. 5-(Thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was a better inhibitor of the DNA polymerase induced by HSV-1 than 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole. PMID:2417198

  8. Antiviral activity of Undaria pinnatifida against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenneth D; Dragar, Charles

    2004-07-01

    The major component of an aqueous extract of the seaweed Undaria pinnati fi da has been identified previously as a galactofucan (GFS), a sulfated polysaccharide. The galactofucan was partially purified and the material tested in this study is 75% pure galactofucan sulfate. GFS was evaluated for antiviral activity against 32 clinical strains of herpes simplex virus (HSV): 14 strains of HSV-1 and 18 strains of HSV-2. Twelve strains (four HSV-1 and eight HSV-2) were resistant to acyclovir (ACV-R) and 20 strains (10 HSV-1 and 10 HSV-2) were susceptible to ACV (ACV-S). The median IC(50) of GFS for the 14 strains of HSV-1 was 32 micro g/mL. The median IC(50) of GFS for the 18 strains of HSV-2 was 0.5 micro g/mL. GFS is significantly more active against clinical strains of HSV-2 than HSV-1, p < 0.001. The mode of action of the GFS was shown to be the inhibition of viral binding and entry into the host cell. The cytotoxicity of GFS was >4.0 mg/mL in the neutral red dye uptake assay indicating that GFS is non-toxic in this assay.

  9. Characterization of a Novel Human-Specific STING Agonist that Elicits Antiviral Activity Against Emerging Alphaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Tina M.; Pryke, Kara M.; Abraham, Jinu; Liu, Andrew; Archer, Iris; Broeckel, Rebecca; Staverosky, Julia A.; Smith, Jessica L.; Al-Shammari, Ahmed; Amsler, Lisi; Sheridan, Kayla; Nilsen, Aaron; Streblow, Daniel N.; DeFilippis, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of innate immune processes represents an attractive strategy to achieve multiple therapeutic outcomes including inhibition of virus replication, boosting antitumor immunity, and enhancing vaccine immunogenicity. In light of this we sought to identify small molecules capable of activating the type I interferon (IFN) response by way of the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). A high throughput in vitro screen yielded 4-(2-chloro-6-fluorobenzyl)-N-(furan-2-ylmethyl)-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-benzo[b][1,4]thiazine-6-carboxamide (referred to herein as G10), which was found to trigger IRF3/IFN-associated transcription in human fibroblasts. Further examination of the cellular response to this molecule revealed expression of multiple IRF3-dependent antiviral effector genes as well as type I and III IFN subtypes. This led to the establishment of a cellular state that prevented replication of emerging Alphavirus species including Chikungunya virus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis virus, and Sindbis virus. To define cellular proteins essential to elicitation of the antiviral activity by the compound we employed a reverse genetics approach that utilized genome editing via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. This allowed the identification of IRF3, the IRF3-activating adaptor molecule STING, and the IFN-associated transcription factor STAT1 as required for observed gene induction and antiviral effects. Biochemical analysis indicates that G10 does not bind to STING directly, however. Thus the compound may represent the first synthetic small molecule characterized as an indirect activator of human STING-dependent phenotypes. In vivo stimulation of STING-dependent activity by an unrelated small molecule in a mouse model of Chikungunya virus infection blocked viremia demonstrating that pharmacologic activation of this signaling pathway may represent a feasible strategy for combating emerging Alphaviruses. PMID:26646986

  10. Antiviral activity of silver nanoparticle/chitosan composites against H1N1 influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasutaka; Ono, Takeshi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Matsui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chitosan (Ch) composites with antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus were prepared. The Ag NP/Ch composites were obtained as yellow or brown floc-like powders following reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. Ag NPs (3.5, 6.5, and 12.9 nm average diameters) were embedded into the chitosan matrix without aggregation or size alternation. The antiviral activity of the Ag NP/Ch composites was evaluated by comparing the TCID50 ratio of viral suspensions treated with the composites to untreated suspensions. For all sizes of Ag NPs tested, antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus increased as the concentration of Ag NPs increased; chitosan alone exhibited no antiviral activity. Size dependence of the Ag NPs on antiviral activity was also observed: antiviral activity was generally stronger with smaller Ag NPs in the composites. These results indicate that Ag NP/Ch composites interacting with viruses exhibit antiviral activity.

  11. Antiviral activity and increased host defense against influenza infection elicited by the human cathelicidin LL-37.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Peter G; Svoboda, Pavel; Mackellar, Annie; Nash, Anthony A; York, Ian A; Pohl, Jan; Davidson, Donald J; Donis, Ruben O

    2011-01-01

    The extensive world-wide morbidity and mortality caused by influenza A viruses highlights the need for new insights into the host immune response and novel treatment approaches. Cationic Host Defense Peptides (CHDP, also known as antimicrobial peptides), which include cathelicidins and defensins, are key components of the innate immune system that are upregulated during infection and inflammation. Cathelicidins have immunomodulatory and anti-viral effects, but their impact on influenza virus infection has not been previously assessed. We therefore evaluated the effect of cathelicidin peptides on disease caused by influenza A virus in mice. The human cathelicidin, LL-37, and the murine cathelicidin, mCRAMP, demonstrated significant anti-viral activity in vivo, reducing disease severity and viral replication in infected mice to a similar extent as the well-characterized influenza virus-specific antiviral drug zanamivir. In vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that the peptides may act directly on the influenza virion rather than via receptor-based mechanisms. Influenza virus-infected mice treated with LL-37 had lower concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the lung than did infected animals that had not been treated with cathelicidin peptides. These data suggest that treatment of influenza-infected individuals with cathelicidin-derived therapeutics, or modulation of endogenous cathelicidin production may provide significant protection against disease.

  12. Antiviral activity of ginsenosides against coxsackievirus B3, enterovirus 71, and human rhinovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Hwa-Jung; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Choi, Kwangman; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Lee, Yong-Pyo; Cho, Sungchan; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ginsenosides are the major components responsible for the biochemical and pharmacological actions of ginseng, and have been shown to have various biological activities. In this study, we investigated the antiviral activities of seven ginsenosides [protopanaxatriol (PT) type: Re, Rf, and Rg2; protopanaxadiol (PD) type: Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd)] against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), enterovirus 71 (EV71), and human rhinovirus 3 (HRV3). Methods Assays of antiviral activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by the sulforhodamine B method using the cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay. Results The antiviral assays demonstrated that, of the seven ginsenosides, the PT-type ginsenosides (Re, Rf, and Rg2) possess significant antiviral activities against CVB3 and HRV3 at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Among the PT-type ginsenosides, only ginsenoside Rg2 showed significant anti-EV71 activity with no cytotoxicity to cells at 100 μg/mL. The PD-type ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd), by contrast, did not show any significant antiviral activity against CVB3, EV71, and HRV3, and exhibited cytotoxic effects to virus-infected cells. Notably, the antiviral efficacies of PT-type ginsenosides were comparable to those of ribavirin, a commonly used antiviral drug. Conclusion Collectively, our findings suggest that the ginsenosides Re, Rf, and Rg2 have the potential to be effective in the treatment of CVB3, EV71, and HRV3 infection. PMID:25378991

  13. Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 Exerts Antiviral Activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Dabo, Abdoulaye J.; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Increased lung levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) are frequently observed during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and elevated MMP9 concentrations are associated with severe disease. However little is known of the functional role of MMP9 during lung infection with RSV. To determine whether MMP9 exerted direct antiviral potential, active MMP9 was incubated with RSV, which showed that MMP9 directly prevented RSV infectivity to airway epithelial cells. Using knockout mice the effect of the loss of Mmp9 expression was examined during RSV infection to demonstrate MMP9’s role in viral clearance and disease progression. Seven days following RSV infection, Mmp9-/- mice displayed substantial weight loss, increased RSV-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and reduced clearance of RSV from the lungs compared to wild type mice. Although total bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) cell counts were similar in both groups, neutrophil recruitment to the lungs during RSV infection was significantly reduced in Mmp9-/- mice. Reduced neutrophil recruitment coincided with diminished RANTES, IL-1β, SCF, G-CSF expression and p38 phosphorylation. Induction of p38 signaling was required for RANTES and G-CSF expression during RSV infection in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, MMP9 in RSV lung infection significantly enhances neutrophil recruitment, cytokine production and viral clearance while reducing AHR. PMID:26284919

  14. Anticancer and antiviral activities of Youngia japonica (L.) DC (Asteraceae, Compositae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Wang, Hua; Luk, Choi-Wan; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2004-09-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of Youngia japonica (also known as Oriental hawksbeard) were tested in vitro for anti-tumor activity against three cell lines, human promyelocytic leukaemia (HL-60), human myelogenous leukaemia (chronic K-562) and mouse Sarcoma 180 (S-180), and for antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A virus (Flu A) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) by cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay. Hot water extract of Youngia japonica inhibited cell proliferation and growth of all cancer cell lines to various extent. K-562 cells were the most sensitive to the extract whereas S-180 cells were the least. It did not show any significant cytotoxic effects on normal mammalian Vero cells up to the concentration of 450 microg/mL. The ethanol extract of whole plant of Youngia japonica exhibited antiviral activity against RSV cultured in HEp-2 cells, but did not have any activity against Flu A and HSV-1. Two partially purified fractions (Fr.10 and Fr.11) from the 95% ethanol extract exhibited significant anti-RSV with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the range of 3.0-6.0 microg/mL. The ratio of the viral titer reduction in the absence (viral control) and presence of the maximal non-cytotoxic concentration (MNCC) of the Fr.10 and Fr.11 was both estimated to be 1 x 10(4) (RF, viral titer reduction factors), indicating that their anti-RSV activity was high enough to justify for further analysis. Our preliminary analysis showed that the antiviral ingredients were likely to contain phenolic compounds including tannins by chemical tests.

  15. Antiviral activity of four types of bioflavonoid against dengue virus type-2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue is a major mosquito-borne disease currently with no effective antiviral or vaccine available. Effort to find antivirals for it has focused on bioflavonoids, a plant-derived polyphenolic compounds with many potential health benefits. In the present study, antiviral activity of four types of bioflavonoid against dengue virus type -2 (DENV-2) in Vero cell was evaluated. Anti-dengue activity of these compounds was determined at different stages of DENV-2 infection and replication cycle. DENV replication was measured by Foci Forming Unit Reduction Assay (FFURA) and quantitative RT-PCR. Selectivity Index value (SI) was determined as the ratio of cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50) to inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) for each compound. Results The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of quercetin against dengue virus was 35.7 μg mL-1 when it was used after virus adsorption to the cells. The IC50 decreased to 28.9 μg mL-1 when the cells were treated continuously for 5 h before virus infection and up to 4 days post-infection. The SI values for quercetin were 7.07 and 8.74 μg mL-1, respectively, the highest compared to all bioflavonoids studied. Naringin only exhibited anti-adsorption effects against DENV-2 with IC50 = 168.2 μg mL-1 and its related SI was 1.3. Daidzein showed a weak anti-dengue activity with IC50 = 142.6 μg mL-1 when the DENV-2 infected cells were treated after virus adsorption. The SI value for this compound was 1.03. Hesperetin did not exhibit any antiviral activity against DENV-2. The findings obtained from Foci Forming Unit Reduction Assay (FFURA) were corroborated by findings of the qRT-PCR assays. Quercetin and daidzein (50 μg mL-1) reduced DENV-2 RNA levels by 67% and 25%, respectively. There was no significant inhibition of DENV-2 RNA levels with naringin and hesperetin. Conclusion Results from the study suggest that only quercetin demonstrated significant anti-DENV-2 inhibitory activities. Other bioflavonoids

  16. A Designed “Nested” Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woodrum, Brian W.; Maxwell, Jason; Allen, Denysia M.; Wilson, Jennifer; Krumpe, Lauren R.H.; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Hill, R. Blake; Kibler, Karen V.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the “nested” covalent insertion of two additional repeats of CV-N, resulting in four possible glycan-binding sites. The resulting Nested CV-N folds into a wild-type-like structure as assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, and displays high thermal stability with a Tm of 59 °C, identical to WT. All four glycan-binding domains encompassed by the sequence are functional as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, which revealed two sets of binding events to dimannose with dissociation constants Kd of 25 μM and 900 μM, assigned to domains B and B’ and domains A and A’ respectively. Nested CV-N displays a slight increase in activity when compared to WT CV-N in both an anti-HIV cellular assay and a fusion assay. This construct conserves the original binding specifityies of domain A and B, thus indicating correct fold of the two CV-N repeats. Thus, rational design can be used to increase multivalency in antiviral lectins in a controlled manner. PMID:27275831

  17. A Designed "Nested" Dimer of Cyanovirin-N Increases Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, Brian W; Maxwell, Jason; Allen, Denysia M; Wilson, Jennifer; Krumpe, Lauren R H; Bobkov, Andrey A; Hill, R Blake; Kibler, Karen V; O'Keefe, Barry R; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2016-06-06

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) is an antiviral lectin with potent activity against enveloped viruses, including HIV. The mechanism of action involves high affinity binding to mannose-rich glycans that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses. In the case of HIV, antiviral activity of CV-N is postulated to require multivalent interactions with envelope protein gp120, achieved through a pseudo-repeat of sequence that adopts two near-identical glycan-binding sites, and possibly involves a 3D-domain-swapped dimeric form of CV-N. Here, we present a covalent dimer of CV-N that increases the number of active glycan-binding sites, and we characterize its ability to recognize four glycans in solution. A CV-N variant was designed in which two native repeats were separated by the "nested" covalent insertion of two additional repeats of CV-N, resulting in four possible glycan-binding sites. The resulting Nested CV-N folds into a wild-type-like structure as assessed by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy, and displays high thermal stability with a Tm of 59 °C, identical to WT. All four glycan-binding domains encompassed by the sequence are functional as demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, which revealed two sets of binding events to dimannose with dissociation constants Kd of 25 μM and 900 μM, assigned to domains B and B' and domains A and A' respectively. Nested CV-N displays a slight increase in activity when compared to WT CV-N in both an anti-HIV cellular assay and a fusion assay. This construct conserves the original binding specifityies of domain A and B, thus indicating correct fold of the two CV-N repeats. Thus, rational design can be used to increase multivalency in antiviral lectins in a controlled manner.

  18. Chemically engineered sulfated glucans from rice bran exert strong antiviral activity at the stage of viral entry.

    PubMed

    Ray, Bimalendu; Hutterer, Corina; Bandyopadhyay, Shruti S; Ghosh, Kanika; Chatterjee, Udipta R; Ray, Sayani; Zeitträger, Isabel; Wagner, Sabrina; Marschall, Manfred

    2013-12-27

    Attachment and entry of many viruses are mediated by their affinity for polysaccharides present on the surface of target cells. In this paper, we demonstrate that sulfated glucans isolated from rice (Oryza sativa) can be utilized as experimental drugs exerting strong antiviral activity. In particular, oleum-DMF-based extraction is described as a procedure for the generation of chemically engineered glucans from commercially available rice bran. The one-step procedure has the potential to provide a spectrum of related glucans with varying molecular masses and modifications, including sulfation. The sulfated glucans P444, P445, and P446 possess increased antiviral activity compared to a previously described glucan (S1G). P444, P445, and P446 were highly active against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), moderately active against other members of the family Herpesviridae, while not active against unrelated viruses. Specific experimentation with HCMV-infected cells provided evidence that antiviral activity was based on inhibition of viral entry and that inhibition occurred in the absence of drug-induced cytotoxicity. These findings underline the high potential of sulfated glucans for antiviral research and drug development. In addition, the procedure described for the efficient transformation of glucan hydroxy groups to sulfate groups may be similarly beneficial for the chemical alteration of other natural products.

  19. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection.

  20. Broad and potent antiviral activity of the NAE inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Megger, Dominik A; Katschinski, Benjamin; Landsberg, Christine D; Rückborn, Meike U; Tao, Sha; Krawczyk, Adalbert; Bayer, Wibke; Drexler, Ingo; Tenbusch, Matthias; Sitek, Barbara; Trilling, Mirko

    2016-02-01

    In terms of infected human individuals, herpesviruses range among the most successful virus families. Subclinical herpesviral infections in healthy individuals contrast with life-threatening syndromes under immunocompromising and immunoimmature conditions. Based on our finding that cytomegaloviruses interact with Cullin Roc ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) in the context of interferon antagonism, we systematically assessed viral dependency on CRLs by utilizing the drug MLN4924. CRL activity is regulated through the conjugation of Cullins with the ubiquitin-like molecule Nedd8. By inhibiting the Nedd8-activating Enzyme (NAE), MLN4924 interferes with Nedd8 conjugation and CRL activity. MLN4924 exhibited pronounced antiviral activity against mouse and human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus (HSV)- 1 (including multi-drug resistant clinical isolates), HSV-2, adeno and influenza viruses. Human cytomegalovirus genome amplification was blocked at nanomolar MLN4924 concentrations. Global proteome analyses revealed that MLN4924 blocks cytomegaloviral replication despite increased IE1 amounts. Expression of dominant negative Cullins assigned this IE regulation to defined Cullin molecules and phenocopied the antiviral effect of MLN4924.

  1. Surfactant-Modified Nanoclay Exhibits an Antiviral Activity with High Potency and Broad Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian-Jong; Wei, Jiun-Chiou; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanomaterials have the characteristics associated with high surface-to-volume ratios and have been explored for their antiviral activity. Despite some success, cytotoxicity has been an issue in nanomaterial-based antiviral strategies. We previously developed a novel method to fully exfoliate montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). We further modified NSP by capping with various surfactants and found that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) was less cytotoxic. In this study, we tested the antiviral potentials of a series of natural-clay-derived nanomaterials. Among the derivatives, NSP modified with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (NSQc), but not the pristine clay, unmodified NSP, a silver nanoparticle-NSP hybrid, NSP modified with cationic n-octadecanylamine hydrochloride salt, or NSP modified with nonionic Triton X-100, significantly suppressed the plaque-forming ability of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) at noncytotoxic concentrations. NSQc also blocked infection with dengue virus (DEN) and influenza A virus. Regarding the antiviral mechanism, NSQc interfered with viral binding through electrostatic interaction, since its antiviral activity can be neutralized by Polybrene, a cationic polymer. Furthermore, NSQc reduced the lethality of JEV and DEN infection in mouse challenge models. Thus, the surfactant-modified exfoliated nanoclay NSQc may be a novel nanomaterial with broad and potent antiviral activity. IMPORTANCE Nanomaterials have being investigated as antimicrobial agents, yet their antiviral potential is overshadowed by their cytotoxicity. By using a novel method, we fully exfoliated montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). Here, we show that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) is less cytotoxic and that NSQc (NSP modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate) could potently block infection by dengue virus (DEN), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV

  2. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  3. Antiviral Activity of Diterpene Esters on Chikungunya Virus and HIV Replication.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Pannecouque, Christophe; Renucci, Franck; Delang, Leen; Neyts, Johan; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Leyssen, Pieter; Litaudon, Marc; Paolini, Julien

    2015-06-26

    Recently, new daphnane, tigliane, and jatrophane diterpenoids have been isolated from various Euphorbiaceae species, of which some have been shown to be potent inhibitors of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) replication. To further explore this type of compound, the antiviral activity of a series of 29 commercially available natural diterpenoids was evaluated. Phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (11) proved to be the most potent inhibitor, with an EC50 value of 6.0 ± 0.9 nM and a selectivity index (SI) of 686, which is in line with the previously reported anti-CHIKV potency for the structurally related 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (13). Most of the other compounds exhibited low to moderate activity, including an ingenane-type diterpene ester, compound 28, with an EC50 value of 1.2 ± 0.1 μM and SI = 6.4. Diterpene compounds are known also to inhibit HIV replication, so the antiviral activities of compounds 1-29 were evaluated also against HIV-1 and HIV-2. Tigliane- (4β-hydroxyphorbol analogues 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, and 18) and ingenane-type (27 and 28) diterpene esters were shown to inhibit HIV replication in vitro at the nanomolar level. A Pearson analysis performed with the anti-CHIKV and anti-HIV data sets demonstrated a linear relationship, which supported the hypothesis made that PKC may be an important target in CHIKV replication.

  4. Activation of cGAS-dependent antiviral responses by DNA intercalating agents

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Thomas, Belinda J.; Ferrand, Jonathan; McArthur, Kate; Bardin, Philip G.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Gantier, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Acridine dyes, including proflavine and acriflavine, were commonly used as antiseptics before the advent of penicillins in the mid-1940s. While their mode of action on pathogens was originally attributed to their DNA intercalating activity, work in the early 1970s suggested involvement of the host immune responses, characterized by induction of interferon (IFN)-like activities through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate here that sub-toxic concentrations of a mixture of acriflavine and proflavine instigate a cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS)-dependent type-I IFN antiviral response. This pertains to the capacity of these compounds to induce low level DNA damage and cytoplasmic DNA leakage, resulting in cGAS-dependent cGAMP-like activity. Critically, acriflavine:proflavine pre-treatment of human primary bronchial epithelial cells significantly reduced rhinovirus infection. Collectively, our findings constitute the first evidence that non-toxic DNA binding agents have the capacity to act as indirect agonists of cGAS, to exert potent antiviral effects in mammalian cells. PMID:27694309

  5. Antiviral activity of polyporoid mushrooms (higher Basidiomycetes) from Altai Mountains (Russia).

    PubMed

    Teplyakova, Tamara V; Psurtseva, Nadezhda V; Kosogova, Tatiana A; Mazurkova, Natalia A; Khanin, Viacheslav A; Vlasenko, Viacheslav A

    2012-01-01

    Antiviral activity against type A influenza virus of birds A/chicken/Kurgan/05/2005 (H5N1) and humans A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) was investigated for aqueous extracts from mycelium of 11 basidial fungi species collected in the Altai Mountains (Altai Republic, Russia). The most perspective strains for producing antiviral medicines are studied strains Daedaleopsis confragosa, Datronia mollis, Ischnoderma benzoinum, Trametes gibbosa, T. versicolor, Laricifomes officinalis, and Lenzites betulina.

  6. In vitro antiviral activity of plant extracts from Asteraceae medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the high prevalence of viral infections having no specific treatment and the constant appearance of resistant viral strains, the development of novel antiviral agents is essential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), poliovirus type 2 (PV-2) and vesicular stomatitis virus of organic (OE) and aqueous extracts (AE) from: Baccharis gaudichaudiana, B. spicata, Bidens subalternans, Pluchea sagittalis, Tagetes minuta and Tessaria absinthioides. A characterization of the antiviral activity of B. gaudichaudiana OE and AE and the bioassay-guided fractionation of the former and isolation of one active compound is also reported. Methods The antiviral activity of the OE and AE of the selected plants was evaluated by reduction of the viral cytopathic effect. Active extracts were then assessed by plaque reduction assays. The antiviral activity of the most active extracts was characterized by evaluating their effect on the pretreatment, the virucidal activity and the effect on the adsorption or post-adsorption period of the viral cycle. The bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE was carried out by column chromatography followed by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography fractionation of the most active fraction and isolation of an active compound. The antiviral activity of this compound was also evaluated by plaque assay. Results B. gaudichaudiana and B. spicata OE were active against PV-2 and VSV. T. absinthioides OE was only active against PV-2. The corresponding three AE were active against HSV-1. B. gaudichaudiana extracts (OE and AE) were the most selective ones with selectivity index (SI) values of 10.9 (PV-2) and >117 (HSV-1). For this reason, both extracts of B. gaudichaudiana were selected to characterize their antiviral effects. Further bioassay-guided fractionation of B. gaudichaudiana OE led to an active fraction, FC (EC50

  7. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  8. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity of propolis of different geographic origin.

    PubMed

    Kujumgiev, A; Tsvetkova, I; Serkedjieva, Y; Bankova, V; Christov, R; Popov, S

    1999-03-01

    Propolis samples from different geographic origins were investigated for their antibacterial (against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli), antifungal (against Candida albicans) and antiviral (against Avian influenza virus) activities. All samples were active against the fungal and Gram-positive bacterial test strains, and most showed antiviral activity. The activities of all samples were similar in spite of the differences in their chemical composition. In samples from the temperate zone, flavonoids and esters of phenolic acids are known to be responsible for the above mentioned activities of bee glue; tropical samples did not contain such substances but showed similar activities. Obviously, in different samples, different substance combinations are essential for the biological activity of the bee glue. It seems that propolis has general pharmacological value as a natural mixture and not as a source of new powerful antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral compounds.

  9. The Effect of Menopause on the Innate Anti-Viral Activity of Cervicovaginal Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Catherine A.; Isaacs, Charles E.; XU, Weimin; Meyn, Leslie A.; Uranker, Kevin; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Moncla, Bernard J.; Hillier, Sharon L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reproductive hormones are known to impact innate mucosal immune function of the lower genital tract. Our objectives were to determine the effect of hormonal status on intrinsic anti-viral (HSV-1, HSV-2 and HIV-1) activity of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL). Methods CVL was collected from165 asymptomatic women which included post-menopausal women (n=29), women not on contraception in the days 1-14 (n=26) or days 15-28 (n=27) of the menstrual cycle, and women using the levonogerestrol intrauterine device (n=28), depomedroxyprogesterone acetate (n=28) or combined oral contraceptives (n=27). The anti-HSV-1/-2 and the anti-HIV-1 activity of the CVL were measured using plaque assays and the Jurkat-Tat-CCR5 assay, respectively. Results CVL from all of the groups had modest anti-viral activity. Anti-HIV-1 activity was decreased in CVL from postmenopausal women when compared to premenopausal women (11% vs. 34%, p=0.002). However there was no difference in anti-HIV-1 activity among premenopausal women regardless of phase of menstrual cycle or contraceptive use. Anti-HIV-1 activity was associated with the protein content of the CVL (r=0.44, p<0.001). There was no difference in anti-HSV-1 or -2 activity by hormonal group. Conclusions Menopause is associated with decreased innate HIV-1 activity in the lower genital tract, suggesting that factors in the vaginal fluid could play a role in increased susceptibility of HIV-1 infection in postmenopausal women. Hormonal contraceptive use, menopause and phase of menstrual cycle did not have a measurable impact on the intrinsic anti-HSV-1 or -2 activity. PMID:25818668

  10. Isohelical DNA-Binding Oligomers: Antiviral Activity and Application for the Design of Nanostructured Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursky, Georgy; Nikitin, Alexei; Surovaya, Anna; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Andronova, Valeria; Galegov, Georgy

    We performed a systematic search for new structural motifs isohelical to double-stranded DNA and found five motifs that can be used for the design and synthesis of new DNA-binding oligomers. Some of the DNA-binding oligomers can be equipped with fluorescence chromophores and metal-chelating groups and may serve as conductive wires in nano-scaled electric circuits. A series of new DNA-binding ligands were synthesized by a modular assembly of pyrrole carboxamides and novel pseudopeptides of the form (XY)n. Here, Y is a glycine residue; n is the degree of polymerization. X is an unusual amino acid residue containing a five-membered aromatic ring. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is studied. Bis-netropsins containing 15 and 31 lysine residues at the N-termini inhibit most effectively reproduction of the herpes virus type 1 in the Vero cell culture, including virus variants resistant to acyclovir and its analogues. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is correlated with their ability to interact with long clusters of AT-base pairs in the origin of replication of the viral DNA.

  11. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Yang, Yongbo; Barlow, Russell; Trapido-Rosenthal, Hank; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-08-07

    Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV) and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV), in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC). Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4), 258M(1), 298M(4), 313(2), 331M(2), 367M(1) and 397(1) appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2) shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts.

  12. Neuraminidase Activity and Resistance of 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus to Antiviral Activity in Bronchoalveolar Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ruangrung, Kanyarat; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Maneechotesuwan, Kittipong; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Assawabhumi, Jirawatna; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Uiprasertkul, Mongkol; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bronchoalveolar fluid is known to have anti-influenza activity. It is believed to be a frontline innate defense against the virus. Several antiviral factors, including surfactant protein D, are believed to contribute to the activity. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus was previously shown to be less sensitive to surfactant protein D. Nevertheless, whether different influenza virus strains have different sensitivities to the overall anti-influenza activity of human bronchoalveolar fluid was not known. We compared the sensitivities of 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1, and seasonal H3N2 influenza virus strains to inhibition by human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The pandemic and seasonal H1N1 strains showed lower sensitivity to human BAL fluid than the H3N2 strains. The BAL fluid anti-influenza activity could be enhanced by oseltamivir, indicating that the viral neuraminidase (NA) activity could provide resistance to the antiviral defense. In accordance with this finding, the BAL fluid anti-influenza activity was found to be sensitive to sialidase. The oseltamivir resistance mutation H275Y rendered the pandemic H1N1 virus but not the seasonal H1N1 virus more sensitive to BAL fluid. Since only the seasonal H1N1 but not the pandemic H1N1 had compensatory mutations that allowed oseltamivir-resistant strains to maintain NA enzymatic activity and transmission fitness, the resistance to BAL fluid of the drug-resistant seasonal H1N1 virus might play a role in viral fitness. IMPORTANCE Human airway secretion contains anti-influenza activity. Different influenza strains may vary in their susceptibilities to this antiviral activity. Here we show that the 2009 pandemic and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses were less sensitive to human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid than H3N2 seasonal influenza virus. The resistance to the pulmonary innate antiviral activity of the pandemic virus was determined by its neuraminidase (NA) gene, and it was shown that the

  13. Antiviral Activity of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Occurs via Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jeffrey W.; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies. PMID:22792064

  14. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jeffrey W; Ahmed, Mohammad; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub) cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs). However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR). WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  15. Induction of IFN-α Subtypes and Their Antiviral Activity in Mumps Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Šantak, Maja; Košutić-Gulija, Tanja; Jergović, Mladen; Jug, Renata; Forčić, Dubravko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human type I interferons (IFNs) comprise one IFN-β, -ω, -κ, and -ɛ and 12 different IFN-α subtypes, which play an important role in early host antiviral response. Despite their high structural homology and signaling through the same receptor, IFN-α subtypes exhibit different antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory activities. Differences in the production of IFN-α subtypes therefore determine the quality of an antiviral response. In this study, we investigated the pattern of IFN-α subtypes induced in infection with different mumps virus (MuV) strains and examined the MuV sensitivity to the action of IFN-α subtypes. We found that all IFN-α subtypes are being expressed in response to MuV infection with a highly similar IFN-α subtype pattern between the virus strains. We assessed an antiviral activity of several IFN-α subtypes: IFN-α1, IFN-α2, IFN-α4, IFN-α6, IFN-α8, IFN-α14, IFN-α17, and IFN-α21. Although they were all effective in suppressing MuV replication, the intensity and pattern of their action varied between MuV strains. Our results indicate that the overall IFN antiviral activity as well as the activity of specific IFN-α subtypes against MuV depend on a virus strain. PMID:25361048

  16. Antiviral activity and mode of action of propolis extracts and selected compounds.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Paul; Neuner, Annett; Nolkemper, Silke; Zundel, Christine; Nowack, Hans; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Reichling, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous and ethanol extracts of propolis were analysed phytochemically and examined for their antiviral activity in vitro. Different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The antiviral effect of propolis extracts and selected constituents, e.g. caffeic acid (1), p-coumaric acid (2), benzoic acid (3), galangin (4), pinocembrin (5) and chrysin (6) against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was analysed in cell culture. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanol propolis extracts for HSV-1 plaque formation was determined at 0.0004% and 0.000035%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests, plaque formation was significantly reduced by >98%. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity when the viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Among the analysed compounds, only galangin and chrysin displayed some antiviral activity. However, the extracts containing many different components exhibited significantly higher antiherpetic effects as well as higher selectivity indices than single isolated constituents. Propolis extracts might be suitable for topical application against herpes infection.

  17. Antiviral activity of natural products extracted from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Uzair, Bushra; Mahmood, Zahra; Tabassum, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and preclinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  18. Molecular Evolution of the Porcine Type I Interferon Family: Subtype-Specific Expression and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Bergkamp, Joseph; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs), key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has been phylogenetically

  19. Antiviral activities of Indonesian medicinal plants in the East Java region against hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The overall prevalence of HCV infection is 2%, representing 120 million people worldwide. Current standard treatment using pegylated interferon and ribavirin is effective in only 50% of the patients infected with HCV genotype 1, and is associated with significant side effects. Therefore, it is still of importance to develop new drugs for treatment of HCV. Antiviral substances obtained from natural products, including medicinal plants, are potentially good targets to study. In this study, we evaluated Indonesian medicinal plants for their anti-HCV activities. Methods Ethanol extracts of 21 samples derived from 17 species of medicinal plants explored in the East Java region were tested. Anti-HCV activities were determined by a cell culture method using Huh7.5 cells and HCV strains of 9 different genotypes (1a to 7a, 1b and 2b). Results Four of the 21 samples tested showed antiviral activities against HCV: Toona sureni leaves (TSL) with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 13.9 and 2.0 μg/ml against the HCV J6/JFH1-P47 and -P1 strains, respectively, Melicope latifolia leaves (MLL) with IC50 of 3.5 and 2.1 μg/ml, respectively, Melanolepis multiglandulosa stem (MMS) with IC50 of 17.1 and 6.2 μg/ml, respectively, and Ficus fistulosa leaves (FFL) with IC50 of 15.0 and 5.7 μg/ml, respectively. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that TSL and MLL inhibited both at the entry and post-entry steps while MMS and FFL principally at the entry step. TSL and MLL inhibited all of 11 HCV strains of all the genotypes tested to the same extent. On the other hand, FFL showed significantly weaker inhibitory activities against the HCV genotype 1a strain, and MMS against the HCV strains of genotypes 2b and 7a to a lesser extent, compared to the other HCV genotypes. Conclusions Ethanol extracts of TSL, MLL, MMS and FFL showed antiviral

  20. Cytotoxic, Virucidal, and Antiviral Activity of South American Plant and Algae Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Faral-Tello, Paula; Mirazo, Santiago; Dutra, Carmelo; Pérez, Andrés; Geis-Asteggiante, Lucía; Frabasile, Sandra; Koncke, Elina; Davyt, Danilo; Cavallaro, Lucía; Heinzen, Horacio; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection has a prevalence of 70% in the human population. Treatment is based on acyclovir, valacyclovir, and foscarnet, three drugs that share the same mechanism of action and of which resistant strains have been isolated from patients. In this aspect, innovative drug therapies are required. Natural products offer unlimited opportunities for the discovery of antiviral compounds. In this study, 28 extracts corresponding to 24 plant species and 4 alga species were assayed in vitro to detect antiviral activity against HSV-1. Six of the methanolic extracts inactivated viral particles by direct interaction and 14 presented antiviral activity when incubated with cells already infected. Most interesting antiviral activity values obtained are those of Limonium brasiliense, Psidium guajava, and Phyllanthus niruri, which inhibit HSV-1 replication in vitro with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 185, 118, and 60 μg/mL, respectively. For these extracts toxicity values were calculated and therefore selectivity indexes (SI) obtained. Further characterization of the bioactive components of antiviral plants will pave the way for the discovery of new compounds against HSV-1. PMID:22619617

  1. Antiviral Activity of Porcine Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 against Swine Viruses in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Chang, Hongtao; Yang, Xia; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Chuanqing; Zhao, Jun

    2015-11-17

    Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), as an important transcription factor, is abundantly induced upon virus infections and participates in host antiviral immune responses. However, the roles of porcine IRF1 (poIRF1) in host antiviral defense remain poorly understood. In this study, we determined that poIRF1 was upregulated upon infection with viruses and distributed in nucleus in porcine PK-15 cells. Subsequently, we tested the antiviral activities of poIRF1 against several swine viruses in cells. Overexpression of poIRF1 can efficiently suppress the replication of viruses, and knockdown of poIRF1 promotes moderately viral replication. Interestingly, overexpression of poIRF1 enhances dsRNA-induced IFN-β and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activation, whereas knockdown of poIRF1 cannot significantly affect the activation of IFN-β promoter induced by RNA viruses. This study suggests that poIRF1 plays a significant role in cellular antiviral response against swine viruses, but might be dispensable for IFN-β induction triggered by RNA viruses in PK-15 cells. Given these results, poIRF1 plays potential roles in cellular antiviral responses against swine viruses.

  2. Effect of Antiviral Therapy on Serum Activity of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Husic-Selimovic, Azra; Sofic, Amela; Huskic, Jasminko; Bulja, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Renin-angiotenzin system (RAS) is frequently activated in patients with chronic liver disease. Angiotenzin - II (AT-II), produced by angiotenzin converting enzyme (ACE), has many physiological effects, including an important role in liver fibrogenesis. Combined antiviral therapy with PEG-IFN and ribavirin besides its antiviral effect also leads to a reduction in liver parenchyma fibrosis. Aim of the study: Determining the value of ACE in serum of patients with chronic hepatitis C before and after combined antiviral therapy, as well as the value of ACE activities in sera of the control group. Materials and methods: We studied 50 patients treated at Gastroenterohepatology Department, in the time-period of four years. Value of ACE in serum was determined by Olympus AU 400 device, with application of kit “Infinity TN ACE Liquid Stable Reagent”. HCV RNA levels in sera were measured by real time PCR. HCV RNA test was performed with modular analysis of AMPLICOR and COBAS AMPLICOR HCV MONITOR test v2.0, which has proved infection and was used for quantification of the viruses and monitoring of the patients’ response to therapy. Liver histology was evaluated in accordance with the level of necroinflammation activity and stage of fibrosis. Results: Serum activities of ACE in chronic hepatitis C patients is statistically higher than the values in the control group (p=0.02). Antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients statistically decreases serum activities of ACE (p= 0.02) and indirectly affects fibrogenesis of the liver parenchyma. Correlation between ACE and ALT activity after the therapy was proved (0.3934). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the activity of ACE in serum is a good indirect parameter of the liver damage, and could be used as an indirect prognostic factor of the level of liver parenchyma damage. Serum activity of ACE can be used as a parameter for non-invasive assessment of intensity of liver damage. PMID:27147779

  3. Effects of pseudorabies virus infection upon cytotoxicity and antiviral activities of porcine alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, G; Pijoan, C; Molitor, T

    1992-10-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) infected with Pseudorabies virus (PRV) were compared to noninfected AM for cytotoxicity against foreign or transformed cells and production of interferon (IFN). Five PRV strains were used to infect AM including strains that are known to be highly virulent for pigs, i.e. strain 4892 and strain S-62 as well as strains that are regarded as mild or nonvirulent, i.e. BUK and Bartha. The multiplicity of infection ranged from 0.005 to 0.05 TCID50/cell. The target cells in the cytotoxicity assays were either chicken red blood cells, PRV-infected vero cells, or human myeloblastoma cells (K562 cell line). For the production of IFN, AM cultures were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C) diluted in tissue culture media at a concentration of 5 micrograms/10(6) cells. Culture supernatants were collected at various times poststimulation and tested for antiviral activity using the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus replication inhibition test. Swine AM were able to lyse chicken red blood cells in an antibody-independent way but not in an antibody-dependent way, whereas lysis of PRV-infected vero cells was accomplished both ways. The cytotoxicity against chicken red blood cells was reduced in the PRV-infected AM as compared to noninfected cells, particularly in AM infected with virulent PRV strains. Specific 51Cr release values for AM infected with S-62 and 4892 strains were 14 and 19, while the noninfected AM had values of 36. Similarly, in the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay against PRV-infected vero cells there was no activity of AM against K562 cells. The production of IFN was readily stimulated with Poly I:C. The optimal time for supernatant collection was between 12 and 16 h poststimulation. The antiviral activity was abrogated by treatment of the supernatant with antiserum against human leukocyte IFN; it was therefore considered to be due to interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) released from the macrophages. The antiviral activity present in

  4. Antiviral activities of hybrids of two major human leukocyte interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Weck, P K; Apperson, S; Stebbing, N; Gray, P W; Leung, D; Shepard, H M; Goeddel, D V

    1981-01-01

    Four hybrid human leukocyte interferon (LeIF or IFN-alpha) genes have been constructed by in vitro recombination of LeIF-A (IFN-alpha 2) and LeIF-D (IFN-alpha 1) genes at common restriction endonuclease sites located within their coding regions. These hybrid genes have been expressed in E. coli under trp promoter control. The interferons produced [LeIF-AD (BglII), -AD (PvuII), -DA (BglII), -DA (PvuII)] have antiviral properties distinct from the parental molecules LeIF-A and -D, varying considerably in their abilities to inhibit plaque formation by different viruses in a range of mammalian cells. All six of the cloned LeIFs exhibit the heat stability, pH 2 stability and antigenic specificity of natural leukocyte interferons. PMID:6171779

  5. Antiviral Activity of Chrysin Derivatives against Coxsackievirus B3 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Jang, Hongjun; Kang, Hyunju; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Kwisung; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Hyoungsu

    2015-01-01

    Chrysin is a 5,7-dihydroxyflavone and was recently shown to potently inhibit enterovirus 71 (EV71) by suppressing viral 3C protease (3Cpro) activity. In the current study, we investigated whether chrysin also shows antiviral activity against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), which belongs to the same genus (Enterovirus) as EV71, and assessed its ability to prevent the resulting acute pancreatitis and myocarditis. We found that chrysin showed antiviral activity against CVB3 at 10 μM, but exhibited mild cellular cytotoxicity at 50 μM, prompting us to synthesize derivatives of chrysin to increase the antiviral activity and reduce its cytotoxicity. Among four 4-substituted benzyl derivatives derived from C(5) benzyl-protected derivatives 7, 9–11 had significant antiviral activity and showed the most potent activity against CVB3 with low cytotoxicity in Vero cells. Intraperitoneal injection of CVB3 in BALB/c mice with 1×106 TCID50 (50% tissue culture infective dose) of CVB3 induced acute pancreatitis with ablation of acinar cells and increased serum CXCL1 levels, whereas the daily administration of 9 for 5 days significantly alleviated the pancreatic inflammation and reduced the elevation in serum CXCL1 levels. Collectively, we assessed the anti-CVB3 activities of chrysin and its derivatives, and found that among 4-substituted benzyl derivatives, 9 exhibited the highest activity against CVB3 in vivo, and protected mice from CVB3-induced pancreatic damage, simultaneously lowering serum CXCL1 levels. PMID:26336587

  6. A mastoparan-derived peptide has broad-spectrum antiviral activity against enveloped viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sample, Christopher J.; Hudak, Kathryn E.; Barefoot, Brice E.; Koci, Matthew D.; Wanyonyi, Moses S.; Abraham, Soman; Staats, Herman F.; Ramsburg, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs are urgently needed to treat individuals infected with new and re-emerging viruses, or with viruses that have developed resistance to antiviral therapies. Mammalian natural host defense peptides (mNHP) are short, usually cationic, peptides that have direct antimicrobial activity, and which in some instances activate cell-mediated antiviral immune responses. Although mNHP have potent activity in vitro, efficacy trials in vivo of exogenously provided mNHP have been largely disappointing, and no mNHP are currently licensed for human use. Mastoparan is an invertebrate host defense peptide that penetrates lipid bilayers, and we reasoned that a mastoparan analog might interact with the lipid component of virus membranes and thereby reduce infectivity of enveloped viruses. Our objective was to determine whether mastoparan-derived peptide MP7-NH2 could inactivate viruses of multiple types, and whether it could stimulate cell-mediated antiviral activity. We found that MP7-NH2 potently inactivated a range of enveloped viruses. Consistent with our proposed mechanism of action, MP7-NH2 was not efficacious against a non-enveloped virus. Pre-treatment of cells with MP7-NH2 did not reduce the amount of virus recovered after infection, which suggested that the primary mechanism of action in vitro was direct inactivation of virus by MP7-NH2. These results demonstrate for the first time that a mastoparan derivative has broad-spectrum antiviral activity in vitro and suggest that further investigation of the antiviral properties of mastoparan peptides in vivo is warranted. PMID:23891650

  7. Antiviral activity of polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids. I. Mode of action in vitro.

    PubMed

    De Somer, P; De Clercq, E; Billiau, A; Schonne, E; Claesen, M

    1968-09-01

    Polyacrylic acid (PAA) and polymethacrylic acid (PMAA) were investigated for their antiviral properties in tissue culture. Compared to other related polyanions, as dextran sulfate, polystyrene sulfonate, polyvinyl sulfate, and polyphloroglucinol phosphate, PAA and PMAA were found to be significantly more antivirally active and less cytotoxic. PMAA added 24 hr prior to virus inoculation inhibited viral growth most efficiently but it was still effective when added 3 hr after infection. Neither a direct irreversible action on the virus nor inhibition of virus penetration into the cell could explain the antiviral activity of PMAA. PMAA inhibited the adsorption of the virus to the host cell and suppressed the one-cycle viral synthesis in tissue cultures inoculated with infectious RNA.

  8. Egyptian propolis: 2. Chemical composition, antiviral and antimicrobial activities of East Nile Delta propolis.

    PubMed

    Abd El Hady, Faten K; Hegazi, Ahmed G

    2002-01-01

    Three propolis samples from East Nile Delta, Egypt were collected. Propolis samples were investigated by GC/MS,103 compounds were identified, 20 being new for propolis. Dakahlia propolis was a typical poplar propolis but it contained two new caffeate esters and two new triterpenoids. Ismailia propolis was characterized by the presence of new triterpenic acid methyl esters and it did not contain any aromatic acids, esters and flavonoids. Sharkia propolis was characterized by the presence of caffeate esters only, some di- and triterpenoids. The antiviral (Infectious Bursal Disease Virus and Reo-Virus) and antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) activities of propolis samples were investigated. Dakahlia propolis showed the highest antiviral activity against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) and the highest antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and the highest antifungal activity against Candida albicans. While Ismailia propolis had the highest antiviral activity against Reo-virus. Sharkia propolis showed the highest antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and moderate antiviral activity against infectious bursal disease virus and reovirus.

  9. Phytochemical screening, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of hexane fraction of Phaleria macrocarpa fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismaeel, Mahmud Yusef Yusef; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Tahir, Mariya Mohd.; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Phaleria macrocarpa fruits have been widely used in the traditional medicine for the treatment of several infections. The current study was done to determine the phytochemical content, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of the hexane fraction (HF) of P. macrocarpa fruits. In the hexane fraction of P. macarocarpa fruits, phytochemical screening showed the presence of terpenoids whereas saponins, alkaloids, tannins and anthraquinones were not present. Evaluation on Vero cell lines by using MTT assay showed that the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) value was 0.48 mg/mL indicating that the fraction is not cytotoxic. Antiviral properties of the plant extracts were determined by plaque reduction assay. The effective concentration (EC50) was 0.18 mg/mL. Whereas the selective index (SI = CC50/EC50) of hexane fraction is 2.6 indicating low to moderate potential as antiviral agent.

  10. Antiviral activity of KR-23502 targeting nuclear export of influenza B virus ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yejin; Lee, Hye Won; Shin, Jin Soo; Go, Yun Young; Kim, Chonsaeng; Shin, Daeho; Malpani, Yashwardhan; Han, Soo Bong; Jung, Young-Sik; Kim, Meehyein

    2016-10-01

    The spiro compound 5,6-dimethyl-3H,3'H-spiro(benzofuran-2,1'-isobenzofuran)-3,3'-dione (KR-23502) has antiviral activity against influenza A and more potently B viruses. The aim of this study is to elucidate its mechanism of action. Subcellular localization and time-course expression of influenza B viral proteins, nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein 1 (M1), showed that KR-23502 reduced their amounts within 5 h post-infection. Early steps of virus life cycle, including virus entry, nuclear localization of NP and viral RNA-dependent RNA replication, were not affected by KR-23502. Instead it interrupted a later event corresponding to nuclear export of NP and M1 proteins. Delivery of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP)-M1 complex has been known to be mediated by the viral nuclear export protein (NEP) through interaction with cellular chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) protein. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated that the compound targets the nuclear export of vRNP. Moreover, a single mutation (aspartate to glycine) at amino acid position 54 in M1 [M1(D54G)] was detected after 18 passages in the presence of KR-23502 with a 2-fold increase in 50% effective concentration indicating that this compound has a relatively high genetic barrier to resistance. Interestingly, it was observed that proteasome-mediated degradation of M1(D54G) was attenuated by KR-23502. In conclusion, we suggest that KR-23502 shows its anti-influenza activity by downregulating NEP/CRM1-mediated nuclear export of influenza vRNP and M1. KR-23502 provides a core chemical skeleton for further structure-based design of novel antivirals against influenza viruses.

  11. Highly efficient antiviral and antibacterial activities of solid-state cuprous compounds.

    PubMed

    Sunada, Kayano; Minoshima, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2012-10-15

    We found that several solid-state cuprous compounds, including cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), sulfide (Cu(2)S), iodide (CuI), and chloride (CuCl), have highly efficient antiviral activities, whereas those of solid-state silver and cupric compounds are markedly lower. On a Cu(2)O-loaded glass substrate, for example, the infectious activity of bacteriophages was reduced by 5-orders of magnitude within 30 min and by 3-orders of magnitude within 1h for bacteria. In contrast, the infectious activities of both phages and bacteria were not markedly reduced on CuO-loaded substrates within a similar time frame. To determine the origin of this inhibitory activity, we investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leached copper ions, and the solid-state compound itself against bacteriophages, and concluded that infectious activity is lost following direct contact with the solid-state surface of cuprous compounds, but not ROS or copper ions. Furthermore, we found that Cu(2)O adsorbed and denatured more proteins than CuO, which suggests the difference of the inhibitory activity between Cu(2)O and CuO.

  12. JOSD1 Negatively Regulates Type-I Interferon Antiviral Activity by Deubiquitinating and Stabilizing SOCS1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Liting; Zhang, Yunli; Zhao, Peng; Qian, Liping; Yuan, Yukang; Liu, Jin; Cheng, Qiao; Xu, Wenqian; Zuo, Yibo; Guo, Tingting; Yu, Zhengyuan; Zheng, Hui

    2017-03-29

    The Josephin domain-containing (JOSD) protein 1 (JOSD1) is recognized as one member of deubiquitinases (DUBs) due to its catalytic "Josephin" domain. However, the in vivo deubiquitinating activity of JOSD1 remains unidentified, and the biological functions of JOSD1 are largely unknown. In this study, we report that JOSD1 plays an important role in regulating type-I interferon (IFN-I)-mediated antiviral activity. JOSD1 physically interacts with SOCS1, which is an essential negative regulator of many cytokines signaling, and enhances SOCS1 stability by deubiquitinating K48-linked polyubiquitination of SOCS1. Furthermore, JOSD1 inhibits IFN-I-induced signaling pathway and antiviral response. Interestingly, during the early stage of viral infections, the levels of JOSD1 and SOCS1 undergo downregulation, which may facilitate activation of IFN-I signaling and efficient antiviral activity. Thus, our finding identified the first deubiquitinating substrate of JOSD1 and a novel biological function of JOSD1 and may provide a potential target for IFNs-based antiviral therapy.

  13. Activity of and Effect of Subcutaneous Treatment with the Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Lectin Griffithsin in Two Laboratory Rodent Models

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Christopher; Kouokam, J. Calvin; Lasnik, Amanda B.; Foreman, Oded; Cambon, Alexander; Brock, Guy; Montefiori, David C.; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; McCormick, Alison A.; O'Keefe, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is a red-alga-derived lectin that binds the terminal mannose residues of N-linked glycans found on the surface of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and other enveloped viruses, including hepatitis C virus (HCV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Ebola virus. GRFT displays no human T-cell mitogenic activity and does not induce production of proinflammatory cytokines in treated human cell lines. However, despite the growing evidence showing the broad-spectrum nanomolar or better antiviral activity of GRFT, no study has reported a comprehensive assessment of GRFT safety as a potential systemic antiviral treatment. The results presented in this work show that minimal toxicity was induced by a range of single and repeated daily subcutaneous doses of GRFT in two rodent species, although we noted treatment-associated increases in spleen and liver mass suggestive of an antidrug immune response. The drug is systemically distributed, accumulating to high levels in the serum and plasma after subcutaneous delivery. Further, we showed that serum from GRFT-treated animals retained antiviral activity against HIV-1-enveloped pseudoviruses in a cell-based neutralization assay. Overall, our data presented here show that GRFT accumulates to relevant therapeutic concentrations which are tolerated with minimal toxicity. These studies support further development of GRFT as a systemic antiviral therapeutic agent against enveloped viruses, although deimmunizing the molecule may be necessary if it is to be used in long-term treatment of chronic viral infections. PMID:24145548

  14. Antiviral Activity of HPMPC (Cidofovir) Against ORF Virus Infected Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Scagliarini, A.; McInnes, C.J.; Gallina, L.; Dal, Pozzo F.; Scagliarini, L.; Snoeck, R.; Prosperi, S.; Sales, J.; Gilray, J.A.; Nettleton, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    (S)-9-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]-2,6-diaminopurine (HPMPC, cidofovir, CDV, Vistide®) is an acyclic nucleoside analogue with a potent and selective activity against a broad spectrum of DNA viruses including the poxviruses. In this study we present the results of different treatment regimens in lambs experimentally infected with orf virus with different cidofovir formulations prepared in Beeler basis and Unguentum M. Our results show that choice of excipient, concentration of cidofovir and treatment regimen were all important to the clinical outcome of the therapy. Whilst one particular regimen appeared to exacerbate the lesion, treatment with 1% w/v cidofovir cream, prepared in Beeler Basis, for 4 consecutive days did result in milder lesions that resolved more quickly than untreated lesions. Furthermore the scabs of the treated animals contained significantly lower amounts of viable virus meaning there should be less contamination of the environment with virus than would normally occur. PMID:17049627

  15. Chemical Derivatives of a Small Molecule Deubiquitinase Inhibitor Have Antiviral Activity against Several RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Pal, Anupama; Gyan, Kofi E.; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Showalter, Hollis D.; Donato, Nicholas J.; O'Riordan, Mary; Wobus, Christiane E.

    2014-01-01

    Most antiviral treatment options target the invading pathogen and unavoidably encounter loss of efficacy as the pathogen mutates to overcome replication restrictions. A good strategy for circumventing drug resistance, or for pathogens without treatment options, is to target host cell proteins that are utilized by viruses during infection. The small molecule WP1130 is a selective deubiquitinase inhibitor shown previously to successfully reduce replication of noroviruses and some other RNA viruses. In this study, we screened a library of 31 small molecule derivatives of WP1130 to identify compounds that retained the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of the parent compound in vitro but exhibited improved drug-like properties, particularly increased aqueous solubility. Seventeen compounds significantly reduced murine norovirus infection in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, with four causing decreases in viral titers that were similar or slightly better than WP1130 (1.9 to 2.6 log scale). Antiviral activity was observed following pre-treatment and up to 1 hour postinfection in RAW 264.7 cells as well as in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. Treatment of the human norovirus replicon system cell line with the same four compounds also decreased levels of Norwalk virus RNA. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the working concentration of 5 µM for all compounds tested. In addition, the WP1130 derivatives maintained their broad-spectrum antiviral activity against other RNA viruses, Sindbis virus, LaCrosse virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, and Tulane virus. Thus, altering structural characteristics of WP1130 can maintain effective broad-spectrum antiviral activity while increasing aqueous solubility. PMID:24722666

  16. Chemical derivatives of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor have antiviral activity against several RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J; Pal, Anupama; Gyan, Kofi E; Charbonneau, Marie-Eve; Showalter, Hollis D; Donato, Nicholas J; O'Riordan, Mary; Wobus, Christiane E

    2014-01-01

    Most antiviral treatment options target the invading pathogen and unavoidably encounter loss of efficacy as the pathogen mutates to overcome replication restrictions. A good strategy for circumventing drug resistance, or for pathogens without treatment options, is to target host cell proteins that are utilized by viruses during infection. The small molecule WP1130 is a selective deubiquitinase inhibitor shown previously to successfully reduce replication of noroviruses and some other RNA viruses. In this study, we screened a library of 31 small molecule derivatives of WP1130 to identify compounds that retained the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of the parent compound in vitro but exhibited improved drug-like properties, particularly increased aqueous solubility. Seventeen compounds significantly reduced murine norovirus infection in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, with four causing decreases in viral titers that were similar or slightly better than WP1130 (1.9 to 2.6 log scale). Antiviral activity was observed following pre-treatment and up to 1 hour postinfection in RAW 264.7 cells as well as in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages. Treatment of the human norovirus replicon system cell line with the same four compounds also decreased levels of Norwalk virus RNA. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the working concentration of 5 µM for all compounds tested. In addition, the WP1130 derivatives maintained their broad-spectrum antiviral activity against other RNA viruses, Sindbis virus, LaCrosse virus, encephalomyocarditis virus, and Tulane virus. Thus, altering structural characteristics of WP1130 can maintain effective broad-spectrum antiviral activity while increasing aqueous solubility.

  17. Antiviral activity of salivary microRNAs for ophthalmic herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Irmak, M Kemal; Erdem, Uzeyir; Kubar, Ayhan

    2012-06-07

    Ophthalmic herpes zoster is a common ocular infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Viral mRNA transcripts play a major role in the replicative cycle of the virus and current antiviral agents have little effect in preventing and treating the complications. Therapeutic use of saliva for certain painful ocular diseases such as ophthalmic herpes zoster is a well-known public practice in our region. We thought that antiviral activity of saliva may stem from salivary microvesicles and we aimed to look for molecules with antiviral activity in these vesicles. As a possible candidate for antiviral activity, salivary microvesicles contain at least 20 microRNAs (miRNAs), small noncoding RNAs, which suppress the translation of target mRNAs. miRNAs not only participate in maintenance of normal cell functions, but are also involved in host-virus interactions and limit the replication of certain virus types. Thus, miRNA gene therapy by targeting mRNAs required for VZV survival may find a niche in the treatment of ophthalmic herpes zoster. But, how could salivary microvesicles reach into the corneal cells to demonstrate their antiviral activity. We suggest that human salivary microvesicles can be effective carriers of miRNA for corneal cells, because they contain a molecular machinery for vesicle trafficking and fusion allowing them to be endocytosed by target cells. After binding to the plasma membrane, microvesicles seem to enter into the corneal cells through the clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In the cytosol, human salivary miRNAs base-pair with specific viral mRNAs and inhibit their translation, thus limiting the replication of the virus.

  18. RNA interference screening of interferon-stimulated genes with antiviral activities against classical swine fever virus using a reporter virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Li, Yongfeng; Li, Lian-Feng; Shen, Liang; Zhang, Lingkai; Yu, Jiahui; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2016-04-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and often fatal disease of pigs, which leads to significant economic losses in many countries. Viral infection can induce the production of interferons (IFNs), giving rise to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) to exert antiviral effects. Although numerous ISGs have been identified to possess antiviral activities against different viruses, rare anti-CSFV ISGs have been reported to date. In this study, to screen anti-CSFV ISGs, twenty-one ISGs reported previously were individually knocked down using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) followed by infection with a reporter CSFV expressing Renilla luciferase (Rluc). As a result, four novel anti-CSFV ISGs were identified, including natural-resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1), cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase III A (NT5C3A), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10), and 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), which were further verified to exhibit antiviral activities against wild-type CSFV. We conclude that the reporter virus is a useful tool for efficient screening anti-CSFV ISGs.

  19. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  20. A 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid-Gelatin Conjugate: The Synthesis, Antiviral Activity and Mechanism of Antiviral Action Against Two Alphaherpesviruses.

    PubMed

    Lisov, Alexander; Vrublevskaya, Veronika; Lisova, Zoy; Leontievsky, Alexey; Morenkov, Oleg

    2015-10-15

    Various natural and synthetic polyanionic polymers with different chemical structures are known to exhibit potent antiviral activity in vitro toward a variety of enveloped viruses and may be considered as promising therapeutic agents. A water-soluble conjugate of 2,5-dihydroxybezoic acid (2,5-DHBA) with gelatin was synthesized by laccase-catalyzed oxidation of 2,5-DHBA in the presence of gelatin, and its antiviral activity against pseudorabies virus (PRV) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1), two members of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily, was studied. The conjugate produced no direct cytotoxic effect on cells, and did not inhibit cell growth at concentrations up to 1000 µg/mL. It exhibited potent antiviral activity against PRV (IC50, 1.5-15 µg/mL for different virus strains) and BoHV-1 (IC50, 0.5-0.7 µg/mL). When present during virus adsorption, the conjugate strongly inhibited the attachment of PRV and BoHV-1 to cells. The 2,5-DHBA-gelatin conjugate had no direct virucidal effect on the viruses and did not influence their penetration into cells, cell-to-cell spread, production of infectious virus particles in cells, and expression of PRV glycoproteins E and B. The results indicated that the 2,5-DHBA-gelatin conjugate strongly inhibits the adsorption of alphaherpesviruses to cells and can be a promising synthetic polymer for the development of antiviral formulations against alphaherpesvirus infections.

  1. Investigation of medicinal plants of togo for antiviral and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Anani, K; Hudson, J B; de Souza, C; Akpagana, K; Tower, G H; Arnason, J T; Gbeassor, M

    2000-01-01

    Methanol extracts were prepared from 19 medicinal plants of Togo and, by means of standard laboratory tests, were analysed for antiviral and antibiotic activities. Ten of the 19 showed significant antiviral activity and all but two displayed antibiotic activity. Extracts of three species, Adansonia digitata (the most potent), Conyza aegyptiaca and Palisota hirsuta , were active against all three test viruses (herpes simplex, Sindbis and poliovirus). The other seven, however, were more selective, showing activity against only one or two viruses. The antibiotic profiles varied considerably. The observation that each extract showed a distinctive permutation of target organisms suggests that different bioactive phytochemicals are present in each species. Only two of the extracts were devoid of bioactivity.

  2. Tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles show antiviral activity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  3. Tannic Acid Modified Silver Nanoparticles Show Antiviral Activity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections. PMID:25117537

  4. Amphipathic DNA polymers exhibit antiviral activity against systemic Murine Cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Phosphorothioated oligonucleotides (PS-ONs) have a sequence-independent, broad spectrum antiviral activity as amphipathic polymers (APs) and exhibit potent in vitro antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of herpesviruses: HSV-1, HSV-2, HCMV, VZV, EBV, and HHV-6A/B, and in vivo activity in a murine microbiocide model of genital HSV-2 infection. The activity of these agents against animal cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections in vitro and in vivo was therefore investigated. Results In vitro, a 40 mer degenerate AP (REP 9) inhibited both murine CMV (MCMV) and guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) with an IC50 of 0.045 μM and 0.16 μM, respectively, and a 40 mer poly C AP (REP 9C) inhibited MCMV with an IC50 of 0.05 μM. Addition of REP 9 to plaque assays during the first two hours of infection inhibited 78% of plaque formation whereas addition of REP 9 after 10 hours of infection did not significantly reduce the number of plaques, indicating that REP 9 antiviral activity against MCMV occurs at early times after infection. In a murine model of CMV infection, systemic treatment for 5 days significantly reduced virus replication in the spleens and livers of infected mice compared to saline-treated control mice. REP 9 and REP 9C were administered intraperitoneally for 5 consecutive days at 10 mg/kg, starting 2 days prior to MCMV infection. Splenomegaly was observed in infected mice treated with REP 9 but not in control mice or in REP 9 treated, uninfected mice, consistent with mild CpG-like activity. When REP 9C (which lacks CpG motifs) was compared to REP 9, it exhibited comparable antiviral activity as REP 9 but was not associated with splenomegaly. This suggests that the direct antiviral activity of APs is the predominant therapeutic mechanism in vivo. Moreover, REP 9C, which is acid stable, was effective when administered orally in combination with known permeation enhancers. Conclusion These studies indicate that APs exhibit potent, well tolerated antiviral activity

  5. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  6. Synthesis of camphecene derivatives using click chemistry methodology and study of their antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Artyushin, Oleg I; Sharova, Elena V; Vinogradova, Natalya M; Genkina, Galina K; Moiseeva, Aleksandra A; Klemenkova, Zinaida S; Orshanskaya, Iana R; Shtro, Anna A; Kadyrova, Renata A; Zarubaev, Vladimir V; Yarovaya, Olga I; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Brel, Valery K

    2017-03-22

    A series of seventeen tetrazole derivatives of 1,7,7-trimethyl-[2.2.1]bicycloheptane were synthesized using click chemistry methodology and characterized by spectral data. Studies of cytotoxicity and in vitro antiviral activity against influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) in MDCK cells of the compounds obtained were performed. The structure-activity relationship analysis suggests that to possess virus-inhibiting activity, the compounds of this group should bear oxygen atom with a short linker (C2-C4), either as a hydroxyl group (18, 19, 29), keto-group (21) or as a part of a heterocycle (24). These compounds demonstrated low cytotoxicity along with high anti-viral activity.

  7. Antimicrobial, antiviral and antioxidant activities of "água-mel" from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria G; Faleiro, Leonor; Antunes, Maria D; Aazza, Smail; Duarte, Joana; Silvério, Ana R

    2013-06-01

    "Água-mel" is a honey-based product produced in Portugal for ancient times. Several attributes have been reported to "água-mel" particularly in the alleviation of simple symptoms of upper respiratory tract. Samples of "água-mel" from diverse beekeepers from different regions of Portugal were studied in what concerns antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiviral properties. The amounts of phenol and brown pigment were also evaluated and correlated with the antioxidant activities. A great variability on the levels of these compounds was found among samples which were responsible for the variability detected also on the antioxidant activities, independent on the method used. Generally, antioxidant activity correlated better with brown pigments' amount than with phenols' content. The antimicrobial activity found for "água-mel" samples confirm the virtues reported by popular findings. In addition, this work also reveals the antiviral properties of "água-mel" evidenced by a decrease on the infectivity of the Qβ bacteriophage.

  8. Expression of feline interferon-alpha subtypes in Esherichia coli, and their antiviral activity and animal species specificity.

    PubMed

    Taira, Osamu; Suzuki, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuko; Aramaki, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Itsuki; Watanabe, Takao; Motokawa, Kenji; Arai, Setsuo; Sato, Hisaaki; Maehara, Nobutoshi

    2005-05-01

    Two kinds of FeIFN-alpha consisting of 166 amino acids (aa) and 171 aa were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified proteins were tested for antiviral activity on homologous and heterologous animal cells. Crude FeIFN induced in feline cells revealed antiviral activity on both homologous and heterologous animal cells. In contrast, both types of recombinant FeIFN-alpha revealed antiviral activity only on the feline cells. All of the FeIFN-alpha subtypes showed high activity to vesicular stomatitis virus, and the three species of feline viruses belonging to different families.

  9. Antiviral Activity of Chrysin Derivatives against Coxsackievirus B3 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Kwon, Bo-Eun; Jang, Hongjun; Kang, Hyunju; Cho, Sungchan; Park, Kwisung; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Hyoungsu

    2015-09-01

    Chrysin is a 5,7-dihydroxyflavone and was recently shown to potently inhibit enterovirus 71 (EV71) by suppressing viral 3C protease (3C(pro)) activity. In the current study, we investigated whether chrysin also shows antiviral activity against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), which belongs to the same genus (Enterovirus) as EV71, and assessed its ability to prevent the resulting acute pancreatitis and myocarditis. We found that chrysin showed antiviral activity against CVB3 at 10 μM, but exhibited mild cellular cytotoxicity at 50 μM, prompting us to synthesize derivatives of chrysin to increase the antiviral activity and reduce its cytotoxicity. Among four 4-substituted benzyl derivatives derived from C(5) benzyl-protected derivatives 7, 9-11 had significant antiviral activity and showed the most potent activity against CVB3 with low cytotoxicity in Vero cells. Intraperitoneal injection of CVB3 in BALB/c mice with 1×10(6) TCID50 (50% tissue culture infective dose) of CVB3 induced acute pancreatitis with ablation of acinar cells and increased serum CXCL1 levels, whereas the daily administration of 9 for 5 days significantly alleviated the pancreatic inflammation and reduced the elevation in serum CXCL1 levels. Collectively, we assessed the anti-CVB3 activities of chrysin and its derivatives, and found that among 4-substituted benzyl derivatives, 9 exhibited the highest activity against CVB3 in vivo, and protected mice from CVB3-induced pancreatic damage, simultaneously lowering serum CXCL1 levels.

  10. Intracellular RNA recognition pathway activates strong anti-viral response in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, J; Rintahaka, J; Kovanen, P T; Matikainen, S; Eklund, K K

    2013-04-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the first line of defence against parasites and bacteria, but less is known about their role in anti-viral responses. Allergic diseases often exacerbate during viral infection, suggesting an increased activation of mast cells in the process. In this study we investigated human mast cell response to double-stranded RNA and viral infection. Cultured human mast cells were incubated with poly(I:C), a synthetic RNA analogue and live Sendai virus as a model of RNA parainfluenza virus infection, and analysed for their anti-viral response. Mast cells responded to intracellular poly(I:C) by inducing type 1 and type 3 interferons and TNF-α. In contrast, extracellular Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR)-3-activating poly(I:C) failed to induce such response. Infection of mast cells with live Sendai virus induced an anti-viral response similar to that of intracellular poly(I:C). Type 1, but not type 3 interferons, up-regulated the expression of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-1 (RIG-1), and TLR-3, demonstrating that human mast cells do not express functional receptors for type 3 interferons. Furthermore, virus infection induced the anti-viral proteins MxA and IFIT3 in human mast cells. In conclusion, our results support the notion that mast cells can recognize an invading virus through intracellular virus sensors and produce high amounts of type 1 and type 3 interferons and the anti-viral proteins human myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) and interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3 (IFIT3) in response to the virus infection.

  11. Synthesis and characteristics of (Hydrogenated) ferulic acid derivatives as potential antiviral agents with insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant viruses cause many serious plant diseases and are currently suppressed with the simultaneous use of virucides and insecticides. The use of such materials, however, increases the amounts of pollutants in the environment. To reduce environmental contaminants, virucides with insecticidal activity is an attractive option. Results A series of substituted ferulic acid amide derivatives 7 and the corresponding hydrogenated ferulic acid amide derivatives 13 were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral and insecticidal activities. The majority of the synthesized compounds exhibited good levels of antiviral activity against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMW), with compounds 7a, 7b and 7d in particular providing higher levels of protective and curative activities against TMV at 500 μg/mL than the control compound ribavirin. Furthermore, these compounds displayed good insecticidal activities against insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, which can spread plant viruses between and within crops. Conclusions Two series of ferulic acid derivatives have been synthesized efficiently. The bioassay showed title compounds not only inhibit the plant viral infection, but also prevented the spread of plant virus by insect vectors. These findings therefore demonstrate that the ferulic acid amides represent a new template for future antiviral studies. PMID:23409923

  12. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Duran, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; Muz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. Material/Methods All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We inoculated 1×105 cells per ml and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum into each well. Studies to determine cytotoxic effect were performed. To investigate the presence of antiviral activity of propolis samples, different concentrations of propolis (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 75, 50, and 25 μg/mL) were added into the culture medium. The amplifications of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA were performed by real-time PCR method. Acyclovir (Sigma, USA) was chosen as a positive control. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was significantly suppressed in the presence of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of Hatay propolis. We found that propolis began to inhibit HSV-1 replication after 24 h of incubation and propolis activity against HSV-2 was found to start at 48 h following incubation. The activity of propolis against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was confirmed by a significant decrease in the number of viral copies. Conclusions We determined that Hatay propolis samples have important antiviral effects compared with acyclovir. In particular, the synergy produced by antiviral activity of propolis and acyclovir combined had a stronger effect against HSV-1 and HSV-2 than acyclovir alone. PMID:26856414

  13. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Duran, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; Muz, Mustafa

    2016-02-09

    BACKGROUND Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. MATERIAL AND METHODS All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We inoculated 1x105 cells per ml and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum into each well. Studies to determine cytotoxic effect were performed. To investigate the presence of antiviral activity of propolis samples, different concentrations of propolis (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 75, 50, and 25 μg/mL) were added into the culture medium. The amplifications of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA were performed by real-time PCR method. Acyclovir (Sigma, USA) was chosen as a positive control. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS The replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was significantly suppressed in the presence of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of Hatay propolis. We found that propolis began to inhibit HSV-1 replication after 24 h of incubation and propolis activity against HSV-2 was found to start at 48 h following incubation. The activity of propolis against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was confirmed by a significant decrease in the number of viral copies. CONCLUSIONS We determined that Hatay propolis samples have important antiviral effects compared with acyclovir. In particular, the synergy produced by antiviral activity of propolis and acyclovir combined had a stronger effect against HSV-1 and HSV-2 than acyclovir alone.

  14. Antiviral activity of a Bacillus sp. P34 peptide against pathogenic viruses of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Débora Scopel e; de Castro, Clarissa Caetano; Silva, Fábio da Silva e; Sant’anna, Voltaire; Vargas, Gilberto D’Avila; de Lima, Marcelo; Fischer, Geferson; Brandelli, Adriano; da Motta, Amanda de Souza; Hübner, Silvia de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    P34 is an antimicrobial peptide produced by a Bacillus sp. strain isolated from the intestinal contents of a fish in the Brazilian Amazon basin with reported antibacterial activity. The aim of this work was to evaluate the peptide P34 for its in vitro antiviral properties against canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2), equine arteritis virus (EAV), equine influenza virus (EIV), feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1). The results showed that the peptide P34 exhibited antiviral activity against EAV and FHV-1. The peptide P34 inhibited the replication of EAV by 99.9% and FHV-1 by 94.4%. Virucidal activity was detected only against EAV. When P34 and EAV were incubated for 6 h at 37 °C the viral titer reduced from 104.5 TCID50 to 102.75 TCID50, showing a percent of inhibition of 98.6%. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that P34 inhibited EAV and FHV-1 replication in infected cell cultures and it showed virucidal activity against EAV. Since there is documented resistance to the current drugs used against herpesviruses and there is no treatment for equine viral arteritis, it is advisable to search for new antiviral compounds to overcome these infections. PMID:25477947

  15. Galactan sulfate of Grateloupia indica: Isolation, structural features and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Mateu, Cecilia G; Mandal, Pinaki; Pujol, Carlos A; Damonte, Elsa B; Ray, Bimalendu

    2007-05-01

    Natural compounds offer interesting pharmacological perspectives for antiviral drug development with regard to broad-spectrum antiviral properties and novel modes of action. In this study, we have analyzed polysaccharide fractions isolated from Grateloupia indica. The crude water extract (GiWE) as well as one fraction (F3) obtained by anion exchange chromatography had potent anti-HSV activity. Their inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) values (0.12-1.06 microg/ml) were much lower than cytotoxic concentration 50% values (>850 microg/ml). These fractions, which were effective antiviral inhibitors if added only during the adsorption period, had very low anticoagulant activity. Furthermore, they had no direct inactivating effect on virions in a virucidal assay. Chemical, chromatographic and spectroscopic methods showed that the active polysaccharide, which has an apparent molecular mass of 60 kDa and negative specific rotation [alpha]D(32) -16 degrees (c 0.2, H2O), contains alpha-(1-->4)- and alpha-(1-->3)-linked galactopyranose residues. Sulfate groups, if present, are located mostly at C-2/6 of (1-->4)- and C-4/6 of (1-->3)-linked galactopyranosyl units, and are essential for the anti herpetic activity of this polymer.

  16. Antiviral activity of an extract derived from roots of Eleutherococcus senticosus.

    PubMed

    Glatthaar-Saalmüller, B; Sacher, F; Esperester, A

    2001-06-01

    A liquid extract from Eleutherococcus senticosus roots inhibited the productive replication of human rhinovirus (HRV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus in cell cultures infected with these viruses, all of which belong to the RNA type viruses. Analysis of virus production after treatment of the infected cells using plaque-reduction assays showed a strong antiviral activity of the Eleutherococcus extract. In contrast, no effect was detected using the same protocol for cells infected with the DNA viruses, adenovirus (Adeno 5) or herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV 1). Pre-treatment of cells did not inhibit either virus adsorption or virus replication. The results of the study demonstrate that the Eleutherococcus extract inhibited the replication of all RNA viruses studied so far. This antiviral activity remained stable under the conditions used for drug preparation and storage.

  17. Enhancement of the antiviral activity against caprine herpesvirus type 1 of Acyclovir in association with Mizoribine.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Lucente, Maria Stella; Losurdo, Michele; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Trerotoli, Paolo; Casalino, Elisabetta; Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabriella; Tempesta, Maria

    2017-02-16

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats is responsible for genital lesions resembling the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in humans (HHV-2). The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) is able to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was evaluated. ACV (100μg/ml) displayed an antiviral effect on CpHV-1 replication. This inhibitory effect was higher when ACV (100μg/ml) was used in association with MIZ (20μg/ml). Other combinations of ACV and MIZ in various concentrations were not as effective as ACV 100μg/ml/MIZ 20μg/ml. These findings suggest that the association of ACV and MIZ is potentially useful for treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses.

  18. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Possesses an Antiviral Activity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Labrie, Josée; Hernandez Reyes, Yenney; Burciaga Nava, Jorge A.; Gagnon, Carl A.; Jacques, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Pigs are often colonized by more than one bacterial and/or viral species during respiratory tract infections. This phenomenon is known as the porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC). Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are pathogens that are frequently involved in PRDC. The main objective of this project was to study the in vitro interactions between these two pathogens and the host cells in the context of mixed infections. To fulfill this objective, PRRSV permissive cell lines such as MARC-145, SJPL, and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) were used. A pre-infection with PRRSV was performed at 0.5 multiplicity of infection (MOI) followed by an infection with App at 10 MOI. Bacterial adherence and cell death were compared. Results showed that PRRSV pre-infection did not affect bacterial adherence to the cells. PRRSV and App co-infection produced an additive cytotoxicity effect. Interestingly, a pre-infection of SJPL and PAM cells with App blocked completely PRRSV infection. Incubation of SJPL and PAM cells with an App cell-free culture supernatant is also sufficient to significantly block PRRSV infection. This antiviral activity is not due to LPS but rather by small molecular weight, heat-resistant App metabolites (<1 kDa). The antiviral activity was also observed in SJPL cells infected with swine influenza virus but to a much lower extent compared to PRRSV. More importantly, the PRRSV antiviral activity of App was also seen with PAM, the cells targeted by the virus in vivo during infection in pigs. The antiviral activity might be due, at least in part, to the production of interferon γ. The use of in vitro experimental models to study viral and bacterial co-infections will lead to a better understanding of the interactions between pathogens and their host cells, and could allow the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic tools. PMID:24878741

  19. Novel Plant-Derived Recombinant Human Interferons with Broad Spectrum Antiviral Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-14

    proliferation rather than to a direct effect on the virus , Daudi inhibition assays were performed using an Epstein – Barr virus - transformed human B-cell...compared the antiviral activities of more than 1400 plant-derived, hybrid IFNs against three RNA viruses and one DNA virus from four different families...highly pathogenic viruses with varying sensitivities to type I IFN. In particular, the DNA virus , MPXV, was not expected to be as susceptible to the

  20. Dufulin Activates HrBP1 to Produce Antiviral Responses in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhuo; Zeng, Mengjiao; Song, Baoan; Hou, Chengrui; Hu, Deyu; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Zhenchao; Fan, Huitao; Bi, Liang; Liu, Jiaju; Yu, Dandan; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song

    2012-01-01

    Background Dufulin is a new antiviral agent that is highly effective against plant viruses and acts by activating systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in plants. In recent years, it has been used widely to prevent and control tobacco and rice viral diseases in China. However, its targets and mechanism of action are still poorly understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) techniques were combined with mass spectrometry (MS) to identify the target of Dufulin. More than 40 proteins were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5 fold or ≤1.5 fold) upon Dufulin treatment in Nicotiana tabacum K326. Based on annotations in the Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, these proteins were found to be related to disease resistance. Directed acyclic graph (DAG) analysis of the various pathways demonstrated harpin binding protein-1 (HrBP1) as the target of action of Dufulin. Additionally, western blotting, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and real time PCR analyses were also conducted to identify the specific mechanism of action of Dufulin. Our results show that activation of HrBP1 triggers the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and thereby produces antiviral responses in the plant host. A protective assay based on lesion counting further confirmed the antiviral activity of Dufulin. Conclusion This study identified HrBP1 as a target protein of Dufulin and that Dufulin can activate the SA signaling pathway to induce host plants to generate antiviral responses. PMID:22662252

  1. Strong antiviral activity of heated and hydrated dolomite--preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Hideaki; Ito, Hiroshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Murase, Toshiyuki; Motoike, Koichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuo; Otsuki, Koichi

    2007-02-01

    Heated and hydrated naturally occurring dolomite showed very strong antiviral activity. Infectivity of avian and human influenza, avian infectious bronchitis (coronavirus), Newcastle disease (paramyxovirus) and avian laryngotracheitis (herpesvirus) viruses dropped at least 1,000 fold following contact with the dolomite for five minutes at 4 degrees C. Dolomite is expected to be useful to inhibit the incidence of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases.

  2. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2. PMID:26257815

  3. Lipophilicity is a key factor to increase the antiviral activity of HIV neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Augusto, Marcelo T; Hollmann, Axel; Troise, Fulvia; Veiga, Ana S; Pessi, Antonello; Santos, Nuno C

    2017-04-01

    The HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5 targets the transiently exposed epitope in the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, by a two-step mechanism involving the viral membrane and this viral glycoprotein. It was recently shown that 2F5 conjugation with a cholesterol moiety outside of the antibody paratope substantially increases its antiviral activity. Additionally, the antiviral activity of D5, a human antibody that binds to the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of gp41 and lacks membrane binding, was boosted by the same cholesterol conjugation. In this work, we evaluated the membrane affinity of both antibodies towards membranes of different compositions, using surface plasmon resonance. A correlation was found between membrane affinity and antiviral activity against HIV-1. We propose that the conjugation of cholesterol to 2F5 or D5 allows a higher degree of antibody pre-concentration at the viral membrane. This way, the antibodies become more available to bind efficiently to the gp41 epitope, blocking viral fusion faster than the unconjugated antibody. These results set up a relevant strategy to improve the rational design of therapeutic antibodies against HIV.

  4. Antiviral and Antioxidant Activities of Sulfated Galactomannans from Plants of Caatinga Biome.

    PubMed

    Marques, Márcia Maria Mendes; de Morais, Selene Maia; da Silva, Ana Raquel Araújo; Barroso, Naiara Dutra; Pontes Filho, Tadeu Rocha; Araújo, Fernanda Montenegro de Carvalho; Vieira, Ícaro Gusmão Pinto; Lima, Danielle Malta; Guedes, Maria Izabel Florindo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents a serious social and economic public health problem; then trying to contribute to improve its control, the objective of this research was to develop phytoterapics for dengue treatment using natural resources from Caatinga biome. Galactomannans isolated from Adenanthera pavonina L., Caesalpinia ferrea Mart., and Dimorphandra gardneriana Tull were chemically sulfated in order to evaluate the antioxidant, and antiviral activities and the role in the inhibition of virus DENV-2 in Vero cells. A positive correlation between the degree of sulfation, antioxidant and antiviral activities was observed. The sulfated galactomannans showed binding to the virus surface, indicating that they interact with DENV-2. The sulfated galactomannans from C. ferrea showed 96% inhibition of replication of DENV-2 followed by D. gardneriana (94%) and A. pavonina (77%) at 25 µg/mL and all sulfated galactomannans also showed antioxidant activity. This work is the first report of the antioxidant and antiviral effects of sulfated galactomannans against DENV-2. The results are very promising and suggest that these sulfated galactomannans from plants of Caatinga biome act in the early step of viral infection. Thus, sulfated galactomannans may act as an entry inhibitor of DENV-2.

  5. Broad-Range Antiviral Activity of Hydrogen Sulfide Against Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bazhanov, Nikolay; Escaffre, Olivier; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Casola, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an important endogenous mediator that has been the focus of intense investigation in the past few years, leading to the discovery of its role in vasoactive, cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory responses. Recently, we made a critical observation that H2S also has a protective role in paramyxovirus infection by modulating inflammatory responses and viral replication. In this study we tested the antiviral and anti-inflammatory activity of the H2S slow-releasing donor GYY4137 on enveloped RNA viruses from Ortho-, Filo-, Flavi- and Bunyavirus families, for which there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic available, with the exception of influenza. We found that GYY4137 significantly reduced replication of all tested viruses. In a model of influenza infection, GYY4137 treatment was associated with decreased expression of viral proteins and mRNA, suggesting inhibition of an early step of replication. The antiviral activity coincided with the decrease of viral-induced pro-inflammatory mediators and viral-induced nuclear translocation of transcription factors from Nuclear Factor (NF)-kB and Interferon Regulatory Factor families. In conclusion, increasing cellular H2S is associated with significant antiviral activity against a broad range of emerging enveloped RNA viruses, and should be further explored as potential therapeutic approach in relevant preclinical models of viral infections. PMID:28106111

  6. Tyrosinase inhibitory components from Aloe vera and their antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Yang, Seo Young; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kwon, Sun Jung; Cho, In Sook; Jeong, Min Hee; Ho Kim, Young; Choi, Gug Seoun

    2017-12-01

    A new compound, 9-dihydroxyl-2'-O-(Z)-cinnamoyl-7-methoxy-aloesin (1), and eight known compounds (2-9) were isolated from Aloe vera. Their structures were elucidated using 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectra. Compound 9 exhibited reversible competitive inhibitory activity against the enzyme tyrosinase, with an IC50 value of 9.8 ± 0.9 µM. A molecular simulation revealed that compound 9 interacts via hydrogen bonding with residues His244, Thr261, and Val283 of tyrosinase. Additionally, compounds 3 and 7 were shown by half-leaf assays to exhibit inhibitory activity towards Pepper mild mottle virus.

  7. SUMO-Interacting Motifs of Human TRIM5α are Important for Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Human TRIM5α potently restricts particular strains of murine leukemia viruses (the so-called N-tropic strains) but not others (the B- or NB-tropic strains) during early stages of infection. We show that overexpression of SUMO-1 in human 293T cells, but not in mouse MDTF cells, profoundly blocks N-MLV infection. This block is dependent on the tropism of the incoming virus, as neither B-, NB-, nor the mutant R110E of N-MLV CA (a B-tropic switch) are affected by SUMO-1 overexpression. The block occurred prior to reverse transcription and could be abrogated by large amounts of restricted virus. Knockdown of TRIM5α in 293T SUMO-1-overexpressing cells resulted in ablation of the SUMO-1 antiviral effects, and this loss of restriction could be restored by expression of a human TRIM5α shRNA-resistant plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis of human TRIM5α revealed a consensus SUMO conjugation site at the N-terminus and three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs) in the B30.2 domain. Mutations of the TRIM5α consensus SUMO conjugation site did not affect the antiviral activity of TRIM5α in any of the cell types tested. Mutation of the SIM consensus sequences, however, abolished TRIM5α antiviral activity against N-MLV. Mutation of lysines at a potential site of SUMOylation in the CA region of the Gag gene reduced the SUMO-1 block and the TRIM5α restriction of N-MLV. Our data suggest a novel aspect of TRIM5α-mediated restriction, in which the presence of intact SIMs in TRIM5α, and also the SUMO conjugation of CA, are required for restriction. We propose that at least a portion of the antiviral activity of TRIM5α is mediated through the binding of its SIMs to SUMO-conjugated CA. PMID:21490953

  8. Antiviral Activity of Hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against Enterovirus 71 Subgenotypes C3 and C4a

    PubMed Central

    Song, JaeHyoung; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Kim, Jin-Won; Kim, JeongHoon; Jeong, HyeonGun; Kwon, YongSoo; Kim, HyunPyo; Lee, SangWon; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the predominant cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). The antiviral activity of hederasaponin B from Hedera helix against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a was evaluated in vero cells. In the current study, the antiviral activity of hederasaponin B against EV71 C3 and C4a was determined by cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction method and western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that hederasaponin B and 30% ethanol extract of Hedera helix containing hederasaponin B showed significant antiviral activity against EV71 subgenotypes C3 and C4a by reducing the formation of a visible CPE. Hederasaponin B also inhibited the viral VP2 protein expression, suggesting the inhibition of viral capsid protein synthesis.These results suggest that hederasaponin B and Hedera helix extract containing hederasaponin B can be novel drug candidates with broad-spectrum antiviral activity against various subgenotypes of EV71. PMID:24596620

  9. Pokeweed Antiviral Protein, a Ribosome Inactivating Protein: Activity, Inhibition and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Domashevskiy, Artem V.; Goss, Dixie J.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses employ an array of elaborate strategies to overcome plant defense mechanisms and must adapt to the requirements of the host translational systems. Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome inactivating protein (RIP) and is an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is thought to play an important role in the plant’s defense mechanism against foreign pathogens. This review focuses on the structure, function, and the relationship of PAP to other RIPs, discusses molecular aspects of PAP antiviral activity, the novel inhibition of this plant toxin by a virus counteraction—a peptide linked to the viral genome (VPg), and possible applications of RIP-conjugated immunotoxins in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25635465

  10. Structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Davide; Márquez, María J.; Márquez, María B.; Brandán, Silvia A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the structural, topological and vibrational properties of an isothiazole derivatives series with antiviral activities in gas and aqueous solution phases were studied by using DFT calculations. The self consistent reaction field (SCRF) method was combined with the polarized continuum (PCM) model in order to study the solvent effects and to predict their reactivities and behaviours in both media. Thus, the 3-mercapto-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (I), 3-methylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (II), 3-Ethylthio-5-phenyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (III), S-[3-(4-cyano-5-phenyl)isothiazolyl] ethyl thiocarbonate (IV), 5-Phenyl-3-(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) disulphanyl-4-isothiazolecarbonitrile (V) and 1,2-Bis(4-cyano-5-phenylisothiazol-3-yl) sulphanyl Ethane (VI) derivatives were studied by using the hybrid B3LYP/6-31G* method. All the properties were compared and analyzed in function of the different R groups linked to the thiazole ring. This study clearly shows that the high polarity of (I) probably explains its elevated antiviral activity due to their facility to traverse biological membranes more rapidly than the other ones while in the (IV) and (V) derivatives the previous hydrolysis of both bonds increasing their antiviral properties inside the cell probably are related to their low S-R bond order values. In addition, the complete vibrational assignments and force constants are presented.

  11. A 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid–Gelatin Conjugate: The Synthesis, Antiviral Activity and Mechanism of Antiviral Action Against Two Alphaherpesviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lisov, Alexander; Vrublevskaya, Veronika; Lisova, Zoy; Leontievsky, Alexey; Morenkov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    Various natural and synthetic polyanionic polymers with different chemical structures are known to exhibit potent antiviral activity in vitro toward a variety of enveloped viruses and may be considered as promising therapeutic agents. A water-soluble conjugate of 2,5-dihydroxybezoic acid (2,5-DHBA) with gelatin was synthesized by laccase-catalyzed oxidation of 2,5-DHBA in the presence of gelatin, and its antiviral activity against pseudorabies virus (PRV) and bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1), two members of the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily, was studied. The conjugate produced no direct cytotoxic effect on cells, and did not inhibit cell growth at concentrations up to 1000 µg/mL. It exhibited potent antiviral activity against PRV (IC50, 1.5–15 µg/mL for different virus strains) and BoHV-1 (IC50, 0.5–0.7 µg/mL). When present during virus adsorption, the conjugate strongly inhibited the attachment of PRV and BoHV-1 to cells. The 2,5-DHBA–gelatin conjugate had no direct virucidal effect on the viruses and did not influence their penetration into cells, cell-to-cell spread, production of infectious virus particles in cells, and expression of PRV glycoproteins E and B. The results indicated that the 2,5-DHBA–gelatin conjugate strongly inhibits the adsorption of alphaherpesviruses to cells and can be a promising synthetic polymer for the development of antiviral formulations against alphaherpesvirus infections. PMID:26501311

  12. Design, synthesis, and antiviral, fungicidal, and insecticidal activities of tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carbohydrazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongxian; Song, Hongjian; Huang, Yuanqiong; Li, Jiarui; Zhao, Sheng; Song, Yuchuan; Yang, Peiwen; Xiao, Zhixin; Liu, Yuxiu; Li, Yongqiang; Shang, Hui; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-10-15

    According to our previous research on the antiviral activity of β-carboline and tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives, using (1S,3S)-1-methyl-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole-3-carbohydrazide (1) as a lead compound, series of novel tetrahydro-β-carboline derivatives containing acylhydrazone moiety were designed, synthesized, and first evaluated for their biological activities. Most of these compounds exhibited excellent antiviral activity both in vitro and in vivo. The in vivo inactivation, curative, and protection activities of compounds 8, 9, 12, 16, 28, 29, and 30 were much higher than that of ribavirin (37.6%, 39.4%, and 37.9% at 500 μg/mL) and the lead compound (40.0%, 42.3%, and 39.6% at 500 μg/mL). Especially, the in vitro and in vivo activities of compound 16 (36.9%, 33.6%, 30.2%, and 35.8%) at 100 μg/mL, which were very close to that of ribavirin (40.0% for in vitro activity) at 500 μg/mL. Compounds 9 and 29 were chosen for the field trials of antiviral efficacy against TMV (tobacco mosaic virus); the results exhibited that both compounds, especially compound 29, showed better activities than control plant virus inhibitors. At the same time, the fungicidal results showed that compounds 6, 9, and 11 exhibited good fungicidal activities against 14 kinds of phytopathogens. Additionally, compounds 3 and 23 exhibited moderate insecticidal activity against the four tested species of insects.

  13. Perhydrolase-nanotube paint composites with sporicidal and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Navdeep; Douaisi, Marc P; Borkar, Indrakant V; Lee, Lillian; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Kane, Ravi S; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2013-10-01

    AcT (perhydrolase) containing paint composites were prepared leading to broad-spectrum decontamination. AcT was immobilized onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and then incorporated into latex-based paints to form catalytic coatings. These AcT-based paint composites showed a 6-log reduction in the viability of spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis (Sterne) within 60 min. The paint composites also showed >4-log reduction in the titer of influenza virus (X-31) within 10 min (initially challenged with 10(7) PFU/mL). AcT-based paint composites were also tested using various perhydrolase acyl donor substrates, including propylene glycol diacetate (PGD), glyceryl triacetate, and ethyl acetate, with PGD observed to be the best among the substrates tested for generation of peracetic acid and killing of bacillus spores. The operational stability of paint composites was also studied at different relative humidities and temperatures to simulate real-life operation.

  14. Synthesis and antiviral activity of boranophosphonate isosteres of AZT and d4T monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Barral, Karine; Priet, Stéphane; De Michelis, Céline; Sire, Joséphine; Neyts, Johan; Balzarini, Jan; Canard, Bruno; Alvarez, Karine

    2010-02-01

    We report synthesis, in vitro antiviral activity, and stability studies in biological media of original boranophosphonate isosteres of AZT and d4T monophophates. A convenient route for the synthesis of 3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine-5'-boranophosphonate 8 and 2',3'-Didehydro-3'-dideoxythymidine-5'-boranophosphonate 12 is described. H-phosphinates 7 and 11, and alpha-boranophosphonates 8 and 12 exhibited no significant in vitro activity against HIV-infected cells, neither against a broad panel of viruses, up to 200 microM. The absence of activity of target compounds 8 and 12 can be partially explained by their short half-life in culture medium.

  15. In vitro antiviral activity of dermaseptin S(4) and derivatives from amphibian skin against herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, Ines; Zairi, Amira; Tangy, Frédéric; Aouni, Mahjoub; Selmi, Boulbaba; Hani, Khaled

    2013-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections have become a public health problem worldwide. The emergence of acyclovir-resistant viral strains and the failure of vaccination to prevent herpetic infections have prompted the search for new antiviral drugs. Accordingly, the present study was undertaken to synthesize chemically and evaluate Dermaseptin S(4) (S(4)), an anti-microbial peptide derived from amphibian skin, and its derivatives in terms of anti-herpetic activity. The effects of biochemical modifications on their antimicrobial potential were also investigated. The peptides were incubated together with HSV-2 on target cells under various conditions, and the antiviral effects were examined via a cell metabolic labeling method. The findings revealed that DS(4) derivatives elicited concentration-dependent antiviral activity at micromole concentrations. The biochemical modifications of S(4) allowed for the reduction of peptide cytotoxicity without altering antiviral activity. Dermaseptins were added at different times during the viral cycle to investigate the mode of antiviral action. At the highest non-cytotoxic concentrations, most of the tested derivatives were noted to exhibit high antiviral activity particularly when pre-incubated with free herpes viruses prior to infection. Among these peptides, K(4)K(20)S(4) exhibited the highest antiviral activity against HSV-2 sensitive and resistant strains. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of K(4)K(20)S(4) was effective on both acyclovir-resistant and -sensitive viruses. The findings indicate that K(4)K(20)S(4) can be considered a promising candidate for future application as a therapeutic virucidal agent for the treatment of herpes viruses.

  16. In vitro antiviral activity of Ficus carica latex against caprine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Lovero, Angela; Elia, Gabriella; Losurdo, Michele; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tempesta, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The latex of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) has been shown to possess antiviral properties against some human viruses. To determine the ability of F. carica latex (F-latex) to interfere with the infection of caprine herpesvirus-1 (CpHV-1) in vitro, F-latex was resuspended in culture media containing 1% ethanol and was tested for potential antiviral effects against CpHV-1. Titration of CpHV-1 in the presence or in the absence of F-latex was performed on monolayers of Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. Simultaneous addition of F-latex and CpHV-1 to monolayers of MDBK cells resulted in a significant reduction of CpHV-1 titres 3 days post-infection and this effect was comparable to that induced by acyclovir. The study suggests that the F-latex is able to interfere with the replication of CpHV-1 in vitro on MDBK cells and future studies will determine the mechanisms responsible for the observed antiviral activity.

  17. The antiviral activity of arctigenin in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Li, Wentao; Jin, Erguang; He, Qigai; Yan, Weidong; Yang, Hanchun; Gong, Shiyu; Guo, Yi; Fu, Shulin; Chen, Xiabing; Ye, Shengqiang; Qian, Yunguo

    2016-06-01

    Arctigenin (ACT) is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan extracted from the traditional herb Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) with anti-viral and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of ACT found in traditional Chinese medicine on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that dosing of 15.6-62.5μg/mL ACT could significantly inhibit the PCV2 proliferation in PK-15 cells (P<0.01). Dosing of 62.5μg/mL ACT 0, 4 or 8h after challenge inoculation significantly inhibited the proliferation of 1MOI and 10MOI in PK-15 cells (P<0.01), and the inhibitory effect of ACT dosing 4h or 8h post-inoculation was greater than 0h after dosing (P<0.01). In vivo test with mice challenge against PCV2 infection demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of 200μg/kg ACT significantly inhibited PCV2 proliferation in the lungs, spleens and inguinal lymph nodes, with an effect similar to ribavirin, demonstrating the effectiveness of ACT as an antiviral agent against PCV2 in vitro and in vivo. This compound, therefore, may have the potential to serve as a drug for protection of pigs against the infection of PCV2.

  18. In-vitro antiviral activity of Solanum nigrum against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C is a major health problem causes liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and death. The current treatment of standard interferon in combination with ribavirin, has limited benefits due to emergence of resistant mutations during long-term treatment, adverse side effects and high cost. Hence, there is a need for the development of more effective, less toxic antiviral agents. Results The present study was designed to search anti-HCV plants from different areas of Pakistan. Ten medicinal plants were collected and tested for anti-HCV activity by infecting the liver cells with HCV 3a innoculum. Methanol and chloroform extracts of Solanum nigrum (SN) seeds exhibited 37% and more than 50% inhibition of HCV respectively at non toxic concentration. Moreover, antiviral effect of SN seeds extract was also analyzed against HCV NS3 protease by transfecting HCV NS3 protease plasmid into liver cells. The results demonstrated that chloroform extract of SN decreased the expression or function of HCV NS3 protease in a dose- dependent manner and GAPDH remained constant. Conclusion These results suggest that SN extract contains potential antiviral agents against HCV and combination of SN extract with interferon will be better option to treat chronic HCV. PMID:21247464

  19. Antiviral activity of Thiosemicarbazones derived from α-amino acids against Dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Padmapriya; Khaleefathullah, Sheriff; Kaveri, Krishansamy; Palani, Gunasekaran; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Thennarasu, Sathiah; Tirichurapalli Sivagnanam, Uma

    2017-03-01

    The endemicity and seasonal outbreaks of Dengue disease in most tropical and subtropical countries underscores an urgent need to develop effective prevention and control measures. Development of a Dengue vaccine, which is complicated by the Antibody Dependent Enhancement effect (ADE), a viral inhibitor, seems prudent as it would inhibit the spread of the virus. In vitro methods such as MTT assay and plaque formation unit reduction assays were employed for screening the viral inhibitory property of α-amino acid based Thiosemicarbazides. The results elicits that at concentrations not exceeding the maximum non cytotoxic concentration (MNCC), these compounds completely prevented Dengue virus infection in vero cells as indicated by the absence of cytopathic effects in a dose-dependent manner. The high potency of Bz-Trp-TSC against all four types of Dengue virus infection elevates Thiosemicarbazide as a lead antiviral agent for Dengue disease. Screening small molecules for antiviral activity against the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease is being explored by several research groups. Our findings would help to augment the efforts to identify the lead compounds for antiviral therapy to combat the Dengue disease. J. Med. Virol. 89:546-552, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  1. Cloning, expression and antiviral activity of IFNγ from the Australian fruit bat, Pteropus alecto.

    PubMed

    Janardhana, Vijaya; Tachedjian, Mary; Crameri, Gary; Cowled, Chris; Wang, Lin-Fa; Baker, Michelle L

    2012-03-01

    Bats are natural reservoir hosts to a variety of viruses, many of which cause morbidity and mortality in other mammals. Currently there is a paucity of information regarding the nature of the immune response to viral infections in bats, partly due to a lack of appropriate bat specific reagents. IFNγ plays a key role in controlling viral replication and coordinating a response for long term control of viral infection. Here we describe the cloning and expression of IFNγ from the Australian flying fox, Pteropus alecto and the generation of mouse monoclonal and chicken egg yolk antibodies specific to bat IFNγ. Our results demonstrate that P. alecto IFNγ is conserved with IFNγ from other species and is induced in bat splenocytes following stimulation with T cell mitogens. P. alecto IFNγ has antiviral activity on Semliki forest virus in cell lines from P. alecto and the microbat, Tadarida brasiliensis. Additionally recombinant bat IFNγ was able to mitigate Hendra virus infection in P. alecto cells. These results provide the first evidence for an antiviral role for bat IFNγin vitro in addition to the application of important immunological reagents for further studies of bat antiviral immunity.

  2. Structural Basis for the Antiviral Activity of BST-2/Tetherin and Its Viral Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Juan F.; Iwabu, Yukie; Tokunaga, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    The interferon-inducible host restriction factor bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2/tetherin) blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. In turn, these viruses have evolved specific antagonists to counteract this host antiviral molecule, such as the HIV-1 protein Vpu. BST-2 is a type II transmembrane protein with an unusual topology consisting of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail (CT) followed by a single transmembrane (TM) domain, a coiled-coil extracellular (EC) domain, and a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor at the C terminus. We and others showed that BST-2 restricts enveloped virus release by bridging the host and virion membranes with its two opposing membrane anchors and that deletion of either one completely abrogates antiviral activity. The EC domain also shows conserved structural properties that are required for antiviral function. It contains several destabilizing amino acids that confer the molecule with conformational flexibility to sustain the protein’s function as a virion tether, and three conserved cysteine residues that mediate homodimerization of BST-2, as well as acting as a molecular ruler that separates the membrane anchors. Conversely, the efficient release of virions is promoted by the HIV-1 Vpu protein and other viral antagonists. Our group and others provided evidence from mutational analyses indicating that Vpu antagonism of BST-2-mediated viral restriction requires a highly specific interaction of their mutual TM domains. This interpretation is further supported and expanded by the findings of the latest structural modeling studies showing that critical amino acids in a conserved helical face of these TM domains are required for Vpu–BST-2 interaction and antagonism. In this review, we summarize the current advances in our understanding of the structural basis for BST-2 antiviral function as well as BST-2-specific viral antagonism. PMID:22180752

  3. Role of Nucleotide Binding and GTPase Domain Dimerization in Dynamin-like Myxovirus Resistance Protein A for GTPase Activation and Antiviral Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Alexej; Graf, Laura; Olal, Daniel; von der Malsburg, Alexander; Gao, Song; Kochs, Georg; Daumke, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Myxovirus resistance (Mx) GTPases are induced by interferon and inhibit multiple viruses, including influenza and human immunodeficiency viruses. They have the characteristic domain architecture of dynamin-related proteins with an N-terminal GTPase (G) domain, a bundle signaling element, and a C-terminal stalk responsible for self-assembly and effector functions. Human MxA (also called MX1) is expressed in the cytoplasm and is partly associated with membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum. It shows a protein concentration-dependent increase in GTPase activity, indicating regulation of GTP hydrolysis via G domain dimerization. Here, we characterized a panel of G domain mutants in MxA to clarify the role of GTP binding and the importance of the G domain interface for the catalytic and antiviral function of MxA. Residues in the catalytic center of MxA and the nucleotide itself were essential for G domain dimerization and catalytic activation. In pulldown experiments, MxA recognized Thogoto virus nucleocapsid proteins independently of nucleotide binding. However, both nucleotide binding and hydrolysis were required for the antiviral activity against Thogoto, influenza, and La Crosse viruses. We further demonstrate that GTP binding facilitates formation of stable MxA assemblies associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, whereas nucleotide hydrolysis promotes dynamic redistribution of MxA from cellular membranes to viral targets. Our study highlights the role of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis for the intracellular dynamics of MxA during its antiviral action. PMID:25829498

  4. Aronia melanocarpa and its components demonstrate antiviral activity against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Park, Sehee; Kim, Jin Il; Lee, Ilseob; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Han, Sang-Zin; Park, Man-Seong

    2013-10-11

    The influenza virus is highly contagious in human populations around the world and results in approximately 250,000-500,000 deaths annually. Vaccines and antiviral drugs are commonly used to protect susceptible individuals. However, the antigenic mismatch of vaccines and the emergence of resistant strains against the currently available antiviral drugs have generated an urgent necessity to develop a novel broad-spectrum anti-influenza agent. Here we report that Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry, Aronia), the fruit of a perennial shrub species that contains several polyphenolic constituents, possesses in vitro and in vivo efficacy against different subtypes of influenza viruses including an oseltamivir-resistant strain. These anti-influenza properties of Aronia were attributed to two constituents, ellagic acid and myricetin. In an in vivo therapeutic mouse model, Aronia, ellagic acid, and myricetin protected mice against lethal challenge. Based on these results, we suggest that Aronia is a valuable source for antiviral agents and that ellagic acid and myricetin have potential as influenza therapeutics.

  5. Evaluation of antiviral activity of compounds isolated from Ranunculus sieboldii and Ranunculus sceleratus.

    PubMed

    Li, Haibo; Zhou, Changxin; Pan, Yunxue; Gao, Xiaozhong; Wu, Xiumei; Bai, Hua; Zhou, Linfu; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Shuili; Shi, Shuyun; Luo, Jiali; Xu, Juanhua; Chen, Liurong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yu

    2005-12-01

    Nineteen compounds isolated from Ranunculus sieboldii and Ranunculus sceleratus were tested for inhibitory effects on hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). The results showed that apigenin 4'- O- alpha-rhamnopyranoside, apigenin 7- O- beta-glucopyranosyl-4'- O- alpha-rhamnopyranoside, tricin 7- O- beta-glucopyranoside, tricin, and isoscopoletin possessed inhibitory activity against HBV replication. Protocatechuyl aldehyde exhibited an inhibiting activity on HSV-1 replication. It is therefore suggested that further investigations on these bioactive compounds might be needed to discover and develop new antiviral agents.

  6. Antiviral activity of Paulownia tomentosa against enterovirus 71 of hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ping; Chen, Changmai; Hu, Yanan; Zhan, Zixuan; Pan, Wei; Li, Rongrong; Li, Erguang; Ge, Hui-Ming; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    The bark, leaves, and flowers of Paulownia trees have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat infectious and inflammatory diseases. We investigated the antiviral effects of Paulownia tomentosa flowers, an herbal medicine used in some provinces of P. R. China for the treatment of skin rashes and blisters. Dried flowers of P. tomentosa were extracted with methanol and tested for antiviral activity against enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CAV16), the predominant etiologic agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease in P. R. China. The extract inhibited EV71 infection, although no effect was detected against CAV16 infection. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was performed to identify apigenin as an active component of the flowers. The EC50 value for apigenin to block EV71 infection was 11.0 µM, with a selectivity index of approximately 9.3. Although it is a common dietary flavonoid, only apigenin, and not similar compounds like naringenin and quercetin, were active against EV71 infection. As an RNA virus, the genome of EV71 has an internal ribosome entry site that interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) and regulates viral translation. Cross-linking followed by immunoprecipitation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that EV71 RNA was associated with hnRNPs A1 and A2. Apigenin treatment disrupted this association, indicating that apigenin suppressed EV71 replication through a novel mechanism by targeting the trans-acting factors. This study therefore validates the effects of Paulownia against EV71 infection. It also yielded mechanistic insights on apigenin as an active compound for the antiviral activity of P. tomentosa against EV71 infection.

  7. Rhodiola rosea Exerts Antiviral Activity in Athletes Following a Competitive Marathon Race.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Maryam; Henson, Dru A; Sanderson, Matthew C; Nieman, David C; Zubeldia, Jose M; Shanely, R Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea, a medicinal plant with demonstrated adaptogenic properties, has recently been reported to contain active compounds with antimicrobial activity. The goal of this study was to measure the antiviral and antibacterial properties of the bioactive metabolites of Rhodiola rosea in the serum of experienced marathon runners following supplementation. Marathon runners, randomly divided into two groups, ingested 600 mg/day of Rhodiola rosea (n = 24, 6 female, 18 male) or placebo (n = 24, 7 females, 17 males) for 30 days prior to, the day of, and 7 days post-marathon. Blood serum samples were collected the day before, 15 min post-, and 1.5 h post-marathon. Serum from Rhodiola rosea-supplemented runners collected after marathon running did not attenuate the marathon-induced susceptibility of HeLa cells to killing by vesicular stomatitis virus. However, the use of Rhodiola rosea induced antiviral activity at early times post-infection by delaying an exercise-dependent increase in virus replication (P = 0.013 compared to placebo). Serum from both groups collected 15 min post-marathon significantly promoted the growth of Escherichia coli in culture as compared to serum collected the day before the marathon (P = 0.003, all subjects). Furthermore, the serum from subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea did not display antibacterial properties at any time point as indicated by a lack of group differences immediately (P = 0.785) or 1.5 h (P = 0.633) post-marathon. These results indicate that bioactive compounds in the serum of subjects ingesting Rhodiola rosea may exert protective effects against virus replication following intense and prolonged exercise by inducing antiviral activity.

  8. A Novel Iminosugar UV-12 with Activity against the Diverse Viruses Influenza and Dengue (Novel Iminosugar Antiviral for Influenza and Dengue).

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Plummer, Emily; Alonzi, Dominic S; Wolfe, Gary W; Sampath, Aruna; Nguyen, Tam; Butters, Terry D; Enterlein, Sven G; Stavale, Eric J; Shresta, Sujan; Ramstedt, Urban

    2015-05-13

    Iminosugars are capable of targeting the life cycles of multiple viruses by blocking host endoplasmic reticulum α-glucosidase enzymes that are required for competent replication of a variety of enveloped, glycosylated viruses. Iminosugars as a class are approved for use in humans with diseases such as diabetes and Gaucher's disease, providing evidence for safety of this class of compounds. The in vitro antiviral activity of iminosugars has been described in several publications with a subset of these demonstrating in vivo activity against flaviviruses, herpesviruses, retroviruses and filoviruses. Although there is compelling non-clinical in vivo evidence of antiviral efficacy, the efficacy of iminosugars as antivirals has yet to be demonstrated in humans. In the current study, we report a novel iminosugar, UV-12, which has efficacy against dengue and influenza in mouse models. UV-12 exhibits drug-like properties including oral bioavailability and good safety profile in mice and guinea pigs. UV-12 is an example of an iminosugar with activity against multiple virus families that should be investigated in further safety and efficacy studies and demonstrates potential value of this drug class as antiviral therapeutics.

  9. Phytochemical screening and antiviral activity of some medicinal plants from the island Soqotra.

    PubMed

    Mothana, Ramzi A A; Mentel, Renate; Reiss, Christiane; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2006-04-01

    Methanol and hot-aqueous extracts of 25 different plant species, used in Yemeni traditional medicine and growing, partly as endemic plants, on the island Soqotra have been investigated for their antiviral activity. In addition, the phytochemical identification of the main chemical constituents was performed. The extracts were assayed in two in vitro viral systems, which used influenza virus type A/MDCK cells and herpes simplex virus type 1/Vero cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The herpes simplex virus type 1 showed more sensitivity than the influenza virus type A against the extracts investigated. The methanol extracts of Boswellia ameero, Boswellia elongata, Buxus hildebrandtii, Cissus hamaderohensis, Cleome socotrana, Dracaena cinnabari, Exacum affine, Jatropha unicostata and Kalanchoe farinacea showed anti-influenza virus type A activity with 50% inhibition (IC50) concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 12.5 microg/mL. In addition, 17 plants of the 25 investigated exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity. The antiviral activity of some active extracts was also observed on a molecular level.

  10. Arginine-rich histones have strong antiviral activity for influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, Marloes; Tripathi, Shweta; White, Mitchell; Qi, Li; Taubenberger, Jeffery; van Eijk, Martin; Haagsman, Henk; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2015-10-01

    While histones are best known for DNA binding and transcription-regulating properties, they also have antimicrobial activity against a broad range of potentially pathogenic organisms. Histones are abundant in neutrophil extracellular traps, where they play an important role in NET-mediated antimicrobial killing. Here, we show anti-influenza activity of histones against both seasonal H3N2 and H1N1, but not pandemic H1N1. The arginine rich histones, H3 and H4, had greater neutralizing and viral aggregating activity than the lysine rich histones, H2A and H2B. Of all core histones, histone H4 is most potent in neutralizing IAV, and incubation with IAV with histone H4 results in a decrease in uptake and viral replication by epithelial cells when measured by qRT-PCR. The antiviral activity of histone H4 is mediated principally by direct effects on viral particles. Histone H4 binds to IAV as assessed by ELISA and co-sedimentation of H4 with IAV. H4 also induces aggregation, as assessed by confocal microscopy and light transmission assays. Despite strong antiviral activity against the seasonal IAV strains, H4 was inactive against pandemic H1N1. These findings indicate a possible role for histones in the innate immune response against IAV.

  11. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    , including interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), have been characterized. Using a minilibrary of porcine ISGs, we identify porcine guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent antiviral ISG against CSFV. We further show that the anti-CSFV action of GBP1 depends on its GTPase activity. The K51 of GBP1, critical for its GTPase activity, is essential for the antiviral action of GBP1 against CSFV replication, and the binding of the NS5A protein to GBP1 antagonizes the GTPase activity and thus the antiviral effect. This study will facilitate the development of anti-CSFV therapeutic agents by targeting host factors and may provide a new strategy for the control of CSF. PMID:26889038

  12. Effect of Complement on HIV-2 Plasma Antiviral Activity Is Intratype Specific and Potent

    PubMed Central

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; Sheik-Khalil, Enas; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Månsson, Fredrik; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter; Fenyö, Eva Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)-infected individuals develop immunodeficiency with a considerable delay and transmit the virus at rates lower than HIV-1-infected persons. Conceivably, comparative studies on the immune responsiveness of HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected hosts may help to explain the differences in pathogenesis and transmission between the two types of infection. Previous studies have shown that the neutralizing antibody response is more potent and broader in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection. In the present study, we have examined further the function of the humoral immune response and studied the effect of complement on the antiviral activity of plasma from singly HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected individuals, as well as HIV-1/HIV-2 dually infected individuals. The neutralization and antibody-dependent complement-mediated inactivation of HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4.CCR5 cells. The results showed that the addition of complement increased intratype antiviral activities of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 plasma samples, although the complement effect was more pronounced with HIV-2 than HIV-1 plasma. Using an area-under-the-curve (AUC)-based readout, multivariate statistical analysis confirmed that the type of HIV infection was independently associated with the magnitude of the complement effect. The analyses carried out with purified IgG indicated that the complement effect was largely exerted through the classical complement pathway involving IgG in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. In summary, these findings suggest that antibody binding to HIV-2 structures facilitates the efficient use of complement and thereby may be one factor contributing to a strong antiviral activity present in HIV-2 infection. PMID:23077299

  13. Antiviral Protection via RdRP-Mediated Stable Activation of Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Meghan M.; Morrison, James H.; Zoecklein, Laurie J.; Rinkoski, Tommy A.; Watzlawik, Jens O.; Papke, Louisa M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Matchett, William E.; Turkowski, Kari L.; Poeschla, Eric M.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    For many emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, definitive solutions via sterilizing adaptive immunity may require years or decades to develop, if they are even possible. The innate immune system offers alternative mechanisms that do not require antigen-specific recognition or a priori knowledge of the causative agent. However, it is unclear whether effective stable innate immune system activation can be achieved without triggering harmful autoimmunity or other chronic inflammatory sequelae. Here, we show that transgenic expression of a picornavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), in the absence of other viral proteins, can profoundly reconfigure mammalian innate antiviral immunity by exposing the normally membrane-sequestered RdRP activity to sustained innate immune detection. RdRP-transgenic mice have life-long, quantitatively dramatic upregulation of 80 interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and show profound resistance to normally lethal viral challenge. Multiple crosses with defined knockout mice (Rag1, Mda5, Mavs, Ifnar1, Ifngr1, and Tlr3) established that the mechanism operates via MDA5 and MAVS and is fully independent of the adaptive immune system. Human cell models recapitulated the key features with striking fidelity, with the RdRP inducing an analogous ISG network and a strict block to HIV-1 infection. This RdRP-mediated antiviral mechanism does not depend on secondary structure within the RdRP mRNA but operates at the protein level and requires RdRP catalysis. Importantly, despite lifelong massive ISG elevations, RdRP mice are entirely healthy, with normal longevity. Our data reveal that a powerfully augmented MDA5-mediated activation state can be a well-tolerated mammalian innate immune system configuration. These results provide a foundation for augmenting innate immunity to achieve broad-spectrum antiviral protection. PMID:26633895

  14. Polysaccharide and extracts from Lentinula edodes: structural features and antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lentinula edodes, known as shiitake, has been utilized as food, as well as, in popular medicine, moreover, compounds isolated from its mycelium and fruiting body have shown several therapeutic properties. The aim of this study was to determine the antiviral activity of aqueous (AqE) and ethanol (EtOHE) extracts and polysaccharide (LeP) from Lentinula edodes in the replication of poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) and bovine herpes virus type 1 (BoHV-1). Methods The time-of-addition assay was performed at the times -2, -1, 0, 1 and 2 h of the infection. The virucidal activity and the inhibition of viral adsorption were also evaluated. Plaque assay was used to monitor antiviral activity throughout. Results The AqE and LeP were more effective when added at 0 h of infection, however, EtOHE was more effective at the times 1 h and 2 h of the infection. AqE, EtOHE and LeP showed low virucidal activity, and the inhibition of viral adsorption was not significant. Conclusions The results allowed us to conclude that AqE, EtOHE and LeP act on the initial processes of the replication of both strains of virus. PMID:22336004

  15. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ying; Chen, Zhen-Ping; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ji, Yu-hua; Liu, Ge; Guo, Chao-wan; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Yi-Fei; Kitazato, Kaio

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  16. ACTIVATION OF COMMON ANTIVIRAL PATHWAYS CAN POTENTIATE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES TO SEPTIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, Lesley A.; Carlton, Stacey; Galen, Benjamin; Cooma-Ramberan, Indranie; Chung, Chung-Shiang; Ayala, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Induction of the antiviral cytokine interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) is common in many viral infections. The impact of ongoing antiviral responses on subsequent bacterial infection is not well understood. In human disease, bacterial superinfection complicating a viral infection can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We injected mice with polyinosinic-polycytidylic (PIC) acid, a TLR3 ligand and known IFN-α/β inducer as well as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activator to simulate very early antiviral pathways. We then challenged mice with an in vivo septic shock model characterized by slowly evolving bacterial infection to simulate bacterial superinfection early during a viral infection. Our data demonstrated robust induction of IFN-α in serum within 24 h of PIC injection with IFN-α/β–dependent major histocompatibility antigen class II up-regulation on peritoneal macrophages. PIC pretreatment before septic shock resulted in augmented tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukins 6 and 10 and heightened lethality compared with septic shock alone. Intact IFN-α/β signaling was necessary for augmentation of the inflammatory response to in vivo septic shock and to both TLR2 and TLR4 agonists in vitro. To assess the NF-κB contribution to PIC-modulated inflammatory responses to septic shock, we treated with parthenolide an NF-κB inhibitor before PIC and septic shock. Parthenolide did not inhibit IFN-α induction by PIC. Inhibition of NF-κB by parthenolide did reduce IFN-α–mediated potentiation of the cytokine response and lethality from septic shock. Our data demonstrate that pathways activated early during many viral infections can have a detrimental impact on the outcome of subsequent bacterial infection. These pathways may be critical to understanding the heightened morbidity and mortality from bacterial superinfection after viral infection in human disease. PMID:16878028

  17. Potent in vitro antiviral activity of Cistus incanus extract against HIV and Filoviruses targets viral envelope proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rebensburg, Stephanie; Helfer, Markus; Schneider, Martha; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Eberle, Josef; Schindler, Michael; Gürtler, Lutz; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic options are urgently needed to improve global treatment of virus infections. Herbal products with confirmed clinical safety features are attractive starting material for the identification of new antiviral activities. Here we demonstrate that Cistus incanus (Ci) herbal products inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in vitro. Ci extract inhibited clinical HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates, and, importantly, a virus isolate with multiple drug resistances, confirming broad anti-HIV activity. Antiviral activity was highly selective for virus particles, preventing primary attachment of the virus to the cell surface and viral envelope proteins from binding to heparin. Bioassay-guided fractionation indicated that Ci extract contains numerous antiviral compounds and therefore has favorably low propensity to induce virus resistance. Indeed, no resistant viruses emerged during 24 weeks of continuous propagation of the virus in the presence of Ci extracts. Finally, Ci extracts also inhibited infection by virus particles pseudotyped with Ebola and Marburg virus envelope proteins, indicating that antiviral activity of Ci extract extends to emerging viral pathogens. These results demonstrate that Ci extracts show potent and broad in vitro antiviral activity against viruses that cause life-threatening diseases in humans and are promising sources of agents that target virus particles. PMID:26833261

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Antiprotozoal and Antiviral Activities of Extracts from Argentinean Mikania Species

    PubMed Central

    Laurella, Laura C.; Frank, Fernanda M.; Sarquiz, Andrea; Alonso, María R.; Giberti, Gustavo; Cavallaro, Lucia; Catalán, Cesar A.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Malchiodi, Emilio; Martino, Virginia S.; Sülsen, Valeria P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antiprotozoal and antiviral activities of four Argentinean Mikania species. The organic and aqueous extracts of Mikania micrantha, M. parodii, M. periplocifolia, and M. cordifolia were tested on Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes, and dengue virus type 2. The organic extract of M. micrantha was the most active against T. cruzi and L. braziliensis exhibiting a growth inhibition of 77.6 ± 4.5% and 84.9 ± 6.1%, respectively, at a concentration of 10 μg/ml. The bioguided fractionation of M. micrantha organic extract led to the identification of two active fractions. The chromatographic profile and infrared analysis of these fractions revealed the presence of sesquiterpene lactones. None of the tested extracts were active against dengue virus type 2. PMID:22919289

  19. Antiviral activity of aloe-emodin against influenza A virus via galectin-3 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shih-Wen; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Lai, Chien-Chen; Huang, Su-Hua; Liao, Jun-Ming; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2014-09-05

    Novel influenza A H7N9 virus, which emerged in 2013, and highly pathogenic H5N1 virus, identified since 2003, pose challenges to public health and necessitate quest for new anti-influenza compounds. Anthraquinone derivatives like aloe-emodin, emodin and chrysophanol, reportedly exhibit antiviral activity. This study probes their inhibitory mechanism and effect against influenza A virus. Of three anthraquinone derivatives, aloe-emodin, with a lower cytotoxicity showed concentration-dependently reducing virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibiting replication of influenza A in MDCK cells. 50% inhibitory concentration value of aloe-emodin on virus yield was less than 0.05 μg/ml. Proteomics and Western blot of MDCK cells indicated aloe-emodin up-regulating galectin-3, and thioredoxin as well as down-regulating nucleoside diphosphate kinase A. Western blot and quantitative PCR confirmed aloe-emodin up-regulating galectin-3 expression; recombinant galectin-3 augmented expression of antiviral genes IFN-β, IFN-γ, PKR and 2'5',-OAS in infected cells, agreeing with expression pattern of those treated with aloe-emodin. Galectin-3 also inhibited influenza A virus replication. Proteomic analysis of treated cells indicated galectin-3 up-regulation as one anti-influenza A virus action by aloe-emodin. Since galectin-3 exhibited cytokine-like regulatory actions via JAK/STAT pathways, aloe-emodin also restored NS1-inhibited STAT1-mediated antiviral responses in transfected cells: e.g., STAT1 phosphorylation of interferon (IFN) stimulation response element (ISRE)-driven promoter, RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and 2'5',-oligoadenylate synthetase (2'5',-OAS) expression. Treatment with aloe-emodin could control influenza infection in humans.

  20. Potent In Vivo Antiviral Activity of the Herpes Simplex Virus Primase-Helicase Inhibitor BAY 57-1293

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Ulrich A. K.; Fischer, Rüdiger; Kleymann, Gerald; Hendrix, Martin; Rübsamen-Waigmann, Helga

    2002-01-01

    BAY 57-1293 belongs to a new class of antiviral compounds and inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2 in the nanomolar range in vitro by abrogating the enzymatic activity of the viral primase-helicase complex. In various rodent models of HSV infection the antiviral activity of BAY 57-1293 in vivo was found to be superior compared to all compounds currently used to treat HSV infections. The compound shows profound antiviral activity in murine and rat lethal challenge models of disseminated herpes, in a murine zosteriform spread model of cutaneous disease, and in a murine ocular herpes model. It is active in parenteral, oral, and topical formulations. BAY 57-1293 continued to demonstrate efficacy when the onset of treatment was initiated after symptoms of herpetic disease were already apparent. PMID:12019088

  1. In vitro cytotoxic and antiviral activities of Ficus carica latex extracts.

    PubMed

    Lazreg Aref, Houda; Gaaliche, Badii; Fekih, Abdelwaheb; Mars, Massoud; Aouni, Mahjoub; Pierre Chaumon, Jean; Said, Khaled

    2011-02-01

    The latex of fig fruit (Ficus carica) is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of skin infections such as warts and also diseases of possible viral origin. Five extracts (methanolic, hexanic, ethyl acetate, hexane-ethyl acetate (v/v) and chloroformic) of this species were investigated in vitro for their antiviral potential activity against herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1), echovirus type 11 (ECV-11) and adenovirus (ADV). To evaluate the capacity of the extracts to inhibit the replication of viruses, the following assays were performed: adsorption and penetration, intracellular inhibition and virucidal activity. Observation of cytopathic effects was used to determine the antiviral action. The hexanic and hexane-ethyl acetate (v/v) extracts inhibited multiplication of viruses by tested techniques at concentrations of 78 µg mL(-1). These two extracts were possible candidates as herbal medicines for herpes virus, echovirus and adenovirus infectious diseases. All extracts had no cytotoxic effect on Vero cells at all tested concentrations.

  2. In vitro Anti-viral Activity of Psoraleae Semen Water Extract against Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang-Gi; Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Oh, Tae Woo; Yim, Nam-Hui; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Influenza causes respiratory infections and poses health risks to humans and animals; its effects are complicated by increasing resistance to existing anti-influenza viral agents. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches against influenza virus infection are required. Psoraleae semen has been widely used in traditional medicine in Korea, Taiwan, China, and Japan for treating and preventing various diseases. In this study, we examined the anti-viral activities and mechanism of action of the water extract of Psoraleae semen (WPS) using RAW 264.7 and MDCK cells. We found that pre- and post-treatment with 100 μg/mL WPS markedly inhibited influenza A virus replication as assessed using a green fluorescent protein reporter virus, reduced viral protein expression (NS-1, PA, HA, PB-1, M1, and M2), and inhibited NA and HA activities. Mechanism studies revealed that WPS induced type I interferon cytokine secretion and subsequent stimulation of an anti-viral state in RAW 264.7 cells. Further, WPS exerted inhibitory effects on neuraminidase in influenza virus strains H1N1 and H3N2. Meanwhile, WPS exhibited inhibitory effects on hemagglutination in H3N2 but not in H1N1. Based on these results, WPS serves as an immunomodulator and inhibitor of influenza hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Our results suggest that WPS is a promising source of novel anti-influenza drug candidates.

  3. Antiviral activity of the zinc ionophores pyrithione and hinokitiol against picornavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Krenn, B M; Gaudernak, E; Holzer, B; Lanke, K; Van Kuppeveld, F J M; Seipelt, J

    2009-01-01

    We have discovered two metal ion binding compounds, pyrithione (PT) and hinokitiol (HK), that efficiently inhibit human rhinovirus, coxsackievirus, and mengovirus multiplication. Early stages of virus infection are unaffected by these compounds. However, the cleavage of the cellular eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4GI by the rhinoviral 2A protease was abolished in the presence of PT and HK. We further show that these compounds inhibit picornavirus replication by interfering with proper processing of the viral polyprotein. In addition, we provide evidence that these structurally unrelated compounds lead to a rapid import of extracellular zinc ions into cells. Imported Zn(2+) was found to be localized in punctate structures, as well as in mitochondria. The observed elevated level of zinc ions was reversible when the compounds were removed. As the antiviral activity of these compounds requires the continuous presence of the zinc ionophore PT, HK, or pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate, the requirement for zinc ions for the antiviral activity is further substantiated. Therefore, an increase in intracellular zinc levels provides the basis for a new antipicornavirus mechanism.

  4. Spliceosome SNRNP200 Promotes Viral RNA Sensing and IRF3 Activation of Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Nicolas; Baril, Martin; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Es-Saad, Salwa; Park, Alex Young; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Lamarre, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomal SNRNP200 is a Ski2-like RNA helicase that is associated with retinitis pigmentosa 33 (RP33). Here we found that SNRNP200 promotes viral RNA sensing and IRF3 activation through the ability of its amino-terminal Sec63 domain (Sec63-1) to bind RNA and to interact with TBK1. We show that SNRNP200 relocalizes into TBK1-containing cytoplasmic structures upon infection, in contrast to the RP33-associated S1087L mutant, which is also unable to rescue antiviral response of SNRNP200 knockdown cells. This functional rescue correlates with the Sec63-1-mediated binding of viral RNA. The hindered IFN-β production of knockdown cells was further confirmed in peripheral blood cells of RP33 patients bearing missense mutation in SNRNP200 upon infection with Sendai virus (SeV). This work identifies a novel immunoregulatory role of the spliceosomal SNRNP200 helicase as an RNA sensor and TBK1 adaptor for the activation of IRF3-mediated antiviral innate response. PMID:27454487

  5. In vitro Anti-viral Activity of Psoraleae Semen Water Extract against Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-gi; Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Oh, Tae Woo; Yim, Nam-Hui; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2016-01-01

    Influenza causes respiratory infections and poses health risks to humans and animals; its effects are complicated by increasing resistance to existing anti-influenza viral agents. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches against influenza virus infection are required. Psoraleae semen has been widely used in traditional medicine in Korea, Taiwan, China, and Japan for treating and preventing various diseases. In this study, we examined the anti-viral activities and mechanism of action of the water extract of Psoraleae semen (WPS) using RAW 264.7 and MDCK cells. We found that pre- and post-treatment with 100 μg/mL WPS markedly inhibited influenza A virus replication as assessed using a green fluorescent protein reporter virus, reduced viral protein expression (NS-1, PA, HA, PB-1, M1, and M2), and inhibited NA and HA activities. Mechanism studies revealed that WPS induced type I interferon cytokine secretion and subsequent stimulation of an anti-viral state in RAW 264.7 cells. Further, WPS exerted inhibitory effects on neuraminidase in influenza virus strains H1N1 and H3N2. Meanwhile, WPS exhibited inhibitory effects on hemagglutination in H3N2 but not in H1N1. Based on these results, WPS serves as an immunomodulator and inhibitor of influenza hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Our results suggest that WPS is a promising source of novel anti-influenza drug candidates. PMID:27965579

  6. Antiviral Activity of Sulfated Polysaccharide of Adenanthera pavonina against Poliovirus in HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Godoi, Ananda Marques; Faccin-Galhardi, Lígia Carla; Lopes, Nayara; de Almeida, Raimundo Rafael; Ricardo, Nágila Maria Pontes Silva; Nozawa, Carlos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Adenanthera pavonina, popularly known as red-bead tree, carolina, pigeon's eye, and dragon's eye, is a plant traditionally used in Brazil for the treatment of several diseases. The present study aimed at evaluating the activity of sulfated polysaccharide from the Adenanthera pavonina (SPLSAp) seeds against poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) in HEp-2 cell cultures. The SPLSAp presented a cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of 500 μg/mL in HEp-2 cell cultures, evaluated by the dimethylthiazolyl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method (MTT). The SPLSAp exhibited a significant antiviral activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 1.18 µg/mL, determined by plaque reduction assay and a high selectivity index (SI) of 423. The maximum inhibition (100%) of PV replication was found when the SPLSAp treatment was concomitant with viral infection (time 0 h), at all tested concentrations. The maximal inhibition was also found when the SPLSAp was used 1 h and 2 h postinfection, albeit at 50 μg/mL and 100 μg/mL. Therefore, we demonstrated that the SPLSAp inhibited PV growth. We also suggested that SPLSAp inhibited PV in more than one step of the replication, as the mechanism of antiviral action. We, therefore, selected the compound as a potential candidate for further development towards the control of the infection. PMID:25221609

  7. Antiviral activity of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide complementary to RNA of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early region.

    PubMed Central

    Azad, R F; Driver, V B; Tanaka, K; Crooke, R M; Anderson, K P

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorothioate oligonucleotides complementary to mRNA of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA polymerase gene or to RNA transcripts of the major immediate-early regions 1 and 2 (IE1 and IE2) of HCMV were evaluated for antiviral activity in a 96-well immunoassay with primary human dermal fibroblasts as host cells. Oligonucleotides complementary to RNA of the IE2 region exhibited the most potent antiviral activity. One of these oligonucleotides, ISIS 2922, was at least 30-fold more potent than the nucleoside analog, ganciclovir, with a 50% effective concentration of 0.37 microM in the 96-well immunoassay. In an infectious virus yield reduction assay, ISIS 2922 and ganciclovir reduced production of infectious virus by 2 log units at concentrations of 2.2 and 36 microM, respectively. A control oligonucleotide showed no inhibition of virus production at concentrations as high as 3 microM. ISIS 2922 reduced IE protein synthesis in HCMV-infected cells in a dose-dependent manner which correlated with antiviral activity. The antiviral activity of ISIS 2922 was not due to oligonucleotide-induced cytotoxicity since effects on cell viability or proliferation were observed only at concentrations well in excess of effective antiviral concentrations. The specificity and potency of ISIS 2922 suggest that it may be useful for the treatment of cytomegalovirus disease in humans. Images PMID:8239610

  8. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC50 values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  9. Lead optimization of an acylhydrazone scaffold possessing antiviral activity against Lassa virus.

    PubMed

    Burgeson, James R; Gharaibeh, Dima N; Moore, Amy L; Larson, Ryan A; Amberg, Sean M; Bolken, Tove' C; Hruby, Dennis E; Dai, Dongcheng

    2013-11-01

    Previously we reported the optimization of antiviral scaffolds containing benzimidazole and related heterocycles possessing activity against a variety of arenaviruses. These series of compounds were discovered through an HTS campaign of a 400,000 small molecule library using lentivirus-based pseudotypes incorporated with the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein (LASV GP). This screening also uncovered an alternate series of very potent arenavirus inhibitors based upon an acylhydrazone scaffold. Subsequent SAR analysis of this chemical series involved various substitutions throughout the chemical framework along with assessment of the preferred stereochemistry. These studies led to an optimized analog (ST-161) possessing subnanomolar activity against LASV and submicromolar activity against a number of other viruses in the Arenaviridae family.

  10. Total synthesis and antiviral activity of indolosesquiterpenoids from the xiamycin and oridamycin families

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhanchao; Yu, Haixin; Li, Li; Tao, Wanyin; Chen, Hao; Wan, Ming; Yang, Peng; Edmonds, David J.; Zhong, Jin; Li, Ang

    2015-01-01

    Indolosesquiterpenoids are a growing class of natural products that exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Here, we report the total syntheses of xiamycin A and oridamycins A and B, indolosesquiterpenoids isolated from Streptomyces. Two parallel strategies were exploited to forge the carbazole core: 6π-electrocyclization/aromatization and indole C2–H bond activation/Heck annulation. The construction of their trans-decalin motifs relied on two diastereochemically complementary radical cyclization reactions mediated by Ti(III) and Mn(III), respectively. The C23 hydroxyl of oridamycin B was introduced by an sp3 C–H bond oxidation at a late stage. On the basis of the chemistry developed, the dimeric congener dixiamycin C has been synthesized for the first time. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of these compounds revealed that xiamycin A is a potent agent against herpes simplex virus–1 (HSV-1) in vitro. PMID:25648883

  11. Identification of a novel multiple kinase inhibitor with potent antiviral activity against influenza virus by reducing viral polymerase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka; Kakisaka, Michinori; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Tajima, Shigeru; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko; Aida, Yoko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Screening of 50,000 compounds and subsequent lead optimization identified WV970. • WV970 has antiviral effects against influenza A, B and highly pathogenic viral strains. • WV970 inhibits viral genome replication and transcription. • A target database search suggests that WV970 may bind to a number of kinases. • KINOMEscan screening revealed that WV970 has inhibitory effects on 15 kinases. - Abstract: Neuraminidase inhibitors are the only currently available influenza treatment, although resistant viruses to these drugs have already been reported. Thus, new antiviral drugs with novel mechanisms of action are urgently required. In this study, we identified a novel antiviral compound, WV970, through cell-based screening of a 50,000 compound library and subsequent lead optimization. This compound exhibited potent antiviral activity with nanomolar IC{sub 50} values against both influenza A and B viruses but not non-influenza RNA viruses. Time-of-addition and indirect immunofluorescence assays indicated that WV970 acted at an early stage of the influenza life cycle, but likely after nuclear entry of viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP). Further analyses of viral RNA expression and viral polymerase activity indicated that WV970 inhibited vRNP-mediated viral genome replication and transcription. Finally, structure-based virtual screening and comprehensive human kinome screening were used to demonstrate that WV970 acts as a multiple kinase inhibitor, many of which are associated with influenza virus replication. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that WV970 is a promising anti-influenza drug candidate and that several kinases associated with viral replication are promising drug targets.

  12. Antiviral activities of extracts and selected pure constituents of Ocimum basilicum.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Lien-Chai; Ng, Lean-Teik; Cheng, Pei-Win; Chiang, Win; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2005-10-01

    1. Ocimum basilicum (OB), also known as sweet basil, is a well known medicinal herb in traditional Chinese medicine preparations. In the present study, extracts and purified components of OB were used to identify possible antiviral activities against DNA viruses (herpes viruses (HSV), adenoviruses (ADV) and hepatitis B virus) and RNA viruses (coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and enterovirus 71 (EV71)). 2. The results show that crude aqueous and ethanolic extracts of OB and selected purified components, namely apigenin, linalool and ursolic acid, exhibit a broad spectrum of antiviral activity. Of these compounds, ursolic acid showed the strongest activity against HSV-1 (EC50 = 6.6 mg/L; selectivity index (SI) = 15.2), ADV-8 (EC50 = 4.2 mg/L; SI = 23.8), CVB1 (EC50 = 0.4 mg/L; SI = 251.3) and EV71 (EC50 = 0.5 mg/L; SI = 201), whereas apigenin showed the highest activity against HSV-2 (EC50 = 9.7 mg/L; SI = 6.2), ADV-3 (EC50 = 11.1 mg/L; SI = 5.4), hepatitis B surface antigen (EC50 = 7.1 mg/L; SI = 2.3) and hepatitis B e antigen (EC50 = 12.8 mg/L; SI = 1.3) and linalool showed strongest activity against AVD-II (EC50 = 16.9 mg/L; SI = 10.5). 3. No activity was noted for carvone, cineole, beta-caryophyllene, farnesol, fenchone, geraniol, beta-myrcene and alpha-thujone. 4. The action of ursolic acid against CVB1 and EV71 was found to occur during the infection process and the replication phase. 5. With SI values greater than 200, the potential use of ursolic acid for treating infection with CVB1 and EV71 merits further investigation.

  13. Antiviral activities of peptide-based covalent inhibitors of the Enterovirus 71 3C protease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong Wah; Ang, Melgious Jin Yan; Lau, Qiu Ying; Poulsen, Anders; Ng, Fui Mee; Then, Siew Wen; Peng, Jianhe; Hill, Jeffrey; Hong, Wan Jin; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a highly contagious disease caused by a range of human enteroviruses. Outbreaks occur regularly, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, putting a burden on public healthcare systems. Currently, there is no antiviral for treating this infectious disease and the only vaccines are limited to circulation in China, presenting an unmet medical need that needs to be filled urgently. The human enterovirus 3 C protease has been deemed a plausible drug target due to its essential roles in viral replication. In this study, we designed and synthesized 10 analogues of the Rhinovirus 3 C protease inhibitor, Rupintrivir, and tested their 3 C protease inhibitory activities followed by a cellular assay using human enterovirus 71 (EV71)-infected human RD cells. Our results revealed that a peptide-based compound containing a trifluoromethyl moiety to be the most potent analogue, with an EC50 of 65 nM, suggesting its potential as a lead for antiviral drug discovery. PMID:27645381

  14. Light-activated nanotube-porphyrin conjugates as effective antiviral agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Douaisi, Marc P.; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Kane, Ravi S.

    2012-03-01

    Porphyrins have been used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) against a wide range of targets like bacteria, viruses and tumor cells. In this work, we report porphyrin-conjugated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (NT-P) as potent antiviral agents. Specifically, we used Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which we attached to acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). We decided to use carbon nanotubes as scaffolds because of their ease of recovery from a solution through filtration. In the presence of visible light, NT-P was found to significantly reduce the ability of Influenza A virus to infect mammalian cells. NT-P may be used effectively against influenza viruses with little or no chance of them developing resistance to the treatment. Furthermore, NT-P can be easily recovered through filtration which offers a facile strategy to reuse the active porphyrin moiety to its fullest extent. Thus NT-P conjugates represent a new approach for preparing ex vivo reusable antiviral agents.

  15. NMR structure of mussel mytilin, and antiviral-antibacterial activities of derived synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Roch, Philippe; Yang, Yinshan; Toubiana, Mylène; Aumelas, André

    2008-01-01

    Mytilin is a 34-residue antibacterial peptide from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which in addition possesses in vitro antiviral activity. The three-dimensional solution structure of the synthetic mytilin was established by using 1H NMR and consists of the common cysteine-stabilized alphabeta motif close to the one observed in the mussel defensin MGD-1. Mytilin is characterized by 8 cysteines engaged in four disulfide bonds (2-27, 6-29, 10-31, and 15-34) only involving the beta-strand II. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas of mytilin account for 63% and 37%, respectively, a ratio very close to that of MGD-1 (64% and 36%). One linear and three cyclic fragments were designed from the interstrand loop sequence known to retain the biological activities in MGD-1. Only the fragment of 10 amino acids (C10C) constrained by two disulfide bonds in a stable beta-hairpin structure was able to inhibit the mortality of Palaemon serratus shrimp injected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Fifty percent inhibition was obtained by in vitro pre-incubation of WSSV with 45 microM of C10C compared with 7 microM for mytilin. Interaction between the fragment and the virus occurred very rapidly as 40% survival was recorded after only 1 min of pre-incubation. In addition, C10C was capable of inhibiting in vitro growth of Vibrio splendidus LGP32 (MIC 125 microM), Vibrio anguillarum (MIC 2mM), Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Escherichia coli (MIC 1mM). Destroying the cysteine-stabilized alphabeta structure or shortening the C10C fragment to the C6C fragment with only one disulfide bond resulted in loss of both antiviral and antibacterial activities. Increasing the positive net charge did not enforce the antibacterial activity and completely suppressed the antiviral one. The C10C-designed peptide from mytilin appeared comparable in composition and structure with protegrin, tachyplesin and polyphemusin.

  16. Antiviral activities of purified compounds from Youngia japonica (L.) DC (Asteraceae, Compositae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Wang, Hua; He, Zhendan; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2006-06-30

    The ethanol extract of a biannual medicinal herb, Youngia japonica (commonly known as Oriental hawk's beard) was reported previously to have potent antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) cultured in HEp-2 cells. Three anti-microbial agents, namely 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and luteolin-7-O-glucoside were subsequently purified and chemically characterized from the ethanol extract of Youngia japonica. The two dicaffeoylquinic acids exhibited prominent anti-RSV with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.5 microg/ml in vitro. Luteolin-7-O-glucoside together with the two dicaffeoylquinic acids were also manifested to have some antibacterial activity towards the causal agents of food-borne disease, namely Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus at the concentration of 2mg/ml. Bacillus cereus was sensitive to 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid only, but not to luteolin-7-O-glucoside.

  17. Antiviral activity of polymethoxylated flavones from "Guangchenpi", the edible and medicinal pericarps of citrus reticulata 'Chachi'.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao-Jiao; Wu, Xia; Li, Man-Mei; Li, Guo-Qiang; Yang, Yi-Ting; Luo, Hu-Jie; Huang, Wei-Huang; Chung, Hau Yin; Ye, Wen-Cai; Wang, Guo-Cai; Li, Yao-Lan

    2014-03-12

    The present study found that the supercritical fluid extract of "Guangchenpi" possessed in vitro antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of this extract led to obtain five active polymethoxylated flavones (1-5). Cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay exhibited that tangeretin (2) and nobiletin (3), two major polymethoxylated flavones in the extract, possessed better anti-RSV effect comparable to the positive control ribavirin. Plaque reduction assay revealed that tangeretin dose-dependently inhibited RSV-induced plaque formation on the HEp-2 cells. This polymethoxylated flavone mainly affected the intracellular replication of RSV, and it also could inhibit RSV entry into the HEp-2 cells. Further investigations with quantitative real-time PCR and confocal and Western blot assays indicated that tangeretin downregulated the expression of RSV phosphoprotein (P protein). Results suggest the potential application of the supercritical fluid extract of "Guangchenpi" and tangeretin in the treatment and the prevention of RSV infection.

  18. Chemical modifications of algal mannans and xylomannans: effects on antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Pérez Recalde, Mercedes; Carlucci, María J; Noseda, Miguel D; Matulewicz, María C

    2012-01-01

    The structures of two sulfated xylomannans extracted from the red alga Nemalion helminthoides were determined. These two fractions plus a sulfated mannan, isolated from the same alga and whose structure was previously reported, were subjected to chemical modification. The mannan was oversulfated with SO(3)-pyridine in dimethyl sulfoxide at 60 °C during two and three hours and the xylomannans were subjected to Smith degradation in order to eliminate xylose side-chains. Structural analysis of all derivatives was carried out by methylation analysis and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2, and dengue virus type 2 of native and modified mannans and xylomannans was estimated. Anticoagulant effect of the active fractions was also determined.

  19. Antiviral Activity of the Human Cathelicidin, LL-37, and Derived Peptides on Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Shweta; Wang, Guangshun; White, Mitchell; Qi, Li; Taubenberger, Jeffery; Hartshorn, Kevan L.

    2015-01-01

    Human LL-37, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, was recently shown to have antiviral activity against influenza A virus (IAV) strains in vitro and in vivo. In this study we compared the anti-influenza activity of LL-37 with that of several fragments derived from LL-37. We first tested the peptides against a seasonal H3N2 strain and the mouse adapted H1N1 strain, PR-8. The N-terminal fragment, LL-23, had slight neutralizing activity against these strains. In LL-23V9 serine 9 is substituted by valine creating a continuous hydrophobic surface. LL-23V9 has been shown to have increased anti-bacterial activity compared to LL-23 and we now show slightly increased antiviral activity compared to LL-23 as well. The short central fragments, FK-13 and KR-12, which have anti-bacterial activity did not inhibit IAV. In contrast, a longer 20 amino acid central fragment of LL-37 (GI-20) had neutralizing activity similar to LL-37. None of the peptides inhibited viral hemagglutination or neuraminidase activity. We next tested activity of the peptides against a strain of pandemic H1N1 of 2009 (A/California/04/09/H1N1 or “Cal09”). Unexpectedly, LL-37 had markedly reduced activity against Cal09 using several cell types and assays of antiviral activity. A mutant viral strain containing just the hemagglutinin (HA) of 2009 pandemic H1N1 was inhibited by LL-37, suggested that genes other than the HA are involved in the resistance of pH1N1. In contrast, GI-20 did inhibit Cal09. In conclusion, the central helix of LL-37 incorporated in GI-20 appears to be required for optimal antiviral activity. The finding that GI-20 inhibits Cal09 suggests that it may be possible to engineer derivatives of LL-37 with improved antiviral properties. PMID:25909853

  20. An examination of the medicinal potential of Scaevola spinescens: Toxicity, antibacterial, and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Cock, Ian E.; Kukkonen, Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Scaevola spinescens is an endemic Australian native plant with a history of use as a medicinal agent by indigenous Australians. Yet the medicinal bioactivities of this plant are poorly studied. Materials and Methods: S. spinescens solvent extracts were tested for antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity and toxicity in vitro. Results: All extracts displayed antibacterial activity in the disc diffusion assay. The methanol extract proved to have the broadest specificity, inhibiting the growth of 7 of the 14 bacteria tested (50%). The water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, and hexane extracts inhibited the growth of 6 (42.9%), 5 (35.7%), 5 (35.7%), and 4 (28.6%) of the 14 bacteria tested, respectively. S. spinescens methanolic extracts were equally effective against Gram-positive (50%) and Gram-negative bacteria (50%). All other extracts were more effective at inhibiting the growth of Gram-negative bacteria. All extracts also displayed antiviral activity in the MS2 plaque reduction assay with the methanol, water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, and hexane extracts inhibiting 95.2 ± 1.8%, 72.3 ± 6.3%, 82.6 ± 4.5%, 100 ± 0% and 47.7 ± 12.9% of plaque formation, respectively. All S. spinescens extracts were nontoxic in the Artemia fransiscana bioassay with no significant increase in mortality induced by any extract at 24 and 48 h. The only increase in mortality was seen for the water extract at 72 h, although even this extract displayed low toxicity, inducing only 41.7 ± 23.3% mortality. Conclusions: The lack of toxicity of the S. spinescens extracts and their inhibitory bioactivity against bacteria and viruses validate the Australian Aboriginal usage of S. spinescens and indicates its medicinal potential. PMID:21772751

  1. Fragment-based discovery of a new family of non-peptidic small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Colliandre, Lionel; Ahnou, Nazim; Nevers, Quentin; Gelin, Muriel; Bessin, Yannick; Brillet, Rozenn; Cala, Olivier; Douguet, Dominique; Bourguet, William; Krimm, Isabelle; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Guichou, Jean- François

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIase) that catalyse the interconversion of the peptide bond at proline residues. Several cyclophilins play a pivotal role in the life cycle of a number of viruses. The existing cyclophilin inhibitors, all derived from cyclosporine A or sanglifehrin A, have disadvantages, including their size, potential for side effects unrelated to cyclophilin inhibition and drug–drug interactions, unclear antiviral spectrum and manufacturing issues. Here we use a fragment-based drug discovery approach using nucleic magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and structure-based compound optimization to generate a new family of non-peptidic, small-molecule cyclophilin inhibitors with potent in vitro PPIase inhibitory activity and antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus and coronaviruses. This family of compounds has the potential for broad-spectrum, high-barrier-to-resistance treatment of viral infections. PMID:27652979

  2. Strain-specific antiviral activity of iminosugars against human influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S.; Miller, J. L.; Harvey, D. J.; Gu, Y.; Rosenthal, P. B.; Zitzmann, N.; McCauley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Drugs that target host cell processes can be employed to complement drugs that specifically target viruses, and iminosugar compounds that inhibit host α-glucosidases have been reported to show antiviral activity against multiple viruses. Here the effect and mechanism of two iminosugar α-glucosidase inhibitors, N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NN-DNJ), on human influenza A viruses was examined. Methods The viruses examined were a recently circulating seasonal influenza A(H3N2) virus strain A/Brisbane/10/2007, an older H3N2 strain A/Udorn/307/72, and A/Lviv/N6/2009, a strain representative of the currently circulating pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Results The inhibitors had the strongest effect on Brisbane/10 and NN-DNJ was more potent than NB-DNJ. Both compounds showed antiviral activity in cell culture against three human influenza A viruses in a strain-specific manner. Consistent with its action as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, NN-DNJ treatment resulted in an altered glycan processing of influenza haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), confirmed by MS. NN-DNJ treatment was found to reduce the cell surface expression of the H3 subtype HA. The level of sialidase activity of NA was reduced in infected cells, but the addition of exogenous sialidase to the cells did not complement the NN-DNJ-mediated inhibition of virus replication. Using reassortant viruses, the drug susceptibility profile was determined to correlate with the origin of the HA. Conclusions NN-DNJ inhibits influenza A virus replication in a strain-specific manner that is dependent on the HA. PMID:25223974

  3. The optimization of sulfation modification conditions for ophiopogonpolysaccharide based on antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Hu, Yuanliang; Wang, Deyun; Qin, Tao; Liu, Cui; Liu, Xu; Sheng, Xin; Chang, Shanshan; Fan, Yunpeng; Guo, Liwei; Nguyen, The Luong

    2012-11-01

    Ophiopogonpolysaccharide (OPS) was extracted by water decoction and ethanol precipitation, purified through eliminating protein by trichloroacetic acid method and column chromatography of DEAE-Cellulose-52, then sulfatedly modified by chlorosulfonic acid-pyridine method according to three-factors, ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine, reaction temperature and reaction time, and three level L₉(3⁴) orthogonal designed to obtain nine sulfated OPSs, sOPS₁-sOPS₉. Their effects on NDV to infect chick embryo fibroblast were compared by MTT assay taking the non-modified OPS as control. The results showed that sulfation modification could significantly enhance the antiviral activity of OPS, sOPS₃ presented best effect and the optimal modification conditions were the ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine of 1:4, the reaction temperature of 60 °C and the reaction time of 2 h.

  4. Structures and antiviral activities of butyrolactone derivatives isolated from Aspergillus terreus MXH-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xinhua; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Xi, Rui; Wang, Wei; Li, Dehai

    2014-12-01

    A new butyrolactone derivative, namely butyrolactone VIII ( 1), and six known butyrolactones ( 2-7) were separated from the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract of the fermentation broth of a fungus, Aspergillus terreus MXH-23. The chemical structures of these metabolites were identified by analyzing their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS). Known butyrolactone derivatives contain an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactone ring with α-hydroxyl and γ-benzyl, and butyrolactone VIII ( 1) was the first butyrolactones contains α-benzyl and γ-hydroxyl on α, β-unsaturated lactone ring. All of the butyrolactone derivatives were tested for their anti-influenza (H1N1) effects. Derivatives 4 and 7 showed moderate antiviral activities while the newly-identified, derivative 1, did not.

  5. Early gene activation initiates neuroinflammation prior to VSV neuroinvasion: Impact on antiviral responses and sleep.

    PubMed

    Ciavarra, Richard P; Lundberg, Patric; Machida, Mayumi; Ambrozewicz, Marta A; Wellman, Laurie L; Breving, Kimberly; Steel, Christina; Sanford, Larry D

    2017-02-15

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is rapidly and persistently suppressed during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) encephalitis in C57Bl/6J (B6) mice. REM sleep suppression was associated with a complex global brain chemokine/cytokine response with bimodal kinetics although regionally distinct cytokine profiles were readily identified. Cytokine mRNA was translated either immediately or suppressed until the pathogen was cleared from the CNS. Innate signaling pathway (TLRs, RIG-I) activation occurred rapidly and sequentially prior to VSV neuroinvasion suggesting that antiviral states are quickly established in the CNS in advance of viral pathogen penetration. Il1β suppressed REM sleep mimicking aspects of VSV-induced sleep alterations whereas some robustly induced chemokines may be protective of REM. Thus, multiple brain chemokines may mediate sleep across VSV encephalitis via differential somnogenic effects.

  6. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:26579205

  7. Actinobacteria from Termite Mounds Show Antiviral Activity against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model for Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Marina Aiello; Rodrigues, Rodney Alexandre Ferreira; Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Martini, Matheus Cavalheiro; Barnabé, Ana Caroline de Souza; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Uetanabaro, Ana Paula Trovatti; Bomfim, Getúlio Freitas; Afonso, Rafael Sanches; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2015-01-01

    Extracts from termite-associated bacteria were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Two bacterial strains were identified as active, with percentages of inhibition (IP) equal to 98%. Both strains were subjected to functional analysis via the addition of virus and extract at different time points in cell culture; the results showed that they were effective as posttreatments. Moreover, we performed MTT colorimetric assays to identify the CC50, IC50, and SI values of these strains, and strain CDPA27 was considered the most promising. In parallel, the isolates were identified as Streptomyces through 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Specifically, CDPA27 was identified as S. chartreusis. The CDPA27 extract was fractionated on a C18-E SPE cartridge, and the fractions were reevaluated. A 100% methanol fraction was identified to contain the compound(s) responsible for antiviral activity, which had an SI of 262.41. GC-MS analysis showed that this activity was likely associated with the compound(s) that had a peak retention time of 5 min. Taken together, the results of the present study provide new information for antiviral research using natural sources, demonstrate the antiviral potential of Streptomyces chartreusis compounds isolated from termite mounds against BVDV, and lay the foundation for further studies on the treatment of HCV infection.

  8. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum glucosidases is required for in vitro and in vivo dengue antiviral activity by the iminosugar UV-4.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Plummer, Emily M; Sayce, Andrew C; Alonzi, Dominic S; Tang, William; Tyrrell, Beatrice E; Hill, Michelle L; Caputo, Alessandro T; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Beatty, P Robert; Harris, Eva; Iwaki, Ren; Kinami, Kyoko; Ide, Daisuke; Kiappes, J L; Kato, Atsushi; Buck, Michael D; King, Kevin; Eddy, William; Khaliq, Mansoora; Sampath, Aruna; Treston, Anthony M; Dwek, Raymond A; Enterlein, Sven G; Miller, Joanna L; Zitzmann, Nicole; Ramstedt, Urban; Shresta, Sujan

    2016-05-01

    The antiviral activity of UV-4 was previously demonstrated against dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) in multiple mouse models. Herein, step-wise minimal effective dose and therapeutic window of efficacy studies of UV-4B (UV-4 hydrochloride salt) were conducted in an antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) mouse model of severe DENV2 infection in AG129 mice lacking types I and II interferon receptors. Significant survival benefit was demonstrated with 10-20 mg/kg of UV-4B administered thrice daily (TID) for seven days with initiation of treatment up to 48 h after infection. UV-4B also reduced infectious virus production in in vitro antiviral activity assays against all four DENV serotypes, including clinical isolates. A set of purified enzyme, in vitro, and in vivo studies demonstrated that inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) α-glucosidases and not the glycosphingolipid pathway appears to be responsible for the antiviral activity of UV-4B against DENV. Along with a comprehensive safety package, these and previously published data provided support for an Investigational New Drug (IND) filing and Phases 1 and 2 clinical trials for UV-4B with an indication of acute dengue disease.

  9. Antiviral Activity of MK-4965, a Novel Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor▿

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Tain; Munshi, Vandna; Touch, Sinoeun; Tynebor, Robert M.; Tucker, Thomas J.; McKenna, Philip M.; Williams, Theresa M.; DiStefano, Daniel J.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Miller, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are the mainstays of therapy for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. However, the effectiveness of NNRTIs can be hampered by the development of resistance mutations which confer cross-resistance to drugs in the same class. Extensive efforts have been made to identify new NNRTIs that can suppress the replication of the prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses. MK-4965 is a novel NNRTI that possesses both diaryl ether and indazole moieties. The compound displays potency at subnanomolar concentrations against wild-type (WT), K103N, and Y181C reverse transcriptase (RT) in biochemical assays. MK-4965 is also highly potent against the WT virus and two most prevalent NNRTI-resistant viruses (viruses that harbor the K103N or the Y181C mutation), against which it had 95% effective concentrations (EC95s) of <30 nM in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum. The antiviral EC95 of MK-4965 was reduced approximately four- to sixfold when it was tested in 50% human serum. Moreover, MK-4965 was evaluated with a panel of 15 viruses with NNRTI resistance-associated mutations and showed a superior mutant profile to that of efavirenz but not to that of etravirine. MK-4965 was similarly effective against various HIV-1 subtypes and viruses containing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor or protease inhibitor resistance-conferring mutations. A two-drug combination study showed that the antiviral activity of MK-4965 was nonantagonistic with each of the 18 FDA-licensed drugs tested vice versa in the present study. Taken together, these in vitro data show that MK-4965 possesses the desired properties for further development as a new NNRTI for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:19289522

  10. Pokeweed antiviral protein increases HIV-1 particle infectivity by activating the cellular mitogen activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Sheila; Kutky, Meherzad; Hudak, Katalin A

    2012-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a plant-derived N-glycosidase that exhibits antiviral activity against several viruses. The enzyme removes purine bases from the messenger RNAs of the retroviruses Human immunodeficiency virus-1 and Human T-cell leukemia virus-1. This depurination reduces viral protein synthesis by stalling elongating ribosomes at nucleotides with a missing base. Here, we transiently expressed PAP in cells with a proviral clone of HIV-1 to examine the effect of the protein on virus production and quality. PAP reduced virus production by approximately 450-fold, as measured by p24 ELISA of media containing virions, which correlated with a substantial decline in virus protein synthesis in cells. However, particles released from PAP-expressing cells were approximately 7-fold more infectious, as determined by single-cycle infection of 1G5 cells and productive infection of MT2 cells. This increase in infectivity was not likely due to changes in the processing of HIV-1 polyproteins, RNA packaging efficiency or maturation of virus. Rather, expression of PAP activated the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway to a limited extent, resulting in increased phosphorylation of viral p17 matrix protein. The increase in infectivity of HIV-1 particles produced from PAP-expressing cells was compensated by the reduction in virus number; that is, virus production decreased upon de novo infection of cells over time. However, our findings emphasize the importance of investigating the influence of heterologous protein expression upon host cells when assessing their potential for antiviral applications.

  11. The Formulated Microbicide RC-101 Was Safe and Antivirally Active Following Intravaginal Application in Pigtailed Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Amy L.; Cosgrove-Sweeney, Yvonne; Rogers, Nicole A.; Ratner, Deena; Sassi, Alexandra B.; Lackman-Smith, Carol; Tarwater, Patrick; Ramratnam, Bharat; Ruchala, Piotr; Lehrer, Robert I.; Waring, Alan J.; Gupta, Phalguni

    2010-01-01

    Background RC-101 is a congener of the antiretroviral peptide retrocyclin, which we and others have reported is active against clinical HIV-1 isolates from all major clades, does not hemagglutinate, and is non-toxic and non-inflammatory in cervicovaginal cell culture. Herein, film-formulated RC-101 was assessed for its antiviral activity in vitro, safety in vivo, retention in the cervix and vagina, and ability to remain active against HIV-1 and SHIV after intravaginal application in macaques. Methodology/Principal Findings RC-101 was formulated as a quick-dissolving film (2000 µg/film), retained complete activity in vitro as compared to unformulated peptide, and was applied intravaginally in six pigtailed macaques daily for four days. At one and four days following the final application, the presence of RC-101 was assessed in peripheral blood, cervicovaginal lavage, cytobrushed cervicovaginal cells, and biopsied cervical and vaginal tissues by quantitative western blots. One day following the last film application, cervical biopsies from RC-101-exposed and placebo-controlled macaques were collected and were subjected to challenge with RT-SHIV in an ex vivo organ culture model. RC-101 peptide was detected primarily in the cytobrush and biopsied cervical and vaginal tissues, with little to no peptide detected in lavage samples, suggesting that the peptide was associated with the cervicovaginal epithelia. RC-101 remained in the tissues and cytobrush samples up to four days post-application, yet was not detected in any sera or plasma samples. RC-101, extracted from cytobrushes obtained one day post-application, remained active against HIV-1 BaL. Importantly, cervical biopsies from RC-101-treated animals reduced RT-SHIV replication in ex vivo organ culture as compared to placebo-treated animals. Conclusions/Significance Formulated RC-101 was stable in vivo and was retained in the mucosa. The presence of antivirally active RC-101 after five days in vivo suggests that RC

  12. Chemical composition of 8 eucalyptus species' essential oils and the evaluation of their antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 1957, Tunisia introduced 117 species of Eucalyptus; they have been used as fire wood, for the production of mine wood and to fight erosion. Actually, Eucalyptus essential oil is traditionally used to treat respiratory tract disorders such as pharyngitis, bronchitis, and sinusitis. A few investigations were reported on the biological activities of Eucalyptus oils worldwide. In Tunisia, our previous works conducted in 2010 and 2011 had been the first reports to study the antibacterial activities against reference strains. At that time it was not possible to evaluate their antimicrobial activities against clinical bacterial strains and other pathogens such as virus and fungi. Methods The essential oils of eight Eucalyptus species harvested from the Jbel Abderrahman, Korbous (North East Tunisia) and Souinet arboreta (North of Tunisia) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion and microbroth dilution methods against seven bacterial isolates: Haemophilus influenzae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, the bactericidal, fungicidal and the antiviral activities of the tested oils were carried out. Results Twenty five components were identified by GC/FID and GC/MS. These components were used to correlate with the biological activities of the tested oils. The chemical principal component analysis identified three groups, each of them constituted a chemotype. According to the values of zone diameter and percentage of the inhibition (zdi, % I, respectively), four groups and subgroups of bacterial strains and three groups of fungal strains were characterized by their sensitivity levels to Eucalyptus oils. The cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity varied significantly within Eucalyptus species oils. Conclusions E. odorata showed the strongest activity against S. aureus, H. influenzae, S. agalactiae, S. pyogenes

  13. Antibody Complementarity-Determining Regions (CDRs) Can Display Differential Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Antitumor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José; Elguezabal, Natalia; Moragues, María Dolores; Casoli, Claudio; Pilotti, Elisabetta; Ronzi, Paola; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Juliano, Maria A.; Maffei, Domenico Leonardo; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) are immunoglobulin (Ig) hypervariable domains that determine specific antibody (Ab) binding. We have shown that synthetic CDR-related peptides and many decapeptides spanning the variable region of a recombinant yeast killer toxin-like antiidiotypic Ab are candidacidal in vitro. An alanine-substituted decapeptide from the variable region of this Ab displayed increased cytotoxicity in vitro and/or therapeutic effects in vivo against various bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The possibility that isolated CDRs, represented by short synthetic peptides, may display antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities irrespective of Ab specificity for a given antigen is addressed here. Methodology/Principal Findings CDR-based synthetic peptides of murine and human monoclonal Abs directed to: a) a protein epitope of Candida albicans cell wall stress mannoprotein; b) a synthetic peptide containing well-characterized B-cell and T-cell epitopes; c) a carbohydrate blood group A substance, showed differential inhibitory activities in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo against C. albicans, HIV-1 and B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells, conceivably involving different mechanisms of action. Antitumor activities involved peptide-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Engineered peptides, obtained by alanine substitution of Ig CDR sequences, and used as surrogates of natural point mutations, showed further differential increased/unaltered/decreased antimicrobial, antiviral and/or antitumor activities. The inhibitory effects observed were largely independent of the specificity of the native Ab and involved chiefly germline encoded CDR1 and CDR2 of light and heavy chains. Conclusions/Significance The high frequency of bioactive peptides based on CDRs suggests that Ig molecules are sources of an unlimited number of sequences potentially active against infectious agents and tumor cells. The easy production and low cost of small sized synthetic

  14. Synthesis and anti-BVDV activity of acridones as new potential antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Tabarrini, Oriana; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Fravolini, Arnaldo; Cecchetti, Violetta; Sabatini, Stefano; De Clercq, Erik; Rozenski, Jef; Canard, Bruno; Dutartre, Hélène; Paeshuyse, Jan; Neyts, Johan

    2006-04-20

    In this study we report the design, synthesis, and activity against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of a novel series of acridone derivatives. BVDV is responsible for major losses in cattle. The virus is also considered to be a valuable surrogate for the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in antiviral drug studies. Some of the synthesized acridones elicited selective anti-BVDV activity with EC(50) values ranging from 0.4 to 4 microg/mL and were not cytotoxic at concentrations that were 25- to 200-fold higher (CC(50) >100 microg/mL). It was proven that the most potent acridone derivative 10 was able to not only protect cells from virus-induced cytopathic effect but also reduce the production of infectious virus and extracellular viral RNA. Furthermore, compound 10, as well as a number of other analogues, inhibited HCV replication to some extent. However, there was no direct correlation between anti-BVDV and anti-HCV activity. Thus, the acridone scaffold, when appropriately functionalized, can yield compounds with selective activity against pestiviruses and related viruses such as the HCV.

  15. Short communication: antiviral activity of subcritical water extract of Brassica juncea against influenza virus A/H1N1 in nonfat milk.

    PubMed

    Lee, N-K; Lee, J-H; Lim, S-M; Lee, K A; Kim, Y B; Chang, P-S; Paik, H-D

    2014-09-01

    Subcritical water extract (SWE) of Brassica juncea was studied for antiviral effects against influenza virus A/H1N1 and for the possibility of application as a nonfat milk supplement for use as an "antiviral food." At maximum nontoxic concentrations, SWE had higher antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1 than n-hexane, ethanol, or hot water (80°C) extracts. Addition of 0.5mg/mL of B. juncea SWE to culture medium led to 50.35% cell viability (% antiviral activity) for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells infected with influenza virus A/H1N1. Nonfat milk supplemented with 0.28mg/mL of B. juncea SWE showed 39.62% antiviral activity against influenza virus A/H1N1. Thus, the use of B. juncea SWE as a food supplement might aid in protection from influenza viral infection.

  16. Antiviral activity of Ecasol against feline calicivirus, a surrogate of human norovirus.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Johnson, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Russell, R J

    2012-12-01

    Human norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis in closed settings such as hospitals, hotels and cruise ships. The virus survives on inanimate surfaces for extended periods of time, and environmental contamination has been implicated in its transmission. The disinfection of contaminated areas is important in controlling the spread of NoV infections. Neutral solutions of electrochemically activated (ECA)-anolyte have been shown to be powerful disinfectants against a broad range of bacterial pathogens. The active chemical ingredient is hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which is registered as an approved food contact surface sanitizer in the United States by the Environmental Protection Agency, pursuant to 40 CFR 180.940. We evaluated the antiviral activity of Ecasol (an ECA-anolyte) against feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate of NoV. FCV dried on plastic surfaces was exposed to Ecasol for 1, 2, or 5min. After exposure to Ecasol, the virus titers were compared with untreated controls to determine the virus inactivation efficacy after different contact times. Ecasol was found to decrease the FCV titer by >5log(10) within 1min of contact, indicating its suitability for inactivation of NoV on surfaces.

  17. Broad-spectrum in vivo antiviral activity of 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine, a novel immunopotentiating agent.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Cottam, H B; Sharma, B S; Jolley, W B; Robins, R K

    1989-01-01

    A novel immunopotentiating agent, 5-amino-3-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazolo [4,5-d]pyrimidine-2,7(3H,6H)-dione (7-thia-8-oxoguanosine), lacks virus-inhibitory properties in vitro but induces interferon and potentiates immune functions, such as natural killer cell activity. It was evaluated in rodent models to determine the spectrum of antiviral activity and effective treatment regimens. At 50 to 200 mg/kg given as single or divided intraperitoneal (i.p.) doses 1 day before virus inoculation, significant protection was afforded to mice infected i.p. with Semliki Forest, San Angelo, banzi, and encephalomyocarditis viruses. Similarly, suckling rats were protected from an intranasal challenge with rat coronavirus. Against San Angelo virus, treatments could be delayed to 1 day post-virus inoculation and still show a beneficial effect. The compound was moderately effective in mice infected i.p. with herpes simplex virus type 2 or intranasally with vesicular stomatitis virus. No activity was seen against influenza B virus in mice when the analog was administered one time pre-virus inoculation or in multiple doses given before and after the virus inoculation. Nor was there a prophylactic effect against herpetic skin lesions on mice. This immune modulator may have promise for the treatment of a variety of virus infections. PMID:2817849

  18. Comparison of antiviral activity of lambda-interferons against HIV replication in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yizhong; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Ting; Ho, Wenzhe

    2015-03-01

    Lambda-interferons (IFN-λs) have been demonstrated as having the ability to inhibit HIV replication in macrophages. However, specific differences in signaling transduction and anti-HIV activity in macrophages between different IFN-λs are unclear. Here, we showed that although all 3 members of (IFN-λ1, λ2, and λ3) IFN-λ family induced the expression of a number of genes of janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway in monocyte-derived macrophages, IFN-λ1 or IFN-λ3 induced higher levels of antiviral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) expression than did IFN-λ2. In addition, IFN-λ1 or IFN-λ3 induced higher levels of several pattern recognition receptors (PPRs) than did IFN-λ2. Incubation of IFN-λs with HIV-infected macrophages showed that IFN-λ1 or IFN-λ3 is more potent in anti-HIV activity than IFN-λ2. We also showed that IFN-λ treatment before HIV infection was more potent in HIV inhibition than that after HIV infection. Further investigations showed that the inductions of ISGs and PPRs expression by IFN-λs were largely compromised by HIV infection. These findings provide further experimental evidence that IFN-λs have therapeutic potential in treatment of HIV infection.

  19. Novel indole-2-carboxamide compounds are potent broad-spectrum antivirals active against western equine encephalitis virus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Sindac, Janice A; Barraza, Scott J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Xiang, Jianming; Kirchhoff, Paul D; Keep, Richard F; Irani, David N; Larsen, Scott D; Miller, David J

    2014-10-01

    Neurotropic alphaviruses, including western, eastern, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses, cause serious and potentially fatal central nervous system infections in humans for which no currently approved therapies exist. We previously identified a series of thieno[3,2-b]pyrrole derivatives as novel inhibitors of neurotropic alphavirus replication, using a cell-based phenotypic assay (W. Peng et al., J. Infect. Dis. 199:950-957, 2009, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/597275), and subsequently developed second- and third-generation indole-2-carboxamide derivatives with improved potency, solubility, and metabolic stability (J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 55:3535-3545, 2012, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm300214e; J. A. Sindac et al., J. Med. Chem. 56:9222-9241, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm401330r). In this report, we describe the antiviral activity of the most promising third-generation lead compound, CCG205432, and closely related analogs CCG206381 and CCG209023. These compounds have half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of ∼1 μM and selectivity indices of >100 in cell-based assays using western equine encephalitis virus replicons. Furthermore, CCG205432 retains similar potency against fully infectious virus in cultured human neuronal cells. These compounds show broad inhibitory activity against a range of RNA viruses in culture, including members of the Togaviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Although their exact molecular target remains unknown, mechanism-of-action studies reveal that these novel indole-based compounds target a host factor that modulates cap-dependent translation. Finally, we demonstrate that both CCG205432 and CCG209023 dampen clinical disease severity and enhance survival of mice given a lethal western equine encephalitis virus challenge. These studies demonstrate that indole-2-carboxamide compounds are viable candidates for continued preclinical development as inhibitors of neurotropic

  20. Developing Novel Antimicrobial and Antiviral Textile Products.

    PubMed

    Iyigundogdu, Zeynep Ustaoglu; Demir, Okan; Asutay, Ayla Burcin; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2017-03-01

    In conjunction with an increasing public awareness of infectious diseases, the textile industry and scientists are developing hygienic fabrics by the addition of various antimicrobial and antiviral compounds. In the current study, sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan are applied to cotton fabrics in order to gain antimicrobial and antiviral properties for the first time. The antimicrobial activity of textiles treated with 3 % sodium pentaborate pentahydrate, 0.03 % triclosan, and 7 % Glucapon has been investigated against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and fungi. Moreover, modified cotton fabrics were tested against adenovirus type 5 and poliovirus type 1. According to the test results, the modified textile goods attained very good antimicrobial and antiviral properties. Thus, the results of the present study clearly suggest that sodium pentaborate pentahydrate and triclosan solution-treated textiles can be considered in the development of antimicrobial and antiviral textile finishes.

  1. A Lipopeptide HIV-1/2 Fusion Inhibitor with Highly Potent in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Chong, Huihui; Xue, Jing; Xiong, Shengwen; Cong, Zhe; Ding, Xiaohui; Zhu, Yuanmei; Liu, Zixuan; Chen, Ting; Feng, Yifan; He, Lei; Guo, Yan; Wei, Qiang; Zhou, Yusen; Qin, Chuan; He, Yuxian

    2017-03-29

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) region of the HIV-1 fusogenic protein gp41 are potent viral entry inhibitors, and currently enfuvirtide (T-20) is the only one for clinical use; however, emerging drug-resistance largely limits its efficacy. In this study, we generated a novel lipopeptide inhibitor, named LP-19, by integrating multiple design strategies, including an N-terminal M-T hook structure, HIV-2 sequence, intra-helical salt-bridges, and a membrane-anchoring lipid tail. LP-19 showed stable binding affinity and highly potent, broad and long-lasting antiviral activity. In in vitro studies, LP-19 efficiently inhibited HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV-mediated cell fusion, viral entry and infection, and it was highly active against diverse subtypes of primary HIV-1 isolates and inhibitor-resistant mutants. The ex vivo studies demonstrated that LP-19 exhibited dramatically increased anti-HIV activity and extended half-life in rhesus macaques. In short-term monotherapy, LP-19 reduced the viral loads to undetectable levels in acutely and chronically SHIV-infected monkeys. Therefore, this study offers an ideal HIV-1/2 fusion inhibitor for clinical development and emphasizes the importance of the viral fusion step as a drug target.IMPORTANCE The peptide drug T-20 is the only viral fusion inhibitor in clinic, which is used in combination therapy of HIV-1 infection; however, it requires high dosage and easily induces drug-resistance, calling for a new drug with significantly improved pharmaceutical profiles. Here, we have developed a short lipopeptide-based fusion inhibitor termed LP-19, which mainly targets the conserved gp41 pocket site and shows highly potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1, HIV-2 and even SIV isolates. LP-19 exhibits dramatically increased antiviral activity and extended half-life in rhesus macaques, and it has potent therapeutic efficacy in SHIV-infected monkeys, highlighting its high potential as a new viral fusion inhibitor for clinical

  2. In Vitro Antiviral Activity of 6-Substituted 9-β-d-Ribofuranosylpurine 3′,5′-Cyclic Phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Sidwell, Robert W.; Huffman, John H.; Allen, Lois B.; Meyer, Rich B.; Shuman, Dennis A.; Simon, Lionel N.; Robins, Roland K.

    1974-01-01

    A series of twelve recently synthesized 6-substituted derivatives of 9-β-d-ribofuranosylpurine 3′,5′-cyclic phosphate (RPcMP) were evaluated for in vitro antiviral activity, using inhibition of viral cytopathogenic effect as the primary parameter for evaluation. Inhibition of the development of intra- and extracellular virus titer was used as a secondary criterion with certain viruses. Five derivatives were considered to have significant antiviral activity. 6-Hydroxylamino-RPcMP was active against type 1 herpes simplex, cytomegalo-, and vaccinia viruses. 6-Thio-RPcMP was inhibitory to types 1 and 2 herpes simplex, cytomegalo-, vaccinia, and type 3 parainfluenza viruses. The 6-methylthio derivative was active against types 1 and 2 herpes simplex, cytomegalo-, and vaccinia viruses, and types 1A, 2, 8, and 13 rhinoviruses; alteration of this 6-substitution to 6-ethylthio or to 6-benzylthio weakened the herpes- and vaccinia virus activity of the compound, but each continued to have significant antirhinovirus activity. The effect of time of addition of 6-methylthio-RPcMP to type 1 herpes simplex virus-infected cells was determined; the compound was most active when added prior to the virus. Early removal of the compound from the infected cells markedly reduced its antiviral effectiveness. PMID:15825420

  3. [Antiviral activity in vitro and pharmacokinetics of HCV entry inhibitor AVR560].

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, A V; Iamanushkin, P M; Mit'kin, O D; Ezhova, E V; Korzinov, O M; Bulanova, E A; Koriakova, A G; Vyshemirskaia, P V; Bychko, V V; Ivashchenko, A A

    2014-01-01

    Several novel compounds were found to be potent inhibitors of the HCV (JFH-1 isolate) infection in vitro. Human serum did not significantly reduce antiviral activity of the lead compound, AVR560 (< 4-fold). The immunohistochemistry studies with the Huh7 cell line, infectable with the HCV (JFH-1 strain), demonstrated that AVR560 inhibited the early steps of viral infection and blocked the spread of the HCV infection in tissue culture. The cytotoxicity in Huh7 and Vero-76 cell lines was mild. AVR560 proved to be a specific HCV inhibitor and exhibited no activity against other flaviviruses such as yellow fever (strain 17D), West Nile (strain NY99), and dengue (New Guinea type 2) in in vitro infection experiments. AVR560 also did not inhibit any of the tested human CYP450 isozymes (3A4, 1A2, 2C19 and 2D6). In the pharmacokinetic studies in mice, rats and dogs, favorable pharmacokinetic profiles and good oral bioavailability were observed for AV560. Further pre-clinical studies with this novel HCV inhibitor are in progress.

  4. Biotransformation of the antiviral drugs acyclovir and penciclovir in activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2011-04-01

    The biotransformation of the two antiviral drugs, acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV), was investigated in contact with activated sludge. Biodegradation kinetics were determined, and transformation products (TPs) were identified using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap- FT Mass Spectrometry (LTQ Orbitrap Velos) and 1D (1H NMR, 13C NMR) and 2D (1H,1H-COSY, 1H-(13)C-HSQC) NMR Spectroscopy. ACV and PCV rapidly dissipated in the activated sludge batch systems with half-lives of 5.3 and 3.4 h and first-order rate constants in relation to the amount of suspended solids (SS) of 4.9±0.1 L gss(-1) d(-1) and 7.6±0.3 L gss(-1) d(-1), respectively. For ACV only a single TP was found, whereas eight TPs were identified for PCV. Structural elucidation of TPs exhibited that transformation only took place at the side chain leaving the guanine moiety unaltered. The oxidation of the primary hydroxyl group in ACV resulted in the formation of carboxy-acyclovir (Carboxy-ACV). For PCV, transformation was more diverse with several enzymatic reactions taking place such as the oxidation of terminal hydroxyl groups and β-oxidation followed by acetate cleavage. Analysis of different environmental samples revealed the presence of Carboxy-ACV in surface and drinking water with concentrations up to 3200 ng L(-1) and 40 ng L(-1), respectively.

  5. Mx Is Not Responsible for the Antiviral Activity of Interferon-α against Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Shi-Qi; Wei, Jian-Chao; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Gao, Zhi-Can; Liu, Ke; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Chen, Pu-Yan; Zhou, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Mx proteins are interferon (IFN)-induced dynamin-like GTPases that are present in all vertebrates and inhibit the replication of myriad viruses. However, the role Mx proteins play in IFN-mediated suppression of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection is unknown. In this study, we set out to investigate the effects of Mx1 and Mx2 expression on the interferon-α (IFNα) restriction of JEV replication. To evaluate whether the inhibitory activity of IFNα on JEV is dependent on Mx1 or Mx2, we knocked down Mx1 or Mx2 with siRNA in IFNα-treated PK-15 cells and BHK-21 cells, then challenged them with JEV; the production of progeny virus was assessed by plaque assay, RT-qPCR, and Western blotting. Our results demonstrated that depletion of Mx1 or Mx2 did not affect JEV restriction imposed by IFNα, although these two proteins were knocked down 66% and 79%, respectively. Accordingly, expression of exogenous Mx1 or Mx2 did not change the inhibitory activity of IFNα to JEV. In addition, even though virus-induced membranes were damaged by Brefeldin A (BFA), overexpressing porcine Mx1 or Mx2 did not inhibit JEV proliferation. We found that BFA inhibited JEV replication, not maturation, suggesting that BFA could be developed into a novel antiviral reagent. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that IFNα inhibits JEV infection by Mx-independent pathways. PMID:28075421

  6. Evaluation of In vitro Antiviral Activity of Datura metel Linn. Against Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumen; Mukherjee, Sandeepan; Pawar, Sandip; Chowdhary, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The soxhlet and cold extracts of Datura metel Linn. were evaluated for in vitro antirabies activity. Materials and Methods: Soxhlet and cold extraction method were used to extract Datura (fruit and seed) extracts. In vitro cytotoxicity assay was performed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Based on the CC50 range, the in vitro antirabies activity of the extracts was screened by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test and molecular method. Results: The Datura (fruit and seed) extracts were not cytotoxic below 5 mg/ml (CC50). Titer of 10−4 rabies virus challenge virus standard (RV CVS) (1 50% tissue culture infective dose [1 TCID50]) was obtained by RFFT method and the challenge dose of 10 TCID50 was used for antirabies assay. Datura fruit and seed (soxhlet and cold) extracts showed 50% inhibition of RV CVS at 2.5 mg/ml and 1.25 mg/ml (inhibitory concentration 50% [IC50]), respectively. The tested extracts showed selectivity index (CC50/IC50) ranging from 2 to 4. The viral RNA was extracted and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed which also revealed a 2-fold reduction of viral load at 1.25 mg/ml of the Datura seed (soxhlet methanolic and cold aqueous) extracts. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of in vitro antiviral activity of D. metel Linn. against rabies virus. Datura seed extracts have a potential in vitro antirabies activity and, in future, can be further screened for in vivo activity against rabies virus in murine model. SUMMARY In the present study, Datura metel. Linn showed and in-vitro anti rabies activity in Vero cell line which was determined by RFFIT method and PCR method PMID:27695266

  7. Benzophenone C-glucosides and gallotannins from mango tree stem bark with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mageed, Wael M; Bayoumi, Soad A H; Chen, Caixia; Vavricka, Christopher J; Li, Li; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Dai, Huanqin; Song, Fuhang; Wang, Luoqiang; Zhang, Jingyu; Gao, George F; Lv, Yali; Liu, Lihong; Liu, Xueting; Sayed, Hanaa M; Zhang, Lixin

    2014-04-01

    The high mutation rate of RNA viruses has resulted in limitation of vaccine effectiveness and increased emergence of drug-resistant viruses. New effective antivirals are therefore needed to control of the highly mutative RNA viruses. The n-butanol fraction of the stem bark of Mangifera indica exhibited inhibitory activity against influenza neuraminidase (NA) and coxsackie virus 3C protease. Bioassay guided phytochemical study of M. indica stem bark afforded two new compounds including one benzophenone C-glycoside (4) and one xanthone dimer (7), together with eleven known compounds. The structures of these isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidences and correlated with known compounds. Anti-influenza and anti-coxsackie virus activities were evaluated by determining the inhibition of anti-influenza neuraminidase (NA) from pandemic A/RI/5+/1957 H2N2 influenza A virus and inhibition of coxsackie B3 virus 3C protease, respectively. The highest anti-influenza activity was observed for compounds 8 and 9 with IC50 values of 11.9 and 9.2μM, respectively. Compounds 8 and 9 were even more potent against coxsackie B3 virus 3C protease, with IC50 values of 1.1 and 2.0μM, respectively. Compounds 8 and 9 showed weak cytotoxic effect against human hepatocellular carcinoma and human epithelial carcinoma cell lines through MTT assay.

  8. Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705) against a Broad Range of Paramyxoviruses In Vitro and against Human Metapneumovirus in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Jochmans, D.; van Nieuwkoop, S.; Smits, S. L.; Neyts, J.; Fouchier, R. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical impact of infections with respiratory viruses belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae argues for the development of antiviral therapies with broad-spectrum activity. Favipiravir (T-705) has demonstrated potent antiviral activity against multiple RNA virus families and is presently in clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza. Here we demonstrate in vitro activity of T-705 against the paramyxoviruses human metapneumovirus (HMPV), respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza virus, measles virus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian metapneumovirus. In addition, we demonstrate activity against HMPV in hamsters. T-705 treatment inhibited replication of all paramyxoviruses tested in vitro, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 8 to 40 μM. Treatment of HMPV-challenged hamsters with T-705 at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day resulted in 100% protection from infection of the lungs. In all treated and challenged animals, viral RNA remained detectable in the respiratory tract. The observation that T-705 treatment had a significant effect on infectious viral titers, with a limited effect on viral genome titers, is in agreement with its proposed mode of action of viral mutagenesis. However, next-generation sequencing of viral genomes isolated from treated and challenged hamsters did not reveal (hyper)mutation. Polymerase activity assays revealed a specific effect of T-705 on the activity of the HMPV polymerase. With the reported antiviral activity of T-705 against a broad range of RNA virus families, this small molecule is a promising broad-range antiviral drug candidate for limiting the viral burden of paramyxoviruses and for evaluation for treatment of infections with (re)emerging viruses, such as the henipaviruses. PMID:27185803

  9. Antiviral Activity of Favipiravir (T-705) against a Broad Range of Paramyxoviruses In Vitro and against Human Metapneumovirus in Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jochmans, D; van Nieuwkoop, S; Smits, S L; Neyts, J; Fouchier, R A M; van den Hoogen, B G

    2016-08-01

    The clinical impact of infections with respiratory viruses belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae argues for the development of antiviral therapies with broad-spectrum activity. Favipiravir (T-705) has demonstrated potent antiviral activity against multiple RNA virus families and is presently in clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza. Here we demonstrate in vitro activity of T-705 against the paramyxoviruses human metapneumovirus (HMPV), respiratory syncytial virus, human parainfluenza virus, measles virus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian metapneumovirus. In addition, we demonstrate activity against HMPV in hamsters. T-705 treatment inhibited replication of all paramyxoviruses tested in vitro, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 8 to 40 μM. Treatment of HMPV-challenged hamsters with T-705 at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day resulted in 100% protection from infection of the lungs. In all treated and challenged animals, viral RNA remained detectable in the respiratory tract. The observation that T-705 treatment had a significant effect on infectious viral titers, with a limited effect on viral genome titers, is in agreement with its proposed mode of action of viral mutagenesis. However, next-generation sequencing of viral genomes isolated from treated and challenged hamsters did not reveal (hyper)mutation. Polymerase activity assays revealed a specific effect of T-705 on the activity of the HMPV polymerase. With the reported antiviral activity of T-705 against a broad range of RNA virus families, this small molecule is a promising broad-range antiviral drug candidate for limiting the viral burden of paramyxoviruses and for evaluation for treatment of infections with (re)emerging viruses, such as the henipaviruses.

  10. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  11. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  12. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  13. Antiviral Activity of Chloroquine Against Dengue Virus Type 2 Replication in Aotus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Paula Renata Lima; Muniz, José Augusto Pereira Carneiro; Imbeloni, Aline Amaral; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dengue virus (DENV) of the Flaviviridae family is a single positive-stranded RNA virus that is transmitted by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. The objective of this study was to investigate the use of chloroquine (CLQ) as an antiviral drug against dengue virus in monkeys. To analyze the action of the drug in vivo, nonhuman primates groups (Aotus azarai infulatus) were inoculated with a subcutaneous injection of a virulent strain of DENV-2, treated and untreated CLQ. Blood hematological, viremia, and serum biochemical values were obtained from 16 DENV-2-inoculated, treated and untreated; four received only CLQ and one mock-infected Aotus monkeys. Monkey serum samples (day 0–10 post-inoculation) were assayed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Cytometric Bead Array for determination of viremia and inflammatory cytokines, respectively. Additionally, body temperature and activity levels were determined. In the present work, CLQ was effective on replication of DENV-2 in Aotus monkeys; a time viremia reduction was observed compared with the controls. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma in the serum of the animals had a statistically significant reduction in the groups treated with CLQ after infection compared with the controls. A significant decrease in systemic levels of the liver enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was also observed in the animals treated with CLQ after infection compared with the controls. These results suggest that CLQ interferes in DENV-2 replication in Aotus monkeys. PMID:25664975

  14. Anatomically restricted synergistic anti-viral activities of innate and adaptive immune cells in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Reynoso, Glennys V.; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Rubin, Erica J.; Magadán, Javier G.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Gibbs, James; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite extensive ex vivo investigation, the spatiotemporal organization of immune cells interacting with virus-infected cells in tissues remains uncertain. To address this, we used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize immune cell interactions with virus-infected cells following epicutaneous vaccinia virus (VV) infection of mice. VV infects keratinocytes in epidermal foci, and numerous migratory dermal inflammatory monocytes outlying the foci. We observed Ly6G+ innate immune cells infiltrating and controlling foci, while CD8+ T cells remained on the periphery killing infected monocytes. Most antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the skin did not interact with virus-infected cells. Blocking the generation of reactive nitrogen species relocated CD8+ T cells into foci, modestly reducing viral titers. Depletion of Ly6G+ and CD8+ cells dramatically increased viral titers, consistent with their synergistic but spatially segregated viral clearance activities. These findings highlight previously unappreciated differences in the anatomic specialization of antiviral immune cell subsets. PMID:23414756

  15. In vitro Antiviral Activity of Rubia cordifolia Aerial Part Extract against Rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Gong, Xuepeng; Tan, Jia Y.; Kang, Lifeng; Li, Dongyan; Vikash; Yang, Jihong; Du, Guang

    2016-01-01

    The root of Rubia cordifolia has been used traditionally as a hemostatic agent, while the aerial part of the plant consisting of leaf and stem is known to exhibit anti-diarrheal properties and has been widely used as a remedy in many parts of China. As rotavirus is one of the most commonly associated diarrhea-causing pathogen, this study aims to investigate the anti-rotaviral effect of R. cordifolia aerial part (RCAP). The cytotoxicity of RCAP toward MA-104 cells was evaluated using the WST-8 assay. Colloidal gold method and real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay were used to confirm the findings of the antiviral assay. Then, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method was subsequently used to investigate the mode of death among the cells. And the representative components of aqueous extract were isolated and identified. It was shown that both the viability of MA-104 cells and the viral load were reduced with increasing concentration of the extract. DAPI staining showed that virus-induced apoptosis was the cause of the low cell viability and viral load, an effect which was accelerated with incubation in the aqueous herbal extract. The major compounds postulated to exhibit this activity were isolated from the aqueous herbal extract and identified to be compounds Xanthopurpurin and Vanillic Acid. This study showed that RCAP extract effectively inhibited rotavirus multiplication by promoting virus-induced apoptosis in MA-104 cells. PMID:27679574

  16. Antiviral activity of tenofovir against Cauliflower mosaic virus and its metabolism in Brassica pekinensis plants.

    PubMed

    Spak, Josef; Votruba, Ivan; Pavingerová, Daniela; Holý, Antonín; Spaková, Vlastimila; Petrzik, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The antiviral effect of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate tenofovir (R)-PMPA on double-stranded DNA Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in Brassica pekinensis plants grown in vitro on liquid medium was evaluated. Double antibody sandwich ELISA and PCR were used for relative quantification of viral protein and detecting nucleic acid in plants. (R)-PMPA at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/l significantly reduced CaMV titers in plants within 6-9 weeks to levels detectable neither by ELISA nor by PCR. Virus-free plants were obtained after 3-month cultivation of meristem tips on semisolid medium containing 50 mg/l (R)-PMPA and their regeneration to whole plants in the greenhouse. Studying the metabolism of (R)-PMPA in B. pekinensis revealed that mono- and diphosphate, structural analogs of NDP and/or NTP, are the only metabolites formed. The data indicate very low substrate activity of the enzymes toward (R)-PMPA as substrate. The extent of phosphorylation in the plant's leaves represents only 4.5% of applied labeled (R)-PMPA. In roots, we detected no radioactive peaks of phosphorylated metabolites of (R)-PMPAp or (R)-PMPApp.

  17. In COS cells Vpu can both stabilize tetherin expression and counteract its antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul A; Kuruppu, Nishani D; Felton, Kathryn L; D'Souza, Darren; Freed, Eric O

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-inducible cellular protein tetherin (CD317/BST-2) inhibits the release of a broad range of enveloped viruses. The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu enhances virus particle release by counteracting this host restriction factor. While the antagonism of human tetherin by Vpu has been associated with both proteasomal and lysosomal degradation, the link between Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation and the ability of Vpu to counteract the antiviral activity of tetherin remains poorly understood. Here, we show that human tetherin is expressed at low levels in African green monkey kidney (COS) cells. However, Vpu markedly increases tetherin expression in this cell line, apparently by sequestering it in an internal compartment that bears lysosomal markers. This stabilization of tetherin by Vpu requires the transmembrane sequence of human tetherin. Although Vpu stabilizes human tetherin in COS cells, it still counteracts the ability of tetherin to suppress virus release. The enhancement of virus release by Vpu in COS cells is associated with a modest reduction in cell-surface tetherin expression, even though the overall expression of tetherin is higher in the presence of Vpu. This study demonstrates that COS cells provide a model system in which Vpu-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 release is uncoupled from Vpu-mediated tetherin degradation.

  18. Chemical constituents from the roots and stems of Erycibe obtusifolia and their in vitro antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Wang, Ying; Liang, Ning; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Man-Mei; Fan, Chun-Lin; Wu, Zhen-Long; Li, Yao-Lan; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2013-11-01

    Three new quinic acid derivatives, 4-O-caffeoyl-3-O-sinapoylquinic acid methyl ester (1), 5-O-caffeoyl-4-O-syringoylquinic acid methyl ester (2), and 4-O-caffeoyl-3-O-syringoylquinic acid methyl ester (3), as well as four new coumarin glycosides, 7-O-(3-O-sinapoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-methoxycoumarin (12), 7-O-(6-O-sinapoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-methoxycoumarin (13), 7-O-(2-O-sinapoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-methoxycoumarin (14), and 7-O-(6-O-syringoyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-6-methoxycoumarin (15), together with eight known compounds (4-11) were isolated from the roots and stems of Erycibe obtusifolia. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical evidence. All the compounds were screened for their in vitro antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus with a cytopathic effect reduction assay. Among them, the di-O-caffeoyl quinates 8-11 displayed a potent in vitro anti-respiratory syncytial virus effect.

  19. Preparation, characterization and in vitro antiviral activity evaluation of foscarnet-chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Russo, E; Gaglianone, N; Baldassari, S; Parodi, B; Cafaggi, S; Zibana, C; Donalisio, M; Cagno, V; Lembo, D; Caviglioli, G

    2014-06-01

    A new nanoparticulate system for foscarnet delivery was prepared and evaluated. Nanoparticles were obtained by ionotropic gelation of chitosan induced by foscarnet itself, acting as an ionotropic agent in a manner similar to tripolyphosphate anion. A Doehlert design allowed finding the suitable experimental conditions. Nanoparticles were between 200 and 300nm in diameter (around 450nm after redispersion). Nanoparticle size increased after 5h, but no size increase was observed after 48h when nanoparticles were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. Zeta potential values of noncrosslinked and crosslinked nanoparticles were between 20 and 25mV, while drug loading of noncrosslinked nanoparticles was about 40% w/w (55% w/w for crosslinked nanoparticles). Nanoparticle yield was around 25% w/w. Crosslinked nanoparticles showed a controlled drug release. Foscarnet released from nanoparticles maintained the antiviral activity of the free drug when tested in vitro against lung fibroblasts (HELF) cells infected with HCMV strain AD-169. Moreover, nanoparticles showed no toxicity on non-infected HELF cells. These nanoparticles may represent a delivery system that could improve the therapeutic effect of foscarnet.

  20. Antiviral activity of Australian tea tree oil and eucalyptus oil against herpes simplex virus in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, P; Schön, K; Reichling, J

    2001-04-01

    The antiviral effect of Australian tea tree oil (TTO) and eucalyptus oil (EUO) against herpes simplex virus was examined. Cytotoxicity of TTO and EUO was evaluated in a standard neutral red dye uptake assay. Toxicity of TTO and EUO was moderate for RC-37 cells and approached 50% (TC50) at concentrations of 0.006% and 0.03%, respectively. Antiviral activity of TTO and EUO against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was tested in vitro on RC-37 cells using a plaque reduction assay. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of TTO for herpes simplex virus plaque formation was 0.0009% and 0.0008% and the IC50 of EUO was determined at 0.009% and 0.008% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. Australian tea tree oil exhibited high levels of virucidal activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in viral suspension tests. At noncytotoxic concentrations of TTO plaque formation was reduced by 98.2% and 93.0% for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively. Noncytotoxic concentrations of EUO reduced virus titers by 57.9% for HSV-1 and 75.4% for HSV-2. Virus titers were reduced significantly with TTO, whereas EUO exhibited distinct but less antiviral activity. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action of both essential oils, either cells were pretreated before viral infection or viruses were incubated with TTO or EUO before infection, during adsorption or after penetration into the host cells. Plaque formation was clearly reduced, when herpes simplex virus was pretreated with the essential oils prior to adsorption. These results indicate that TTO and EUO affect the virus before or during adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell. Thus TTO and EUO are capable to exert a direct antiviral effect on HSV. Although the active antiherpes components of Australian tea tree and eucalyptus oil are not yet known, their possible application as antiviral agents in recurrent herpes infection is promising.

  1. TRIM25 Enhances the Antiviral Action of Zinc-Finger Antiviral Protein (ZAP)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Zerlina; Cheung, Pamela; Schneider, William M.; Bozzacco, Leonia; Buehler, Eugen; Takaoka, Akinori; Rice, Charles M.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    The host factor and interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene (ISG) product, zinc-finger antiviral protein (ZAP), inhibits a number of diverse viruses by usurping and intersecting with multiple cellular pathways. To elucidate its antiviral mechanism, we perform a loss-of-function genome-wide RNAi screen to identify cellular cofactors required for ZAP antiviral activity against the prototype alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). In order to exclude off-target effects, we carry out stringent confirmatory assays to verify the top hits. Important ZAP-liaising partners identified include proteins involved in membrane ion permeability, type I IFN signaling, and post-translational protein modification. The factor contributing most to the antiviral function of ZAP is TRIM25, an E3 ubiquitin and ISG15 ligase. We demonstrate here that TRIM25 interacts with ZAP through the SPRY domain, and TRIM25 mutants lacking the RING or coiled coil domain fail to stimulate ZAP’s antiviral activity, suggesting that both TRIM25 ligase activity and its ability to form oligomers are critical for its cofactor function. TRIM25 increases the modification of both the short and long ZAP isoforms by K48- and K63-linked polyubiquitin, although ubiquitination of ZAP does not directly affect its antiviral activity. However, TRIM25 is critical for ZAP’s ability to inhibit translation of the incoming SINV genome. Taken together, these data uncover TRIM25 as a bona fide ZAP cofactor that leads to increased ZAP modification enhancing its translational inhibition activity. PMID:28060952

  2. Domain 2 of a Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon possesses antiviral activity against WSSV.

    PubMed

    Visetnan, Suwattana; Donpudsa, Suchao; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2014-12-01

    A 5-domain Kazal type serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon is involved in innate immune defense against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). To test which domains were involved, the 5 domains of SPIPm2 were over-expressed and tested against WSSV infection. By using hemocyte primary cell culture treated with each recombinant SPIPm2 domain along with WSSV, the expression of WSSV early genes ie1, WSV477 and late gene VP28 were substantially reduced as compared to other domains when the recombinant domain 2, rSPIPm2D2, was used. Injecting the WSSV along with rSPIPm2D2 but not with other domains caused delay in mortality rate of the infected shrimp. The results indicate that the SPIPm2D2 possesses strong antiviral activity and, hence, contributes predominantly to the antiviral activity of SPIPm2.

  3. Simultaneous Antibiofilm and Antiviral Activities of an Engineered Antimicrobial Peptide during Virus-Bacterium Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Lashua, Lauren P.; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Yang, Guanyi; Deslouches, Berthony; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    formed by the ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during coinfection with respiratory syncytial virus. We also observed antiviral activity, indicating the ability of engineered antimicrobial peptides to act as cross-kingdom single-molecule combination therapies. PMID:27303744

  4. Sequence-Specific Modifications Enhance the Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Response Activated by RIG-I Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cindy; Beljanski, Vladimir; Yin, Kevin; Olagnier, David; Ben Yebdri, Fethia; Steel, Courtney; Goulet, Marie-Line; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Haddad, Elias K.; Trautmann, Lydie; Ross, Ted; Lin, Rongtuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytosolic RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene I) receptor plays a pivotal role in the initiation of the immune response against RNA virus infection by recognizing short 5′-triphosphate (5′ppp)-containing viral RNA and activating the host antiviral innate response. In the present study, we generated novel 5′ppp RIG-I agonists of varieous lengths, structures, and sequences and evaluated the generation of the antiviral and inflammatory responses in human epithelial A549 cells, human innate immune primary cells, and murine models of influenza and chikungunya viral pathogenesis. A 99-nucleotide, uridine-rich hairpin 5′pppRNA termed M8 stimulated an extensive and robust interferon response compared to other modified 5′pppRNA structures, RIG-I aptamers, or poly(I·C). Interestingly, manipulation of the primary RNA sequence alone was sufficient to modulate antiviral activity and inflammatory response, in a manner dependent exclusively on RIG-I and independent of MDA5 and TLR3. Both prophylactic and therapeutic administration of M8 effectively inhibited influenza virus and dengue virus replication in vitro. Furthermore, multiple strains of influenza virus that were resistant to oseltamivir, an FDA-approved therapeutic treatment for influenza, were highly sensitive to inhibition by M8. Finally, prophylactic M8 treatment in vivo prolonged survival and reduced lung viral titers of mice challenged with influenza virus, as well as reducing chikungunya virus-associated foot swelling and viral load. Altogether, these results demonstrate that 5′pppRNA can be rationally designed to achieve a maximal RIG-I-mediated protective antiviral response against human-pathogenic RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE The development of novel therapeutics to treat human-pathogenic RNA viral infections is an important goal to reduce spread of infection and to improve human health and safety. This study investigated the design of an RNA agonist with enhanced antiviral and inflammatory

  5. In vivo antiviral activity of ribavirin/alpha-cyclodextrin complex: evaluation on experimental measles virus encephalitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeulin, H; Grancher, N; Kedzierewicz, F; Finance, C; Le Faou, A E; Venard, V

    2008-06-05

    Intracranial injection of the rodent adapted CAM/RB strain of measles virus (MV) induces encephalitis in CBA/ca mice. It has already been shown that cyclodextrins can be used as carriers to increase the antiviral activity of ribavirin (RBV) against MV in cellular model. In this study, the antiviral activity of a RBV/alpha-cyclodextrin complex has been evaluated in vivo using the above model. CBA/ca mice were treated by intraperitoneal injection of free ribavirin (40 mg/kg) or a RBV/alpha-cyclodextrin complex (molar ratio 1:3). After 21 days, intracerebral injection of CAM/RB resulted in 100% mortality in the mock group. In contrast, mortality rates of 80% and 40%, respectively, were observed in RBV and RBV/alpha-CD-treated mice (p<0.05 and p=0.06 for distilled water and RBV, respectively). The viral load of MV in the mouse brain was monitored daily by real-time PCR until day 6 after infection, to compare virus production in treated and non-treated mice. This data shows that RBV complexation with alpha-cyclodextrin can increase the antiviral activity of ribavirin in a measles virus encephalitis model in mice.

  6. Fucoidans from the brown seaweed Adenocystis utricularis: extraction methods, antiviral activity and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Nora M A; Pujol, Carlos A; Damonte, Elsa B; Flores, María L; Stortz, Carlos A

    2003-01-20

    The brown seaweed Adenocystis utricularis (family Adenocystaceae, order Ectocarpales sensu lato) was extracted in parallel with three solvents usually utilized for obtaining fucoidans: distilled water, 2% calcium chloride solution and diluted hydrochloric acid (pH 2) solution. In each case, the extraction was effected at room temperature and then at 70 degrees C. The extraction yields and characteristics of the products were similar in the three cases, with only minor differences. The analytical features of the products indicate that two different types of fucoidans are present in this seaweed. One of them, mostly extracted at room temperature, is composed mainly of L-fucose, D-galactose and ester sulfate (the 'galactofucan'). The other product (the 'uronofucoidan') is the major component of the extracts obtained at 70 degrees C. It is composed mainly of fucose, accompanied by other monosaccharides (mostly Man, but also Glc, Xyl, Rha and Gal), significant amounts of uronic acids and low proportions of sulfate ester. Fractionation with the cationic detergent cetrimide has allowed achieving a better separation of the galactofucan and uronofucoidan components. The galactofucans show a high inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus 1 and 2, with no cytotoxicity, whereas the uronofucoidans carry no antiviral activity. Structural studies on the galactofucan fractions were carried out by methylation analysis, desulfation and NMR spectroscopy. The fucan constituent is mainly composed of 3-linked alpha-L-fucopyranosyl backbone, mostly sulfated at C-4, and branched at C-2 with non-sulfated fucofuranosyl and fucopyranosyl units, and 2-sulfated fucopyranosyl units. The galactan moiety is more heterogeneous, with predominant D-galactopyranose units linked on C-3 and C-6, and sulfation mostly on C-4, even in terminal non-reducing units. It may be inferred that at least some of these galactose units carry the alpha-configuration.

  7. Skeletal modifications of [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids and their antiviral activity profile.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Huang, Yuanqiong; Song, Hongjian; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-11-01

    To study the effect of the variation of fused ring size and substitution on the antiviral activity of [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids, four types of structurally novel [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids analogues, with indole-fused six- to nine-membered-rings motifs, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Bioassay results indicated that most of these analogues had significant anti-TMV activity; especially I-14 (54 [Formula: see text] 3 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 51 [Formula: see text] 2, 45 [Formula: see text] 2, and 42 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), II-4 (53 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 49 [Formula: see text] 2, 57 [Formula: see text] 2, and 48 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), and II-8 (48 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 53 [Formula: see text] 2 %, 56 [Formula: see text] 2 %, and 46 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), which were more potent vs. TMV than was ribavirin (36 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 37 [Formula: see text] 2, 41 [Formula: see text] 2, and 38 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo). The size of the fused ring has important effects on anti-TMV potency, which may be ascribed to conformational differences. The X-ray structures of I-1, I-6, II-8, and III show differing conformational preferences. The most potent compounds can be used as leads for further optimization as antiphytoviral agents.

  8. Copper(II) complexes with new fluoroquinolones: Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic and theoretical study, DNA damage, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Dorotíková, Sandra; Kožíšková, Júlia; Malček, Michal; Jomová, Klaudia; Herich, Peter; Plevová, Kristína; Briestenská, Katarína; Chalupková, Anna; Mistríková, Jela; Milata, Viktor; Dvoranová, Dana; Bučinský, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes with fluoroquinolones in the presence of the nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline have been considered in detail. The phenanthroline moiety was introduced into the ligand environment with the aim to determine whether the nuclease activity is feasible. All suitable X-ray structures of the complexes under study reveal a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry for Cu(II) atom. The conformational and spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-visible) behavior has been analyzed and has been interpreted with respect to B3LYP/6-311G* calculations including molecular dynamics. The ability of the complexes to cleave DNA was studied by agarose gel electrophoresis with plasmid DNA pBSK+. The results have confirmed that the complexes under study behave as the chemical nucleases. Nuclease like activity in the absence of hydrogen peroxide allows us to deduce an interaction of the complexes with the DNA resulting in the conversion of supercoiled circular DNA to the nicked form. The DNA cleavage activity enhanced by the presence of hydrogen peroxide demonstrates the participation of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide radical anions and hydroxyl radicals which presence was confirmed independently using the standard radical scavenging agents. It has been suggested that the radical formation through the Fenton/Haber-Weiss reaction is mediated by the redox cycling mechanisms with the participation of cupric/cuprous ions. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated as the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50). The potential effects of tested compounds on replication of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) under in vitro conditions were also evaluated. However, no antiviral activity against MHV-68 was observed.

  9. CD8+ T-cell interaction with HCV replicon cells: evidence for both cytokine- and cell-mediated antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhu, Haizhen; Tu, Zhengkun; Xu, Yi-Ling; Nelson, David R

    2003-06-01

    The interaction between the host immune response and infected hepatocytes plays a central role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The lack of a suitable animal or in vitro model has hindered our understanding of the host T-cell/HCV interaction. Our aim was to develop an in vitro model to study the mechanisms of HCV-specific T-cell-mediated antiviral and cytolytic function. The HCV replicon was HLA typed and lymphocytes were obtained from an HLA class I-matched subject. CD8(+) T cells were expanded with 2 HCV-specific/HLA-restricted peptides for NS3. Lymphocyte preparations were cocultured with HCV replicon (FCA1) and control (Huh7) cells labeled with (51)Cr. After a 48-hour incubation, the cells were harvested for RNA extraction. Standard blocking assays were performed in the presence of anti-interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and anti-FasL. Cytolytic activity was measured by (51)Cr release. HCV replicon cells express homozygous HLA-A11 alleles and present HCV nonstructural proteins. HCV-specific expansion of CD8(+) cells led to a 10-fold decrease in HCV replication by Northern blot analysis and 21% specific lysis of FCA1 cells (compared with 2% of control Huh7 cells). Twenty percent of this antiviral activity was independent of T-cell binding, suggesting cytokine-mediated antiviral activity. The CD8(+) antiviral effect was markedly reduced by blocking either IFN-gamma or FasL but was unaffected by blocking TNF-alpha. In conclusion, HCV-specific CD8(+) cells inhibit viral RNA replication by cytokine-mediated and direct cytolytic effects. This T-cell/HCV subgenomic replicon system represents a model for the investigation of CD8 cell interaction with HCV-infected hepatocytes.

  10. IRAV (FLJ11286), an Interferon-Stimulated Gene with Antiviral Activity against Dengue Virus, Interacts with MOV10

    PubMed Central

    Balinsky, Corey A.; Schmeisser, Hana; Wells, Alexandra I.; Ganesan, Sundar; Jin, Tengchuan; Singh, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the genus Flavivirus and can cause severe febrile illness. Here, we show that FLJ11286, which we refer to as IRAV, is induced by DENV in an interferon-dependent manner, displays antiviral activity against DENV, and localizes to the DENV replication complex. IRAV is an RNA binding protein and localizes to cytoplasmic processing bodies (P bodies) in uninfected cells, where it interacts with the MOV10 RISC complex RNA helicase, suggesting a role for IRAV in the processing of viral RNA. After DENV infection, IRAV, along with MOV10 and Xrn1, localizes to the DENV replication complex and associates with DENV proteins. Depletion of IRAV or MOV10 results in an increase in viral RNA. These data serve to characterize an interferon-stimulated gene with antiviral activity against DENV, as well as to propose a mechanism of activity involving the processing of viral RNA. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus, a member of the family Flaviviridae, can result in a life-threatening illness and has a significant impact on global health. Dengue virus has been shown to be particularly sensitive to the effects of type I interferon; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which interferon-stimulated genes function to inhibit viral replication. A better understanding of the interferon-mediated antiviral response to dengue virus may aid in the development of novel therapeutics. Here, we examine the influence of the interferon-stimulated gene IRAV (FLJ11286) on dengue virus replication. We show that IRAV associates with P bodies in uninfected cells and with the dengue virus replication complex after infection. IRAV also interacts with MOV10, depletion of which is associated with increased viral replication. Our results provide insight into a newly identified antiviral gene, as well as broadening our understanding of the innate immune response to dengue virus infection. PMID:27974568

  11. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Broglie, Jessica Jenkins; Alston, Brittny; Yang, Chang; Ma, Lun; Adcock, Audrey F.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs) is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk) virus-like particles (VLPs) as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1) by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus. PMID:26474396

  12. Computer-aided identification, design and synthesis of a novel series of compounds with selective antiviral activity against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Bassetto, Marcella; De Burghgraeve, Tine; Delang, Leen; Massarotti, Alberto; Coluccia, Antonio; Zonta, Nicola; Gatti, Valerio; Colombano, Giampiero; Sorba, Giovanni; Silvestri, Romano; Tron, Gian Cesare; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Brancale, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Arbovirus that is transmitted to humans primarily by the mosquito species Aedes aegypti. Infection with this pathogen is often associated with fever, rash and arthralgia. Neither a vaccine nor an antiviral drug is available for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Albeit considered a tropical pathogen, adaptation of the virus to the mosquito species Aedes albopictus, which is also very common in temperate zones, has resulted in recent outbreaks in Europe and the US. In the present study, we report on the discovery of a novel series of compounds that inhibit CHIKV replication in the low μM range. In particular, we initially performed a virtual screening simulation of ∼5 million compounds on the CHIKV nsP2, the viral protease, after which we investigated and explored the Structure-Activity Relationships of the hit identified in silico. Overall, a series of 26 compounds, including the original hit, was evaluated in a virus-cell-based CPE reduction assay. The study of such selective inhibitors will contribute to a better understanding of the CHIKV replication cycle and may represents a first step towards the development of a clinical candidate drug for the treatment of this disease.

  13. TLR9-dependent recognition of MCMV by IPC and DC generates coordinated cytokine responses that activate antiviral NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Krug, Anne; French, Anthony R; Barchet, Winfried; Fischer, Jens A A; Dzionek, Andrzej; Pingel, Jeanette T; Orihuela, Michael M; Akira, Shizuo; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Colonna, Marco

    2004-07-01

    Natural interferon-producing cells (IPC) respond to viruses by secreting type I interferon (IFN) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 mediates IPC recognition of some of these viruses in vitro. However, whether TLR9-induced activation of IPC is necessary for an effective antiviral response in vivo is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that IPC and dendritic cells (DC) recognize murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) through TLR9. TLR9-mediated cytokine secretion promotes viral clearance by NK cells that express the MCMV-specific receptor Ly49H. Although depletion of IPC leads to a drastic reduction of the IFN-alpha response, this allows other cell types to secrete IL-12, ensuring normal IFN-gamma and NK cell responses to MCMV. We conclude that the TLR9/MyD88 pathway mediates antiviral cytokine responses by IPC, DC, and possibly other cell types, which are coordinated to promote effective NK cell function and MCMV clearance.

  14. Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Immunomodulatory Activity Studies of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs® 7630) in the Context of Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Pelargonium species contribute significantly to the health care of a large population in the Southern African region, as part of a long-standing medical system intimately linked to traditional healing practices. Most notably, extracts of the roots of P. sidoides have commonly been applied for the treatment of dysentery and diarrhoea but only occasionally for respiratory complaints. Clinical trials have shown that a modern aqueous-ethanolic formulation of P. sidoides extracts (EPs® 7630) is an efficacious treatment for disorders of the respiratory tract, for example bronchitis and sinusitis. It should be noted that EPs® 7630 is the most widely investigated extract and therefore is the focus of this review. In order to provide a rationale for its therapeutic activity extracts have been evaluated for antibacterial activity and for their effects on non-specific immune functions. Only moderate direct antibacterial capabilities against a spectrum of bacteria, including Mycobacteria strains, have been noted. In contrast, a large body of in vitro studies has provided convincing evidence for an anti-infective principle associated with activation of the non-specific immune system. Interestingly, significant inhibition of interaction between bacteria and host cells, a key to the pathogenesis of respiratory tract infections, has emerged from recent studies. In addition, antiviral effects have been demonstrated, including inhibition of the replication of respiratory viruses and the enzymes haemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Besides, an increase of cilliary beat frequency of respiratory cells may contribute to the beneficial effects of P. sidoides extracts. This example provides a compelling argument for continuing the exploration of Nature and traditional medical systems as a source of therapeutically useful herbal medicines. PMID:27721327

  15. Antiviral activity of the Lippia graveolens (Mexican oregano) essential oil and its main compound carvacrol against human and animal viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pilau, Marciele Ribas; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Weiblen, Rudi; Arenhart, Sandra; Cueto, Ana Paula; Lovato, Luciane Teresinha

    2011-01-01

    Mexican oregano (Lippia graveolens) is a plant found in Mexico and Central America that is traditionally used as a medicinal herb. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral activity of the essential oil of Mexican oregano and its major component, carvacrol, against different human and animal viruses. The MTT test (3–4,5-dimethythiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) was conducted to determine the selectivity index (SI) of the essential oil, which was equal to 13.1, 7.4, 10.8, 9.7, and 7.2 for acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (ACVR-HHV-1), acyclovir-sensitive HHV-1, human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), bovine herpesvirus type 2 (BoHV-2), and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), respectively. The human rotavirus (RV) and BoHV-1 and 5 were not inhibited by the essential oil. Carvacrol alone exhibited high antiviral activity against RV with a SI of 33, but it was less efficient than the oil for the other viruses. Thus, Mexican oregano oil and its main component, carvacrol, are able to inhibit different human and animal viruses in vitro. Specifically, the antiviral effects of Mexican oregano oil on ACVR-HHV-1 and HRSV and of carvacrol on RV justify more detailed studies. PMID:24031796

  16. In vitro antiviral activity of a series of wild berry fruit extracts against representatives of Picorna-, Orthomyxo- and Paramyxoviridae.

    PubMed

    Nikolaeva-Glomb, Lubomira; Mukova, Luchia; Nikolova, Nadya; Badjakov, Ilian; Dincheva, Ivayla; Kondakova, Violeta; Doumanova, Lyuba; Galabov, Angel S

    2014-01-01

    Wild berry species are known to exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities. They have long been traditionally applied for their antiseptic, antimicrobial, cardioprotective and antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study is to reveal the potential for selective antiviral activity of total methanol extracts, as well as that of the anthocyanins and the non-anthocyanins from the following wild berries picked in Bulgaria: strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) of the Rosaceae plant family, and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillis L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L) of the Ericaceae. The antiviral effect has been tested against viruses that are important human pathogens and for which chemotherapy and/or chemoprophylaxis is indicated, namely poliovirus type 1 (PV-1) and coxsackievirus B1 (CV-B1) from the Picornaviridae virus family, human respiratory syncytial virus A2 (HRSV-A2) from the Paramyxoviridae and influenza virus A/H3N2 of Orthomyxoviridae. Wild berry fruits are freeze-dried and ground, then total methanol extracts are prepared. Further the extracts are fractioned by solid phase extraction and the non-anthocyanin and anthocyanin fractions are eluted. The in vitro antiviral effect is examined by the virus cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition test. The results reveal that the total extracts of all tested berry fruits inhibit the replication of CV-B1 and influenza A virus. CV-B1 is inhibited to the highest degree by both bilberry and strawberry, as well as by lingonberry total extracts, and influenza A by bilberry and strawberry extracts. Anthocyanin fractions of all wild berries strongly inhibit the replication of influenza virus A/H3N2. Given the obtained results it is concluded that wild berry species are a valuable resource of antiviral substances and the present study should serve as a basis for further detailed research on the matter.

  17. Antiviral activity of Quercus persica L.: High efficacy and low toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali; Moradi, Mohammad-Taghi; Saeedi, Mojtaba; Asgari, Sedigheh; Rafieian-kopaei, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug-resistant strain of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-I) has increased the interest in the use of natural substances. Aims: This study was aimed to determine minimum inhibitory concentration of hydroalchoholic extract of a traditionally used herbal plant, Quercus persica L., on HSV-1 replication on baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Setting: The study was conducted in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Design: This was an experimental study. Materials and Methods: BHK cells were grown in monolayer culture with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with 5% fetal calf serum and plated onto 48-well culture plates. Fifty percent cytotoxic concentration (CC50%) of Q. persica L. on BHK cells was determined. Subsequently, 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50%) of the extract on replication of HSV-1 both in interacellular and exteracellular cases was assessed. Statistical Analysis: Statistic Probit model was used for statistical analysis. The dose-dependent effect of antiviral activity of the extracts was determined by linear regression. Results: Q. persica L. had no cytotoxic effect on this cell line. There was significant relationship between the concentration of the extract and cell death (P<0.01). IC50s of Q. persica L. on HSV-1, before and after attachment to BHK cells were 1.02 and 0.257 μg/mL, respectively. There was significant relationship between the concentration of this extract and inhibition of cytopathic effect (CPE) (P<0.05). Antioxidant capacity of the extract was 67.5%. Conclusions: The hydroalchoholic extract of Q. persica L. is potentially an appropriate and promising anti herpetic herbal medicine. PMID:24516836

  18. Three novel Anas platyrhynchos avian β-defensins, upregulated by duck hepatitis virus, with antibacterial and antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Ma, Deying; Lin, Lijuan; Zhang, Kexin; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Shengwang

    2011-10-01

    Three novel Anas platyrhynchos avian β-defensins (Apl_AvBDs), Apl_AvBD4, 7 and 12, were identified successfully and characterized in tissues from Peking ducks in the present study. The cDNA fragment of Apl_AvBD4 contained 171 bp, and encoded 56 amino acids. The complete nucleotide sequences of Apl_AvBD7 and 12 contained 204 bp and 198 bp open reading frames, which encoded 67 and 65 amino acids, respectively. Both recombinant and synthetic forms of the three Apl_AvBDs showed antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria investigated, including Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, except for Salmonella choleraesuis. In addition, the antibacterial activity of all the three Apl_AvBDs decreased significantly in 150 mM NaCl. Significant antiviral activity of the three Apl_AvBDs was shown against duck hepatitis virus (DHV). However, none of the Apl_AvBDs showed significant hemolytic activity. Additionally, the expressions of the three Apl_AvBDs in response to DHV infection was highly variable, and significant upregulation of Apl_AvBD7 in liver was found in response to infection at different time points. Expression of Apl_AvBD4 in thymus, and of Apl_AvBD7 in bone marrow was induced in a time-dependent fashion by DHV infection. In contrast, expression of Apl_AvBD12 was found to be significantly decreased, and was hard to detect in cecal tonsil, spleen, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus of ducks at some time points after DHV infection. The present results demonstrate that Apl_AvBDs play vital roles in the immune response of ducks against bacterial and viral pathogens.

  19. Antiviral Activity of Bay 41-4109 on Hepatitis B Virus in Humanized Alb-uPA/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Brezillon, Nicolas; Brunelle, Marie-Noëlle; Massinet, Hélène; Giang, Eric; Lamant, Céline; DaSilva, Lucie; Berissi, Sophie; Belghiti, Jacques; Hannoun, Laurent; Puerstinger, Gherard; Wimmer, Eva; Neyts, Johan; Hantz, Olivier; Soussan, Patrick; Morosan, Serban; Kremsdorf, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Current treatments for HBV chronic carriers using interferon alpha or nucleoside analogues are not effective in all patients and may induce the emergence of HBV resistant strains. Bay 41-4109, a member of the heteroaryldihydropyrimidine family, inhibits HBV replication by destabilizing capsid assembly. The aim of this study was to determine the antiviral effect of Bay 41-4109 in a mouse model with humanized liver and the spread of active HBV. Antiviral assays of Bay 41-4109 on HepG2.2.15 cells constitutively expressing HBV, displayed an IC50 of about 202 nM with no cell toxicity. Alb-uPA/SCID mice were transplanted with human hepatocytes and infected with HBV. Ten days post-infection, the mice were treated with Bay 41-4109 for five days. During the 30 days of follow-up, the HBV load was evaluated by quantitative PCR. At the end of treatment, decreased HBV viremia of about 1 log(10) copies/ml was observed. By contrast, increased HBV viremia of about 0.5 log(10) copies/ml was measured in the control group. Five days after the end of treatment, a rebound of HBV viremia occurred in the treated group. Furthermore, 15 days after treatment discontinuation, a similar expression of the viral capsid was evidenced in liver biopsies. Our findings demonstrate that Bay 41-4109 displayed antiviral properties against HBV in humanized Alb-uPA/SCID mice and confirm the usefulness of Alb-uPA/SCID mice for the evaluation of pharmaceutical compounds. The administration of Bay 41-4109 may constitute a new strategy for the treatment of patients in escape from standard antiviral therapy. PMID:22162746

  20. A Novel CDK7 Inhibitor of the Pyrazolotriazine Class Exerts Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Activity at Nanomolar Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Corina; Eickhoff, Jan; Milbradt, Jens; Korn, Klaus; Zeitträger, Isabel; Bahsi, Hanife; Wagner, Sabrina; Zischinsky, Gunther; Wolf, Alexander; Degenhart, Carsten; Unger, Anke; Baumann, Matthias; Klebl, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent central and multifunctional regulators of a balanced virus-host interaction. Cyclin-dependent protein kinase 7 (CDK7) plays crucial regulatory roles in cell cycle and transcription, both connected with the replication of many viruses. Previously, we developed a CDK7 inhibitor, LDC4297, that inhibits CDK7 in vitro in the nano-picomolar range. Novel data from a kinome-wide evaluation (>330 kinases profiled in vitro) demonstrate a kinase selectivity. Importantly, we provide first evidence for the antiviral potential of the CDK7 inhibitor LDC4297, i.e., in exerting a block of the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in primary human fibroblasts at nanomolar concentrations (50% effective concentration, 24.5 ± 1.3 nM). As a unique feature compared to approved antiherpesviral drugs, inhibition occurred already at the immediate-early level of HCMV gene expression. The mode of antiviral action was considered multifaceted since CDK7-regulated cellular factors that are supportive of HCMV replication were substantially affected by the inhibitors. An effect of LDC4297 was identified in the interference with HCMV-driven inactivation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), a regulatory step generally considered a hallmark of herpesviral replication. In line with this finding, a broad inhibitory activity of the drug could be demonstrated against a selection of human and animal herpesviruses and adenoviruses, whereas other viruses only showed intermediate drug sensitivity. Summarized, the CDK7 inhibitor LDC4297 is a promising candidate for further antiviral drug development, possibly offering new options for a comprehensive approach to antiviral therapy. PMID:25624324

  1. The Cytoplasmic Location of Chicken Mx Is Not the Determining Factor for Its Lack of Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Benfield, Camilla T. O.; Lyall, Jon W.; Tiley, Laurence S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chicken Mx belongs to the Mx family of interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases, which in some species possess potent antiviral properties. Conflicting data exist for the antiviral capability of chicken Mx. Reports of anti-influenza activity of alleles encoding an Asn631 polymorphism have not been supported by subsequent studies. The normal cytoplasmic localisation of chicken Mx may influence its antiviral capacity. Here we report further studies to determine the antiviral potential of chicken Mx against Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an economically important cytoplasmic RNA virus of chickens, and Thogoto virus, an orthomyxovirus known to be exquisitely sensitive to the cytoplasmic MxA protein from humans. We also report the consequences of re-locating chicken Mx to the nucleus. Methodology/Principal Findings Chicken Mx was tested in virus infection assays using NDV. Neither the Asn631 nor Ser631 Mx alleles (when transfected into 293T cells) showed inhibition of virus-directed gene expression when the cells were subsequently infected with NDV. Human MxA however did show significant inhibition of NDV-directed gene expression. Chicken Mx failed to inhibit a Thogoto virus (THOV) minireplicon system in which the cytoplasmic human MxA protein showed potent and specific inhibition. Relocalisation of chicken Mx to the nucleus was achieved by inserting the Simian Virus 40 large T antigen nuclear localisation sequence (SV40 NLS) at the N-terminus of chicken Mx. Nuclear re-localised chicken Mx did not inhibit influenza (A/PR/8/34) gene expression during virus infection in cell culture or influenza polymerase activity in A/PR/8/34 or A/Turkey/50-92/91 minireplicon systems. Conclusions/Significance The chicken Mx protein (Asn631) lacks inhibitory effects against THOV and NDV, and is unable to suppress influenza replication when artificially re-localised to the cell nucleus. Thus, the natural cytoplasmic localisation of the chicken Mx protein does not account for its

  2. Study of interferon-β antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 in neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia cultures.

    PubMed

    Low-Calle, Ana Maria; Prada-Arismendy, Jeanette; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2014-02-13

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes a lytic infection in epithelial cells before being captured and moved via retrograde axonal transport to the nuclei of the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion or dorsal root, where it establishes a latent infection. HSV-1 infection induces an antiviral response through the production of Beta Interferon (IFN-β) in infected trigeminal ganglia. The aim of this work was to characterize the response induced by IFN-β in neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia primary cultures infected with HSV-1. An antiviral effect of IFN-β in these cultures was observed, including reduced viral production and increased cell survival. In contrast, viral infection significantly decreased both double stranded RNA dependent protein kinase (Pkr) transcription and Jak-1 and Stat-1 phosphorylation, suggesting a possible HSV-1 immune evasion mechanism in trigeminal cells. Additionally, HSV-1 infection upregulated Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-3 (Socs3) mRNA; upregulation of socs3 was inhibited in IFN-β treated cultures. HSV-1 infection increased the number of Socs3 positive cells and modified the intracellular distribution of Socs3 protein, in infected cells. This neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia culture model could be used to elucidate the HSV-1 viral cycle in sensory neurons and to study cellular antiviral responses and possible viral evasion mechanisms that underlie the choice between viral replication and latency.

  3. Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir: synthesis and antiviral activity in HIV-1 and HSV-1 models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakirova, Natalia F; Shipitsyn, Alexander V; Jasko, Maxim V; Prokofjeva, Maria M; Andronova, Valeria L; Galegov, Georgiy A; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Kochetkov, Sergey N

    2012-10-01

    The antiviral activity against HIV and HSV and the chemical stability of ACV phosphoramidate derivatives were studied. The phosphoramidates of ACV demonstrated moderate activity. The best compound appeared to be 9-(2-hydroxymethyl)guanine phosphoromonomorpholidate (7), which inhibited virus replication in pseudo-HIV-1 particles by 50% at 50 μM. It also inhibited replication of wild-type HSV-1 (9.7 μM) as well as an acyclovir-resistant strain (25 μM). None of the synthesised compounds showed any cytotoxicity.

  4. Antiviral activity of Basidiomycete mycelia against influenza type A (serotype H1N1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Krupodorova, Tetiana; Rybalko, Svetlana; Barshteyn, Victor

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vitro antiviral activity of the mycelia of higher mushrooms against influenza virus type A (serotype H1N1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), strain BH. All 10 investigated mushroom species inhibited the reproduction of influenza virus strain A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) in MDCK cells reducing the infectious titer by 2.0-6.0 lg ID50. Four species, Pleurotus ostreatus, Fomes fomentarius, Auriporia aurea, and Trametes versicolor, were also determined to be effective against HSV-2 strain BH in RK-13 cells, with similar levels of inhibition as for influenza. For some of the investigated mushroom species-Pleurotus eryngii, Lyophyllum shimeji, and Flammulina velutipes-this is the first report of an anti-influenza effect. This study also reports the first data on the medicinal properties of A. aurea, including anti-influenza and antiherpetic activities. T. versicolor 353 mycelium was found to have a high therapeutic index (324.67), and may be a promising material for the pharmaceutical industry as an anti-influenza and antiherpetic agent with low toxicity. Mycelia with antiviral activity were obtained in our investigation by bioconversion of agricultural wastes (amaranth flour after CO2 extraction), which would reduce the cost of the final product and solve some ecological problems.

  5. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-22

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity.

  6. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  7. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-06-17

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process.

  8. Convergent Transcription of Interferon-stimulated Genes by TNF-α and IFN-α Augments Antiviral Activity against HCV and HEV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshi; Xu, Lei; Brandsma, Johannes H; Wang, Yijin; Hakim, Mohamad S; Zhou, Xinying; Yin, Yuebang; Fuhler, Gwenny M; van der Laan, Luc J W; van der Woude, C Janneke; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Smits, Ron; Poot, Raymond A; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-05-06

    IFN-α has been used for decades to treat chronic hepatitis B and C, and as an off-label treatment for some cases of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. TNF-α is another important cytokine involved in inflammatory disease, which can interact with interferon signaling. Because interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) are the ultimate antiviral effectors of the interferon signaling, this study aimed to understand the regulation of ISG transcription and the antiviral activity by IFN-α and TNF-α. In this study, treatment of TNF-α inhibited replication of HCV by 71 ± 2.4% and HEV by 41 ± 4.9%. Interestingly, TNF-α induced the expression of a panel of antiviral ISGs (2-11 fold). Blocking the TNF-α signaling by Humira abrogated ISG induction and its antiviral activity. Chip-seq data analysis and mutagenesis assay further revealed that the NF-κB protein complex, a key downstream element of TNF-α signaling, directly binds to the ISRE motif in the ISG promoters and thereby drives their transcription. This process is independent of interferons and JAK-STAT cascade. Importantly, when combined with IFN-α, TNF-α works cooperatively on ISG induction, explaining their additive antiviral effects. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism of convergent transcription of ISGs by TNF-α and IFN-α, which augments their antiviral activity against HCV and HEV.

  9. Leader-Containing Uncapped Viral Transcript Activates RIG-I in Antiviral Stress Granules

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seong-Wook; Onomoto, Koji; Wakimoto, Mai; Onoguchi, Kazuhide; Ishidate, Fumiyoshi; Fujiwara, Takahiro; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Kato, Hiroki; Fujita, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    RIG-I triggers antiviral responses by recognizing viral RNA (vRNA) in the cytoplasm. However, the spatio-temporal dynamics of vRNA sensing and signal transduction remain elusive. We investigated the time course of events in cells infected with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a non-segmented negative-strand RNA virus. RIG-I was recruited to viral replication complexes (vRC) and triggered minimal primary type I interferon (IFN) production. RIG-I subsequently localized to antiviral stress granules (avSG) induced after vRC formation. The inhibition of avSG attenuated secondary IFN production, suggesting avSG as a platform for efficient vRNA detection. avSG selectively captured positive-strand vRNA, and poly(A)+ RNA induced IFN production. Further investigations suggested that uncapped vRNA derived from read-through transcription was sensed by RIG-I in avSG. These results highlight how viral infections stimulate host stress responses, thereby selectively recruiting uncapped vRNA to avSG, in which RIG-I and other components cooperate in an efficient antiviral program. PMID:26862753

  10. Proteolytic activation of the SARS-coronavirus spike protein: cutting enzymes at the cutting edge of antiviral research.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Graham; Zmora, Pawel; Gierer, Stefanie; Heurich, Adeline; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic revealed that zoonotic transmission of animal coronaviruses (CoV) to humans poses a significant threat to public health and warrants surveillance and the development of countermeasures. The activity of host cell proteases, which cleave and activate the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein, is essential for viral infectivity and constitutes a target for intervention. However, the identities of the proteases involved have been unclear. Pioneer studies identified cathepsins and type II transmembrane serine proteases as cellular activators of SARS-CoV and demonstrated that several emerging viruses might exploit these enzymes to promote their spread. Here, we will review the proteolytic systems hijacked by SARS-CoV for S protein activation, we will discuss their contribution to viral spread in the host and we will outline antiviral strategies targeting these enzymes. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.''

  11. Different antiviral activity and cell specificity of interferon preparations produced by mouse peritoneal cells at 37 degrees C and at 26 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Cembrzyńska-Nowak, M

    1989-01-01

    Three sublines of mouse L cells and mouse embryo fibroblasts were used for determination of the antiviral activity of mouse interferons produced by nonadherent peritoneal exudate cells incubated either at 37 degrees C or at 26 degrees C. IFN produced at 37 degrees C or at 26 degrees C had the same antiviral activity in L Borgen, L929 cells. However, in MEC IFN-37 degrees had relatively higher activity than IFN-26 degrees. Of the interferon investigated only IFN-37 degrees exhibited antiviral activity in the established line of rat kidney cells. The IFN preparations showed no activity in the human and chicken cells. The studies on the sensitivity of viruses to both forms of IFN revealed that EMC and VSV viruses were equally sensitive to IFN-26 degrees C. However, the replication of EMC virus was more strongly inhibited by IFN-37 degrees than the multiplication of VSV virus.

  12. Antiviral immunity in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haipeng; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Jiravanichpaisal, Pikul

    2009-08-01

    Viral diseases of shrimp have caused negative effects on the economy in several countries in Asia, South America and America, where they have numerous shrimp culture industries. The studies on the immunity of shrimp and other crustaceans have mainly focused on general aspects of immunity and as a consequence little is known about the antiviral responses in crustaceans. The aim of this review is to update recent knowledge of innate immunity against viral infections in crustaceans. Several antiviral molecules have been isolated and characterized recently from decapods. Characterization and identification of these molecules might provide a promising strategy for protection and treatment of these viral diseases. In addition dsRNA-induced antiviral immunity is also included.

  13. Evaluation of anti-Zika virus activities of broad-spectrum antivirals and NIH clinical collection compounds using a cell-based, high-throughput screen assay.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Robert S; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Golden, Jennifer E; Chung, Dong-Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have clearly underscored the association between Zika virus (ZIKV) and severe neurological diseases such as microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Given the historical complacency surrounding this virus, however, no significant antiviral screenings have been performed to specifically target ZIKV. As a result, there is an urgent need for a validated screening method and strategy that is focused on highlighting potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors that can be further advanced via rigorous validation and optimization. To address this critical gap, we sought to test whether a cell-based assay that measures protection from the ZIKV-induced cytopathic effect could serve as a high-throughput screen assay for discovering novel anti-ZIKV inhibitors. Employing this approach, we tested the anti-ZIKV activity of previously known broad-spectrum antiviral compounds and discovered several compounds (e.g., NITD008, SaliPhe, and CID 91632869) with anti-ZIKV activity. Interestingly, while GTP synthesis inhibitors (e.g., ribavirin or mycophenolic acid) were too toxic or showed no anti-ZIKV activity (EC50 > 50 μM), ZIKV was highly susceptible to pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors (e.g., brequinar) in the assay. We amended the assay into a high-throughput screen (HTS)-compatible 384-well format and then screened the NIH Clinical Compound Collection library, which includes a total of 727 compounds organized, using an 8-point dose response format with two Zika virus strains (MR766 and PRVABC59, a recent human isolate). The screen discovered 6-azauridine and finasteride as potential anti-ZIKV inhibitors with EC50 levels of 3.18 and 9.85 μM for MR766, respectively. We further characterized the anti-ZIKV activity of 6-azauridine and several pyrimidine synthesis inhibitors such as brequinar in various secondary assays including an antiviral spectrum test within flaviviruses and alphaviruses, Western blot (protein), real-time PCR (RNA), and plaque reduction assays (progeny

  14. Evaluation of the antiviral activity of chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Sanekata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Toshiaki; Miura, Takanori; Morino, Hirofumi; Lee, Cheolsung; Maeda, Ken; Araki, Kazuko; Otake, Toru; Kawahata, Takuya; Shibata, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the antiviral activity of a chlorine dioxide gas solution (CD) and sodium hypochlorite (SH) against feline calicivirus, human influenza virus, measles virus, canine distemper virus, human herpesvirus, human adenovirus, canine adenovirus and canine parvovirus. CD at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppm produced potent antiviral activity, inactivating >or= 99.9% of the viruses with a 15 sec treatment for sensitization. The antiviral activity of CD was approximately 10 times higher than that of SH.

  15. Carbon nanotubes supported tyrosinase in the synthesis of lipophilic hydroxytyrosol and dihydrocaffeoyl catechols with antiviral activity against DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Botta, Giorgia; Bizzarri, Bruno Mattia; Garozzo, Adriana; Timpanaro, Rossella; Bisignano, Benedetta; Amatore, Donatella; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Nencioni, Lucia; Saladino, Raffaele

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxytyrosol and dihydrocaffeoyl catechols with lipophilic properties have been synthesized in high yield using tyrosinase immobilized on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by the Layer-by-Layer technique. All synthesized catechols were evaluated against a large panel of DNA and RNA viruses, including Poliovirus type 1, Echovirus type 9, Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), Coxsackievirus type B3 (Cox B3), Adenovirus type 2 and type 5 and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). A significant antiviral activity was observed in the inhibition of HSV-1, HSV-2, Cox B3 and CMV. The mechanism of action of the most active dihydrocaffeoyl derivative was investigated against a model of HSV-1 infection.

  16. Antiviral Activity of a Novel Compound CW-33 against Japanese Encephalitis Virus through Inhibiting Intracellular Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su-Hua; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Chen, Chao-Jung; Liu, Yu-Ching; Wang, Ching-Ying; Ping, Chia-Fong; Lin, Yu-Fong; Huang, An-Cheng; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has five genotypes (I, II, III, IV, and V). JEV genotype I circulates widely in some Asian countries. However, current JEV vaccines based on genotype III strains show low neutralizing capacities against genotype I variants. In addition, JE has no specific treatment, except a few supportive treatments. Compound CW-33, an intermediate synthesized derivative of furoquinolines, was investigated for its antiviral activities against JEV in this study. CW-33 exhibited the less cytotoxicity to Syrian baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) and human medulloblastoma (TE761) cells. CW-33 dose-dependently reduced the cytopathic effect and apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. Supernatant virus yield assay pinpointed CW-33 as having potential anti-JEV activity with IC50 values ranging from 12.7 to 38.5 μM. Time-of-addition assay with CW-33 indicated that simultaneous and post-treatment had no plaque reduction activity, but continuous and simultaneous treatments proved to have highly effective antiviral activity, with IC50 values of 32.7 and 48.5 μM, respectively. CW-33 significantly moderated JEV-triggered Ca2+ overload, which correlated with the recovery of mitochondria membrane potential as well as the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals in treated infected cells. Phosphopeptide profiling by LC-MS/MS revealed that CW-33 upregulated proteins from the enzyme modulator category, such as protein phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2), Rho GTPase-activating protein 35, ARF GTPase-activating protein GIT2, and putative 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 2. These enzyme modulators identified were associated with the activation of Akt/mTOR and Jak/STAT1 signals. Meanwhile, I-2 treatment substantially inhibited the apoptosis of JEV-infected cells. The results demonstrated that CW-33 exhibited a significant potential in the development of anti-JEV agents. PMID:27563890

  17. Dimeric structure of pseudokinase RNase L bound to 2-5A reveals a basis for interferon induced antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zeqiraj, Elton; Dong, Beihua; Jha, Babal Kant; Duffy, Nicole; Orlicky, Stephen; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Talukdar, Manisha; Pillon, Monica C.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Wan, Leo; Juang, Yu-Chi; Mao, Daniel Y.L.; Gaughan, Christina; Brinton, Margo A.; Perelygin, Andrey A.; Kourinov, Igor; Guarné, Alba; Silverman, Robert H.; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary RNase L is an ankyrin repeat domain containing dual endoribonuclease-pseudokinase that is activated by unusual 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) second messengers and which impedes viral infections in higher vertebrates. Despite its importance in interferon regulated antiviral innate immunity, relatively little is known about its precise mechanism of action. Here, we present a functional characterization of 2.5 Å and 3.25 Å X-ray crystal and small angle x-ray scattering structures of RNase L bound to a natural 2-5A activator with and without ADP or the non-hydrolysable ATP mimetic AMP-PNP. These studies reveal how recognition of 2-5A through interactions with the ankyrin repeat domain and the pseudokinase domain together with nucleotide binding, impose a rigid intertwined dimer configuration that is essential for RNase catalytic and anti-viral functions. The involvement of the pseudokinase domain of RNase L in 2-5A sensing, nucleotide binding, dimerization, and ribonuclease functions highlights the evolutionary adaptability of the eukaryotic protein kinase fold. PMID:24462203

  18. Antiviral activity produced by an IPNV-carrier EPC cell culture confers resistance to VHSV infection.

    PubMed

    Jurado, María Teresa; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Estepa, Amparo; Perez, Luis

    2013-10-25

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), a fish birnavirus, can establish a persistent infection on epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells producing a carrier state where a small fraction of IPNV-infected cells is maintained in the culture after continuous subculture. The EPC(IPNV) cells are resistant to challenge with IPNV as well as to challenge with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a rhabdovirus. In this work, the antiviral effect of the IPNV carrier culture conditioned medium (EPC(IPNV)-CM) was tested and analyzed in detail. EPC cells treated with the carrier culture supernatant become protected against VHSV challenge. Size-fractionation by filtration and acid and heat treatment showed that the IPNV persistently infected cells release an acid-resistant soluble factor in the molecular weight fraction bellow 50 kDa. The capacity of the EPC(IPNV)-CM to induce cytokine genes in EPC cells was also determined by real-time RT-PCR. We found that there is a positive correlation between up-regulation of mx gene expression in EPC cells treated with EPC(IPNV)-CM and protection against VHSV challenge. Our findings indicate that the control of IPNV multiplication in the carrier culture as well as the interference with rhabdovirus replication are connected to the production and release of an antiviral (interferon-like) factor to the medium.

  19. Novel Role for Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in the Restriction of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 by the Cellular Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Wasson, Peter; McFarlane, Steven; Tong, Lily; Brown, James R.; Grant, Kyle G.; Domingues, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is used by the intrinsic antiviral immune response to restrict viral pathogens, such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Despite characterization of the host factors that rely on SUMOylation to exert their antiviral effects, the enzymes that mediate these SUMOylation events remain to be defined. We show that unconjugated SUMO levels are largely maintained throughout infection regardless of the presence of ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase. Moreover, in the absence of ICP0, high-molecular-weight SUMO-conjugated proteins do not accumulate if HSV-1 DNA does not replicate. These data highlight the continued importance for SUMO signaling throughout infection. We show that the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) is upregulated during HSV-1 infection and localizes to nuclear domains that contain viral DNA. PIAS4 is recruited to sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry through SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent mechanisms that are destabilized by ICP0. In contrast, PIAS4 accumulates in replication compartments through SIM-independent mechanisms irrespective of ICP0 expression. Depletion of PIAS4 enhances the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, which is susceptible to restriction by the intrinsic antiviral immune response. The mechanisms of PIAS4-mediated restriction are synergistic with the restriction mechanisms of a characterized intrinsic antiviral factor, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and are antagonized by ICP0. We provide the first evidence that PIAS4 is an intrinsic antiviral factor. This novel role for PIAS4 in intrinsic antiviral immunity contrasts with the known roles of PIAS proteins as suppressors of innate immunity. IMPORTANCE Posttranslational modifications with small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins regulate multiple aspects of host immunity and viral replication. The protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) family of SUMO ligases is predominantly associated

  20. International society for antiviral research - 23rd international conference.

    PubMed

    Mason, Vicki L

    2010-06-01

    The 23rd International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR), organized by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR) and held in San Francisco, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of antivirals. This conference report highlights selected presentations on CD4-BFFI (Roche Holding AG), a CD4 mAb-based bifunctional HIV entry inhibitor; a CLDC-HBsAg vaccine (Juvaris BioTherapeutics Inc/China National Biotec Group) against HBV; ODE-(S)-MPMPA (University of California San Diego), a potent anti-HCV compound; the anti-human CMV activity exhibited by tricin; the protective activity of Ingavirin against influenza A; and Prosetta Bioconformatics's approach to identifying small-molecule antivirals.

  1. Synthesis and antiviral activity of IVFRU, a potential probe for the non-invasive diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Iwashina, T; Tovell, D R; Xu, L; Tyrrell, D L; Knaus, E E; Wiebe, L I

    1988-12-01

    Synthesis of (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-D-ribofuranosyl)uracil (IVFRU; 4a), and its [125I] and [131I] derivatives (4b and 4c) are described. Compared with IVDU, IVFRU had comparable antiviral activity (MIC50 = 0.01-0.1 microgram/ml), and a greater ethanol/water partition coefficient; its affinity for the murine erythrocyte nucleoside transporter system was greater than that of 2'-deoxyuridine. The [125I] derivative (4b) was selectively trapped within rabbit kidney cells (27.9 and 41.2% at 4 and 24 hr, respectively) infected in vitro by thymidine kinase-positive (TK+) herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), but not within either HSV (TK-) or mock-infected cells where uptake was less than 1%. It was resistant to glycosidic bond cleavage by pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, but underwent catabolism to an unidentified metabolite and iodide during in vivo plasma and urinary excretion studies in mice. We conclude that the [123I] derivative of IVFRU warrants further evaluation as a non-invasive radiopharmaceutical agent for the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), and that IVFRU warrants further evaluation as an antiviral agent.

  2. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A

    2016-07-07

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV.

  3. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P.; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S.; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K.; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A.

    2016-01-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV. PMID:27385120

  4. Safety and Antiviral Activity of the HCV Entry Inhibitor ITX5061 in Treatment-Naive HCV-Infected Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 1b Study

    PubMed Central

    Sulkowski, Mark S.; Kang, Minhee; Matining, Roy; Wyles, David; Johnson, Victoria A.; Morse, Gene D.; Amorosa, Valerianna; Bhattacharya, Debika; Coughlin, Kristine; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry involves scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1). In vitro, SRB1 inhibition by ITX5061 impedes HCV replication. Methods. Multicenter study to assess safety/activity of ITX5061 in previously untreated, noncirrhotic, HCV genotype 1 infected adults. Design included sequential cohorts of 10 subjects with ITX5061 (n = 8) or placebo (n = 2) to escalate duration (3 to 14 to 28 days) or deescalate dose (150 to 75 to 25 mg) based on predefined criteria for safety and activity (≥4 of 8 subjects with HCV RNA decline ≥1 log10 IU/mL). Results. Thirty subjects enrolled in 3 cohorts: ITX5061 150 mg/day by mouth for 3 (A150), 14 (B150), and 28 (C150) days. Six subjects had grade ≥3 adverse events (one in placebo); none were treatment related. One of the 7 C150 subjects (14.3%, 95% confidence interval [CI], .7%–55.4%) had ≥1 log10 IU/mL decline in HCV RNA (1.49 log10 IU/mL), whereas none of the 6 placebo, 8 A150 or 8 B150 subjects showed such decline. Conclusions. Oral ITX5061 150 mg/day for up to 28 days was safe and well tolerated. In the 28-day cohort, 1 of 7 subjects showed antiviral activity; however, predefined criteria for antiviral activity were not met at the doses and durations studied. PMID:24041792

  5. Antiviral Activity of Bictegravir (GS-9883), a Novel Potent HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitor with an Improved Resistance Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Goldsmith, Joshua; Mulato, Andrew; Hansen, Derek; Kan, Elaine; Tsai, Luong; Bam, Rujuta A.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Yant, Stephen R.; Yu, Helen; Kukolj, George; Cihlar, Tomas; Lazerwith, Scott E.; Jin, Haolun

    2016-01-01

    Bictegravir (BIC; GS-9883), a novel, potent, once-daily, unboosted inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN), specifically targets IN strand transfer activity (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 7.5 ± 0.3 nM) and HIV-1 integration in cells. BIC exhibits potent and selective in vitro antiretroviral activity in both T-cell lines and primary human T lymphocytes, with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 2.4 nM and selectivity indices up to 8,700 relative to cytotoxicity. BIC exhibits synergistic in vitro antiviral effects in pairwise combinations with tenofovir alafenamide, emtricitabine, or darunavir and maintains potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 variants resistant to other classes of antiretrovirals. BIC displayed an in vitro resistance profile that was markedly improved compared to the integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir (EVG), and comparable to that of dolutegravir (DTG), against nine INSTI-resistant site-directed HIV-1 mutants. BIC displayed statistically improved antiviral activity relative to EVG, RAL, and DTG against a panel of 47 patient-derived HIV-1 isolates with high-level INSTI resistance; 13 of 47 tested isolates exhibited >2-fold lower resistance to BIC than DTG. In dose-escalation experiments conducted in vitro, BIC and DTG exhibited higher barriers to resistance than EVG, selecting for HIV-1 variants with reduced phenotypic susceptibility at days 71, 87, and 20, respectively. A recombinant virus with the BIC-selected M50I/R263K dual mutations in IN exhibited only 2.8-fold reduced susceptibility to BIC compared to wild-type virus. All BIC-selected variants exhibited low to intermediate levels of cross-resistance to RAL, DTG, and EVG (<8-fold) but remained susceptible to other classes of antiretrovirals. A high barrier to in vitro resistance emergence for both BIC and DTG was also observed in viral breakthrough studies in the presence of constant clinically relevant drug concentrations. The

  6. The ribavirin analog ICN 17261 demonstrates reduced toxicity and antiviral effects with retention of both immunomodulatory activity and reduction of hepatitis-induced serum alanine aminotransferase levels.

    PubMed

    Tam, R C; Ramasamy, K; Bard, J; Pai, B; Lim, C; Averett, D R

    2000-05-01

    The demonstrated utility of the nucleoside analog ribavirin in the treatment of certain viral diseases can be ascribed to its multiple distinct properties. These properties may vary in relative importance in differing viral disease conditions and include the direct inhibition of viral replication, the promotion of T-cell-mediated immune responses via an enhanced type 1 cytokine response, and a reduction of circulating alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels associated with hepatic injury. Ribavirin also has certain known toxicities, including the induction of anemia upon chronic administration. To determine if all these properties are linked, we compared the D-nucleoside ribavirin to its L-enantiomer (ICN 17261) with regard to these properties. Strong similarities were seen for these two compounds with respect to induction of type 1 cytokine bias in vitro, enhancement of type 1 cytokine responses in vivo, and the reduction of serum ALT levels in a murine hepatitis model. In contrast, ICN 17261 had no in vitro antiviral activity against a panel of RNA and DNA viruses, while ribavirin exhibited its characteristic activity profile. Importantly, the preliminary in vivo toxicology profile of ICN 17261 is significantly more favorable than that of ribavirin. Administration of 180 mg of ICN 17261 per kg of body weight to rats by oral gavage for 4 weeks generated substantial serum levels of drug but no observable clinical pathology, whereas equivalent doses of ribavirin induced a significant anemia and leukopenia. Thus, structural modification of ribavirin can dissociate its immunomodulatory properties from its antiviral and toxicologic properties, resulting in a compound (ICN 17261) with interesting therapeutic potential.

  7. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Marjakangas, Jenni M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development.

  8. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses

    PubMed Central

    Westover, Jonna B.; Sefing, Eric J.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F.; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B.

    2016-01-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin. PMID:26711718

  9. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin.

  10. Zika virus: a race in search for antivirals.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2017-03-27

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes, was an almost neglected pathogen until its introduction in the Americas in 2015, and its subsequent explosive spread throughout the continent, where it has infected millions of people. The virus has caused social and sanitary alarm, mainly due to its association with severe neurological disorders (Guillain-Barré syndrome, and microcephaly in fetus and newborns). Nowadays, no specific antiviral therapy is available against ZIKV. However, during the past months, a great effort has been made in search for antiviral candidates by using different approaches and methodologies, from testing specific compounds with known antiviral activity to screenings of libraries with hundreds of bioactive molecules. The identified antiviral candidates include drugs targeting viral components, as well as cellular ones. Here, an updated review of what has been done in this line is presented.

  11. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs.

  12. Ubiquitin-Induced Oligomerization of the RNA Sensors RIG-I and MDA5 Activates Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Kinch, Lisa; Brautigam, Chad A.; Chen, Xiang; Du, Fenghe; Grishin, Nick; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I and MDA5 detect viral RNA in the cytoplasm and activate signaling cascades leading to the production of type-I interferons. RIG-I is activated through sequential binding of viral RNA and unanchored lysine-63 (K63) polyubiquitin chains, but how polyubiquitin activates RIG-I and whether MDA5 is activated through a similar mechanism remain unresolved. Here we showed that the CARD domains of MDA5 bound to K63 polyubiquitin and that this binding was essential for MDA5 to activate the transcription factor IRF3. Mutations of conserved residues in MDA5 and RIG-I that disrupt their ubiquitin binding also abrogated their ability to activate IRF3. Polyubiquitin binding induced the formation of a large complex consisting of four RIG-I and four ubiquitin chains. This hetero-tetrameric complex was highly potent in activating the antiviral signaling cascades. These results suggest a unified mechanism of RIG-I and MDA5 activation and reveal a unique mechanism by which ubiquitin regulates cell signaling and immune response. PMID:22705106

  13. Screening bioactives reveals nanchangmycin as a broad spectrum antiviral active against Zika virus

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Keiko; Hackett, Brent; Weinbren, Nathan; Reeder, Sophia; Sadovsky, Yoel; Hunter, Christopher; Schultz, David C.; Coyne, Carolyn; Cherry, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is an emerging arthropod-borne flavivirus for which there are no vaccines or specific therapeutics. We screened a library of 2000 ‘bioactive’ compounds for their ability to block Zika virus infection in three distinct cell-types with two different strains of Zika virus. Using a microscopy-based assay, we validated 38 drugs that inhibited Zika virus infection, including FDA approved nucleoside analogs. Cells expressing high levels of the attachment factor AXL can be protected from infection with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, while placental-derived cells that lack AXL expression are insensitive to this inhibition. Importantly, we identified nanchangmycin as a potent inhibitor of Zika virus entry across all cell types tested including physiologically relevant primary cells. Nanchanmycin was also active against other medically relevant viruses including West Nile, dengue, and chikungunya virus that use a similar route of entry. This study provides a resource of small molecules to study Zika virus pathogenesis. PMID:28099856

  14. Synthesis and antiviral activity of the carbocyclic analogues of 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine and of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Shealy, Y F; O'Dell, C A; Arnett, G; Shannon, W M

    1986-01-01

    The carbocyclic analogue of the antiviral agent 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EDU) was synthesized by two routes. The pivotal step in the first route is the reaction of lithium dimethylcuprate with the carbocyclic analogue of 5-(bromomethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine dibenzoate (6). The second route is based on the synthesis of the carbocyclic analogue of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (12) by a coupling reaction catalyzed by bis(triphenylphosphine)palladium(II) chloride and copper(I) iodide, a method reported recently (Robins and Barr) for the synthesis of the true nucleoside 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (1b). The carbocyclic analogue of EDU inhibits the replication of type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex viruses in Vero cells. The carbocyclic analogue of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine has modest activity against herpes simplex virus, types 1 and 2.

  15. Antiviral activity of the oseltamivir and Melissa officinalis L. essential oil against avian influenza A virus (H9N2).

    PubMed

    Pourghanbari, Gholamhosein; Nili, Hasan; Moattari, Afagh; Mohammadi, Ali; Iraji, Aida

    2016-06-01

    Lemon balm derivatives are going to acquire a novelty as natural and potent remedy for treatment of viral infections since the influenza viruses are developing resistance to the current antivirals widely. Oseltamivir, Melissa officinalis essential oil (MOEO) and their synergistic efficacy against avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H9N2 were evaluated in vitro in MDCK cells at different time exposure by using TCID50, HA, Real Time PCR and HI assay. The results showed that MOEO could inhibit replication of AVI through the different virus replication phase (P ≤ 0.05). Also the highest antiviral activity of MOEO was seen when AIV incubated with MOEO before cell infection. The TCID50/ml was reduced 1.3-2.1, 2.3-2.8, 3.7-4.5 log 10 than control group (5.6 log 10), HAU/50 µl was decreased 85-94, 71.4-94, 71.4-94 % and viral genome copy number/µl was brought down 68-95, 90-100, 89.6-99.9 % at pre-infection, post-infection and simultaneous stage, respectively. Hemagglutination inhibition result showed the MOEO was not able to inhibit agglutination of the chicken red blood cell (cRBC). Replication of the AVI was suppressed by the different concentration of oseltamivir completely or near 100 %. Also oseltamivir showed a synergistic activity with MOEO especially when oseltamivir concentration reduced under 0.005 mg/ml. The chemical composition was examined by GC-MS analysis and Its main constituents were identified as monoterpenaldehydes citral a, citral b. In conclusion, the findings of the study showed that lemon balm essential oil could inhibit influenza virus replication through different replication cycle steps especially throughout the direct interaction with the virus particles.

  16. [Potentiation of NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 5-nitroisatin and antiviral preparatation arbidol].

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Shchegolev, A Iu; Medvedev, A E

    2013-01-01

    Isatin (indole-dione) is an endogenous indole that exibits a wide range of biological and physiological activity. The influence of isatin derivatives 5-nitroisatin and arbidol (an antiviral preparatation) on spermine NONO-induced activation of human platelet soluble guanylyl cyclase was investigated. 5-nitroistnin and arbidol had no effect on basal activity, but synergistically increased in a concentration-dependent manner the spermine NONO-induced activation of this enzyme. 5-Nitroisatin and arbidol, like YC-1, sensitized guanylyl cyclase towards nitric oxide (NO) and produced a leftward shift of the spermine NONO concentration response curve. At the same time both compounds used did not influence the activation of guanylyl cyclase by YC-1 and did not change the synergistic increase of spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the presence of YC-1. This suggests that 5-nitroisanin and arbidol did not compete with YC-1. Addition of isatin did not change the synergistic increase in the spermine NONO-induced guanylyl cyclase activation by 5-nitroisatin and arbidol and did not influence a leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve produced by these compounds. These data suggest lack of competitive interaction between isatin and both its derivatives used.

  17. Pokeweed antiviral protein region Gly209-Lys225 is critical for RNA N-glycosidase activity of the prokaryotic ribosome.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yoshimi; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kondo, Toshiya

    2008-05-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) isolated from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) that has RNA N-glycosidase (RNG) activity towards both eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. In contrast, karasurin-A (KRN), a RIP from Trichosanthes kirilowii var. japonica, is active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Stepwise selection of chimera proteins between PAP and KRN indicated that the C-terminal region of PAP (residues 209-225) was critical for RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosomes. When the region of PAP (residues 209-225) was replaced with the corresponding region of KRN the PAP chimera protein, like KRN, was active only on eukaryotic ribosomes. Furthermore, insertion of the region of PAP (residues 209-225) into the KRN chimera protein resulted not only in the detectable RNG activity toward prokaryotic ribosome, but also activity toward the eukaryotic ribosomes as well that was seven-fold higher than for the original KRN. In this study, the possibility of genetic manipulation of the activity and substrate specificity of RIPs is demonstrated.

  18. Application of "hydrogen bonding interaction" in new drug development: design, synthesis, antiviral activity, and SARs of thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Aidang; Wang, Ziwen; Zhou, Zhenghong; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-02-11

    A series of simple thiourea derivatives were designed based on the structure of natural product harmine and lead compound and synthesized from amines in one step. The antiviral activity of these thiourea derivatives was evaluated. Most of them exhibited significantly higher anti-TMV activity than commercial plant virucides ribavirin, harmine, and lead compound. The hydrogen bond was found to be important but not the more the better. The optimal compound (R,R)-20 showed the best anti-TMV activity in vitro and in vivo (in vitro activity, 75%/500 μg/mL and 39%/100 μg/mL; inactivation activity, 71%/500 μg/mL and 35%/100 μg/mL; curative activity, 73%/500 μg/mL and 37%/100 μg/mL; protection activity, 69%/500 μg/mL and 33%/100 μg/mL), which is significantly higher than that of Ningnanmycin. The systematic study provides strong evidence that these simple thiourea derivatives could become potential TMV inhibitors.

  19. Antiviral activity of lambda-carrageenan prepared from red seaweed (Gigartina skottsbergii) against BoHV-1 and SuHV-1.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Jésica V; Novo, Sabrina Galdo; González, Marcelo J; Ciancia, Marina; Bratanich, Ana C

    2015-02-01

    The antiviral effect of polysaccharides has been known for many years. Carrageenans are considered a good alternative for the prevention of a wide range of diseases, mainly caused by enveloped viruses. The advantages lie on their high availability, low cost and low induction of resistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of two viral pathogens of veterinary interest to the presence of lambda-carrageenan. This is the first report of a lambda-carrageenan having antiviral activity against animal viruses belonging to the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily, BoHV-1 (bovine herpesvirus type 1) strain Cooper and SuHV-1 (suid herpesvirus type 1) strain Bartha. Lambda-carrageenan was able to reduce infectivity of both viruses with a more pronounced effect against BoHV-1. These results proved, as previously shown for human herpes virus type 1, that these compounds could be used as potential antiviral agents in the veterinary field.

  20. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effect and antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities of Hypericum triquetrifolium Turra essential oils from Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of bio-active secondary metabolites have been identified and reported for several Hypericum species. Many studies have reported the potential use of the plant extracts against several pathogens. However, Hypericum triquetrifolium is one of the least studied species for its antimicrobial activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of the essential oils of Hypericum triquetrifolium as well as their antimicrobial potential against coxsakievirus B3 and a range of bacterial and fungal strains. Methods The essential oils of Hypericum triquetrifolium harvested from five different Tunisian localities (Fondouk DJedid, Bou Arada, Bahra, Fernana and Dhrea Ben Jouder) were evaluated for their antimicrobial activities by micro-broth dilution methods against bacterial and fungal strains. In addition, the cytotoxic effect and the antiviral activity of these oils were carried out using Vero cell lines and coxsakievirus B3. Results The results showed a good antibacterial activities against a wide range of bacterial strains, MIC values ranging between 0.39-12.50 mg/ml and MBC values between 1.56-25.0 mg/ml. In addition, the essential oils showed promising antifungal activity with MIC values ranging between 0.39 μg/mL and 12.50 μg/mL; MFC values ranged between 3.12 μg/mL and 25.00 μg/mL; a significant anticandidal activity was noted (MIC values comprised between 0.39 μg/mL and 12.50 μg/mL). Although their low cytotoxic effect (CC50 ranged between 0.58 mg/mL and 12.00 mg/mL), the essential oils did not show antiviral activity against coxsakievirus B3. Conclusion The essential oils obtained from Hypericum triquetrifolium can be used as antimicrobial agents and could be safe at non cytotoxic doses. As shown for the tested essential oils, comparative analysis need to be undertaken to better characterize also the antimicrobial activities of Hypericum triquetrifolium extracts with different solvents as well as their

  1. Antiviral activity and possible mode of action of ellagic acid identified in Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves toward human rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cause billions of USD annually in medical visits and school and work absenteeism. An assessment was made of the cytotoxic and antiviral activities and possible mode of action of the tannin ellagic acid from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa toward HeLa cells and three rhinoviruses, HRV-2, -3, and -4. Methods The antiviral property and mechanism of action of ellagic acid were evaluated using a sulforhodamine B assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green dye. Results were compared with those of the currently used broad-spectrum antiviral agent, ribavirin. Results As judged by 50% inhibitory concentration values, natural ellagic acid was 1.8, 2.3, and 2.2 times more toxic toward HRV-2 (38 μg/mL), HRV-3 (31 μg/mL), and HRV-4 (29 μg/mL) than ribavirin, respectively. The inhibition rate of preincubation with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid was 17%, whereas continuous presence of ellagic acid during infection led to a significant increase in the inhibition (70%). Treatment with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid considerably suppressed HRV-4 infection only when added just after the virus inoculation (0 h) (87% inhibition), but not before -1 h or after 1 h or later (<20% inhibition). These findings suggest that ellagic acid does not interact with the HRV-4 particles and may directly interact with the human cells in the early stage of HRV infections to protect the cells from the virus destruction. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 50 μg/mL ellagic acid strongly inhibited the RNA replication of HRV-4 in HeLa cells, suggesting that ellagic acid inhibits virus replication by targeting on cellular molecules, rather than virus molecules. Conclusions Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on L. speciosa leaf-derived materials containing ellagic acid as potential anti-HRV products or a lead molecule for the

  2. The innate antiviral immune system of the cat: molecular tools for the measurement of its state of activation.

    PubMed

    Robert-Tissot, Céline; Rüegger, Vera L; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina L; Riond, Barbara; Gomes-Keller, Maria Alice; Vögtlin, Andrea; Wittig, Burghardt; Juhls, Christiane; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2011-10-15

    The innate immune system plays a central role in host defence against viruses. While many studies portray mechanisms in early antiviral immune responses of humans and mice, much remains to be discovered about these mechanisms in the cat. With the objective of shedding light on early host-virus interactions in felids, we have developed 12 real-time TaqMan(®) qPCR systems for feline genes relevant to innate responses to viral infection, including those encoding for various IFNα and IFNω subtypes, IFNβ, intracellular antiviral factor Mx, NK cell stimulator IL-15 and effectors perforin and granzyme B, as well as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3 and 8. Using these newly developed assays and others previously described, we measured the relative expression of selected markers at early time points after viral infection in vitro and in vivo. Feline embryonic fibroblasts (FEA) inoculated with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) indicated peak levels of IFNα, IFNβ and Mx expression already 6h after infection. In contrast, Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CrFK) cells inoculated with feline herpes virus (FHV) responded to infection with high levels of IFNα and IFNβ only after 24h, and no induction of Mx could be detected. In feline PBMCs challenged in vitro with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), maximal expression levels of IFNα, β and ω subtype genes as well as IL-15 and TLRs 3, 7 and 8 were measured between 12 and 24h after infection, whereas expression levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene IL-6 were consistently downregulated until 48h post inoculation. A marginal upregulation of granzyme B was also observed within 3h after infection. In an in vivo experiment, cats challenged with FIV exhibited a 2.4-fold increase in IFNα expression in blood 1 week post infection. We furthermore demonstrate the possibility of stimulating feline immune cells in vitro with various immune response modifiers (IRMs) already known for their immunostimulatory properties in mice and humans, namely

  3. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Adcock, Robert S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B.; Cramer, Daniel E.; Chilton, Paula M.; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A.; Prodhan, Aminul I.; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons. PMID:27185801

  4. Discovery of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Compound That Inhibits Pyrimidine Biosynthesis and Establishes a Type 1 Interferon-Independent Antiviral State.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Golden, Jennifer E; Adcock, Robert S; Schroeder, Chad E; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sotsky, Julie B; Cramer, Daniel E; Chilton, Paula M; Song, Chisu; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Prodhan, Aminul I; Yin, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Viral emergence and reemergence underscore the importance of developing efficacious, broad-spectrum antivirals. Here, we report the discovery of tetrahydrobenzothiazole-based compound 1, a novel, broad-spectrum antiviral lead that was optimized from a hit compound derived from a cytopathic effect (CPE)-based antiviral screen using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Compound 1 showed antiviral activity against a broad range of RNA viruses, including alphaviruses, flaviviruses, influenza virus, and ebolavirus. Mechanism-of-action studies with metabolomics and molecular approaches revealed that the compound inhibits host pyrimidine synthesis and establishes an antiviral state by inducing a variety of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Notably, the induction of the ISGs by compound 1 was independent of the production of type 1 interferons. The antiviral activity of compound 1 was cell type dependent with a robust effect observed in human cell lines and no observed antiviral effect in mouse cell lines. Herein, we disclose tetrahydrobenzothiazole compound 1 as a novel lead for the development of a broad-spectrum, antiviral therapeutic and as a molecular probe to study the mechanism of the induction of ISGs that are independent of type 1 interferons.

  5. Unabated Adenovirus Replication following Activation of the cGAS/STING-Dependent Antiviral Response in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cGAS/STING DNA sensing complex has recently been established as a predominant pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) for DNA-directed type I interferon (IFN) innate immune activation. Using replication-defective adenovirus vectors and replication-competent wild-type adenovirus, we have modeled the influence of the cGAS/STING cascade in permissive human cell lines (A549, HeLa, ARPE19, and THP1). Wild-type adenovirus induced efficient early activation of the cGAS/STING cascade in a cell-specific manner. In all responsive cell lines, cGAS/STING short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown resulted in a loss of TBK1 and interferon response factor 3 (IRF3) activation, a lack of beta interferon transcript induction, loss of interferon-dependent STAT1 activation, and diminished induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Adenoviruses that infect through the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) (Ad2 and Ad5) and the CD46 (Ad35) and desmoglein-2 (Ad7) viral receptors all induce the cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade. The magnitude of the IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response was strongly influenced by serotype, with Ad35>Ad7>Ad2. For each serotype, no enhancement of viral DNA replication or virus production occurred in cGAS or STING shRNA-targeted cell line pools. We found no replication advantage in permissive cell lines that do not trigger the cGAS/STING cascade following infection. The cGAS/STING/TBK1/IRF3 cascade was not a direct target of viral antihost strategies, and we found no evidence that Ad stimulation of the cGAS/STING DNA response had an impact on viral replication efficiency. IMPORTANCE This study shows for the first time that the cGAS DNA sensor directs a dominant IRF3/IFN/ISG antiviral response to adenovirus in human cell lines. Activation of cGAS occurs with viruses that infect through different high-affinity receptors (CAR, CD46, and desmoglein-2), and the magnitude of the cGAS/STING DNA response cascade is influenced by serotype-specific functions

  6. Aloe-emodin is an interferon-inducing agent with antiviral activity against Japanese encephalitis virus and enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Chia-Fang; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Chang, Ching-Yao; Li, Shih-Wein; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Wei-Yong

    2008-10-01

    In this study, aloe-emodin was identified as a potential interferon (IFN)-inducer by screening compounds from Chinese herbal medicine. Aloe-emodin showed low cytotoxicity to human HL-CZ promonocyte cells and TE-671 medulloblastoma cells and significantly activated interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and gamma-activated sequence (GAS)-driven cis-reporting systems. Moreover, aloe-emodin upregulated expression of IFN-stimulated genes such as dsRNA-activated protein kinase and 2',5'-oligoisoadenylate synthase. Aloe-emodin resulted in significant activation of nitric oxide production. The antiviral activity of aloe-emodin against Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) was evaluated using dose- and time-dependent plaque reduction assays in HL-CZ cells and TE-671 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aloe-emodin ranged from 0.50microg/mL to 1.51microg/mL for JEV and from 0.14microg/mL to 0.52microg/mL for EV71. Aloe-emodin showed clearly potent virus inhibitory abilities and achieved high therapeutic indices, in particular for HL-CZ cells. Therefore, the study demonstrated dose- and time-dependent actions of aloe-emodin on the inhibition of JEV and EV71 replication via IFN signalling responses.

  7. Assorted Processing of Synthetic Trans-Acting siRNAs and Its Activity in Antiviral Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingmin; San León, David; Mesel, Frida; García, Juan Antonio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The use of syn-tasiRNAs has been proposed as an RNA interference technique alternative to those previously described: hairpin based, virus induced gene silencing or artificial miRNAs. In this study we engineered the TAS1c locus to impair Plum pox virus (PPV) infection by replacing the five native siRNAs with two 210-bp fragments from the CP and the 3´NCR regions of the PPV genome. Deep sequencing analysis of the small RNA species produced by both constructs in planta has shown that phased processing of the syn-tasiRNAs is construct-specific. While in syn-tasiR-CP construct the processing was as predicted 21-nt phased in register with miR173-guided cleavage, the processing of syn-tasiR-3NCR is far from what was expected. A 22-nt species from the miR173-guided cleavage was a guide of two series of phased small RNAs, one of them in an exact 21-nt register, and the other one in a mixed of 21-/22-nt frame. In addition, both constructs produced abundant PPV-derived small RNAs in the absence of miR173 as a consequence of a strong sense post-transcriptional gene silencing induction. The antiviral effect of both constructs was also evaluated in the presence or absence of miR173 and showed that the impairment of PPV infection was not significantly higher when miR173 was present. The results show that syn-tasiRNAs processing depends on construct-specific factors that should be further studied before the so-called MIGS (miRNA-induced gene silencing) technology can be used reliably.

  8. Antiviral activity of the plant extracts from Thuja orientalis, Aster spathulifolius, and Pinus thunbergii against influenza virus A/PR/8/34.

    PubMed

    Won, Ji-Na; Lee, Seo-Yong; Song, Dae-sub; Poo, Haryoung

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans through epidemics or pandemics. Currently, two classes of anti-influenza virus drugs, M2 ion-channel inhibitors (amantadin and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir), have been used for the treatment of the influenza virus infection. Since the resistance to these drugs has been reported, the development of a new antiviral agent is necessary. In this study, we examined the antiviral efficacy of the plant extracts against the influenza A/PR/8/34 infection. In vitro, the antiviral activities of the plant extracts were investigated using the cell-based screening. Three plant extracts, Thuja orientalis, Aster spathulifolius, and Pinus thunbergii, were shown to induce a high cell viability rate after the infection with the influenza A/PR/8/34 virus. The antiviral activity of the plant extracts also increased as a function of the concentration of the extracts and these extracts significantly reduced the visible cytopathic effect caused by virus infections. Furthermore, the treatment with T. orientalis was shown to have a stronger inhibitory effect than that with A. spathulifolius or P. thunbergii. These results may suggest that T. orientalis has anti-influenza A/PR/8/34 activity.

  9. Effect of Egyptian propolis on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification and its antiviral activity with special emphasis on chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hady, Faten K; Hegazi, Ahmed G; Wollenweber, Eckhard

    2007-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of eight Egyptian propolis samples from different localities was evaluated by the antioxidative potential and capacity of the DPPH-ESR signal, superoxide anion generated in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (XOD) system and low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation assay. As, F, Is and D samples showed the highest antioxidative capacity and potential, respectively. The El, IsR, Is, D and So samples exhibited highly significant antioxidant activity in the XOD system and in LDL peroxidation assays. The antiviral activity of propolis samples was investigated. They showed variations in their activity; sample D induced the highest antiviral activity against Newcastle disease virus and infectious bursal disease virus. 42 Polyphenolic compounds were identified by HPLC; 13 aromatic acids, esters and alcohols were present, 29 flavonoids were identified, 6 of them being new to propolis.

  10. Escape Mutations in NS4B Render Dengue Virus Insensitive to the Antiviral Activity of the Paracetamol Metabolite AM404

    PubMed Central

    van Cleef, Koen W. R.; Overheul, Gijs J.; Thomassen, Michael C.; Marjakangas, Jenni M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous disease burden associated with dengue virus infections, a licensed antiviral drug is lacking. Here, we show that the paracetamol (acetaminophen) metabolite AM404 inhibits dengue virus replication. Moreover, we find that mutations in NS4B that were previously found to confer resistance to the antiviral compounds NITD-618 and SDM25N also render dengue virus insensitive to AM404. Our work provides further support for NS4B as a direct or indirect target for antiviral drug development. PMID:26856827

  11. Antiviral activity of benzimidazole derivatives. III. Novel anti-CVB-5, anti-RSV and anti-Sb-1 agents.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Michele; Novelli, Federica; Tasso, Bruno; Vazzana, Iana; Sparatore, Anna; Boido, Vito; Sparatore, Fabio; La Colla, Paolo; Sanna, Giuseppina; Giliberti, Gabriele; Busonera, Bernardetta; Farci, Pamela; Ibba, Cristina; Loddo, Roberta

    2014-09-01

    A library of eighty-six assorted benzimidazole derivatives was screened for antiviral activity against a panel of ten RNA and DNA viruses. Fifty-two of them displayed different levels of activity against one or more viruses, among which CVB-5, RSV, BVDV and Sb-1 were the most frequently affected. In particular, fourteen compounds exhibited an EC50 in the range 9-17μM (SI from 6 to >11) versus CVB-5, and seven compounds showed an EC50 in the range 5-15μM (SI from 6.7 to ⩾20) against RSV, thus resulting comparable to or more potent than the respective reference drugs (NM108 and ribavirin). Most of these compounds derive from 2-benzylbenzimidazole, but also other molecular scaffolds [as 1-phenylbenzimidazole (2), 2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole (69), dihydropyrido[3',2':4,5]imidazo[1,2-a][1,4]benzodiazepin-5-one (3), dibenzo[c,e]benzimidazo[1,2-a]azepine (22), and 2-(tetrahydropyran-2-yl)benzimidazole (81, 82 and 86)] are related to interesting levels of activity against these or other viruses (BVDV, Sb-1). Thus, these scaffolds (some of which, so far unexplored), represent valid starting points to develop more efficient agents against pathologies caused by CVB-5, RSV, BVDV and Sb-1 viruses.

  12. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  13. Cross-Species Antiviral Activity of Goose Interferons against Duck Plague Virus Is Related to Its Positive Self-Feedback Regulation and Subsequent Interferon Stimulated Genes Induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Chen, Shun; Zhou, Qin; Wei, Yunan; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Liu, Fei; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Sun, Kunfeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2016-01-01

    Interferons are a group of antiviral cytokines acting as the first line of defense in the antiviral immunity. Here, we describe the antiviral activity of goose type I interferon (IFNα) and type II interferon (IFNγ) against duck plague virus (DPV). Recombinant goose IFNα and IFNγ proteins of approximately 20 kDa and 18 kDa, respectively, were expressed. Following DPV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) infection of duck embryo fibroblast cells (DEFs) with IFNα and IFNγ pre-treatment, the number of viral gene copies decreased more than 100-fold, with viral titers dropping approximately 100-fold. Compared to the control, DPV-EGFP cell positivity was decreased by goose IFNα and IFNγ at 36 hpi (3.89%; 0.79%) and 48 hpi (17.05%; 5.58%). In accordance with interferon-stimulated genes being the “workhorse” of IFN activity, the expression of duck myxovirus resistance (Mx) and oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) was significantly upregulated (p < 0.001) by IFN treatment for 24 h. Interestingly, duck cells and goose cells showed a similar trend of increased ISG expression after goose IFNα and IFNγ pretreatment. Another interesting observation is that the positive feedback regulation of type I IFN and type II IFN by goose IFNα and IFNγ was confirmed in waterfowl for the first time. These results suggest that the antiviral activities of goose IFNα and IFNγ can likely be attributed to the potency with which downstream genes are induced by interferon. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the functional significance of the interferon antiviral system in aquatic birds and to the development of interferon-based prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against viral disease. PMID:27438848

  14. Rapid Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of (Quinazolin-4-Ylamino)Methyl-Phosphonates Through Microwave Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hui; Hu, Deyu; Wu, Jian; He, Ming; Jin, Linhong; Yang, Song; Song, Baoan

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the simple synthesis of new (quinazolin-4-ylamino) methylphosphonates via microwave irradiation. Substituted-2-aminobenzonitrile reacted with 1,1-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylmethanamine at a reflux condition to obtain N′-(substituted-2-cyanophenyl)-N,N-dimethylformamidine (1). The subsequent reaction of this intermediate product with α-aminophosphonate (2) in a solution containing glacial acetic acid in 2-propanol through microwave irradiation resulted in the formation of (quinazolin-4-ylamino)methyl-phosphonate derivatives 3a to 3x, which were unequivocally characterized by the spectral data and elemental analysis. The influence of the reaction conditions on the yield of 3a was investigated to optimize the synthetic conditions. The relative optimal conditions for the synthesis of 3a include a 1:1 molar ratio of N′-(2-cyanophenyl)-N,N-dimethylformamidine to diethyl amino(phenyl)methylphosphonate and a 4:1 volume ratio of isopropanol to HOAc in the solvent mixture, at a reaction temperature of 150 °C, with a microwave power of 100 W and a corresponding pressure of 150 psi for 20 min in the microwave synthesizer. The yield of 3a was approximately 79%, whereas those of 3b to 3x were approximately 77% to 86%. Some of the synthesized compounds displayed weak to good anti-Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activity. PMID:22837660

  15. Activity of antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory in compounds andrographolide salt.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li; Xia, Nan; Chen, Xianghong; Li, Yingxiu; Hong, Yi; Liu, YaJie; Wang, ZiZhen; Liu, YaJie

    2014-10-05

    Andrographolide sulfonic acid sodium salt (ASS) was synthesized to increase the the solubility of Andrographolide in aqueous solution. We have studied its pharmacological effect of antibiosis, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulation. Cylinder-plate method was used to study ASS׳s in vitro antibacterial activity, and its protection for mice infected by Staphylococcus aureus and Shigella dysenteriae. Various inflammation models, including the auricular edema induced by xylene in mice, CMC-Na induced air pounch model and the paw edema induced by albumen in rats were used to explore the characteristic of ASS׳s anti-inflammation effect. We built up the immune model by injecting chicken red cells in enter celiac of mice and study the effect of ASS on immunoregulation, taking andrographolide as the positive control. bacteriostasis in vivo and in vitro experiments show that ASS has a weak antibacterial effect and no bactericidal effect, but can reduce the mice mortality of Staphylococcus aureus infected. Anti-inflammatory experiments show that ASS can reduce the mouse ear swelling induced by xylene and rat paw swelling induced by egg albumin, and lessen leukocytes in air bag caused by CMCNa, and lower IL1 not ably in rat serum. Immune tests indicate that ASS can get spleen and thymus gain weight and increase rate of abdominal macrophage phagocytosis of mice. The result of bacteriostasis shows that ASS has weak in vitro antibacterial effect. ASS shows significant effects of anti-inflammation and improving immunity, thus enables the mice against bacteria better.

  16. Antiviral herbs--present and future.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Su, Dan; Feng, Yulin; Liu, Kuangyi; Song, Yonggui

    2014-01-01

    Viral disease is a calamity which absolutely can not be ignored for human health. The emergence of drug resistance and spread of new virus will be the new challenge against viral disease. To find and develop new antivirus agents with properties of safety, significant effect and low toxicity is the pressing question facing humans today. Because of its advantages, including rich resources, low price, less adverse effect, Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) have become the research focus in antiviral treatment. In recent years, there are numerous articles about the studies from separation of active ingredients to the antiviral mechanism. In this paper, the progress in experimental study was illustrated on the basis of active ingredients, species of virus, mechanism, clinical application. Obviously, TCM have obvious advantages in the treatment of virus infectious disease and has a broad prospect of application.

  17. Antiviral Activity of Total Flavonoid Extracts from Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron against Coxsackie Virus B3 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dan; Li, Juan; Lei, Xiang; Liu, Yimei; Yang, Zhanqiu; Chen, Keli

    2014-01-01

    The antiviral activity of total flavonoid extracts from Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron and its main constituents amentoflavone were investigated against coxsackie virus B3 (CVB3). When added during or after viral infection, the extracts and amentoflavone prevented the cytopathic effect (CPE) of CVB3, as demonstrated in a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) from 19 ± 1.6 to 41 ± 1.2 μg/mL and 25 ± 1.2 to 52 ± 0.8 μg/mL, respectively. KM mice were used as animal models to test the extracts' activity in vivo. Oral administration of the total flavonoid extracts at 300 mg/kg/day significantly reduced mean viral titers in the heart and kidneys as well as mortality after infection for 15 days. The experimental results demonstrate that in vitro and in vivo the model mice infected with CVB3 can be effectively treated by the total flavonoid extracts from Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. PMID:24963331

  18. [The synthesis and antiviral activity of glycyrrhizic acid conjugates with alpha-D-glucosamine and some glycosylamines].

    PubMed

    Kondratenko, R M; Baltina, L A; Mustafina, S R; Vasil'eva, E V; Pompei, R; Deidda, D; Pliasunova, O A; Pokrovskiĭ, A G; Tolstikov, G A

    2004-01-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid and its 30-methyl ester were conjugated with 2-amino-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranose, 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl amine, 2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-apha-L-arabinopyranosyl amine, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl amine, and beta-D-galactopyranosyl amine using N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and its mixtures with N-hydroxybenzotriazole. Structures of the conjugates were confirmed by IR, UV, 1H, and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The glycoconjugate with the residues of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl amine in the carbohydrate part of its molecule exhibited antiviral activity (ID50 4 microg/ml) toward the herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV-1) in the VERO cell culture. Two compounds demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity (50-70% inhibition of p24) in a culture of MT-4 cells at concentrations of 0.5-20 microg/ml. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2004, vol. 30, no. 3; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  19. Multiple interferon stimulated genes synergize with the zinc finger antiviral protein to mediate anti-alphavirus activity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Sophiya; Li, Melody M H; Schoggins, John W; Tian, Suyan; Rice, Charles M; MacDonald, Margaret R

    2012-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a host factor that mediates inhibition of viruses in the Filoviridae, Retroviridae and Togaviridae families. We previously demonstrated that ZAP blocks replication of Sindbis virus (SINV), the prototype Alphavirus in the Togaviridae family at an early step prior to translation of the incoming genome and that synergy between ZAP and one or more interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) resulted in maximal inhibitory activity. The present study aimed to identify those ISGs that synergize with ZAP to mediate Alphavirus inhibition. Using a library of lentiviruses individually expressing more than 350 ISGs, we screened for inhibitory activity in interferon defective cells with or without ZAP overexpression. Confirmatory tests of the 23 ISGs demonstrating the largest infection reduction in combination with ZAP revealed that 16 were synergistic. Confirmatory tests of all potentially synergistic ISGs revealed 15 additional ISGs with a statistically significant synergistic effect in combination with ZAP. These 31 ISGs are candidates for further mechanistic studies. The number and diversity of the identified ZAP-synergistic ISGs lead us to speculate that ZAP may play an important role in priming the cell for optimal ISG function.

  20. Synthesis and hepatitis C antiviral activity of 1-aminobenzyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide analogues.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing-Jing; Ji, Fei-Hong; He, Pei-Lan; Yang, Ya-xi; Tang, Wei; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Li, Yuan-Chao

    2013-05-01

    FIGHTING HCV: Two potent antiviral analogues were developed from a previously identified lead as novel agents against hepatitis C virus. Their potency and selectivity (5 n: IC50 =0.013 μM and EC50 =0.018 μM; 5 t: IC50 =0.007 μM and EC50 =0.024 μM) make them good candidates for further development as antiviral agents.

  1. [Favipiravir, a new concept of antiviral drug against influenza viruses].

    PubMed

    Reina, J; Reina, N

    2017-04-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) is a new antiviral drug with strong inhibitory activity on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of most RNA virus genome. All the influenza viruses have been shown fully sensitive to this new antiviral, including genetic strains to neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir) resistance. Its mechanism of action lies in blocking viral replication and induction of lethal mutagenesis which determines the loss of infective activity of influenza viruses. Its activity is particularly intense in the respiratory tract, decreasing the viral load to non-infectious levels. Clinical trials in humans have not yet completed but have very favourable results. It seems that the best therapy would be the combination of favipiravir with oseltamivir; both antivirals are synergistic and avoid the emergence of resistance.

  2. Synthesis and antiviral, insecticidal, and fungicidal activities of gossypol derivatives containing alkylimine, oxime or hydrazine moiety.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Zheng; Wang, Kailiang; Liu, Yuxiu; Li, Yongqiang; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-02-01

    Gossypol is a part of the cotton plant's defense system against pathogens and herbivorous insects. To discover gossypol analogs with broad spectrum and high activity, a series of gossypol alkylamine Schiff base, oxime and hydrazone derivatives were synthesised and bioassayed. The biological results indicated that most of these derivatives exhibited higher anti-TMV activity than gossypol. Interestingly, the activities of compounds 10, 15, 18, 20, 23 and 26 were much higher than that of ribavirin. Furthermore, compound 26, which was low toxicity to rat, showed better activity than control plant virus inhibitors in the field. Additionally, allyl amine Schiff base (9) displayed remarkable insecticidal activities against Mythimna separata, Helicoverpa armigera and Ostrinia nubilalis, whereas (pyridin-3-yl)methanamine Schiff base (13) showed excellent activity against Culex pipiens pallens. The fungicidal results revealed that all of compounds exhibited good activity against Physalospora piricola.

  3. Synthesis of benzopolycyclic cage amines: NMDA receptor antagonist, trypanocidal and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Eva; Duque, María D.; López-Querol, Marta; Taylor, Martin C.; Naesens, Lieve; Ma, Chunlong; Pinto, Lawrence H.; Sureda, Francesc X.; Kelly, John M.; Vázquez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of several 6,7,8,9,10,11-hexahydro-9-methyl-5,7:9,11-dimethano-5H-benzocyclononen-7-amines is reported. Several of them display low micromolar NMDA receptor antagonist and/or trypanocidal activities. Two compounds are endowed with micromolar anti vesicular stomatitis virus activity, while only one compound shows micromolar anti-influenza activity. The anti-influenza activity of this compound does not seem to be mediated by blocking of the M2 protein. PMID:22178660

  4. Metabolic variations, antioxidant potential, and antiviral activity of different extracts of Eugenia singampattiana (an endangered medicinal plant used by Kani tribals, Tamil Nadu, India) leaf.

    PubMed

    John, K M Maria; Ayyanar, Muniappan; Jeeva, Subbiah; Suresh, Murugesan; Enkhtaivan, Gansukh; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Eugenia singampattiana is an endangered medicinal plant used by the Kani tribals of South India. The plant had been studied for its antioxidant, antitumor, antihyperlipidemic, and antidiabetic activity. But its primary and secondary metabolites profile and its antiviral properties were unknown, and so this study sought to identify this aspect in Eugenia singampattiana plant through different extraction methods along with their activities against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The GC-MS analysis revealed that 11 primary metabolites showed significant variations among the extracts. Except for fructose all other metabolites were high with water extract. Among 12 secondary metabolites showing variations, the levels of 4-hydroxy benzoic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, ferulic acid, coumaric acid, epigallocatechin gallate, quercetin, myricetin, and kaempferol were high with methanol extract. Since the flavonoid content of methanol extracts was high, the antioxidant potential, such as ABTS, and phosphomolybdenum activity increased. The plants antiviral activity against PRRSV was for the first time confirmed and the results revealed that methanol 25 µg and 75 to 100 µg in case of water extracts revealed antiviral activity.

  5. Human mucosal-associated invariant T cells contribute to antiviral influenza immunity via IL-18–dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Liyen; Wang, Zhongfang; Sant, Sneha; Koutsakos, Marios; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Liu, Ligong; Fairlie, David P.; Crowe, Jane; Rossjohn, Jamie; Xu, Jianqing; Doherty, Peter C.; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes known to elicit potent immunity to a broad range of bacteria, mainly via the rapid production of inflammatory cytokines. Whether MAIT cells contribute to antiviral immunity is less clear. Here we asked whether MAIT cells produce cytokines/chemokines during severe human influenza virus infection. Our analysis in patients hospitalized with avian H7N9 influenza pneumonia showed that individuals who recovered had higher numbers of CD161+Vα7.2+ MAIT cells in peripheral blood compared with those who succumbed, suggesting a possible protective role for this lymphocyte population. To understand the mechanism underlying MAIT cell activation during influenza, we cocultured influenza A virus (IAV)-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro, then assayed them by intracellular cytokine staining. Comparison of influenza-induced MAIT cell activation with the profile for natural killer cells (CD56+CD3−) showed robust up-regulation of IFNγ for both cell populations and granzyme B in MAIT cells, although the individual responses varied among healthy donors. However, in contrast to the requirement for cell-associated factors to promote NK cell activation, the induction of MAIT cell cytokine production was dependent on IL-18 (but not IL-12) production by IAV-exposed CD14+ monocytes. Overall, this evidence for IAV activation via an indirect, IL-18–dependent mechanism indicates that MAIT cells are protective in influenza, and also possibly in any human disease process in which inflammation and IL-18 production occur. PMID:27543331

  6. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  7. Influenza B virus non-structural protein 1 counteracts ISG15 antiviral activity by sequestering ISGylated viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Sridharan, Haripriya; Chen, Ran; Baker, Darren P.; Wang, Shanshan; Krug, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 and its conjugation to proteins (ISGylation) are strongly induced by type I interferon. Influenza B virus encodes non-structural protein 1 (NS1B) that binds human ISG15 and provides an appropriate model for determining how ISGylation affects virus replication in human cells. Here using a recombinant virus encoding a NS1B protein defective in ISG15 binding, we show that NS1B counteracts ISGylation-mediated antiviral activity by binding and sequestering ISGylated viral proteins, primarily ISGylated viral nucleoprotein (NP), in infected cells. ISGylated NP that is not sequestered by mutant NS1B acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of oligomerization of the more abundant unconjugated NP. Consequently formation of viral ribonucleoproteins that catalyse viral RNA synthesis is inhibited, causing decreased viral protein synthesis and virus replication. We verify that ISGylated NP is largely responsible for inhibition of viral RNA synthesis by generating recombinant viruses that lack known ISGylation sites in NP. PMID:27587337

  8. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue.

  9. Thiosemicarbazones and Phthalyl-Thiazoles compounds exert antiviral activity against yellow fever virus and Saint Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Pacca, Carolina Colombelli; Marques, Rafael Elias; Espindola, José Wanderlan P; Filho, Gevânio B O Oliveira; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Nogueira, Mauricio L

    2017-03-01

    Arboviruses, arthropod-borneviruses, are frequency associated to human outbreak and represent a serious health problem. The genus Flavivirus, such as Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus (SLEV), are important pathogens with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Brazil, YFV is maintained in sylvatic cycle, but many cases are notified annually, despite the efficiency of vaccine. SLEV causes an acute encephalitis and is widely distributed in the Americas. There is no specific antiviral drugs for these viruses, only supporting treatment that can alleviate symptoms and prevent complications. Here, we evaluated the potential anti-YFV and SLEV activity of a series of thiosemicarbazones and phthalyl-thiazoles. Plaque reduction assay, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and cellular viability were used to test the compounds in vitro. Treated cells showed efficient inhibition of the viral replication at concentrations that presented minimal toxicity to cells. The assays showed that phthalyl-thiazole and phenoxymethyl-thiosemicarbazone reduced 60% of YFV replication and 75% of SLEV replication.

  10. Structure and antiviral activity of arabinogalactan with (1→6)-β-D-galactan core from Stevia rebaudiana leaves.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Arildo José Braz; Cordeiro, Lucimara M C; Gonçalves, Regina Aparecida Correia; Ceole, Ligia Fernanda; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Iacomini, Marcello

    2013-04-15

    Cell wall polysaccharides from leaves of Stevia rebaudiana were extracted successively with water and with aq. 10% KOH. After the purification steps, homogeneous fractions (SFW-10RM and SSFK-10RM) were analyzed by sugar composition, HPSEC, methylation and (13)C NMR spectroscopy analysis. The results showed that SFW-10RM is a pectic arabinogalactan with an unusual β-(1→6)-linked D-Galp residues forming the main chain. Approximately 38% of the β-D-Galp units of the backbone carry branches on position O-3, consisting of single D-Galp units or arabinan side chains. Arabinose residues were found to occupy mostly the terminal positions in both furanose and pyranose forms and as 2-, 5- and 3,5-linked residues in these side chains. Fraction SSFK-10RM is a similar arabinogalactan, differing mainly in the relative proportions of arabinans attached to the galactan core and in the content of D-GalpA residues present in the pectic domain. The crude aqueous and alkaline extracts and homogeneous SSFK-10RM showed antiviral activity against Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) in vitro.

  11. An ancestral host defence peptide within human β-defensin 3 recapitulates the antibacterial and antiviral activity of the full-length molecule

    PubMed Central

    Nigro, Ersilia; Colavita, Irene; Sarnataro, Daniela; Scudiero, Olga; Zambrano, Gerardo; Granata, Vincenzo; Daniele, Aurora; Carotenuto, Alfonso; Galdiero, Stefania; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Urbanowicz, Richard A.; Ball, Jonathan K.; Salvatore, Francesco; Pessi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are critical components of innate immunity. Despite their diversity, they share common features including a structural signature, designated “γ-core motif”. We reasoned that for each HDPs evolved from an ancestral γ-core, the latter should be the evolutionary starting point of the molecule, i.e. it should represent a structural scaffold for the modular construction of the full-length molecule, and possess biological properties. We explored the γ-core of human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) and found that it: (a) is the folding nucleus of HBD3; (b) folds rapidly and is stable in human serum; (c) displays antibacterial activity; (d) binds to CD98, which mediates HBD3 internalization in eukaryotic cells; (e) exerts antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus and herpes simplex virus; and (f) is not toxic to human cells. These results demonstrate that the γ-core within HBD3 is the ancestral core of the full-length molecule and is a viable HDP per se, since it is endowed with the most important biological features of HBD3. Notably, the small, stable scaffold of the HBD3 γ-core can be exploited to design disease-specific antimicrobial agents. PMID:26688341

  12. Identification of an anti-lipopolysacchride factor possessing both antiviral and antibacterial activity from the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Yu; Gao, Yan; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Qiu-Xia; Zeng, Chang-Lin; Liu, Hai-Peng

    2016-10-01

    It is well-known that anti-lipopolysacchride factors (ALFs) are involved in the recognition and elimination of invading pathogens. In this study, the full-length ALF cDNA sequence of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (termed CqALF) was cloned from a suppression subtractive hybridization library constructed using red claw crayfish hematopoietic tissue cell (Hpt cell) cultures following challenge with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The full-length cDNA sequence of CqALF was 863 bp, and the open reading frame encoded 123 amino acids with a signal peptide in the N-terminus and a conserved LPS-binding domain. Unlike most ALFs, which are highly expressed in haemocytes, high expression levels of CqALF were detected in epithelium, the stomach and eyestalks, while lower expression was detected in Hpt, nerves, the heart, muscle tissue, gonads, haemocytes, intestines, gills and the hepatopancreas. To further explore the biological activities of CqALF, mature recombinant CqALF protein (rCqALF) was expressed and purified using a eukaryotic expression system, and an antimicrobial activity test was carried out. rCqALF clearly exerted antiviral activity, as evidenced by the severe disruption of the envelope of intact WSSV virions following co-incubation of virions with rCqALF. Additionally, pre-incubation of WSSV with rCqALF resulted in both a significant reduction in WSSV replication in red claw crayfish Hpt cell cultures and an increased survival rate among animals. Furthermore, rCqALF was effective against both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, particularly Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus. A membrane integrity assay suggested that rCqALF was unlikely to disrupt bacterial membrane integrity compared to cecropin P1. Taken together, these data suggest that CqALF may play an important role in immune defence in the crustacean C. quadricarinatus.

  13. Antimicrobial and antiviral activities of polyphenolics from Cocos nucifera Linn. (Palmae) husk fiber extract.

    PubMed

    Esquenazi, Daniele; Wigg, Marcia D; Miranda, Mônica M F S; Rodrigues, Hugo M; Tostes, João B F; Rozental, Sonia; da Silva, Antonio J R; Alviano, Celuta S

    2002-12-01

    The decoction of Cocos nucifera L. husk fiber has been used in northeastern Brazil traditional medicine for treatment of diarrhea and arthritis. Water extract obtained from coconut husk fiber and fractions from adsorption chromatography revealed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The crude extract and one of the fractions rich in catechin also showed inhibitory activity against acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1-ACVr). All fractions were inactive against the fungi Candida albicans, Fonsecaea pedrosoi and Cryptococcus neoformans. Catechin and epicatechin together with condensed tannins (B-type procyanidins) were demonstrated to be the components of the water extract.

  14. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  15. Antiviral Activity of Ctn[15-34], A Cathelicidin-Derived Eicosapeptide, Against Infectious Myonecrosis Virus in Litopenaeus vannamei Primary Hemocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Girão, P R N; Falcão, C B; Rocha, I R C B; Lucena, H M R; Costa, F H F; Rádis-Baptista, G

    2017-02-16

    The shrimp farming has been converted into a mature aquaculture industry dealing with over millions of metric tonnes of processed commodities. Nevertheless, the global shrimp productions are constantly threatened by disease outbreaks, mainly triggered by rapidly disseminating viruses. Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) is one of these epizootic agents affecting shrimp production in Brazil, of which no treatment exists. Herein, the antiviral activity against IMNV of an eicosapeptide, named Ctn[15-34], derived from a member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides, was demonstrated. Cultures of hemocytes from Litopenaeus vannamei were established that support IMNV replication and infectivity titration. The cytotoxic effect of IMNV in culture and the in vitro anti-IMNV activity of Ctn[15-34] were assessed using a high-sensitive fluorescent-based method in combination with quantitative PCR. The Ctn[15-34] (<12.5 µM) neutralized the toxic effects of IMNV at loads sufficient to kill 50% of shrimp hemocytes. This study reported for the first time the replication of IMNV in vitro and the employment of a straightforward methodology to assess cell viability and viral/antiviral activities. In addition, it provided the basis for the development of the anti-infective multi-effector Ctn[15-34] eicosapeptide and analogs as components of antiviral formulations against shrimp viral diseases.

  16. Novel Antiviral Characteristics of Nanosized Copper(I) Iodide Particles Showing Inactivation Activity against 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tetsuya; Hayata, Taishi; Nagao, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Mikio; Nakayama, Tsuruo; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the antiviral activity of nanosized copper(I) iodide (CuI) particles having an average size of 160 nm. CuI particles showed aqueous stability and generated hydroxyl radicals, which were probably derived from monovalent copper (Cu+). We confirmed that CuI particles showed antiviral activity against an influenza A virus of swine origin (pandemic [H1N1] 2009) by plaque titration assay. The virus titer decreased in a dose-dependent manner upon incubation with CuI particles, with the 50% effective concentration being approximately 17 μg/ml after exposure for 60 min. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the inactivation of the virus due to the degradation of viral proteins such as hemagglutinin and neuraminidase by CuI. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy revealed that CuI generates hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution, and radical production was found to be blocked by the radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these findings indicate that CuI particles exert antiviral activity by generating hydroxyl radicals. Thus, CuI may be a useful material for protecting against viral attacks and may be suitable for applications such as filters, face masks, protective clothing, and kitchen cloths. PMID:22156433

  17. Monomerization of the viral entry inhibitor griffithsin yields insights into the relationship between multivalent binding to high mannose oligosaccharides and antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer. PMID:20826337

  18. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  19. Antiviral activity of tumor-suppressor pathways: clues from molecular piracy by KSHV.

    PubMed

    Moore, P S; Chang, Y

    1998-04-01

    A common feature of many tumor viruses is that they possess genes that produce specific proteins to inhibit major cellular tumor-suppressor pathways. Despite intensive studies, the reasons why these diverse and unrelated viruses have independently evolved oncogenes remains obscure. Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or HHV8) has pirated a number of recognizable cellular genes that are key to cell survival and proliferation. In this review, we provide an overview of the known activities of these viral genes and show that many of these pirated proteins affect the same cellular pathways targeted by other, unrelated tumor viruses. We speculate that tumor-suppressor pathways are used by the cell as a primary defense against persistent virus infection, in addition to their well-known activity in regulating cell proliferation.

  20. Anti-viral activity of water extract of Paeonia lactiflora pallas against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Wang, Kuo-Chih; Lin, Chun-Ching; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Chang, Jung-San

    2013-01-01

    Paeonia lactiflora Pallas (P. lactiflora, Ranunculaceae) is a common ingredient of Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (SMGGT; Shoma-kakkon-to) and Ge-Gen-Tang (GGT; kakkon-to). SMGGT and GGT are different prescriptions of traditional Chinese medicine with different ingredients designed for airway symptoms. Both SMGGT and GGT have anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). Therefore, P. lactiflora was hypothesized to be the effective ingredient of both SMGGT and GGT against HRSV. However, P. lactiflora does not have any proven antiviral activity. This study used both human upper (Human larynx epidermoid carcinoma cell line, HEp-2) and lower (human lung carcinoma cell line, A549) respiratory tract cells to test the hypothesis that a hot water extract of P. lactiflora could effectively inhibit plaque formation induced by HRSV infection. The ability of P. lactiflora to stimulate anti-viral cytokines was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that P. lactiflora was time-dependently and dose-dependently effective against HRSV in HEp-2 and A549 cells, particularly supplemented before viral inoculation (p < 0.0001). 10 μg/ml P. lactiflora had a comparable anti-HRSV activity with 10 μg/ml ribavirin, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent. P. lactiflora was dose-dependently effective against viral attachment (p < 0.0001), with a better effect on A549 cells (p < 0.0001). P. lactiflora was time-dependently (p < 0.0001) and dose-dependently (p < 0.0001) effective against viral penetration. Moreover, P. lactiflora stimulated IFN-β secretion without any effect on TNF-α secretion. Therefore, P. lactiflora could be beneficial at preventing HRSV infection by inhibiting viral attachment, internalization, and stimulating IFN secretion.

  1. Synthesis of Nucleoside Analogues with Potential Antiviral Activity against Negative Strand RNA Virus Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    standing overnight. Washing the filtered crystals with ether removed triethylamine hydrochloride and triphenyl phosphine, then recrystallisation from...pyridine to from an ester, DMF and pyridinium hydrochloride . The reaction of the Vilsmeier reagent with (E)-5-(2-carboxyvinyl)uridine and quenching...include 2-deoxy-2-glucose (28), D- glucosamine (29) and tunicamycin (30). Deoxyglucose is utilized instead of glucose in the formation of guanosine

  2. Anti-HIV activities of natural antioxidant caffeic acid derivatives: toward an antiviral supplementation diet.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Fabrice; Cotelle, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was designed to rapidly control HIV replication. It has had a significant impact on patient health and progression of AIDS in developed countries, but its success has not been complete. HAART strategy still suffers from issues of patient compliance, cost, deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, expansion of novel anti-HIV drugs and targets will be critical in the coming years. In this context, discovering anti-HIV agents from natural sources and particularly from plants, may highlight the principle of a nutritional antioxidant antiretroviral diet. In this paper, we review the putative anti-HIV activity of simple caffeic acid derivatives, together with their antioxidant properties. Toxicity, metabolism and bioavailability, when known, will also be detailed. Well-known caffeic acid derivatives, such as chicoric, rosmarinic and lithospermic acids, may be designed as future leads multi-target anti-HIV compounds and the plants and vegetables containing them as potent nutritional therapeutic supplementation source. They are not expected to replace the actual antiretroviral therapy, but more likely, to complete and perhaps lighten it by adapted diet.

  3. Interferon: signal molecules involved in its antiviral effect.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, S N; Cernescu, C; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M

    1989-01-01

    A major problem concerning interferon (IFN)-cell interaction is the second messenger system that transduces the IFN signal. We discuss the evidences existing in literature and our arguments which suggest that the antiviral effect of IFNs alpha and beta are mediated by a membrane mechanism including a phospholipase C dependent hydrolysis of phosphoinositides. The resulting two second messengers: diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate and subsequent, separate but interacting, signal pathways: activation of protein kinase C and ionic events are tested in respect with the antiviral effect of IFN.

  4. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 2-substituted methylthio-5-(4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-5-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenneng; Chen, Qin; Tai, Anqi; Jiang, Guangqi; Ouyang, Guiping

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel 2-substituted methylthio-5-(4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-5-yl-)-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for antiviral activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) via half-leaf method. The preliminary biological results showed that these compounds exhibited good antiviral activity against TMV in vivo. Among these compounds, compounds 8f, 8h, 8k, 8n, 8q and 8w exhibited the similar curative effect against TMV (EC50=290.98-438.29μg/mL) as the commercial product Ningnanmycin (301.83μg/mL). Notably, compound 8i exhibited the excellent curative effect against TMV, with EC50 value of 246.48μg/mL, which was better than that of Ningnanmycin. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first Letter of 2-substituted methylthio-5-(4-amino-2-methylpyrimidin-5-yl-)-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives with potent antiviral against TMV.

  5. Cissampelos pareira Linn: Natural Source of Potent Antiviral Activity against All Four Dengue Virus Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Ruchi; Raut, Rajendra; Tyagi, Poornima; Pareek, Pawan Kumar; Barman, Tarani Kanta; Singhal, Smita; Shirumalla, Raj Kumar; Kanoje, Vijay; Subbarayan, Ramesh; Rajerethinam, Ravisankar; Sharma, Navin; Kanaujia, Anil; Shukla, Gyanesh; Gupta, Y. K.; Katiyar, Chandra K.; Bhatnagar, Pradip K.; Upadhyay, Dilip J.; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease, poses a significant global public health risk. In tropical countries such as India where periodic dengue outbreaks can be correlated to the high prevalence of the mosquito vector, circulation of all four dengue viruses (DENVs) and the high population density, a drug for dengue is being increasingly recognized as an unmet public health need. Methodology/Principal findings Using the knowledge of traditional Indian medicine, Ayurveda, we developed a systematic bioassay-guided screening approach to explore the indigenous herbal bio-resource to identify plants with pan-DENV inhibitory activity. Our results show that the alcoholic extract of Cissampelos pariera Linn (Cipa extract) was a potent inhibitor of all four DENVs in cell-based assays, assessed in terms of viral NS1 antigen secretion using ELISA, as well as viral replication, based on plaque assays. Virus yield reduction assays showed that Cipa extract could decrease viral titers by an order of magnitude. The extract conferred statistically significant protection against DENV infection using the AG129 mouse model. A preliminary evaluation of the clinical relevance of Cipa extract showed that it had no adverse effects on platelet counts and RBC viability. In addition to inherent antipyretic activity in Wistar rats, it possessed the ability to down-regulate the production of TNF-α, a cytokine implicated in severe dengue disease. Importantly, it showed no evidence of toxicity in Wistar rats, when administered at doses as high as 2g/Kg body weight for up to 1 week. Conclusions/Significance Our findings above, taken in the context of the human safety of Cipa, based on its use in Indian traditional medicine, warrant further work to explore Cipa as a source for the development of an inexpensive herbal formulation for dengue therapy. This may be of practical relevance to a dengue-endemic resource-poor country such as India. PMID:26709822

  6. AVP-IC50 Pred: Multiple machine learning techniques-based prediction of peptide antiviral activity in terms of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50).

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Tandon, Himani; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-11-01

    Peptide-based antiviral therapeutics has gradually paved their way into mainstream drug discovery research. Experimental determination of peptides' antiviral activity as expressed by their IC50 values involves a lot of effort. Therefore, we have developed "AVP-IC50 Pred," a regression-based algorithm to predict the antiviral activity in terms of IC50 values (μM). A total of 759 non-redundant peptides from AVPdb and HIPdb were divided into a training/test set having 683 peptides (T(683)) and a validation set with 76 independent peptides (V(76)) for evaluation. We utilized important peptide sequence features like amino-acid compositions, binary profile of N8-C8 residues, physicochemical properties and their hybrids. Four different machine learning techniques (MLTs) namely Support vector machine, Random Forest, Instance-based classifier, and K-Star were employed. During 10-fold cross validation, we achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficients (PCCs) of 0.66, 0.64, 0.56, 0.55, respectively, for the above MLTs using the best combination of feature sets. All the predictive models also performed well on the independent validation dataset and achieved maximum PCCs of 0.74, 0.68, 0.59, 0.57, respectively, on the best combination of feature sets. The AVP-IC50 Pred web server is anticipated to assist the researchers working on antiviral therapeutics by enabling them to computationally screen many compounds and focus experimental validation on the most promising set of peptides, thus reducing cost and time efforts. The server is available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/ic50avp.

  7. Memory re-differentiation and reduced lymphocyte activation in chronic HCV-infected patients receiving direct-acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Burchill, M A; Golden-Mason, L; Wind-Rotolo, M; Rosen, H R

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the treatment of HCV has advanced significantly due to the introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Studies using interferon (IFN)-containing regimens failed to consistently show restoration of immunologic responses. Therefore, IFN-free DAA formulations provide a unique opportunity to dissect the immunologic effect of HCV cure. This study investigates the restoration of the immune compartment as a consequence of rapid viral clearance in patients successfully treated with DAAs and in the absence of IFN and ribavirin. Here, we evaluate the immunologic changes that occurred following DAA-mediated HCV cure. Peripheral blood from nineteen previously treatment-naïve patients with chronic HCV genotype 1a/1b who received an IFN and ribavirin-free regimen of daclatasvir, asunaprevir and BMS-791325 was evaluated. Immune reconstitution occurs in patients in whom HCV was successfully eradicated via DAA therapy. Restoration of the CD4(+) T-cell compartment in the peripheral blood and a re-differentiation of the T lymphocyte memory compartment resulted in a more effector memory cell population and a reduction in expression in the co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT in bulk T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we observed a partial reversal of the exhausted phenotype in HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells and a dampening of the activation state in peripheral NK cells. Collectively, our data provide the groundwork for dissecting the effect of DAA therapy on the immune system and identifying novel mechanisms by which chronic HCV infection exerts immunosuppressive effects on T cells through the recently described co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT.

  8. Conformational Adaptation of Asian Macaque TRIMCyp Directs Lineage Specific Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rasaiyaah, Jane; Hué, Stéphane; Rose, Nicola J.; Marzetta, Flavia; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5α but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations. PMID:20808866

  9. The system of fucoidans from the brown seaweed Dictyota dichotoma: chemical analysis and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Rabanal, Melissa; Ponce, Nora M A; Navarro, Diego A; Gómez, Ricardo M; Stortz, Carlos A

    2014-01-30

    Room-temperature acid (pH 2) extraction of Dictyota dichotoma thalli yielded 2.2% of sulfated polysaccharides. Further extraction with the same solvent at 70°C was conducted sequentially for nine times, with a total yield of 7.2%. Fucose was the main monosaccharide only in the room-temperature extract (EAR) and in the first 70°C extract (EAH1). The remaining fractions showed increasing amounts of mannose (the main neutral monosaccharide), xylose and uronic acids. Fractionation by means of cetrimide precipitation and redissolution in increasing sodium chloride solutions has allowed obtaining several subfractions from each extract. The fractions redissolved at lower NaCl concentrations have large amounts of uronic acids and lesser sulfate contents, whereas those redissolved at higher NaCl concentrations are heavily sulfated and have low uronic acid contents. For the fucose-rich extracts (EAR and EAH1), fractionation leads to uronoxylomannofucan-rich and galactofucan-rich fractions. The remaining extracts gave rise to complex mixtures, with mannose and uronic acid-rich polysaccharides. Moderate inhibitory effect against herpes virus (HSV-1) and Coxsackie virus (CVB3) were found for the galactofucan-rich fractions. Most of the other fractions were inactive against both viruses, although some xylomannan-rich fractions were also active against HSV-1.

  10. Mytilus galloprovincialis Myticin C: A Chemotactic Molecule with Antiviral Activity and Immunoregulatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Martínez-López, Alicia; Figueras, Antonio; Estepa, Amparo; Novoa, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the myticin class C (Myt C) is the most abundantly expressed gene in cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries after immune stimulation of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. However, to date, the expression pattern, the antimicrobial activities and the immunomodulatory properties of the Myt C peptide have not been determined. In contrast, it is known that Myt C mRNA presents an unusual and high level of polymorphism of unidentified biological significance. Therefore, to provide a better understanding of the features of this interesting molecule, we have investigated its function using four different cloned and expressed variants of Myt C cDNA and polyclonal anti-Myt C sera. The in vivo results suggest that this AMP, mainly present in hemocytes, could be acting as an immune system modulator molecule because its overexpression was able to alter the expression of mussel immune-related genes (as the antimicrobial peptides Myticin B and Mytilin B, the C1q domain-containing protein MgC1q, and lysozyme). Moreover, the in vitro results indicate that Myt C peptides have antimicrobial and chemotactic properties. Their recombinant expression in a fish cell line conferred protection against two different fish viruses (enveloped and non-enveloped). Cell extracts from Myt C expressing fish cells were also able to attract hemocytes. All together, these results suggest that Myt C should be considered not only as an AMP but also as the first chemokine/cytokine-like molecule identified in bivalves and one of the few examples in all of the invertebrates. PMID:21858010

  11. Mytilus galloprovincialis myticin C: a chemotactic molecule with antiviral activity and immunoregulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Pablo; Falcó, Alberto; Romero, Alejandro; Dios, Sonia; Martínez-López, Alicia; Figueras, Antonio; Estepa, Amparo; Novoa, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the myticin class C (Myt C) is the most abundantly expressed gene in cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries after immune stimulation of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. However, to date, the expression pattern, the antimicrobial activities and the immunomodulatory properties of the Myt C peptide have not been determined. In contrast, it is known that Myt C mRNA presents an unusual and high level of polymorphism of unidentified biological significance. Therefore, to provide a better understanding of the features of this interesting molecule, we have investigated its function using four different cloned and expressed variants of Myt C cDNA and polyclonal anti-Myt C sera. The in vivo results suggest that this AMP, mainly present in hemocytes, could be acting as an immune system modulator molecule because its overexpression was able to alter the expression of mussel immune-related genes (as the antimicrobial peptides Myticin B and Mytilin B, the C1q domain-containing protein MgC1q, and lysozyme). Moreover, the in vitro results indicate that Myt C peptides have antimicrobial and chemotactic properties. Their recombinant expression in a fish cell line conferred protection against two different fish viruses (enveloped and non-enveloped). Cell extracts from Myt C expressing fish cells were also able to attract hemocytes. All together, these results suggest that Myt C should be considered not only as an AMP but also as the first chemokine/cytokine-like molecule identified in bivalves and one of the few examples in all of the invertebrates.

  12. Isolation and antiviral activity of water-soluble Cynomorium songaricum Rupr. polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Tuvaanjav, Suvdmaa; Shuqin, Han; Komata, Masashi; Ma, Chunjie; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The plant, Cynomorium songaricum Rupr., is used as a traditional medicine in China and Mongolia. In the present study, two new water-soluble polysaccharides isolated from C. songaricum Rupr. were purified by successive Sephadex G-75 and G-50 column chromatographies and then characterized by high resolution NMR and IR spectroscopies. The molecular weights of two polysaccharides were determined by an aqueous GPC to be [Formula: see text] = 3.7 × 10(4) and 1.0 × 10(4), respectively. In addition, it was found that the polysaccharide with the larger molecular weight was an acidic polysaccharide. It was found that the iodine-starch reaction of both isolated polysaccharides was negative and the methylation analysis gave 2, 4, 6-tri-O-methyl alditol acetate as a main product. NMR and IR measurements and sugar analysis revealed that both polysaccharides had a (1 → 3)-α-d-glucopyranosidic main chain with a small number of branches. After sulfation, the sulfated C. songaricum Rupr. polysaccharides were found to have a potent inhibitory effect on HIV infection of MT-4 cells at a 50% effective concentration of 0.3-0.4 μg/ml, a concentration that has almost the same high activity as standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, EC50 = 0.35 and 0.14 μg/ml, respectively. The 50% cytotoxic concentration was low, CC50>1000 μg/ml. In addition, the interaction between the sulfated polysaccharides and poly-l-lysine as a model protein compound was investigated by a surface plasmon resonance to reveal the anti-HIV mechanism.

  13. Treating Hepatitis C in a Ryan White-Funded HIV Clinic: Has the Treatment Uptake Improved in the Interferon-Free Directly Active Antiviral Era?

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Rebecca; Glowa, Thomas; Faulds, Samantha; McMahon, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Now that highly efficacious, interferon-free (IFN-free), direct acting antivirals (DAA) for the treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) have closed the gap between treatment and cure, identifying barriers that prevent initiation of treatment is more crucial than ever. This is a retrospective study utilizing Electronic Medical Records and Prior Authorization Records to identify HCV treatment gaps, including predictors for intention-to-treat and treatment initiation in the first 15 months of a Ryan White funded human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV co-infection clinic. This study included 128 adults ≥18 years old with HIV and chronic HCV infection who had visited the treatment center at least once since January 2013. Provider intent-to-treat was used to differentiate patients actively considered for treatment based on documentation kept by a multidisciplinary HCV team. Members of this group who had gone on to initiate treatment were identified. Baseline characteristics were compared. Rates of active treatment consideration and treatment initiation were 30% and 14%, respectively. HCV treatment-naïve individuals were less likely to be considered for treatment [risk ratio (RR) 1.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07–2.32] and initiate therapy (RR 2.33, 95% CI 0.97–5.60). Advanced liver disease had no significant association. Black race (RR 1.96, 95% CI 0.90–4.25) and Medicaid insurance holders (RR 1.90, 95% CI 0.95–3.82) tended to be less likely to initiate therapy. The availability of IFN-free DAA regimens has yet to increase HCV treatment uptake in our HIV/HCV co-infected population. Barriers to HCV treatment initiation have shifted from medical contraindications to socioeconomic variables. PMID:26744994

  14. Mimiviruses and the Human Interferon System: Viral Evasion of Classical Antiviral Activities, But Inhibition By a Novel Interferon-β Regulated Immunomodulatory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gabriel Magno de Freitas; Silva, Lorena C Ferreira; Colson, Philippe; Abrahao, Jonatas Santos

    2017-01-01

    In this review we discuss the role of mimiviruses as potential human pathogens focusing on clinical and evolutionary evidence. We also propose a novel antiviral immunomodulatory pathway controlled by interferon-β (IFN-β) and mediated by immune-responsive gene 1 (IRG1) and itaconic acid, its product. Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus (APMV) was isolated from amoebae in a hospital while investigating a pneumonia outbreak. Mimivirus ubiquity and role as protist pathogens are well understood, and its putative status as a human pathogen has been gaining strength as more evidence is being found. The study of APMV and human cells interaction revealed that the virus is able to evade the IFN system by inhibiting the regulation of interferon-stimulated genes, suggesting that the virus and humans have had host-pathogen interactions. It also has shown that the virus is capable of growing on IFN-α2, but not on IFN-β-treated cells, hinting at an exclusive IFN-β antiviral pathway. Our hypothesis based on preliminary data and published articles is that IFN-β preferentially upregulates IRG1 in human macrophagic cells, which in turn produces itaconic acid. This metabolite links metabolism to antiviral activity by inactivating the virus, in a novel immunomodulatory pathway relevant for APMV infections and probably to other infectious diseases as well.

  15. Oyster viperin retains direct antiviral activity and its transcription occurs via a signalling pathway involving a heat-stable haemolymph protein.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Speck, Peter; Geng, Lu; Raftos, David; Beard, Michael R; Helbig, Karla J

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the response of non-model invertebrates, such as oysters, to virus infection. The vertebrate innate immune system detects virus-derived nucleic acids to trigger the type I IFN pathway, leading to the transcription of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) that exert antiviral functions. Invertebrates were thought to lack the IFN pathway based on the absence of IFN or ISGs encoded in model invertebrate genomes. However, the oyster genome encodes many ISGs, including the well-described antiviral protein viperin. In this study, we characterized oyster viperin and showed that it localizes to caveolin-1 and inhibits dengue virus replication in a heterologous model. In a second set of experiments, we have provided evidence that the haemolymph from poly(I : C)-injected oysters contains a heat-stable, protease-susceptible factor that induces haemocyte transcription of viperin mRNA in conjunction with upregulation of IFN regulatory factor. Collectively, these results support the concept that oysters have antiviral systems that are homologous to the vertebrate IFN pathway.

  16. Synthesis and antiviral activity of new phenylimidazopyridines and N-benzylidenequinolinamines derived by molecular simplification of phenylimidazo[4,5-g]quinolines.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Roberta; Briguglio, Irene; Corona, Paola; Piras, Sandra; Loriga, Mario; Paglietti, Giuseppe; Carta, Antonio; Sanna, Giuseppina; Giliberti, Gabriele; Ibba, Cristina; Farci, Pamela; La Colla, Paolo

    2014-09-12

    Continuing our program of research concerning the antiviral activity of a wide series of new angular and linear azolo bicyclic and tricyclic derivatives, now we have simplified and modified the 4-chloro-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-3H-imidazo[4,5-g]quinoline 1, which previously resulted the most active derivative, through either the elimination of the central ring or the opening of the imidazole ring, obtaining various imidazopyridines and N-benzylidenequinolinamines respectively. Title compounds were tested in cell-based assays for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against representatives of two DNA virus families as wells as against representatives of RNA virus families containing single-stranded, either positive-sense (ssRNA(+)) or negative-sense (ssRNA(-)), and double-stranded genomes (dsRNA). Some imidazo[4,5-b]pyridines emerged as new derivatives endowed with antiviral activity against Vaccinia Virus (VV) at concentrations ranging from 2 to 16 μM. In particular, compound 2b demonstrate to be about 10 times more potent than Cidofovir, used as reference drug. Similarly, the imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines and N-benzylidenequinolinamines derivatives resulted active against Bovine Viral Diarrhoea virus (BVDV), at concentrations ranging from 1.2 to 28 μM. Above all compounds 1, 3a and 3f showed an EC50 of the same order of magnitude of the reference drug, the 2'-C-methyl-guanosine. Moreover, several N-benzylidenequinolinamines showed an interesting activity against Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) at concentrations between 12 and 26 μM.

  17. Identification of cellular genes induced in human cells after activation of the OAS/RNaseL pathway by vaccinia virus recombinants expressing these antiviral enzymes.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Gil, Elena; González, José Manuel; Esteban, Mariano

    2010-03-01

    Interferon (IFN) type I induces the expression of antiviral proteins such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS). The enzyme OAS is activated by dsRNA to produce 5'-phosphorylated, 2-5-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A) that activate RNaseL which, in turn, triggers RNA breakdown, leading to multiple biological functions. Although RNaseL is required for IFN antiviral function, there are many aspects of the molecular mechanisms that remain obscure. Here, we have used microarray analyses from human HeLa cells infected with vaccinia virus (VACV) recombinants expressing OAS-RNaseL enzymes (referred as 2-5A system) with the aim to identify host genes that are up- or down-regulated in the course of infection by the activation of this antiviral pathway. We found that activation of the 2-5A system from VACV recombinants produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription for genes that regulate many cellular processes, like those that promote cell growth arrest, GADD45B and KCTD11, apoptosis as CUL2, PDCD6, and TNFAIP8L2, IFN-stimulated genes as IFI6, and related to tumor suppression as PLA2G2A. The 2-5A system activation produces down-regulation of transcription of some genes that promote cell growth as RUNX2 and ESR2 and of genes in charge to maintain mitochondria homeostasis as MIPEP and COX5A. These results reveal new genes induced in response to the activation of the 2-5A system with roles in apoptosis, translational control, cell growth arrest, and tumor suppression.

  18. Interferon induced IFIT family genes in host antiviral defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Secretion of interferons (IFNs) from virus-infected cells is a hallmark of host antiviral immunity and in fact, IFNs exert their antiviral activities through the induction of antiviral proteins. The IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) family is among hundreds of IF stimulated ...

  19. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  20. Antiviral Activity and Possible Mechanism of Action of Constituents Identified in Paeonia lactiflora Root toward Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ngan, Luong Thi My; Jang, Myeong Jin; Kwon, Min Jung; Ahn, Young Joon

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cost billions of USD annually in medical visits and missed school and work. An assessment was made of the antiviral activities and mechanisms of action of paeonol (PA) and 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (PGG) from Paeonia lactiflora root toward HRV-2 and HRV-4 in MRC5 cells using a tetrazolium method and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results were compared with those of a reference control ribavirin. Based on 50% inhibitory concentration values, PGG was 13.4 and 18.0 times more active toward HRV-2 (17.89 μM) and HRV-4 (17.33 μM) in MRC5 cells, respectively, than ribavirin. The constituents had relatively high selective index values (3.3–>8.5). The 100 μg/mL PA and 20 μg/mL PGG did not interact with the HRV-4 particles. These constituents inhibited HRV-4 infection only when they were added during the virus inoculation (0 h), the adsorption period of HRVs, but not after 1 h or later. Moreover, the RNA replication levels of HRVs were remarkably reduced in the MRC5 cultures treated with these constituents. These findings suggest that PGG and PA may block or reduce the entry of the viruses into the cells to protect the cells from the virus destruction and abate virus replication, which may play an important role in interfering with expressions of rhinovirus receptors (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor), inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor, interferon beta, and IL-1β), and Toll-like receptor, which resulted in diminishing symptoms induced by HRV. Global efforts to reduce the level of synthetic drugs justify further studies on P. lactiflora root-derived materials as potential anti-HRV products or lead molecules for the prevention or treatment of HRV. PMID:25860871

  1. TRIMmunity: The roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A.

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM-family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, sub-cellular localization, and in cell-type specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research. PMID:24333484

  2. TRIMmunity: the roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A

    2014-03-20

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, by sub-cellular localization and in cell-type-specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research.

  3. [Antiviral vaccines].

    PubMed

    Girard, M

    1999-01-01

    Vaccination has been successful in controlling numerous diseases in man and animals. Smallpox has been eradicated and poliomyelitis is on the verge of being eradicated. The traditional immunization arsenal includes vaccines using live, attenuated, and inactivated organisms. DNA recombinant technology has added two new types of vaccines, i.e. subunit vaccines based on purified antigens produced by genetic engineering in bacterial, yeast, or animal-cell cultures and live recombinant vaccines based on attenuated bacterial or viral vectors. Currently the best known examples of these new vaccines are those using poxvirus vectors (vaccinia virus, canarypox virus, or fowlpox virus) but new vectors are under development. Another application for genetic engineering in the field of vaccinology is the development of DNA vaccines using naked plasmid DNA. This technique has achieved remarkable results in small rodents but its efficacy, safety, and feasibility in man has yet to be demonstrated. Numerous studies are now under way to improve the process. In the field of synthetic vaccines, lipopeptides have shown promise for induction of cell immune response. Development of vaccines for administration by the oral or nasal route may one day revolutionize vaccination techniques. However, effective vaccines against hepatitis C and HIV have stalled in the face of the complexity and pathophysiology of these diseases. These are the greatest challenges confronting scientists at the dawn of the new millennium.

  4. Antiviral Potential of Algae Polysaccharides Isolated from Marine Sources: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Azin; Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    From food to fertilizer, algal derived products are largely employed in assorted industries, including agricultural, biomedical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Among different chemical compositions isolated from algae, polysaccharides are the most well-established compounds, which were subjected to a variety of studies due to extensive bioactivities. Over the past few decades, the promising results for antiviral potential of algae-derived polysaccharides have advocated them as inordinate candidates for pharmaceutical research. Numerous studies have isolated various algal polysaccharides possessing antiviral activities, including carrageenan, alginate, fucan, laminaran, and naviculan. In addition, different mechanisms of action have been reported for these polysaccharides, such as inhibiting the binding or internalization of virus into the host cells or suppressing DNA replication and protein synthesis. This review strives for compiling previous antiviral studies of algae-derived polysaccharides and their mechanism of action towards their development as natural antiviral agents for future investigations. PMID:26484353

  5. Synthesis, antiviral activity, 3D-QSAR, and interaction mechanisms study of novel malonate derivatives containing quinazolin-4(3H)-one moiety.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihang; Li, Pei; Hu, Deyu; Zeng, Song; Li, Tianxian; Jin, Linhong; Xue, Wei; Song, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel malonate derivatives containing quinazolin-4(3H)-one moiety were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activities against cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Results indicated that the title compounds exhibited good antiviral activities. Notably, compounds g15, g16, g17, and g18 exhibited excellent curative activities in vivo against CMV, with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 208.36, 153.78, 181.47, and 164.72μg/mL, respectively, which were better than that of Ningnanmycin (256.35μg/mL) and Ribavirin (523.34μg/mL). Moreover, statistically valid three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models with good correlation and predictive power were obtained with comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) steric and electrostatic fields (r(2)=0.990, q(2)=0.577) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) with combined steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond acceptor fields (r(2)=0.977, q(2)=0.516), respectively. Based on those models, compound g25 was designed, synthesized, and showed better curative activity (146.30μg/mL) than that of compound g16. The interaction of between cucumber mosaic virus coat protein (CMV CP) and g25 with 1:1.83 ratio is typically spontaneous and exothermic with micromole binding affinity by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and fluorescence spectroscopy investigation.

  6. The Transcription Factor FoxK Participates with Nup98 To Regulate Antiviral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Debasis; Gold, Beth; Tartell, Michael A.; Rausch, Keiko; Casas-Tinto, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Upon infection, pathogen recognition leads to a rapidly activated gene expression program that induces antimicrobial effectors to clear the invader. We recently found that Nup98 regulates the expression of a subset of rapidly activated antiviral genes to restrict disparate RNA virus infections in Drosophila by promoting RNA polymerase occupancy at the promoters of these antiviral genes. How Nup98 specifically targets these loci was unclear; however, it is known that Nup98 participates with transcription factors to regulate developmental-gene activation. We reasoned that additional transcription factors may facilitate the Nup98-dependent expression of antiviral genes. In a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified a relatively understudied forkhead transcription factor, FoxK, as active against Sindbis virus (SINV) in Drosophila. Here we find that FoxK is active against the panel of viruses that are restricted by Nup98, including SINV and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Mechanistically, we show that FoxK coordinately regulates the Nup98-dependent expression of antiviral genes. Depletion of FoxK significantly reduces Nup98-dependent induction of antiviral genes and reduces the expression of a forkhead response element-containing luciferase reporter. Together, these data show that FoxK-mediated activation of gene expression is Nup98 dependent. We extended our studies to mammalian cells and found that the mammalian ortholog FOXK1 is antiviral against two disparate RNA viruses, SINV and VSV, in human cells. Interestingly, FOXK1 also plays a role in the expression of antiviral genes in mammals: depletion of FOXK1 attenuates virus-inducible interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) reporter expression. Overall, our results demonstrate a novel role for FOXK1 in regulating the expression of antiviral genes, from insects to humans. PMID:25852164

  7. Discovery of potent broad spectrum antivirals derived from marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C; Dobry, Craig J; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J; Blakely, Pennelope K; Tai, Andrew W; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  8. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  9. C7L Family of Poxvirus Host Range Genes Inhibits Antiviral Activities Induced by Type I Interferons and Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Schoggins, John; Rose, Lloyd; Cao, Jingxin; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) K1L and C7L function equivalently in many mammalian cells to support VACV replication and antagonize antiviral activities induced by type I interferons (IFNs). While K1L is limited to orthopoxviruses, genes that are homologous to C7L are found in diverse mammalian poxviruses. In this study, we showed that the C7L homologues from sheeppox virus and swinepox virus could rescue the replication defect of a VACV mutant deleted of both K1L and C7L (vK1L−C7L−). Interestingly, the sheeppox virus C7L homologue could rescue the replication of vK1L−C7L− in human HeLa cells but not in murine 3T3 and LA-4 cells, in contrast to all other C7L homologues. Replacing amino acids 134 and 135 of the sheeppox virus C7L homologue, however, made it functional in the two murine cell lines, suggesting that these two residues are critical for antagonizing a putative host restriction factor which has some subtle sequence variation in human and murine cells. Furthermore, the C7L family of host range genes from diverse mammalian poxviruses were all capable of antagonizing type I IFN-induced antiviral activities against VACV. Screening of a library of more than 350 IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) identified interferon-regulated factor 1 (IRF1) as an inhibitor of vK1L−C7L− but not wild-type VACV. Expression of either K1L or C7L, however, rendered vK1L−C7L− resistant to IRF1-induced antiviral activities. Altogether, our data show that K1L and C7L antagonize IRF1-induced antiviral activities and that the host modulation function of C7L is evolutionally conserved in all poxviruses that can readily replicate in tissue-cultured mammalian cells. PMID:22345458

  10. [Antimycoplasmic Activity of Fermentation Broth of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180, an Organism Producing L-Lysine-α-Oxidase, an Antitumor and Antiviral Enzyme].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I P; Rakovskaya, I V

    2014-01-01

    A concentrate of the fermentation broth of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180, an organism producing L-lysine-α-oxidase, an antitumor and antiviral enzyme, with the activity in the fermentation broth of 0.54-0.56 U/mI was recovered. The effect of the concentrate on the mycoplasmas growth was investigated for the first time. Two representatives of Mycoplasmafaceae, i.e. Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans and one representative of Aholeplasmataceae. i. e. Aholeplasma laidlawii were used. It was shown that the fermentation broth inhibited the growth of Mycoplasma hominis after the preliminary exposure. The inhibition rate depended on the mycoplasma inoculation dose and the fermentation broth concentration.

  11. Discovery of a highly selective PLD2 inhibitor (ML395): a new probe with improved physiochemical properties and broad-spectrum antiviral activity against influenza strains.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Matthew C; Oguin, Thomas H; Scott, Sarah A; Thomas, Paul G; Locuson, Charles W; Morrison, Ryan D; Daniels, J Scott; Brown, H Alex; Lindsley, Craig W

    2014-12-01

    Further chemical optimization of the halopemide-derived family of dual phospholipase D1/2 (PLD1/2) inhibitors afforded ML395 (VU0468809), a potent, >80-fold PLD2 selective allosteric inhibitor (cellular PLD1, IC50 >30,000 nM; cellular PLD2, IC50 =360 nM). Moreover, ML395 possesses an attractive in vitro DMPK profile, improved physiochemical properties, ancillary pharmacology (Eurofins Panel) cleaner than any other reported PLD inhibitor, and has been found to possess interesting activity as an antiviral agent in cellular assays against a range of influenza strains (H1, H3, H5 and H7).

  12. Antiviral activity of human oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) is mediated by enhancing retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yugen; Ghosh, Arundhati; Cuevas, Rolando A.; Forero, Adriana; Dhar, Jayeeta; Ibsen, Mikkel Søes; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan Leo; Schmidt, Tobias; Ganapathiraju, Madhavi K.; Fujita, Takashi; Hartmann, Rune; Barik, Sailen; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Virus infection is sensed in the cytoplasm by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I, also known as DDX58), which requires RNA and polyubiquitin binding to induce type I interferon (IFN), and activate cellular innate immunity. We show that the human IFN-inducible oligoadenylate synthetases-like (OASL) protein had antiviral activity and mediated RIG-I activation by mimicking polyubiquitin. Loss of OASL expression reduced RIG-I signaling and enhanced virus replication in human cells. Conversely, OASL expression suppressed replication of a number of viruses in a RIG-I-dependent manner and enhanced RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. OASL interacted and colocalized with RIG-I, and through its C-terminal ubiquitin-like domain specifically enhanced RIG-I signaling. Bone marrow derived macrophages from mice deficient for Oasl2 showed that among the two mouse orthologs of human OASL; Oasl2 is functionally similar to human OASL. Our findings show a mechanism by which human OASL contributes to host antiviral responses by enhancing RIG-I activation. PMID:24931123

  13. Synthesis and antiviral activity of a series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds as anti-HCV and anti-EV71 agents.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi; Wang, Huiqiang; Li, Yanping; Peng, Zonggen; Li, Yuhuan; Li, Zhuorong

    2015-05-01

    A series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activity against HCV and EV71 (strain SZ-98). The biological results showed that three compounds (23, 25 and 41) exhibited considerable anti-HCV activity (IC50=0.57-7.12 μmol/L) and several compounds (23, 28, 29, 30, 31 and 42) displayed potent activity against EV71 with the IC50 values lower than 5.00 μmol/L. The potency of compound 23 (IC50=0.57 μmol/L) was superior to that of reported compounds IMB-1f (IC50=1.90 μmol/L) and IMB-1g (IC50=1.00 μmol/L) as anti-HCV agents, and compound 29 possessed the highest anti-EV71 activity, comparable to the comparator drug pirodavir. The efficacy in vivo and antiviral mechanism of these compounds warrant further investigations.

  14. Class A scavenger receptor-mediated dsRNA internalization is independent of innate antiviral signaling and does not require PI3K activity1

    PubMed Central

    Nellimarla, Srinivas; Baid, Kaushal; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Bowdish, Dawn M.; Mossman, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA is a potent trigger of innate immune signaling, eliciting effects within virally infected cells and following release from dying cells. Given its inherent stability, extracellular dsRNA induces both local and systemic effects. Although the class A scavenger receptors (SR-As)3 mediate dsRNA entry, it is unknown if they contribute to signaling beyond ligand internalization. Here, we investigated if SR-As contribute to innate immune signaling independent of the classic TLR and RLR pathways. We generated a stable A549 human epithelial cell line with inducible expression of the Hepatitis C virus protease NS3/4A, which efficiently cleaves TRIF and IPS-1, adaptors for TLR3 and the RLRs respectively. Cells expressing NS3/4A as well as TLR3/MDA5/IPS-1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts completely lacked antiviral activity to extracellular dsRNA relative to control cells, suggesting that SR-As do not possess signaling capacity independent of TLR3 or the RLRs. Previous studies implicated PI3K signaling in SR-A-mediated activities and in downstream production of type I interferon. We found that SR-A-mediated dsRNA internalization occurs independent of PI3K activation, while downstream signaling leading to interferon production was partially dependent on PI3K activity. Overall, these findings suggest that SR-A-mediated dsRNA internalization is independent of innate antiviral signaling. PMID:26363049

  15. Antiviral potential of lactic acid bacteria and their bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Al Kassaa, I; Hober, D; Hamze, M; Chihib, N E; Drider, D

    2014-12-01

    Emerging resistance to antiviral agents is a growing public health concern worldwide as it was reported for respiratory, sexually transmitted and enteric viruses. Therefore, there is a growing demand for new, unconventional antiviral agents which may serve as an alternative to the currently used drugs. Meanwhile, published literature continues shedding the light on the potency of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their bacteriocins as antiviral agents. Health-promoting LAB probiotics may exert their antiviral activity by (1) direct probiotic-virus interaction; (2) production of antiviral inhibitory metabolites; and/or (3) via stimulation of the immune system. The aim of this review was to highlight the antiviral activity of LAB and substances they produce with antiviral activity.

  16. Information for Teachers (Including Classroom Activities), Skylab Student Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This program is intended to directly involve the educational community in space experiments, many of which can be related to existing curricula. Included in this first packet are: 1) a brief description of the Skylab Program and the National Science Teachers Association-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NSTA-NASA) Skylab Student…

  17. Expression of porcine Mx1 with FMDV IRES enhances the antiviral activity against foot-and-mouth disease virus in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bing; Fang, Hui; Shen, Chao; Zheng, Congyi

    2015-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the most contagious pathogen in cloven-hoofed (two-toed) animals. Due to the rapid replication and spread of FMDV, novel therapeutic strategies are greatly needed to reduce or block FMDV shedding in cases of disease outbreak. Here, we generated an IRES-Mx1 construct in which the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of FMDV was inserted between the promoter and open reading frame (ORF) of porcine myxovirus resistance protein 1 (poMx1). This construct provides more powerful protection against FMDV infection than the IRES-IFN construct that was previously generated by our group. The results indicate that this IRES-Mx1 construct was able to express poMx1 12 h after transfection and induce a robust immune response. In contrast to the control, the proliferation of virus in transfected cells was significantly inhibited, as evaluated by morphology monitoring, real-time RT-PCR, virus titration and Western blot. In addition, we also found that the antiviral activity in cells transfected with pc-IRES-Mx1 was abolished when the JAK/STAT pathway was repressed, which indicates that the antiviral mechanism of poMx1 is JAK/STAT pathway dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that the antiviral activity of poMx1 is possibly produced by affecting the host cells themselves, instead of interacting with the virus directly. The new construct reported here could be used as a novel effective therapy against FMDV infection.

  18. Fluorinated nucleosides as antiviral and antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Meng, Wei-Dong; Qing, Feng-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of nucleosides and analogues with fluoride modifications on the surgar moiety are reviewed, and their biological activities as potential antiviral and anti-tumor agents are also discussed.

  19. Synthesis and antiviral activity of N9-[3-fluoro-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl] analogues derived from N6-substituted adenines and 2,6-diaminopurines.

    PubMed

    Baszczyňski, Ondřej; Jansa, Petr; Dračínský, Martin; Klepetářová, Blanka; Holý, Antonín; Votruba, Ivan; de Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Janeba, Zlatko

    2011-04-01

    An efficient method for the synthesis of N(9)-[3-fluoro-2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl] (FPMP) derivatives of purine bases has been developed. Both (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of the N(6)-substituted FPMP derivatives of adenine and 2,6-diaminopurine were prepared and their anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and anti-Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) activity was evaluated. Whereas none of the 6-substituted FPMPA derivatives showed any antiviral activity, several FPMPDAP derivatives had a moderate antiretroviral activity. Moreover, the data obtained from the study of the substrate activity of the active derivatives towards N(6)-methyl-AMP aminohydrolase support the notion that the studied N(6)-substituted FPMPDAP derivatives act as prodrugs of the antiretroviral FPMPG analogues.

  20. Antivirals against animal viruses.

    PubMed

    Villa, T G; Feijoo-Siota, L; Rama, J L R; Ageitos, J M

    2016-09-30

    Antivirals are compounds used since the 1960s that can interfere with viral development. Some of these antivirals can be isolated from a variety of sources, such as animals, plants, bacteria or fungi, while others must be obtained by chemical synthesis, either designed or random. Antivirals display a variety of mechanisms of action, and while some of them enhance the animal immune system, others block a specific enzyme or a particular step in the viral replication cycle. As viruses are mandatory intracellular parasites that use the host's cellular machinery to survive and multiply, it is essential that antivirals do not harm the host. In addition, viruses are continually developing new antiviral resistant strains, due to their high mutation rate, which makes it mandatory to continually search for, or develop, new antiviral compounds. This review describes natural and synthetic antivirals in chronological order, with an emphasis on natural compounds, even when their mechanisms of action are not completely understood, that could serve as the basis for future development of novel and/or complementary antiviral treatments.

  1. Antiviral Actions of Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of the antiviral actions of interferons (IFNs), as well as strategies evolved by viruses to antagonize the actions of IFNs. Furthermore, advances made while elucidating the IFN system have contributed significantly to our understanding in multiple areas of virology and molecular cell biology, ranging from pathways of signal transduction to the biochemical mechanisms of transcriptional and translational control to the molecular basis of viral pathogenesis. IFNs are approved therapeutics and have moved from the basic research laboratory to the clinic. Among the IFN-induced proteins important in the antiviral actions of IFNs are the RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L, and the Mx protein GTPases. Double-stranded RNA plays a central role in modulating protein phosphorylation and RNA degradation catalyzed by the IFN-inducible PKR kinase and the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L, respectively, and also in RNA editing by the IFN-inducible RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR1). IFN also induces a form of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS2) and the major histocompatibility complex class I and II proteins, all of which play important roles in immune response to infections. Several additional genes whose expression profiles are altered in response to IFN treatment and virus infection have been identified by microarray analyses. The availability of cDNA and genomic clones for many of the components of the IFN system, including IFN-α, IFN-β, and IFN-γ, their receptors, Jak and Stat and IRF signal transduction components, and proteins such as PKR, 2′,5′-OAS, Mx, and ADAR, whose expression is regulated by IFNs, has permitted the generation of mutant proteins, cells that overexpress different forms of the proteins, and animals in which their expression has been disrupted by targeted gene disruption. The use of these IFN system

  2. A novel video tracking method to evaluate the effect of influenza infection and antiviral treatment on ferret activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ding Yuan; Barr, Ian G; Hurt, Aeron C

    2015-01-01

    Ferrets are the preferred animal model to assess influenza virus infection, virulence and transmission as they display similar clinical symptoms and pathogenesis to those of humans. Measures of disease severity in the ferret include weight loss, temperature rise, sneezing, viral shedding and reduced activity. To date, the only available method for activity measurement has been the assignment of an arbitrary score by a 'blind' observer based on pre-defined responsiveness scale. This manual scoring method is subjective and can be prone to bias. In this study, we described a novel video-tracking methodology for determining activity changes in a ferret model of influenza infection. This method eliminates the various limitations of manual scoring, which include the need for a sole 'blind' observer and the requirement to recognise the 'normal' activity of ferrets in order to assign relative activity scores. In ferrets infected with an A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, video-tracking was more sensitive than manual scoring in detecting ferret activity changes. Using this video-tracking method, oseltamivir treatment was found to ameliorate the effect of influenza infection on activity in ferret. Oseltamivir treatment of animals was associated with an improvement in clinical symptoms, including reduced inflammatory responses in the upper respiratory tract, lower body weight loss and a smaller rise in body temperature, despite there being no significant reduction in viral shedding. In summary, this novel video-tracking is an easy-to-use, objective and sensitive methodology for measuring ferret activity.

  3. Purification of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. Essential Oil Using Macroporous Resin Followed by Microemulsion Encapsulation to Improve Its Safety and Antiviral Activity.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jianmei; Dong, Wujun; Li, Yuhuan; Xia, Xuejun; Liu, Zhihua; Hao, Huazhen; Jiang, Lingmin; Liu, Yuling

    2017-02-15

    Essential oil extracted from Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (H. cordata) is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine due to its excellent biological activities. However, impurities and deficient preparations of the essential oil limit its safety and effectiveness. Herein, we proposed a strategy to prepare H. cordata essential oil (HEO) safely and effectively by combining the solvent extraction and the macroporous resin purification flexibly, and then encapsulating it using microemulsion. The extraction and purification process were optimized by orthogonal experimental design and adsorption-desorption tests, respectively. The average houttuynin content in pure HEO was then validated at 44.3% ± 2.01%, which presented a great potential for industrial application. Subsequently, pure HEO-loaded microemulsion was prepared by high-pressure homogenization and was then fully characterized. Results showed that the pure HEO-loaded microemulsion was successfully prepared with an average particle size of 179.1 nm and a high encapsulation rate of 94.7%. Furthermore, safety evaluation tests and in vitro antiviral testing indicated that the safety and activity of HEO were significantly improved after purification using D101 resin and were further improved by microemulsion encapsulation. These results demonstrated that the purification of HEO by macroporous resin followed by microemulsion encapsulation would be a promising approach for industrial application of HEO for the antiviral therapies.

  4. In vitro antiviral activity of circular triple helix forming oligonucleotide RNA towards Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus replication.

    PubMed

    Choong, Oi Kuan; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP) is a severe fatal immune-augmented disease in cat population. It is caused by FIP virus (FIPV), a virulent mutant strain of Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECV). Current treatments and prophylactics are not effective. The in vitro antiviral properties of five circular Triple-Helix Forming Oligonucleotide (TFO) RNAs (TFO1 to TFO5), which target the different regions of virulent feline coronavirus (FCoV) strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 genome, were tested in FIPV-infected Crandell-Rees Feline Kidney (CRFK) cells. RT-qPCR results showed that the circular TFO RNAs, except TFO2, inhibit FIPV replication, where the viral genome copy numbers decreased significantly by 5-fold log10 from 10(14) in the virus-inoculated cells to 10(9) in the circular TFO RNAs-transfected cells. Furthermore, the binding of the circular TFO RNA with the targeted viral genome segment was also confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The strength of binding kinetics between the TFO RNAs and their target regions was demonstrated by NanoITC assay. In conclusion, the circular TFOs have the potential to be further developed as antiviral agents against FIPV infection.

  5. Thymosin From Bombyx mori Is Down-Regulated in Expression by BmNPV Exhibiting Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Yongdi; Fang, Qiang; Xu, Minlin; Lv, Mengyuan; Liao, Jinxu; Li, Si; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Wenping

    2016-01-01

    Thymosins have been highly conserved during evolution. These hormones exist in many animal species and play an essential role in many biological events. However, little is known regarding the physiological function of silkworm Bombyx mori thymosin (BmTHY). In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of BmTHY in a Bombyx mori larval ovarian cell line (BmN) challenged with Bombyx mori nuclear polyhydrosis virus (BmNPV) and the antiviral effect of recombinant BmTHY (rBmTHY) for Bombyx mori against BmNPV. Western-blot assay and qRT-PCR analysis revealed that the level of BmTHY protein expression and transcription decreased over time when BmN cells were infected by BmNPV. Treatment with endotoxin-free rBmTHY led to a significant reduction in viral titer in the supernatant of BmN cells challenged with BmNPV. The results from antiviral tests performed in vitro and in vivo showed that endotoxin-free rBmTHY improved the survival rate of Bombyx mori infected with BmNPV. These findings suggest that BmTHY exerts immunomodulatory effects on Bombyx mori, rendering them resistant to viral infection. PMID:27432352

  6. Interferon-Induced Genes of the Expanded IFIT Family Show Conserved Antiviral Activities in Non-Mammalian Species

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, Patricia; Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Costa, Maria M.; Dios, Sonia; Romero, Alejandro; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) are involved in the protective response to viral infection, although the precise mechanism of IFITs for reducing viral proliferation is currently unknown. The interaction with the translation initiation factor eIF-3 or viral proteins and the sequestering of viral RNA have been proposed as potential antiviral functions for these proteins. In humans, four members of this family have been characterized. Nevertheless, information about these proteins in fish is almost non-existent. Exploiting the conservation of synteny between human and zebrafish genomes, we have identified ten members of the IFIT family located on four different chromosomes. The induction of these genes was examined both in vitro and in vivo after interferon (IFN) administration and rhabdovirus challenge. Whereas an induction of IFIT genes was observed after interferon treatments (IFNΦ1, IFNΦ2 and IFNΦ3), the viral infection did not affect these IFN-induced genes in vitro, and even reduced the IFN-induced expression of these genes. The response was largely different in vivo, with a broad up-regulation of IFIT genes after viral challenge. In addition, three selected IFITs were cloned in an expression vector and microinjected into zebrafish larvae to examine the protective effect of IFITs upon viral infection. Reduction in the mortality rate was observed confirming a conserved antiviral function in non-mammalian species. PMID:24950240

  7. Synthesis, crystal structure, structure-activity relationships, and antiviral activity of a potent SARS coronavirus 3CL protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Syaulan; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hsu, Min-Feng; Wu, Jen-Dar; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Liu, Yu-Fan; Chen, Hua-Chien; Kuo, Chun-Wei; Wu, Chi-Shen; Chang, Li-Wen; Chen, Wen-Chang; Liao, Shao-Ying; Chang, Teng-Yuan; Hung, Hsin-Hui; Shr, Hui-Lin; Liu, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Yu-An; Chang, Ling-Yin; Hsu, Jen-Chi; Peters, Clarence J; Wang, Andrew H-J; Hsu, Ming-Chu

    2006-08-10

    A potent SARS coronavirus (CoV) 3CL protease inhibitor (TG-0205221, Ki = 53 nM) has been developed. TG-0205221 showed remarkable activity against SARS CoV and human coronavirus (HCoV) 229E replications by reducing the viral titer by 4.7 log (at 5 microM) for SARS CoV and 5.2 log (at 1.25 microM) for HCoV 229E. The crystal structure of TG-0205221 (resolution = 1.93 A) has revealed a unique binding mode comprising a covalent bond, hydrogen bonds, and numerous hydrophobic interactions. Structural comparisons between TG-0205221 and a natural peptide substrate were also discussed. This information may be applied toward the design of other 3CL protease inhibitors.

  8. Antiviral, antifungal, and antiparasitic activities of fluoroquinolones optimized for treatment of bacterial infections: a puzzling paradox or a logical consequence of their mode of action?

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes evidence that commercially available fluoroquinolones used for the treatment of bacterial infections are active against other non-bacterial infectious agents as well. Any of these fluoroquinolones exerts, in parallel to its antibacterial action, antiviral, antifungal, and antiparasitic actions at clinically achievable concentrations. This broad range of anti-infective activities is due to one common mode of action, i.e., the inhibition of type II topoisomerases or inhibition of viral helicases, thus maintaining the selective toxicity of fluoroquinolones inhibiting microbial topoisomerases at low concentrations but mammalian topoisomerases at much higher concentrations. Evidence suggests that standard doses of the fluoroquinolones studied are clinically effective against viral and parasitic infections, whereas higher doses administered topically were active against Candida spp. causing ophthalmological infections. Well-designed clinical studies should be performed to substantiate these findings.

  9. Immunoproteasome Activation During Early Antiviral Response in Mouse Pancreatic β-cells: New Insights into Auto-antigen Generation in Type I Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Freudenburg, Wieke; Gautam, Madhav; Chakraborty, Pradipta; James, Jared; Richards, Jennifer; Salvatori, Alison S; Baldwin, Aaron; Schriewer, Jill; Buller, R Mark L; Corbett, John A; Skowyra, Dorota

    2013-04-23

    Type 1 diabetes results from autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing pancreatic β-cells. The immunoproteasome, a version of the proteasome that collaborates with the 11S/PA28 activator to generate immunogenic peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules, has long been implicated in the onset of the disease, but little is known about immunoproteasome function and regulation in pancreatic β-cells. Interesting insight into these issues comes from a recent analysis of the immunoproteasome expressed in pancreatic β-cells during early antiviral defenses mediated by interferon β (IFNβ), a type I IFN implicated in the induction of the diabetic state in human and animal models. Using mouse islets and the MIN6 insulinoma cell line, Freudenburg et al. found that IFNβ stimulates expression of the immunoproteasome and the 11S/PA28 activator in a manner fundamentally similar to the classic immuno-inducer IFNγ, with similar timing of mRNA accumulation and decline; similar transcriptional activation mediated primarily by the IRF1 and similar mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, neither IFNβ nor IFNγ altered the expression of regular proteolytic subunits or prevented their incorporation into proteolytic cores. As a result, immunoproteasomes had stochastic combinations of immune and regular proteolytic sites, an arrangement that would likely increase the probability with which unique immunogenic peptides are produced. However, immunoproteasomes were activated by the 11S/PA28 only under conditions of ATP depletion. A mechanism that prevents the activation of immunoproteasome at high ATP levels has not been reported before and could have a major regulatory significance, as it could suppress the generation of immunogenic peptides as cell accumulate immunoproteasome and 11S/PA28, and activate antigen processing only when ATP levels drop. We discuss implications of these new findings on the link between early antiviral response and the onset of type 1 diabetes.

  10. Immunobiological activity and antiviral regulation efforts of Chinese goose (Anser cygnoides) CD8α during NGVEV and GPV infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shun; Zhao, Qiurong; Qi, Yulin; Liu, Fei; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-01-01

    The CD8 molecule is a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are involved in the clearance of viruses. However, the functional characterization of goose CD8α is still unclear. The immunobiological characterization of goose CD8α in goose spleen mononuclear cells (MNCs) was examined by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). It was shown that CD8α mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated by in vitro treatment of MNCs with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (ConA), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) in a dose-dependent way, but lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) did not have this same effect. Moreover, the time-course effect of CD8α expression in response to mitogens (PHA, ConA, and poly I:C) was evaluated in MNCs. A significant increase in the transcriptional levels of CD8α was detected in new type gosling viral enteritis virus (NGVEV)-infected goose MNCs at 48 h postinfection (PI) and in goose parvovirus (GPV)-infected MNCs at 72 h PI. Also, the number of CD8α+ cells was significantly increased during viral infection from 72 h on. The seminal changes in mRNA profiles of antiviral cytokines (IFN-α, IFN-γ, and IL-18) were observed and were significantly increased during late phases of NGVEV and GPV infection. Accordingly, our data not only contribute to the understanding of the immune characteristics of goose CD8α, but they also provide new insight into the innate antiviral immunity of geese.

  11. H11/HSPB8 Restricts HIV-2 Vpx to Restore the Anti-Viral Activity of SAMHD1

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, Ayumi; Miyakawa, Kei; Matsunaga, Satoko; Matsushima, Yuki; Kosugi, Isao; Kimura, Hirokazu; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Virus–host interactions play vital roles in viral replication and virus-induced pathogenesis. Viruses rely entirely upon host cells to reproduce progeny viruses; however, host factors positively or negatively regulate virus replication by interacting with viral proteins. The elucidation of virus–host protein interaction not only provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which host cells combat viral infections, but also facilitates the development of new anti-viral therapeutics. Identification of relevant host factors requires techniques that enable comprehensive characterization of virus–host protein interactions. In this study, we developed a proteomic approach to systematically identify human protein kinases that interact potently with viral proteins. For this purpose, we synthesized 412 full-length human protein kinases using the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system, and screened them for their association with a virus protein using the amplified luminescent proximity homogenous assay (AlphaScreen). Using this system, we attempted to discover a robust anti-viral host restriction mechanism targeting virus protein X (Vpx) of HIV-2. The screen identified H11/HSPB8 as a Vpx-binding protein that negatively regulates the stability and function of Vpx. Indeed, overexpression of H11/HSPB8 promoted the degradation of Vpx via the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and inhibited its interaction with SAMHD1, a host restriction factor responsible for blocking replication of HIV. Conversely, targeted knockdown of H11/HSPB8 in human trophoblast cells, which ordinarily express high levels of this protein, restored the expression and function of Vpx, making the cells highly susceptible to viral replication. These results demonstrate that our proteomic approach represents a powerful tool for revealing virus–host interaction not yet identified by conventional methods. Furthermore, we showed that H11/HSPB8 could be a potential host regulatory

  12. Matrine displayed antiviral activity in porcine alveolar macrophages co-infected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and porcine circovirus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Na; Sun, Panpan; Lv, Haipeng; Sun, Yaogui; Guo, Jianhua; Wang, Zhirui; Luo, Tiantian; Wang, Shaoyu; Li, Hongquan

    2016-01-01

    The co-infection of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is quite common in clinical settings and no effective treatment to the co-infection is available. In this study, we established the porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM) cells model co-infected with PRRSV/PCV2 with modification in vitro, and investigated the antiviral activity of Matrine on this cell model and further evaluated the effect of Matrine on virus-induced TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway. The results demonstrated PAM cells inoculated with PRRSV followed by PCV2 2 h later enhanced PRRSV and PCV2 replications. Matrine treatment suppressed both PRRSV and PCV2 infection at 12 h post infection. Furthermore, PRRSV/PCV2 co- infection induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation as well as the translocation of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus indicating that PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection induced NF-κB activation. Matrine treatment significantly down-regulated the expression of TLR3, TLR4 and TNF-α although it, to some extent, suppressed p-IκBα expression, suggesting that TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway play an important role of Matrine in combating PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection. It is concluded that Matrine possesses activity against PRRSV/PCV2 co-infection in vitro and suppression of the TLR3,4/NF-κB/TNF-α pathway as an important underlying molecular mechanism. These findings warrant Matrine to be further explored for its antiviral activity in clinical settings. PMID:27080155

  13. Inorganic base-catalyzed formation of antivirally active N-substituted benzamides from α-amido sulfones and N-nucleophile

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heteronucleophiles as well as carbanionic reagents can be used to react with α-amido sulfones, thus giving the opportunity to prepare a large array of amino derivatives. Since, novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiol derivatives can serve as potent nucleophiles, we employed 5-subsititued phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiols as the nucleophilic source of nitrogen in the reaction with α-amido sulfones. Results A series of N-substituted benzamides bearing 1,3,4-oxadiazol unit were prepared for the first time by the reaction of in situ generated protected imine from α-amido sulfones with 5-subsititued phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiols as the source of nitrogen nucleophile. Some of the synthesized products displayed favourable antiviral activity against cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in preliminary antiviral activity tests. The title compounds 5c, 5o and 5r revealed curative activity of 42.2%, 48.7% and 40.5%, respectively against CMV (inhibitory rate) compared to the commercial standard Ningnanmycin (53.4%) at 500 μg/mL. Conclusion A practical synthetic route to N-benzoyl-α-amido sulfones by the reaction of 5-subsititued phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole-2-thiols as the source of nitrogen nucleophiles with in situ generated protected imine from N-benzoyl-α-amido sulfones is presented. The reaction catalyzed by an inorganic base has considerable significance to exploit the potential of α-amido sulfones in organic synthesis. PMID:21545729

  14. Henipavirus pathogenesis and antiviral approaches.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Horvat, Branka

    2015-03-01

    Hendra virus and Nipah virus are closely related, recently emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses, belonging to the Henipavirus genus. Both viruses induce generalized vasculitis affecting particularly the respiratory tract and CNS. The exceptionally broad species tropism of Henipavirus, the high case fatality rate and person-to-person transmission associated with Nipah virus outbreaks emphasize the necessity of effective antiviral strategies for these intriguing threatening pathogens. Current therapeutic approaches, validated in animal models, target early steps in viral infection; they include the use of neutralizing virus-specific antibodies and blocking membrane fusion with peptides that bind the viral fusion protein. A better understanding of Henipavirus pathogenesis is critical for the further advancement of antiviral treatment, and we summarize here the recent progress in the field.

  15. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  16. Antiviral activity of chlorogenic acid against influenza A (H1N1/H3N2) virus and its inhibition of neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yue; Cao, Zeyu; Cao, Liang; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Lonicera japonica Thunb, rich in chlorogenic acid (CHA), is used for viral upper respiratory tract infection treatment caused by influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, and respiratory syncytial virus, ect in China. It was reported that CHA reduced serum hepatitis B virus level and death rate of influenza virus-infected mice. However, the underlying mechanisms of CHA against the influenza A virus have not been fully elucidated. Here, the antiviral effects and potential mechanisms of CHA against influenza A virus were investigated. CHA revealed inhibitory against A/PuertoRico/8/1934(H1N1) (EC50 = 44.87 μM), A/Beijing/32/92(H3N2) (EC50 = 62.33 μM), and oseltamivir-resistant strains. Time-course analysis showed CHA inhibited influenza virus during the late stage of infectious cycle. Indirect immunofluorescence assay indicated CHA down-regulated the NP protein expression. The inhibition of neuraminidase activity confirmed CHA blocked release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg/d CHA possessed effective antiviral activity in mice, conferring 60% and 50% protection from death against H1N1 and H3N2, reducing virus titres and alleviating inflammation in the lungs effectively. These results demonstrate that CHA acts as a neuraminidase blocker to inhibit influenza A virus both in cellular and animal models. Thus, CHA has potential utility in the treatment of the influenza virus infection. PMID:28393840

  17. Water extract of Pueraria lobata Ohwi has anti-viral activity against human respiratory syncytial virus in human respiratory tract cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzeng-Jih; Yeh, Chia-Feng; Wang, Kuo-Chih; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Chang, Jung-San

    2013-12-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) infects all age groups and causes bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome with a significant mortality rate. To date, only ribavirin has been used to manage HRSV infection. However, ribavirin is expensive with an only modest effect. Furthermore, ribavirin has several side effects, which means it has limited clinical benefit. Pueraria lobata Ohwi (P. lobata) is a common ingredient of Ge-Gen-Tang (Kakkon-to) and Sheng-Ma-Ge-Gen-Tang (Shoma-kakkon-to), which are prescriptions of Chinese traditional medicine proven to have antiviral activity against HRSV. Therefore, it was hypothesized that P. lobata might be effective against HRSV. To find a cost-effective therapeutic modality, both human upper (HEp-2) and lower (A549) respiratory tract cell lines were used to test the hypothesis that P. lobata could inhibit HRSV-induced plaque formation. Results showed that the water extract of P. lobata was effective (p < 0.0001) against HRSV-induced plaque formation. P. lobata was more effective when given prior to viral inoculation (p < 0.0001) by inhibiting viral attachment (p < 0.0001) and penetration (p < 0.0001). However, supplementation with P. lobata could not stimulate interferon secretion after HRSV infection. In conclusion, P. lobata has antiviral activity against HRSV-induced plaque formation in airway mucosa mainly by inhibiting viral attachment and internalization. Further identification of effective constituents could contribute to the prevention of HRSV infection.

  18. An M2-V27A channel blocker demonstrates potent in vitro and in vivo antiviral activities against amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmei; Musharrafieh, Rami; Ma, Chunlong; Zhang, Jiantao; Smee, Donald F; DeGrado, William F; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Adamantanes such as amantadine (1) and rimantadine (2) are FDA-approved anti-influenza drugs that act by inhibiting the wild-type M2 proton channel from influenza A viruses, thereby inhibiting the uncoating of the virus. Although adamantanes have been successfully used for more than four decades, their efficacy was curtailed by emerging drug resistance. Among the limited number of M2 mutants that confer amantadine resistance, the M2-V27A mutant was found to be the predominant mutant under drug selection pressure, thereby representing a high profile antiviral drug target. Guided by molecular dynamics simulations, we previously designed first-in-class M2-V27A inhibitors. One of the potent lead compounds, spiroadamantane amine (3), inhibits both the M2-WT and M2-V27A mutant with IC50 values of 18.7 and 0.3 μM, respectively, in in vitro electrophysiological assays. Encouraged by these findings, in this study we further examine the in vitro and in vivo antiviral activity of compound 3 in inhibiting both amantadine-sensitive and -resistant influenza A viruses. Compound 3 not only had single to sub-micromolar EC50 values against M2-WT- and M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses in antiviral assays, but also rescued mice from lethal viral infection by either M2-WT- or M2-V27A-containing influenza A viruses. In addition, we report the design of two analogs of compound 3, and one was found to have improved in vitro antiviral activity over compound 3. Collectively, this study represents the first report demonstrating the in vivo antiviral efficacy of inhibitors targeting M2 mutants. The results suggest that inhibitors targeting drug-resistant M2 mutants are promising antiviral drug candidates worthy of further development.

  19. RNA degradation in antiviral immunity and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Rachel E.; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control determines the fate of cellular RNA molecules. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) provides quality control of mRNA, targeting faulty cellular transcripts for degradation by multiple nucleases including the RNA exosome. Recent findings have revealed a role for NMD in targeting viral RNA molecules, thereby restricting virus infection. Interestingly, NMD is also linked to immune responses at another level: mutations affecting the NMD or RNA exosome machineries cause chronic activation of defence programmes, resulting in autoimmune phenotypes. Here we place these observations in the context of other links between innate antiviral immunity and type I interferon mediated disease and examine two models: one in which expression or function of pathogen sensors is perturbed and one wherein host-derived RNA molecules with a propensity to activate such sensors accumulate. PMID:25709093

  20. Antiviral Defenses in Plants through Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Romay, Gustavo; Bragard, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Plant–virus interactions based-studies have contributed to increase our understanding on plant resistance mechanisms, providing new tools for crop improvement. In the last two decades, RNA interference, a post-transcriptional gene silencing approach, has been used to induce antiviral defenses in plants with the help of genetic engineering technologies. More recently, the new genome editing systems (GES) are revolutionizing the scope of tools available to confer virus resistance in plants. The most explored GES are zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 endonuclease. GES are engineered to target and introduce mutations, which can be deleterious, via double-strand breaks at specific DNA sequences by the error-prone non-homologous recombination end-joining pathway. Although GES have been engineered to target DNA, recent discoveries of GES targeting ssRNA molecules, including virus genomes, pave the way for further studies programming plant defense against RNA viruses. Most of plant virus species have an RNA genome and at least 784 species have positive ssRNA. Here, we provide a summary of the latest progress in plant antiviral defenses mediated by GES. In addition, we also discuss briefly the GES perspectives in light of the rebooted debate on genetic modified organisms (GMOs) and the current regulatory frame for agricultural products involving the use of such engineering technologies. PMID:28167937

  1. Broad specificity of human phosphoglycerate kinase for antiviral nucleoside analogs.

    PubMed

    Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Faraj, Abdesslem; Seclaman, Edward; Sommadossi, Jean-Pierre; Deville-Bonne, Dominique; Véron, Michel

    2004-11-01

    Nucleoside analogs used in antiviral therapies need to be phosphorylated to their tri-phospho counterparts in order to be active on their cellular target. Human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) was recently reported to participate in the last step of phosphorylation of cytidine L-nucleotide derivatives [Krishnan PGE, Lam W, Dutschman GE, Grill SP, Cheng YC. Novel role of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, a glycolytic enzyme, in the activation of L-nucleoside analogs, a new class of anticancer and antiviral agents. J Biol Chem 2003;278:36726-32]. In the present work, we extended the enzymatic study of human PGK specificity to purine and pyrimidine nucleotide derivatives in both D- and L-configuration. Human PGK demonstrated catalytic efficiencies in the 10(4)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1) range for purine ribo-, deoxyribo- and dideoxyribonucleotide derivatives, either in D- or L-configuration. In contrast, it was poorly active with natural pyrimidine D-nucleotides (less than 10(3)M(-1)s(-1)). Pyrimidine L-enantiomers, which are promising therapeutic analogs against B hepatitis, were 2-25 times better substrates than their D-counterparts. The broad specificity of substrate of human PGK suggests that this enzyme may be involved in the cellular activation of several antiviral nucleoside analogs including dideoxyinosine, acyclovir, L-2'-deoxycytosine and L-2'-deoxythymidine.

  2. Antiviral Innate Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Adults Negatively Affects H1/IC31-Induced Vaccine-Specific Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Tobias; Kagina, Benjamin M.; Zhang, Jitao David; Lukindo, Tedson; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bang, Peter; Kromann, Ingrid; Hoff, Søren T.; Andersen, Peter; Reither, Klaus; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Certa, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem, with vaccination being a necessary strategy for disease containment and elimination. A TB vaccine should be safe and immunogenic as well as efficacious in all affected populations, including HIV-infected individuals. We investigated the induction and maintenance of vaccine-induced memory CD4+ T cells following vaccination with the subunit vaccine H1/IC31. H1/IC31 was inoculated twice on study days 0 and 56 among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts of >350 cells/mm3. Whole venous blood stimulation was conducted with the H1 protein, and memory CD4+ T cells were analyzed using intracellular cytokine staining and polychromatic flow cytometry. We identified high responders, intermediate responders, and nonresponders based on detection of interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expressing central (TCM) and effector memory CD4+ T cells (TEM) 182 days after the first immunization. Amplicon-based transcript quantification using next-generation sequencing was performed to identify differentially expressed genes that correlated with vaccine-induced immune responses. Genes implicated in resolution of inflammation discriminated the responders from the nonresponders 3 days after the first inoculation. The volunteers with higher expression levels of genes involved in antiviral innate immunity at baseline showed impaired H1-specific TCM and TEM maintenance 6 months after vaccination. Our study showed that in HIV-infected volunteers, expression levels of genes involved in the antiviral innate immune response affected long-term maintenance of H1/IC31 vaccine-induced cellular immunity. (The clinical trial was registered in the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry [PACTR] with the identifier PACTR201105000289276.) PMID:25924764

  3. Isolation and characterization of a new class of DNA aptamers specific binding to Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) with antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Yan, Yang; Wei, Shina; Wei, Jingguang; Gao, Ren; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Jiang, Guohua; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-08-08

    The Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a member of the genus Ranavirus, is a major viral pathogen that has caused heavy economic losses to the grouper aquaculture industry in China and Southeast Asia. No efficient method of controlling SGIV outbreaks is currently available. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is now widely used for the in vitro selection of artificial ssDNA or RNA ligands, known as aptamers, which bind to targets through their stable three-dimensional structures. In our current study, we generated ssDNA aptamers against the SGIV, and evaluated their ability to block SGIV infection in cultured fish cells and cultured fish in vivo. The anti-SGIV DNA aptamers, LMB-761, LMB-764, LMB-748, LMB-439, LMB-755, and LMB-767, were selected from a pool of oligonucleotides randomly generated using a SELEX iterative method. The analysis of the secondary structure of the aptamers revealed that they all formed similar stem-loop structures. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the aptamers bound SGIV specifically, as evidenced by a lack cross-reactivity with the soft shell turtle iridovirus. The aptamers produced no cytotoxic effects in cultured grouper spleen cells (GS). Assessment of cytopathic effects (CPE) and viral titer assays showed that LMB-761, LMB-764, LMB-748, LMB-755, and LMB-767 significantly inhibited SGIV infection in GS cells. The in vivo experiments showed that LMB-761 and LMB-764 reduced SGIV-related mortality, and no negative effects were observed in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, indicating that these DNA aptamers may be suitable antiviral candidates for controlling SGIV infections in fish reared in marine aquaculture facilities.

  4. Antiviral potential of a diterpenoid compound sugiol from Metasequoia glyptostroboides.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Vivek K; Kim, Na-Hyung; Kim, Kangmin; Kang, Sun Chul

    2016-05-01

    This research reports first time antiviral activity of sugiol, a diterpenoid isolated from Metasequoia glyptostroboides in terms of its ability to inhibit in vitro growth of H1N1 influenza virus. Antiviral potential of sugiol was evaluated through hcytopathogenic reduction assay using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. Sugiol (500 μg/ml) was found to exhibit considerable anti-cytopathic effect on MDCK cell line confirming its antiviral efficacy against H1N1 influenza virus. These findings strongly reinforce the suggestion that sugiol could be a candidate of choice in combinational regimen with potential antiviral efficacy.

  5. Antifungal and antiviral products of marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Pan, Wen Liang; Chan, Yau Sang; Yin, Cui Ming; Dan, Xiu Li; Wang, He Xiang; Fang, Evandro Fei; Lam, Sze Kwan; Ngai, Patrick Hung Kui; Xia, Li Xin; Liu, Fang; Ye, Xiu Yun; Zhang, Guo Qing; Liu, Qing Hong; Sha, Ou; Lin, Peng; Ki, Chan; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din; Wan, David Chi Cheong

    2017-01-01

    Marine organisms including bacteria, fungi, algae, sponges, echinoderms, mollusks, and cephalochordates produce a variety of products with antifungal activity including bacterial chitinases, lipopeptides, and lactones; fungal (−)-sclerotiorin and peptaibols, purpurides B and C, berkedrimane B and purpuride; algal gambieric acids A and B, phlorotannins; 3,5-dibromo-2-(3,5-dibromo-2-methoxyphenoxy)phenol, spongistatin 1, eurysterols A and B, nortetillapyrone, bromotyrosine alkaloids, bis-indole alkaloid, ageloxime B and (−)-ageloxime D, haliscosamine, hamigeran G, hippolachnin A from sponges; echinoderm triterpene glycosides and alkene sulfates; molluscan kahalalide F and a 1485-Da peptide with a sequence SRSELIVHQR; and cepalochordate chitotriosidase and a 5026.9-Da antifungal peptide. The antiviral compounds from marine organisms include bacterial polysaccharide and furan-2-yl acetate; fungal macrolide, purpurester A, purpurquinone B, isoindolone derivatives, alterporriol Q, tetrahydroaltersolanol C and asperterrestide A, algal diterpenes, xylogalactofucan, alginic acid, glycolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, sulfated polysaccharide p-KG03, meroditerpenoids, methyl ester derivative of vatomaric acid, lectins, polysaccharides, tannins, cnidarian zoanthoxanthin alkaloids, norditerpenoid and capilloquinol; crustacean antilipopolysaccharide factors, molluscan hemocyanin; echinoderm triterpenoid glycosides; tunicate didemnin B, tamandarins A and B and; tilapia hepcidin 1–5 (TH 1–5), seabream SauMx1, SauMx2, and SauMx3, and orange-spotted grouper β-defensin. Although the mechanisms of antifungal and antiviral activities of only some of the afore-mentioned compounds have been elucidated, the possibility to use those known to have distinctly different mechanisms, good bioavailability, and minimal toxicity in combination therapy remains to be investigated. It is also worthwhile to test the marine antimicrobials for possible synergism with existing drugs. The

  6. Targeting Innate Immunity for Antiviral Therapy through Small Molecule Agonists of the RLR Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pattabhi, Sowmya; Wilkins, Courtney R.; Dong, Ran; Knoll, Megan L.; Posakony, Jeffrey; Kaiser, Shari; Mire, Chad E.; Wang, Myra L.; Ireton, Renee C.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Bedard, Kristin M.; Iadonato, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cellular response to virus infection is initiated when pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) engage viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). This process results in induction of downstream signaling pathways that activate the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). IRF3 plays a critical role in antiviral immunity to drive the expression of innate immune response genes, including those encoding antiviral factors, type 1 interferon, and immune modulatory cytokines, that act in concert to restrict virus replication. Thus, small molecule agonists that can promote IRF3 activation and induce innate immune gene expression could serve as antivirals to induce tissue-wide innate immunity for effective control of virus infection. We identified small molecule compounds that activate IRF3 to differentially induce discrete subsets of antiviral genes. We tested a lead compound and derivatives for the ability to suppress infections caused by a broad range of RNA viruses. Compound administration significantly decreased the viral RNA load in cultured cells that were infected with viruses of the family Flaviviridae, including West Nile virus, dengue virus, and hepatitis C virus, as well as viruses of the families Filoviridae (Ebola virus), Orthomyxoviridae (influenza A virus), Arenaviridae (Lassa virus), and Paramyxoviridae (respiratory syncytial virus, Nipah virus) to suppress infectious virus production. Knockdown studies mapped this response to the RIG-I-like receptor pathway. This work identifies a novel class of host-directed immune modulatory molecules that activate IRF3 to promote host antiviral responses to broadly suppress infections caused by RNA viruses of distinct genera. IMPORTANCE Incidences of emerging and reemerging RNA viruses highlight a desperate need for broad-spectrum antiviral agents that can effectively control infections caused by viruses of distinct genera. We identified small molecule compounds that can

  7. Viruses transfer the antiviral second messenger cGAMP between cells

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, A.; Maelfait, J.; Davenne, T.; Partridge, T.; Peng, Y.; Mayer, A.; Dong, T.; Kaever, V.; Borrow, P.; Rehwinkel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) detects cytosolic DNA during virus infection and induces an antiviral state. cGAS signals by synthesis of a second messenger, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING). We show that cGAMP is incorporated into viral particles, including lentivirus and herpesvirus virions, when these are produced in cGAS-expressing cells. Virions transferred cGAMP to newly infected cells and triggered a STING-dependent antiviral program. These effects were independent of exosomes and viral nucleic acids. Our results reveal a way by which a signal for innate immunity is transferred between cells, potentially accelerating and broadening antiviral responses. Moreover, infection of dendritic cells with cGAMP-loaded lentiviruses enhanced their activation. Loading viral vectors with cGAMP therefore holds promise for vaccine development. PMID:26229117

  8. Antiviral activity of esterified alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin against herpes simplex virus type 1. Comparison with the effect of acyclovir and L-polylysines.

    PubMed

    Sitohy, Mahmoud; Billaudel, Sylviane; Haertlé, Thomas; Chobert, Jean-Marc

    2007-12-12

    The antiviral activity of methylated alpha-lactalbumin (Met-ALA), methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins (Met- and Et-BLG) was evaluated against acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and -resistant strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and compared to that of ACV and L-polylysines (4-15 kDa) using fixed or suspended Vero cell lines. Esterified whey proteins and their peptic hydrolyzates displayed protective action against HSV-1, which was relatively lower than that induced by ACV or L-polylysines. The higher activity of L-polylysines was maintained against an ACV-resistant strain of HSV-1, whereas ACV lost much of its activity. The mean 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was about 0.8-0.9 microg/mL for L-polylysines against ACV-sensitive and -resistant strains of HSV-1 when using two concentrations of virus (50% and 100% cytopathic effect, CPE). The IC50 values of ACV against the sensitive strain of HSV-1 were 3 and 15 microg/mL when using the low and high concentrations of virus, respectively. When using 50% CPE, IC50 values for esterified whey proteins ranged from 20 to 95 microg/mL, depending on the nature of the ester group, the degree of esterification, and the nature of the protein. Using the real-time PCR technique, it was shown that Met-ALA inhibited HSV-1 replication.

  9. Selective antiviral activity of synthetic soluble L-tyrosine and L-dopa melanins against human immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Montefiori, D C; Zhou, J Y

    1991-01-01

    Melanins are pigments found in hair, skin, irides of the eye, and brain. Their functions in mammals include protection from exposure to sunlight, camouflage from predators, sexual recognition within species, and possible electron transfer reactants. Most natural melanins exist in an insoluble form, which is one reason there is little information on the biological properties of soluble melanins. Here, synthetic soluble melanins were obtained by chemical oxidation of L-tyrosine or spontaneous oxidation of L-beta-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). Replication of human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) was inhibited by soluble melanin in two human lymphoblastoid cell lines (MT-2 and H9) and in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human T cells. Effective concentrations of 0.15-10 micrograms/ml had no cell toxicity. Melanin blocked infection by cell-free virus and interfered with HIV-induced syncytium formation and cytopathic effects when fusion-susceptible, uninfected cells, were mixed with chronically infected cells. Melanin also impeded the HIV-1 envelope surface glycoprotein, and T cell specific monoclonal antibody leu-3a (CD4), but not leu-5b (CD2), from binding to the surface of MT-2 cells. No effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity in viral lysates was observed. These results identify a unique biological property of melanin, and suggest that soluble melanins may represent a new class of pharmacologically active substances which should be further investigated for potential therapeutic utility in the treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

  10. Interferon-alpha regulates the dynamic balance between human activated regulatory and effector T cells: implications for antiviral and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Golding, Amit; Rosen, Antony; Petri, Michelle; Akhter, Ehtisham; Andrade, Felipe

    2010-09-01

    An adequate effector response against pathogens and its subsequent inactivation after pathogen clearance are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. This process involves an initial phase of T-cell effector (Teff) activation followed by the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), a unique cell population that limits Teff functions. However, significant questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that regulate the balance between these cell populations. Using an in vitro system to mimic T-cell activation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analysed the patterns of Treg and Teff activation, with special attention to the role of type I interferon (IFN-I). Interestingly, we found that IFN-alpha, either exogenously added or endogenously induced, suppressed the generation of CD4(+) FoxP3(HI )IFN-gamma(Neg) activated Tregs (aTregs) while simultaneously promoting propagation of CD4(+) FoxP3(Low/Neg )IFN-gamma(Pos) activated Teffs (aTeffs). We also showed that IFN-alpha-mediated inhibition of interleukin (IL)-2 production may play an essential role in IFN-alpha-induced suppression of aTregs. In order to test our findings in a disease state with chronically elevated IFN-alpha, we investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Plasma from patients with SLE was found to contain IFN-I activity that suppressed aTreg generation. Furthermore, anti-CD3 activated SLE PBMCs exhibited preferential expansion of aTeffs with a very limited increase in aTreg numbers. Together, these observations support a model whereby a transient production of IFN-alpha (such as is seen in an early antiviral response) may promote CD4 effector functions by delaying aTreg generation, but a chronic elevation of IFN-alpha may tip the aTeff:aTreg balance towards aTeffs and autoimmunity.

  11. Potential antiviral lignans from the roots of Saururus chinensis with activity against Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui; Xu, Bo; Wu, Taizong; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Yan; Gu, Qiong

    2014-01-24

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the γ-herpes virus subfamily and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on an EtOAc-soluble extract of the roots of Saururus chinensis and monitored using an EBV lytic replication assay. This led to the isolation of 19 new (1-19) and nine known (20-28) lignans. The absolute configurations of the new lignans were established by Mosher's ester, ECD, and computational methods. Eight lignans, including three sesquineolignans (19, 23, and 24) and five dineolignans (3, 4, 26, 27, and 28), exhibited inhibitory effects toward EBV lytic replication with EC50 values from 1.09 to 7.55 μM and SI values from 3.3 to 116.4. In particular, manassantin B (27) exhibited the most promising inhibition, with an EC50 of 1.72 μM, low cytotoxicity, CC50 > 200 μM, and SI > 116.4. This is the first study demonstrating that lignans possess anti-EBV lytic replication activity.

  12. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical studies, Fukui functions, in vitro antiviral activity and molecular docking of 5-chloro-N-(3-nitrophenyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, S. H. Rosline; Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; El-Emam, Ali A.; Panicker, C. Yohannan; Zitko, Jan; Dolezal, Martin; VanAlsenoy, C.

    2016-09-01

    The molecular structural parameters and vibrational frequencies of 5-chloro-N-(3-nitrophenyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide have been obtained using density functional theory technique in the B3LYP approximation and CC-pVDZ (5D, 7F) basis set. Detailed vibrational assignments of observed FT-IR and FT-Raman bands have been proposed on the basis of potential energy distribution and most of the modes have wavenumbers in the expected range. In the present case, the NH stretching mode is a doublet in the IR spectrum with a difference of 138 cm-1 and is red shifted by 76 cm-1 from the computed value, which indicates the weakening of NH bond resulting in proton transfer to the neighboring oxygen atom. The molecular electrostatic potential has been mapped for predicting sites and relative reactivities towards electrophilic and nucleophilic attack. The hyperpolarizability values are calculated in order to find its role in nonlinear optics. From the molecular docking study, amino acids Asn161, His162 forms H-bond with pyrazine ring and Trp184, Gln19 shows H-bond with Cdbnd O group and the docked ligand, title compound forms a stable complex with cathepsin K and the results suggest that the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against cathepsin K. Moderate in vitro antiviral activity with EC50 at tens of μM was detected against feline herpes virus, coxsackie virus B4, and influenza A/H1N1 and A/H3N2.

  13. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  14. Ontogeny and water temperature influences the antiviral response of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Montagnani, Caroline; Benkendorff, Kirsten; Robinson, Nick; Speck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Disease is caused by a complex interaction between the pathogen, environment, and the physiological status of the host. Determining how host ontogeny interacts with water temperature to influence the antiviral response of the Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, is a major goal in understanding why juvenile Pacific oysters are dying during summer as a result of the global emergence of a new genotype of the Ostreid herpesvirus, termed OsHV-1 μvar. We measured the effect of temperature (12 vs 22 °C) on the antiviral response of adult and juvenile C. gigas injected with poly I:C. Poly I:C up-regulated the expression of numerous immune genes, including TLR, MyD88, IκB-1, Rel, IRF, MDA5, STING, SOC, PKR, Viperin and Mpeg1. At 22 °C, these immune genes showed significant up-regulation in juvenile and adult oysters, but the majority of these genes were up-regulated 12 h post-injection for juveniles compared to 26 h for adults. At 12 °C, the response of these genes was completely inhibited in juveniles and delayed in adults. Temperature and age had no effect on hemolymph antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). These results suggest that oysters rely on a cellular response to minimise viral replication, involving recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns to induce host cells into an antiviral state, as opposed to producing broad-spectrum antiviral compounds. This cellular response, measured by antiviral gene expression of circulating hemocytes, was influenced by temperature and oyster age. We speculate whether the vigorous antiviral response of juveniles at 22 °C results in an immune-mediated disorder causing mortality.

  15. Tannins from Hamamelis virginiana bark extract: characterization and improvement of the antiviral efficacy against influenza A virus and human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Linda L; Erdelmeier, Clemens A J; Spoden, Gilles A; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Sausy, Aurélie; Florin, Luise; Muller, Claude P

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral activity has been demonstrated for different tannin-rich plant extracts. Since tannins of different classes and molecular weights are often found together in plant extracts and may differ in their antiviral activity, we have compared the effect against influenza A virus (IAV) of Hamamelis virginiana L. bark extract, fractions enriched in tannins of different molecular weights and individual tannins of defined structures, including pseudotannins. We demonstrate antiviral activity of the bark extract against different IAV strains, including the recently emerged H7N9, and show for the first time that a tannin-rich extract inhibits human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection. As the best performing antiviral candidate, we identified a highly potent fraction against both IAV and HPV, enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins by ultrafiltration, a simple, reproducible and easily upscalable method. This ultrafiltration concentrate and the bark extract inhibited early and, to a minor extent, later steps in the IAV life cycle and tannin-dependently inhibited HPV attachment. We observed interesting mechanistic differences between tannin structures: High molecular weight tannin containing extracts and tannic acid (1702 g/mol) inhibited both IAV receptor binding and neuraminidase activity. In contrast, low molecular weight compounds (<500 g/mol) such as gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate or hamamelitannin inhibited neuraminidase but not hemagglutination. Average molecular weight of the compounds seemed to positively correlate with receptor binding (but not neuraminidase) inhibition. In general, neuraminidase inhibition seemed to contribute little to the antiviral activity. Importantly, antiviral use of the ultrafiltration fraction enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins and, to a lesser extent, the unfractionated bark extract was preferable over individual isolated compounds. These results are of interest for developing and improving plant

  16. Tannins from Hamamelis virginiana Bark Extract: Characterization and Improvement of the Antiviral Efficacy against Influenza A Virus and Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Linda L.; Erdelmeier, Clemens A. J.; Spoden, Gilles A.; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Sausy, Aurélie; Florin, Luise; Muller, Claude P.

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral activity has been demonstrated for different tannin-rich plant extracts. Since tannins of different classes and molecular weights are often found together in plant extracts and may differ in their antiviral activity, we have compared the effect against influenza A virus (IAV) of Hamamelis virginiana L. bark extract, fractions enriched in tannins of different molecular weights and individual tannins of defined structures, including pseudotannins. We demonstrate antiviral activity of the bark extract against different IAV strains, including the recently emerged H7N9, and show for the first time that a tannin-rich extract inhibits human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 infection. As the best performing antiviral candidate, we identified a highly potent fraction against both IAV and HPV, enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins by ultrafiltration, a simple, reproducible and easily upscalable method. This ultrafiltration concentrate and the bark extract inhibited early and, to a minor extent, later steps in the IAV life cycle and tannin-dependently inhibited HPV attachment. We observed interesting mechanistic differences between tannin structures: High molecular weight tannin containing extracts and tannic acid (1702 g/mol) inhibited both IAV receptor binding and neuraminidase activity. In contrast, low molecular weight compounds (<500 g/mol) such as gallic acid, epigallocatechin gallate or hamamelitannin inhibited neuraminidase but not hemagglutination. Average molecular weight of the compounds seemed to positively correlate with receptor binding (but not neuraminidase) inhibition. In general, neuraminidase inhibition seemed to contribute little to the antiviral activity. Importantly, antiviral use of the ultrafiltration fraction enriched in high molecular weight condensed tannins and, to a lesser extent, the unfractionated bark extract was preferable over individual isolated compounds. These results are of interest for developing and improving plant

  17. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance.

  18. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  19. The Antiviral RNAi Response in Vector and Non-vector Cells against Orthobunyaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Mick; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Skelton, Jessica K.; Kohl, Alain; Elliott, Richard M.; Schnettler, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Background Vector arthropods control arbovirus replication and spread through antiviral innate immune responses including RNA interference (RNAi) pathways. Arbovirus infections have been shown to induce the exogenous small interfering RNA (siRNA) and Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathways, but direct antiviral activity by these host responses in mosquito cells has only been demonstrated against a limited number of positive-strand RNA arboviruses. For bunyaviruses in general, the relative contribution of small RNA pathways in antiviral defences is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The genus Orthobunyavirus in the Bunyaviridae family harbours a diverse range of mosquito-, midge- and tick-borne arboviruses. We hypothesized that differences in the antiviral RNAi response in vector versus non-vector cells may exist and that could influence viral host range. Using Aedes aegypti-derived mosquito cells, mosquito-borne orthobunyaviruses and midge-borne orthobunyaviruses we showed that bunyavirus infection commonly induced the production of small RNAs and the effects of the small RNA pathways on individual viruses differ in specific vector-arbovirus interactions. Conclusions/Significance These findings have important implications for our understanding of antiviral RNAi pathways and orthobunyavirus-vector interactions and tropism. PMID:28060823

  20. Biomedical potential of actinobacterially synthesized selenium nanoparticles with special reference to anti-biofilm, anti-oxidant, wound healing, cytotoxic and anti-viral activities.

    PubMed

    Ramya, Suseenthar; Shanmugasundaram, Thangavel; Balagurunathan, Ramasamy

    2015-10-01

    Currently, there is an ever-increasing need to develop environmentally benign processes in place of synthetic protocols. As a result, researchers in the field of nanoparticle synthesis are focusing their attention on microbes from rare biological ecosystems. One potential actinobacterium, Streptomyces minutiscleroticus M10A62 isolated from a magnesite mine had the ability to synthesize selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs), extracellularly. Actinobacteria mediated SeNP synthesis were characterized by UV-visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis. The UV-spectral analysis of SeNPs indicated the maximum absorption at 510nm, FT-IR spectral analysis confirms the presence of capping protein, peptide, amine and amide groups. The selenium signals confirm the presence of SeNPs. All the diffraction peaks in the XRD pattern and HR-TEM confirm the size of SeNPs in the range of 10-250nm. Further, the anti-biofilm and antioxidant activity of the SeNPs increased proportionally with rise in concentration, and the test strains reduced to 75% at concentration of 3.2μg. Selenium showed significant anti-proliferative activity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The wound healing activity of SeNPs reveals that 5% selenium oinment heals the excision wound of Wistar rats up to 85% within 18 days compared to the standard ointment. The biosynthesized SeNPs exhibited good antiviral activity against Dengue virus. The present study concludes that extremophilic actinobacterial strain was a novel source for SeNPs with versatile biomedical applications and larger studies are needed to quantify these observed effects of SeNPs.

  1. New soluble-formazan assay for HIV-1 cytopathic effects: application to high-flux screening of synthetic and natural products for AIDS-antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Weislow, O S; Kiser, R; Fine, D L; Bader, J; Shoemaker, R H; Boyd, M R

    1989-04-19

    We have developed an effective and optimally safe microculture method for rapid and convenient assay of the in vitro cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) on human lymphoblastoid or other suitable host cells. The assay procedure is applicable to the evaluation of drug effects on in vitro infections induced directly in cultured host cells by cell-free HIV-1 or by coculture with H9 cells chronically infected with HIV-1. The assay uses a newly developed tetrazolium reagent that is metabolically reduced by viable cells to yield a soluble, colored formazan product measurable by conventional colorimetric techniques. This simple microassay minimizes the number of plate manipulations typically required with other assay methods and, coupled with computerized data collection and analysis, facilitates large-scale screening of agents for potential antiviral activity. To support and enhance the discovery of new anti-HIV-1 agents, the National Cancer Institute is offering investigators worldwide the opportunity to submit new candidate agents for anti-HIV-1 screening with this method.

  2. VX-950, a Novel Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3-4A Protease Inhibitor, Exhibits Potent Antiviral Activities in HCV Replicon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Perni, Robert B.; Kwong, Ann D.; Lin, Chao

    2006-01-01

    The NS3-4A serine protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is essential for viral replication and therefore has been one of the most attractive targets for developing specific antiviral agents against HCV. VX-950, a highly selective, reversible, and potent peptidomimetic inhibitor of the HCV NS3-4A protease, is currently in clinical development for the treatment of hepatitis C. In this report, we describe the in vitro characterization of anti-HCV activities of VX-950 in subgenomic HCV replicon cells. Incubation with VX-950 resulted in a time- and dose-dependent reduction of HCV RNA and proteins in replicon cells. Moreover, following a 2-week incubation with VX-950, a reduction in HCV RNA levels of 4.7 log10 was observed, and this reduction resulted in elimination of HCV RNA from replicon cells, since there was no rebound in replicon RNA after withdrawal of the inhibitor. The combination of VX-950 and alpha interferon was additive to moderately synergistic in reducing HCV RNA in replicon cells with no significant increase in cytotoxicity. The benefit of the combination was sustained over time: a 4-log10 reduction in HCV RNA level was achieved following a 9-day incubation with VX-950 and alpha interferon at lower concentrations than when either VX-950 or alpha interferon was used alone. The combination of VX-950 and alpha interferon also suppressed the emergence of in vitro resistance mutations against VX-950 in replicon cells. PMID:16641454

  3. Double-Stranded Ribonucleic Acid from Mengo Virus: Production, Characterization, and Interferon-Inducing and Antiviral Activities in Comparison with Polyriboinosinic · Polyribocytidylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Falcoff, E.; Falcoff, R.; Cherby, J.; Florent, J.; Lunel, J.; Ninet, L.; De Ratuld, Y.; Tissier, R.; Vuillemin, B.; Werner, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Mengo virus double-stranded ribonucleic acid (dsRNA) was obtained on a semi-industrial scale from infected cultures of BHK-21 cells grown in suspension. Yield of the extraction and purification operations was small (about 22 mg from 1011 cells in a 100-liter culture). Physicochemical characterization of this dsRNA gave an estimated molecular weight close to 4 × 106, a density of 1.59 (similar to that of the poliovirus dsRNA), and a thermal transition midpoint of 94 C. This product was a little more toxic for the mouse, by the intravenous route, than polyriboinosinic · polyribocytidylic acid (poly I:C) and strictly comparable in this respect to poliovirus dsRNA. The interferon-inducing capacity in the mouse and the antiviral activities in the mouse (infected with encephalomyocarditis, Semliki Forest, influenza, foot-and-mouth disease, and murine hepatitis viruses) and in the rabbit (Shope fibroma virus) of the ultraviolet light-inactivated product were practically identical, on a quantitative basis, with those of poly I:C. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed the dsRNA from Mengo virus to be slightly but significantly more resistant than poly I:C to the inactivating effect of human serum. PMID:4364180

  4. Single- and repeat-dose toxicity of IDX14184, a nucleotide prodrug with antiviral activity for hepatitis C viral infection, in mice, rats, and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Luo, S; Rush, R; Standring, D

    2016-05-01

    The single- and repeat-dose toxicity profile of IDX14184, a novel guanosine nucleotide prodrug with antiviral activity against hepatitis C viral infection, was characterized following once daily oral administration for durations up to 13, 26, and 32 weeks in mouse, rat, and cynomolgus monkey, respectively. The heart, liver, kidney, skeletal muscles, and lower gastrointestinal tract (cecum, colon, and/or rectum) were identified as the primary toxicity targets in these nonclinical species. The mouse was relatively insensitive to IDX14184-induced cardiac toxicity and hepatotoxicity. The rat was very sensitive to IDX14184-induced skeletal muscle, liver, heart, and lower gastrointestinal tract toxicity but relatively insensitive to kidney toxicity. The monkey is a good animal species to detect IDX14184-induced toxicity in the cardiac and skeletal muscles, and in the liver and kidney, but not lower gastrointestinal tract toxicity. The toxicity profile of IDX14184 was most appropriately characterized in rats and monkeys. The conduct of a series of cardiac size and function assessments during a non-rodent toxicology study using echocardiography proved great utility in this work. IDX14184 clinical development was eventually terminated due to suboptimal efficacy and regulatory concerns on potential heart and kidney injury in patients, as seen with a different guanosine nucleotide prodrug, BMS-986094.

  5. Protein kinase C and the antiviral effect of human interferon.

    PubMed

    Cernescu, C; Constantinescu, S N; Baltă, F; Popescu, L M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors: Hidaka's compounds H-7 (10 microM) and H-8 (20 microM), palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) and phloretin (50 microM), did not modify the antiviral effect of human natural or recombinant interferon alpha and of natural interferon beta. The tumor promoter 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) (200 nM), known as activator of PKC induced an antiviral state when tested on human embryo fibroblasts challenged with the vesicular stomatitis virus. The battery of PKC inhibitors used inhibited the antiviral effect induced by TPA. Palmitoyl-carnitine (10 microM) exerted a toxic effect that was reversed by interferon treatment (2,000 IU/ml interferon alpha). These results suggest that PKC, possibly activated by interferon-receptor interaction, is not essential for inducing the antiviral effect of interferon, but, probably, mediates the antiviral effect of TPA.

  6. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit for market promotion activities, including paid... promotion activities, including paid advertising. (a) In order for a handler to receive credit for his/her...) Other market promotion activities. Credit-Back shall be granted for market promotion other than...

  7. Possible role of tocopherols in the modulation of host microRNA with potential antiviral activity in patients with hepatitis B virus-related persistent infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, S; Bacchi-Reggiani, L; Sabbatani, S; Grizzi, F; di Tommaso, L; Masetti, M; Fornelli, A; Bondi, A; de Biase, D; Visani, M; Cuppini, A; Jovine, E; Pession, A

    2014-12-14

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection represents a serious global health problem and persistent HBV infection is associated with an increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. Recently, the study of the role of microRNA (miRNA) in the pathogenesis of HBV has gained considerable interest as well as new treatments against this pathogen have been approved. A few studies have investigated the antiviral activity of vitamin E (VE) in chronic HBV carriers. Herein, we review the possible role of tocopherols in the modulation of host miRNA with potential anti-HBV activity. A systematic research of the scientific literature was performed by searching the MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases. The keywords used were 'HBV therapy', 'HBV treatment', 'VE antiviral effects', 'tocopherol antiviral activity', 'miRNA antiviral activity' and 'VE microRNA'. Reports describing the role of miRNA in the regulation of HBV life cycle, in vitro and in vivo available studies reporting the effects of VE on miRNA expression profiles and epigenetic networks, and clinical trials reporting the use of VE in patients with HBV-related chronic hepatitis were identified and examined. Based on the clinical results obtained in VE-treated chronic HBV carriers, we provide a reliable hypothesis for the possible role of this vitamin in the modulation of host miRNA profiles perturbed by this viral pathogen and in the regulation of some cellular miRNA with a suggested potential anti-HBV activity. This approach may contribute to the improvement of our understanding of pathogenetic mechanisms involved in HBV infection and increase the possibility of its management and treatment.

  8. Smallpox Antiviral Drug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Nevirapine 1996 HIV Delavirdine 1997 HIV Abacavir 1998 HIV Efavirenz 1998 HIV Tenofovir 2001 HIV Adefovirn dipivoxil 2002 HBV Emtricitabine 2003 HIV Acyclovir...toxicity, hair loss, and skin changes [De Benedittis et al., 2004]. The other approach to orthopoxvirus antiviral drug discovery is to screen new...Rouzioux C. 2004. Penetration of enfuvirtide, tenofovir, efavirenz , and protease inhibitors in the genital tract of HIV-1-infected men. Aids 18:1958

  9. Novel antiviral activity and mechanism of bromocriptine as a Zika virus NS2B-NS3 protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Chik, Kenn Ka-Heng; Yuan, Shuofeng; Yip, Cyril Chik-Yan; Zhu, Zheng; Tee, Kah-Meng; Tsang, Jessica Oi-Ling; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Lu, Gang; Zhang, Anna Jinxia; Lai, Kin-Kui; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Kao, Richard Yi-Tsun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2017-02-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection is associated with congenital malformations in infected fetuses and severe neurological and other systemic complications in adults. There are currently limited anti-ZIKV treatment options that are readily available and safe for use in pregnancy. In this drug repurposing study, bromocriptine was found to have inhibitory effects on ZIKV replication in cytopathic effect inhibition, virus yield reduction, and plaque reduction assays. Time-of-drug-addition assay showed that bromocriptine exerted anti-ZIKV activity between 0 and 12 h post-ZIKV inoculation, corroborating with post-entry events in the virus replication cycle prior to budding. Our docking model showed that bromocriptine interacted with several active site residues of the proteolytic cavity involving H51 and S135 in the ZIKV-NS2B-NS3 protease protein, and might occupy the active site and inhibit the protease activity of the ZIKV-NS2B-NS3 protein. A fluorescence-based protease inhibition assay confirmed that bromocriptine inhibited ZIKV protease activity. Moreover, bromocriptine exhibited synergistic effect with interferon-α2b against ZIKV replication in cytopathic effect inhibition assay. The availability of per vagina administration of bromocriptine as suppositories or vaginoadhesive discs and the synergistic anti-ZIKV activity between bromocriptine and type I interferon may make bromocriptine a potentially useful and readily available treatment option for ZIKV infection. The anti-ZIKV effects of bromocriptine should be evaluated in a suitable animal model.

  10. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses extracorporeal removal of viral particles and their antigens from the blood as an auxiliary therapy. This hypothesis has not been reported before. In some chronic blood-borne viral infections, the virus remains systemic and persistent for extended periods of time, with adverse effects that weaken the immune system. Blood titers of virus and its toxins are proportional to the severity of the disease, and their reduction can alleviate symptoms, leading to improved health. Several blood-borne viral infections can be overcome by the young, but are life-threatening in the elderly. It is known that some older people have extreme difficulty tolerating viral infections such as influenza and the common cold. Further, several types of viral infection persist throughout the life of the individual and cannot be eliminated by conventional treatments. Well-known infections of this type include HIV and hepatitis B. In the case of Ebola virus, patients remain infectious as long as their blood contains the virus. According to the present hypothesis, an extracorporeal viral antibody column (EVAC) is proposed for elimination or reduction of the blood viral titer when treating blood-borne viral infection. EVAC would selectively trap viral antigens and toxins in the blood into an extracorporeal circuit, while returning detoxified blood back to the patient’s body. It is anticipated that EVAC would reduce mortality caused by blood-borne viral infections in the elderly since reduction of blood virus titers would improve health, leading to improved overall patient performance. Such enhancement would also make conventional therapies even more effective. EVAC could have a lifesaving role in treatment of viral illness, especially those involving lethal viruses such as Ebola, where the patient’s recovery to a large extent depends on their general health status. EVAC would be for single use and appropriately disposed of after each detoxification procedure. When

  11. Isolation and anticancer, anthelminthic, and antiviral (HIV) activity of acylphloroglucinols, and regioselective synthesis of empetrifranzinans from Hypericum roeperianum.

    PubMed

    Fobofou, Serge Alain Tanemossu; Franke, Katrin; Sanna, Giuseppina; Porzel, Andrea; Bullita, Enrica; La Colla, Paolo; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2015-10-01

    From the ethno-medicinally used leaves of Hypericum roeperianum we isolated a new tricyclic acylphloroglucinol (1), a new tetracyclic acylphloroglucinol (2), and a new prenylated bicyclic acylphloroglucinol (3) together with four known prenylated (4-7) and three known tetracyclic acylphloroglucinol derivatives (8-10). Structure elucidation was based on UV, IR, [α]D(25), 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. Furthermore, empetrifranzinans A (8) and C (9) were synthesized regioselectively in only two steps. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against PC-3 and HT-29 cancer cell lines as well as antibacterial and anthelmintic activities. They were also tested in cell-based assays for cytotoxicity against MT-4 cells and for anti-HIV activity in infected MT-4 cells. Significant anthelmintic activity against Caenorhabditis elegans was exhibited by compound 7 (3-geranyl-1-(2'-methylbutanoyl)-phloroglucinol), which might provide a new lead.

  12. Anti-HIV, anti-poxvirus, and anti-SARS activity of a nontoxic, acidic plant extract from the Trifollium species Secomet-V/anti-vac suggests that it contains a novel broad-spectrum antiviral.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Girish J; Kaczmarek, Jennifer N; Leivers, Steven; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Kulkarni, Amod P; Bauer, Gabriele; De Beer, Corena; Preiser, Wolfgang; Mohamed, Abdu Rahman

    2005-11-01

    Enveloped animal viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus, Marburg, and influenza are major public health concerns around the world. The prohibitive cost of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for most HIV-infected patients in sub-Saharan Africa and the serious side effects in those who have access to ARV drugs make a compelling case for the study of complementary and alternative therapies. Such therapies should have scientifically proved antiviral activity and minimal toxic effects. A plant extract, Secomet-V, with an anecdotal indication in humans for promise as an anti-HIV treatment, was investigated. Using a previously described attenuated vaccinia virus vGK5, we established the antiviral activity of Secomet-V. Chemical analysis showed that it has an acidic pH, nontoxic traces of iron (<10 ppm), and almost undetectable levels of arsenic (<1.0 ppm). The color varies from colorless to pale yellow to dark brown. The active agent is heat stable at least up to sterilizing temperature of 121 degrees C. The crude plant extract is a mixture of several small molecules separable by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The HIV viral loads were significantly reduced over several months in a few patients monitored after treatment with Secomet-V. Secomet-V was also found to have antiviral activity against the SARS virus but not against the West Nile virus. Secomet-V, therefore, is a broad-spectrum antiviral, which possibly works by neutralizing viral infectivity, resulting in the prevention of viral attachment.

  13. Antiviral properties of quinolone-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Richter, Sara; Parolin, Cristina; Palumbo, Manlio; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-06-01

    Quinolones represent an important class of broad-spectrum antibacterials, the main structural features of which are a 1,4 dihydro-4-oxo-quinolinyl moiety bearing an essential carboxyl group at position 3. Quinolones inhibit prokaryotic type II topoisomerases, namely DNA gyrase and, in a few cases, topoisomerase IV, through direct binding to the bacterial chromosome. Based on the hypothesis that these drugs could also bind to the viral nucleic acids or nucleoprotein-complexes, several quinolone derivatives were tested for their antiviral activity. Indeed, antibacterial fluoroquinolones were shown to be effective against vaccinia virus and papovaviruses; these preliminary results prompted the synthesis of modified quinolones to optimize antiviral action and improve selectivity index. The introduction of an aryl group at the piperazine moiety of the fluoroquinolone shifted the activity from antibacterial to antiviral, with a specific action against HIV. The antiviral activity seemed to be related to an inhibitory effect at the transcriptional level, and further evidence suggested a mechanism of action mediated by inhibition of Tat functions. Substitution of the fluorine at position 6 with an amine group to give aryl-piperazinyl-6-amino-quinolones improved the activity and selectivity against HIV-1: the most potent compound of this series was shown to inhibit virus replication through interference with Tat-TAR interaction. A comprehensive SAR investigation was performed based on additional chemical intervention to the quinolone template moiety, such as the introduction of nucleoside derivative functions. The information gained so far will be useful for future rational drug design aimed at developing new compounds with optimized antiviral activity.

  14. Antiviral activity of casein and αs2 casein hydrolysates against the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a rhabdovirus from salmonid fish.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Saint-Jean, S; De las Heras, A; Carrillo, W; Recio, I; Ortiz-Delgado, J B; Ramos, M; Gomez-Ruiz, J A; Sarasquete, C; Pérez-Prieto, S I

    2013-05-01

    Salmonid fish viruses, such as infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), are responsible for serious losses in the rainbow trout and salmon-farming industries, and they have been the subject of intense research in the field of aquaculture. Thus, the aim of this work is to study the antiviral effect of milk-derived proteins as bovine caseins or casein-derived peptides at different stages during the course of IHNV infection. The results indicate that the 3-h fraction of casein and α(S2) -casein hydrolysates reduced the yield of infectious IHNV in a dose-dependent manner and impaired the production of IHNV-specific antigens. Hydrolysates of total casein and α(S2) -casein target the initial and later stages of viral infection, as demonstrated by the reduction in the infective titre observed throughout multiple stages and cycles. In vivo, more than 50% protection was observed in the casein-treated fish, and the kidney sections exhibited none of the histopathological characteristics of IHNV infection. The active fractions from casein were identified, as well as one of the individual IHNV-inhibiting peptides. Further studies will be required to determine which other peptides possess this activity. These findings provide a basis for future investigations on the efficacy of these compounds in treating other viral diseases in farmed fish and to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. However, the present results provide convincing evidence in support of a role for several milk casein fractions as suitable candidates to prevent and treat some fish viral infections.

  15. Antiviral activity against the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of 1-indanone thiosemicarbazones and their inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Glisoni, Romina J; Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Moglioni, Albertina G; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2012-10-09

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of acute and chronic hepatitis in humans. Approximately 5% of the infected people die from cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The current standard therapy comprises a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin. Due to the relatively low effectiveness, the prohibitive costs and the extensive side effects of the treatment, an intense research for new direct-acting anti-HCV agents is taking place. Furthermore, NS3 protease inhibitors recently introduced into the market are not effective against all HCV subgenotypes. Thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) have shown antiviral activity against a wide range of DNA and RNA viruses. However, their extremely low aqueous solubility and high self-aggregation tendency often preclude their reliable biological evaluation in vitro. In this work, we investigated and compared for the first time the anti-HCV activity of two 1-indanone TSCs, namely 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone TSC and 5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanone N4-allyl TSC, and their inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβ-CD) in Huh-7.5 cells containing the full-length and the subgenomic subgenotype 1b HCV replicon system. Studies of physical stability in culture medium showed that free TSCs precipitated rapidly and formed submicron aggregates. Conversely, TSC complexation with HPβ-CD led to more stable systems with minimal size growth and drug concentration loss. More importantly, both TSCs and their inclusion complexes displayed a potent suppression of the HCV replication in both cell lines with no cytotoxic effects. The mechanism likely involves the inhibition of non-structural proteins of the virus. In addition, findings suggested that the cyclodextrin released the drug to the culture medium over time. This platform could be exploited for the study of the drug toxicity and pharmacokinetics animal models.

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Antiviral Activity of Novel Ribonucleosides of 1,2,3‐Triazolylbenzyl‐aminophosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Ouahrouch, Abdelaaziz; Taourirte, Moha; Schols, Dominique; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; Lazrek, Hassan B.

    2015-01-01

    A novel series of ribonucleosides of 1,2,3‐triazolylbenzyl‐aminophosphonates was synthesized through the Kabachnik–Fields reaction using I2 as catalyst followed by copper‐catalyzed cycloaddition of the azide–alkyne reaction (CuAAC). All structures of the newly prepared compounds were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and HRMS spectra. The structures of 2e, 2f, 3d, and 3g were further confirmed by X‐ray diffraction analysis. These compounds were tested against various strains of DNA and RNA viruses; compounds 4b and 4c showed a modest inhibitory activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and compound 4h displayed modest inhibitory activity against Coxsackie virus B4. PMID:26575425

  17. Contribution of Toll-like receptors to the control of hepatitis B virus infection by initiating antiviral innate responses and promoting specific adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ejuan; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that adaptive immunity plays a key role in the control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In contrast, the contribution of innate immunity has only received attention in recent years. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) sense pathogen-associated molecule patterns and activate antiviral mechanisms, including intracellular antiviral pathways and the production of antiviral effector interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Experimental results from in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that TLRs mediate the activation of cellular signaling pathways and the production of antiviral cytokines, resulting in a suppression of HBV replication. However, HBV infection is associated with downregulation of TLR expression on host cells and blockade of the activation of downstream signaling pathways. In primary HBV infection, TLRs may slow down HBV infection, but contribute only indirectly to viral clearance. Importantly, TLRs may modulate HBV-specific T- and B-cell responses in vivo, which are essential for the termination of HBV infection. Thus, TLR agonists are promising candidates to act as immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. Antiviral treatment may recover TLR expression and function in chronic HBV infection and may increase the efficacy of therapeutic approaches based on TLR activation. A combined therapeutic strategy with antiviral treatment and TLR activation could facilitate the restoration of HBV-specific immune responses and thereby, achieve viral clearance in chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:25418467

  18. 1,3,4-oxadiazole: a privileged structure in antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhan, P; Liu, X

    2011-11-01

    1,3,4-oxadiazole, a privileged structure, endows its derivatives with broad and potent biological functions, especially in antiviral activities, including anti-HIV, anti-HCV, anti-HBV, anti-HSV activities, etc. Molecular modeling and pharmacokinetic studies have demonstrated that the introduction of 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring to the inhibitors can change their polarity, flexibility as well as metabolic stability, and 1,3,4-oxadiazole scaffold can also act as acceptors of hydrogen bonds formation, which make it possible to be used as a isosteric substituent for amide or ester groups. This review focuses on the recent advances in the synthesis of 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring and mainly the discovery, biological activities investigations and structural modifications of several distinct classes of 1,3,4-oxadiazoles as potent antiviral agents. In addition, the binding models of some representative 1,3,4-oxadiazoles were also discussed, which provide rational explanation for their interesting antiviral activities, and also pave the way for further optimization of 1,3,4- oxadiazole based antiviral agents.

  19. In vitro antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705) against drug-resistant influenza and 2009 A(H1N1) viruses.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, Katrina; Mishin, Vasiliy P; Deyde, Varough M; Furuta, Yousuke; Klimov, Alexander I; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2010-06-01

    Favipiravir (T-705) has previously been shown to have a potent antiviral effect against influenza virus and some other RNA viruses in both cell culture and in animal models. Currently, favipiravir is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of influenza A and B virus infections. In this study, favipiravir was evaluated in vitro for its ability to inhibit the replication of a representative panel of seasonal influenza viruses, the 2009 A(H1N1) strains, and animal viruses with pandemic (pdm) potential (swine triple reassortants, H2N2, H4N2, avian H7N2, and avian H5N1), including viruses which are resistant to the currently licensed anti-influenza drugs. All viruses were tested in a plaque reduction assay with MDCK cells, and a subset was also tested in both yield reduction and focus inhibition (FI) assays. For the majority of viruses tested, favipiravir significantly inhibited plaque formation at 3.2 muM (0.5 microg/ml) (50% effective concentrations [EC(50)s] of 0.19 to 22.48 muM and 0.03 to 3.53 microg/ml), and for all viruses, with the exception of a single dually resistant 2009 A(H1N1) virus, complete inhibition of plaque formation was seen at 3.2 muM (0.5 microg/ml). Due to the 2009 pandemic and increased drug resistance in circulating seasonal influenza viruses, there is an urgent need for new drugs which target influenza. This study demonstrates that favipiravir inhibits in vitro replication of a wide range of influenza viruses, including those resistant to currently available drugs.

  20. The anti-lymphoma activity of antiviral therapy in HCV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peveling-Oberhag, J; Arcaini, L; Bankov, K; Zeuzem, S; Herrmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Many epidemiological studies provide solid evidence for an association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). However, the most convincing evidence for a causal relationship between HCV infection and lymphoma development is the observation of B-NHL regression after HCV eradication by antiviral therapy (AVT). We conducted a literature search to identify studies that included patients with HCV-associated B-NHL (HCV-NHL) who received AVT, with the intention to treat lymphoma and viral disease at the same time. The primary end point was the correlation of sustained virological response (SVR) under AVT with lymphoma response. Secondary end points were overall lymphoma response rates and HCV-NHL response in correlation with lymphoma subtypes. We included 20 studies that evaluated the efficacy of AVT in HCV-NHL (n = 254 patients). Overall lymphoma response rate through AVT was 73% [95%>confidence interval, (CI) 67-78%]. Throughout studies there was a strong association between SVR and lymphoma response (83% response rate, 95%>CI, 76-88%) compared to a failure in achieving SVR (53% response rate, 95%>CI, 39-67%, P = 0.0002). There was a trend towards favourable response for AVT in HCV-associated marginal zone lymphomas (response rate 81%, 95%>CI, 74-87%) compared to nonmarginal zone origin (response rate 71%, 95%>CI, 61-79%, P = 0.07). In conclusion, in the current meta-analysis, the overall response rate of HCV-NHL under AVT justifies the recommendation for AVT as first-line treatment in patients who do not need immediate conventional treatment. The strong correlation of SVR and lymphoma regression supports the hypothesis of a causal relationship of HCV and lymphomagenesis.

  1. Anti-viral drug treatment along with immune activator IL-2: a control-based mathematical approach for HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath Chatterjee, Amar; Roy, Priti Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Recent development in antiretroviral treatment against HIV can help AIDS patients to fight against HIV. But the question that whether the disease is to be partially or totally eradicated from HIV infected individuals still remains unsolved. Usually, the most effective treatment for the disease is HAART which can only control the disease progression. But as the immune system becomes weak, the patients can not fight against other diseases. Immune cells are activated and proliferated by IL-2 after the identification of antigen. IL-2 production is impaired in HIV positive patients and intermitted administration of immune activator IL-2 together with HAART which is a more effective treatment to fight against the disease. Thus, its expediency is essential and is yet to be explored. In this article we anticipated a mathematical model of the effect of IL-2 together with RTIs therapy in HIV positive patients. Our analytical as well as numerical study shows that the optimal schedule of treatment for best result is to be obtained by systematic drug therapy. But at the last stage of treatment, the infection level raises again due to minimisation of drug dosage. Thus we study the perfect adherence of the drugs and found out if RTIs are taken with sufficient interval then for fixed interval of IL-2 therapy, certain amount of drug dosages may be able to sustain the immune system at pre-infection stage and the infected CD4+T cells are going towards extinction.

  2. Heterosubtypic antiviral activity of hemagglutinin-specific antibodies induced by intranasal immunization with inactivated influenza viruses in mice.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Mieko; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kajihara, Masahiro; Maruyama, Junki; Kimura, Takashi; Manzoor, Rashid; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1-H17) and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1-H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses.

  3. Heterosubtypic Antiviral Activity of Hemagglutinin-Specific Antibodies Induced by Intranasal Immunization with Inactivated Influenza Viruses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Mieko; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Tomabechi, Daisuke; Kajihara, Masahiro; Maruyama, Junki; Kimura, Takashi; Manzoor, Rashid; Ito, Kimihito; Takada, Ayato

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus subtypes are classified on the basis of the antigenicity of their envelope glycoproteins, hemagglutinin (HA; H1–H17) and neuraminidase. Since HA-specific neutralizing antibodies are predominantly specific for a single HA subtype, the contribution of antibodies to the heterosubtypic immunity is not fully understood. In this study, mice were immunized intranasally or subcutaneously with viruses having the H1, H3, H5, H7, H9, or H13 HA subtype, and cross-reactivities of induced IgG and IgA antibodies to recombinant HAs of the H1–H16 subtypes were analyzed. We found that both subcutaneous and intranasal immunizations induced antibody responses to multiple HAs of different subtypes, whereas IgA was not detected remarkably in mice immunized subcutaneously. Using serum, nasal wash, and trachea-lung wash samples of H9 virus-immunized mice, neutralizing activities of cross-reactive antibodies were then evaluated by plaque-reduction assays. As expected, no heterosubtypic neutralizing activity was detected by a standard neutralization test in which viruses were mixed with antibodies prior to inoculation into cultured cells. Interestingly, however, a remarkable reduction of plaque formation and extracellular release of the H12 virus, which was bound by the H9-induced cross-reactive antibodies, was observed when infected cells were subsequently cultured with the samples containing HA-specific cross-reactive IgA. This heterosubtypic plaque reduction was interfered when the samples were pretreated with anti-mouse IgA polyclonal serum. These results suggest that the majority of HA-specific cross-reactive IgG and IgA antibodies produced by immunization do not block cellular entry of viruses, but cross-reactive IgA may have the potential to inhibit viral egress from infected cells and thus to play a role in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A viruses. PMID:23977065

  4. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  5. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  6. SUMO Ligase Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT1 (PIAS1) Is a Constituent Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Body Protein That Contributes to the Intrinsic Antiviral Immune Response to Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James R.; Conn, Kristen L.; Wasson, Peter; Charman, Matthew; Tong, Lily; Grant, Kyle; McFarlane, Steven

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspects of intrinsic antiviral immunity are mediated by promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body (PML-NB) constituent proteins. During herpesvirus infection, these antiviral proteins are independently recruited to nuclear domains that contain infecting viral genomes to cooperatively promote viral genome silencing. Central to the execution of this particular antiviral response is the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) signaling pathway. However, the participating SUMOylation enzymes are not fully characterized. We identify the SUMO ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) as a constituent PML-NB protein. We show that PIAS1 localizes at PML-NBs in a SUMO interaction motif (SIM)-dependent manner that requires SUMOylated or SUMOylation-competent PML. Following infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), PIAS1 is recruited to nuclear sites associated with viral genome entry in a SIM-dependent manner, consistent with the SIM-dependent recruitment mechanisms of other well-characterized PML-NB proteins. In contrast to that of Daxx and Sp100, however, the recruitment of PIAS1 is enhanced by PML. PIAS1 promotes the stable accumulation of SUMO1 at nuclear sites associated with HSV-1 genome entry, whereas the accumulation of other evaluated PML-NB proteins occurs independently of PIAS1. We show that PIAS1 cooperatively contributes to HSV-1 restriction through mechanisms that are additive to those of PML and cooperative with those of PIAS4. The antiviral mechanisms of PIAS1 are counteracted by ICP0, the HSV-1 SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, which disrupts the recruitment of PIAS1 to nuclear domains that contain infecting HSV-1 genomes through mechanisms that do not directly result in PIAS1 degradation. IMPORTANCE Adaptive, innate, and intrinsic immunity cooperatively and efficiently restrict the propagation of viral pathogens. Intrinsic immunity mediated by constitutively expressed cellular proteins represents the first line of intracellular defense against

  7. In vitro antiviral activity of neem (Azardirachta indica L.) bark extract against herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Yue, Beatrice Y. J. T.; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) causes significant health problems from periodical skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. We report here that an aqueous extract preparation from the barks of neem plant Azardirachta indica acts as a potent entry inhibitor against HSV-1 infection into natural target cells. The extract from neem bark (NBE) significantly blocked HSV-1 entry into cells at concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 μg/ml. The blocking activity of NBE was observed when the extract was pre-incubated with the virus but not with the target cells suggesting a direct anti-HSV-1 property of the neem bark. Further, virions treated with NBE failed to bind the cells which implicate a role of NBE as an attachment step blocker. Cells treated with NBE also inhibited HSV-1 glycoprotein mediated cell to cell fusion and polykaryocytes formation suggesting an additional role of NBE at the viral fusion step. These finding open a potential new avenue for the development of NBE as a novel anti-herpetic microbicide. PMID:20041417

  8. P1-Substituted Symmetry-Based Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors with Potent Antiviral Activity against Drug-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    DeGoey, David A.; Grampovnik, David J.; Chen, Hui-Ju; Flosi, William J.; Klein, Larry L.; Dekhtyar, Tatyana; Stoll, Vincent; Mamo, Mulugeta; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J.

    2013-03-07

    Because there is currently no cure for HIV infection, patients must remain on long-term drug therapy, leading to concerns over potential drug side effects and the emergence of drug resistance. For this reason, new and safe antiretroviral agents with improved potency against drug-resistant strains of HIV are needed. A series of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) with potent activity against both wild-type (WT) virus and drug-resistant strains of HIV was designed and synthesized. The incorporation of substituents with hydrogen bond donor and acceptor groups at the P1 position of our symmetry-based inhibitor series resulted in significant potency improvements against the resistant mutants. By this approach, several compounds, such as 13, 24, and 29, were identified that demonstrated similar or improved potencies compared to 1 against highly mutated strains of HIV derived from patients who previously failed HIV PI therapy. Overall, compound 13 demonstrated the best balance of potency against drug resistant strains of HIV and oral bioavailability in pharmacokinetic studies. X-ray analysis of an HIV PI with an improved resistance profile bound to WT HIV protease is also reported.

  9. SP-303, an antiviral oligomeric proanthocyanidin from the latex of Croton lechleri (Sangre de Drago).

    PubMed

    Ubillas, R; Jolad, S D; Bruening, R C; Kernan, M R; King, S R; Sesin, D F; Barrett, M; Stoddart, C A; Flaster, T; Kuo, J; Ayala, F; Meza, E; Castañel, M; McMeekin, D; Rozhon, E; Tempesta, M S; Barnard, D; Huffman, J; Smee, D; Sidwell, R; Soike, K; Brazier, A; Safrin, S; Orlando, R; Kenny, P T; Berova, N; Nakanishi, K

    1994-09-01

    SP-303, a large proanthocyanidin oligomer isolated from the latex of the plant species Croton lechleri (Eupborbiaceae) has demonstrated broad activity against a variety of DNA and RNA viruses. In cell culture, SP-303 exhibits potent activity against isolates and laboratory strains of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza A virus (FLU-A) and parainfluenza virus (PIV). Parallel assays of SP-303 and ribavirin showed comparable activity against these viruses. SP-303 also exhibits significant inhibitory activity against herpesvirus (HSV) types 1 and 2, including herpesviruses resistant to acyclovir and foscarnet. Inhibition was also observed against hepatitis A and B viruses. The antiviral mechanism of SP-303 seems to derive from its direct binding to components of the viral envelope, resulting in inhibition of viral attachment and penetration of the plasma membrane. Antiviral effects of SP-303 were measured by three distinct methods: CPE, MTT and precursor uptake/incorporation. Cytotoxicity endpoints were markedly greater than the respective antiviral endpoints. SP-303 exhibited activity in RSV-infected cotton rats and African green monkeys, PIV-3-infected cotton rats, HSV-2 infected mice and guinea pigs and FLU-A-infected mice. The most successful routes of SP-303 administration for producing efficacy were: topical application to HSV-2- genital lesions in mice and guinea pigs, aerosol inhalation to FLU-A-infected mice and PIV-3-infected cotton rats, and oral dosage to RSV-infected cotton rats. A variety of toxicological evaluations demonstrated the safety of SP-303, particularly orally, which was predictable, since condensed tannins are a common dietary component. It is notable that the larger proanthocyanidins as a class have high antiviral activity, whereas most of the monomers are inactive. Clinical trials are ongoing to evaluate SP-303 as a therapeutic antiviral agent.

  10. Antiviral activity of peptide inhibitors derived from the protein E stem against Japanese encephalitis and Zika viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liman; Liu, Yang; Wang, Shaobo; Sun, Jianhong; Wang, Peilin; Xin, Qilin; Zhang, Leike; Xiao, Gengfu; Wang, Wei

    2017-02-21

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and Zika virus (ZIKV) are mosquito-borne viruses of the Flavivirus genus that cause viral encephalitis and congenital microcephaly, respectively, in humans, and thus present a risk to global public health. The envelope glycoprotein (E protein) of flaviviruses is a class II viral fusion protein that mediates host cell entry through a series of conformational changes, including association between the stem region and domain II leading to virion-target cell membrane fusion. In this study, peptides derived from the JEV E protein stem were investigated for their ability to block JEV and ZIKV infection. Peptides from stem helix 2 inhibit JEV infection with the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) in the nanomolar range. One of these peptides (P5) protected mice against JEV-induced lethality by decreasing viral load, while abrogating histopathological changes associated with JEV infection. We also found that P5 blocked ZIKV infection with IC50 at the micromolar level. Moreover, P5 was proved to reduce the histopathological damages in brain and testes resulting from ZIKV infection in type I and II interferon receptor-deficient (AG6) mice. These findings provide a basis for the development of peptide-based drugs against JEV and ZIKV.

  11. Ubiquitin-fusion as a strategy to modulate protein half-life: A3G antiviral activity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cadima-Couto, Iris; Freitas-Vieira, Acilino; Nowarski, Roni; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe; Goncalves, Joao

    2009-10-25

    The human APOBEC3G (A3G) is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and its activity is suppressed by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif). Vif neutralizes A3G mainly by inducing its degradation in the proteasome and blocking its incorporation into HIV-1 virions. Assessing the time needed for A3G incorporation into virions is, therefore, important to determine how quickly Vif must act to induce its degradation. We show that modelling the intracellular half-life of A3G can induce its Vif-independent targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system. By using various amino acids (X) in a cleavable ubiquitin-X-A3G fusion, we demonstrate that the half-life (t1/2) of X-A3G can be manipulated. We show that A3G molecules with a half-life of 13 min are incorporated into virions, whereas those with a half-life shorter than 5 min were not. The amount of X-A3G incorporated into virions increases from 13 min (Phe-A3G) to 85 min (Asn-A3G) and remains constant after this time period. Interestingly, despite the presence of similar levels of Arg-A3G (t1/2 = 28 min) and Asp-A3G (t1/2 = 65 min) into HIV-1 DELTAvif virions, inhibition of viral infectivity was only evident in the presence of A3G proteins with a longer half-life (t1/2 >= 65 min).

  12. Gene Expression Signature-Based Screening Identifies New Broadly Effective Influenza A Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Josset, Laurence; Textoris, Julien; Loriod, Béatrice; Ferraris, Olivier; Moules, Vincent; Lina, Bruno; N'Guyen, Catherine; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Classical antiviral therapies target viral proteins and are consequently subject to resistance. To counteract this limitation, alternative strategies have been developed that target cellular factors. We hypothesized that such an approach could also be useful to identify broad-spectrum antivirals. The influenza A virus was used as a model for its viral diversity and because of the need to develop therapies against unpredictable viruses as recently underlined by the H1N1 pandemic. We proposed to identify a gene-expression signature associated with infection by different influenza A virus subtypes which would allow the identification of potential antiviral drugs with a broad anti-influenza spectrum of activity. We analyzed the cellular gene expression response to infection with five different human and avian influenza A virus strains and identified 300 genes as differentially expressed between infected and non-infected samples. The most 20 dysregulated genes were used to screen the connectivity map, a database of drug-associated gene expression profiles. Candidate antivirals were then identified by their inverse correlation to the query signature. We hypothesized that such molecules would induce an unfavorable cellular environment for influenza virus replication. Eight potential antivirals including ribavirin were identified and their effects were tested in vitro on five influenza A strains. Six of the molecules inhibited influenza viral growth. The new pandemic H1N1 virus, which was not used to define the gene expression signature of infection, was inhibited by five out of the eight identified molecules, demonstrating that this strategy could contribute to identifying new broad anti-influenza agents acting on cellular gene expression. The identified infection signature genes, the expression of which are modified upon infection, could encode cellular proteins involved in the viral life cycle. This is the first study showing that gene expression-based screening can be

  13. [Antiviral therapy in herpetic keratitis].

    PubMed

    Popa, D P; Ivaşcu, M; Ristea, L

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of ocular herpes has increased in the last time. The pathogenic mechanisms of herpetic ocular inflammation consist in cells degeneration produced by intracell virus accumulation, and immunopathological processes. It is presented the antiviral treatment in ocular herpes and antiviral efficacity of acyclovir, in comparison with other chemotherapeutics.

  14. Assessment of Antiviral Properties of Peramivir against H7N9 Avian Influenza Virus in an Experimental Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Amber; Huang, Linxi; Wu, Suwu; Cai, Yingmu; Su, Min; Lin, Pengzhou; Chen, Weihong; Fang, Xibin; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yisu; Zeng, Tiansheng; Paquette, Stephane G.; Khan, Adnan; Kelvin, Alyson A.

    2015-01-01

    The H7N9 influenza virus causes a severe form of disease in humans. Neuraminidase inhibitors, including oral oseltamivir and injectable peramivir, are the first choices of antiviral treatment for such cases; however, the clinical efficacy of these drugs is questionable. Animal experimental models are essential for understanding the viral replication kinetics under the selective pressure of antiviral agents. This study demonstrates the antiviral activity of peramivir in a mouse model of H7N9 avian influenza virus infection. The data show that repeated administration of peramivir at 30 mg/kg of body weight successfully eradicated the virus from the respiratory tract and extrapulmonary tissues during the acute response, prevented clinical signs of the disease, including neuropathy, and eventually protected mice against lethal H7N9 influenza virus infection. Early treatment with peramivir was found to be associated with better disease outcomes. PMID:26369969

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  16. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  17. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  18. Antiviral effects of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 and Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205 and SPM1206 on rotavirus-infected Caco-2 cells and a neonatal mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Joo Yeon; Lee, Do Kyung; Ha, Nam Joo; Shin, Hea Soon

    2015-11-01

    Rotavirus is worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis including severe diarrhea and fatal dehydration in infants and young children. There is an available vaccination program for preventing rotavirus infection, but it has limits and restrictions. Probiotics therapy could be an alternative method of antiviral prevention and modulation against rotavirus infection. In this study, we screened the antiviral activity of probiotic bacteria such as 3 Lactobacillus spp. and 14 Bifidobacterium spp. isolated from young Korean. Three of the bacteria, Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211, Bifidobacterium longum SPM1205, and SPM1206, inhibited human strain Wa rotavirus infection in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, these bacterial strains inhibited rotavirus replication in a rotavirus-infected neonatal mouse model. To clarify the mechanism of inhibition, we investigated gene expression of Interferon (IFN)-signaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors. All 3 probiotics increased IFN-α and IFN-β levels compared with the control. Gene expression of IFNsignaling components and IFN-inducible antiviral effectors also increased. Overall, these results indicate that L. ruminis SPM0211, B. longum SPM1205 and 1206 efficiently inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro and in vivo. Especially, the antiviral effect of Lactobacillus ruminis SPM0211 is worthy of notice. This is the first report of L. ruminis with antiviral activity. Anti-rotaviral effects of the 3 probiotics are likely due to their modulation of the immune response through promoting type I IFNs, which are key regulators in IFN signaling pathway.

  19. A quantitative measurement of antiviral activity of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drugs against simian immunodeficiency virus infection: dose-response curve slope strongly influences class-specific inhibitory potential.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Zink, M Christine; Clements, Janice E; Siliciano, Robert F

    2012-10-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in macaques is so far the best animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) studies, but suppressing viral replication in infected animals remains challenging. Using a novel single-round infectivity assay, we quantitated the antiviral activities of antiretroviral drugs against SIV. Our results emphasize the importance of the dose-response curve slope in determining the inhibitory potential of antiretroviral drugs and provide useful information for regimen selection in treating SIV-infected animals in models of therapy and virus eradication.

  20. Impaired NK cell antiviral cytokine response against influenza virus in small-for-gestational-age neonates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinrong; Li, Hong; Mao, Huawei; Yu, Meixing; Yang, Fan; Feng, Ting; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Shen, Chongyang; Yin, Zhongwei; Mao, Meng; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    The neonates, particularly small-for-gestational-age (SGA) ones, are susceptible to various microbial infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of host innate immunity system and the main source of the inflammatory cytokines, which provide critical protection during the early phase of viral infections before the development of an appropriate adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the antiviral effects of NK cells in neonates especially the SGA population. Herein, a prospective descriptive study was performed to determine the differences of NK cell immunity among adults, appropriate-for gestational-age (AGA) and SGA neonates. Adults have much higher NK cell number in peripheral blood than that in cord blood from neonates. In response to influenza virus stimulation, neonatal NK cells, especially SGA baby cells, expressed significantly lower antiviral cytokines including perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α responses than adult NK cells. In addition, the antiviral cytokine responses of NK cells were positively correlated with neonatal birth weight. Our data suggested that the depressed antiviral activity and less frequency of NK cells are likely to be responsible for the high susceptibility to microbial infection in neonates, at least in part. Improving the function of innate immunity may provide a new way to defend virus infection. PMID:23872919

  1. Antivirals against enteroviruses: a critical review from a public-health perspective.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Kimberley S M; van der Avoort, Harrie G A M; Duizer, Erwin; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2015-01-01

    The enteroviruses (EVs) of the Picornaviridae family are the most common viral pathogens known. Most EV infections are mild and self-limiting but manifestations can be severe in children and immunodeficient individuals. Antiviral development is actively pursued to benefit these high-risk patients and, given the alarming problem of antimicrobial drug resistance, antiviral drug resistance is a public-health concern. Picornavirus antivirals can be used off-label or as part of outbreak control measures. They may be used in the final stages of poliovirus eradication and to mitigate EV-A71 outbreaks. We review the potential emergence of drug-resistant strains and their impact on EV transmission and endemic circulation. We include non-picornavirus antivirals that inhibit EV replication, for example, ribavirin, a treatment for infection with HCV, and amantadine, a treatment for influenza A. They may have spurred resistance emergence in HCV or influenza A patients who are unknowingly coinfected with EV. The public-health challenge is always to find a balance between individual benefit and the long-term health of the larger population.

  2. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  3. Antiviral Efficacy of Pyrazofurin against Selected RNA Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-24

    DTIC Antiviral Research, 2 (1982) 33-337 ELECTE31 Elsevier Biomedical Press JUN t4 s ANTIVIRAL EFFICACY OF PYRAZOFURIN AGAINST SELECTED RNA VIRUSES ...hydroxypyrazole-5-carboxamide, markedly inhibited the in vitro replication of a number of RNA viruses including Rift Valley fever (RVF), S Venezuelan equine...encephalomyelitis (VEE), Sandfly, Pichinde, Lassa and LCM virus . Plaque forma- tion was reduced by 80% or more with 2-10 pg/ml of pyrazofurin while 2 ug

  4. Solar attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-08-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control, which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  5. Solar sail attitude control including active nutation damping in a fixed-momentum wheel satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth

    1992-01-01

    In geostationary cruise of a momentum biased satellite, it is necessary to stabilize the roll/yaw attitude due to disturbances, caused mainly by solar radiation pressure. This work presents a roll/yaw control which is obtained by the use of solar arrays and fixed flaps as actuators, with a horizon sensor for roll measurement. The design also includes an active nutation damping.

  6. Implementation of the Project "Including Disabled Senior Citizens in Creative Activities in 2013-2015"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploch, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    This paper made an attempt to indicate the findings of the author's research from the experiences of the implementation of the project "Including disabled senior citizens in creative activities in 2013-2015". The issues of disabled senior citizens have been an object of interest over the recent years though it still has not had a proper…

  7. Modifying Physical Activities to Include Individuals with Disabilities: A Systematic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi S.; Davis, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Effectively including individuals with disabilities in a physical activity setting can often be a challenge due to constraints related to equipment, class size, curriculum, and the various ability levels of individuals with and without disabilities. However, there are ways the instructor can control the environment and tasks to meet the needs of…

  8. An antiviral furanoquinone from Paulownia tomentosa Steud.

    PubMed

    Kang, K H; Huh, H; Kim, B K; Lee, C K

    1999-11-01

    A methanol extract of the stem bark of Paulownia tomentosa showed antiviral activity against poliovirus types 1 and 3. Sequential liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane, chloroform and water, and a silicagel column chromatography resulted in the purification of a compound. The compound was identified as methyl-5-hydroxy-dinaphthol[1,2-2',3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carbox yla te on the basis of spectroscopic data. The component caused a significant reduction of viral cytopathic effect when it was subjected to a standard antiviral assay by using HeLa cells. The EC(50) of the compound against poliovirus type 1 strain Brunhilde, and type 3 strain Leon were 0.3 microg/mL and 0.6 microg/mL, respectively.

  9. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  10. Differential regulatory activities of viral protein X for anti-viral efficacy of nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in monocyte-derived macrophages and activated CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Schader, Susan M.; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Kim, Baek

    2015-01-01

    Vpx encoded by HIV-2 and SIVsm enhances retroviral reverse transcription in macrophages in vitro by mediating the degradation of the host SAMHD1 protein that hydrolyzes dNTPs and by elevating cellular dNTP levels. Here we employed RT-SHIV constructs (SIV encoding HIV-1 RT) to investigate the contribution of Vpx to the potency of NRTIs, which compete against dNTPs, in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and activated CD4+ T cells. Relative to HIV-1, both SIV and RT-SHIV exhibited reduced sensitivities to AZT, 3TC and TDF in MDMs but not in activated CD4+ T cells. However, when SIV and RT-SHIV constructs not coding for Vpx were utilized, we observed greater sensitivities to all NRTIs tested using activated CD4+ T cells relative to the Vpx-coding counterparts. This latter phenomenon was observed for AZT only when using MDMs. Our data suggest that Vpx in RT-SHIVs may underestimate the antiviral efficacy of NRTIs in a cell type dependent manner. PMID:26319213

  11. Differential regulatory activities of viral protein X for anti-viral efficacy of nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in monocyte-derived macrophages and activated CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Schader, Susan M; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2015-11-01

    Vpx encoded by HIV-2 and SIVsm enhances retroviral reverse transcription in macrophages in vitro by mediating the degradation of the host SAMHD1 protein that hydrolyzes dNTPs and by elevating cellular dNTP levels. Here we employed RT-SHIV constructs (SIV encoding HIV-1 RT) to investigate the contribution of Vpx to the potency of NRTIs, which compete against dNTPs, in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and activated CD4(+) T cells. Relative to HIV-1, both SIV and RT-SHIV exhibited reduced sensitivities to AZT, 3TC and TDF in MDMs but not in activated CD4(+) T cells. However, when SIV and RT-SHIV constructs not coding for Vpx were utilized, we observed greater sensitivities to all NRTIs tested using activated CD4(+) T cells relative to the Vpx-coding counterparts. This latter phenomenon was observed for AZT only when using MDMs. Our data suggest that Vpx in RT-SHIVs may underestimate the antiviral efficacy of NRTIs in a cell type dependent manner.

  12. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgad