Science.gov

Sample records for activities including nuclear

  1. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  2. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  3. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  4. PNRC: a proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein that modulates transcriptional activation of multiple nuclear receptors including orphan receptors SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) and ERRalpha1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, D; Quach, K M; Yang, C; Lee, S Y; Pohajdak, B; Chen, S

    2000-07-01

    PNRC (proline-rich nuclear receptor coregulatory protein) was identified using bovine SF1 (steroidogenic factor 1) as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screening of a human mammary gland cDNA expression library. PNRC is unique in that it has a molecular mass of 35 kDa, significantly smaller than most of the coregulatory proteins reported so far, and it is proline-rich. PNRC's nuclear localization was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. In the yeast two-hybrid assays, PNRC interacted with the orphan receptors SF1 and ERRalpha1 in a ligand-independent manner. PNRC was also found to interact with the ligand-binding domains of all the nuclear receptors tested including estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor (PR), thyroid hormone receptor (TR), retinoic acid receptor (RAR), and retinoid X receptor (RXR) in a ligand-dependent manner. Functional AF2 domain is required for nuclear receptors to bind to PNRC. Furthermore, in vitro glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assay was performed to demonstrate a direct contact between PNRC and nuclear receptors such as SF1. Coimmunoprecipitation experiment using Hela cells that express PNRC and ER was performed to confirm the interaction of PNRC and nuclear receptors in vivo in a ligand-dependent manner. PNRC was found to function as a coactivator to enhance the transcriptional activation mediated by SF1, ERR1 (estrogen related receptor alpha-1), PR, and TR. By examining a series of deletion mutants of PNRC using the yeast two-hybrid assay, a 23-amino acid (aa) sequence in the carboxy-terminal region, aa 278-300, was shown to be critical and sufficient for the interaction with nuclear receptors. This region is proline rich and contains a SH3-binding motif, S-D-P-P-S-P-S. Results from the mutagenesis study demonstrated that the two conserved proline (P) residues in this motif are crucial for PNRC to interact with the nuclear receptors. The exact 23

  5. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  6. FBI-1 Can Stimulate HIV-1 Tat Activity and Is Targeted to a Novel Subnuclear Domain that Includes the Tat-P-TEFb—containing Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Pendergrast, P. Shannon; Wang, Chen; Hernandez, Nouria; Huang, Sui

    2002-01-01

    FBI-1 is a cellular POZ-domain–containing protein that binds to the HIV-1 LTR and associates with the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat. Here we show that elevated levels of FBI-1 specifically stimulate Tat activity and that this effect is dependent on the same domain of FBI-1 that mediates Tat-FBI-1 association in vivo. FBI-1 also partially colocalizes with Tat and Tat's cellular cofactor, P-TEFb (Cdk9 and cyclin T1), at the splicing-factor–rich nuclear speckle domain. Further, a less-soluble population of FBI-1 distributes in a novel peripheral-speckle pattern of localization as well as in other nuclear regions. This distribution pattern is dependent on the FBI-1 DNA binding domain, on the presence of cellular DNA, and on active transcription. Taken together, these results suggest that FBI-1 is a cellular factor that preferentially associates with active chromatin and that can specifically stimulate Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription. PMID:11907272

  7. FBI-1 can stimulate HIV-1 Tat activity and is targeted to a novel subnuclear domain that includes the Tat-P-TEFb-containing nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Pendergrast, P Shannon; Wang, Chen; Hernandez, Nouria; Huang, Sui

    2002-03-01

    FBI-1 is a cellular POZ-domain-containing protein that binds to the HIV-1 LTR and associates with the HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat. Here we show that elevated levels of FBI-1 specifically stimulate Tat activity and that this effect is dependent on the same domain of FBI-1 that mediates Tat-FBI-1 association in vivo. FBI-1 also partially colocalizes with Tat and Tat's cellular cofactor, P-TEFb (Cdk9 and cyclin T1), at the splicing-factor-rich nuclear speckle domain. Further, a less-soluble population of FBI-1 distributes in a novel peripheral-speckle pattern of localization as well as in other nuclear regions. This distribution pattern is dependent on the FBI-1 DNA binding domain, on the presence of cellular DNA, and on active transcription. Taken together, these results suggest that FBI-1 is a cellular factor that preferentially associates with active chromatin and that can specifically stimulate Tat-activated HIV-1 transcription.

  8. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  9. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  10. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  11. High-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules including nuclear motion and a nuclear modes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, C. B.; Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2010-04-15

    We present a generic approach for treating the effect of nuclear motion in high-order harmonic generation from polyatomic molecules. Our procedure relies on a separation of nuclear and electron dynamics where we account for the electronic part using the Lewenstein model and nuclear motion enters as a nuclear correlation function. We express the nuclear correlation function in terms of Franck-Condon factors, which allows us to decompose nuclear motion into modes and identify the modes that are dominant in the high-order harmonic generation process. We show results for the isotopes CH{sub 4} and CD{sub 4} and thereby provide direct theoretical support for a recent experiment [S. Baker et al., Science 312, 424 (2006)] that uses high-order harmonic generation to probe the ultrafast structural nuclear rearrangement of ionized methane.

  12. Nuclear Science Teaching Aids and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodburn, John H.

    This publication is a sourcebook for science teachers. It provides guides for basic laboratory work in nuclear energy, suggesting various teacher and student demonstrations. Ideas for science clubs, science fairs, and project research seminars are presented. Problem-solving activities for both science and mathematics classes are included, as well…

  13. Photo Library of the Nevada Site Office (Includes historical archive of nuclear testing images)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Nevada Site Office makes available publicly released photos from their archive that includes photos from both current programs and historical activities. The historical collections include atmospheric and underground nuclear testing photos and photos of other events and people related to the Nevada Test Site. Current collections are focused on homeland security, stockpile stewardship, and environmental management and restoration. See also the Historical Film Library at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/films/testfilms.aspx and the Current Film Library at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/films/current.aspx. Current films can be viewed online, but only short clips of the historical films are viewable. They can be ordered via an online request form for a very small shipping and handling fee.

  14. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  15. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  16. Nuclear fear and children: the impact of parental nuclear activism, responsivity, and fear

    SciTech Connect

    LaGuardia, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the extent to which parental nuclear fear, parental activism, and parental responsivity is associated with children's (age 10) nuclear fear. Other associated variables investigated include: nuclear denial, general anxiety and fear, and the personal characteristics of sex, socio-economic status, and academic aptitude. Findings indicate that children attend to nuclear issues when their parents attend to a significant degree. Children's hopelessness about the arms race is increased as parents' worry about nuclear war increases. Children's fear about not surviving a nuclear war increases as parents' worry about survivability decreases. Children who have more general fears also indicated that they have a high level of hopelessness, pervasive worry, and much concern about being able to survive a nuclear war. Children with a high degree of general anxiety did not indicate high degrees of nuclear fears. Children with high academic aptitude were more knowledgeable about nuclear issues and expressed more fears about the nuclear threat. Boys demonstrated more knowledge about nuclear issues than girls, and girls expressed much more frequent fear and worry about the nuclear threat than boys. Parents of lower socio-economic statues (SES) expressed more denial about the nuclear threat and were more pro-military than the higher SES parents.

  17. Relationship of sea level muon charge ratio to primary composition including nuclear target effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goned, A.; Shalaby, M.; Salem, A. M.; Roushdy, M.

    1985-01-01

    The discrepancy between the muon charge ratio observed at low energies and that calculated using pp data is removed by including nuclear target effects. Calculations at high energies show that the primary iron spectrum is expected to change slope from 2 to 2.2 to 2.4 to 2.5 for energies approx. 4 x 10 to the 3 GeV/nucleon if scaling features continue to the highest energies.

  18. Active genes at the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Angela

    2007-06-01

    The nucleus is spatially and functionally organized and its architecture is now seen as a key contributor to genome functions. A central component of this architecture is the nuclear envelope, which is studded with nuclear pore complexes that serve as gateways for communication between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Although the nuclear periphery has traditionally been described as a repressive compartment and repository for gene-poor chromosome regions, several recent studies in yeast have demonstrated that repressive and activating domains can both be positioned at the periphery of the nucleus. Moreover, association with the nuclear envelope favors the expression of particular genes, demonstrating that nuclear organization can play an active role in gene regulation. PMID:17467257

  19. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  20. Nuclear relativistic Hartree-Fock calculations including pions interacting with a scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, S.; Lopez-Quelle, M.; Niembro, R.; Savushkin, L. N.

    2012-10-20

    The effect of pions on the nuclear shell structure is analyzed in a relativistic Hartree-Fock approximation (RHFA). The Lagrangian includes, in particular, a mixture of {pi}N pseudoscalar (PS) and pseudovector (PV) couplings, self-interactions of the scalar field {sigma} and a {sigma} - {pi} interaction that dresses pions with an effective mass (m*{sub {pi}}). It is found that an increase of m*{sub {pi}} strongly reduces the unrealistic effect of pions, keeping roughly unchanged their contribution to the total binding energy.

  1. Neutron monitoring systems including gamma thermometers and methods of calibrating nuclear instruments using gamma thermometers

    DOEpatents

    Moen, Stephan Craig; Meyers, Craig Glenn; Petzen, John Alexander; Foard, Adam Muhling

    2012-08-07

    A method of calibrating a nuclear instrument using a gamma thermometer may include: measuring, in the instrument, local neutron flux; generating, from the instrument, a first signal proportional to the neutron flux; measuring, in the gamma thermometer, local gamma flux; generating, from the gamma thermometer, a second signal proportional to the gamma flux; compensating the second signal; and calibrating a gain of the instrument based on the compensated second signal. Compensating the second signal may include: calculating selected yield fractions for specific groups of delayed gamma sources; calculating time constants for the specific groups; calculating a third signal that corresponds to delayed local gamma flux based on the selected yield fractions and time constants; and calculating the compensated second signal by subtracting the third signal from the second signal. The specific groups may have decay time constants greater than 5.times.10.sup.-1 seconds and less than 5.times.10.sup.5 seconds.

  2. Rapid multipoint linkage analysis of recessive traits in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Lander, E.S. |

    1995-02-01

    Homozygosity mapping is a powerful strategy for mapping rare recessive traits in children of consanguineous marriages. Practical applications of this strategy are currently limited by the inability of conventional linkage analysis software to compute, in reasonable time, multipoint LOD scores for pedigrees with inbreeding loops. We have developed a new algorithm for rapid multipoint likelihood calculations in small pedigrees, including those with inbreeding loops. The running time of the algorithm grows, at most, linearly with the number of loci considered simultaneously. The running time is not sensitive to the presence of inbreeding loops, missing genotype information, and highly polymorphic loci. We have incorporated this algorithm into a software package, MAPMAKER/HOMOZ, that allows very rapid multipoint mapping of disease genes in nuclear families, including homozygosity mapping. Multipoint analysis with dozens of markers can be carried out in minutes on a personal workstation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Nuclear waste isolation activities report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    Included are: a report from the Deputy Assistant Secretary, a summary of recent events, new literature, a list of upcoming waste management meetings, and background information on DOE`s radwaste management programs. (DLC)

  4. Antiradical activity of gallic acid included in lipid interphases.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, C L; Frías, M A; Cutro, A C; Nazareno, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are well known as antioxidant agents and by their effects on the hydration layers of lipid interphases. Among them, gallic acid and its derivatives are able to decrease the dipole potential and to act in water as a strong antioxidant. In this work we have studied both effects on lipid interphases in monolayers and bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. The results show that gallic acid (GA) increases the negative surface charges of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and decreases the dipole potential of the lipid interphase. As a result, positively charged radical species such as ABTS(+) are able to penetrate the membrane forming an association with GA. These results allow discussing the antiradical activity (ARA) of GA at the membrane phase which may be taking place in water spaces between the lipids.

  5. Examination of psychological variables related to nuclear attitudes and nuclear activism

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    It was hypothesized that knowledge about nuclear arms developments would not be correlated with nuclear attitudes, that sense of efficacy would be positively correlated with magnitude of nuclear activism, and that death anxiety would be correlated with high level of nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes, but not with sense of power. It was also hypothesized that positive correlations would be found between nuclear activism and political activism, knowledge of nuclear facts, and degree of adherence to anti-nuclear attitudes. One hundred and forty three women and 90 men participated in this questionnaire study. Major findings are as follows. In general, the more people knew about nuclear developments, the more anti-nuclear were their attitudes. Also, regardless of nuclear attitudes, a positive correlation was found between knowledge of nuclear facts and nuclear activism. Death anxiety and powerlessness were not correlated. There was a positive correlation between anxiety and both nuclear knowledge and anti-nuclear attitudes. A strong positive correlation was found between nuclear activism and anti-nuclear attitudes, and between political activism and nuclear activism. Internal locus of control did not correlate significantly with high sense of power or with high degree of nuclear activism.

  6. Including nuclear quantum effects into highly correlated electronic structure calculations of weakly bound systems.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Néstor F; Villarreal, Pablo; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo; Posada, Edwin; Reyes, Andrés; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; de Lara-Castells, María Pilar

    2013-05-14

    An interface between the APMO code and the electronic structure package MOLPRO is presented. The any particle molecular orbital APMO code [González et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 108, 1742 (2008)] implements the model where electrons and light nuclei are treated simultaneously at Hartree-Fock or second-order Möller-Plesset levels of theory. The APMO-MOLPRO interface allows to include high-level electronic correlation as implemented in the MOLPRO package and to describe nuclear quantum effects at Hartree-Fock level of theory with the APMO code. Different model systems illustrate the implementation: (4)He2 dimer as a protype of a weakly bound van der Waals system; isotopomers of [He-H-He](+) molecule as an example of a hydrogen bonded system; and molecular hydrogen to compare with very accurate non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations. The possible improvements and future developments are outlined.

  7. Ionization potential of {sup 9}Be calculated including nuclear motion and relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Stanke, Monika; Kedziera, Dariusz; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-05-15

    Variational calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions have been performed for the ground states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 9}Be{sup +} including the nuclear motion [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. An approach based on the analytical energy gradient calculated with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters was employed, leading to energies of the two systems noticeably improved over those found in the recent paper of Pachucki and Komasa [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052502 (2006)]. The non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections ({alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c). With those corrections and the {alpha}{sup 3} and {alpha}{sup 4} corrections taken from Pachucki and Komasa, a new value of the ionization potential (IP) of {sup 9}Be was determined. It agrees very well with the most recent experimental IP.

  8. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  9. Improved best estimate plus uncertainty methodology including advanced validation concepts to license evolving nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, Cetin; Williams, Brian; Mc Clure, Patrick; Nelson, Ralph A

    2010-01-01

    Many evolving nuclear energy programs plan to use advanced predictive multi-scale multi-physics simulation and modeling capabilities to reduce cost and time from design through licensing. Historically, the role of experiments was primary tool for design and understanding of nuclear system behavior while modeling and simulation played the subordinate role of supporting experiments. In the new era of multi-scale multi-physics computational based technology development, the experiments will still be needed but they will be performed at different scales to calibrate and validate models leading predictive simulations. Cost saving goals of programs will require us to minimize the required number of validation experiments. Utilization of more multi-scale multi-physics models introduces complexities in the validation of predictive tools. Traditional methodologies will have to be modified to address these arising issues. This paper lays out the basic aspects of a methodology that can be potentially used to address these new challenges in design and licensing of evolving nuclear technology programs. The main components of the proposed methodology are verification, validation, calibration, and uncertainty quantification. An enhanced calibration concept is introduced and is accomplished through data assimilation. The goal is to enable best-estimate prediction of system behaviors in both normal and safety related environments. To achieve this goal requires the additional steps of estimating the domain of validation and quantification of uncertainties that allow for extension of results to areas of the validation domain that are not directly tested with experiments, which might include extension of the modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities for application to full-scale systems. The new methodology suggests a formalism to quantify an adequate level of validation (predictive maturity) with respect to required selective data so that required testing can be minimized for cost

  10. Nuclear c-Abl-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation induces chromatin structural changes through histone modifications that include H4K16 hypoacetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Kazumasa; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Kubota, Sho; Morinaga, Takao; Horiike, Yasuyoshi; Yuki, Ryuzaburo; Takahashi, Akinori; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2011-12-10

    c-Abl tyrosine kinase, which is ubiquitously expressed, has three nuclear localization signals and one nuclear export signal and can shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. c-Abl plays important roles in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and apoptosis. Recently, we developed a pixel imaging method for quantitating the level of chromatin structural changes and showed that nuclear Src-family tyrosine kinases are involved in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation. Using this method, we show here that nuclear c-Abl induces chromatin structural changes in a manner dependent on the tyrosine kinase activity. Expression of nuclear-targeted c-Abl drastically increases the levels of chromatin structural changes, compared with that of c-Abl. Intriguingly, nuclear-targeted c-Abl induces heterochromatic profiles of histone methylation and acetylation, including hypoacetylation of histone H4 acetylated on lysine 16 (H4K16Ac). The level of heterochromatic histone modifications correlates with that of chromatin structural changes. Adriamycin-induced DNA damage stimulates translocation of c-Abl into the nucleus and induces chromatin structural changes together with H4K16 hypoacetylation. Treatment with trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, blocks chromatin structural changes but not nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by c-Abl. These results suggest that nuclear c-Abl plays an important role in chromatin dynamics through nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation-induced heterochromatic histone modifications.

  11. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chichester, D. L.; Seabury, E. H.

    2009-03-10

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  12. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  13. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited.

    PubMed

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker's yeast. PMID:26473931

  14. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Laba, Justyna K.; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the membrane while the extralumenal domains encoding a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and intrinsically disordered linker (L) are accompanied by transport factors and travel through the NPC. Here, we validate the proposed mechanism and explore and discuss alternative interpretations of the data. First, to disprove an interpretation where the membrane proteins become membrane embedded only after nuclear import, we present biochemical and localization data to support that the previously used, as well as newly designed reporter proteins are membrane-embedded irrespective of the presence of the sorting signals, the specific transmembrane domain (multipass or tail anchored), independent of GET, and also under conditions that the proteins are trapped in the NPC. Second, using the recently established size limit for passive diffusion of membrane proteins in yeast, and using an improved assay, we confirm active import of polytopic membrane protein with extralumenal soluble domains larger than those that can pass by diffusion on similar timescales. This reinforces that NLS-L dependent active transport is distinct from passive diffusion. Thirdly, we revisit the proposed route through the center of the NPC and conclude that the previously used trapping assay is, unfortunately, poorly suited to address the route through the NPC, and the route thus remains unresolved. Apart from the uncertainty about the route through the NPC, the data confirm active, transport factor dependent, nuclear transport of membrane-embedded mono- and polytopic membrane proteins in baker’s yeast. PMID:26473931

  15. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016. PMID:27237444

  16. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016.

  17. Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Process Interface Including the HyPEP Model

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2007-05-01

    The Nuclear Reactor/Hydrogen Plant interface is the intermediate heat transport loop that will connect a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) to a thermochemical, high-temperature electrolysis, or hybrid hydrogen production plant. A prototype plant called the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 2018-2021 timeframe, and will involve a VHTR, a high-temperature interface, and a hydrogen production plant. The interface is responsible for transporting high-temperature thermal energy from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant while protecting the nuclear plant from operational disturbances at the hydrogen plant. Development of the interface is occurring under the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) and involves the study, design, and development of high-temperature heat exchangers, heat transport systems, materials, safety, and integrated system models. Research and development work on the system interface began in 2004 and is expected to continue at least until the start of construction of an engineering-scale demonstration plant.

  18. Optimal design of active and semi-active suspensions including time delays and preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac', A.; Youn, I.

    1993-10-01

    Several control laws for active and semi-active suspension based on a linear half car model are derived and investigated. The strategies proposed take full advantage of the fact that the road input to the rear wheels is a delayed version of that to the front wheels, which in turn can be obtained either from the measurements of the front wheels and body motions or by direct preview of road irregularities if preview sensors are available. The suspension systems are optimized with respect to ride comfort, road holding and suspension rattle space as expressed by the mean-square-values of body acceleration (including effects of heave and pitch), tire deflections and front and rear suspension travels. The optimal control laws that minimize the given performance index and include passivity constraints in the semi-active case are derived using calculus of variation. The optimal semi-active suspension becomes piecewise linear, varying between passive and fully active systems and combinations of them. The performances of active and semi-active systems with and without preview were evaluated by numerical simulation in the time and frequency domains. The results show that incorporation of time delay between the front and rear axles in controller design improves the dynamic behavior of the rear axle and control of body pitch motion, while additional preview improves front wheel dynamics and body heave.

  19. Analysis of advanced european nuclear fuel cycle scenarios including transmutation and economical estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Merino Rodriguez, I.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the transition from the existing Light Water Reactors (LWR) to the advanced reactors is analyzed, including Generation III+ reactors in a European framework. Four European fuel cycle scenarios involving transmutation options have been addressed. The first scenario (i.e., reference) is the current fleet using LWR technology and open fuel cycle. The second scenario assumes a full replacement of the initial fleet with Fast Reactors (FR) burning U-Pu MOX fuel. The third scenario is a modification of the second one introducing Minor Actinide (MA) transmutation in a fraction of the FR fleet. Finally, in the fourth scenario, the LWR fleet is replaced using FR with MOX fuel as well as Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for MA transmutation. All scenarios consider an intermediate period of GEN-III+ LWR deployment and they extend for a period of 200 years looking for equilibrium mass flows. The simulations were made using the TR-EVOL code, a tool for fuel cycle studies developed by CIEMAT. The results reveal that all scenarios are feasible according to nuclear resources demand (U and Pu). Concerning to no transmutation cases, the second scenario reduces considerably the Pu inventory in repositories compared to the reference scenario, although the MA inventory increases. The transmutation scenarios show that elimination of the LWR MA legacy requires on one hand a maximum of 33% fraction (i.e., a peak value of 26 FR units) of the FR fleet dedicated to transmutation (MA in MOX fuel, homogeneous transmutation). On the other hand a maximum number of ADS plants accounting for 5% of electricity generation are predicted in the fourth scenario (i.e., 35 ADS units). Regarding the economic analysis, the estimations show an increase of LCOE (Levelized cost of electricity) - averaged over the whole period - with respect to the reference scenario of 21% and 29% for FR and FR with transmutation scenarios respectively, and 34% for the fourth scenario. (authors)

  20. Fission Activities of the Nuclear Reactions Group in Uppsala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Alhassan, E.; Gustavsson, C.; Helgesson, P.; Jansson, K.; Koning, A.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Sjöstrand, H.; Solders, A.; Tarrío, D.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    This paper highlights some of the main activities related to fission of the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala University. The group is involved for instance in fission yield experiments at the IGISOL facility, cross-section measurements at the NFS facility, as well as fission dynamics studies at the IRMM JRC-EC. Moreover, work is ongoing on the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) methodology and on including the GEF fission code into the TALYS nuclear reaction code. Selected results from these projects are discussed.

  1. Galaxy interactions and strength of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of data in the literature for differential velocities and projected separations of nearby Seyfert galaxies with possible companions shows a clear difference in projected separations between type 1's and type 2's. This kinematic difference between the two activity classes reinforces other independent evidence that their different nuclear characteristics are related to a non-nuclear physical distinction between the two classes. The differential velocities and projected separations of the galaxy pairs in this sample yield mean galaxy masses, sizes, and mass to light ratios which are consistent with those found by the statistical methods of Karachentsev. Although the galaxy sample discussed here is too small and too poorly defined to provide robust support for these conclusions, the results strongly suggest that nuclear activity in Seyfert galaxies is associated with gravitational perturbations from companion galaxies, and that there are physical distinctions between the host companions of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 nuclei which may depend both on the environment and the structure of the host galaxy itself.

  2. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  3. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Meyer, Richard A.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Hix, W. Raphael; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Ma, Zhanwen; Scott, Jason P.; Kozub, Raymond L.

    2005-12-01

    Recent measurements with radioactive beams at ORNL's Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) have prompted the evaluation of a number of reactions involving unstable nuclei needed for stellar explosion studies. We discuss these evaluations, as well as the development of a new computational infrastructure to enable the rapid incorporation of the latest nuclear physics results in astrophysics models. This infrastructure includes programs that simplify the generation of reaction rates, manage rate databases, and visualize reaction rates, all hosted at a new website .

  4. Tabulated equation of state for supernova matter including full nuclear ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Buyukcizmeci, N.; Botvina, A. S.; Mishustin, I. N.

    2014-07-01

    This is an introduction to the tabulated database of stellar matter properties calculated within the framework of the Statistical Model for Supernova Matter (SMSM). The tables present thermodynamical characteristics and nuclear abundances for 31 values of baryon density (10{sup –8} < ρ/ρ{sub 0} < 0.32, ρ{sub 0} = 0.15 fm{sup –3} is the normal nuclear matter density), 35 values of temperature (0.2 MeV < T < 25 MeV), and 28 values of electron-to-baryon ratio (0.02 < Y{sub e} < 0.56). The properties of stellar matter in β equilibrium are also considered. The main ingredients of the SMSM are briefly outlined, and the data structure and content of the tables are explained.

  5. An improved global analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions including RHIC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskola, Kari J.; Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A.

    2008-07-01

    We present an improved leading-order global DGLAP analysis of nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs), supplementing the traditionally used data from deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering and Drell-Yan dilepton production in proton-nucleus collisions, with inclusive high-pT hadron production data measured at RHIC in d+Au collisions. With the help of an extended definition of the χ2 function, we now can more efficiently exploit the constraints the different data sets offer, for gluon shadowing in particular, and account for the overall data normalization uncertainties during the automated χ2 minimization. The very good simultaneous fit to the nuclear hard process data used demonstrates the feasibility of a universal set of nPDFs, but also limitations become visible. The high-pT forward-rapidity hadron data of BRAHMS add a new crucial constraint into the analysis by offering a direct probe for the nuclear gluon distributions—a sector in the nPDFs which has traditionally been very badly constrained. We obtain a strikingly stronger gluon shadowing than what has been estimated in previous global analyses. The obtained nPDFs are released as a parametrization called EPS08.

  6. Summary of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.

    1984-11-01

    This review of international practices for nuclear fuel reprocessing was prepared to provide a nontechnical summary of the current status of nuclear fuel reprocessing activities around the world. The sources of information are widely varied.

  7. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  8. Multicomponent Molecular Orbital-Climbing Image-Nudged Elastic Band Method to Analyze Chemical Reactions Including Nuclear Quantum Effect.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Taro; Suzuki, Kimichi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2015-10-26

    To analyze the H/D isotope effects on hydrogen transfer reactions in XHCHCHCHY↔XCHCHCHYH (X, Y=O, NH, or CH2 ) including the nuclear quantum effect of proton and deuteron, we propose a multicomponent molecular orbital-climbing image-nudged elastic band (MC_MO-CI-NEB) method. We obtain not only transition state structures but also minimum-energy paths (MEPs) on the MC_MO effective potential energy surface by using MC_MO-CI-NEB method. We find that nuclear quantum effect affects not only stationary-point geometries but also MEPs and electronic structures in the reactions. We clearly demonstrate the importance of including nuclear quantum effects for H/D isotope effect on rate constants (kH /kD ).

  9. Efficient method to include nuclear quantum effects in the determination of phase boundaries.

    PubMed

    Brito, B G A; Antonelli, A

    2012-07-21

    We developed a methodology to assess nuclear quantum effects in phase boundaries calculations that is based on the dynamical integration of Clausius-Clapeyron equation using path integral simulations. The technique employs non-equilibrium simulations that are very efficient. The approach was applied to the calculation of the melting line of Ne in an interval of pressures ranging from 1 to 3366 bar. Our results show a very good agreement with both experimental findings and results from previous calculations. The methodology can be applied to solid and liquid phases, without limitations regarding anharmonicities. The method allows the computation of coexistence lines for wide intervals of pressure and temperature using, in principle, a single simulation.

  10. Occupational Employment in Nuclear-Related Activities, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joe G.; Olsen, Kathryn

    Employment in nuclear- and nuclear energy-related activities in 1981 was examined and compared to that in previous years. Survey instruments were returned by 784 establishments. Total 1981 nuclear-related employment was estimated to be 249,500--a growth of 22,600 (10%) workers over the 1977 total. Government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO)…

  11. Differential two-body compound nuclear cross section, including the width-fluctuation corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Herman, M.

    2014-09-02

    We figure out the compound angular differential cross sections, following mainly Fröbrich and Lipperheide, but with the angular momentum couplings that make sense for optical model work. We include the width-fluctuation correction along with calculations.

  12. Double photoionization of molecular hydrogen: A theoretical study including the nuclear dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Rouzo, H.

    1988-03-01

    The double photoionization of molecular hydrogen is theoretically investigated in the 40-100-eV photon energy range. The calculation is ab initio and rests first on the Born-Oppenheimer separation. The exact nuclear wave functions have been used for both (bound) initial and (dissociative) final two-proton states and the Franck-Condon approximation is not invoked. The electronic part of the initial ground state of H2 is highly correlated while the final one is simply a symmetrized product of uncorrelated Coulomb wave functions. Within this framework, the total cross sections obtained in the dipole-velocity formulation agree well with very recent experimental results. In addition, the method is able to provide the kinetic-energy distributions of the fragments (electrons and protons) as functions of the photon energy. The energy distributions of the ejected protons, produced by 60-100-eV impacting photons, are similar in shape to those resulting from electron or proton impact on H2. In contrast, it is found that the most probable two-proton kinetic energy is significantly lowered in the threshold region. On the other hand, the differential electron spectrum gives some insights into the sharing of energy between the s, p, and d ejected electrons. Within the δ approximation, which is shown to be very accurate over the whole photon energy range, the threshold law for the double photoionization of diatomic molecules is derived. It is found that the cross section can be represented, up to 10 eV above threshold, as the convolution of the density probability in the initial vibrational ground state with a series of linear thresholds, similar to those derived in the Wannier-Rau-Peterkop theory for atoms.

  13. An expanded Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) to include Carpolepis and Tepualia based on nuclear genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Metrosideros (Myrtaceae) comprises 50-60 species, found largely across the Pacific Islands. The relationships within this genus, including the circumscriptions of the subgenera Mearnsia and Metrosideros and their relationships with the other members of the tribe Metrosidereae, namely the N...

  14. Galaxy interactions and the stimulation of nuclear activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckman, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that interactions between galaxies can lead to enhanced galactic activity. He discusses whether, apart from the observational evidence, there is a strong theoretical or heuristic motivation for investigating galaxy interactions as stimulators of nuclear activity in galaxies. Galactic interactions as mechanisms for triggering nuclear starbursts are covered.

  15. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  16. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Sandra; Jeschke, Julia; Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma.

  17. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  18. Active Faults and Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Neil; Berryman, Kelvin; Villamor, Pilar; Epstein, Woody; Cluff, Lloyd; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) following the March 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami brought into sharp focus the susceptibility of NPPs to natural hazards. This is not a new issue—seismic hazard has affected the development of plants in the United States, and volcanic hazard was among the reasons for not commissioning the Bataan NPP in the Philippines [Connor et al., 2009].

  19. Summary of aerospace and nuclear engineering activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Texas A&M Nuclear and Aerospace engineering departments have worked on five different projects for the NASA/USRA Advanced Design Program during the 1987/88 year. The aerospace department worked on two types of lunar tunnelers that would create habitable space. The first design used a heated cone to melt the lunar regolith, and the second used a conventional drill to bore its way through the crust. Both used a dump truck to get rid of waste heat from the reactor as well as excess regolith from the tunneling operation. The nuclear engineering department worked on three separate projects. The NEPTUNE system is a manned, outer-planetary explorer designed with Jupiter exploration as the baseline mission. The lifetime requirement for both reactor and power-conversion systems was twenty years. The second project undertaken for the power supply was a Mars Sample Return Mission power supply. This was designed to produce 2 kW of electrical power for seven years. The design consisted of a General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) utilizing a Stirling engine as the power conversion unit. A mass optimization was performed to aid in overall design. The last design was a reactor to provide power for propulsion to Mars and power on the surface. The requirements of 300 kW of electrical power output and a mass of less than 10,000 Rg were set. This allowed the reactor and power conversion unit to fit within the Space Shuttle cargo bay.

  20. Molecular phylogenetics of subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA regions, including a new taxonomic arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Azorín, Mario; Crespo, Manuel B.; Juan, Ana; Fay, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic arrangement within subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) has been a matter of controversy in recent decades: several new taxonomic treatments have been proposed, based exclusively on plastid DNA sequences, and these have resulted in classifications which are to a great extent contradictory. Some authors have recognized only a single genus Ornithogalum for the whole subfamily, including 250–300 species of variable morphology, whereas others have recognized many genera. In the latter case, the genera are inevitably much smaller and they are better defined morphologically. However, some are not monophyletic as circumscribed. Methods Phylogenetic analyses of Ornithogaloideae were based on nucleotide sequences of four plastid regions (trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, rbcL and matK) and a nuclear region (ITS). Eighty species covering all relevant taxonomic groups previously recognized in the subfamily were sampled. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses were performed. The molecular data were compared with a matrix of 34 morphological characters. Key Results Combinations of plastid and nuclear data yielded phylogenetic trees which are better resolved than those obtained with any plastid region alone or plastid regions in combination. Three main clades are found, corresponding to the previously recognized tribes Albuceae, Dipcadieae and Ornithogaleae. In these, up to 19 clades are described which are definable by morphology and biogeography. These mostly correspond to previously described taxa, though some need recircumscription. Morphological characters are assessed for their diagnostic value for taxonomy in the subfamily. Conclusions On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, 19 monophyletic genera are accepted within Ornithogaloideae: Albuca, Avonsera, Battandiera, Cathissa, Coilonox, Dipcadi, Eliokarmos, Elsiea, Ethesia, Galtonia, Honorius, Loncomelos, Melomphis, Neopatersonia, Nicipe, Ornithogalum, Pseudogaltonia, Stellarioides and

  1. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities, and Bibliography. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.; Long, Alison T.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population matters. The document describes 15 class sessions which integrate information for sociology, anthropology, psychology, biology, animal behavior, and education. Topics include the history of human…

  2. 76 FR 10385 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation, DHS FORM 0700-01, DHS FORM 0700-02, DHS FORM 0700-03...: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition Policy...

  3. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  4. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  5. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  6. The Active Field of Nuclear and Radiochemistry: Not Just Nuclear Power.

    PubMed

    Walther, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    " … The number of universities teaching nuclear and radiochemistry has decreased, not least as radiochemistry is erroneously linked to the use of nuclear power … Radiochemistry is essential for a variety of fields, including radiopharmaceuticals, as well as the management of radioactive waste … we are facing a lack of specialists in the area of radiation protection …" Read more in the Editorial by Clemens Walther.

  7. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) as a quantitative pharmacodynamic parameter for tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; Tornatore, Kathleen M; O'Loughlin, Kieran L; Venuto, Rocco C; Minderman, Hans

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a family of transcription factors involved in regulating the immune response. The canonical NFAT pathway is calcium-dependent and upon activation, NFAT is dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, calcineurin. This results in its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and transcription of downstream target genes that include the cytokines IL-2, IL-10, and IFNγ. Calcineurin inhibitors including tacrolimus inhibit the NFAT pathway and are used as immunosuppressants in transplant settings to prevent graft rejection. There is, as yet, no direct means to monitor tacrolimus pharmacodynamics. In this study, a rapid, quantitative, image cytometry-based measurement of nuclear translocation of NFAT1 is used to evaluate NFAT activation in T cells and its tacrolimus-induced inhibition. A strong dose-dependent correlation between NFAT1 inhibition and tacrolimus dose is demonstrated in vitro. Time kinetic analysis of NFAT1 inhibition in plasma from stable renal transplant recipients before and after an in vivo dose with tacrolimus correlated with the expected pharmacokinetic profile of tacrolimus. This was further corroborated by analysis of patients' autologous CD4 and CD8 T cells. This is the first report to show that the measurement of NFAT1 activation potential by nuclear translocation can be used as a direct, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative pharmacodynamic readout for tacrolimus action. These results, and the rapid turnaround time for this assay, warrant its evaluation in a larger clinical setting to assess its role in therapeutic drug monitoring of calcineurin inhibitors.

  8. Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Tracy N.

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in an off-site classroom to conduct experiments via a "virtual" control console. In addition to the regularly scheduled courses, other programs, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Summer Nuclear Engineering Institute and Office of Naval Research partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, provide access to the facility for students from other universities both domestic and foreign. And NETL hosts professional development programs such as training programs for Nuclear Regulatory Commission personnel and International Atomic Energy Agency fellowships.

  9. (129)I record of nuclear activities in marine sediment core from Jiaozhou Bay in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Guangshan

    2016-04-01

    Iodine-129 has been used as a powerful tool for environmental tracing of human nuclear activities. In this work, a sediment core collected from Jiaozhou Bay, the east coast of China, in 2002 was analyzed for (129)I to investigate the influence of human nuclear activities in this region. Significantly enhanced (129)I level was observed in upper 70 cm of the sediment core, with peak values in the layer corresponding to 1957, 1964, 1974, 1986, and after 1990. The sources of (129)I and corresponding transport processes in this region are discussed, including nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, global fallout from a large numbers of nuclear weapon tests in 1963, the climax of Chinese nuclear weapons testing in the early 1970s, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and long-distance dispersion of European reprocessing derived (129)I. The very well (129)I records of different human nuclear activities in the sediment core illustrate the potential application of (129)I in constraining ages and sedimentation rates of the recent sediment. The releases of (129)I from the European nuclear fuel reprocessing plants at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) were found to dominate the inventory of (129)I in the Chinese sediments after 1990, not only the directly atmospheric releases of these reprocessing plants, but also re-emission of marine discharged (129)I of these reprocessing plants in the highly contaminated European seas. PMID:26821329

  10. (129)I record of nuclear activities in marine sediment core from Jiaozhou Bay in China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yukun; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhou, Weijian; Liu, Guangshan

    2016-04-01

    Iodine-129 has been used as a powerful tool for environmental tracing of human nuclear activities. In this work, a sediment core collected from Jiaozhou Bay, the east coast of China, in 2002 was analyzed for (129)I to investigate the influence of human nuclear activities in this region. Significantly enhanced (129)I level was observed in upper 70 cm of the sediment core, with peak values in the layer corresponding to 1957, 1964, 1974, 1986, and after 1990. The sources of (129)I and corresponding transport processes in this region are discussed, including nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, global fallout from a large numbers of nuclear weapon tests in 1963, the climax of Chinese nuclear weapons testing in the early 1970s, the Chernobyl accident in 1986, and long-distance dispersion of European reprocessing derived (129)I. The very well (129)I records of different human nuclear activities in the sediment core illustrate the potential application of (129)I in constraining ages and sedimentation rates of the recent sediment. The releases of (129)I from the European nuclear fuel reprocessing plants at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) were found to dominate the inventory of (129)I in the Chinese sediments after 1990, not only the directly atmospheric releases of these reprocessing plants, but also re-emission of marine discharged (129)I of these reprocessing plants in the highly contaminated European seas.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA replication includes the sequential recruitment of pre-replication and replication machineries close to nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; de Melo Godoy, Patrícia Diogo; Motta, Maria Cristina M; Mortara, Renato A; Schenkman, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes, many nuclear processes are spatially compartmentalized. Previously, we have shown that in Trypanosoma cruzi, an early-divergent eukaryote, DNA replication occurs at the nuclear periphery where chromosomes remain constrained during the S phase of the cell cycle. We followed Orc1/Cdc6, a pre-replication machinery component and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a component of replication machinery, during the cell cycle of this protozoon. We found that, at the G1 stage, TcOrc1/Cdc6 and TcPCNA are dispersed throughout the nuclear space. During the G1/S transition, TcOrc1/Cdc6 migrates to a region close to nuclear periphery. At the onset of S phase, TcPCNA is loaded onto the DNA and remains constrained close to nuclear periphery. Finally, in G2, mitosis and cytokinesis, TcOrc1/Cdc6 and TcPCNA are dispersed throughout the nuclear space. Based on these findings, we propose that DNA replication in T. cruzi is accomplished by the organization of functional machineries in a spatial-temporal manner. PMID:21738836

  12. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses.

  13. Nuclear factor Y regulates ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus core promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongliang; Liu, Yanfeng; Luo, Mengjun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wei; Pan, Shaokun; Xie, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Endogenous viral elements (EVE) in animal genomes are the fossil records of ancient viruses and provide invaluable information on the origin and evolution of extant viruses. Extant hepadnaviruses include avihepadnaviruses of birds and orthohepadnaviruses of mammals. The core promoter (Cp) of hepadnaviruses is vital for viral gene expression and replication. We previously identified in the budgerigar genome two EVEs that contain the full-length genome of an ancient budgerigar hepadnavirus (eBHBV1 and eBHBV2). Here, we found eBHBV1 Cp and eBHBV2 Cp were active in several human and chicken cell lines. A region from nt -85 to -11 in eBHBV1 Cp was critical for the promoter activity. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a putative binding site of nuclear factor Y (NF-Y), a ubiquitous transcription factor, at nt -64 to -50 in eBHBV1 Cp. The NF-Y core binding site (ATTGG, nt -58 to -54) was essential for eBHBV1 Cp activity. The same results were obtained with eBHBV2 Cp and duck hepatitis B virus Cp. The subunit A of NF-Y (NF-YA) was recruited via the NF-Y core binding site to eBHBV1 Cp and upregulated the promoter activity. Finally, the NF-Y core binding site is conserved in the Cps of all the extant avihepadnaviruses but not of orthohepadnaviruses. Interestingly, a putative and functionally important NF-Y core binding site is located at nt -21 to -17 in the Cp of human hepatitis B virus. In conclusion, our findings have pinpointed an evolutionary conserved and functionally critical NF-Y binding element in the Cps of avihepadnaviruses. PMID:27501758

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  15. Active seat suspension for a small vehicle: considerations for control system including observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Hiroyuki; Shiino, Hiroshi; Oshinoya, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa; Ozaki, Koichi; Ogino, Hirohiko

    2007-12-01

    We have examined the improvement of ride quality and the reduction of riding fatigue brought about by the active control of the seat suspension of small vehicles such as one-seater electric automobiles. A small active seat suspension, which is easy to install, was designed and manufactured for one-seater electric automobiles. For the actuator, a maintenance-free voice coil motor used as a direct drive was adopted. For fundamental considerations, we designed a one-degree-of-freedom model for the active seat suspension system. Then, we designed a disturbance cancellation control system that includes the observer for a two-degree-of-freedom model. In an actual driving test, a test road, in which the concavity and convexity of an actual road surface were simulated using hard rubber, was prepared and the control performance of vertical vibrations of the seat surface during driving was examined. As a result, in comparison with the one-degree-of-freedom control system, it was confirmed that the control performance was improved by the two-degree-of-freedom control system that includes the observer.

  16. Nuclear removal during terminal lens fiber cell differentiation requires CDK1 activity: appropriating mitosis-related nuclear disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Chaffee, Blake R.; Shang, Fu; Chang, Min-Lee; Clement, Tracy M.; Eddy, Edward M.; Wagner, Brad D.; Nakahara, Masaki; Nagata, Shigekazu; Robinson, Michael L.; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelial cells and early lens fiber cells contain the typical complement of intracellular organelles. However, as lens fiber cells mature they must destroy their organelles, including nuclei, in a process that has remained enigmatic for over a century, but which is crucial for the formation of the organelle-free zone in the center of the lens that assures clarity and function to transmit light. Nuclear degradation in lens fiber cells requires the nuclease DNase IIβ (DLAD) but the mechanism by which DLAD gains access to nuclear DNA remains unknown. In eukaryotic cells, cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), in combination with either activator cyclins A or B, stimulates mitotic entry, in part, by phosphorylating the nuclear lamin proteins leading to the disassembly of the nuclear lamina and subsequent nuclear envelope breakdown. Although most post-mitotic cells lack CDK1 and cyclins, lens fiber cells maintain these proteins. Here, we show that loss of CDK1 from the lens inhibited the phosphorylation of nuclear lamins A and C, prevented the entry of DLAD into the nucleus, and resulted in abnormal retention of nuclei. In the presence of CDK1, a single focus of the phosphonuclear mitotic apparatus is observed, but it is not focused in CDK1-deficient lenses. CDK1 deficiency inhibited mitosis, but did not prevent DNA replication, resulting in an overall reduction of lens epithelial cells, with the remaining cells possessing an abnormally large nucleus. These observations suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylations required for the initiation of nuclear membrane disassembly during mitosis are adapted for removal of nuclei during fiber cell differentiation. PMID:25139855

  17. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals.

  18. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals. PMID:24184688

  19. Plants as sources of airborne bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Constantinidou, H A; Barchet, W R; Upper, C D

    1982-11-01

    Vertical wind shear and concentration gradients of viable, airborne bacteria were used to calculate the upward flux of viable cells above bare soil and canopies of several crops. Concentrations at soil or canopy height varied from 46 colony-forming units per m over young corn and wet soil to 663 colony-forming units per m over dry soil and 6,500 colony-forming units per m over a closed wheat canopy. In simultaneous samples, concentrations of viable bacteria in the air 10 m inside an alfalfa field were fourfold higher than those over a field with dry, bare soil immediately upwind. The upward flux of viable bacteria over alfalfa was three- to fourfold greater than over dry soil. Concentrations of ice nucleation-active bacteria were higher over plants than over soil. Thus, plant canopies may constitute a major source of bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria, in the air.

  20. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  1. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  2. THE AIMS AND ACTIVITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF NUCLEAR STRUCTURE AND DECAY DATA EVALUATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    NICHOLS,A.L.; TULI, J.K.

    2007-04-22

    International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators consists of a number of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries that appreciate the merits of working together to maintain and ensure the quality and comprehensive content of the ENSDF database (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File). Biennial meetings of the network are held under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assign evaluation responsibilities, monitor progress, discuss improvements and emerging difficulties, and agree on actions to be undertaken by individual members. The evaluated data and bibliographic details are made available to users via various media, such as the journals ''Nuclear Physics A'' and ''Nuclear Data Sheets'', the World Wide Web, on CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides and ''Nuclear Wallet Cards''. While the ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, these data are also available from other nuclear data centers including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy, in cooperation with the IAEA, organizes workshops on NSDD at regular intervals. The primary aims of these particular workshops are to provide hands-on training in the data evaluation processes, and to encourage new evaluators to participate in NSDD activities. The technical contents of these NSDD workshops are described, along with the rationale for the inclusion of various topics.

  3. Stability and activity of alcohol dehydrogenases in W/O-microemulsions: enantioselective reduction including cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlich, B; Berger, H; Lade, M; Schomäcker, R

    2000-12-20

    Microemulsions provide an interesting alternative to classical methods for the conversion of less water-soluble substrates by alcohol dehydrogenase, but until now stability and activity were too low for economically useful processes. The activity and stability of the enzymes are dependent on the microemulsion composition, mostly the water and the surfactant concentration. Therefore, it is necessary to know the exact phase behavior of a given microemulsion reaction system and the corresponding enzyme behavior therein. Because of their economic and ecologic suitability polyethoxylated fatty alcohols were investigated concerning their phase behavior and their compatibility with enzymes in ternary mixtures. The phase behavior of Marlipal O13-60 (C13EO6 in industrial quality)/cyclohexane/water and its effect on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase from Yeast (YADH) and horse liver (HLADH) and the carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR) is presented in this study. Beside the macroscopic phase behavior of the reaction system, the viscosity of the system indicates structural changes of aggregates in the microemulsion. The changes of the enzyme activities with the composition are discussed on the basis of transitions from reverse micelles to swollen reverse micelles and finally, the transition to the phase separation. The formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii was used for the NADH-regeneration during reduction reactions. While the formate dehydrogenase did not show any kinetic effect on the microemulsion composition, the other enzymes show significant changes of activity and stability varying the water or surfactant concentration of the microemulsion. Under certain conditions, stability could be maintained with HLADH for several weeks. Successful experiments with semi-batch processes including cofactor regeneration and product separation were performed.

  4. Induced starburst and nuclear activity: Faith, facts, and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the origin of starburst and nuclear (nonstellar) activity in galaxies is reviewed. A physical understanding of the mechanism(s) that induce both types of activity requires one to address the following issues: (1) what is the source of fuel that powers starbursts and active galactic nuclei; and (2) how is it channeled towards the central regions of host galaxies? As a possible clue, the author examines the role of non-axisymmetric perturbations of galactic disks and analyzes their potential triggers. Global gravitational instabilities in the gas on scales approx. 100 pc appear to be crucial for fueling the active galactic nuclei.

  5. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Teng; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Yong-li

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  6. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  7. Nuclear structure studies in JUSTIPEN and EFES activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Naoyuki

    2009-10-01

    JUSTIPEN: Japan-US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei was launched in June 2006. JUSTIPEN has been established in order to facilitate collaborations between U.S. and Japanese scientists whose main research thrust is in the area of the physics of exotic nuclei. More than 40 nuclear scientists in U.S. have visited Japan in three years, and the many collaborations are established. I briefly summarize the JUSTIPEN activity from the Japanese side. There is counterpart program for the Japanese scientists. International Research Network for Exotic Femto Systems (EFES) was selected as one of the Core-to-Core Programs of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This is the program to send Japanese nuclear scientists to U.S., Germany, France, Italy, Norway, and Finland and to promote the international collaborations in the field of nuclear study. Many joint workshops were held with partner countries. To operate these international programs, University of Tokyo and RIKEN agreed to corporate with each other and established Todai-RIKEN Joint International Program for Nuclear Physics (TORIJIN) in June 2006. I summarize the activities in three years, and I also mention about the relation between these activities and my personal research -- many-body correlations in light nuclei.

  8. Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Rugama, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

  9. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  10. Nuclear design of a very-low-activation fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.T.; Hopkins, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the nuclear design aspects of using very-low-activation materials, such as SiC, MgO, and aluminum for fusion-reactor first wall, blanket, and shield applications. In addition to the advantage of very-low radioactive inventory, it was found that the very-low-activation fusion reactor can also offer an adequate tritium-breeding ratio and substantial amount of blanket nuclear heating as a conventional-material-structured reactor does. The most-stringent design constraint found in a very-low-activation fusion reactor is the limited space available in the inboard region of a tokamak concept for shielding to protect the superconducting toroidal field coil. A reference design was developed which mitigates the constraint by adopting a removable tungsten shield design that retains the inboard dimensions and gives the same shield performance as the reference STARFIRE tokamak reactor design.

  11. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  12. NNDC Stand: Activities and Services of the National Nuclear Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Arcilla, R.; Burrows, T.W.; Dunford, C.L.; Herman, M.W.; McLane, V.; Oblozinsky, P.; Sonzogni, A.A.; Tuli, J.K.; Winchell, D.F.

    2005-05-24

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) collects, evaluates, and disseminates nuclear physics data for basic nuclear research, applied nuclear technologies including energy, shielding, medical and homeland security. In 2004, to answer the needs of nuclear data users community, NNDC completed a project to modernize data storage and management of its databases and began offering new nuclear data Web services. The principles of database and Web application development as well as related nuclear reaction and structure database services are briefly described.

  13. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  14. The EMT-activator ZEB1 induces bone metastasis associated genes including BMP-inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Kerstin; Preca, Bogdan-Tiberius; Brummer, Tilman; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion, dissemination and metastasis is triggered by an aberrant activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), often mediated by the transcription factor ZEB1. Disseminating tumor cells must acquire specific features that allow them to colonize at different organ sites. Here we identify a set of genes that is highly expressed in breast cancer bone metastasis and activated by ZEB1. This gene set includes various secreted factors, e.g. the BMP-inhibitor FST, that are described to reorganize the bone microenvironment. By inactivating BMP-signaling, BMP-inhibitors are well-known to induce osteolysis in development and disease. We here demonstrate that the expression of ZEB1 and BMP-inhibitors is correlated with bone metastasis, but not with brain or lung metastasis of breast cancer patients. In addition, we show that this correlated expression pattern is causally linked, as ZEB1 induces the expression of the BMP-inhibitors NOG, FST and CHRDL1 both by directly increasing their gene transcription, as well as by indirectly suppressing their reduction via miR-200 family members. Consequently, ZEB1 stimulates BMP-inhibitor mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that ZEB1 is not only driving EMT, but also contributes to the formation of osteolytic bone metastases in breast cancer. PMID:25973542

  15. Rattling Nucleons: New Developments in Active Interrogation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Runkle; David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Active interrogation is a vigorous area of research and development due to its promise of offering detection and characterization capabilities of special nuclear material in environments where passive detection fails. The primary value added by active methods is the capability to penetrate shielding - special nuclear material itself, incidental materials, or intentional shielding - and advocates hope that active interrogation will provide a solution to the problem of detecting shielded uranium, which is at present the greatest obstacle to interdiction efforts. The technique also provides a unique benefit for quantifying nuclear material in high background-radiation environments, an area important for nuclear material safeguards and material accountancy. Progress has been made in the field of active interrogation on several fronts, most notably in the arenas of source development, systems integration, and the integration and exploitation of multiple fission and non-fission signatures. But penetration of interrogating radiation often comes at a cost, not only in terms of finance and dose but also in terms of induced backgrounds, system complexity, and extended measurement times (including set up and acquisition). These costs make the calculus for deciding to implement active interrogation more subtle than may be apparent. The purpose of this review is thus to examine existing interrogation methods, compare and contrast their attributes and limitations, and identify missions where active interrogation may hold the most promise.

  16. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  17. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies associate with transcriptionally active genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jayson; Shiels, Carol; Sasieni, Peter; Wu, Pei Jun; Islam, Suhail A.; Freemont, Paul S.; Sheer, Denise

    2004-01-01

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is aggregated into nuclear bodies that are associated with diverse nuclear processes. Here, we report that the distance between a locus and its nearest PML body correlates with the transcriptional activity and gene density around the locus. Genes on the active X chromosome are more significantly associated with PML bodies than their silenced homologues on the inactive X chromosome. We also found that a histone-encoding gene cluster, which is transcribed only in S-phase, is more strongly associated with PML bodies in S-phase than in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. However, visualization of specific RNA transcripts for several genes showed that PML bodies were not themselves sites of transcription for these genes. Furthermore, knock-down of PML bodies by RNA interference did not preferentially change the expression of genes closely associated with PML bodies. We propose that PML bodies form in nuclear compartments of high transcriptional activity, but they do not directly regulate transcription of genes in these compartments. PMID:14970191

  18. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Wieslander, E.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Murari, A.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In ITER, {alpha} particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  19. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  20. Nuclear cardiology in the UK 1994: activity relative to Europe, USA, and British Cardiac Society targets

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, D; Prvulovich, E; Tweddel, A; Caplin, J

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To survey practice in nuclear cardiology in the UK in 1994.
Design—A questionnaire was sent to 219 centres performing nuclear imaging asking for details of current practice in nuclear cardiology. Replies were received from 192 centres (88%).
Main outcome measures—Activity in performance of myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and radionuclide ventriculography (RNV), anticipated changes in activity, differences between regional and district hospitals, technical imaging parameters, and referral sources. 
Results—Of the responding centres, 125 (65%) performed nuclear cardiology procedures. More regional than district hospitals performed nuclear cardiology procedures (85% v 55%, p < 0.0003) and regional centres performed a higher proportion (62% v 24%, p < 0.001) of nuclear cardiology activity. Nuclear cardiology activity was 0.82 scans per 1000 population per year (MPI 0.56, RNV 0.26). There has been a significant increase (24%) in nuclear cardiology since 1988. There has been a pronounced rise in MPI (350%) while RNV has fallen by 47%. Myocardial perfusion activity in the UK remains very low (25% and 5% in regional and district hospitals, respectively) compared with the 1994 figures of 2.2/1000/year for Europe or 10.8/1000/year for the USA.
Conclusions—MPI has increased on average by 23%/annum (compound rate) since 1988, but in 1994 was still only 32% of the British Cardiac Society target of 2.6/1000/year. Proper resources for capital expenditure on new equipment and new staff will be important to maintain momentum in closing the gap. Also important is improved clinical understanding, as already implemented by including nuclear cardiology in guidelines for specialist cardiology training.

 Keywords: survey;  nuclear cardiology;  myocardial perfusion imaging;  radionuclide ventriculography;  guidelines;  British Cardiac Society PMID:9875092

  1. Active control of environmental noise, VIII: increasing the response to primary source changes including unpredictable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Atmoko, H.; Vuksanovic, B.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional adaptive cancellation systems using traditional transverse finite impulse response (FIR) filters, together with least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithms, well known in active noise control, are slow to adapt to primary source changes. This makes them inappropriate for cancelling rapidly changing noise, including unpredictable noise such as speech and music. Secondly, the cancelling structures require considerable computational processing effort to adapt to primary source and plant changes, particularly for multi-channel systems. This paper describes methods to increase the adaptive speed to primary source changes in large enclosed spaces and outdoor environments. A method is described that increases the response to time varying periodic noise using traditional transverse FIR filters. Here a multi-passband filter, with individual variable adaptive step sizes for each passband is automatically adjusted according to the signal level in each band. This creates a similar adaptive response for all frequencies within the total pass-band, irrespective of amplitude, minimizing the signal distortion and increasing the combined adaptive speed. Unfortunately, there is a limit to the adaptive speed using the above method as classical transverse FIR filters have a finite adaptive speed given by the stability band zero bandwidth. For rapidly changing periodic noise and unpredictable non-stationary noise, a rapid to instantaneous response is required. In this case the on-line adaptive FIR filters are dispensed with and replaced by a time domain solution that gives virtually instantaneous cancellation response (infinite adaptive speed) to primary source changes, and is computationally efficient.

  2. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism. PMID:22414897

  3. Transcriptional integration of metabolism by the nuclear sterol-activated receptors LXR and FXR.

    PubMed

    Calkin, Anna C; Tontonoz, Peter

    2012-03-14

    Nuclear receptors are integrators of hormonal and nutritional signals, mediating changes to metabolic pathways within the body. Given that modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism has been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes, obesity and atherosclerosis, a greater understanding of pathways that regulate metabolism in physiology and disease is crucial. The liver X receptors (LXRs) and the farnesoid X receptors (FXRs) are activated by oxysterols and bile acids, respectively. Mounting evidence indicates that these nuclear receptors have essential roles, not only in the regulation of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism but also in the integration of sterol, fatty acid and glucose metabolism.

  4. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  5. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  6. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  7. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  8. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  9. End of FY2014 Report - Filter Measurement System for Nuclear Material Storage Canisters (Including Altitude Correction for Filter Pressure Drop)

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2015-02-24

    Two LANL FTS (Filter Test System ) devices for nuclear material storage canisters are fully operational. One is located in PF-4 ( i.e. the TA-55 FTS) while the other is located at the Radiation Protection Division’s Aerosol Engineering Facility ( i.e. the TA-3 FTS). The systems are functionally equivalent , with the TA-3 FTS being the test-bed for new additions and for resolving any issues found in the TA-55 FTS. There is currently one unresolved issue regarding the TA-55 FTS device. The canister lid clamp does not give a leak tight seal when testing the 1 QT (quart) or 2 QT SAVY lids. An adapter plate is being developed that will ensure a correct test configuration when the 1 or 2 QT SAVY lid s are being tested .

  10. Using Assistive Technology Adaptations To Include Students with Learning Disabilities in Cooperative Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a process for integrating technology adaptations for students with learning disabilities into cooperative-learning activities in terms of three components: (1) selecting adaptations; (2) monitoring use of adaptations during cooperative-learning activities; and (3) evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. Barriers to and support systems…

  11. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  12. The Evaluation of Lithium Hydride for Use in a Space Nuclear Reactor Shield, Including a Historical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    D. Poeth

    2005-12-09

    LiH was one of the five primary shield materials the NRPCT intended to develop (along with beryllium, boron carbide, tungsten, and water) for potential Prometheus application. It was also anticipated that {sup 10}B metal would be investigated for feasibility at a low level of effort. LiH historically has been selected as a low mass, neutron absorption material for space shields (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), Topaz, SP-100). Initial NRPCT investigations did not produce convincing evidence that LiH was desirable or feasible for a Prometheus mission due to material property issues (primarily swelling and hydrogen cover gas containment), and related thermal design complexity. Furthermore, if mass limits allowed, an option to avoid use of LiH was being contemplated to lower development costs and associated risks. However, LiH remains theoretically the most efficient neutron shield material per unit mass, and, with sufficient testing and development, could be an optimal material choice for future flights.

  13. Nuclear Physics Activities in Asia and ANPhA

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, H.

    2011-05-06

    On 18 July 2009 the Asian Nuclear Physics Association (ANPhA) has been officially launched in Beijing by the representatives from China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Since then Australia, India, Mongolia and Taiwan have joined to ANPhA and now the member country/region has increased to eight. Some activities and features on ANPhA are introduced. In addition, pleasant collaboration with Professor Arima by the author in regard to the Gamow-Teller quenching problem is also briefly mentioned.

  14. The hydro nuclear services dry active waste processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    There is a real need for a dry active waste processing system that can separate clean trash and recoverable items from radwaste safely and efficiently. This paper reports that Hydro Nuclear Services has produced just such a system and is marketing it as a DAW Segregation/Volume Reduction Process. The system is a unique, semi-automated package of sensitive monitoring instruments of volume reduction equipment that separates clean trash from contaminated and recoverable items in the waste stream and prepares the clean trash for unrestricted release. What makes the HNS system truly unique is its end product - clean trash.

  15. Rhinosporidium seeberi Nuclear Cycle Activities Using Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Delfino, Darly; Mendoza, Leonel; Vilela, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    Rhinosporidium seeberi is an uncultivated Ichthyosporean infecting animals, including humans. Recent studies suggested R. seeberi undergoes synchronized nuclear division without cytokinesis. We used confocal microscopy to investigate R. seeberi nuclear division cycles in formalin-fixed tissues stained with DAPI and phalloidin. We report that R. seeberi nuclei in juvenile and intermediary sporangia synchronously divided without cytokinesis. Intermediary sporangia display numerous 3-4 μm nuclei at different mitotic stages as well as a thick inner layer with strong affinity for phalloidin. Mature sporangia showed numerous 5-12 μm cell-walled endospores, each containing a 2-4 μm in diameter nucleus. Phalloidin did not bind to the inner layers of mature sporangia or endospores. The development of a "germinative zone" in the inner layer of mature sporangia containing hundreds of nuclei was also confirmed. This study establishes that during the R. seeberi life cycle synchronous nuclear divisions without cytokinesis takes place, resulting in the formation of thousands of nuclei. Cytokinesis, on the other hand, is a 1-time event and occurs in the latest stages of intermediate sporangia, after the formation of thousands of nuclei and just before mature sporangia development. PMID:26461427

  16. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  17. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values. PMID:23082579

  18. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values.

  19. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  20. Effect of the interactions and environment on nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Best, P. N.; Argudo-Fernández, M.

    2013-03-01

    We present a study of the prevalence of optical and radio nuclear activity with respect to the environment and interactions in a sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies. The aim is to determine the independent effects of distinct aspects of source environment on the triggering of different types of nuclear activity. We defined a local density parameter and a tidal force estimator and used a cluster richness estimator from the literature to trace different aspects of environment and interaction. The possible correlations between the environmental parameters were removed using a principal component analysis. By far, the strongest trend found for the active galactic nuclei (AGN) fractions, of all AGN types, is with galaxy mass. We therefore applied a stratified statistical method that takes into account the effect of possible confounding factors like the galaxy mass. We found that (at fixed mass) the prevalence of optical AGN is a factor of 2-3 lower in the densest environments, but increases by a factor of ˜2 in the presence of strong one-on-one interactions. These effects are even more pronounced for star-forming nuclei. The importance of galaxy interactions decreases from star-forming nuclei to Seyferts to low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions to passive galaxies, in accordance with previous suggestions of an evolutionary time-sequence. The fraction of radio AGN increases very strongly (by nearly an order of magnitude) towards denser environments, and is also enhanced by galaxy interactions. Overall, the results agree with a scenario in which the mechanisms of accretion into the black hole are determined by the presence and nature of a supply of gas, which in turn is controlled by the local density of galaxies and their interactions. A plentiful cold gas supply is required to trigger star formation, optical AGN and radiatively efficient radio AGN. This is less common in the cold-gas-poor environments of groups and clusters, but is enhanced by

  1. Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education: Modifying Net/Wall Games to Include Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Luciana; Tracy, Julia F.; Taliaferro, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of students with disabilities in higher education settings has presented challenges for instructors with regards to appropriate inclusion. Concerning physical activity courses in higher education, instructors may not have the knowledge or resources to make modifications and accommodations that will ultimately result in…

  2. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test.

  3. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Methods: Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA…

  4. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population concerns. Designed to educate general college audiences, it is also intended for use as a preservice course for teachers. In addition, the course can be modified for high school students. The course…

  5. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  6. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  7. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  8. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  9. Backyards and Butterflies: Ways to Include Children with Disabilities in Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Doreen; And Others

    This sourcebook is designed for children, parents, and families, detailing ideas for outdoor play and learning activities, with emphasis on involving children with disabilities in outdoor play. A rural perspective permeates the guide, although each chapter contains ideas for making outdoor environments more accessible and safer for all children,…

  10. Beyond Right or Wrong: Challenges of Including Creative Design Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore challenges encountered by K-12 educators in establishing classroom cultures that support creative learning activities with the Scratch programming language. Providing opportunities for students to understand and to build capacities for creative work was described by many of the teachers that we interviewed as a central…

  11. Phytochrome activation of two nuclear genes requires cytoplasmic protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E; Green, P J; Wong, M; Chua, N H

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on light-induced expression of two plant nuclear genes, Cab and rbcS, in wheat, pea and transgenic tobacco. Light activation of these two genes is very sensitive to cycloheximide, an inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis but not to chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of organellar protein synthesis. Studies with chimeric gene constructs in transgenic tobacco seedlings show that cycloheximide exerts its effect at the transcriptional level. As a control, we show that the expression of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter is enhanced by cycloheximide treatment, irrespective of the coding sequence used. Escape-time analyses with green wheat seedlings show that the cycloheximide block for Cab gene expression is after the primary signal transduction step linked to phytochrome photoconversion. Our results suggest that phytochrome activation of Cab and rbcS is mediated by a labile protein factor(s) synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Images PMID:2583082

  12. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  13. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... relations purposes, including E-commerce (mail ordering through the Internet): Provided, That Credit-Back...-Back is requested. (e) The following requirements shall apply to Credit-Back for all promotional... and Canada, paragraph (e)(5) of this section shall also apply. (2) The clear and evident purpose...

  14. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Carlson, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially unique set of clinical characteristics compared with other aminoglycosides. This study assessed the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of plazomicin against 15 clinical isolates as well as three reference strains representing Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis. These data were compared with those obtained for six other aminoglycosides and two aminocyclitols. Plazomicin and gentamicin were the only drugs demonstrating bactericidal activity towards two of the three Brucella spp., whilst plazomicin was the only drug exhibiting bactericidal activity against B. suis. This is the first study to assess the bactericidal nature of plazomicin against Brucella spp. in vitro. PMID:25459738

  15. The Nuclear Activities of Nearby S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng-Yuan; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Zhou, Luwenjia

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of nuclear activities in nearby S0 galaxies. After cross-matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 with the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3) and visually checking the SDSS images, we derive a sample of 583 S0 galaxies with the central spectrophotometric information. In order to separate nebular emission lines from the underlying stellar contribution, we fit the stellar population model to the SDSS spectra of these S0 galaxies. According to the BPT diagram, we find that 8% of S0 galaxies show central star-forming activity, while the fractions of Seyfert, Composite, and low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) are 2%, 8%, and 21.4%, respectively. We also find that star-forming S0s have the lowest stellar masses, over one magnitude lower than the others, and that the active S0s are mainly located in the sparse environment, while the normal S0s are located in the dense environment, which might suggest that the environment plays an important role in quenching star formation and/or AGN activity in S0 galaxies. By performing bulge-disk decomposition of 45 star-forming S0s in g- and r-bands with the 2D fitting software Galfit, as well as exploiting the catalog of 2D photometric decompositions of Meert et al., we find that the bulges of approximately one-third of star-forming S0 galaxies (16/45) are bluer than their disks, while for other types of S0s the bulge and disk components show similar color distributions. Besides, the Sérsic index of most star-forming S0s bulges is less than two, while for normal S0s, it is between two and six.

  16. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  17. Phytophthora infestans Has a Plethora of Phospholipase D Enzymes Including a Subclass That Has Extracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Harold J. G.; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  18. Phytophthora infestans has a plethora of phospholipase D enzymes including a subclass that has extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  19. A Methodology for Post Operational Clean Out of a Highly Active Facility Including Solids Behaviour - 12386

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Michael J.; Ward, Tracy R.; Maxwell, Lisa J.

    2012-07-01

    The Highly Active Liquor Evaporation and Storage (HALES) plant at Sellafield handles acidic fission product containing liquor with typical activities of the order of 18x10{sup 9} Bq/ml. A strategy experimental feedback approach has been used to establish a wash regime for the Post Operational Clean Out (POCO) of the oldest storage tanks for this liquor. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for removal of acid insoluble fission product precipitates. Ammonium carbamate and sodium carbonate yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. The proposed wash reagents provide dissolution of caesium phosphomolybdate (CPM) and zirconium molybdate (ZM) solid phases but yields a fine, mobile precipitate of metal carbonates from the Highly Active Liquor (HAL) supernate. Addition of nitric acid to the wash effluent can cause CPM to precipitate where there is sufficient caesium and phosphorous available. Where they are not present (from ZM dissolution) the nitric acid addition initially produces a nitrate precipitate which then re-dissolves, along with the metal carbonates, to give a solid-free solution. The different behaviour of the two solids during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing the rheology of ZM sediments through doping with tellurium or particular organic acids. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for the POCO of HALES Oldside HASTs. AC and SC both yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. However, the different behaviour of the two principle HAL solids, CPM and ZM, during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing its rheology through doping with tellurium or certain

  20. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  1. Nuclear IKK activity leads to dysregulated notch-dependent gene expression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Majada, V; Aguilera, C; Villanueva, A; Vilardell, F; Robert-Moreno, A; Aytés, A; Real, F X; Capella, G; Mayo, M W; Espinosa, L; Bigas, A

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear functions for IkappaB kinase (IKK), including phosphorylation of histone H3 and nuclear corepressors, have been recently described. Here, we show that IKK is activated in colorectal tumors concomitant with the presence of phosphorylated SMRT (silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor) corepressor that is aberrantly localized in the cytoplasm. In these tumors, IKKalpha associates to the chromatin of specific Notch targets, leading to the release of SMRT. Abrogation of IKK activity by BAY11-7082 or by expressing dominant negative IKKalpha restores the association of SMRT with Notch target genes, resulting in specific gene repression. Finally, BAY11-7082 significantly reduces tumor size in colorectal cancer xenografts (CRC-Xs) implanted in nude mice.

  2. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  3. Modulation of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) nuclear import and tubulin deacetylase activity through acetylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanjing; Peng, Lirong; Seto, Edward; Huang, Suming; Qiu, Yi

    2012-08-17

    The reversible acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in many cellular processes in eukaryotic cells. HDAC6 is a unique histone deacetylase with two deacetylase domains and a C-terminal zinc finger domain. HDAC6 resides mainly in the cytoplasm and regulates many important biological processes, including cell migration and degradation of misfold proteins. HDAC6 has also been shown to localize in the nucleus to regulate transcription. However, how HDAC6 shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm is largely unknown. In addition, it is not clear how HDAC6 enzymatic activity is modulated. Here, we show that HDAC6 can be acetylated by p300 on five clusters of lysine residues. One cluster (site B) of acetylated lysine is in the N-terminal nuclear localization signal region. These lysine residues in site B were converted to glutamine to mimic acetylated lysines. The mutations significantly reduced HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity and further impaired cell motility, but had no effect on histone deacetylase activity. More interestingly, these mutations retained HDAC6 in the cytoplasm by blocking the interaction with the nuclear import protein importin-α. The retention of HDAC6 in the cytoplasm by acetylation eventually affects histone deacetylation. Thus, we conclude that acetylation is an important post-translational modification that regulates HDAC6 tubulin deacetylase activity and nuclear import.

  4. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  5. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X.; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipids are well known for their membrane forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  6. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth.

  7. Modeling the development of biofilm density including active bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Laspidou, Chrysi S; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    We present the unified multi-component cellular automaton (UMCCA) model, which predicts quantitatively the development of the biofilm's composite density for three biofilm components: active bacteria, inert or dead biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances. The model also describes the concentrations of three soluble organic components (soluble substrate and two types of soluble microbial products) and oxygen. The UMCCA model is a hybrid discrete-differential mathematical model and introduces the novel feature of biofilm consolidation. Our hypothesis is that the fluid over the biofilm creates pressures and vibrations that cause the biofilm to consolidate, or pack itself to a higher density over time. Each biofilm compartment in the model output consolidates to a different degree that depends on the age of its biomass. The UMCCA model also adds a cellular automaton algorithm that identifies the path of least resistance and directly moves excess biomass along that path, thereby ensuring that the excess biomass is distributed efficiently. A companion paper illustrates the trends that the UMCCA model is able to represent and shows a comparison with experimental results. PMID:15276752

  8. Ozone control of biological activity during Earth's history, including the KT catastrophe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    There have been brief periods since the beginning of the Cambrian some 600 m.y. ago when mass extinctions destroyed a significant fraction of living species. The most widely studied of these events is the catastrophe at the KT boundary that ended the long dominance of the dinosaurs. In addition to mass extinctions, there is another profound discontinuity in the history of Earth's biota, the explosion of life at the end of the Precambrian era which is an episode that is not explained well at all. For some 3 b.y. before the Cambrian, life had been present on Earth, but maintained a low level of activity which is an aspect of the biota that is puzzling, especially during the last two-thirds of that period. During the last 2 b.y. before the Cambrian, conditions at the Earth's surface were suitable for a burgeoning of the biota, according to most criteria: the oceans neither boiled nor were fozen solid during this time, and the atmosphere contained sufficient O for the development of animals. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that mass extinctions and the lackluster behavior of the Precambrian biota share a common cause: an inadequate amount of ozone in the atmosphere.

  9. Radio Properties of Low Redshift Broad Line Active Galactic Nuclei Including Multiple Component Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafter, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the radio properties of a low redshift (z < 0.35) sample of 8434 broad line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey after correlating the optical sources with radio sources in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey. We find that 10% of our sample has radio emission < 4" away from the optical counterpart (core-only sources), and 1% has significant extended emission that must be taken into account when calculating the total radio luminosity (multi-component sources). Association of the extended radio emission is established by the proximity to the optical source, physical connection of jets and lobes, or large scale symmetry like in classic FRIIs. From these data we find an FRI/FRII luminosity dividing line like that found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974), where we use our core-only sources as proxies for FRIs, and our multi-component sources for the FRIIs. We find a bimodal distribution for the radio loudness (R = L(radio)/L(opt)) where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the multi-component extended sources, compared with no evidence for bimodality when just the core-only sources are used. We also find that a log(R) value of 1.75 is well suited to separate the FRIs from the FRIIs, and that the R bimodality seen here is really a manifestation of the FRI/FRII break originally found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974). We find modest trends in the radio loud fraction as a function of Eddington ratio and black hole mass, where the fraction of RL AGNs decreases with increasing Eddington ratio, and increases when the black hole mass is above 2 x 108 solar masses.

  10. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  11. Hyperfine interactions and nuclear probes in chemistry: The active interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herber, R. H.

    1990-08-01

    A symposium entitled “Hyperfine Interaction and Nuclear Probes in Chemistry” was held in conjunction with the 198 th. National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Miami Beach, Florida, 12 and 13 September 1989. The four half-day sessions consisted of 15 invited and 4 contributed papers, and allowed numerous opportunities for spirited discussion and information exchange, especially at the informal luncheons and pre-dinner periods, and Miami Beach proved to be a most effective venue for these activities. In the pages to follow are collected a number of the scientific reports presented at this symposium; other contributions will be published elsewhere at the discretion of the author(s).

  12. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending…

  13. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  14. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, U.; Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Cabellos, O.; Kodeli, I.; Koning, A.; Konobeyev, A.Yu.; Leeb, H.; Rochman, D.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Sauvan, P.; Sublet, J.-C.; Dupont, E.; Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J.

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  15. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants.

  16. Recent Nuclear Astrophysics Data Activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, D.W.; Blackmon, J.C.; Browne, E.; Firestone, R.B.; Hale, G.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Ma, Z.; McLane, V.; Norman, E.B.; Shu, N.; Smith, D.L.; Smith, M.S.; Van Wormer, L.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Wu, S.-C.

    1999-08-30

    Measurements in nuclear physics laboratories form the empirical foundation for new, realistic, sophisticated theoretical models of a wide variety of astrophysical systems. The predictive power of these models has, in many instances, a strong dependence on the input nuclear data, and more extensive and accurate nuclear data is required for these models than ever before. Progress in astrophysics can be aided by providing scientists with more usable, accurate, and significant amounts of nuclear data in a timely fashion in formats that can be easily incorporated into their models. A number of recent data compilations, evaluations, calculations, and disseminations that address nuclear astrophysics data needs will be described.

  17. Development of an oregano-based ointment with anti-microbial activity including activity against methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Eng, William; Norman, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance has prompted a search for new compounds with anti-microbial activity. In the authors' previous study, oregano extract was identified as one of the most potent anti-microbial compounds. The disk diffusion method was employed to assess the degree of inhibition against various microorganisms, and the bacteriostatic or bactericidal mechanism of action. Disk diffusion studies showed that oregano was found to be bacteriostatic for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, (MRSA) but bacteriocidal for seven other microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa could not be inhibited by oregano. An ointment consisting of 1-10% oregano could inhibit most organisms except for Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris, which required 20% and Pseudomonas which could not be inhibited even at the highest concentration of 80%. Oregano extracts can be formulated into an ointment that shows broad antimicrobial activity. Additional testing to assess tissue toxicity and other adverse reactions would be needed prior to human testing.

  18. Heat-shock stress activates a novel nuclear import pathway mediated by Hikeshi

    PubMed Central

    Imamoto, Naoko; Kose, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stresses significantly affect nuclear transport systems. Nuclear transport pathways mediated by importin β-family members, which are active under normal conditions, are downregulated. During thermal stress, a nuclear import pathway mediated by a novel carrier, which we named Hikeshi, becomes active. Hikeshi is not a member of the importin β family and mediates the nuclear import of Hsp70s. Unlike importin β family-mediated nuclear transport, the Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import of Hsp70s is not coupled to the GTPase cycle of the small GTPase Ran but rather is coupled with the ATPase cycle of Hsp70s. Hikeshi-mediated nuclear import is essential for the attenuation and reversal of the thermal stress response in human cells. The mechanism and functions of this newly identified nuclear import pathway will be discussed. PMID:22895094

  19. Parvoviruses Cause Nuclear Envelope Breakdown by Activating Key Enzymes of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Manvi; Cohen, Sarah; Snoussi, Kenza; Popa-Wagner, Ruth; Anderson, Fenja; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Wodrich, Harald; Dinsart, Christiane; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A.; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca++ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca++ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis. PMID:24204256

  20. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  1. Homocysteine-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells coincides with nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 activity.

    PubMed

    Sipkens, Jessica A; Hahn, Nynke; van den Brand, Carlien S; Meischl, Christof; Cillessen, Saskia A G M; Smith, Desirée E C; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Musters, René J P; Roos, Dirk; Jakobs, Cornelis; Blom, Henk J; Smulders, Yvo M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Rauwerda, Jan A; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Niessen, Hans W M

    2013-11-01

    Apoptosis of endothelial cells related to homocysteine (Hcy) has been reported in several studies. In this study, we evaluated whether reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing signaling pathways contribute to Hcy-induced apoptosis induction, with specific emphasis on NADPH oxidases. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 0.01-2.5 mM Hcy. We determined the effect of Hcy on caspase-3 activity, annexin V positivity, intracellular NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, and p47(phox) expression and localization, nuclear nitrotyrosine accumulation, and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m). Hcy induced caspase-3 activity and apoptosis; this effect was concentration dependent and maximal after 6-h exposure to 2.5 mM Hcy. It was accompanied by a significant increase in ΔΨ m. Cysteine was inactive on these parameters excluding a reactive thiol group effect. Hcy induced an increase in cellular NOX2, p47(phox), and NOX4, but not that of NOX1. 3D digital imaging microscopy followed by image deconvolution analysis showed nuclear accumulation of NOX2 and p47(phox) in endothelial cells exposed to Hcy, but not in control cells, which coincided with accumulation of nuclear nitrotyrosine residues. Furthermore, Hcy enhanced peri-nuclear localization of NOX4 coinciding with accumulation of peri-nuclear nitrotyrosine residues, a reflection of local ROS production. p47(phox) was also increased in the peri-nuclear region. The Hcy-induced increase in caspase-3 activity was prevented by DPI and apocynin, suggesting involvement of NOX activity. The data presented in this article reveal accumulation of nuclear NOX2 and peri-nuclear NOX4 accumulation as potential source of ROS production in Hcy-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  2. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. O'Brien

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  3. Activation analysis study on Li-ion batteries for nuclear forensic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik B.; Whitney, Chad; Holbert, Keith E.; Zhang, Taipeng; Stannard, Tyler; Christie, Anthony; Harper, Peter; Anderson, Blake; Christian, James F.

    2015-06-01

    The nuclear materials environment has been increasing significantly in complexity over the past couple of decades. The prevention of attacks from nuclear weapons is becoming more difficult, and nuclear forensics is a deterrent by providing detailed information on any type of nuclear event for proper attribution. One component of the nuclear forensic analysis is a measurement of the neutron spectrum. As an example, the neutron component provides information on the composition of the weapons, whether boosting is involved or the mechanisms used in creating a supercritical state. As 6Li has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the lithium battery is a primary candidate for assessing the neutron spectrum after detonation. The absorption process for 6Li yields tritium, which can be measured at a later point after the nuclear event, as long as the battery can be processed in a manner to successfully extract the tritium content. In addition, measuring the activated constituents after exposure provides a means to reconstruct the incident neutron spectrum. The battery consists of a spiral or folded layers of material that have unique, energy dependent interactions associated with the incident neutron flux. A detailed analysis on the batteries included a pre-irradiated mass spectrometry analysis to be used as input for neutron spectrum reconstruction. A set of batteries were exposed to a hard neutron spectrum delivered by the University of Massachusetts, Lowell research reactor Fast Neutron Irradiator (FNI). The gamma spectra were measured from the batteries within a few days and within a week after the exposure to obtain sufficient data on the activated materials in the batteries. The activity was calculated for a number of select isotopes, indicating the number of associated neutron interactions. The results from tritium extraction are marginal. A measurable increase in detected particles (gammas and betas) below 50 keV not self-attenuated by the battery was observed

  4. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. )

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Proton Reaction Data Library for Nuclear Activation (Medium Energy Nuclear Data Library.)

    2002-03-01

    Version 00 GROUPXS does file handling and processing of the double-differential continuum-emission cross sections stored in the new MF6 format of ENDF/VI. It treats the energy-angle data that are supposed to be represented by a Legendre-polynomial expansion in the center-of-mass system and can do the following: (1) Conversion of MF6 data from center-of-mass system to the laboratory system, with the possibility to continue the calculation with the options (2), (3), and (4). (2) Conversion ofmore » Legendre-polynomial representation into point-wise angular data, in MF6 format. (3) Conversion of data from MF6 into MF4 + MF5 (ENDF-V). (4) Calculation of group constants, scattering matrices and transfer matrices for arbitrary group structures with a fusion micro-flux weighting spectrum (PN-approximation). The code treats only continuum reaction types that are stored in the MF6 format with the restrictions as specified for the European Fusion File (EFF1). These restrictions are not inconvenient for the purpose of fusion neutronics calculations and they facilitate relatively simple processing . This neutron reaction data library can be used for nuclear activation and transmutation applications at energies up to 100 MeV.« less

  6. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  7. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better. PMID:16102243

  8. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  9. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  10. Tune-out wavelength around 413 nm for the helium 2 3S1 state including relativistic and finite-nuclear-mass corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Hui; Tang, Li-Yan; Zhang, Xian-Zhou; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2016-05-01

    The tune-out wavelength at 413 nm for the 2 3S1 state of helium is expected to be sensitive to finite nuclear mass, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamic (QED) corrections, which provides a scheme for testing atomic structure theory [J. Mitroy and L.-Y. Tang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 052515 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.052515]. In the present work, a large-scale full-configuration-interaction calculation based on both the Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian and the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian is performed for the dynamic dipole polarizabilities of helium in the 2 3S1 state. The tune-out wavelengths for the magnetic sublevels MJ=0 and MJ=±1 are determined to be 413.0801(4) nm and 413.0859(4) nm, respectively, at sub-ppm accuracy, including finite nuclear mass and relativistic corrections. Our value for the MJ=1 sublevel agrees with the measured value of 413.0938(20)(9) nm [B. M. Henson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 043004 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.043004] at the level of 19 ppm. The discrepancy between these two values is mainly due to the uncalculated QED contribution. Our current value confirms quantitatively the prediction of Mitroy and Tang. Also, for the state of 2 3S1 we find that the corrections due to finite nuclear mass and relativistic effects to the static dipole polarizability of 315.7227(4)a03 are about 600 ppm and 310 ppm, respectively, which are about 1.4 and 5.4 times larger than those for the ground state. A measurement at the level of 10 ppm for the static dipole polarizability of helium in 2 3S1 can be used to determine the transition matrix element between 2 3S and 2 3P at the level of 10-5.

  11. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  12. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  13. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  14. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  15. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  16. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  17. NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IS MORE PREVALENT IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, D. J.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Popesso, P.; Genzel, R.; Saintonge, A.; Tacconi, L.; Wuyts, S. E-mail: lutz@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: popesso@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: amelie@mpe.mpg.de E-mail: swuyts@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-07-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation (SF) to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called Green Valley, a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing SF quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel/PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields with redshifts, stellar masses, and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U - V color distributions and star formation rate distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z {approx} 2, but we show that such colors are poor tracers of SF. While the FIR distributions of both star-forming AGNs and star-forming inactive galaxies are statistically similar, we show that AGNs are preferentially found in star-forming host galaxies, or, in other words, AGNs are less likely to be found in weakly star-forming or quenched galaxies. We postulate that, among X-ray-selected AGNs of low and moderate accretion luminosities, the supply of cold gas primarily determines the accretion rate distribution of the nuclear black holes.

  18. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  19. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  20. A novel phylogeny of the Gelidiales (Rhodophyta) based on five genes including the nuclear CesA, with descriptions of Orthogonacladia gen. nov. and Orthogonacladiaceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Boo, Ga Hun; Le Gall, Line; Miller, Kathy Ann; Freshwater, D Wilson; Wernberg, Thomas; Terada, Ryuta; Yoon, Kyung Ju; Boo, Sung Min

    2016-08-01

    Although the Gelidiales are economically important marine red algae producing agar and agarose, the phylogeny of this order remains poorly resolved. The present study provides a molecular phylogeny based on a novel marker, nuclear-encoded CesA, plus plastid-encoded psaA, psbA, rbcL, and mitochondria-encoded cox1 from subsets of 107 species from all ten genera within the Gelidiales. Analyses of individual and combined datasets support the monophyly of three currently recognized families, and reveal a new clade. On the basis of these results, the new family Orthogonacladiaceae is described to accommodate Aphanta and a new genus Orthogonacladia that includes species previously classified as Gelidium madagascariense and Pterocladia rectangularis. Acanthopeltis is merged with Gelidium, which has nomenclatural priority. Nuclear-encoded CesA was found to be useful for improving the resolution of phylogenetic relationships within the Gelidiales and is likely to be valuable for the inference of phylogenetic relationship among other red algal taxa. PMID:27223999

  1. Active nuclear import and export pathways regulate E2F-5 subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Margarita D; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Carla; D'Souza, Sudhir J A; Dagnino, Lina

    2002-09-13

    Epidermal keratinocyte differentiation is accompanied by differential regulation of E2F genes, including up-regulation of E2F-5 and its concomitant association with the retinoblastoma family protein p130. This complex appears to play a role in irreversible withdrawal from the cell cycle in differentiating keratinocytes. We now report that keratinocyte differentiation is also accompanied by changes in E2F-5 subcellular localization, from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. To define the molecular determinants of E2F-5 nuclear import, we tested its ability to enter the nucleus in import assays in vitro using digitonin-permeabilized cells. We found that E2F-5 enters the nucleus through mediated transport processes that involve formation of nuclear pore complexes. It has been proposed that E2F-4 and E2F-5, which lack defined nuclear localization signal (NLS) consensus sequences, enter the nucleus in association with NLS-containing DP-2 or pRB family proteins. However, we show that nuclear import of E2F-5 only requires the first N-terminal 56 amino acid residues and is not dependent on interaction with DP or pRB family proteins. Because E2F-5 is predominantly cytoplasmic in undifferentiated keratinocytes and in other intact cells, we also examined whether this protein is subjected to active nuclear export. Indeed, E2F-5 is exported from the nucleus through leptomycin B-sensitive, CRM1-mediated transport, through a region corresponding to amino acid residues 130-154. This region excludes the DNA- and the p130-binding domains. Thus, the subcellular distribution of E2F-5 is tightly regulated in intact cells, through multiple functional domains that direct nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of this protein.

  2. Caspase-like activity in programmed nuclear death during conjugation of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Endoh, H

    2003-06-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is common in a variety of eucaryotes, from unicellular protozoa to vertebrates. The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila has a unique apoptosis-like nuclear death during conjugation, called programmed nuclear death. This death program involves nuclear condensation (pyknosis) and oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in the parental macronucleus. Subsequently, the condensed nucleus is entirely resorbed in the autophagosome. Here we demonstrate that caspase-8- and -9-like activity was detected, but no caspase-3-like activity, by in vitro assay during the nuclear resorption process, suggesting that caspase-like activity is associated with both programmed cell death and apoptosis-like nuclear death in Tetrahymena. The use of indicator dye to detect the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggested the uptake of mitochondria and the degenerating macronucleus by the autophagosome. An involvement of mitochondria in the programmed nuclear death is discussed.

  3. Mapping neural circuits with activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Masuyama, Kaoru; Zhang, Yi; Rao, Yi; Wang, Jing W

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is a calcium-responsive transcription factor. We describe here an NFAT-based neural tracing method-CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA)-for labeling active neurons in behaving animals. In this system, sustained neural activity induces nuclear import of the chimeric transcription factor LexA-VP16-NFAT, which in turn drives green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter expression only in active neurons. We tested this system in Drosophila and found that volatile sex pheromones excite specific neurons in the olfactory circuit. Furthermore, complex courtship behavior associated with multi-modal sensory inputs activated neurons in the ventral nerve cord. This method harnessing the mechanism of activity-dependent nuclear import of a transcription factor can be used to identify active neurons in specific neuronal population in behaving animals. PMID:22236090

  4. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. XI. Optical characterisation of nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabater, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Leon, S.; Best, P.; Sulentic, J.

    2012-09-01

    Context. This paper is part of a series involving the AMIGA project (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies), which identifies and studies a statistically significant sample of the most isolated galaxies in the northern sky. Aims: We present a catalogue of nuclear activity, traced by optical emission lines, in a well-defined sample of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe, which will be used as a basis for studying the effect of the environment on nuclear activity. Methods: We obtained spectral data from the 6th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which were inspected in a semi-automatic way. We subtracted the underlying stellar populations from the spectra (using the software Starlight) and modelled the nuclear emission features. Standard emission-line diagnostics diagrams were applied, using a new classification scheme that takes into account censored data, to classify the type of nuclear emission. Results: We provide a final catalogue of spectroscopic data, stellar populations, emission lines and classification of optical nuclear activity for AMIGA galaxies. The prevalence of optical active galactic nuclei (AGN) in AMIGA galaxies is 20.4%, or 36.7% including transition objects. The fraction of AGN increases steeply towards earlier morphological types and higher luminosities. We compare these results with a matched analysis of galaxies in isolated denser environments (Hickson Compact Groups). After correcting for the effects of the morphology and luminosity, we find that there is no evidence for a difference in the prevalence of AGN between isolated and compact group galaxies, and we discuss the implications of this result. Conclusions: We find that a major interaction is not a necessary condition for the triggering of optical AGN. Full Tables 1-7 and A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://amiga.iaa.es/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  5. Hyperglycemia Exacerbates Burn-Induced Liver Inflammation via Noncanonical Nuclear Factor-κB Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Gabriela A; Tilton, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia and inflammation are hallmarks of burn injury. In this study, we used a rat model of hyperglycemia and burn injury to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia on inflammatory responses in the liver. Hyperglycemia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with streptozotocin (STZ) (35–40 mg/kg), followed by a 60% third-degree scald burn injury. Cytokine levels (by multiplex, in cytosolic liver extracts), hormones (by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], in serum), nuclear factor (NF)-κB protein deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) binding (by ELISA, in nuclear liver extracts) and liver functional panel (using VetScan, in serum) were measured at different time points up to 7 d after burn injury. Blood glucose significantly increased after burn injury in both groups with different temporal patterns. Hyperglycemic rats were capable of endogenous insulin secretion, which was enhanced significantly versus controls 12 h after burn injury. DNA binding data of liver nuclear extracts showed a robust and significant activation of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway in the hyperglycemic versus control burn animals, including increased NF-κB–inducing kinase expression (p < 0.05). Liver acute-phase proteins and cytokine expression were increased, whereas secretion of constitutive proteins was decreased after burn injury in hyperglycemic versus control animals (p < 0.05). These results indicate that burn injury to the skin rapidly activated canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in the liver. Robust activation of the NF-κB noncanonical pathway was associated with increased expression of inflammatory markers and acute-phase proteins, and impaired glucose metabolism. Hyperglycemia is detrimental to burn outcome by augmenting inflammation mediated by hepatic noncanonical NF-κB pathway activation. PMID:22572938

  6. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-09-16

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D&D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D&D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C.

  7. Computer programs for absolute neutron activation analysis on the nuclear data 6620 data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, J.W.; Emery, J.F.

    1982-03-01

    Five computer programs that provide multielement neutron activation analysis are discussed. The software package was designed for use on the Nuclear Data 6620 Data Acquisition System and interacts with existing Nuclear Data Corporation software. The programs were developed to make use of the capabilities of the 6620 system to analyze large numbers of samples and assist in a large sample workload that had begun in the neutron activation analysis facility of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Nuclear Data neutron activation software is unable to perform absolute activation analysis and therefore was inefficient and inadequate for our applications.

  8. Cdk1 Activates Pre-mitotic Nuclear Envelope Dynein Recruitment and Apical Nuclear Migration in Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Baffet, Alexandre D; Hu, Daniel J; Vallee, Richard B

    2015-06-22

    Dynein recruitment to the nuclear envelope is required for pre-mitotic nucleus-centrosome interactions in nonneuronal cells and for apical nuclear migration in neural stem cells. In each case, dynein is recruited to the nuclear envelope (NE) specifically during G2 via two nuclear pore-mediated mechanisms involving RanBP2-BicD2 and Nup133-CENP-F. The mechanisms responsible for cell-cycle control of this behavior are unknown. We now find that Cdk1 serves as a direct master controller for NE dynein recruitment in neural stem cells and HeLa cells. Cdk1 phosphorylates conserved sites within RanBP2 and activates BicD2 binding and early dynein recruitment. Late recruitment is triggered by a Cdk1-induced export of CENP-F from the nucleus. Forced NE targeting of BicD2 overrides Cdk1 inhibition, fully rescuing dynein recruitment and nuclear migration in neural stem cells. These results reveal how NE dynein recruitment is cell-cycle regulated and identify the trigger mechanism for apical nuclear migration in the brain.

  9. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  10. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  11. PIASy, a nuclear matrix–associated SUMO E3 ligase, represses LEF1 activity by sequestration into nuclear bodies

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Shrikesh; Bruhn, Laurakay; Sieber, Heidemarie; Pichler, Andrea; Melchior, Frauke; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2001-01-01

    The Wnt-responsive transcription factor LEF1 can activate transcription in association with β-catenin and repress transcription in association with Groucho. In search of additional regulatory mechanisms of LEF1 function, we identified the protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, as a novel interaction partner of LEF1. Coexpression of PIASy with LEF1 results in potent repression of LEF1 activity and in covalent modification of LEF1 with SUMO. PIASy markedly stimulates the sumoylation of LEF1 and multiple other proteins in vivo and functions as a SUMO E3 ligase for LEF1 in a reconstituted system in vitro. Moreover, PIASy binds to nuclear matrix–associated DNA sequences and targets LEF1 to nuclear bodies, suggesting that PIASy-mediated subnuclear sequestration accounts for the repression of LEF1 activity. PMID:11731474

  12. Fluctuations in nuclear envelope's potential mediate synchronization of early neural activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Masayuki

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear envelope's potential changes with a release of Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Changes in nuclear envelope's potential underlie synchronous burst discharges. {yields} Nuclear envelope's potential generates periodic bursts of fluctuations. {yields} Fluctuations in nuclear envelope's potential function as a current noise generator. -- Abstract: Neural progenitor cells and developing neurons show periodic, synchronous Ca{sup 2+} rises even before synapse formation, and the origin of the synchronous activity remains unknown. Here, fluorescence measurement revealed that the membrane potential of the nuclear envelope, which forms an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} store, changed with a release of Ca{sup 2+} and generated spontaneous, periodic bursts of fluctuations in potential. Furthermore, changes in the nuclear envelope's potential underlay spike burst generations. These results support the model that voltage fluctuations of the nuclear envelope synchronize Ca{sup 2+} release between cells and also function as a current noise generator to cause synchronous burst discharges.

  13. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility (Figure 1) was used in the early to mid-1960s for testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles. The TCA facility, known as Corrective Action Unit 115, was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously, provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. First, preliminary investigation activities were performed, including review of process knowledge documentation, targeted facility radiological and hazardous material surveys, concrete core drilling and analysis, shield wall radiological characterization, and discrete sampling, which proved to be very useful and cost-effective in subsequent decommissioning planning and execution and worker safety. Second, site setup and mobilization of equipment and personnel were completed. Third, early removal of hazardous materials, including asbestos, lead, cadmium, and oil, was performed ensuring worker safety during more invasive demolition activities. Process piping was to be verified void of contents. Electrical systems were de-energized and other systems were rendered free of residual energy. Fourth, areas of high radiological contamination were decontaminated using multiple methods. Contamination levels varied across the facility. Fixed beta/gamma contamination levels ranged up to 2 million disintegrations per minute (dpm)/100

  14. Hypoxic preconditioning decreases nuclear factor κB activity via Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ren; Liu, Qian; Khoury, Joseph; Li, Yue-Jin; Han, Xiao-Hui; Li, Jing; Ibla, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB is a key mediator of inflammation during conditions of hypoxia. Here, we used models of hypoxic pre-conditioning as mechanism to decrease nuclear factor κB activity induced by hypoxia. Our initial studies suggested that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 may be induced by hypoxic pre-conditioning and possibly involved in the regulation of nuclear factor κB. In this study we used Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 exogenous over-expression and knock-down to determine its effect on ataxia telangiectasia mutated--nuclear factor κB activation cascade. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic pre-conditioning significantly increased the expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 at mRNA and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo. Over-expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 significantly attenuated the hypoxia-mediated ataxia telangiectasia mutated phosphorylation and prevented its cytoplasm translocation where it functions to activate nuclear factor κB. We further determined that Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 activated the protein phosphatase 2A, preventing the phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated serine-1981, the main regulatory site of ataxia telangiectasia mutated activity. Cellular levels of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1 protein significantly decreased nuclear factor κB activation profiles and pro-inflammatory gene expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxic pre-conditioning decreases the activation of nuclear factor κB through the transcriptional induction of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1.

  15. Aberrant activation of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Tsung-Chieh; Hsieh, Sen-Yung; Hsieh, Yi-Yueh; Chen, Tse-Chin; Yeh, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lin, Deng-Yn; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear factor of activated T cell 2 (NFAT2), the major NFAT protein in peripheral T cells, in sustained T cell activation and intractable inflammation in human ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: We used two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, double immunohistochemical staining, and confocal microscopy to inspect the expression of NFAT2 in 107, 15, 48 and 5 cases of UC, Crohn’s disease (CD), non-specific colitis, and 5 healthy individuals, respectively. RESULTS: Up-regulation with profound nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 of lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) of colonic mucosa was found specifically in the affected colonic mucosa from patients with UC, as compared to CD or NC (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Nucleo-translocation/activation of NFAT2 primarily occurred in CD8+T, but was less prominent in CD4+ T cells or CD20+B cells. It was strongly associated with the disease activity, including endoscopic stage (τ = 0.2145, P = 0.0281) and histologic grade (τ = 0.4167, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We disclose for the first time the nucleo-translocation/activatin of NFAT2 in lamina propria mononuclear cells in ulcerative colitis. Activation of NFAT2 was specific for ulcerative colitis and highly associated with disease activity. Since activation of NFAT2 is implicated in an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop of sustained T-cell activation and NFAT proteins play key roles in the calcium/calcineurin signaling pathways, our results not only provide new insights into the mechanism for sustained intractable inflammation, but also suggest the calcium-calcineurin/NFAT pathway as a new therapeutic target for ulcerative colitis. PMID:18350607

  16. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of a Siderophore Cephalosporin, S-649266, against Enterobacteriaceae Clinical Isolates, Including Carbapenem-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Kohira, Naoki; West, Joshua; Ito, Akinobu; Ito-Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Rio; Sato, Takafumi; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2015-11-16

    S-649266 is a novel siderophore cephalosporin antibiotic with a catechol moiety on the 3-position side chain. Two sets of clinical isolate collections were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of S-649266 against Enterobacteriaceae. These sets included 617 global isolates collected between 2009 and 2011 and 233 β-lactamase-identified isolates, including 47 KPC-, 49 NDM-, 12 VIM-, and 8 IMP-producers. The MIC90 values of S-649266 against the first set of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates were all ≤1 μg/ml, and there were only 8 isolates (1.3%) among these 617 clinical isolates with MIC values of ≥8 μg/ml. In the second set, the MIC values of S-649266 were ≤4 μg/ml against 109 strains among 116 KPC-producing and class B (metallo) carbapenemase-producing strains. In addition, S-649266 showed MIC values of ≤2 μg/ml against each of the 13 strains that produced other types of carbapenemases such as SME, NMC, and OXA-48. The mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility of 7 class B carbapenemase-producing strains with MIC values of ≥16 μg/ml are uncertain. This is the first report to demonstrate that S-649266, a novel siderophore cephalosporin, has significant antimicrobial activity against Enterobacteriaceae, including strains that produce carbapenemases such as KPC and NDM-1.

  17. Controls of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Activity by 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation With Examples in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Generally, both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) effects are alleviated through differential posttranslational modification of NF-κB phosphorylation after pretreatment with 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as 5´-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or the hypoglycemic agent metformin. We found that AICAR or metformin acts as a regulator of LPS/NF-κB-or hypoxia/NF-κB-mediated cyclooxygenase induction by an AMPK-dependent mechanism with interactions between p65-NF-κB phosphorylation and acetylation, including in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). In summary, we highlighted the regulatory interactions of AMPK activity on NF-κB induction, particularly in posttranslational phosphorylation and acetylation of NF-κB under inflammatory conditions or hypoxia environment. PMID:27706018

  18. Activity of eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, including multidrug-resistant isolates, from New York City.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David; Quale, John

    2015-03-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 μg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 μg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 μg/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  19. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  20. Diabetes-induced activation of nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, and its inhibition by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, Renu A; Koppolu, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Chen, Shali

    2003-11-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in the retina in diabetes, and long-term administration of antioxidants inhibits the development of retinopathy in diabetic rats. The purpose of this study is to determine how diabetes affects the activation of a redox-sensitive nuclear transcriptional factor in the retina, NF-kappaB, and its inhibition by antioxidants. Alloxan diabetic rats were assigned to receive standard diet or the diet supplemented with multiple antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, Trolox, dl alpha-tocopherol acetate, N-acetyl cysteine, beta-carotene, and selenium for up to 14 months. NF-kappaB activation, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were measured in the retina at 2, 8 and 14 months of diabetes. Retinal NF-kappaB was activated by about 60% at two months after induction of diabetes, remained activated for up to 14 months of diabetes, and the duration of diabetes had no effect on the intensity of NF-kappaB activation. Similarly, oxidative stress and nitric oxides were elevated by over 50% in the retina of rats diabetic for 14 months, and nitrotyrosine levels were elevated by over two folds. Administration of the antioxidants to the rats for the entire duration of diabetes inhibited activation of NF-kappaB and elevations in oxidative stress, nitric oxides and nitrotyrosine formation without ameliorating the severity of hyperglycemia. These in vivo results were confirmed by in vitro studies showing that high glucose activates NF-kappaB and elevates NO and lipid peroxides in both retinal endothelial cells and pericytes that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Thus, the results suggest that the activation of retinal NF-KB in diabetes is an early event in the development of retinopathy, and it remains active when the retinal capillary cell death is accelerating, and histopathology is developing. Beneficial effects of antioxidants on the development of diabetic retinopathy might involve inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and its downstream pathways in the retina.

  1. Molecular hydrogen: An abundant energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libert, M.; Bildstein, O.; Esnault, L.; Jullien, M.; Sellier, R.

    A thorough understanding of the energy sources used by microbial systems in the deep terrestrial subsurface is essential since the extreme conditions for life in deep biospheres may serve as a model for possible life in a nuclear waste repository. In this respect, H 2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep terrestrial subsurface environments. This hydrogen is produced from abiotic and biotic processes but its concentration in natural systems is usually maintained at very low levels due to hydrogen-consuming bacteria. A significant amount of H 2 gas will be produced within deep nuclear waste repositories, essentially from the corrosion of metallic components. This will consequently improve the conditions for microbial activity in this specific environment. This paper discusses different study cases with experimental results to illustrate the fact that microorganisms are able to use hydrogen for redox processes (reduction of O 2, NO3-, Fe III) in several waste disposal conditions. Consequences of microbial activity include: alteration of groundwater chemistry and shift in geochemical equilibria, gas production or consumption, biocorrosion, and potential modifications of confinement properties. In order to quantify the impact of hydrogen bacteria, the next step will be to determine the kinetic rate of the reactions in realistic conditions.

  2. An Overview of the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, Thomas M.; Polk, James E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) research and development activity within NASA's Project Prometheus, was one of three proposals selected by NASA to develop thruster technologies for long life, high power, high specific impulse nuclear electric propulsion systems that would enable more robust and ambitious science exploration missions to the outer solar system. NEXIS technology represents a dramatic improvement in the state-of-the-art for ion propulsion and is designed to achieve propellant throughput capabilities >= 2000 kg and efficiencies >= 78% while increasing the thruster power to >= 20 kW and specific impulse to >= 6000 s. The NEXIS technology uses erosion resistant carbon-carbon grids, a graphite keeper, a new reservoir hollow cathode, a 65-cm diameter chamber masked to produce a 57-cm diameter ion beam, and a shared neutralizer architecture to achieve these goals. The accomplishments of the NEXIS activity so far include performance testing of a laboratory model thruster, successful completion of a proof of concept reservoir cathode 2000 hour wear test, structural and thermal analysis of a completed development model thruster design, fabrication of most of the development model piece parts, and the nearly complete vacuum facility modifications to allow long duration wear testing of high power ion thrusters.

  3. The nuclear factor SPBP contains different functional domains and stimulates the activity of various transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Rekdal, C; Sjøttem, E; Johansen, T

    2000-12-22

    SPBP (stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element binding protein) was originally cloned from a cDNA expression library by virtue of its ability to bind to a platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element in the human stromelysin-1 promoter. A 937-amino acid-long protein was deduced from a 3995-nucleotide murine cDNA sequence. By analyses of both human and murine cDNAs, we now show that SPBP is twice as large as originally found. The human SPBP gene contains six exons and is located on chromosome 22q13.1-13.3. Two isoforms differing in their C termini are expressed due to alternative splicing. PCR analyses of multitissue cDNA panels showed that SPBP is expressed in most tissues except for ovary and prostate. Functional mapping revealed that SPBP is a nuclear, multidomain protein containing an N-terminal region with transactivating ability, a novel type of DNA-binding domain containing an AT hook motif, and a bipartite nuclear localization signal as well as a C-terminal zinc finger domain. This type of zinc finger domain is also found in the trithorax family of chromatin-based transcriptional regulator proteins. Using cotransfection experiments, we find that SPBP enhances the transcriptional activity of various transcription factors such as c-Jun, Ets1, Sp1, and Pax6. Hence, SPBP seems to act as a transcriptional coactivator. PMID:10995766

  4. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  5. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  6. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  8. Comparison of the activity measurements in nuclear medicine services in the Brazilian northeast region.

    PubMed

    de Farias Fragoso, Maria da Conceição; de Albuquerque, Antônio Morais; de Oliveira, Mércia L; de Lima, Fabiana Farias; Barreto, Flávio Chiappetta Paes; de Andrade Lima, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern Regional Centre for Nuclear Sciences (CRCN-NE), National Nuclear Energy Commission, has organized for the first time in nuclear medicine services (NMSs) in the Brazilian northeast region a comparison of activity measurements for (99m)Tc, (131)I, (67)Ga, (201)Tl and (57)Co. This tool is widely utilized to evaluate not only the accuracy of radionuclide calibrators, but also the competence of NMSs to measure the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals and the performance of the personnel involved in these measurements. The comparison results showed that 90% of the results received from participants are within the ±10% limit established by the Brazilian Norm.

  9. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Koji; Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie; Asaka, Masahiro; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  10. Nuclear presence of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c3 and c4 is required for Toll-like receptor-activated innate inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Hiroshi; Shin, Mike J; Celil Aydemir, Ayse B; Kim, Kyung-Ok; Nizami, Saqib A; Chung, Gook-Jin; Lee, Francis Young-In

    2011-11-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATs) are crucial transcription factors that tightly control proinflammatory cytokine expression for adaptive immunity in T and B lymphocytes. However, little is known about the role of NFATs for innate immunity in macrophages. In this study, we report that NFAT is required for Toll-like receptor (TLR)-initiated innate immune responses in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). All TLR ligand stimulation including LPS, a TLR4 ligand, and Pam(3)CSK(4), a TLR1/2 ligand, induced expression of TNF which was inhibited by VIVIT, an NFAT-specific inhibitor peptide. BMMs from NFATc4 knock-out mouse expressed less TNF than wild type. Despite apparent association between NFAT and TNF, LPS did not directly activate NFAT based on NFAT-luciferase reporter assay, whereas NF-κB was inducibly activated by LPS. Instead, macrophage exhibited constitutive NFAT activity which was not increased by LPS and was decreased by VIVIT. Immunocytochemical examination of NFATc1-4 of BMMs exhibited nuclear localization of NFATc3/c4 regardless of LPS stimulation. LPS stimulation did not cause nuclear translocation of NFATc1/c2. Treatment with VIVIT resulted in nuclear export of NFATc3/c4 and inhibited TLR-activated TNF expression, suggesting that nuclear residence of NFATc is required for TLR-related innate immune response. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay using anti-RNA polymerase II (PolII) antibody suggested that VIVIT decreased PolII binding to TNF gene locus, consistent with VIVIT inhibition of LPS-induced TNF mRNA expression. This study identifies a novel paradigm of innate immune regulation rendered by NFAT which is a well known family of adaptive immune regulatory proteins.

  11. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  12. GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

    2011-10-01

    The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly

  13. The effect of an iodine restricted including no sea foods diet, on technetium-99m thyroid scintigraphy: a neglected issue in nuclear medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Neshandarasli, Isa; Mogharrabi, Mehdi; Jalallat, Sara; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Although it is recommended to patients to avoid sea food and iodine-containing medications prior to iodine-131 (¹³¹I) scanning, the efficacy of this diet as for technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)Tc-P) thyroid scintigraphy is not well addressed in the literature. We evaluated a self-managed, outpatients, iodine restricted diet (IRD) designed to reduce total body iodine in preparation for such a scan. We have studied 39 patients who referred to our Department for multinodular goiter, 30 females and 9 males, aged:14-54 years and their (99m)Tc-P thyroid scintigraphy showed poor visualization of the thyroid gland. These patiens were living in regions with high consumption of sea foods went underwent a two-weeks iodine restriction including restriction of sea food diet for the reduction of iodine body content. These patients were called for a repeated scan after going on a IRD for at least two weeks. The two scans were compared visually, and by semiquantitative analysis. Semiquantitative analysis was applied in 8 regions of interest (ROI) by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Thirty-six subjects had better quality scintigraphy images in the post IRD thyroid scan, as was visually assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians. Semiquantitatetively, there was a significant difference in the mean counts of ROI of the right and the left thyroid lobes in favor of the post IRD scans (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study suggests that in patients with multinodular goiter, living in regions with high consumption of sea foods a two-weeks diet for the reduction of iodine body content induces in most of the cases a slightly better diagnostic thyroid (99m)Tc-P scan.

  14. The effect of an iodine restricted including no sea foods diet, on technetium-99m thyroid scintigraphy: a neglected issue in nuclear medicine practice.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Neshandarasli, Isa; Mogharrabi, Mehdi; Jalallat, Sara; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Although it is recommended to patients to avoid sea food and iodine-containing medications prior to iodine-131 (¹³¹I) scanning, the efficacy of this diet as for technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)Tc-P) thyroid scintigraphy is not well addressed in the literature. We evaluated a self-managed, outpatients, iodine restricted diet (IRD) designed to reduce total body iodine in preparation for such a scan. We have studied 39 patients who referred to our Department for multinodular goiter, 30 females and 9 males, aged:14-54 years and their (99m)Tc-P thyroid scintigraphy showed poor visualization of the thyroid gland. These patiens were living in regions with high consumption of sea foods went underwent a two-weeks iodine restriction including restriction of sea food diet for the reduction of iodine body content. These patients were called for a repeated scan after going on a IRD for at least two weeks. The two scans were compared visually, and by semiquantitative analysis. Semiquantitative analysis was applied in 8 regions of interest (ROI) by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Thirty-six subjects had better quality scintigraphy images in the post IRD thyroid scan, as was visually assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians. Semiquantitatetively, there was a significant difference in the mean counts of ROI of the right and the left thyroid lobes in favor of the post IRD scans (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study suggests that in patients with multinodular goiter, living in regions with high consumption of sea foods a two-weeks diet for the reduction of iodine body content induces in most of the cases a slightly better diagnostic thyroid (99m)Tc-P scan. PMID:22413111

  15. Technosocial Modeling for Determining the Status and Nature of a State’s Nuclear Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Harvey, Julia B.

    2009-09-25

    The International Atomic Energy Agency State Evaluation Process: The Role of Information Analysis in Reaching Safeguards Conclusions (Mathews et al. 2008), several examples of nonproliferation models using analytical software were developed that may assist the IAEA with collecting, visualizing, analyzing, and reporting information in support of the State Evaluation Process. This paper focuses on one of the examples a set of models developed in the Proactive Scenario Production, Evidence Collection, and Testing (ProSPECT) software that evaluates the status and nature of a state’s nuclear activities. The models use three distinct subject areas to perform this assessment: the presence of nuclear activities, the consistency of those nuclear activities with national nuclear energy goals, and the geopolitical context in which those nuclear activities are taking place. As a proof-of-concept for the models, a crude case study was performed. The study, which attempted to evaluate the nuclear activities taking place in Syria prior to September 2007, yielded illustrative, yet inconclusive, results. Due to the inconclusive nature of the case study results, changes that may improve the model’s efficiency and accuracy are proposed.

  16. Validation of a high throughput flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay including assessment of metabolic activation in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Christiansen, Joan; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2014-12-01

    Genotoxicity is an unacceptable property for new drug candidates and we employ three screening assays during the drug discovery process to identify genotoxicity early and optimize chemical series. One of these methods is the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay for which protocol optimizations have been described recently. Here, we report further validation of the assay in TK6 cells including assessment of metabolic activation. We first optimized assay conditions to allow for testing with and without metabolic activation in parallel in a 96-well plate format. Then, we tested a set of 48 compounds carefully selected to contain known in vivo genotoxins, nongenotoxins and drugs. Avoidance of irrelevant positives, a known issue with mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays, is important to prevent early deselection of potentially promising compounds. Therefore, we enriched the validation set with compounds that were previously reported to produce irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays. The resulting dataset was used to set the relevant cut-off values for scoring a compound positive or negative, such that we obtained an optimal balance of high sensitivity (88%) and high specificity (87%). Finally, we tested an additional set of 16 drugs to further probe assay performance and 14 of them were classified correctly. To our knowledge, the present study is the most comprehensive validation of the in vitro flow cytometric micronucleus assay and the first to report parallel assessment with metabolic activation in reasonable throughput. The assay allows for rapidly screening novel compounds for genotoxicity and is therefore well-suited for use in early drug discovery projects. Environ.

  17. Macrophage activation: role of toll-like receptors, nitric oxide, and nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Billack, Blase

    2006-10-15

    Macrophages play an important role in host-defense and inflammation. In response to an immune challenge, macrophages become activated and produce proinflammatory mediators that contribute to nonspecific immunity. The mediators released by activated macrophages include: superoxide anion; reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitric oxide and peroxynitrite; bioactive lipids; and cytokines. Although essential to the immune response, overproduction of certain macrophage-derived mediators during an immune challenge or inflammatory response can result in tissue injury and cellular death. The present report is focused on understanding some of the molecular mechanisms used by macrophages to produce reactive nitrogen intermediates in response to immunostimulatory agents such as heat shock protein 60 and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. The role of Toll-like receptors and transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) in the innate immune response is also described. A basic understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for macrophage activation should serve as a foundation for novel drug development aimed at modulating macrophage activity.

  18. Worldwide activities on the reduction of occupational exposure at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1988-06-01

    This report is based on analysis of an informational data base set up at the Brookhaven National Laboratory ALARA Center. It is part of a project sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor and evaluate research on dose reduction at nuclear power plants in the US and abroad. The main benefits to be expected from reducing occupational exposures are highlighted in the report, the chief causes of elevated doses are identified, and effective approaches to minimize radiation exposures are proposed. A wide range of research activity is covered, including plant chemistry, cobalt reduction techniques, stress corrosion cracking, decontamination, remote tools and devices, and robotics. Advanced reactors, which are designed for low radiation exposures, are examined, and health physics technology programs which have been effective in reducing occupational exposure at various utilities are discussed. The highlights of the programs on dose reduction conducted by a number of countries are described, and comparisons are made of the collective occupational radiation dose equivalents for selected countries. The short and long term trends such studies are pointing to are evaluated. It is concluded that the efforts to improve dose reduction, both in the US and abroad, remain in a healthy state but require continuing encouragement and further development.

  19. Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

  20. Classical Nuclear Hormone Receptor Activity as a Mediator of Complex Concentration Response Relationships for Endocrine Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cookman, Clifford J.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are frequently observed for endocrine active ligands that act via nuclear receptors. The curve of best fit for nonmonotonic concentration response relationships are often inverted U-shaped with effects at intermediate concentrations that are different from effects at higher or lower concentrations. Cytotoxicity is a major mode of action responsible for inverted U-shaped concentration response relationships. However, evidence suggests that ligand selectivity, activation of multiple molecular targets, concerted regulation of multiple opposing endpoints, and multiple ligand binding sites within nuclear receptors also contribute to nonmonotonic concentration response relationships of endocrine active ligands. This review reports the current understanding of mechanisms involved in classical nuclear receptor mediated nonmonotonic concentration response relationships with a focus on studies published between 2012 and 2014. PMID:25299165

  1. Discrimination of Nuclear Explosions against Civilian Sources Based on Atmospheric Radioiodine Isotopic Activity Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Martin B.; Liao, Yen-Yo; Pistner, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System that will verify compliance with the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty (CTBT) once the treaty has entered into force. This paper studies isotopic activity ratios to support the interpretation of observed atmospheric concentrations of 135I, 133I and 131I. The goal is to distinguish nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulated nuclear explosion releases along with observational data of radioiodine releases from historic nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site are compared to simulated light water reactor releases in order to provide a proof of concept for source discrimination based on radioiodine isotopic activity ratios.

  2. Nuclear factor RIP140 modulates transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Cavaillès, V; Dauvois, S; L'Horset, F; Lopez, G; Hoare, S; Kushner, P J; Parker, M G

    1995-01-01

    A conserved region in the hormone-dependent activation domain AF2 of nuclear receptors plays an important role in transcriptional activation. We have characterized a novel nuclear protein, RIP140, that specifically interacts in vitro with this domain of the estrogen receptor. This interaction was increased by estrogen, but not by anti-estrogens and the in vitro binding capacity of mutant receptors correlates with their ability to stimulate transcription. RIP140 also interacts with estrogen receptor in intact cells and modulates its transcriptional activity in the presence of estrogen, but not the anti-estrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen. In view of its widespread expression in mammalian cells, RIP140 may interact with other members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors and thereby act as a potential co-activator of hormone-regulated gene transcription. Images PMID:7641693

  3. Resource Letter FNP-1: Frontiers of nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsch, G. F.

    2004-08-01

    This Resource Letter provides a bibliography of the current research activities in nuclear physics and also a guide for finding useful nuclear data. The major areas included are nuclear structure and reactions, symmetry tests, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, high-density matter, and nuclear instrumentation.

  4. Nuclear activity in galaxy pairs: a spectroscopic analysis of 48 UZC-BGPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, P.; Zitelli, V.; Marinoni, S.

    2008-06-01

    Context: The role played by interaction on galaxy formation and evolution continues to be debated. Several questions remain open, among them whether, and to what extent, galaxy interaction induce nuclear activity, as theoretical predictions, so far, have not been adequately supported by observations. Part of the uncertainty affecting the observational results is likely to be due to the limited sizes and the inhomogeneity of the samples. Aims: Galaxy pairs are ideal sites in which to investigate the role of interaction on nuclear activity, since the proximity, in redshift and in projected separation, between members make interaction and encounters highly probable. For this reason we have undertaken a spectroscopic survey of a large homogeneous sample of galaxy pairs (UZC-BGP) selected applying an objective neighbour search algorithm to a 3D galaxy catalog (UZC). Methods: We present the results of the nuclear spectral classification, performed using standard diagnostic diagrams, of 48 UZC-BGPs, which represents more than half of the whole sample and has an excellent morphological match with it. Results: The fraction of emission line galaxies in our pair sample is large, especially among spirals where it reaches 84% and 95%, for early and late spirals. Star Burst (SB) is the most frequent type of nuclear activity encountered (30% of galaxies), while AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei) make only 19%. The fractions increase to 45% and 22% when considering only spirals. Late spirals are characterized by both an unusual increase (35%) of AGN activity and high luminosity (44% have MB < -20.0 + 5 log h). LLAGNs (Low Luminosity AGNs) are only 8% of the total number of galaxies, but this kind of activity could be present in another 10% of the galaxies (LLAGN candidates). If confirmed, these candidates would make LLAGNs constitute a significant fraction of the whole AGN (LLAGN + AGN) population, and raise the AGN population as a whole to 37%. Absorption line galaxies reside mostly

  5. Natural compounds regulate energy metabolism by the modulating the activity of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Obesity causes excess fat accumulation in various tissues, most notoriously in the adipose tissue, along with other insulin-responsive organs such as skeletal muscle and the liver, which predisposes an individual to the development of metabolic abnormalities. The molecular mechanisms underlying obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities have not been completely elucidated; however, in recent years, the search for therapies to prevent the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders has increased. It is known that several nuclear receptors, when activated by specific ligands, regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at the transcriptional level. The expression of lipid metabolism-related enzymes is directly regulated by the activity of various nuclear receptors via their interaction with specific response elements in promoters of those genes. Many natural compounds act as ligands of nuclear receptors and regulate carbohydrate and lipid metabolism by regulating the activities of these nuclear receptors. In this review, we describe our current knowledge of obesity, the role of lipid-sensing nuclear receptors in energy metabolism, and several examples of food factors that act as agonists or antagonists of nuclear receptors, which may be useful for the management of obesity and the accompanying energy metabolism abnormalities.

  6. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  7. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Development Activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center - 2006 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005-06, the Prometheus program funded a number of tasks at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system for future manned exploration missions. These tasks include the following: 1. NTP Design Develop Test & Evaluate (DDT&E) Planning 2. NTP Mission & Systems Analysis / Stage Concepts & Engine Requirements 3. NTP Engine System Trade Space Analysis and Studies 4. NTP Engine Ground Test Facility Assessment 5. Non-Nuclear Environmental Simulator (NTREES) 6. Non-Nuclear Materials Fabrication & Evaluation 7. Multi-Physics TCA Modeling. This presentation is a overview of these tasks and their accomplishments

  8. Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Spector, David L.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear speckles, also known as interchromatin granule clusters, are nuclear domains enriched in pre-mRNA splicing factors, located in the interchromatin regions of the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells. When observed by immunofluorescence microscopy, they usually appear as 20–50 irregularly shaped structures that vary in size. Speckles are dynamic structures, and their constituents can exchange continuously with the nucleoplasm and other nuclear locations, including active transcription sites. Studies on the composition, structure, and dynamics of speckles have provided an important paradigm for understanding the functional organization of the nucleus and the dynamics of the gene expression machinery. PMID:20926517

  9. Research activities in nuclear astrophysics and related areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA/GRO grant NAG 5-2081, at the University of Chicago, has provided support for a broad program of theoretical research in nuclear astrophysics and related areas, with regard to gamma-ray and hard X-ray emission from classical nova explosions. This research emphasized the possible detection of 22Na gamma-ray line emission from nearby novae involving ONeMg white dwarfs, the detailed examination of 26Al production in novae, and the possible detection of the predicted early gamma ray emission from novae that arises from the decay of the short lived, positron emitting isotopes of CNO elements. Studies of nova related problems have consumed an increasing fraction of the Principal Investigator's research efforts over the past decade. Current research addresses problems associated with the standard model for the outbursts of the classical novae: the occurrence of thermonuclear runaways (TNR) in the accreted hydrogen rich envelopes on white dwarfs in close binary systems (see, e.g., the reviews by Truran 1982; and Shara 1989). Research in progress and planned for the next three years has three main objectives: (1) to gain an improved understanding of the early evolution of the light curves of, particularly, the fastest novae; (2) to gain an improved understanding of the relative importance of the various possible mechanisms of envelope hydrogen depletion (e.g. winds, common envelope driven mass loss, and nuclear burning) to the long term evolution of novae in outburst; and (3) to seek to provide a somewhat more definitive statement of the role of classical novae in nucleosynthesis. Our proposed 2-D studies of convection during the early phases of the TNR and our systematic attempt to incorporate an improved treatment of radiation hydrodynamics into the hydrodynamic code utilized in our calculations, are particularly relevant to the first of these objectives. Further 2-D studies of the effects of common envelope evolution are intended to provide more realistic constraints

  10. [Evaluation of an obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and physical activity applied in public schools of Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Kain, Juliana; Leyton, Bárbara; Concha, Fernando; Weisstaub, Gerardo; Lobos, Luz; Bustos, Nelly; Vio, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and physical activity applied to low income Chilean children in a longitudinal three-year follow-up study. Participants included all 4-7 year old children from 7 public schools located in a low socioeconomic district of Santiago. The main aspects of the intervention were: training of teachers so they could apply an educational program on healthy eating, increase in physical education classes from 3 to 4 per week, and improvement of their quality. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC) and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were assessed yearly in 597 children. We calculated BMI, BMI Z, % normal (N), overweight (OW) and obesity (OB), WC > 90th percentile (NHANES III) and fitness (6MWD/height). Annual changes in BMI Z, WC, 6MWD and fitness were assessed, using repeated measures ANOVA and the test of proportions. Knowledge in healthy eating was assessed during 2 of the 3 years. Results showed that % OB remained unchanged for 2 years (17%) but increased to 19.3% at follow-up. BMI Z increased from 0.3 to 0.38 (p = 0.052) in the N, remained unchanged in the OW, while decreasing significantly in the OB (2.73 to 2.41 p < 0.0001). % WC > 90 th percentile decreased in the OW and OB; 6 MWD was higher in the OW, but the increase in distance overtime was greater among the N. Overall fitness improved, however it was only significant among the N (p = 0.0002). There was a significant increase in food knowledge. We conclude that in spite of a decrease in BMI Z of the OB, an improvement in fitness in the N and food knowledge in all the children, obesity increased at follow-up. This study shows that in school-based obesity programs it is necessary to apply more intense interventions with another type of methodology; otherwise this condition will continue to rise.

  11. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grambow, Bernd

    2008-12-01

    When disposing nuclear waste in clay formations it is expected that the most radiotoxic elements like Pu, Np or Am move only a few centimetres to meters before they decay. Only a few radionuclides are able to reach the biosphere and contribute to their long-term exposure risks, mainly anionic species like I129, Cl36, Se79 and in some cases C14 and Tc99, whatever the scenario considered. The recent OECD/NEA cosponsored international MOFAP workshop focussed on transport and chemical behaviour of these less toxic radionuclides. New research themes have been addressed, such as how to make use of molecular level information for the understanding of the problem of migration at large distances. Diffusion studies need to face mineralogical heterogeneities over tens to hundreds of meters. Diffusion rates are very low since the clay rock pores are so small (few nm) that electrostatic repulsion limits the space available for anion diffusion (anion exclusion). The large volume of traversed rock will provide so many retention sites that despite weak retention, even certain of these "mobile" nuclides may show significant retardation. However, the question how to measure reliably very low retention parameters has been posed. An important issue is whether redox states or organic/inorganic speciation change from their initial state at the moment of release from the waste during long term contact with surfaces, hydrogen saturated environments, etc.

  12. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Grambow, Bernd

    2008-12-12

    When disposing nuclear waste in clay formations it is expected that the most radiotoxic elements like Pu, Np or Am move only a few centimetres to meters before they decay. Only a few radionuclides are able to reach the biosphere and contribute to their long-term exposure risks, mainly anionic species like I129, Cl36, Se79 and in some cases C14 and Tc99, whatever the scenario considered. The recent OECD/NEA cosponsored international MOFAP workshop focussed on transport and chemical behaviour of these less toxic radionuclides. New research themes have been addressed, such as how to make use of molecular level information for the understanding of the problem of migration at large distances. Diffusion studies need to face mineralogical heterogeneities over tens to hundreds of meters. Diffusion rates are very low since the clay rock pores are so small (few nm) that electrostatic repulsion limits the space available for anion diffusion (anion exclusion). The large volume of traversed rock will provide so many retention sites that despite weak retention, even certain of these "mobile" nuclides may show significant retardation. However, the question how to measure reliably very low retention parameters has been posed. An important issue is whether redox states or organic/inorganic speciation change from their initial state at the moment of release from the waste during long term contact with surfaces, hydrogen saturated environments, etc.

  13. Development of nuclear analysis capabilities for DOE waste management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; DeHart, M.D.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Petrie, L.M.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate prototypic analysis capabilities that can be used by the nuclear safety analysis practitioners to: (1) demonstrate a more thorough understanding of the underlying physics phenomena that can lead to improved reliability and defensibility of safety evaluations; and (2) optimize operations related to the handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of fissile material and DOE spent fuel. To address these problems, the project will investigate the implementation of sensitivity and uncertainty methods within existing Monte Carlo codes used for criticality safety analyses, as well as within a new deterministic code that allows specification of arbitrary grids to accurately model the geometry details required in a criticality safety analysis. This capability can facilitate improved estimations of the required subcritical margin and potentially enable the use of a broader range of experiments in the validation process. The new arbitrary-grid radiation transport code will also enable detailed geometric modeling valuable for improved accuracy in application to a myriad of other problems related to waste characterization. Application to these problems will also be explored.

  14. TDP-43 Inhibits NF-κB Activity by Blocking p65 Nuclear Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingyan; Cynader, Max S.; Jia, William

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA binding protein 43) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that has been found to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43’s involvement in nuclear factor-kappaB pathways has been reported in both neurons and microglial cells. The NF-κB pathway targets hundreds of genes, many of which are involved in inflammation, immunity and cancer. p50/p65 (p50/RelA) heterodimers, as the major Rel complex in the NF-κB family, are induced by diverse external physiological stimuli and modulate transcriptional activity in almost all cell types. Both p65 and TDP-43 translocation occur through the classic nuclear transportation system. In this study, we report that TDP-43 overexpression prevents TNF-α induced p65 nuclear translocation in a dose dependent manner, and that this further inhibits p65 transactivation activity. The inhibition by TDP-43 does not occur through preventing IκB degradation but probably by competing for the nuclear transporter-importin α3 (KPNA4). This competition is dependent on the presence of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in TDP-43. Silencing TDP-43 using a specific siRNA also increased p65 nuclear localization upon TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that endogenous TDP-43 may be a default suppressor of the NF-κB pathway. Our results indicate that TDP-43 may play an important role in regulating the levels of NF-κB activity by controlling the nuclear translocation of p65. PMID:26571498

  15. TDP-43 Inhibits NF-κB Activity by Blocking p65 Nuclear Translocation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingyan; Cynader, Max S; Jia, William

    2015-01-01

    TDP-43 (TAR DNA binding protein 43) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that has been found to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43's involvement in nuclear factor-kappaB pathways has been reported in both neurons and microglial cells. The NF-κB pathway targets hundreds of genes, many of which are involved in inflammation, immunity and cancer. p50/p65 (p50/RelA) heterodimers, as the major Rel complex in the NF-κB family, are induced by diverse external physiological stimuli and modulate transcriptional activity in almost all cell types. Both p65 and TDP-43 translocation occur through the classic nuclear transportation system. In this study, we report that TDP-43 overexpression prevents TNF-α induced p65 nuclear translocation in a dose dependent manner, and that this further inhibits p65 transactivation activity. The inhibition by TDP-43 does not occur through preventing IκB degradation but probably by competing for the nuclear transporter-importin α3 (KPNA4). This competition is dependent on the presence of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) in TDP-43. Silencing TDP-43 using a specific siRNA also increased p65 nuclear localization upon TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that endogenous TDP-43 may be a default suppressor of the NF-κB pathway. Our results indicate that TDP-43 may play an important role in regulating the levels of NF-κB activity by controlling the nuclear translocation of p65. PMID:26571498

  16. Inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation by pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ).

    PubMed

    Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Koide, Naoki; Haque, Abedul; Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2012-02-29

    The effect of pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ) on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation was examined using RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. RANKL led to the formation of osteoclasts identified as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in the culture of RAW 264.7 cells. However, PQQ inhibited the appearance of osteoclasts and prevented the decrease of F4/80 macrophage maturation marker on RANKL-stimulated cells, suggesting a preventive action of PQQ on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PQQ inhibited the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1), a key transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, in RANKL-stimulated cells. On the other hand, PQQ did not inhibit the signaling pathway from RANK/RANKL binding to NFATc1 activation, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). PQQ augmented the expression of type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) and enhanced the IFN-β-mediated janus kinase (JAK1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1) expression. Moreover, PQQ reduced the expression level of c-Fos leading to the activation of NFATc1. Taken together, PQQ was suggested to prevent RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via the inactivation of NFATc1 by reduced c-Fos expression. The reduced c-Fos expression might be mediated by the enhanced IFN-β signaling due to augmented IFNAR expression.

  17. Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.

    2008-07-15

    An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

  18. NASA safety program activities in support of the Space Exploration Initiatives Nuclear Propulsion program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Panels have been used as the basis for the current development of safety policies and requirements for the Space Exploration Initiatives (SEI) Nuclear Propulsion Technology development program. The Safety Division of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Quality has initiated efforts to develop policies for the safe use of nuclear propulsion in space through involvement in the joint agency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG), encouraged expansion of the initial policy development into proposed programmatic requirements, and suggested further expansion into the overall risk assessment and risk management process for the NASA Exploration Program. Similar efforts are underway within the Department of Energy to ensure the safe development and testing of nuclear propulsion systems on Earth. This paper describes the NASA safety policy related to requirements for the design of systems that may operate where Earth re-entry is a possibility. The expected plan of action is to support and oversee activities related to the technology development of nuclear propulsion in space, and support the overall safety and risk management program being developed for the NASA Exploration Program.

  19. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  20. Da0324, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB activation, demonstrates selective antitumor activity on human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Qiuxiang; Li, Wulan; Chen, Dahui; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Chengguang; Du, Xiaojing; Shi, Dengjian; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in a variety of human cancers, including gastric cancer. NF-κB inhibitors that selectively kill cancer cells are urgently needed for cancer treatment. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation. Unfortunately, the therapeutic potential of curcumin is limited by its relatively low potency and poor cellular bioavailability. In this study, we presented a novel NF-κB inhibitor named Da0324, a synthetic asymmetric mono-carbonyl analog of curcumin. The purpose of this study is to research the expression of NF-κB in gastric cancer and the antitumor activity and mechanism of Da0324 on human gastric cancer cells. Methods The expressions between gastric cancer tissues/cells and normal gastric tissues/cells of NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot. The inhibition viability of compounds on human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901, BGC-823, MGC-803, and normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell line GES-1 was assessed with the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Absorption spectrum method and high-performance liquid chromatography method detected the stability of the compound in vitro. The compound-induced changes of inducible NF-κB activation in the SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells were examined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods. The antitumor activity of compound was performed by clonogenic assay, matrigel invasion assay, flow cytometric analysis, Western blot analysis, and Hoechst 33258 staining assay. Results High levels of p65 were found in gastric cancer tissues and cells. Da0324 displayed higher growth inhibition against several types of gastric cancer cell lines and showed relatively low toxicity to GES-1. Moreover, Da0324 was more stable than curcumin in vitro. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods showed that Da0324 blocked NF-κB activation. In addition, Da0324 significantly inhibited tumor proliferation

  1. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  2. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  3. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  4. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  5. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  6. HEPS Inventory Tool: An Inventory Tool Including Quality Assessment of School Interventions on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadaczynski, Kevin; Paulus, Peter; de Vries, Nanne; de Ruiter, Silvia; Buijs, Goof

    2010-01-01

    The HEPS Inventory Tool aims to support stakeholders working in school health promotion to promote high quality interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. As a tool it provides a step-by-step approach on how to develop a national or regional inventory of existing school based interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. It…

  7. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Power Plants'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of withdrawal. SUMMARY: The U.S... (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power Plants... 1.160, ``Monitoring the Effectiveness of Maintenance at Nuclear Power Plants.'' ADDRESSES:...

  8. Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun

    2013-07-01

    The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

  9. Nuclear PKM2 contributes to gefitinib resistance via upregulation of STAT3 activation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Zhang, Daoxiang; Chen, Xiaoying; He, Lei; Li, Tianming; Xu, Xiaoping; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD-1839), a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, is currently under investigation in clinical trials for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, as known, some patients develop resistance to TKIs, and the mechanisms mediating intrinsic resistance to EGFR-TKIs in CRC have not been fully characterized. Resistance to EGFR inhibitors reportedly involves activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in glioma and lung cancer. Here, we demonstrated that the nuclear pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) levels were positively correlated with gefitinib resistance in CRC cells. The overexpression of nuclear PKM2 in HT29 cells decreased the effect of gefitinib therapy, whereas PKM2 knockdown increased gefitinib efficacy. Furthermore, the activation of STAT3 by nuclear PKM2 was associated with gefitinib resistance. Inhibition of STAT3 by Stattic, a STAT3-specific inhibitor, or STAT3-specific siRNA sensitized resistant cells to gefitinib. These results suggest that nuclear PKM2 modulates the sensitivity of CRC cells to gefitinib and indicate that small molecule pharmacological disruption of nuclear PKM2 association with STAT3 is a potential avenue for overcoming EGFR-TKI resistance in CRC patients. PMID:26542452

  10. Effects of restricted feeding on daily fluctuations of hepatic functions including p450 monooxygenase activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Jun; Arakawa, Shingo; Watanabe, Kyoko; Ito, Kazumi; Furukawa, Tadashi

    2006-02-10

    Hepatic P450 monooxygenase activities, assessed by measurement of 7-alkoxycoumarin O-dealkylase (ACD) activities, show obvious daily fluctuations in male rats with high values during the dark period and low values during the light period. We have already confirmed that the ACD activities are controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is well known as the oscillator of circadian rhythm. Recently, it is reported that circadian oscillators exist not only in the SCN but also in peripheral organs. To date, it is unclear which circadian oscillators predominantly drive the daily fluctuations of hepatic ACD activities. To address this question, we examined the effects of restricted feeding, which uncouples the circadian oscillators in the liver from the central pacemaker in the SCN, on the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities in male rats. Here we show that restricted feeding inverts the oscillation phase of the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities. Regarding the hepatic P450 content, there were no fluctuations between the light and dark periods under ad libitum and restricted feeding conditions. Therefore, it is considered that the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities are predominantly driven by the circadian factors in peripheral organs rather than by the oscillator in the SCN directly.

  11. Nuclear activity and the environments of nearby radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dey, Arjun; Vanbreugel, Wil

    1993-01-01

    Much of our present understanding of galaxy evolution over a large redshift range is based on the study of samples selected on the basis of non-thermal radio emission. It is therefore necessary to understand the relationship between radio source activity and the host galaxy. Recent observations suggest that there is a connection between radio galaxy (RG) activity and radio galaxy evolution. For example, high-redshift RGs (z approx. greater than 0.7) show evidence for significant populations of young stars, and have optical continuum morphologies nearly always aligned with the radio axis (McCarthy et al. 1987; Chambers et al. 1987). This phenomenon is generally attributed to radio jet induced star formation (DeYoung 1989), but the lack of high S/N spectra of the galaxy continua, and recent detections of polarized light in a few objects make it hard to rule out other processes such as scattering or synchrotron radiation. A detailed study of the continuum light in the distant RGs is difficult as they are optically very faint. However, nearby RGs (z approx. less than 0.1) have bluer B-V colors than radio-quiet ellipticals, presumably due to the presence of young stellar populations (Smith and Heckman 1989) and several have extended UV continuum emitting regions along their radio axes (van Bruegel et al. 1985a, b, di Serego Alighieri et al. 1989), reminiscent of the alignment effect seen in the high redshift RGs. We have almost completed a continuum imaging survey of nearby (and therefore optically brighter), powerful RGs to study any possible relationships between the optical continuum light and radio source activity. In particular we are interested in (1) whether these lower redshift RGs shown any evidence of the alignment effect (in their rest-frame UV light) that is seen in the distant RGs, and (2) the effects that the radio source has on the environment of the host galaxy.

  12. Activation of hippocampal nuclear factor-kappa B by retrieval is required for memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Blake, Mariano; de la Fuente, Veronica; Acosta, Gabriela; Baratti, Carlos; Romano, Arturo

    2007-12-01

    Initially, memory is labile and requires consolidation to become stable. However, several studies support that consolidated memories can undergo a new period of lability after retrieval. The mechanistic differences of this process, termed reconsolidation, with the consolidation process are under debate, including the participation of hippocampus. Up to this point, few reports describe molecular changes and, in particular, transcription factor (TF) involvement in memory restabilization. Increasing evidence supports the participation of the TF nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in memory consolidation. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibition of NF-kappaB after memory reactivation impairs retention of a hippocampal-dependent inhibitory avoidance task in mice. We used two independent disruptive strategies to reach this conclusion. First, we administered intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal sulfasalazine, an inhibitor of IKK (IkappaB kinase), the kinase that activates NF-kappaB. Second, we infused intracerebroventricular or intrahippocampal kappaB decoy, a direct inhibitor of NF-kappaB consisting of a double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide that contains the kappaB consensus sequence. When injected immediately after memory retrieval, sulfasalazine or kappaB decoy (Decoy) impaired long-term retention. In contrast, a one base mutated kappaB decoy (mDecoy) had no effect. Furthermore, we also found NF-kappaB activation in the hippocampus, with a peak 15 min after memory retrieval. This activation was earlier than that found during consolidation. Together, these results indicate that NF-kappaB is an important transcriptional regulator in memory consolidation and reconsolidation in hippocampus, although the temporal kinetics of activation differs between the two processes.

  13. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems. PMID:27176426

  14. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  15. Fermi bubbles: the explosive nuclear activity of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-08-01

    The Galaxy's supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) is a hundred times closer than any other massive singularity. It is surrounded by a highly unstable gas disk so why is the black hole so peaceful at the present time? This mystery has led to a flurry of models in order to explain why Sgr A* is radiating far below (1 part in 10^8) the Eddington accretion limit. But has this always been so? Evidence is gathering that Sgr A* has been far more active in the recent past, on timescales of thousands of years and longer. The bipolar wind discovered by MSX, the gamma-ray bubbles discovered by Fermi-LAT, the WMAP haze, the positronium flash confirmed by INTEGRAL, are suggestive of something truly spectacular in the recent past. We present exciting new evidence that the Galactic Centre was a full blown "active galaxy" just two million years ago. The echo of this incredible event can be seen today imprinted across the Galaxy.

  16. Antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV includes both cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; Castilletti, Concetta; Cimini, Eleonora; Romanelli, Antonella; Lapa, Daniele; Quartu, Serena; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe central nervous system infection in humans, primarily in the elderly and immunocompromised subjects. Human γδ T-cells play a critical role in the immune response against viruses, and studies of WNV meningoencephalitis in laboratory mice described a role of γδ T-cells in the protective immune response. Aim of this study was to analyze the cytolytic and non-cytolytic antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV replication. The anti-WNV activity of soluble factor released by zoledronic acid (ZA)-activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and the cytotoxic capability of Vδ2 T-cell lines against WNV-infected cells were tested in vitro. The activation of Vδ2 T-cell lines was able to inhibit WNV replication through the release of soluble factors. IFN-γ is massively released by activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and is involved in the anti-WNV activity. Moreover, the Vδ2 T-cell lines can efficiently kill WNV-infected cells possibly through perforin-mediated mechanism. Altogether, our results provide insight into the effector functions of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV. The possibility to target these cells by ZA, a commercially available drug used in humans, could potentially offer a new immunotherapeutic strategy for WNV infection. PMID:27196553

  17. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U) RNA.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Antonio; Soprano, Adriana Santos; de Lira, Nayara Patricia Vieira; Quaresma, Alexandre José Christino; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC), a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX), a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2), a high mobility group (CsHMG) and two poly(A)-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2), interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U) RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  18. NUCLEAR RADIO JET FROM A LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Akihiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz ({alpha} {approx} 0.3; F {sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds ({Gamma} {approx}> 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  19. Nuclear Radio Jet from a Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus in NGC 4258

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Akihiro; Kohno, Kotaro; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Kameno, Seiji; Inoue, Makoto; Hada, Kazuhiro; Sorai, Kazuo

    2013-03-01

    The nearby low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN) NGC 4258 has a weak radio continuum component at the galactic center. We investigate its radio spectral properties on the basis of our new observations using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array at 100 GHz and archival data from the Very Large Array at 1.7-43 GHz and the James Clerk Maxwell telescope at 347 GHz. The NGC 4258 nuclear component exhibits (1) an intra-month variable and complicated spectral feature at 5-22 GHz and (2) a slightly inverted spectrum at 5-100 GHz (α ~ 0.3; F νvpropνα) in time-averaged flux densities, which are also apparent in the closest LLAGN M81. These similarities between NGC 4258 and M81 in radio spectral natures in addition to previously known core shift in their AU-scale jet structures produce evidence that the same mechanism drives their nuclei. We interpret the observed spectral property as the superposition of emission spectra originating at different locations with frequency-dependent opacity along the nuclear jet. Quantitative differences between NGC 4258 and M81 in terms of jet/counter jet ratio, radio loudness, and degree of core shift can be consistently understood by fairly relativistic speeds (Γ >~ 3) of jets and their quite different inclinations. The picture established from the two closest LLAGNs is useful for understanding the physical origin of unresolved and flat/inverted spectrum radio cores that are prevalently found in LLAGNs, including Sgr A*, with starved supermassive black holes in the present-day universe.

  20. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples. PMID:26895346

  1. Isotopic signature of selected lanthanides for nuclear activities profiling using cloud point extraction and ICP-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Charles; Lebed, Pablo J; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    The presence of fission products, which include numerous isotopes of lanthanides, can impact the isotopic ratios of these elements in the environment. A cloud point extraction (CPE) method was used as a preconcentration/separation strategy prior to measurement of isotopic ratios of three lanthanides (Nd, Sm, and Eu) by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). To minimise polyatomic interference, the combination of interferents removal by CPE, reaction/collision cell conditions in He and NH3 mode and tandem quadrupole configuration was investigated and provided optimal results for the determination of isotopic ratio in environmental samples. Isotopic ratios were initially measured in San Joaquin soil (NIST-2709a), an area with little contamination of nuclear origin. Finally, samples collected from three sites with known nuclear activities (Fangataufa Lagoon in French Polynesia, Chernobyl and the Ottawa River near Chalk River Laboratory) were analysed and all exhibited altered isotopic ratios for (143/145)Nd, (147/149)Sm, and (151/153)Eu. These results demonstrate the potential of CPE and ICP-MS/MS for the detection of altered isotopic ratio in environmental samples collected in area subjected to nuclear anthropogenic contamination. The detection of variations in these isotopic ratios of fission products represents the first application of CPE in nuclear forensic investigations of environmental samples.

  2. Active nondestructive assay of nuclear materials: principles and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gozani, Tsahi

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to present, coherently and comprehensively, the wealth of available but scattered information on the principles and applications of active nondestructive analysis (ANDA). Chapters are devoted to the following: background and overview; interactions of neutrons with matter; interactions of ..gamma..-rays with matter; neutron production and sources; ..gamma..-ray production and sources; effects of neutron and ..gamma..-ray transport in bulk media; signatures of neutron- and photon-induced fissions; neutron and photon detection systems and electronics; representative ANDA systems; and instrument analysis, calibration, and measurement control for ANDA. Each chapter has an introductory section describing the relationship of the topic of that chapter to ANDA. Each chapter ends with a section that summarizes the main results and conclusions of the chapter, and a reference list.

  3. Recurrent mutations, including NPM1c, activate a BRD4-dependent core transcriptional program in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, M A; Gudgin, E J; Horton, S J; Giotopoulos, G; Meduri, E; Robson, S; Cannizzaro, E; Osaki, H; Wiese, M; Putwain, S; Fong, C Y; Grove, C; Craig, J; Dittmann, A; Lugo, D; Jeffrey, P; Drewes, G; Lee, K; Bullinger, L; Prinjha, R K; Kouzarides, T; Vassiliou, G S; Huntly, B J P

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) epigenetic readers may have clinical utility against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we validate this hypothesis, demonstrating the efficacy of the BET inhibitor I-BET151 across a variety of AML subtypes driven by disparate mutations. We demonstrate that a common ‘core' transcriptional program, which is HOX gene independent, is downregulated in AML and underlies sensitivity to I-BET treatment. This program is enriched for genes that contain ‘super-enhancers', recently described regulatory elements postulated to control key oncogenic driver genes. Moreover, our program can independently classify AML patients into distinct cytogenetic and molecular subgroups, suggesting that it contains biomarkers of sensitivity and response. We focus AML with mutations of the Nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) and show evidence to suggest that wild-type NPM1 has an inhibitory influence on BRD4 that is relieved upon NPM1c mutation and cytosplasmic dislocation. This leads to the upregulation of the core transcriptional program facilitating leukemia development. This program is abrogated by I-BET therapy and by nuclear restoration of NPM1. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of I-BET151 in a unique murine model and in primary patient samples of NPM1c AML. Taken together, our data support the use of BET inhibitors in clinical trials in AML. PMID:24220271

  4. Recurrent mutations, including NPM1c, activate a BRD4-dependent core transcriptional program in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, M A; Gudgin, E J; Horton, S J; Giotopoulos, G; Meduri, E; Robson, S; Cannizzaro, E; Osaki, H; Wiese, M; Putwain, S; Fong, C Y; Grove, C; Craig, J; Dittmann, A; Lugo, D; Jeffrey, P; Drewes, G; Lee, K; Bullinger, L; Prinjha, R K; Kouzarides, T; Vassiliou, G S; Huntly, B J P

    2014-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inhibition of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) epigenetic readers may have clinical utility against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we validate this hypothesis, demonstrating the efficacy of the BET inhibitor I-BET151 across a variety of AML subtypes driven by disparate mutations. We demonstrate that a common 'core' transcriptional program, which is HOX gene independent, is downregulated in AML and underlies sensitivity to I-BET treatment. This program is enriched for genes that contain 'super-enhancers', recently described regulatory elements postulated to control key oncogenic driver genes. Moreover, our program can independently classify AML patients into distinct cytogenetic and molecular subgroups, suggesting that it contains biomarkers of sensitivity and response. We focus AML with mutations of the Nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) and show evidence to suggest that wild-type NPM1 has an inhibitory influence on BRD4 that is relieved upon NPM1c mutation and cytosplasmic dislocation. This leads to the upregulation of the core transcriptional program facilitating leukemia development. This program is abrogated by I-BET therapy and by nuclear restoration of NPM1. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of I-BET151 in a unique murine model and in primary patient samples of NPM1c AML. Taken together, our data support the use of BET inhibitors in clinical trials in AML.

  5. Fast and accurate dating of nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio.

    PubMed

    Yamba, Kassoum; Sanogo, Oumar; Kalinowski, Martin B; Nikkinen, Mika; Koulidiati, Jean

    2016-06-01

    This study reports on a fast and accurate assessment of zero time of certain nuclear events using La-140/Ba-140 isotopic activity ratio. For a non-steady nuclear fission reaction, the dating is not possible. For the hypothesis of a nuclear explosion and for a release from a steady state nuclear fission reaction the zero-times will differ. This assessment is fast, because we propose some constants that can be used directly for the calculation of zero time and its upper and lower age limits. The assessment is accurate because of the calculation of zero time using a mathematical method, namely the weighted least-squares method, to evaluate an average value of the age of a nuclear event. This was done using two databases that exhibit differences between the values of some nuclear parameters. As an example, the calculation method is applied for the detection of radionuclides La-140 and Ba-140 in May 2010 at the radionuclides station JPP37 (Okinawa Island, Japan).

  6. AIM2 inflammasome is activated by pharmacological disruption of nuclear envelope integrity

    PubMed Central

    Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Lugrin, Jérôme; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hsu, Erh-Ting; Tardivel, Aubry; De Gassart, Aude; Zaffalon, Léa; Bujisic, Bojan; Siegert, Stefanie; Quadroni, Manfredo; Broz, Petr; Henry, Thomas; Hrycyna, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are critical sensors that convey cellular stress and pathogen presence to the immune system by activating inflammatory caspases and cytokines such as IL-1β. The nature of endogenous stress signals that activate inflammasomes remains unclear. Here we show that an inhibitor of the HIV aspartyl protease, Nelfinavir, triggers inflammasome formation and elicits an IL-1R–dependent inflammation in mice. We found that Nelfinavir impaired the maturation of lamin A, a structural component of the nuclear envelope, thereby promoting the release of DNA in the cytosol. Moreover, deficiency of the cytosolic DNA-sensor AIM2 impaired Nelfinavir-mediated inflammasome activation. These findings identify a pharmacologic activator of inflammasome and demonstrate the role of AIM2 in detecting endogenous DNA release upon perturbation of nuclear envelope integrity. PMID:27462105

  7. 14 CFR 440.11 - Duration of coverage for licensed launch, including suborbital launch, or permitted activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... LICENSING FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Financial Responsibility for Licensed and Permitted Activities § 440.11...; modifications. (a) Insurance coverage required under § 440.9, or other form of financial responsibility, shall... recovery; or (ii) The FAA's determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result...

  8. Activated Notch1 Target Genes during Embryonic Cell Differentiation Depend on the Cellular Context and Include Lineage Determinants and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Stiegen, Franziska; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Bernoth, Kristina; Martini, Simone; Hieronymus, Thomas; Ruau, David; Zenke, Martin; Just, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Background Notch receptor signaling controls developmental cell fates in a cell-context dependent manner. Although Notch signaling directly regulates transcription via the RBP-J/CSL DNA binding protein, little is known about the target genes that are directly activated by Notch in the respective tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze how Notch signaling mediates its context dependent function(s), we utilized a Tamoxifen-inducible system to activate Notch1 in murine embryonic stem cells at different stages of mesodermal differentiation and performed global transcriptional analyses. We find that the majority of genes regulated by Notch1 are unique for the cell type and vary widely dependent on other signals. We further show that Notch1 signaling regulates expression of genes playing key roles in cell differentiation, cell cycle control and apoptosis in a context dependent manner. In addition to the known Notch1 targets of the Hes and Hey families of transcriptional repressors, Notch1 activates the expression of regulatory transcription factors such as Sox9, Pax6, Runx1, Myf5 and Id proteins that are critically involved in lineage decisions in the absence of protein synthesis. Conclusion/Significance We suggest that Notch signaling determines lineage decisions and expansion of stem cells by directly activating both key lineage specific transcription factors and their repressors (Id and Hes/Hey proteins) and propose a model by which Notch signaling regulates cell fate commitment and self renewal in dependence of the intrinsic and extrinsic cellular context. PMID:20628604

  9. Overview of the International R&D Recycling Activities of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last 30 years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence on the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel remains the “Achilles’ Heel” of this energy source since the storage of used nuclear fuel is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 tons of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 spent fuel assemblies stored in dry cask and 88,000 stored in pools. Two options adopted by several countries will be presented. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide used nuclear fuel are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission products and minor actinides (americium and curium). Several new chemical extraction processes, such as TRUSPEAK

  10. Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Carter, Amy E; Guest, Maya; Collins, Clare E; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley K; Ashby, Samantha E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapists may have an impact on obesity prevention and treatment by providing nutrition and physical activity advice to overweight or obese clients; yet little is known about physiotherapists' beliefs and practices related to client weight management. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the practices, beliefs, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapists regarding the provision of weight management advice to overweight or obese clients. Physiotherapists (n = 65) working in multiple practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression determined factors associated with the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for weight management. The majority of physiotherapists (n = 53 [81.5%]) believed providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice, yet only a minority had received training during their professional entry level education (n = 13 [20%]) or through professional development (n = 7 [11%]). Most physiotherapists (n = 55 [84.6%]) provided physical activity advice for weight management, but a minority (n = 27 [41.5%]) provided dietary advice. Having received training in weight management during their professional entry level education was associated with providing dietary advice (Odds ratio 8.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0-38.9, p = 0.004). Training in weight management may increase the likelihood of physiotherapists providing dietary advice, improving physiotherapists' management of obesity.

  11. The MRX Complex Ensures NHEJ Fidelity through Multiple Pathways Including Xrs2-FHA–Dependent Tel1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Daichi; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Shima, Hiroki; Higashide, Mika; Terasawa, Masahiro; Gasser, Susan M.; Shinohara, Miki

    2016-01-01

    Because DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most cytotoxic DNA lesions and often cause genomic instability, precise repair of DSBs is vital for the maintenance of genomic stability. Xrs2/Nbs1 is a multi-functional regulatory subunit of the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2/Nbs1 (MRX/N) complex, and its function is critical for the primary step of DSB repair, whether by homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining. In human NBS1, mutations result truncation of the N-terminus region, which contains a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain, cause Nijmegen breakage syndrome. Here we show that the Xrs2 FHA domain of budding yeast is required both to suppress the imprecise repair of DSBs and to promote the robust activation of Tel1 in the DNA damage response pathway. The role of the Xrs2 FHA domain in Tel1 activation was independent of the Tel1-binding activity of the Xrs2 C terminus, which mediates Tel1 recruitment to DSB ends. Both the Xrs2 FHA domain and Tel1 were required for the timely removal of the Ku complex from DSB ends, which correlates with a reduced frequency of imprecise end-joining. Thus, the Xrs2 FHA domain and Tel1 kinase work in a coordinated manner to maintain DSB repair fidelity. PMID:26990569

  12. The IKAROS Interaction with a Complex Including Chromatin Remodeling and Transcription Elongation Activities Is Required for Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Pak, Helen; Daou, Salima; Bourgoin, Vincent; Lakehal, Yahia A.; Affar, El Bachir; Milot, Eric

    2014-01-01

    IKAROS is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell fate and its dynamic expression pattern is required for proper hematopoiesis. In collaboration with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, it promotes gene repression and activation. It remains to be clarified how IKAROS can support transcription activation while being associated with the HDAC-containing complex NuRD. IKAROS also binds to the Positive-Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) at gene promoters. Here, we demonstrate that NuRD and P-TEFb are assembled in a complex that can be recruited to specific genes by IKAROS. The expression level of IKAROS influences the recruitment of the NuRD-P-TEFb complex to gene regulatory regions and facilitates transcription elongation by transferring the Protein Phosphatase 1α (PP1α), an IKAROS-binding protein and P-TEFb activator, to CDK9. We show that an IKAROS mutant that is unable to bind PP1α cannot sustain gene expression and impedes normal differentiation of IkNULL hematopoietic progenitors. Finally, the knock-down of the NuRD subunit Mi2 reveals that the occupancy of the NuRD complex at transcribed regions of genes favors the relief of POL II promoter-proximal pausing and thereby, promotes transcription elongation. PMID:25474253

  13. Binding site requirements and differential representation of TGF factors in nuclear ASF-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Lam, Y K

    1995-09-25

    Activating sequence factor 1 (ASF-1) is a nuclear DNA-binding activity that is found in monocots and dicots. It interacts with several TGACG-containing elements that have been characterized from viral and T-DNA genes, the prototypes of which are the as-1 element of the CaMV 35S promoter and the ocs element from the octopine synthase promoter. This class of cis-acting elements can respond to auxin and salicylic acid treatments. Consistent with these observations, we have shown that ASF-1 can interact with promoter elements of an auxin-inducible tobacco gene GNT35, encoding a glutathione S-transferase. Characterization of the nuclear factors that make up ASF-1 activity in vivo will be an important step toward understanding this induction phenomenon. The TGA family of basic-leucine-zipper (bZIP) proteins are good candidates for the ASF-1 nuclear factor. However, there may be as many as seven distinct TGA genes in Arabidopsis, five of which have now been reported. In this study, we expressed the cDNAs that encode four of these five Arabidopsis TGA factors in vitro and compared their DNA-binding behavior using two types of TGACG-containing elements. With specific antisera prepared against three of the five known Arabidopsis TGA factors, we also investigated the relative abundance of these three proteins within the ASF-1 activities of root and leaf nuclear extracts. Our results indicate that these TGA factors bind to DNA with different degrees of cooperativity and their relative affinity toward as-1 also can differ significantly. The results of a supershift assay suggested that only one of the three TGA factors represented a significant component of nuclear ASF-1 activity. Arabidopsis TGA2 comprises approximately 33 and 50% of the ASF-1 activity detected in root and leaf nuclear extracts respectively. These results suggest that each member of the TGA factor family may be differentially regulated and that they may play different roles by virtue of their distinct DNA

  14. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  15. 78 FR 57668 - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... COMMISSION U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned for Monitoring Activities for the Saltstone Disposal... availability of ``U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Plan for Monitoring Disposal Actions Taken by the U.S... responsibilities for monitoring DOE's waste disposal activities at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at...

  16. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  17. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Raab, Lindsay N.; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N.

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semi-annual records of anthropometry, maturity and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year pre-menarche [predictor] and ~5 years post-menarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent inter-scan PA and PA over 3 maturity sub-phases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry and strength indices at non-dominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) sub-head BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or post-menarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and inter-scan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p<0.07). Pre-menarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semi-partial r2 = 0.21-0.59, p≤0.001). Adult 1/3 radius and sub-head BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years post-menarche (p<0.03). PA 3-5 years post-menarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter and buckling ratio (p<0.05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  18. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (Including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Kanaley, Jill A; Raab, Lindsay N; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N

    2015-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semiannual records of anthropometry, maturity, and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year premenarche [predictor] and ~5 years postmenarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent interscan PA and PA over 3 maturity subphases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry, and strength indices at nondominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) subhead BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or postmenarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and interscan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p > .07). Premenarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semipartial r2 = .21-0.59, p ≤ .001). Adult 1/3 radius and subhead BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years postmenarche (p < .03). PA 3-5 years postmenarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter, and buckling ratio (p < .05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  19. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-15

    Radioactive fission product {sup 131}I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m{sup -3} in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m{sup -3}) variation of stable cesium ({sup 133}Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  20. Correlation between Asian Dust and Specific Radioactivities of Fission Products Included in Airborne Samples in Tokushima, Shikoku Island, Japan, Due to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakama, M.; Nagano, Y.; Kitade, T.; Shikino, O.; Nakayama, S.

    2014-06-01

    Radioactive fission product 131I released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (FD-NPP) was first detected on March 23, 2011 in an airborne aerosol sample collected at Tokushima, Shikoku Island, located in western Japan. Two other radioactive fission products, 134Cs and 137Cs were also observed in a sample collected from April 2 to 4, 2011. The maximum specific radioactivities observed in this work were about 2.5 to 3.5 mBq×m-3 in a airborne aerosol sample collected on April 6. During the course of the continuous monitoring, we also made our first observation of seasonal Asian Dust and those fission products associated with the FDNPP accident concurrently from May 2 to 5, 2011. We found that the specific radioactivities of 134Cs and 137Cs decreased drastically only during the period of Asian Dust. And also, it was found that this trend was very similar to the atmospheric elemental concentration (ng×m-3) variation of stable cesium (133Cs) quantified by elemental analyses using our developed ICP-DRC-MS instrument.

  1. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  2. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  3. Identification of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) as a repressor of C/EBPbeta-mediated gene activation.

    PubMed

    Miau, L H; Chang, C J; Shen, B J; Tsai, W H; Lee, S C

    1998-04-24

    Transcription factor C/EBPbeta has been known to regulate a wide array of genes including those involved in the acute-phase response. One of the molecular mechanisms underlying transcription activation by C/EBPbeta is through protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors. Here we report the identification and characterization of physical and functional interactions between C/EBPbeta and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K. This interaction results in the repression of C/EBPbeta-dependent trans-activation of the agp gene. Footprinting assays indicate that hnRNP K cannot bind to the promoter region of agp gene or interfere with the binding of C/EBPbeta to its cognate DNA site. Furthermore, agp gene activation by the synergistic interaction of Nopp140 and C/EBPbeta is abolished by hnRNP K. The kinetics of appearance of C/EBPbeta-hnRNP K complex in the nuclear extract after initiation of acute-phase reaction indicates that hnRNP K functions as a negative regulator of C/EBPbeta-mediated activation of agp gene.

  4. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  5. JEM spotlight: Nuclear desalination--environmental impacts and implications for planning and monitoring activities.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Vladimir; Khamis, Ibrahim

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear desalination has been identified as an option since the 1960s, but only recently, as climate change intensifies, has it gained interest again. Although environmental impacts of nuclear desalination have not been paid a lot of attention in the few implemented projects, now more than ever, it is essential to provide an overview of their nature and magnitude. The gathered information and basic analysis allow for a general comparison of a 200,000 m(3)/d nuclear desalination facility using a once-through cooling system as a reference case, with alternative co-location options. Results of the review indicate that the potential for marine impacts requires careful planning and monitoring. They also reveal that adverse coastal, atmospheric and socio-economic impacts are minor in comparison with other co-location alternatives. The issues regarding public health are discussed and experiences presented. Nuclear desalination facilities are expected to show a better environmental performance than other co-located power/desalination options. Environmental planning and monitoring activities are thus much simpler and their scope smaller, with the most important monitoring parameters listed. In conclusion, the application of nuclear desalination is recommended as a less environmentally harmful option.

  6. The isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of acetone in supercritical water: a sequential Monte Carlo/quantum mechanics study including solute polarization.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Tertius L; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2008-07-21

    The nuclear isotropic shielding constants sigma((17)O) and sigma((13)C) of the carbonyl bond of acetone in water at supercritical (P=340.2 atm and T=673 K) and normal water conditions have been studied theoretically using Monte Carlo simulation and quantum mechanics calculations based on the B3LYP6-311++G(2d,2p) method. Statistically uncorrelated configurations have been obtained from Monte Carlo simulations with unpolarized and in-solution polarized solute. The results show that solvent effects on the shielding constants have a significant contribution of the electrostatic interactions and that quantitative estimates for solvent shifts of shielding constants can be obtained modeling the water molecules by point charges (electrostatic embedding). In supercritical water, there is a decrease in the magnitude of sigma((13)C) but a sizable increase in the magnitude of sigma((17)O) when compared with the results obtained in normal water. It is found that the influence of the solute polarization is mild in the supercritical regime but it is particularly important for sigma((17)O) in normal water and its shielding effect reflects the increase in the average number of hydrogen bonds between acetone and water. Changing the solvent environment from normal to supercritical water condition, the B3LYP6-311++G(2d,2p) calculations on the statistically uncorrelated configurations sampled from the Monte Carlo simulation give a (13)C chemical shift of 11.7+/-0.6 ppm for polarized acetone in good agreement with the experimentally inferred result of 9-11 ppm.

  7. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  8. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  9. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J. Matthew; Titiz, Ali S.; Hernan, Amanda E.; Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  10. Product and rate determinations with chemically activated nucleotides in the presence of various prebiotic materials, including other mono- and polynucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Alberas, D. J.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the reactions of ImpN's in the presence of a number of prebiotically plausible materials, such as metal ions, phosphate, amines and other nucleotides and hope to learn more about the stability/reactivity of ImpN's in a prebiotic aqueous environment. We find that, in the presence of phosphate, ImpN's form substantial amounts of diphosphate nucleotides. These diphosphate nucleotides are not very good substrates for template directed reactions, but are chemically activated and are known to revert to the phosphoimidazolides in the presence of imidazole under solid state conditions. With respect to our studies of the oligomerization reaction, the determination of the dimerization rate constant of a specific ImpN (guanosine 5'-phospho 2 methylimidazolide) both in the absence and the presence of the template leads to the conclusion that at 37 C the dimerization is not template directed, although the subsequent polymerization steps are. In other words, this specific polynucleotide synthesizing system favors the elongation of oligonucleotides as compared with the formation of dimers and trimers. This favoring of the synthesis of long as opposed to short oligonucleotides may be regarded as a rudimentary example of natural selection at the molecular level.

  11. A comparison of methods of assessment of body composition including neutron activation analysis of total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Mendez, J; Buskirk, E R; Cohn, S H

    1981-08-01

    Fourteen healthy men underwent determinations of total body nitrogen (TBN) by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis and total body potassium (TBK) by whole body counting to estimate the muscle and nonmuscle components of the fat-free body mass (FFBM) and their protein contents. Comparison of FFBM estimated from TBN and TBK (60.6 +/- 6.9 kg, mean +/- SD), densitometry (62.3 +/- 7.1 kg), TBK alone (62.2 +/- 8.0 kg) and TBW (63.9 +/- 7.8 kg) showed no differences among the techniques. Similarly, there were neither differences in fat mass nor percent body fat among the methods. Analysis of the chemical composition of FFBM of this group showed TBK/FFBM = 62.6 +/- 2.3 mEq/kg, TBW/FFBM = 74.6 +/- 0.2%, TBN/FFBM = 32.74 +/- 1.09 g/kg, protein/FFBM = 20.5+/- 0.7%. The calculated mineral content of the FFBM was 6.4%. These values are strikingly similar to the values calculated by direct chemical analysis. It was concluded that the combined TBN-TBK method is a valid technique for estimating body composition in man.

  12. INVESTIGATING THE NUCLEAR ACTIVITY OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES: THE CASE OF NGC 1672

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Koribalski, B.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Zezas, A.

    2011-06-10

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D{sub 25} area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (L{sub X} > 5 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard ({Gamma} {approx} 1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  13. Investigating the Nuclear Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J.; Koribalski, B.; Kuntz, K. D.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Roberts, T. P.; Ward, M. J.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D25 area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (LX 5 * 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1)) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard (1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 * 10(exp 38) erg s(exp -1). This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  14. Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D. ); Harrison, D.L. . Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

    1991-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

  15. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  16. UNCOVERING THE DEEPLY EMBEDDED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE INTERACTING GALAXY Arp 299

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Roche, P. F.; Esquej, P.; Colina, L.; González-Martín, O.; Ramos Almeida, C.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodríguez Espinosa, J. M.; Alvarez, C.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Levenson, N. A.; Packham, C.; Mason, R. E.; Aretxaga, I.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Perlman, E.; Telesco, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) 8-13 μm spectroscopy of the nuclear regions of the interacting galaxy Arp 299 (IC 694+NGC 3690) obtained with CanariCam (CC) on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). The high angular resolution (∼0.''3-0.''6) of the data allows us to probe nuclear physical scales between 60 and 120 pc, which is a factor of 10 improvement over previous MIR spectroscopic observations of this system. The GTC/CC spectroscopy displays evidence of deeply embedded active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in both nuclei. The GTC/CC nuclear spectrum of NGC 3690/Arp 299-B1 can be explained as emission from AGN-heated dust in a clumpy torus with both a high covering factor and high extinction along the line of sight. The estimated bolometric luminosity of the AGN in NGC 3690 is 3.2 ± 0.6 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}. The nuclear GTC/CC spectrum of IC 694/Arp 299-A shows 11.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission stemming from a deeply embedded (A{sub V} ∼ 24 mag) region of less than 120 pc in size. There is also a continuum-emitting dust component. If associated with the putative AGN in IC 694, we estimate that it would be approximately five times less luminous than the AGN in NGC 3690. The presence of dual AGN activity makes Arp 299 a good example to study such phenomena in the early coalescence phase of interacting galaxies.

  17. Selective Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of Human DNA Methyltransferases Active in Cancer Including in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are important enzymes involved in epigenetic control of gene expression and represent valuable targets in cancer chemotherapy. A number of nucleoside DNMT inhibitors (DNMTi) have been studied in cancer, including in cancer stem cells, and two of them (azacytidine and decitabine) have been approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, only a few non-nucleoside DNMTi have been identified so far, and even fewer have been validated in cancer. Through a process of hit-to-lead optimization, we report here the discovery of compound 5 as a potent non-nucleoside DNMTi that is also selective toward other AdoMet-dependent protein methyltransferases. Compound 5 was potent at single-digit micromolar concentrations against a panel of cancer cells and was less toxic in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than two other compounds tested. In mouse medulloblastoma stem cells, 5 inhibited cell growth, whereas related compound 2 showed high cell differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, 2 and 5 are the first non-nucleoside DNMTi tested in a cancer stem cell line. PMID:24387159

  18. Novel stilbenoids, including cannabispiradienone glycosides, from Tragopogon tommasinii (Asteraceae, Cichorieae) and their potential anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Granica, Sebastian; Piwowarski, Jakub P; Randazzo, Antonio; Schneider, Peter; Żyżyńska-Granica, Barbara; Zidorn, Christian

    2015-09-01

    A phytochemical investigation of Tragopogon tommasinii Sch.Bip. (Asteraceae, Cichorieae) yielded a total of 21 natural products, two simple phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-coumaric acid), four caffeic acid derivatives (chlorogenic acid, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid), six flavonoids (luteolin, luteolin 7-O-glucoside, vitexin, orientin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside), three simple bibenzyls [2-carboxyl-5-hydroxy-3-methoxy-4'-β-glucopyranosyl-oxybibenzyl, 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxy-5,4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxybibenzyl, 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxy-4'-dihydroxy-5,3'-dimethoxybibenzyl], three phtalides [3-(4-β-glucopyranosyloxybenzyl)-7-hydroxy-5-methoxyphtalide, 7-β-glucopyranosyloxy-(S)-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-5-methoxyphtalide, and 7-(1→6)-α-rhamnosyl-β-glucopyranosyloxy-(S)-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-5-methoxyphtalide], two cannabispiradienone derivatives [3-O-β-glucopyranosyldemethoxycannabispiradienone and 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxydemethoxycannabispiradienone], and tetra-N-coumaroyl spermine. The three bibenzyls, the latter two benzylphthalides, and both cannabispiradienone derivatives represent new natural compounds and all compounds, except the caffeic acid derivatives and the flavonoids were new for T. tommasinii. The structures were established by HR mass spectrometry, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Moreover, the potential anti-inflammatory activities of the new compounds were assayed using human neutrophils and their production of IL-1b, IL-8, TNF-α and MMP-9 as well as the expression of TLR-4, respectively.

  19. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  20. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children.

  1. Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Norman S.; Lewis, Robert N.; Perry, Ronald B.

    1976-01-01

    The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

  2. High water-stressed population estimated by world water resources assessment including human activities under SRES scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, M.; Shen, Y.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2009-04-01

    In an argument of the reduction and the adaptation for the climate change, the evaluation of the influence by the climate change is important. When we argue in adaptation plan from a damage scale and balance with the cost, it is particularly important. Parry et al (2001) evaluated the risks in shortage of water, malaria, food, the risk of the coast flood by temperature function and clarified the level of critical climate change. According to their evaluation, the population to be affected by the shortage of water suddenly increases in the range where temperature increases from 1.5 to 2.0 degree in 2080s. They showed how much we need to reduce emissions in order to draw-down significantly the number at risk. This evaluation of critical climate change threats and targets of water shortage did not include the water withdrawal divided by water availability. Shen et al (2008a) estimated the water withdrawal of projection of future world water resources according to socio-economic driving factors predicted for scenarios A1b, A2, B1, and B2 of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). However, these results were in function of not temperature but time. The assessment of the highly water-stressed population considered the socioeconomic development is necessary for a function of the temperature. Because of it is easy to understand to need to reduce emission. We present a multi-GCM analysis of the global and regional populations lived in highly water-stressed basin for a function of the temperature using the socioeconomic data and the outputs of GCMs. In scenario A2, the population increases gradually with warming. On the other hand, the future projection population in scenario A1b and B1 increase gradually until the temperature anomaly exceeds around from +1 to +1.5 degree. After that the population is almost constant. From Shen et al (2008b), we evaluated the HWSP and its ratio in the world with temperature function for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1 by the index of W

  3. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFNγ

    PubMed Central

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFNγ) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFNγ-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1α. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFNγ. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFNγ treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The β-actin gene, which is not activated by IFNγ, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFNγ treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFNγ treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFNγ treatment resulted in its disassociation and then re-association as pSTAT1. The results suggest a novel role for activated JAKs in epigenetic events for specific gene activation. PMID:21689637

  4. Effect-Directed Analysis of Human Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Nuclear Receptors (PPARγ1) Ligands in Indoor Dust.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-08-18

    Agonism of human peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptor gamma (PPARγ1) was recently observed in 15 of 25 samples of indoor dust extracts at environmentally relevant exposure levels. In this study, an effect-directed analysis approach was used to identify the primary contributors of PPARγ1 activity in the dust extracts. Three dust extracts showing significant PPARγ1 activity were fractionated with normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) and each fraction was tested for PPARγ1 activity. Three dust extracts showed a similar PPARγ1 activity distribution in the NP-HPLC fractions. In most active fractions, fatty acids (FAs), including oleic acid, stearic acid, palmitic acid and myristic acid, were the primary chemicals identified using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chemical measurements of the FAs in house dust extracts revealed a positive and significant correlation with the observed PPARγ1 activity. To test the role of FAs in the activity, a mixture of four FAs was prepared in the ratios measured in the dust samples and tested for activity. The activity of this mixture was 30-50% of the activity observed in the dust extracts, suggesting they were contributing to the observed activity, but also suggesting additional unknown compounds are likely still present in the dust extracts. To tentatively identify sources of FAs in the dust samples, FAs were quantified in human/animal hair, dead skin cells, and cooking oil. FAs were abundant in all samples and our data indicate that all of these may be sources to indoor dust.

  5. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    SciTech Connect

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Lizano, Marcela

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  6. The mid-infrared emission of narrow-line active galactic nuclei: Star formation, nuclear activity, and two populations revealed by WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, David J.; Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Richard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the nature of the long-wavelength mid-infrared (MIR) emission of a sample of 13,000 local Type II (narrow-line) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using 12 μm and 22 μm photometry from the WISE all-sky survey. In combination with FIRST 1.4 GHz photometry, we show that AGNs divide into two relatively distinct populations or 'branches' in the plane of MIR and radio luminosity. Seyfert galaxies lie almost exclusively on an MIR-bright branch (Branch A), while low-ionization nuclear emission line galaxies (LINERs) are split evenly into Branch A and the MIR-faint Branch B. We devise various tests to constrain the processes that define the branches, including a comparison to the properties of pure star-forming inactive galaxies on the MIR-radio plane. We demonstrate that the total MIR emission of objects on Branch A, including most Seyfert galaxies, is governed primarily by host star formation, with ≈15% of the 22 μm luminosity coming from AGN-heated dust. This implies that ongoing dusty star formation is a general property of Seyfert host galaxies. We show that the 12 μm broadband luminosity of AGNs on Branch A is suppressed with respect to star-forming galaxies, possibly due to the destruction of PAHs or deeper 10 μm Si absorption in AGNs. We uncover a correlation between the MIR luminosity and [O III] λ5007 luminosity in AGNs. This suggests a relationship between the star formation rate and nuclear luminosity in the AGN population, but we caution on the importance of selection effects inherent to such AGN-dominated emission-line galaxies in driving such a correlation. We highlight the MIR-radio plane as a useful tool in comparative studies of star formation and nuclear activity in AGNs.

  7. Overview of the international R&D recycling activities of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear power has demonstrated over the last thirty years its capacity to produce base-load electricity at a low, predictable and stable cost due to the very low economic dependence of the price of uranium. However the management of used nuclear fuel (UNF) remains the “Achilles’ heel of this energy source since the storage of UNF is increasing as evidenced by the following number with 2,000 to 2,300 of UNF produced each year by the 104 US nuclear reactor units which equates to a total of 62,000 UNF assemblies stored in dry cask storage and 88,000 stored in pools. Alarmingly, more than half of US commercial reactor sites have filled their pools to capacity and have had to add dry cask storage facilities. Two options adopted by several countries will be discussed. The first one adopted by Europe, Japan and Russia consists of recycling the used nuclear fuel after irradiation in a nuclear reactor. Ninety six percent of uranium and plutonium contained in the spent fuel could be reused to produce electricity and are worth recycling. The separation of uranium and plutonium from the wastes is realized through the industrial PUREX process so that they can be recycled for re-use in a nuclear reactor as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The second option undertaken by Finland, Sweden and the United States implies the direct disposal of UNF into a geologic formation. One has to remind that only 30% of the worldwide UNF are currently recycled, the larger part being stored (90% in pool) waiting for scientific or political decisions. A third option is emerging with a closed fuel cycle which will improve the global sustainability of nuclear energy. This option will not only decrease the volume amount of nuclear waste but also the long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste, as well as improving the long-term safety and the heat-loading of the final repository. At the present time, numerous countries are focusing on the R&D recycling activities of the ultimate waste composed of fission

  8. Calmodulin Involvement in Stress-Activated Nuclear Localization of Albumin in JB6 Epithelial Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Negash, Sewite; Smallwood, Heather S.; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Thrall, Brian D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-06-15

    We report that in response to oxidative stress, albumin is translocated to the nucleus where it binds in concert with known transcription factors to an antioxidant response element (ARE), which controls the expression of glutathione-S-transferase and other antioxidant enzymes, functioning to mediate adaptive cellular responses. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this adaptive cell response, we have identified linkages between calcium signaling and the nuclear translocation of albumin in JB6 epithelial cells. Under resting conditions, albumin and the calcium regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), co-immunoprecipitate using antibodies against either protein, indicating a tight association. Calcium activation of CaM disrupts the association between CaM and albumin, suggesting that transient increases in cytosolic calcium levels function to mobilize intracellular albumin to facilitate its translocation into the nucleus. Likewise, nuclear translocation of albumin is induced by exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide or a phorbol ester, indicating a functional linkage between reactive oxygen species, calcium, and PKC-signaling pathways. Inclusion of an antioxidant enzyme (i.e., superoxide dismutase) blocks nuclear translocation, suggesting that the oxidation of sensitive proteins functions to coordinate the adaptive cellular response. These results suggest that elevated calcium transients, and associated increases in reactive oxygen species, contribute to adaptive cellular responses through the mobilization and nuclear translocation of cellular albumin to mediate the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant responsive elements.

  9. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  10. Omega-3 fatty acid concentrate from Dunaliella salina possesses anti-inflammatory properties including blockade of NF-κB nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    Chitranjali, T; Anoop Chandran, P; Muraleedhara Kurup, G

    2015-02-01

    The health benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6), have been long known. Although various studies have demonstrated the health benefits of ω-3 PUFA, the mechanisms of action of ω-3 PUFAs are still not completely understood. While the major commercial source is marine fish oil, in this study we suggest the marine micro algae, Dunaliella salina as an alternate source of omega-3 fatty acids. Treatment with this algal omega-3 fatty acid concentrate (Ds-ω-3 FA) resulted in significant down-regulation of LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-6 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The concentrate was also found to be a potent blocker of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9) expression. The present study reveals the anti-inflammatory properties of Ds-ω-3 FA concentrate including the inhibition of NF-κB translocation.

  11. Modulation of both activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappa B signal transduction of human T cells by amiodarone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shu-Meng; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Ho, Ling-Jun; Tsai, Tsung-Neng; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2015-01-01

    Amiodarone, a common and effective antiarrhythmic drug, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects such as reducing the activation and movement of neutrophils. However, its effects on human T cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects and possible underlying mechanisms of amiodarone on human T cells. We isolated human primary T cells from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, luciferase assay, and Western blotting to evaluate the modulatory effects of amiodarone on human T cells. We found that amiodarone dose dependently inhibited the production of cytokines, including interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma in activated human T cells. By flow cytometry, we demonstrated that amiodarone suppressed the expression of IL-2 receptor-alpha (CD25) and CD69, the cell surface markers of activated T cells. Moreover, molecular investigations revealed that amiodarone down-regulated activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) DNA-binding activities in activated human T cells and also inhibited DNA binding and transcriptional activities of both AP-1 and NF-κB in Jurkat cells. Finally, by Western blotting, we showed that amiodarone reduced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and suppressed stimuli-induced I-kappa B-alpha degradation in activated human T cells. Through regulation of AP-1 and NF-κB signaling, amiodarone inhibits cytokine production and T cell activation. These results show the pleiotropic effects of amiodarone on human T cells and suggest its therapeutic potential in inflammation-related cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25073960

  12. Management of National Nuclear Power Programs for assured safety

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed in this report include: nuclear utility organization; before the Florida Public Service Commission in re: St. Lucie Unit No. 2 cost recovery; nuclear reliability improvement and safety operations; nuclear utility management; training of nuclear facility personnel; US experience in key areas of nuclear safety; the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - function and process; regulatory considerations of the risk of nuclear power plants; overview of the processes of reliability and risk management; management significance of risk analysis; international and domestic institutional issues for peaceful nuclear uses; the role of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO); and nuclear safety activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  13. Lymphotoxin β receptor activation promotes bladder cancer in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, MO; DUAN, XIUZHI; ZHOU, PING; ZHOU, WU; WU, XIULING; XU, SIQI; CHEN, YUHUA; TAO, ZHIHUA

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the most common tumor of the urinary system. Chronic inflammation in the papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)may contribute to carcinogenesis, including that of BCa, via poorly understood mechanisms. In this study, we show that the lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) is upregulated in BCa via activation of the canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. The mRNA expression of LTβR in 81 BCa, 10 chronic cystitis and 23 healthy bladder mucosa tissues was investigated by reverse transcription-fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-FQ-PCR), and protein expression was studied in 73 BCa, 30 cystitis and 15 healthy paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. Both LTβR mRNA and protein were upregulated in BCa and cystitis compared to the healthy group (P<0.05). The mRNA level of the downstream NF-κB canonical pathway p65 gene and of the non-canonical pathway RelB gene were higher in the BCa and cystitis groups compared to the healthy one. The level of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65) protein of the canonical NF-κB pathway and that of p52, a protein of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, were also higher in the BCa and cystitis group compared to the healthy group. The levels of these proteins significantly correlated to the pathological grade, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis of BCa patients (P<0.05). In addition, there was a positive correlation between LTβR and NF-κB pathway proteins. Thus, LTβR signaling may be involved in promoting BCa through the NF-κB pathway, and which may represent the molecular link between inflammation and BCa. PMID:25369740

  14. Lymphotoxin β receptor activation promotes bladder cancer in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mo; Duan, Xiuzhi; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Wu; Wu, Xiuling; Xu, Siqi; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2015-02-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the most common tumor of the urinary system. Chronic inflammation in the papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)may contribute to carcinogenesis, including that of BCa, via poorly understood mechanisms. In this study, we show that the lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) is upregulated in BCa via activation of the canonical and non-canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathways. The mRNA expression of LTβR in 81 BCa, 10 chronic cystitis and 23 healthy bladder mucosa tissues was investigated by reverse transcription-fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-FQ-PCR), and protein expression was studied in 73 BCa, 30 cystitis and 15 healthy paraffin-embedded tissue sections by immunohistochemistry. Both LTβR mRNA and protein were upregulated in BCa and cystitis compared to the healthy group (P<0.05). The mRNA level of the downstream NF-κB canonical pathway p65 gene and of the non-canonical pathway RelB gene were higher in the BCa and cystitis groups compared to the healthy one. The level of phosphorylated p65 (p-p65) protein of the canonical NF-κB pathway and that of p52, a protein of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, were also higher in the BCa and cystitis group compared to the healthy group. The levels of these proteins significantly correlated to the pathological grade, clinical stage and lymph node metastasis of BCa patients (P<0.05). In addition, there was a positive correlation between LTβR and NF-κB pathway proteins. Thus, LTβR signaling may be involved in promoting BCa through the NF-κB pathway, and which may represent the molecular link between inflammation and BCa.

  15. Overview of a FPGA-based nuclear instrumentation dedicated to primary activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Pierre, S; Thiam, C

    2012-09-01

    In National Metrology Institutes like LNE-LNHB, renewal and improvement of the instrumentation is an important task. Nowadays, the current trend is to adopt digital boards, which present numerous advantages over the standard electronics. The feasibility of an on-line fulfillment of nuclear-instrumentation functionalities using a commercial FPGA-based (Field-Programmable Gate Array) board has been validated in the case of TDCR primary measurements (Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio method based on liquid scintillation). The new applications presented in this paper have been included to allow either an on-line processing of the information or a raw-data acquisition for an off-line treatment. Developed as a complementary tool for TDCR counting, a time-to-digital converter specifically designed for this technique has been added. In addition, the description is given of a spectrometry channel based on the connection between conventional shaping amplifiers and the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) input available on the same digital board. First results are presented in the case of α- and γ-counting related to, respectively, the defined solid angle and well-type NaI(Tl) primary activity techniques. The combination of two different channels (liquid scintillation and γ-spectrometry) implementing the live-time anticoincidence processing is also described for the application of the 4πβ-γ coincidence method. The need for an optimized coupling between the analog chain and the ADC stage is emphasized. The straight processing of the signals delivered by the preamplifier connected to a HPGe detector is also presented along with the first development of digital filtering.

  16. Constitutive nuclear localization of NFAT in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells independent of calcineurin activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuxia; Shakya, Arvind; Guo, Xiaohua; Zhang, Hongbo; Tantin, Dean; Jensen, Peter E; Chen, Xinjian

    2012-05-01

    Foxp3 plays an essential role in conferring suppressive functionality to CD4(+)/Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Although studies showed that Foxp3 has to form cooperative complexes with NFAT to bind to target genes, it remains unclear whether NFAT is available in the nucleus of primary Tregs for Foxp3 access. It is generally believed that NFAT in resting cells resides in the cytoplasm, and its nuclear translocation depends on calcineurin (CN) activation. We report that a fraction of NFAT protein constitutively localizes in the nucleus of primary Tregs, where it selectively binds to Foxp3 target genes. Treating Tregs with CN inhibitor does not induce export of NFAT from the nucleus, indicating that its nuclear translocation is independent of CN activity. Consistently, Tregs are resistant to CN inhibitors in the presence of IL-2 and continue to proliferate in response to anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas proliferation of non-Tregs is abrogated by CN inhibitors. In addition, PMA, which activates other transcription factors required for T cell activation but not NFAT, selectively induces Treg proliferation in the absence of ionomycin. TCR interaction with self-MHC class II is not required for PMA-induced Treg proliferation. Tregs expanded by PMA or in the presence of CN inhibitors maintain Treg phenotype and functionality. These findings shed light on Treg biology, paving the way for strategies to selectively activate Tregs.

  17. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  18. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  19. Domestic politics, citizen activism, and U. S. nuclear arms control policy

    SciTech Connect

    Knopf, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The author seeks to ascertain whether and how citizens' movements concerning nuclear arms control and disarmament affect US arms control policy. The author employs a comparative case study methodology. He examines cases of the Eisenhower and Kennedy Administrations during the period of protest against nuclear testing, and the Reagan Administration during the nuclear weapons freeze campaign and the subsequent campaign for a comprehensive test ban. He hows there are four mechanisms through which public advocacy efforts can influence arms control policy, identifies the conditions under which each can be effective, and details the type of impact each mechanism has. Domestic activism interacts with broader public opinion in a way that creates electoral pressure; with elite-level debates in a way that removes a consensus behind presidential policy or changes the winning coalition in Congress; with bureaucratic politics, by generating ideas that have utility for some agents within the Executive; or with the public diplomacy of foreign governments, especially the Soviet Union. Citizens' movements had an impact on policy in each of the cases studied. The type and extent of impact, and the mechanisms involved in giving activism influence, are different for each case.

  20. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  1. Nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays a role in SV40 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, Kate; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidence highlighted a role for the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), in the transcription of the human polyomavirus JCV. Here we show that NFAT is also important in the transcriptional control of the related polyomavirus, Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Inhibition of NFAT activity reduced SV40 infection of Vero, 293A, and HeLa cells, and this block occurred at the stage of viral transcription. Both NFAT3 and NFAT4 bound to the SV40 promoter through {kappa}B sites located within the 72 bp repeated enhancer region. In Vero cells, NFAT was involved in late transcription, but in HeLa and 293A cells both early and late viral transcription required NFAT activity. SV40 large T-Ag was found to increase NFAT activity and provided a positive feedback loop to transactivate the SV40 promoter.

  2. Daily variation of constitutively activated nuclear factor kappa B (NFKB) in rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Cecon, Erika; Fernandes, Pedro A; Pinato, Luciana; Ferreira, Zulma S; Markus, Regina P

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, the production of melatonin by the pineal gland is mainly controlled by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the master clock of the circadian system. We have previously shown that agents involved in inflammatory responses, such as cytokines and corticosterone, modulate pineal melatonin synthesis. The nuclear transcription factor NFKB, detected by our group in the rat pineal gland, modulates this effect. Here, we evaluated a putative constitutive role for the pineal gland NFKB pathway. Male rats were kept under 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle or under constant darkness (DD) condition. Nuclear NFKB was quantified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay on pineal glands obtained from animals killed throughout the day at different times. Nuclear content of NFKB presented a daily rhythm only in LD-entrained animals. During the light phase, the amount of NFKB increased continuously, and a sharp drop occurred when lights were turned off. Animals maintained in a constant light environment until ZT 18 showed diurnal levels of nuclear NFKB at ZT15 and ZT18. Propranolol (20 mg/kg, i.p., ZT 11) treatment, which inhibits nocturnal sympathetic input, impaired nocturnal decrease of NFKB only at ZT18. A similar effect was observed in free-running animals, which secreted less nocturnal melatonin. Because melatonin reduces constitutive NFKB activation in cultured pineal glands, we propose that this indolamine regulates this transcription factor pathway in the rat pineal gland, but not at the LD transition. The controversial results regarding the inhibition of pineal function by constant light or blocking sympathetic neurotransmission are discussed according to the hypothesis that the prompt effect of lights-off is not mediated by noradrenaline, which otherwise contributes to maintaining low levels of nuclear NFKB at night. In summary, we report here a novel transcription factor in the pineal gland, which exhibits a constitutive rhythm dependent on environmental photic

  3. Tissue transglutaminase constitutively activates HIF-1α promoter and nuclear factor-κB via a non-canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Mehta, Kapil

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been linked with carcinogenesis and cancer progression, including metastasis, chemoresistance, and radiation resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that result in constitutive activation of NF-κB are poorly understood. Here we show that chronic expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) reprograms the transcription regulatory network in epithelial cells via constitutive activation of NF-κB. TG2-induced NF-κB binds the functional NF-κB binding site in hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1α) promoter and results in its increased expression at transcription and protein levels even under normoxic conditions. TG2/NF-κB-induced HIF-1 was deemed essential for increased expression of some transcription repressors, like Zeb1, Zeb2, Snail, and Twist. Unlike tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), TG2 did not require IκB kinase (IKK) for NF-κB activation. Our data suggest that TG2 binds with IκBα and results in its rapid degradation via a non-proteasomal pathway. Importantly, the catalytically inactive (C277S) mutant form of TG2 was as effective as was wild-type TG2 in activating NF-κB and inducing HIF-1 expression. We also found that TG2 interacted with p65/RelA protein, both in the cytosolic and the nuclear compartment. The TG2/p65(NF-κB) complex binds to the HIF-1 promoter and induced its transcriptional regulation. Inhibition of TG2 or p65/RelA also inhibited the HIF-1α expression and attenuated Zeb1, Zeb2, and Twist expression. To our knowledge, these findings show for the first time a direct link between TG2, NF-κB, and HIF-1α, demonstrating TG2's important role in cancer progression. PMID:23185316

  4. Role of Calcineurin, hnRNPA2 and Akt in Mitochondrial Respiratory Stress-Mediated Transcription Activation of Nuclear Gene Targets

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Manti; Tang, Weigang; Sondheimer, Neal; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions causing mitochondrial dysfunction and altered transmembrane potential (Δψm) initiate a mitochondrial respiratory stress response, also known as mitochondrial retrograde response, in a variety of mammalian cells. An increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ [Ca2+]c as part of this signaling cascade activates Ca2+ responsive phosphatase, Calcineurin (Cn). Activation of IGF1R accompanied by increased glycolysis, invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis are phenotypic hallmarks of C2C12 rhabdomyoblast cells subjected to this stress. The signaling is associated with activation and increased nuclear translocation of a number of transcription factors including a novel NFκB (cRel: p50) pathway, NFAT, CREB and C/EBPδ. This culminates in the upregulation of a number of nuclear genes including Cathepsin L, RyR1, Glut4 and Akt1. We observed that stress regulated transcription activation of nuclear genes involves a cooperative interplay between NFκB (cRel:p50), C/EBPδ, CREB, NFAT. Our results show that the functional synergy of these factors requires the stress-activated heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPA2 as a transcriptional co-activator. We report here that mitochondrial stress leads to induced expression and activation of serine threonine kinase Akt1. Interestingly, we observe that Akt1 phosphorylates hnRNPA2 under mitochondrial stress conditions, which is a crucial step for the recruitment of this coactivator to the stress target promoters and culmination in mitochondrial stress-mediated transcription activation of target genes. We propose that mitochondrial stress plays an important role in tumor progression and emergence of invasive phenotypes. PMID:20153290

  5. A feasibility study of the in vivo prompt gamma activation analysis using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Yuan, L J; Chen, K B; Weng, P S; Chang, P S; Ho, Y H

    1985-05-01

    A facility for in vivo prompt gamma activation analysis using moderated neutron beams from a 0.1 W mobile nuclear reactor is described. The low-power nuclear reactor provides total neutron flux of 3.3 X 10(4)n cm-2 s-1 on the surface of a vertical beam tube to which a liquid phantom is positioned. The capability of such a partial-body irradiation facility is demonstrated by measuring trace amounts of toxic cadmium in kidney. The detection limit of Cd in kidney for a skin dose of 1.66 mSv (166 mrem) is 1.34 mg under 500 s irradiation. This facility therefore combines the advantages of mobility with high sensitivity of detection of a toxic element under low neutron and gamma doses.

  6. Identification of a region within the ubiquitin-activating enzyme required for nuclear targeting and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Handley-Gearhart, P M; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1997-04-18

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme exists as two isoforms: E1a, localized predominantly in the nucleus, and E1b, localized in the cytoplasm. Previously we generated hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged cDNA constructs, HA1-E1 (epitope tag placed after the first methionine) and HA2-E1 (epitope tag placed after the second methionine) (Handley-Gearhart, P. M., Stephen, A. G., Trausch-Azar, J. S., Ciechanover, A., and Schwartz, A. L. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 33171-33178), which represent the native isoforms. HA1-E1 is exclusively nuclear, whereas HA2-E1 is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. Using high resolution isoelectric focusing and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we confirm that these epitope-tagged constructs HA1-E1 and HA2-E1 represent the two isoforms E1a and E1b. HA1-E1/E1a exists as one non-phosphorylated and four phosphorylated forms, and HA2-E1/E1b exists as one predominant non-phosphorylated form and two minor phosphorylated forms. We demonstrate that the first 11 amino acids are essential for phosphorylation and exclusive nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Within this region are four serine residues and a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS; 5PLSKKRR). Removal of these four serine residues reduced phosphorylation levels by 60% but had no effect on nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Each serine residue was independently mutated to an alanine and analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; only serine 4 was phosphorylated. Disruption of the basic amino acids within the NLS resulted in loss of exclusive nuclear localization and a 90-95% decrease in the phosphorylation of HA1-E1. This putative NLS was able to confer nuclear import on a non-nuclear protein in digitonin-permeabilized cells in a temperature- and ATP-dependent manner. Thus the predominant requirement for efficient phosphorylation of HA1-E1/E1a is a functional NLS, suggesting that E1a may be phosphorylated within the nucleus. PMID:9099746

  7. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd Yussup, Nolida; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Soh Shaari, Syirrazie Bin Che; Azman, Azraf B.; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Bt. Abdullah; Ismail, Nadiah Binti

    2015-04-29

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on ‘Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)’. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6.

  8. Sample registration software for process automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia nuclear agency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Yussup, Nolida; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Bt. Abdullah; Ibrahim, Maslina Bt. Mohd; Mokhtar, Mukhlis B.; Soh@Shaari, Syirrazie Bin Che; Azman, Azraf B.; Ismail, Nadiah Binti

    2015-04-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) had been established in Nuclear Malaysia since 1980s. Most of the procedures established were done manually including sample registration. The samples were recorded manually in a logbook and given ID number. Then all samples, standards, SRM and blank were recorded on the irradiation vial and several forms prior to irradiation. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel were time consuming and not efficient. Sample registration software is developed as part of IAEA/CRP project on `Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Facility in Malaysia Nuclear Agency (RC17399)'. The objective of the project is to create a pc-based data entry software during sample preparation stage. This is an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries that needs to be completed by laboratory personnel. The software developed will automatically generate sample code for each sample in one batch, create printable registration forms for administration purpose, and store selected parameters that will be passed to sample analysis program. The software is developed by using National Instruments Labview 8.6.

  9. Nuclear weapons and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Cassel, C.; McCally, M.; Abraham, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the potential radiation hazards and environmental impacts of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include medical responsibility and thermonuclear war, the threat of nuclear war, nuclear weaponry, biological effects, radiation injury, decontamination, long-term effects, ecological effects, psychological aspects, the economic implications of nuclear weapons and war, ethics, civil defense, arms control, nuclear winter, and long-term biological consequences of nuclear war.

  10. THE NUCLEAR INFRARED EMISSION OF LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R. E.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Alonso-Herrero, A.; Elitzur, M.; Aretxaga, I.; Roche, P. F.; Oi, N.

    2012-07-15

    We present high-resolution mid-infrared (MIR) imaging, nuclear spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and archival Spitzer spectra for 22 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs; L{sub bol} {approx}< 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). Infrared (IR) observations may advance our understanding of the accretion flows in LLAGNs, the fate of the obscuring torus at low accretion rates, and, perhaps, the star formation histories of these objects. However, while comprehensively studied in higher-luminosity Seyferts and quasars, the nuclear IR properties of LLAGNs have not yet been well determined. We separate the present LLAGN sample into three categories depending on their Eddington ratio and radio emission, finding different IR characteristics for each class. (1) At the low-luminosity, low-Eddington-ratio (log L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} < -4.6) end of the sample, we identify 'host-dominated' galaxies with strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bands that may indicate active (circum-)nuclear star formation. (2) Some very radio-loud objects are also present at these low Eddington ratios. The IR emission in these nuclei is dominated by synchrotron radiation, and some are likely to be unobscured type 2 AGNs that genuinely lack a broad-line region. (3) At higher Eddington ratios, strong, compact nuclear sources are visible in the MIR images. The nuclear SEDs of these galaxies are diverse; some resemble typical Seyfert nuclei, while others lack a well-defined MIR 'dust bump'. Strong silicate emission is present in many of these objects. We speculate that this, together with high ratios of silicate strength to hydrogen column density, could suggest optically thin dust and low dust-to-gas ratios, in accordance with model predictions that LLAGNs do not host a Seyfert-like obscuring torus. We anticipate that detailed modeling of the new data and SEDs in terms of accretion disk, jet, radiatively inefficient accretion flow, and torus components will provide further insights into the nuclear

  11. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  12. A mid-infrared look at the dusty nuclear environments of local active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso Herrero, Almudena

    2016-08-01

    Active galactic nuclei are largely explained in the context of a unified theory, by which a geometrically and optically thick torus of gas and dust obscures the AGN central engine. The torus intercepts a substantial amount of flux from the central engine and and reradiates it in the infrared. There are still many open questions about the nature of the torus material and the role of nuclear (< 100 pc) starbursts in feeding and/or obscuring AGNs. Ground-based mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy on 8-10m class telescopes allow us to study the dusty environments of nearby active galactic nuclei on physical scales of less than 100pc. In this talk I will present results from a mid-infrared sub-arcsecond resolution imaging and spectroscopy survey of a sample of local AGN. The observations were mostly taken with CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) through an ESO/GTC large programme and the CanariCam AGN guaranteed time program. I will discuss results on the torus properties of different types of AGN from the modelling of the unresolved infrared emission with the CLUMPY torus models. I will also show that the molecules responsible for the 11.3micron PAH feature survive in the vicinity of the active nucleus and thus this PAH feature can be used to study the nuclear star formation activity in AGN.

  13. Nuclear Factor-κB Activation in Schwann Cells Regulates Regeneration and Re-myelination

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Paul D.; Johnstone, Joshua T.; Ramos, Angel Y.; Liebl, Daniel J.; Bunge, Mary B.; Bethea, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are crucial for peripheral nerve development and regeneration; however, the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms governing post-injury responses are poorly understood. Activation and deacetylation of nuclear factor-κB (NF- κB) in SCs have been implicated as prerequisites for peripheral nerve myelination. Using GFAP-IκBα-dn mice in which NF- κB transcriptional activation is inhibited in SCs we found no discernable differences in the quantity or structure of myelinated axons in adult facial nerves. Following crush injury, axonal regeneration was impaired at 31 days and significantly enhanced at 65 days in transgenic animals. Compact re-myelination and Remak bundle organization were significantly compromised at 31 days and restored by 65 days post injury. Together, these data indicate that inhibition of NF- κB activation in SCs transiently delays axonal regeneration and compact re-myelination. Manipulating the temporal activation of nuclear factor-κB in Schwann cells may offer new therapeutic avenues for PNS and CNS regeneration. PMID:22275133

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus M2-1 protein induces the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, Kerstin . E-mail: reimers.kerstin@mh-hannover.de; Buchholz, Katja; Werchau, Hermann

    2005-01-20

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces the production of a number of cytokines and chemokines by activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). The activation of NF-{kappa}B has been shown to depend on viral replication in the infected cells. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of RSV M2-1 protein, a transcriptional processivity and anti-termination factor, is sufficient to activate NF-{kappa}B in A549 cells. Electromobility shift assays show increased NF-{kappa}B complexes in the nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells. M2-1 protein is found in nuclei of M2-1-expressing cells and in RSV-infected cells. Co-immunoprecipitations of nuclear extracts of M2-1-expressing cells and of RSV-infected cells revealed an association of M2-1 with Rel A protein. Furthermore, the activation of NF-{kappa}B depends on the C-terminus of the RSV M2-1 protein, as shown by NF-{kappa}B-induced gene expression of a reporter gene construct.

  15. Controlling nuclear JAKs and STATs for specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Noon-Song, Ezra N.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Dabelic, Rea; Canton, Johnathan; Johnson, Howard M.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interact with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-associated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. {yields} We show that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also associate with IFNGR1 in the nucleus. {yields} The activated Janus kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of tyrosine 41 on histone H3, an important epigenetic event for specific gene activation. -- Abstract: We previously showed that gamma interferon (IFN{gamma}) and its receptor subunit, IFNGR1, interacted with the promoter region of IFN{gamma}-activated genes along with transcription factor STAT1{alpha}. Recent studies have suggested that activated Janus kinases pJAK2 and pJAK1 also played a role in gene activation by phosphorylation of histone H3 on tyrosine 41. This study addresses the question of the role of activated JAKs in specific gene activation by IFN{gamma}. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR in IFN{gamma} treated WISH cells and showed association of pJAK1, pJAK2, IFNGR1, and STAT1 on the same DNA sequence of the IRF-1 gene promoter. The {beta}-actin gene, which is not activated by IFN{gamma}, did not show this association. The movement of activated JAK to the nucleus and the IRF-1 promoter was confirmed by the combination of nuclear fractionation, confocal microscopy and DNA precipitation analysis using the biotinylated GAS promoter. Activated JAKs in the nucleus was associated with phosphorylated tyrosine 41 on histone H3 in the region of the GAS promoter. Unphosphorylated JAK2 was found to be constitutively present in the nucleus and was capable of undergoing activation in IFN{gamma} treated cells, most likely via nuclear IFNGR1. Association of pJAK2 and IFNGR1 with histone H3 in IFN{gamma} treated cells was demonstrated by histone H3 immunoprecipitation. Unphosphorylated STAT1 protein was associated with histone H3 of untreated cells. IFN

  16. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability.

  17. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  18. A3 Domain Region 1803–1818 Contributes to the Stability of Activated Factor VIII and Includes a Binding Site for Activated Factor IX

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803–1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803–1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803–1810 and FVIII/FV 1811–1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811–1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  19. A Second Class of Nuclear Receptors for Oxysterols: Regulation of RORα and RORγ activity by 24S-Hydroxycholesterol (Cerebrosterol)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongjun; Kumar, Naresh; Crumbley, Christine; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor α and γ (RORα [NR1F1] and RORγ [NR1F3]) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. These 2 receptors regulate many physiological processes including development, metabolism and immunity. We recently found that certain oxysterols, namely the 7-substituted oxysterols, bound to the ligand binding domains (LBDs) of RORα and RORγ with high affinity, altered the LBD conformation and reduced coactivator binding resulting in suppression of the constitutive transcriptional activity of these two receptors. Here, we show that another oxysterol, 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OHC), is also a high affinity ligand for RORα and RORγ (Ki ∼ 25 nM). 24S-OHC is also known as cerebrosterol due to its high level in the brain where it plays an essential role as an intermediate in cholesterol elimination from the CNS. 24S-OHC functions as a RORα/γ inverse agonist suppressing the constitutive transcriptional activity of these receptors in cotransfection assays. Additionally, 24S-OHC suppressed the expression of several RORα target genes including BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in a ROR-dependent manner. We also demonstrate that 24S-OHC decreases the ability of RORα to recruit the coactivator SRC-2 when bound to the BMAL1 promoter. We also noted that 24(S), 25-epoxycholesterol selectively suppressed the activity of RORγ. These data indicate that RORα and RORγ may serve as sensors of oxsterols. Thus, RORα and RORγ display an overlapping ligand preference with another class of oxysterol nuclear receptors, the liver X receptors (LXRα [NR1H3] and LXRβ [NR1H2]). PMID:20211758

  20. Preschool Curriculum: A Child Centered Curriculum of Concepts and Activities Including All of the CDA Functional Areas--Bi-lingual and Home Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Dorothy, Comp.

    This preschool resource curriculum, intended for use in a Head Start center, was written to correspond with a work plan and curriculum for children 3 to 5 years of age. The units included in the curriculum guide are aimed at integrating growth experiences with the learning of basic skills. Each of the 16 units contains material related to each of…

  1. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  2. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkas, Dmytro

    2011-10-01

    As a result of the nuclear accident at the Chernobyl NPP in 1986, the explosion dispeesed nuclear materials contained in the nuclear fuel of the reactor core over the destroyed facilities at Unit No. 4 and over the territory immediately adjacent to the destroyed unit. The debris was buried under the Cascade Wall. Nuclear materials at the SHELTER can be characterized as spent nuclear fuel, fresh fuel assemblies (including fuel assemblies with damaged geometry and integrity, and individual fuel elements), core fragments of the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4, finely-dispersed fuel (powder/dust), uranium and plutonium compounds in water solutions, and lava-like nuclear fuel-containing masses. The new safe confinement (NSC) is a facility designed to enclose the Chernobyl NPP Unit No. 4 destroyed by the accident. Construction of the NSC involves excavating operations, which are continuously monitored including for the level of radiation. The findings of such monitoring at the SHELTER site will allow us to characterize the recovered radioactive waste. When a process material categorized as high activity waste (HAW) is detected the following HLW management operations should be involved: HLW collection; HLW fragmentation (if appropriate); loading HAW into the primary package KT-0.2; loading the primary package filled with HAW into the transportation cask KTZV-0.2; and storing the cask in temporary storage facilities for high-level solid waste. The CDAS system is a system of 3He tubes for neutron coincidence counting, and is designed to measure the percentage ratio of specific nuclear materials in a 200-liter drum containing nuclear material intermixed with a matrix. The CDAS consists of panels with helium counter tubes and a polyethylene moderator. The panels are configured to allow one to position a waste-containing drum and a drum manipulator. The system operates on the ‘add a source’ basis using a small Cf-252 source to identify irregularities in the matrix during an assay

  3. Prolonged interval between fusion and activation impairs embryonic development by inducing chromosome scattering and nuclear aneuploidy in pig somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    You, Jinyoung; Song, Kilyoung; Lee, Eunsong

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of various intervals between electrofusion and activation (FA interval) on the nuclear remodelling and development of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos in pigs. Reconstructed oocytes were activated at 0 (simultaneous fusion and activation; SFA), 1, 2 and 3 h (delayed activation) after electrofusion; these groups were designated as DA1, DA2 and DA3, respectively. When oocyte nuclear status was examined at 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h after electrofusion, the incidence of chromosome scattering was increased (P < 0.01) as the FA interval was extended (0.0%, 12.0%, 77.3% and 78.0%, respectively). Extending the FA interval led to an increase (P < 0.01) in the percentage of oocytes containing multiple (>or=3) pseudopronuclei (PPN) (0.0% of SFA; 5.3% of DA1; 21.7% of DA2; and 33.5% of DA3). The development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was decreased (P < 0.05) in DA2 (5.7%) and DA3 (5.0%) compared with SFA (18.1%) and DA1 (19.5%). Our results demonstrate that extending the FA interval impairs the development of SCNT pig embryos by inducing chromosome scattering and the formation of multiple PPN, which may result in increased nuclear aneuploidy.

  4. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  5. Including Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Health Promotion Research: Development and Reliability of a Structured Interview to Assess the Correlates of Physical Activity among Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Carol; Bandini, Linda G.; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Lo, Charmaine; Gleason, James M.; Fleming, Richard K.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The input of youth with intellectual disabilities in health promotion and health disparities research is essential for understanding their needs and preferences. Regular physical activity (PA) is vital for health and well-being, but levels are low in youth generally, including those with intellectual disabilities. Understanding the…

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of BK Virus by Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Joslynn A.; Manley, Kate; Dugan, Aisling S.; O'Hara, Bethany A.; Atwood, Walter J.

    2010-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) is a common virus for which 80 to 90% of the adult population is seropositive. BKV reactivation in immunosuppressed patients or renal transplant patients is the primary cause of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). Using the Dunlop strain of BKV, we found that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important regulatory role in BKV infection. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that NFAT4 bound to the viral promoter and regulated viral transcription and infection. The mutational analysis of the NFAT binding sites demonstrated complex functional interactions between NFAT, c-fos, c-jun, and the p65 subunit of NF-κB that together influence promoter activity and viral growth. These data indicate that NFAT is required for BKV infection and is involved in a complex regulatory network that both positively and negatively influences promoter activity and viral infection. PMID:19955309

  7. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  8. EspC, an Autotransporter Protein Secreted by Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Causes Apoptosis and Necrosis through Caspase and Calpain Activation, Including Direct Procaspase-3 Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Serapio-Palacios, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) has the ability to antagonize host apoptosis during infection through promotion and inhibition of effectors injected by the type III secretion system (T3SS), but the total number of these effectors and the overall functional relationships between these effectors during infection are poorly understood. EspC produced by EPEC cleaves fodrin, paxillin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which are also cleaved by caspases and calpains during apoptosis. Here we show the role of EspC in cell death induced by EPEC. EspC is involved in EPEC-mediated cell death and induces both apoptosis and necrosis in epithelial cells. EspC induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by provoking (i) a decrease in the expression levels of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, (ii) translocation of the proapoptotic protein Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, (iii) cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, (iv) loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, (v) caspase-9 activation, (vi) cleavage of procaspase-3 and (vii) an increase in caspase-3 activity, (viii) PARP proteolysis, and (ix) nuclear fragmentation and an increase in the sub-G1 population. Interestingly, EspC-induced apoptosis was triggered through a dual mechanism involving both independent and dependent functions of its EspC serine protease motif, the direct cleavage of procaspase-3 being dependent on this motif. This is the first report showing a shortcut for induction of apoptosis by the catalytic activity of an EPEC protein. Furthermore, this atypical intrinsic apoptosis appeared to induce necrosis through the activation of calpain and through the increase of intracellular calcium induced by EspC. Our data indicate that EspC plays a relevant role in cell death induced by EPEC. PMID:27329750

  9. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ryan M; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  10. Modulation of nuclear factor-κB activity can influence the susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kalergis, Alexis M; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu I; Barrientos, Magaly J; González, Pablo A; Herrada, Andres A; Leiva, Eduardo D; Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Riedel, Claudia A; Bueno, Susan M; Jacobelli, Sergio H

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), result from deficiencies in self-antigen tolerance processes, which require regulated dendritic cell (DC) function. In this study we evaluated the phenotype of DCs during the onset of SLE in a mouse model, in which deletion of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb leads to the production of anti-nuclear antibodies and glomerulonephritis. Splenic DCs from FcγRIIb-deficient mice suffering from SLE showed increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Furthermore, diseased mice showed an altered function of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor, which is involved in DC maturation. Compared with healthy animals, expression of the inhibitory molecule IκB-α was significantly decreased in mice suffering from SLE. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity in FcγRIIb-deficient mice led to reduced susceptibility to SLE and prevented symptoms, such as anti-nuclear antibodies and kidney damage. Our data suggest that the occurrence of SLE is significantly influenced by alterations of NF-κB function, which can be considered as a new therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:19016912

  11. Polarization of PI3K Activity Initiated by Ooplasmic Segregation Guides Nuclear Migration in the Mesendoderm.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Naohito; Oonuma, Kouhei; Nishida, Hiroki; Saiga, Hidetoshi

    2015-11-01

    Asymmetric localization of RNA is a widely observed mechanism of cell polarization. Using embryos of the ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi, we previously showed that mesoderm and endoderm fates are separated by localization of mRNA encoding a transcription factor, Not, to the future mesoderm-side cytoplasm of the mesendoderm cell through asymmetric positioning of the nucleus. Here, we investigated the mechanism that defines the direction of the nuclear migration. We show that localization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 to the future mesoderm region determines the direction of nuclear migration. Localization of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 was dependent on the localization of PI3Kα to the future mesoderm region. PI3Kα was first localized at the 1-cell stage by the ooplasmic movement. Activity of localized PI3Kα at the 4-cell stage was required for the localization of PI3Kα up to the nuclear migration. Our results provide the scaffold for understanding the chain of causality leading to the separation of germ layer fates. PMID:26555053

  12. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Ryan M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  13. X-RAY NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN S{sup 4}G BARRED GALAXIES: NO LINK BETWEEN BAR STRENGTH AND CO-OCCURRENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FUELING

    SciTech Connect

    Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H.; González-Martín, Omaira; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun; Díaz-García, Simón; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Ho, Luis C.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L.; Sheth, Kartik; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Gil de Paz, Armando; Holwerda, Benne W.; and others

    2013-10-10

    Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d < 35 Mpc) barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We use Chandra observations to measure nuclear 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6 μm imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q{sub b} , taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing the presence of both stellar bars and nuclear activity, we are able to account for the continuum of bar strengths and degrees of AGN activity. We find nuclear X-ray sources in 31 out of 41 galaxies with median X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio of L{sub X} = 4.3 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 6.9 × 10{sup –6}, respectively, consistent with low-luminosity AGN activity. Including upper limits for those galaxies without nuclear detections, we find no significant correlation between any of the bar strength indicators and the degree of nuclear activity, irrespective of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, Hubble type, or bulge size. Strong bars do not favor brighter or more efficient nuclear activity, implying that at least for the low-luminosity regime, supermassive black hole fueling is not closely connected to large-scale features.

  14. Flame Retardant BDE-47 Effectively Activates Nuclear Receptor CAR in Human Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether BDE-47 (2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) is a thyroid hormone disruptor in mice; hepatic induction of various metabolic enzymes and transporters has been suggested as the mechanism for this disruption. Utilizing Car −/− and Pxr −/− mice as well as human primary hepatocytes, here we have demonstrated that BDE-47 activated both mouse and human nuclear receptor constitutive activated/androstane receptor (CAR). In mouse livers, CAR, not PXR, was responsible for Cyp2b10 mRNA induction by BDE-47. In human primary hepatocytes, BDE-47 was able to induce translocation of YFP-tagged human CAR from the cytoplasm to the nucleus andCYP2B6 and CYP3A4 mRNAs expressions. BDE-47 activated human CAR in a manner akin to the human CAR ligand CITCO (6-(4-Chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime) in luciferase-reporter assays using Huh-7 cells. In contrast, mouse CAR was not potently activated by BDE-47 in the same reporter assays. Furthermore, human pregnane X receptor (PXR) was effectively activated by BDE-47 while mouse PXR was weakly activated in luciferase-reporter assays. Our results indicate that BDE-47 induces CYP genes through activation of human CAR in addition to the previously identified pathway through human PXR. PMID:24218150

  15. Transcriptional activation of NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    SciTech Connect

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-09-04

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD{sup +}-dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  16. Differentiation between earthquake radon anomalies and those arising from nuclear activities.

    PubMed

    Elmaghraby, Elsayed K; Lotfy, Yahia A

    2009-01-01

    The present work offers a methodology to correlate the earthquake time, magnitude and location based on the behavior of radon concentration. By correlating tectonic events to radon behavior, based on previously published radon data, radon concentration signals can be taken into consideration in decision making. Three correlations between magnitude, time and epicenter distance are presented. The applicability of any one of them depends on the measurement technique. Moreover, a suggested procedure is presented to determine the possible confusion between signals for radon anomalies originating from tectonic failure and those arising from nuclear activities. The suggested method depends on the change observed on the (219)Rn and (222)Rn daughters concentration ratios.

  17. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed.

  18. Synergistic activation of the human orphan nuclear receptor SHP gene promoter by basic helix–loop–helix protein E2A and orphan nuclear receptor SF-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Jong; Kim, Joon-Young; Park, Yun-Yong; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2003-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) is an unusual orphan nuclear receptor that lacks a conventional DNA-binding domain and acts as a modulator of transcriptional activities of a number of nuclear receptors. We have previously reported that the orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ activates the SHP promoter. In this study, we have found that basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) transcription factors, the E2A proteins (E47, E12 and E2/5), activated the human but not the mouse SHP promoter. In contrast, the tissue-specific E47 heterodimer partner BETA2 repressed the E47- mediated transactivation of the human SHP (hSHP) promoter. Using serial deletions and E-box mutant constructs of the hSHP promoter, we identified two E-boxes (E6 and E7) as E47-responsive E-boxes, which are not conserved in the mouse SHP promoter. Moreover, gel shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and northern blot assays demonstrated that E47 directly binds to the hSHP promoter in vivo and in vitro and that Id proteins inhibited E47 binding to the hSHP promoter. Finally, we found that E47 and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), a regulator of the SHP promoter, synergistically activate the human but not the mouse SHP promoter. Our findings suggest that the E2A proteins differentially regulate the human and mouse SHP promoters and cooperate with orphan nuclear receptor SF-1 for transcriptional activation of the hSHP promoter. PMID:14627819

  19. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  20. Measurement of factor VIII activity using one-stage clotting assay: a calibration curve has not to be systematically included in each run.

    PubMed

    Lattes, S; Appert-Flory, A; Fischer, F; Jambou, D; Toulon, P

    2011-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is usually evaluated using activated partial thromboplastin time-based one-stage clotting assays. Guidelines for clotting factor assays indicate that a calibration curve should be included each time the assay is performed. Therefore, FVIII measurement is expensive, reagent- and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to compare FVIII activities obtained using the same fully automated assay that was calibrated once (stored calibration curve) or each time the assay was performed. Unique lots of reagents were used throughout the study. We analysed 255 frozen plasma samples from patients who were prescribed FVIII measurement including treated and untreated haemophilia A patients. Twenty-six runs were performed on a 28-week period, each including four lyophilized control and at most 10 patient plasma samples. In control samples, FVIII activities were not significantly different when the assay was performed using the stored calibration curve or was daily calibrated. The same applied to FVIII activities in patient plasma samples that were not significantly different throughout the measuring range of activities [68.3% (<1-179) vs. 67.6% (<1-177), P=0.48] and no relevant bias could be demonstrated when data were compared according to Bland and Altman. These results suggest that in the studied technical conditions, performing the FVIII assay using a stored calibration curve is reliable, for at least 6 months. Therefore, as far as the same lots of reagents are used, it is not mandatory to include a calibration curve each time the FVIII assay was performed. However, this strategy has to be validated if the assay is performed in different technical conditions.

  1. Activation of the human nuclear xenobiotic receptor PXR by the reverse transcriptase-targeted anti-HIV drug PNU-142721

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yuan; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2012-10-09

    The human pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. PXR responds to a structurally diverse variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, and coordinates the expression of genes central to the metabolism and excretion of potentially harmful chemicals, including human therapeutics. The reverse transcriptase inhibitor PNU-142721 has been designed to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although this compound has anti-HIV activity, it was established using cell-based assays that PNU-142721 is an efficacious PXR agonist. We present here the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the human PXR ligand-binding domain in complex with PNU-142721. PXR employs one hydrogen bond and fourteen van der Waals contacts to interact with the ligand, but allows two loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket to remain disordered in the structure. These observations highlight the role structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous responses to xenobiotics. The crystal structure also explains why PNU-173575, a thiomethyl metabolite of PNU-142721, exhibits enhanced PXR activation relative to the unmodified compound and why PNU-142721 can also activate rat PXR. Taken together, the results presented here elucidate the structural basis for PXR activation by PNU-142721 and related chemicals.

  2. Nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibits the activity of STAT3

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhihao; Zhang, Xiaoai; Yang, Juntao; Wu, Guangzhou; Zhang, Ying; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Chang, Zhijie; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2009-09-18

    STAT3 (Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) is a key transcription factor of the JAK-STAT (Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway that regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis. Activation of STAT3 is under tight regulation, and yet the different signaling pathways and the mechanisms that regulate its activity remain to be elucidated. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a nuclear protein I{kappa}B-{zeta} that interacts in a novel way with STAT3. This physical interaction was further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction regions were mapped to the coiled-coil domain of STAT3 and the C-terminal of I{kappa}B-{zeta}. Overexpression of I{kappa}B-{zeta} inhibited the transcriptional activity of STAT3. It also suppressed cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in SRC-simulated cells, which is partially mediated by down-regulation of expression of a known STAT3 target gene, MCL1. Our results suggest that I{kappa}B-{zeta} is a negative regulator of STAT3, and demonstrate a novel mechanism in which a component of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway inhibits the activation of STAT3.

  3. Intercomparison of 131I and 99mTc activity measurements in Brazilian nuclear medicine services.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, A; De Oliveira, A E; Tauhata, L; da Silva, C J; Lopes, R T

    2001-03-01

    This work outlines the quality assurance program for the activity measurements of the most used radionuclides at Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS). The program aims to guarantee that the patient is given the correct prescribed amount of activity in diagnostic or therapeutic applications. This accurate administration depends upon proper use and calibration of the activity meters by the NMS. Underestimation of administered activity in diagnostic practices could delay correct diagnosis disturbing the value of the investigation. On the other hand, the overestimation would be worse, mainly in therapeutic applications, because an unnecessarily high absorbed dose would be delivered to the patient. The preliminary results of intercomparison for 131I and 99mTc showed that many activity meters used at NMS's present problems giving results up to 41% greater than the reference values determined at the National Metrology Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI) which is recognized as the Brazilian authorized metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation. These results have demonstrated that the NMS should improve the accuracy of the activity measurements of the radionuclides administered to the patients and establish the traceability to the national standards of measurements. These standards are based on a pressurized well-type ionization chamber installed at LNMRI and calibrated with reference sources standardized by absolute methods. The protocol of the intercomparison and recommendations made in order to minimize errors in measuring procedures are described and results are discussed.

  4. The AP-1 family member FOS blocks transcriptional activity of the nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Sirianni, Rosa; Nogueira, Edson; Bassett, Mary H.; Carr, Bruce R.; Suzuki, Takashi; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Andò, Sebastiano; Rainey, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Steroid production in the adrenal zona glomerulosa is under the control of angiotensin II (Ang II), which, upon binding to its receptor, activates protein kinase C (PKC) within these cells. PKC is a potent inhibitor of the steroidogenic enzyme CYP17. We have demonstrated that, in the ovary, PKC activates expression of FOS, a member of the AP-1 family, and increased expression of this gene is linked to CYP17 downregulation. However, the pathway and the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of PKC on CYP17 expression are not defined. Herein, we demonstrated that Ang II inhibited CYP17 through PKC and ERK1/2-activated FOS and that blocking FOS expression decreased PKC-mediated inhibition. Although CYP17 transcription was activated by the nuclear receptor SF-1, expression of FOS resulted in a decrease in SF-1-mediated gene transcription. FOS physically interacted with the hinge region of SF-1 and modulated its transactivity, thus preventing binding of cofactors such as SRC1 and CBP, which were necessary to fully activate CYP17 transcription. Collectively, these results indicate a new regulatory mechanism for SF-1 transcriptional activity that might influence adrenal zone-specific expression of CYP17, a mechanism that can potentially be applied to other steroidogenic tissues. PMID:20980388

  5. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Is Activated in the Endothelium of Retinal Microvessels in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zetterqvist, Anna V.; Blanco, Fabiana; Öhman, Jenny; Kotova, Olga; Berglund, Lisa M.; de Frutos Garcia, Sergio; Al-Naemi, Raed; Wigren, Maria; McGuire, Paul G.; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.; Gomez, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains unclear but hyperglycemia is an established risk factor. Endothelial dysfunction and changes in Ca2+ signaling have been shown to precede the onset of DR. We recently demonstrated that high extracellular glucose activates the Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor NFAT in cerebral arteries and aorta, promoting the expression of inflammatory markers. Here we show, using confocal immunofluorescence, that NFAT is expressed in the endothelium of retinal microvessels and is readily activated by high glucose. This was inhibited by the NFAT blocker A-285222 as well as by the ectonucleotidase apyrase, suggesting a mechanism involving the release of extracellular nucleotides. Acute hyperglycemia induced by an IP-GTT (intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test) resulted in increased NFATc3 nuclear accumulation and NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity in retinal vessels of NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. In both Akita (Ins2+/−) and streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic mice, NFAT transcriptional activity was elevated in retinal vessels. In vivo inhibition of NFAT with A-285222 decreased the expression of OPN and ICAM-1 mRNA in retinal vessels, prevented a diabetes driven downregulation of anti-inflammatory IL-10 in retina, and abrogated the increased vascular permeability observed in diabetic mice. Results identify NFAT signaling as a putative target for treatment of microvascular complications in diabetes. PMID:25918731

  6. Activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and not activator protein-1 in cellular response to nickel compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Davidson, Gerard; Li, Jingxia; Yan, Yan; Chen, Fei; Costa, Max; Chen, Lung Chi; Huang, Chuanshu

    2002-01-01

    The predominant exposure route for nickel compounds is by inhalation, and several studies have indicated the correlation between nickel exposure and respiratory cancers. The tumor-promoting effects of nickel compounds are thought to be associated with their transactivation of transcription factors. We have investigated the possible activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor KB (NF-kappaB) in mouse C141 epidermal cells and fibroblasts 3T3 and B82, and human bronchoepithelial BEAS-2B cells in response to nickel compound exposure. Our results show that NF-kappaB activity is induced by nickel exposure in 3T3 and BEAS-2B cells. Conversely, similar nickel treatment of these cells did not induce AP-1 activity, suggesting that nickel tumorigenesis occurs through NF-kappaB and not AP-1. We also investigated the role of NF-kappaB in the induction of Cap43 by nickel compounds using dominant negative mutant Ikappabeta kinase b-KM BEAS-2B transfectants. PMID:12426142

  7. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  8. Tensile force on human macrophage cells promotes osteoclastogenesis through receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand induction.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Chien, Chien-Fang; Shie, Ming-You; Yeh, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the effects of tensile forces on osteoclastogenesis by human monocytes in the absence of mechanosensitive cells, including osteoblasts and fibroblasts. In this study we consider the effects of tensile force on osteoclastogenesis in human monocytes. The cells were treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) to promote osteoclastogenesis. Then,expression and secretion of cathepsin K were examined. RANKL and the formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process under continual tensile stress were evaluated by Western blot. It was also found that -100 kPa or lower induces RANKL-enhanced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, an increased tensile force raises the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL, and is concurrent with the increase of TNF-receptor-associated factor 6 induction and nuclear factor κB activation. Overall, the current report demonstrates that tensile force reinforces RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The tensile force is able to modify every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, affecting the fusion of preosteoclasts and function of osteoclasts. However, tensile force increased TNF-receptor-associated factor 6 expression. These results are in vitro findings and were obtained under a condition of tensile force. The current results help us to better understand the cellular roles of human macrophage populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling when there is tensile stress.

  9. History of Nuclear India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Ram

    2000-04-01

    India emerged as a free and democratic country in 1947, and entered into the nuclear age in 1948 by establishing the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), with Homi Bhabha as the chairman. Later on the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) was created under the Office of the Prime Minister Jawahar Lal Nehru. Initially the AEC and DAE received international cooperation, and by 1963 India had two research reactors and four nuclear power reactors. In spite of the humiliating defeat in the border war by China in 1962 and China's nuclear testing in 1964, India continued to adhere to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. On May 18, 1974 India performed a 15 kt Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE). The western powers considered it nuclear weapons proliferation and cut off all financial and technical help, even for the production of nuclear power. However, India used existing infrastructure to build nuclear power reactors and exploded both fission and fusion devices on May 11 and 13, 1998. The international community viewed the later activity as a serious road block for the Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; both deemed essential to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. India considers these treaties favoring nuclear states and is prepared to sign if genuine nuclear disarmament is included as an integral part of these treaties.

  10. Prognostic and health management of active assets in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy; Pham, Binh T.; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-06-04

    This study presents the development of diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for active assets in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research was performed under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Idaho National Laboratory researched, developed, implemented, and demonstrated diagnostic and prognostic models for generator step-up transformers (GSUs). The Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was used to perform diagnosis and prognosis. As part of the research activity, Idaho National Laboratory implemented 22 GSU diagnostic models in the Asset Fault Signature Database and two wellestablished GSU prognostic models for the paper winding insulation in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The implemented models along with a simulated fault data stream were used to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of the FW-PHM Suite. Knowledge of the operating condition of plant asset gained from diagnosis and prognosis is critical for the safe, productive, and economical long-term operation of the current fleet of NPPs. This research addresses some of the gaps in the current state of technology development and enables effective application of diagnostics and prognostics to nuclear plant assets.

  11. Calibration of a direct nuclear activation diagnostic which uses boron nitride to measure energetic deuterium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G.W.; Chambers, G.D.; Savage, M.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.

    1998-07-01

    A direct nuclear activation diagnostic for the measurement of the kinetic energy of deuterium ions in the energy range of 1 to 3 MeV has been successfully developed. This diagnostic is based on the fact that the ratio of two different thick target yields which are generated by the same incident ion species can be a sensitive function of incident ion energy. Targets for this diagnostic are made of {alpha}-boron nitride (BN) and use the two reactions: {sup 10}B(d,n){sup 11}C({beta}+) and {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O({beta}+). As long as the BN material matrix remains constant, the ratio of thick target yields depends only on the deuterium ion energy and is independent of ion fluence and detector efficiency. Calibration of the diagnostic was accomplished by irradiating BN targets with deuterium beams of known ion kinetic energy and fluence. The calibrated diagnostic was then fielded to measure the voltage in a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Electrical measurements of the POS voltage and the voltage inferred from the BN nuclear activation diagnostic were in good agreement.

  12. Nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-zeta, an egg-activating factor, during early embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Yoshie; Ito, Masahiko; Shirakawa, Hideki; Shikano, Tomohide; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Shunichi . E-mail: shunm@research.twmu.ac.jp

    2005-05-13

    Phospholipase C-zeta (PLC{zeta}), a strong candidate of the egg-activating sperm factor, causes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} oscillations and egg activation, and is subsequently accumulated into the pronucleus (PN), when expressed in mouse eggs by injection of RNA encoding PLC{zeta}. Changes in the localization of expressed PLC{zeta} were investigated by tagging with a fluorescent protein. PLC{zeta} began to translocate into the PN formed at 5-6 h after RNA injection and increased there. Observation in the same embryo revealed that PLC{zeta} in the PN dispersed to the cytoplasm upon nuclear envelope breakdown and translocated again into the nucleus after cleavage. The dynamics was found in the second mitosis as well. When RNA was injected into fertilization-originated 1-cell embryos or blastomere(s) of 2-8-cell embryos, the nuclear localization of expressed PLC{zeta} was recognized in every embryo up to blastocyst. Thus, PLC{zeta} exhibited alternative cytoplasm/nucleus localization during development. This supports the view that the sperm factor could control cell cycle-dependent generation of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in early embryogenesis.

  13. Plumes of neuronal activity propagate in three dimensions through the nuclear avian brain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In mammals, the slow-oscillations of neuronal membrane potentials (reflected in the electroencephalogram as high-amplitude, slow-waves), which occur during non-rapid eye movement sleep and anesthesia, propagate across the neocortex largely as two-dimensional traveling waves. However, it remains unknown if the traveling nature of slow-waves is unique to the laminar cytoarchitecture and associated computational properties of the neocortex. Results We demonstrate that local field potential slow-waves and correlated multiunit activity propagate as complex three-dimensional plumes of neuronal activity through the avian brain, owing to its non-laminar, nuclear neuronal cytoarchitecture. Conclusions The traveling nature of slow-waves is not dependent upon the laminar organization of the neocortex, and is unlikely to subserve functions unique to this pattern of neuronal organization. Finally, the three-dimensional geometry of propagating plumes may reflect computational properties not found in mammals that contributed to the evolution of nuclear neuronal organization and complex cognition in birds. PMID:24580797

  14. Nuclear activity and stellar population of a sample of interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastoriza, M. G.; Donzelli, C. J.; Bonatto, C.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the nuclear activity and stellar population in a sample of 27 physical galaxy pairs. Equivalent widths of absorption features are used to characterise the nuclear stellar population according to templates: most galaxies of the sample have important flux contributions from stars younger than 10(8) years. According to classical diagnostic-diagrams the galaxies in our sample are either classified as H II regions or have emission line ratios near the transition zone between H II regions and LINERs. Based on the observed spectra, only 4 galaxies show LINER properties and 1 nucleus is a Seyfert 2. We found that the spectrum of a transition object (38% of the sample) can be described by a combination of an AGN with an H II region. As a result, 20 galaxies of the present sample may host a low-luminosity active nucleus. Based on observations made at CASLEO and CTIO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO) is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cient\\'\\i ficas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  15. Prognostic and health management of active assets in nuclear power plants

    DOE PAGES

    Agarwal, Vivek; Lybeck, Nancy; Pham, Binh T.; Rusaw, Richard; Bickford, Randall

    2015-06-04

    This study presents the development of diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for active assets in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research was performed under the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Technologies Pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Idaho National Laboratory researched, developed, implemented, and demonstrated diagnostic and prognostic models for generator step-up transformers (GSUs). The Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was used to perform diagnosis and prognosis. As part of the research activity, Idaho National Laboratory implemented 22 GSU diagnostic models in the Asset Fault Signature Database and twomore » wellestablished GSU prognostic models for the paper winding insulation in the Remaining Useful Life Database of the FW-PHM Suite. The implemented models along with a simulated fault data stream were used to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of the FW-PHM Suite. Knowledge of the operating condition of plant asset gained from diagnosis and prognosis is critical for the safe, productive, and economical long-term operation of the current fleet of NPPs. This research addresses some of the gaps in the current state of technology development and enables effective application of diagnostics and prognostics to nuclear plant assets.« less

  16. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. PMID:23948303

  17. Phytol metabolites are circulating dietary factors that activate the nuclear receptor RXR.

    PubMed Central

    Kitareewan, S; Burka, L T; Tomer, K B; Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Stevens, R D; Forman, B M; Mais, D E; Heyman, R A; McMorris, T; Weinberger, C

    1996-01-01

    RXR is a nuclear receptor that plays a central role in cell signaling by pairing with a host of other receptors. Previously, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9cRA) was defined as a potent RXR activator. Here we describe a unique RXR effector identified from organic extracts of bovine serum by following RXR-dependent transcriptional activity. Structural analyses of material in active fractions pointed to the saturated diterpenoid phytanic acid, which induced RXR-dependent transcription at concentrations between 4 and 64 microM. Although 200 times more potent than phytanic acid, 9cRA was undetectable in equivalent amounts of extract and cannot be present at a concentration that could account for the activity. Phytanic acid, another phytol metabolite, was synthesized and stimulated RXR with a potency and efficacy similar to phytanic acid. These metabolites specifically displaced [3H]-9cRA from RXR with Ki values of 4 microM, indicating that their transcriptional effects are mediated by direct receptor interactions. Phytol metabolites are compelling candidates for physiological effectors, because their RXR binding affinities and activation potencies match their micromolar circulating concentrations. Given their exclusive dietary origin, these chlorophyll metabolites may represent essential nutrients that coordinate cellular metabolism through RXR-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8856661

  18. Reconstruction of 137Cs activity in the ocean following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Tsubono, Takaki; Tateda, Yutaka; Misumi, Kazuhiro; Hayami, Hiroshi; Toyoda, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Yoshikatsu; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2014-05-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant following the earthquake and tsunami of 11 March 2011 resulted in the release of radioactive materials to the ocean by two major pathways, direct release from the accident site and atmospheric deposition. We reconstructed spatiotemporal variability of 137Cs activity in the ocean by the comparison model simulations and observed data. We employed a regional scale and the North Pacific scale oceanic dispersion models, an atmospheric transport model, a sediment transport model, a dynamic biological compartment model for marine biota and river runoff model to investigate the oceanic contamination. Direct releases of 137Cs were estimated for more than 2 years after the accident by comparing simulated results and observed activities very close to the site. The estimated total amounts of directly released 137Cs was 3.6±0.7 PBq. Directly release rate of 137Cs decreased exponentially with time by the end of December 2012 and then, was almost constant. The daily release rate of 137Cs was estimated to be 3.0 x 1010 Bq day-1 by the end of September 2013. The activity of directly released 137Cs was detectable only in the coastal zone after December 2012. Simulated 137Cs activities attributable to direct release were in good agreement with observed activities, a result that implies the estimated direct release rate was reasonable, while simulated 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition were low compared to measured activities. The rate of atmospheric deposition onto the ocean was underestimated because of a lack of measurements of dose rate and air activity of 137Cs over the ocean when atmospheric deposition rates were being estimated. Observed 137Cs activities attributable to atmospheric deposition in the ocean helped to improve the accuracy of simulated atmospheric deposition rates. Although there is no observed data of 137Cs activity in the ocean from 11 to 21 March 2011, observed data of

  19. Nuclear Science References Database

    SciTech Connect

    Pritychenko, B.; Běták, E.; Singh, B.; Totans, J.

    2014-06-15

    The Nuclear Science References (NSR) database together with its associated Web interface, is the world's only comprehensive source of easily accessible low- and intermediate-energy nuclear physics bibliographic information for more than 210,000 articles since the beginning of nuclear science. The weekly-updated NSR database provides essential support for nuclear data evaluation, compilation and research activities. The principles of the database and Web application development and maintenance are described. Examples of nuclear structure, reaction and decay applications are specifically included. The complete NSR database is freely available at the websites of the National Nuclear Data Center (http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/nsr) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (http://www-nds.iaea.org/nsr)

  20. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training Program: Summary of program activities, fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-27

    The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Nuclear Energy Training (HBCU NET) Program, funded by DOE, Office of Nuclear Energy and administered by ORAU, began in February 1984. The program provides support for training, study, research participation, and academic enrichment of students and faculty at designated HBCUs in nuclear science, nuclear engineering, and other nuclear-related technologes and disciplines. The program is composed of undergraduate scholarships, graduate fellowships, student and faculty research participation, and an annual student training institute.

  1. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-02-28

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  2. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  3. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  4. 78 FR 13712 - U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned Monitoring Activities for F-Area Tank Farm at the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... COMMISSION U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Planned Monitoring Activities for F-Area Tank Farm at the... Savannah River Site F-Area Tank Farm Facility in Accordance with the National Defense Authorization Act for... DOE's waste disposal activities at the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site, in accordance...

  5. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  6. Rational Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (RQSAR) Screen for PXR and CAR Isoform-Specific Nuclear Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dring, Ann M.; Anderson, Linnea E.; Qamar, Saima; Stoner, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related orphan nuclear receptor proteins that share several ligands and target overlapping sets of genes involved in homeostasis and all phases of drug metabolism. CAR and PXR are involved in the development of certain diseases, including diabetes, metabolic syndrome and obesity. Ligand screens for these receptors so far have typically focused on steroid hormone analogs with pharmacophore-based approaches, only to find relatively few new hits. Multiple CAR isoforms have been detected in human liver, with the most abundant being the constitutively active reference, CAR1, and the ligand-dependent isoform CAR3. It has been assumed that any compound that binds CAR1 should also activate CAR3, and so CAR3 can be used as a ligand-activated surrogate for CAR1 studies. The possibility of CAR3-specific ligands has not, so far, been addressed. To investigate the differences between CAR1, CAR3 and PXR, and to look for more CAR ligands that may be of use in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies, we performed a luciferase transactivation assay screen of 60 mostly non-steroid compounds. Known active compounds with different core chemistries were chosen as starting points and structural variants were rationally selected for screening. Distinct differences in agonist versus inverse agonist/antagonist effects were seen in 49 compounds that had some ligand effect on at least one receptor and 18 that had effects on all three receptors; eight were CAR1 ligands only, three were CAR3 only ligands and four affected PXR only. This work provides evidence for new CAR ligands, some of which have CAR3-specific effects, and provides observational data on CAR and PXR ligands with which to inform in silico strategies. Compounds that demonstrated unique activity on any one receptor are potentially valuable diagnostic tools for the investigation of in vivo molecular targets. PMID:20869355

  7. Basis for and practical methods of controlling painting activities at the Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.R.

    1997-08-01

    Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) follows the guidance presented in Regulatory Guide (R.G.) 1.52, {open_quotes}Design, Testing, and Maintenance Criteria for Atmospheric Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption System Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants{close_quotes} in protecting its charcoal filter trains from the effects of painting and other chemical releases. SQN, as well as other nuclear facilities around the country, have the problem of how to address the issue of protection of Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) filter systems from degradation due to communication with airborne hydrocarbons (i.e., primarily paints and solvents). R.G. 1.52 (and a similar statement from R.G. 1.140) states in part,{open_quotes}Testing should be performed ... following painting, fire, or chemical release in any ventilation zone communicating with the system...,{close_quotes} and requires that a test be performed upon any kind of painting or chemical release. This is considered overly restrictive if the activity is minor and in a location remote from the charcoal filters. Charcoal filters used in air cleaning systems are required to filter out radioactive iodine from an airstream before its release from the plant to the environment. Charcoal filters will age with time because of their ability to adsorb many different types of material. This aging affects the charcoal by lowering its iodine retention efficiency, and therefore the charcoal needs to be protected from the effects of chemicals such as paint fumes. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation. PMID:23232059

  9. Upregulation of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by ErbB2 through nuclear factor-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shau-Hsuan; Hawthorne, Valerie S; Neal, Christopher L; Sanghera, Sartaj; Xu, Jia; Yang, Jun; Guo, Hua; Steeg, Patricia S; Yu, Dihua

    2009-12-15

    ErbB2 (HER2, neu) is a receptor tyrosine kinase overexpressed in about 25% of invasive breast carcinomas. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in a variety of cancers, including breast carcinomas. NGAL can inhibit erythroid cell production, leading to anemia. Anemia usually occurs in cancer patients and negatively affects quality of life. However, current treatment for cancer-related anemia has potential complications. ErbB2, NGAL, and anemia have all been associated with increased metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients, although the relationship between ErbB2 and NGAL expression is not clear. Here, using breast cancer cell lines in vitro and transgenic mice carrying the activated c-neu oncogene driven by a mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV-neu) in vivo, we show that ErbB2 overexpression leads to NGAL upregulation, which is dependent on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activity. MMTV-neu transgenic mice developed anemia after tumor onset, and anemia progression could be partially arrested by a NF-kappaB inhibitor and ErbB2-targeted therapy. Taken together, upregulation of NGAL by ErbB2 through NF-kappaB activation is involved in cancer-related anemia, and the ErbB2, NF-kappaB, and NGAL pathways may serve as potential therapeutic targets for cancer-related anemia.

  10. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid Leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade®), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  11. Aberrant nuclear factor-kappa B activity in acute myeloid leukemia: from molecular pathogenesis to therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Ching, Ying Qing; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2015-03-20

    The overall survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been improved significantly over the last decade. Molecularly targeted agents hold promise to change the therapeutic landscape in AML. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) controls a plethora of biological process through switching on and off its long list of target genes. In AML, constitutive NF-κB has been detected in 40% of cases and its aberrant activity enable leukemia cells to evade apoptosis and stimulate proliferation. These facts suggest that NF-κB signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the development of AML and it represents an attractive target for the intervention of AML. This review summarizes our current knowledge of NF-κB signaling transduction including canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways. Then we specifically highlight what factors contribute to the aberrant activation of NF-κB activity in AML, followed by an overview of 8 important clinical trials of the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor, Bortezomib (Velcade), which is a NF-κB inhibitor too, in combination with other therapeutic agents in patients with AML. Finally, this review discusses the future directions of NF-κB inhibitor in treatment of AML, especially in targeting leukemia stem cells (LSCs). PMID:25823927

  12. Cynaropicrin from Cynara scolymus L. suppresses photoaging of skin by inhibiting the transcription activity of nuclear factor-kappa B.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka Tsuda; Tanaka, Kiyotaka; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Tomoji; Masutani, Teruaki; Tsuboi, Makoto; Akao, Yukihiro

    2013-01-15

    Aging of skin is characterized by skin wrinkling, laxity, and pigmentation induced by several environmental stress factors. Histological changes during the photoaging of skin include hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes causing skin wrinkles and pigmentation. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the representative transcription factors active in conjunction with inflammation. NF-κB is activated by stimulation such as ultraviolet rays and inflammatory cytokines and induces the expression of various genes such as those of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1). We screened several plant extracts for their possible inhibitory effect on the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. One of them, an extract from Cynara scolymus L., showed a greatest effect on the suppression of NF-κB transactivation. As a result, we found that cynaropicrin, which is a sesquiterpene lactone, inhibited the NF-κB-mediated transactivation of bFGF and MMP-1. Furthermore, it was confirmed that in an in vivo mouse model cynaropicrin prevented skin photoaging processes leading to the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and melanocytes. These findings taken together indicate that cynaropicrin is an effective antiphotoaging agent that acts by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated transactivation.

  13. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-κB-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

  14. Fluctuation-based imaging of nuclear Rac1 activation by protein oligomerisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gaus, Katharina; Hahn, Klaus M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Here we describe a fluctuation-based method to quantify how protein oligomerisation modulates signalling activity of a multifunctional protein. By recording fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data of a FRET biosensor in a format that enables concomitant phasor and cross Number and Brightness (cN&B) analysis, we measure the nuclear dynamics of a Rac1 FRET biosensor and assess how Rac1 homo-oligomers (N&B) regulate Rac1 activity (hetero-oligomerisation with the biosensor affinity reagent, PBD, by FLIM-FRET) or interaction with an unknown binding partner (cN&B). The high spatiotemporal resolution of this method allowed us to discover that upon DNA damage monomeric and active Rac1 in the nucleus is segregated from dimeric and inactive Rac1 in the cytoplasm. This reorganisation requires Rac1 GTPase activity and is associated with an importin-α2 redistribution. Only with this multiplexed approach can we assess the oligomeric state a molecular complex must form in order to regulate a complex signalling network.

  15. Flavonoids induce HIF-1alpha but impair its nuclear accumulation and activity.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Anastasia; Mylonis, Ilias; Simos, George; Bonanou, Sophia; Tsakalof, Andreas

    2008-02-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is the regulatory subunit of the transcription factor HIF-1, which is highly involved in the pathology of diseases associated with tissue hypoxia. In this study we investigated the ability of plant flavonoids to induce HIF-1alpha and regulate HIF-1 transcriptional activity in HeLa cells. We demonstrate for the first time that the flavonoids baicalein, luteolin and fisetin, as well as the previously investigated quercetin, induce HIF-1alpha under normal oxygen pressure, whereas kaempferol, taxifolin, and rutin are inactive. We further reveal that the capability of flavonoids to bind efficiently intracellular iron and their lipophilicity are essential for HIF-1alpha induction. Despite the ability of flavonoids to stabilize HIF-1alpha, the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 induced by flavonoids was significantly lower than that observed with the iron chelator and known HIF-1 inducer, desferrioxamine (DFO). Furthermore, when cells in which HIF-1 had been induced by DFO were also treated with flavonoids, the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 was strongly impaired without simultaneous reduction in HIF-1alpha protein levels. Localization of HIF-1alpha by immuno- and direct fluorescence microscopy and in vitro phosphorylation assays suggest that flavonoids inhibit HIF-1 activity by impairing the MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha, thereby decreasing its nuclear accumulation.

  16. Nuclear localization of catalytically active MMP-2 in endothelial cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Satyesh K; Asotra, Kamlesh; Uzui, Hiroyasu; Nagwani, Santosh; Mishra, Vivek; Rajavashisth, Tripathi B

    2014-01-01

    From microscopic organelles and sub-cellular domains to the level of whole tissues, organs, and body parts, living organisms must continuously maintain and renovate structural components. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a family of over two dozen Zn-dependent endopeptidases thought to be primary effectors of extracellular tissue renewal and remodeling processes. Endogenous inhibitors, particularly the tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs), counteract MMP-2 proteolytic activity, but also participate in conversion of several pro-MMPs to proteolytically active forms. Numerous pathologies are characterized by imbalances in activities of MMPs relative to TIMPs. MMPs are synthesized and stored in cytoplasmic domains prior to secretion or expression in cell surface-associated form. Several proteases have been identified in cell nuclei, but their functions, regulation, and substrates remain largely unknown. Here we showed that the catalytically active gelatinase MMP-2 is expressed in nuclei of endothelial cells and neurons, but not in glial or Schwannoma cell lines, in a pattern resembling nuclear speckles, and colocalizes with TIMP-1. PMID:24489995

  17. Determination of 63Ni and 59Ni in spent ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal from the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Taddei, M H T; Macacini, J F; Vicente, R; Marumo, J T; Sakata, S K; Terremoto, L A A

    2013-07-01

    A radiochemical method has been adapted to determine (59)Ni and (63)Ni in samples of radioactive wastes from the water cleanup system of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. The process includes extraction chromatographic resin with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as a functional group. Activity concentrations of (59)Ni and (63)Ni were measured, respectively, by X-ray spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting, whereas the chemical yield was determined by ICP-OES. The average ratio of measured activity concentrations of (63)Ni and (59)Ni agree well with theory.

  18. Nuclear choices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, R.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains part of the series New Liberal Arts, which is intended to make science and technology more accessible to students of the liberal arts. Volume in hand provides a comprehensive, multifaceted examination of nuclear energy, in nontechnical terms. Wolfson explains the basics of nuclear energy and radiation, nuclear power..., and nuclear weapons..., and he invites readers to make their own judgments on controversial nuclear issues. Illustrated with photos and diagrams. Each chapter contains suggestions for additional reading and a glossary. For policy, science, and general collections in all libraries. (ES) Topics contained include Atoms and nuclei. Effects and uses of radiation. Energy and People. Reactor safety. Nuclear strategy. Defense in the nuclear age. Nuclear power, nuclear weapons, and nuclear futures.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide and TNF-alpha activate the nuclear factor kappa B pathway in the human placental JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lappas, M; Yee, K; Permezel, M; Rice, G E

    2006-01-01

    Up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and prostaglandins is a critical factor driving human term labour and inflammation-associated preterm labour. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is activated in response to a number of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate if TNF-alpha and LPS activate the NF-kappaB pathway; and (ii) to use short interfering RNA (siRNA) against inhibitor kappaB kinase (IKK)-beta to confirm the role of the NF-kappaB pathway in the regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in human placental JEG-3 cells. JEG-3 cells (3 independent experiments) were (i) incubated in the presence or absence of 10 microg/ml LPS or 20 ng/ml TNF-alpha, or (ii) transfected with 100 nM IKK-beta siRNA. Incubation of JEG-3 cells with LPS and TNF-alpha increased the expression of cytoplasmic IKK-beta and phosphorylated IkappaB-alpha, and nuclear NF-kappaB proteins p50 and p65. This was associated with a concurrent increase in COX-2 protein, and IL-6 and PGF2alpha release from JEG-3 cells. Treatment of cells with BAY 11-7082 at 50 microM significantly inhibited basal, LPS- and TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB and COX-2 expression, and IL-6 and PGF2alpha release. Transfection of JEG-3 cells with IKK-beta siRNA significantly decreased IL-6 and PGF2alpha release. The data presented in this study demonstrate that pro-inflammatory mediators regulate the NF-kappaB transcription pathway in human JEG-3 cells, and the IKK-beta/NF-kappaB pathway is a regulator of inflammatory mediators in placental JEG-3 cells.

  20. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License.

  1. Evidence of parasexual activity in "asexual amoebae" Cochliopodium spp. (Amoebozoa): extensive cellular and nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Yonas I; Anderson, O Roger; Lecky, Ariel F

    2014-09-01

    The majority of microbial eukaryotes have long been considered asexual, though new evidence indicates sex, or sexual-like (parasexual) behaviors that deviate from the usual union of two gametes, among other variant aspects. Over a dozen amoebozoans are implicated to have sexual stages. However, the exact mechanism by which sex occurs in these lineages remains elusive. This is mainly due to the diverse quality and cryptic nature of their life cycle. In this study we present evidence of some previously unreported aspects of the life cycle of an amoeba, Cochliopodium, that undergoes unusual intraspecific interactions using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Similar to other amoebozoans, Cochliopodium, is considered asexual with no published reports of sex or parasexuality. We also investigated environmental conditions that govern the observed intraspecific interactions. Both light microscopic and immunocytochemistry evidence demonstrates Cochliopodium undergoes cellular fusion (plasmogamy) and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Large plasmodia eventually undergo karyogamy and contain large fused, polyploid, nuclei. These are observed to fragment, subsequently, by karyotomy (nuclear fission) and cytoplasmic fission to yield uninucleated amoebae. This process could lead to a non-meiotic, parasexual exchange of chromosomes in Cochliopodium. These findings strongly suggest that Cochliopodium is involved in parasexual activity and should no longer be considered strictly asexual.

  2. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License. PMID:27388038

  3. Applying the Model of Goal-Directed Behavior, Including Descriptive Norms, to Physical Activity Intentions: A Contribution to Improving the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriele; van Bavel, René; Baranowski, Tom; Duch-Brown, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contribute to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) applied to physical activity (PA) intention. We also test the inclusion of a descriptive norms construct as an addition to the subjective norms construct, also applied to PA, resulting in two additional models: TPB including descriptive norms (TPB + DN) and MGDB including descriptive norms (MGDB + DN). The study is based on an online survey of 400 young adult Internet users, previously enrolled in a subject pool. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that TPB and TPB + DN were not fit for purpose, while MGDB and MGDB + DN were. Structural equation modelling (SEM) conducted on MGDB and MGDB + DN showed that the inclusion of descriptive norms took over the significance of injunctive norms, and increased the model's account of total variance in intention to be physically active. PMID:27229344

  4. Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) in neurons via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Su; Shutov, Leonid P; Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Lin, Zhihong; Rysted, Jacob E; Ulrich, Jason D; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2014-11-01

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) plays an important role in regulating many neuronal functions, including excitability, axonal growth, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. NFAT can be activated by action potential firing or depolarization that leads to Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of NFAT and its translocation to the nucleus. Recent data suggest that NFAT and NFAT-dependent functions in neurons can also be potently regulated by NGF and other neurotrophins. However, the mechanisms of NFAT regulation by neurotrophins are not well understood. Here, we show that in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, NGF markedly facilitates NFAT-mediated gene expression induced by mild depolarization. The effects of NGF were not associated with changes in [Ca(2+)]i and were independent of phospholipase C activity. Instead, the facilitatory effect of NGF depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway downstream of the TrkA receptor and on inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a protein kinase known to phosphorylate NFAT and promote its nuclear export. Knockdown or knockout of NFATc3 eliminated this facilitatory effect. Simultaneous monitoring of EGFP-NFATc3 nuclear translocation and [Ca(2+)]i changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons indicated that NGF slowed the rate of NFATc3 nuclear export but did not affect its nuclear import rate. Collectively, our data suggest that NGF facilitates depolarization-induced NFAT activation by stimulating PI3K/Akt signaling, inactivating GSK3β, and thereby slowing NFATc3 export from the nucleus. We propose that NFAT serves as an integrator of neurotrophin action and depolarization-driven calcium signaling to regulate neuronal gene expression.

  5. Growth hormone and drug metabolism. Acute effects on nuclear ribonucleic acid polymerase activity and chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Spelsberg, T C; Wilson, J T

    1976-01-01

    Adult male rats, subjected either to sham operation or to hypophysectomy and adrenalectomy were maintained for 10 days before treatment with growth hormone. Results of the acute effects of growth hormone on the rat liver nuclear RNA polymerase I (nucleolar) and II (nucleoplasmic) activities as well as the chromatin template capacity were then studied and compared with the growth-hormone effects on the drug metabolism described in the preceding paper (Wilson & Spelsberg, 1976). 2. Conditions for isolation and storage of nuclei for maintenance of optimal polymerase activities are described. It is verified that the assays for polymerase activities require a DNA template, all four nucleoside triphosphates, and a bivalent cation, and that the acid-insoluble radioactive product represents RNA. Proof is presented that under high-salt conditions DNA-like RNA (polymerase II) is synthesized, and that under low-salt conditions in the presence of alpha-amanitin, rRNA (polymerase I) is synthesized. 3. In the livers of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, growth hormone increases the activity of both RNA polymerase enzymes and the chromatin template capacity within 1h after treatment. The effects last for 12h in the case of polymerase II but for only 6h in the case of polymerase I. Sham-operated rats respond to growth hormone in a manner somewhat similar to that shown by hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats. These results, which demonstrate an enhancement of RNA polymerase I activity in response to growth hormone, support those from other laboratories. 4. Growth-hormone enhancement of the chromatin template capacity in the liver of hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats contrasts with previous reports. The growth-hormone-induced de-repression of the chromatin DNA could represent the basis of the growth-hormone-induced enhancement of RNA polymerase II activity in the hypophysectomized/adrenalectomized rats, although some effect of growth-hormone on the polymerase enzymes

  6. Down-regulation of PTEN by HCV core protein through activating nuclear factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Rong-Qing; Feng, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Li

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is an important causative agent in HCV related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tumor suppressor gene PTEN appears to act in the liver at the crossroad of processes controlling cell proliferation. In this study we investigated the effect of the HCV core protein on the PTEN pathway in hepatocarcinogenesis. The HCV core was transfected stably into HepG2 cell. The effect of HCV core on cell proliferation and viability were detected by 3-(4, 5)-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1)-3, 5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay, clonogenic survival assay and Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter (FACS) analysis. The expressions of PTEN were detected by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blot analysis, also the mechanism of down-regulation of PTEN was explored by western blot, luciferase assay and RNA interference. We found the HCV core promoted cell proliferation, survival and G2/M phase accumulation. It downregulated PTEN at mRNA and protein level and activated PTEN downstream gene Akt accompanied with NF-κB activation. Furthermore, the inhibition of HCV core by its specific shRNAs decreased the effect of growth promotion and G2/M phase arrest, inhibited the expression of nuclear p65 and increased PTEN expression. The activity of PTEN was restored when treated with NF-κB inhibitor PDTC. By luciferase assay we found that NF-κB inhibited PTEN promoter transcription activity directly in HCV core cells, while PDTC was contrary. Our study suggests that HCV proteins could modulate PTEN by activating NF-κB. Furthermore strategies designed to restore the expression of PTEN may be promising therapies for preventing HCV dependent hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:25550771

  7. Considerations for an active and passive scanner to assay nuclear waste drums

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H.E.; Azevedo, S.G.; Roberson, G.P.; Schneberk, D.J.; Koenig, Z.M.; Camp, D.C. )

    1990-06-08

    Radioactive wastes are generated at many DOE laboratories, military facilities, fuel fabrication and enrichment plants, reactors, hospitals, and university research facilities. At all of these sites, wastes must be separated, packaged, categorized, and packed into some sort of container--usually 208-L (55-gal) drums--for shipment to waste-storage sites. Prior to shipment, the containers must be labeled, assayed, and certified; the assay value determines the ultimate disposition of the waste containers. An accurate nondestructive assay (NDA) method would identify all the radioisotopes present and provide a quantitative measurement of their activity in the drum. In this way, waste containers could be routed in the most cost-effective manner and without having to reopen them. Currently, the most common gamma-ray method used to assay nuclear waste drums is segmented gamma-ray scanning (SGS) spectrometer that crudely measures only the amount of {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu present in the drum. This method uses a spatially-averaged, integrated, emitted gamma-ray-intensity value. The emitted intensity value is corrected by an assumed constant-attenuation value determined by a spatially-averaged, transmission (or active) measurement. Unfortunately, this typically results in an inaccurate determination of the radioactive activities within a waste drum because this measurement technique is valid only for homogeneous-attenuation or known drum matrices. However, since homogeneous-attenuation matrices are not common and may be unknown, other NDA techniques based on active and Passive CT (A PCT) are under development. The active measurement (ACT) yields a better attenuation matrix for the drum, while the passive measurement (PCT) more accurately determines the identity of the radioisotopes present and their activities. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Some possible applications of measurements on mu mesons to nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and arms control activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, W.R.; Vanier, P.E.

    1997-10-01

    In the nuclear safeguards and arms control areas, well-developed methodologies exist for determining the properties of nuclear materials via measurements of the gamma rays and neutrons emitted from these materials, or in the arms control area, by the use of radiography. In certain favorable instances, it may by feasible to perform comparable measurements with the use of a ubiquitous, naturally-occurring radiation--cosmic ray mu mesons (muons). At the earth`s surface these charged particles have a broad energy distribution peaking at about 500 MeV with a flux of approximately 10{sup {minus}2}/cm{sup 2}-sec-steradian. In traversing matter, muons lose energy at a rate of approximately 2 MeV/gram almost independent of atomic number. Muons can readily be detected by either plastic scintillators or wire planes. While the flux is small, a scintillator of one meter area, for example, will register about 20,000 events/min. these particles should have utility in the detection and imaging of objects with sectional densities of a few hundred grams/cm{sup 2}. The degree of intrusiveness of the imaging can be controlled through the detector configuration. Some possible applications include: (1) mass measurements on large UF{sub 6} cylinders, (2) determination of the size of treaty-limited objects, e.g., missiles, in rail cars or other containment; (3) verification of single or multiple warheads or components; (4) the detection of concealed, underground cavities. Examples will be presented.

  9. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  10. Proton nuclear Overhauser effect study of the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Dugad, L B; Goff, H M

    1992-07-13

    Proton nuclear Overhauser effect and paramagnetic relaxation measurements have been used to define more extensively the heme active site structure of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, CMP (previously known as Coprinus cinereus peroxidase), as the ferric low-spin cyanide ligated complex. The results are compared with other well-characterized peroxidase enzymes. The NMR spectrum of CMPCN shows changes in the paramagnetically shifted resonances as a function of time, suggesting a significant heme disorder for CMP. The presence of proximal and distal histidine amino acid residues are common to the heme environments of both CMPCN and HRPCN. However, the upfield distal arginine signals of HRPCN are not evident in the 1H-NMR spectra of CMPCN.

  11. Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium up to 80MeV.

    PubMed

    Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Csikai, J; Hermanne, A; Uddin, M S; Baba, M

    2016-08-01

    Activation cross sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on palladium were measured up to 80MeV by using the stacked foil irradiation technique and gamma ray spectrometry. The beam intensity, the incident energy and the energy degradation were controlled by a method based on flux constancy via normalization to the excitation functions of monitor reactions measured in parallel. Excitation functions for direct and cumulative cross-sections were measured for the production of (104m,104g,105g,106m,110m)Ag, (100,101)Pd, (99m,99g,100,101m,101g,102m,102g,105)Rh and (103,97)Ru radioisotopes. The cross section data were compared with the theoretical predictions of TENDL-2014 and -2015 libraries. For practical applications thick target yields were derived from the measured excitation functions. Application in the field of medical radionuclide production is shortly discussed. PMID:27235887

  12. In Vivo Imaging of Hedgehog Pathway Activation with a Nuclear Fluorescent Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Mich, John K.; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Rack, Paul G.; Chen, James K.

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for embryonic development and tissue regeneration, and its dysregulation can lead to birth defects and tumorigenesis. Understanding how this signaling mechanism contributes to these processes would benefit from an ability to visualize Hedgehog pathway activity in live organisms, in real time, and with single-cell resolution. We report here the generation of transgenic zebrafish lines that express nuclear-localized mCherry fluorescent protein in a Gli transcription factor-dependent manner. As demonstrated by chemical and genetic perturbations, these lines faithfully report Hedgehog pathway state in individual cells and with high detection sensitivity. They will be valuable tools for studying dynamic Gli-dependent processes in vertebrates and for identifying new chemical and genetic regulators of the Hh pathway. PMID:25068273

  13. MicroRNA-19a mediates gastric carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Hongjian; Jiang, Zhenyu; Hu, Anxiang; Chu, Lisha; Sun, Yiling; Han, Junqing

    2015-10-01

    In gastric carcinoma, the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway is highly active, and the constitutive activation of NF‑κB prompts malignant cell proliferation. MicroRNAs are considered to be important mediators in the regulation of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. The present study predominantly focussed on the effects of microRNA (miR)‑19a on NF‑κB activation. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative levels of miR‑19a in gastric carcinoma cells. MTT assays were used to determine the effect of miR‑19a on cellular proliferation. To detect the activation of NF‑κB, western blotting was performed to measure the protein levels of NF‑κB and the products of its downstream target genes. To define the target genes, luciferase reporter assays were used. miR‑19a was found to be markedly upregulated in gastric carcinoma cells. The overexpression of miR‑19a resulted in proliferation and enhanced migratory capabilities of the MGC‑803 gastric carcinoma cell line. The results of the western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of p65 increased when the MGC‑803 cells were transfected with miR‑19a mimics. In addition, the downstream target genes of miR‑19a, including intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1, were upregulated. The results of the luciferase assay indicated that IκB‑α was the target gene of miR‑19a. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that miR‑19a enhances malignant gastric cell proliferation by constitutively activating the NF‑κB signaling pathway.

  14. MicroRNA-200a mediates nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhuliang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Delu; Huang, Jie; Fan, Jie; Zhou, Subo; Wang, Xin; Hu, Jiandao; Huang, Fei

    2016-02-01

    In nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is highly active. The constitutive activation of NF-κB prompts malignant cell proliferation, and microRNAs are considered an important mediator in regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. The current study investigated the effect of microRNA-200a (miR-200a) on NF-κB activation. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative level of miR-200a in NPC tissue samples and CNE2 cells. An MTT assay was used to investigate the effect of miR-200a on cell proliferation. To investigate the activation of NF-κB, western blotting was used to measure the protein levels of NF-κB and its downstream targets. To identify the target genes of miR-200a, a luciferase reporter assay was used. The current study demonstrated that miR-200a was upregulated in NPC tissue samples and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-200a resulted in the proliferation of CNE2 cells. Western blot analysis indicated that the protein levels of p65 increased when CNE2 cells were transfected with miR-200a mimics. Additionally, the downstream targets of miR-200a were upregulated, including vascular cell adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. The luciferase assay indicated that IκBα was the target gene of miR-200a. In conclusion, miR-200a was demonstrated to enhance NPC cell proliferation by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  15. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin levels in gingival crevicular fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sarlati, Fatemeh; Sattari, Mandana; Razzaghi, Shilan; Nasiri, Malihe

    2012-01-01

    Background: Osteoclastogenesis is coordinated by the interaction of three members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily: Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). The aim of this study was to investigate RANKL and OPG levels, and their relative ratio in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as healthy controls. Materials and Methods: In this analytical study, GCF was obtained from healthy (n = 10), mild chronic periodontitis (n = 18), moderate chronic periodontitis (n = 18), severe chronic periodontitis (n = 20), and generalized aggressive periodontitis (n = 20) subjects. RANKL and OPG concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Statistical tests used were Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney U rank sum test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: Mean RANKL concentration showed no statistically significant differences between groups (P = 0.58). There were also no significant differences between mean OPG concentration in the five groups (P = 0.0.56). Moreover, relative RANKL/OPG ratio did not reveal a significant difference between the three study group subjects: healthy, chronic periodontitis (mild, moderate, severe), and aggressive periodontitis (P = 0.41). There was statistically significant correlation between the concentration of sRANKL and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL) in moderate chronic periodontitis patients (R = 0.48, P = 0.04). There was also negative correlation between OPG concentration and CAL in moderate chronic periodontitis patients, although not significant (R = −0.13). Conclusion: RANKL was prominent in periodontitis sites, especially in moderate periodontitis patients, whereas OPG was not detectable in some diseased sites with bleeding on probing, supporting the role of these two molecules in

  16. A novel mechanism for regulating the activity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by a small protein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Yopp, Daniel C.; Hileman, Travis H.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Hurwitz, Jerard; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) forms a trimeric ring that associates with and influences the activity of many proteins participating in DNA metabolic processes and cell cycle progression. Previously, an uncharacterized small protein, encoded by TK0808 in the archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis, was shown to stably interact with PCNA in vivo. Here, we show that this protein, designated Thermococcales inhibitor of PCNA (TIP), binds to PCNA in vitro and inhibits PCNA-dependent activities likely by preventing PCNA trimerization. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, the interacting regions of PCNA and TIP were identified. Most proteins bind to PCNA via a PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) motif that interacts with the inter domain connecting loop (IDCL) on PCNA. TIP, however, lacks any known PCNA-interacting motif, suggesting a new mechanism for PCNA binding and regulation of PCNA-dependent activities, which may support the development of a new subclass of therapeutic biomolecules for inhibiting PCNA. PMID:24728986

  17. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells Transcription Factor Nfatp Controls Superantigen-Induced Lethal Shock

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsykova, Alla V.; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) is the key mediator of superantigen-induced T cell lethal shock. Here, we show that nuclear factor of activated T cells transcription factor, NFATp, controls susceptibility to superantigen-induced lethal shock in mice through its activation of TNF-α gene transcription. In NFATp-deficient mice, T cell stimulation leads to delayed induction and attenuation of TNF-α mRNA levels, decreased TNF-α serum levels, and resistance to superantigen-induced lethal shock. By contrast, after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, serum levels of TNF-α and susceptibility to shock are unaffected. These results demonstrate that NFATp is an essential activator of immediate early TNF-α gene expression in T cells and they present in vivo evidence of the inducer- and cell type–specific regulation of TNF-α gene expression. Furthermore, they suggest NFATp as a potential selective target in the treatment of superantigen-induced lethal shock. PMID:10952728

  18. Investigation of Active Interrogation Techniques to Detect Special Nuclear Material in Maritime Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W

    2010-01-01

    The detection and interdiction of special nuclear material (SNM) is still a high-priority focus area for many organizations around the world. One method that is commonly considered a leading candidate in the detection of SNM is active interrogation (AI). AI is different from its close relative, passive interrogation, in that an active source is used to enhance or create a detectable signal (usually fission) from SNM, particularly in shielded scenarios or scenarios where the SNM has a low activity. The use of AI thus makes the detection of SNM easier or, in some scenarios, even enables previously impossible detection. In this work the signal from prompt neutrons and photons as well as delayed neutrons and photons will be combined, as is typically done in AI. In previous work AI has been evaluated experimentally and computationally. However, for the purposes of this work, past scenarios are considered lightly shielded and tightly coupled spatially. At most, the previous work interrogated the contents of one standard cargo container (2.44 x 2.60 x 6.10 m) and the source and detector were both within a few meters of the object being interrogated. A few examples of this type of previous work can be found in references 1 and 2. Obviously, more heavily shielded AI scenarios will require larger source intensities, larger detector surface areas (larger detectors or more detectors), greater detector efficiencies, longer count times, or some combination of these.

  19. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals

    PubMed Central

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y–dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  20. Molecular imaging of nuclear factor-Y transcriptional activity maps proliferation sites in live animals.

    PubMed

    Goeman, Frauke; Manni, Isabella; Artuso, Simona; Ramachandran, Balaji; Toietta, Gabriele; Bossi, Gianluca; Rando, Gianpaolo; Cencioni, Chiara; Germoni, Sabrina; Straino, Stefania; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Bacchetti, Silvia; Maggi, Adriana; Sacchi, Ada; Ciana, Paolo; Piaggio, Giulia

    2012-04-01

    In vivo imaging involving the use of genetically engineered animals is an innovative powerful tool for the noninvasive assessment of the molecular and cellular events that are often targets of therapy. On the basis of the knowledge that the activity of the nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factor is restricted in vitro to proliferating cells, we have generated a transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc (for mitosis-luciferase), in which an NF-Y-dependent promoter controls luciferase expression. In these mice, bioluminescence imaging of NF-Y activity visualizes areas of physiological cell proliferation and regeneration during response to injury. Using this tool, we highlight for the first time a role of NF-Y activity on hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. MITO-Luc reporter mice should facilitate investigations into the involvement of genes in cell proliferation and provide a useful model for studying aberrant proliferation in disease pathogenesis. They should be also useful in the development of new anti/proproliferative drugs and assessment of their efficacy and side effects on nontarget tissues. PMID:22379106

  1. Deposition of fission and activation products after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Shozugawa, Katsumi; Nogawa, Norio; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2012-04-01

    The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, damaged reactor cooling systems at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The subsequent venting operation and hydrogen explosion resulted in a large radioactive nuclide emission from reactor containers into the environment. Here, we collected environmental samples such as soil, plant species, and water on April 10, 2011, in front of the power plant main gate as well as 35 km away in Iitate village, and observed gamma-rays with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. We observed activation products ((239)Np and (59)Fe) and fission products ((131)I, (134)Cs ((133)Cs), (137)Cs, (110m)Ag ((109)Ag), (132)Te, (132)I, (140)Ba, (140)La, (91)Sr, (91)Y, (95)Zr, and (95)Nb). (239)Np is the parent nuclide of (239)Pu; (59)Fe are presumably activation products of (58)Fe obtained by corrosion of cooling pipes. The results show that these activation and fission products, diffused within a month of the accident.

  2. Transcriptional activation of nuclear estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Liang; Qiu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Sheng; Xia, Guo-Liang; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are two important members of steroid receptors family, an evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Upon binding to their ligands, ER and PR enter cell nucleus to interact with specific DNA element in the context of chromatin to initiate the transcription of diverse target genes, which largely depends on the timely recruitment of a wide range of cofactors. Moreover, the interactions between steroid hormones and their respective receptors also trigger post-translational modifications on these receptors to fine-tune their transcriptional activities. Besides the well-known phosphorylation modifications on tyrosine and serine/threonine residues, recent studies have identified several other covalent modifications, such as ubiquitylation and sumoylation. These post-translational modifications of steroid receptors affect its stability, subcellular localization, and/or cofactor recruitment; eventually influence the duration and extent of transcriptional activation. This review is to focus on the recent research progress on the transcriptional activation of nuclear ER and PR as well as their physiological functions in early pregnancy, which may help us to better understand related female reproductive diseases. PMID:27546504

  3. Deposition of fission and activation products after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Shozugawa, Katsumi; Nogawa, Norio; Matsuo, Motoyuki

    2012-04-01

    The Great Eastern Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, damaged reactor cooling systems at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The subsequent venting operation and hydrogen explosion resulted in a large radioactive nuclide emission from reactor containers into the environment. Here, we collected environmental samples such as soil, plant species, and water on April 10, 2011, in front of the power plant main gate as well as 35 km away in Iitate village, and observed gamma-rays with a Ge(Li) semiconductor detector. We observed activation products ((239)Np and (59)Fe) and fission products ((131)I, (134)Cs ((133)Cs), (137)Cs, (110m)Ag ((109)Ag), (132)Te, (132)I, (140)Ba, (140)La, (91)Sr, (91)Y, (95)Zr, and (95)Nb). (239)Np is the parent nuclide of (239)Pu; (59)Fe are presumably activation products of (58)Fe obtained by corrosion of cooling pipes. The results show that these activation and fission products, diffused within a month of the accident. PMID:22266366

  4. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  5. Prediction of the relative activity levels of the actinides in a fallout from a nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Friberg, I

    1999-02-01

    The relative activities of the actinides that can be expected in a fresh fallout from a nuclear reactor (BWR, PWR, RBMK) accident have been estimated from fuel composition calculations. The results can be used to (1) adapt analytical methods to better suit emergency situations, (2) estimate the activity levels of radionuclides not measured and (3) estimate the relative activities of nuclides in unresolved alpha-peaks. The latter two can be applied to investigations concerning the Chernobyl fallout, in addition to emergency situations.

  6. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents inc...

  7. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Ana V; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  8. Balanced Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of EDS1 Are Required for a Complete Plant Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    García, Ana V.; Blanvillain-Baufumé, Servane; Huibers, Robin P.; Wiermer, Marcel; Li, Guangyong; Gobbato, Enrico; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane E.

    2010-01-01

    An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR) receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor)-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1). In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES)) or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)) in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack. PMID:20617163

  9. Distinct activation properties of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) isoforms NFATc3 and NFATc4 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Jason D; Kim, Man-Su; Houlihan, Patrick R; Shutov, Leonid P; Mohapatra, Durga P; Strack, Stefan; Usachev, Yuriy M

    2012-11-01

    The Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) is implicated in regulating dendritic and axonal development, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. Despite the increasing appreciation for the importance of NFAT-dependent transcription in the nervous system, the regulation and function of specific NFAT isoforms in neurons are poorly understood. Here, we compare the activation of NFATc3 and NFATc4 in hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion neurons following electrically evoked elevations of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). We find that NFATc3 undergoes rapid dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation that are essentially complete within 20 min, although NFATc4 remains phosphorylated and localized to the cytosol, only exhibiting nuclear localization following prolonged (1-3 h) depolarization. Knocking down NFATc3, but not NFATc4, strongly diminished NFAT-mediated transcription induced by mild depolarization in neurons. By analyzing NFATc3/NFATc4 chimeras, we find that the region containing the serine-rich region-1 (SRR1) mildly affects initial NFAT translocation, although the region containing the serine-proline repeats is critical for determining the magnitude of NFAT activation and nuclear localization upon depolarization. Knockdown of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) significantly increased the depolarization-induced nuclear localization of NFATc4. In contrast, inhibition of p38 or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinases had no significant effect on nuclear import of NFATc4. Thus, electrically evoked [Ca(2+)](i) elevation in neurons rapidly and strongly activates NFATc3, whereas activation of NFATc4 requires a coincident increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and suppression of GSK3β, with differences in the serine-proline-containing region giving rise to these distinct activation properties of NFATc3 and NFATc4.

  10. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  11. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. Methods CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Results Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008–0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%–100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%–100.0% among Aspergillus spp. Conclusions The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. PMID:27287236

  12. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  13. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation

    PubMed Central

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B.; Jaeger, Baptiste N.; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y.; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J.; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H.

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo. PMID:27090946

  14. Nuclear RNA-seq of single neurons reveals molecular signatures of activation.

    PubMed

    Lacar, Benjamin; Linker, Sara B; Jaeger, Baptiste N; Krishnaswami, Suguna; Barron, Jerika; Kelder, Martijn; Parylak, Sarah; Paquola, Apuã; Venepally, Pratap; Novotny, Mark; O'Connor, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Erwin, Jennifer; Hsu, Jonathan Y; Husband, David; McConnell, Michael J; Lasken, Roger; Gage, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing methods have emerged as powerful tools for identification of heterogeneous cell types within defined brain regions. Application of single-cell techniques to study the transcriptome of activated neurons can offer insight into molecular dynamics associated with differential neuronal responses to a given experience. Through evaluation of common whole-cell and single-nuclei RNA-sequencing (snRNA-seq) methods, here we show that snRNA-seq faithfully recapitulates transcriptional patterns associated with experience-driven induction of activity, including immediate early genes (IEGs) such as Fos, Arc and Egr1. SnRNA-seq of mouse dentate granule cells reveals large-scale changes in the activated neuronal transcriptome after brief novel environment exposure, including induction of MAPK pathway genes. In addition, we observe a continuum of activation states, revealing a pseudotemporal pattern of activation from gene expression alone. In summary, snRNA-seq of activated neurons enables the examination of gene expression beyond IEGs, allowing for novel insights into neuronal activation patterns in vivo. PMID:27090946

  15. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  16. Functional interplay of SP family members and nuclear factor Y is essential for transcriptional activation of the human Calreticulin gene.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Julian A; Keller, Manuela; Seipel, Katja; Pabst, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) is a highly conserved, multifunctional protein involved in a variety of cellular processes including the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, proper protein folding, differentiation and immunogenic cell death. More recently, a crucial role for CALR in the pathogenesis of certain hematologic malignancies was discovered: in clinical subgroups of acute myeloid leukemia, CALR overexpression mediates a block in differentiation, while somatic mutations have been found in the majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) or thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). However, the mechanisms underlying CALR promoter activation have insufficiently been investigated so far. By dissecting the core promoter region, we could identify a functional TATA-box relevant for transcriptional activation. In addition, we characterized two evolutionary highly conserved cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) within the proximal promoter each composed of one binding site for the transcription factors SP1 and SP3 as well as for the nuclear transcription factor Y (NFY) and we verified binding of these factors to their cognate sites in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits in persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention: the Norwegian study in RENEWING HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Holmen, Heidi; Wahl, Astrid; Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Jenum, Anne Karen; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Ribu, Lis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits using baseline data from persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention. We examined the associations between stages of change for physical activity change and dietary change, and between stages of change for each behavior and individual characteristics, health-related quality of life, self-management, depressive symptoms, and lifestyle. Research design and methods We examined 151 persons with type 2 diabetes with an glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7.1%, aged ≥18 years at baseline of a randomized controlled trial, before testing a mobile app with or without health counseling. Stages of change were dichotomized into ‘pre-action’ and ‘action’. Self-management was measured using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) where a higher score reflects increased self-management, and health-related quality of life was measured with the Short-Form-36 (SF-36). Logistic regression modeling was performed. Results The median HbA1c level was 7.9% (7.1–12.4), 90% were overweight or obese, and 20% had ≥3 comorbidities. 58% were in the preaction stage for physical activity change and 79% in the preaction stage for dietary change. Higher scores of self-management were associated with an increased chance of being in the action stage for both dietary change and physical activity change. Higher body mass index was associated with an 8% reduced chance of being in the action stage for physical activity change (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99). Conclusions Being in the action stage was associated with higher scores of self-management, crucial for type 2 diabetes. Over half of the participants were in the preaction stage for physical activity and dietary change, and many had a high disease burden with comorbidities and overweight. Trial registration number NCT01315756. PMID:27239317

  18. The G32E Functional Variant Reduces Activity of PPARD by Nuclear Export and Post-Translational Modification in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yanyu; Brenig, Bertram; Wu, Xiaohui; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARD) is a crucial and multifaceted determinant of diverse biological functions including lipid metabolism, embryonic development, inflammatory response, wound healing and cancer. Recently, we proposed a novel function of porcine PPARD (sPPARD) in external ear development. A missense mutation (G32E) in an evolutionary conservative domain of sPPARD remarkably increases external ear size in pigs. Here, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of the causal mutation at the cellular level. Using a luciferase reporter system, we showed that the G32E substitution reduced transcription activity of sPPARD in a ligand-dependent manner. By comparison of the subcellular localization of wild-type and mutated sPPARD in both PK-15 cells and pinna cartilage-derived primary chondrocytes, we found that the G32E substitution promoted CRM-1 mediated nuclear exportation of sPPARD. With the surface plasmon resonance technology, we further revealed that the G32E substitution had negligible effect on its ligand binding affinity. Finally, we used co-immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays to show that the G32E substitution greatly reduced ubiquitination level by blocking ubiquitination of the crucial A/B domain and consequently decreased transcription activity of sPPARD. Taken together, our findings strongly support that G32E is a functional variant that plays a key role in biological activity of sPPARD, which advances our understanding of the underlying mechanism of sPPARD G32E for ear size in pigs. PMID:24058710

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Levels and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) Activity Are Attenuated in the Setting of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Lefer, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase are endogenous enzymatic sources of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Functions of H2S are mediated by several targets including ion channels and signaling proteins. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 is responsible for the expression of antioxidant response element–regulated genes and is known to be upregulated by H2S. We examined the levels of H2S, H2S-producing enzymes, and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation status in skeletal muscle obtained from critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius tissues were attained postamputation from human CLI and healthy control patients. We found mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to control. H2S and sulfane sulfur levels were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. We also observed significant reductions in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation as well as antioxidant proteins, such as Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl formation, were significantly increased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to healthy controls. Conclusions The data demonstrate that H2S bioavailability and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation are both attenuated in CLI tissues concomitant with significantly increased oxidative stress. Reductions in the activity of H2S-producing enzymes may contribute to the pathogenesis of CLI. PMID:25977470

  20. Activation of the nuclear receptor FXR enhances hepatocyte chemoprotection and liver tumor chemoresistance against genotoxic compounds.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Javier; Briz, Oscar; Herraez, Elisa; Muntané, Jordi; Marin, Jose J G

    2013-10-01

    The success of pharmacological treatments in primary liver cancers is limited by the marked efficacy of mechanisms of chemoresistance already present in hepatocytes. The role of the nuclear receptor FXR is unclear. Although, in non-treated liver tumors, its expression is reduced, the refractoriness to anticancer drugs is high. Moreover, the treatment with cisplatin up-regulates FXR. The aim of this study was to investigate whether FXR is involved in stimulating chemoprotection/chemoresistance in healthy and tumor liver cells. In human hepatocytes, the activation of FXR with the agonist GW4064 resulted in a significant protection against cisplatin-induced toxicity. In human hepatoma Alexander cells, with negligible endogenous expression of FXR, GW4064 also protected against cisplatin-induced toxicity, but only if they were previously transfected with FXR/RXR. Investigation of 109 genes potentially involved in chemoresistance revealed that only ABCB4, TCEA2, CCL14, CCL15 and KRT13 were up-regulated by FXR activation both in human hepatocytes and FXR/RXR-expressing hepatoma cells. In both models, cisplatin, even in the absence of FXR agonists, such as bile acids and GW4064, was able to up-regulate FXR targets genes, which was due to FXR-mediated trans-activation of response elements in the promoter region. FXR-dependent chemoprotection was also efficient against other DNA-damaging compounds, such as doxorubicin, mitomycin C and potassium dichromate, but not against non-genotoxic drugs, such as colchicine, paclitaxel, acetaminophen, artesunate and sorafenib. In conclusion, ligand-dependent and independent activation of FXR stimulates mechanisms able to enhance the chemoprotection of hepatocytes against genotoxic compounds and to reduce the response of liver tumor cells to certain pharmacological treatments.

  1. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-03-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors.

  2. Activity and function of the nuclear factor kappaB pathway in human parathyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Corbetta, S; Vicentini, L; Ferrero, S; Lania, A; Mantovani, G; Cordella, D; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies indicate that nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcription factor is deregulated and overexpressed in several human neoplasias. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the NF-kappaB pathway may be involved in parathyroid tumorigenesis. For this purpose, we determined the level of NF-kappaB activity, evaluated as phosphorylation of the transcription subunit p65, its modulation by specific and non-specific agents and its impact on cyclin D1 expression. Phosphorylated p65 levels present in parathyroid neoplasias (n = 13) were significantly lower than those found in normal tissues (n = 3; mean optical density (OD) 0.19 +/- 0.1 vs 0.4 +/- 0.1, P = 0.007), but there was no significant difference between adenomas and secondary and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related hyperplasia. Conversely, MEN2A (Cys634Arg)-related parathyroid samples showed extremely high levels of phosphorylated p65 that exhibited a nuclear localization at immunohistochemistry (n = 3). Phosphorylated p65 levels negatively correlated with menin expression (r(2) = 0.42, P = 0.05). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) caused a significant increase in phosphorylated p65 levels (183 +/- 13.8% of basal) while calcium sensing receptor (CaR) agonists exerted a significant inhibition (19.2 +/- 3.3% of basal). Although TNFalpha was poorly effective in increasing cyclin D1 expression, NF-kappaB blockade by the specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 reduced FCS-stimulated cyclin D1 by about 60%. Finally, the inhibitory effects of CaR and BAY11-7082 on cyclin D1 expression were not additive - by blocking NF-kappaB CaR activation did not induce a further reduction in cyclin D1 levels. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that in parathyroid tumors: (1) p65 phosphorylation was dramatically increased by RET constitutive activation and was negatively correlated with menin expression, (2) p65 phosphorylation was increased and reduced by TNFalpha and CaR agonists respectively

  3. A Comparison of Brunt Criteria, the Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) & a Proposed NAS-including fibrosis as Valid Diagnostic Scores for NASH

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rolón, Amarilys; Purcell, Dagmary; Rosado, Kathia; Toro, Doris H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can result in cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of NASH in Latino veterans with metabolic syndrome and compare histologic grading using Brunt Criteria, the NAFLD activity score (NAS), and a proposed NAS score including fibrosis. Methods Veterans with metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis and elevation of ALT/AST who underwent a liver biopsy from 2004-2010 were included in this study. Biopsies were evaluated by a single blinded Hepatopathologist. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis were graded per specimen. Each biopsy was evaluated using Brunt criteria, NAS and NAS plus fibrosis. Results Sixty patients were included in this study, 88.3% men with a mean age of 50.4 (± 12.8). 50.0% met criteria for NASH according to the Brunt system. When classifying biopsies using NAS, only 30.0% (18/60) had a score ≥5, while when adding fibrosis, the number of patients with a score ≥5 increased to 33 (55.0%). When evaluating the predictive ability of the two scoring systems, we found that NAS including fibrosis had a higher sensitivity than NAS (86.7% vs. 40.0%) and a lower specificity (76.7% vs. 80.0%). Conclusion In our population with metabolic syndrome and altered liver function tests, about 50-55% had steatohepatitis. There were significant differences between the scoring systems. When using NAS-plus-fibrosis more patients were recognized and the sensitivity increased. Further validation studies are required to evaluate this proposed NAS scoring System. PMID:26602577

  4. Ischemia induces nuclear NOX2 expression in cardiomyocytes and subsequently activates apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Meischl, C; Krijnen, P A J; Sipkens, J A; Cillessen, S A G M; Muñoz, I Gámez; Okroj, M; Ramska, M; Muller, A; Visser, C A; Musters, R J P; Simonides, W S; Hack, C E; Roos, D; Niessen, H W M

    2006-06-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated increased expression of NOX2 in cardiomyocytes of infarcted human hearts. In the present manuscript we investigated the functional role of NOX2 in ischemically challenged H9c2 cells, a rat cardiomyoblast cell line, and adult rat cardiomyocytes. Expression of NOX2 in H9c2 cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. In Western-blot experiments, increased NOX2 expression was detected during ischemia, which was inhibited by transcription and translation inhibitors. Surprisingly, under ischemia, in addition to an increased cytosolic expression, NOX2 was localized mainly in the nucleus of apoptotic cardiomyocytes, where it colocalized with nitrotyrosine residues and activated caspase 3. Inhibition of reactive-oxygen-species generation with the flavoenzyme inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and the NADPH-oxidase inhibitor apocynin led to a significantly decreased induction of apoptosis as assessed by quantification of caspase-3 activity and by TUNEL analysis. These results demonstrate that NOX2 is expressed in the nucleus of cardiomyocytes during apoptosis and that it likely participates in proapoptotic signaling. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of nuclear NOX2 expression and its involvement in cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  5. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy.

  6. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B activation decreases survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Feldman, Nicole E; Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T; Strand, Matthew J; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R; Kinney, William H; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E; Voelker, Dennis R; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  7. Broad-spectrum therapeutic suppression of metastatic melanoma through nuclear hormone receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Pencheva, Nora; Buss, Colin G; Posada, Jessica; Merghoub, Taha; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2014-02-27

    Melanoma metastasis is a devastating outcome lacking an effective preventative therapeutic. We provide pharmacologic, molecular, and genetic evidence establishing the liver-X nuclear hormone receptor (LXR) as a therapeutic target in melanoma. Oral administration of multiple LXR agonists suppressed melanoma invasion, angiogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. Molecular and genetic experiments revealed these effects to be mediated by LXRβ, which elicits these outcomes through transcriptional induction of tumoral and stromal apolipoprotein-E (ApoE). LXRβ agonism robustly suppressed tumor growth and metastasis across a diverse mutational spectrum of melanoma lines. LXRβ targeting significantly prolonged animal survival, suppressed the progression of established metastases, and inhibited brain metastatic colonization. Importantly, LXRβ activation displayed melanoma-suppressive cooperativity with the frontline regimens dacarbazine, B-Raf inhibition, and the anti-CTLA-4 antibody and robustly inhibited melanomas that had acquired resistance to B-Raf inhibition or dacarbazine. We present a promising therapeutic approach that uniquely acts by transcriptionally activating a metastasis suppressor gene.

  8. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activation Decreases Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chmura, Kathryn; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Su, Wen-Lin; Griffin, Laura; Pyeon, Dohun; McGibney, Mischa T.; Strand, Matthew J.; Numata, Mari; Murakami, Seiji; Gaido, Loretta; Honda, Jennifer R.; Kinney, William H.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) is a ubiquitous transcription factor that mediates pro-inflammatory responses required for host control of many microbial pathogens; on the other hand, NFκB has been implicated in the pathogenesis of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. Mice with genetic disruption of the p50 subunit of NFκB are more likely to succumb to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). However, the role of NFκB in host defense in humans is not fully understood. We sought to examine the role of NFκB activation in the immune response of human macrophages to MTB. Targeted pharmacologic inhibition of NFκB activation using BAY 11-7082 (BAY, an inhibitor of IκBα kinase) or an adenovirus construct with a dominant-negative IκBα significantly decreased the number of viable intracellular mycobacteria recovered from THP-1 macrophages four and eight days after infection. The results with BAY were confirmed in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and alveolar macrophages. NFκB inhibition was associated with increased macrophage apoptosis and autophagy, which are well-established killing mechanisms of intracellular MTB. Inhibition of the executioner protease caspase-3 or of the autophagic pathway significantly abrogated the effects of BAY. We conclude that NFκB inhibition decreases viability of intracellular MTB in human macrophages via induction of apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:23634218

  9. Radiation does from medical in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation using a mobile nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C; Chen, C P; Chang, P S

    1988-10-01

    A method of medical diagnosis of toxic elements, using a neutron beam from a mobile nuclear reactor to perform partial-body in-vivo prompt gamma-ray activation technique, has been developed. Both neutron and gamma-ray dose equivalents in an irradiated phantom and around medical researchers were measured and evaluated. Neutron flux at various kinetic energies was measured using an activation foil technique, and the neutron dose equivalents at tissues of risk inside the irradiated phantom were calculated by neutron transport code. Gamma-ray dose equivalents inside the irradiated phantom and around the nuclear reactor were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The risk associated with the neutron and gamma radiation dose equivalents received by both the irradiated phantom and medical researchers were evaluated in detail. The radiation safety of the in-vivo medical diagnosis using the mobile nuclear reactor, under the context of radiation protection guidelines, is discussed.

  10. Nuclear power: Fourth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes the basics of nuclear power generation, explaining both the benefits and the real and imagined risks of nuclear power. It includes a discussion of the Three Mile Island accident and its effects. Nuclear Power has been used in the public information programs of more than 100 utilities. The contents discussed are: Nuclear Power and People; Why Nuclear Power. Electricity produced by coal; Electricity produced by nuclear fuel; Nuclear plant sites in the United States; Short History of Commercial Nuclear Power; U.S. nuclear submarines, Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants; Licensing process, Nuclear Power Plant Operator Training; Nuclear power plant simulator, Are Nuclear Plants Safe.; Containment structure, Nuclear Power Plant Insurance; Is Radiation Dangerous.; Man-made radiation, What is Nuclear Fuel.; Fuel cycle for commercial nuclear power plants; Warm Water Discharge; Cooling tower; Protection of Radioactive Materials; Plutonium and Proliferation; Disposal of Radioactive Wastes; Are Alternate Energy Sources Available.; Nuclear Opposition; and Nuclear Power in the Future.

  11. Cooperative Activity of GABP with PU.1 or C/EBPε Regulates Lamin B Receptor Gene Expression, Implicating Their Roles in Granulocyte Nuclear Maturation.

    PubMed

    Malu, Krishnakumar; Garhwal, Rahul; Pelletier, Margery G H; Gotur, Deepali; Halene, Stephanie; Zwerger, Monika; Yang, Zhong-Fa; Rosmarin, Alan G; Gaines, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear segmentation is a hallmark feature of mammalian neutrophil differentiation, but the mechanisms that control this process are poorly understood. Gene expression in maturing neutrophils requires combinatorial actions of lineage-restricted and more widely expressed transcriptional regulators. Examples include interactions of the widely expressed ETS transcription factor, GA-binding protein (GABP), with the relatively lineage-restricted E-twenty-six (ETS) factor, PU.1, and with CCAAT enhancer binding proteins, C/EBPα and C/EBPε. Whether such cooperative interactions between these transcription factors also regulate the expression of genes encoding proteins that control nuclear segmentation is unclear. We investigated the roles of ETS and C/EBP family transcription factors in regulating the gene encoding the lamin B receptor (LBR), an inner nuclear membrane protein whose expression is required for neutrophil nuclear segmentation. Although C/EBPε was previously shown to bind the Lbr promoter, surprisingly, we found that neutrophils derived from Cebpe null mice exhibited normal Lbr gene and protein expression. Instead, GABP provided transcriptional activation through the Lbr promoter in the absence of C/EBPε, and activities supported by GABP were greatly enhanced by either C/EBPε or PU.1. Both GABP and PU.1 bound Ets sites in the Lbr promoter in vitro, and in vivo within both early myeloid progenitors and differentiating neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that GABP, PU.1, and C/EBPε cooperate to control transcription of the gene encoding LBR, a nuclear envelope protein that is required for the characteristic lobulated morphology of mature neutrophils. PMID:27342846

  12. Evidence that Armadillo transduces wingless by mediating nuclear export or cytosolic activation of Pangolin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu-Kwong; Struhl, Gary

    2002-10-18

    Secreted proteins of the Wnt family have profound organizing roles during animal development and are transduced via the activities of the Frizzled (Fz) class of transmembrane receptors and the TCF/LEF/Pangolin class of transcription factors. beta-catenins, including Drosophila Armadillo (Arm), link activation of Fz at the cell surface to transcriptional regulation by TCF in the nucleus. The consensus view is that Wnt signaling induces beta-catenin to enter the nucleus and combine with TCF to form a transcription factor complex in which TCF binds DNA and the C-terminal domain of beta-catenin activates transcription. Here, we present findings, which challenge this view and suggest instead that beta-catenin may transduce Wnt signals by exporting TCF from the nucleus or activating it in the cytoplasm. PMID:12408870

  13. Evidence that Armadillo transduces wingless by mediating nuclear export or cytosolic activation of Pangolin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu-Kwong; Struhl, Gary

    2002-10-18

    Secreted proteins of the Wnt family have profound organizing roles during animal development and are transduced via the activities of the Frizzled (Fz) class of transmembrane receptors and the TCF/LEF/Pangolin class of transcription factors. beta-catenins, including Drosophila Armadillo (Arm), link activation of Fz at the cell surface to transcriptional regulation by TCF in the nucleus. The consensus view is that Wnt signaling induces beta-catenin to enter the nucleus and combine with TCF to form a transcription factor complex in which TCF binds DNA and the C-terminal domain of beta-catenin activates transcription. Here, we present findings, which challenge this view and suggest instead that beta-catenin may transduce Wnt signals by exporting TCF from the nucleus or activating it in the cytoplasm.

  14. Distinct nuclear arrangement of active and inactive c-myc genes in control and differentiated colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harnicarova, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav . E-mail: kozubek@ibp.cz; Pachernik, Jiri; Krejci, Jana; Bartova, Eva

    2006-12-10

    Using sequential RNA-DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, the nuclear arrangement of both the active and inactive c-myc gene as well as its transcription was investigated in colon cancer HT-29 cells induced to differentiate into enterocytes. Cytogenetic studies revealed the presence of two chromosomes 8 in HT-29 cells, of which the one containing c-myc gene amplicons was substantially larger and easily distinguished from the normal chromosome. This observation enabled detection of both activity and nuclear localization of c-myc genes in single cells and in individual chromosome territories. Similar transcriptional activity of the c-myc gene was observed in both the normal and derivative chromosome 8 territories showing no influence of the amplification on the c-myc gene expression. Our experiments demonstrate strikingly specific nuclear and territorial arrangements of active genes as compared with inactive ones: on the periphery of their territories facing to the very central region of the cell nucleus. Nuclear arrangement of c-myc genes and transcripts was conserved during cell differentiation and, therefore, independent of the level of differentiation-specific c-myc gene expression. However, after the induction of differentiation, a more internal territorial location was found for the single copy c-myc gene of normal chromosome 8, while amplicons conserved their territorial topography.

  15. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure 90Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. 137Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with 90Sr. The 90Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg−1 while the 137Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg−1. The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  16. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure 90Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. 137Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with 90Sr. The 90Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg‑1 while the 137Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg‑1. The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  17. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product (90)Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing (90)Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure (90)Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. (137)Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with (90)Sr. The (90)Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg(-1) while the (137)Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg(-1). The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of (134)Cs. However, (90)Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of (90)Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between (90)Sr and (137)Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background (90)Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  18. Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Inhibition Enhances Memory Acquisition through Activation of PPAR-alpha Nuclear Receptors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzola, Carmen; Medalie, Julie; Scherma, Maria; Panlilio, Leigh V.; Solinas, Marcello; Tanda, Gianluigi; Drago, Filippo; Cadet, Jean Lud; Goldberg, Steven R.; Yasar, Sevil

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) increase endogenous levels of anandamide (a cannabinoid CB[subscript 1]-receptor ligand) and oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide (OEA and PEA, ligands for alpha-type peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors, PPAR-alpha) when and where they are naturally released in the brain.…

  19. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-06

    The radioactive fission product (90)Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing (90)Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure (90)Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. (137)Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with (90)Sr. The (90)Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg(-1) while the (137)Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg(-1). The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of (134)Cs. However, (90)Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of (90)Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between (90)Sr and (137)Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background (90)Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  20. Menadione cytotoxicity to Hep G2 cells and protection by activation of nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Cederbaum, A I

    1997-10-01

    Menadione (vitamin K-3,2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), a redox cycling reagent, generates reactive oxygen intermediates and causes oxidative injury. The addition of menadione to Hep G2 cells produced a time- and concentration-dependent loss of cell viability. Preincubation of Hep G2 cells with low, nontoxic concentrations of menadione increased the viability of the cells against toxic doses of menadione or H2O2. Maximum protection was found with menadione concentrations of approximately 3 microM and preincubation times of approximately 45 min. This protective effect could be blocked by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and by a variety of antioxidants. The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaF (NF-kappaB) is known to be activated by many compounds, including reactive oxygen intermediates. Menadione activated NF-kappaB as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. This activation was prevented by the same antioxidants that blocked protection against cytotoxicity produced by preincubation with menadione. Anti-p50 IgG prevented the menadione-stimulated binding of NF-kappaB to the oligonucleotide probe, whereas anti-p65 IgG produced a supershift of the NF-kappaB/oligonucleotide complex. Salicylate prevented the activation of NF-kappaB by menadione, and under these conditions, salicylate potentiated the cytotoxicity of menadione or H2O2. Transfection with a plasmid containing cDNA encoding mouse IkappaBbeta, an inhibitor of NF-kappaB, resulted in increased toxicity by menadione. Furthermore, when protein kinase C was down-regulated by prolonged treatment with active phorbol ester (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate), the Hep G2 cells became more sensitive to menadione treatment. However, short term treatment with PMA, which activated NF-kappaB, resulted in protection against menadione cytotoxicity. Menadione cytotoxicity was enhanced when the Hep G2 cells were depleted of GSH. An increased level of GSH was observed after menadione pretreatment

  1. Human T-cell activation by 14- and 18-kilodalton nuclear proteins of Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed Central

    Suffia, I; Quaranta, J F; Eulalio, M C; Ferrua, B; Marty, P; Le Fichoux, Y; Kubar, J

    1995-01-01

    Leishmanial antigens which stimulate T lymphocytes from primed individuals may be candidates for a vaccine. We recently found a significant concordance between the humoral response specific for two proteins from Leishmania infantum promastigotes, p14 and p18, and a positive leishmanin delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction, testifying to the occurrence of cell-mediated immunity. In this communication, we describe a partial characterization of these antigens and an in vitro analysis of their capacity to activate primed human T cells. We showed, by immunofluorescent staining and through analysis of subcellular fractions by Western immunoblotting, that in stationary-phase promastigotes, p14 and p18 were located only in the parasite nuclei; in the middle of the log phase, a transitory and only weak expression outside the nucleus was detected. We then showed that p14 and p18 antigens shared a common epitope(s). Finally, we analyzed the in vitro proliferation and interleukin-2 production induced by leishmanial proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from sensitized subjects. We showed that in some individuals who have been exposed to L. infantum the specific response to the whole lysate was mostly due to the nuclear antigens. We demonstrated directly the capacity of nitrocellulose-bound p14 and p18 to activate in vitro all of the tested primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which contrasted with a lack of stimulatory activity of other membrane-bound leishmanial proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that an antigenic determinant(s) dominant for some individuals might exist on both antigens. PMID:7558278

  2. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  3. Modulation of transcriptional activation and coactivator interaction by a splicing variation in the F domain of nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha1.

    PubMed

    Sladek, F M; Ruse, M D; Nepomuceno, L; Huang, S M; Stallcup, M R

    1999-10-01

    Transcription factors, such as nuclear receptors, often exist in various forms that are generated by highly conserved splicing events. Whereas the functional significance of these splicing variants is often not known, it is known that nuclear receptors activate transcription through interaction with coactivators. The parameters, other than ligands, that might modulate those interactions, however, are not well characterized, nor is the role of splicing variants. In this study, transient transfection, yeast two-hybrid, and GST pulldown assays are used to show not only that nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha1 (HNF4alpha1, NR2A1) interacts with GRIP1, and other coactivators, in the absence of ligand but also that the uncommonly large F domain in the C terminus of the receptor inhibits that interaction. In vitro, the F domain was found to obscure an AF-2-independent binding site for GRIP1 that did not map to nuclear receptor boxes II or III. The results also show that a natural splicing variant containing a 10-amino-acid insert in the middle of the F domain (HNF4alpha2) abrogates that inhibition in vivo and in vitro. A series of protease digestion assays indicates that there may be structural differences between HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 in the F domain as well as in the ligand binding domain (LBD). The data also suggest that there is a direct physical contact between the F domain and the LBD of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 and that that contact is different in the HNF4alpha1 and HNF4alpha2 isoforms. Finally, we propose a model in which the F domain of HNF4alpha1 acts as a negative regulatory region for transactivation and in which the alpha2 insert ameliorates the negative effect of the F domain. A conserved repressor sequence in the F domains of HNF4alpha1 and -alpha2 suggests that this model may be relevant to other nuclear receptors as well. PMID:10490591

  4. Nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation is affected by poor chromatin compaction and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Martínez-Heredia, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2015-04-01

    There is an interest in the nuclear degraded sperm subpopulation because, although it is present in a low percentage in all semen samples, patient groups such as varicocele and rearranged genome carriers show high levels of these degraded spermatozoa. This study is designed with two objectives in mind: first, incubations of H2 O2 and nuclease on DTT-treated and untreated samples to show the aetiology of this subpopulation and second, assessment of the correlation between the protamine ratio and nuclear degraded spermatozoa. A very high increase in the nuclear degraded subpopulation has been found with nuclease incubation, and it is even higher when it has been merged with nuclear decompaction using DTT. Alternatively, incubation with H2 O2 with and without DTT did not show such a significant increase in nuclear degraded spermatozoa. The protamine ratio correlated with this subpopulation, showing, in patients, that poor nuclear compaction would turn the sperm susceptible to degradation. Then, the assessment of nuclear degraded spermatozoa might not be only a measure of DNA degradation but also an indicator of chromatin compaction in the spermatozoa. Different patient groups would fit this model for sperm nuclear degradation, such as varicocele patients, who show a high percentage of immature spermatozoa and nuclear degraded spermatozoa, and reorganised genome carriers, where reorganisation might also cause poor chromatin compaction on the sperm nucleus.

  5. Suppression of nuclear factor-κB activation and inflammation in microglia by physically modified saline.

    PubMed

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Jana, Arundhati; Roy, Avik; Mazumder, Monalisa; Bhushan, Bharat; Wood, Tony; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-08-24

    Chronic inflammation involving activated microglia and astroglia is becoming a hallmark of many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Although NF-κB is a multifunctional transcription factor, it is an important target for controlling inflammation as the transcription of many proinflammatory molecules depends on the activation of NF-κB. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate NF-κB activation and associated inflammation in activated glial cells. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanostructures that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen), and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification) were found to inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated microglia. Similarly, RNS60 also inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated astroglia. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by RNS60 suggests that RNS60 exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NF-κB. Interestingly, RNS60 induced the activation of type IA phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt and rapidly up-regulated IκBα, a specific endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase and Akt by either chemical inhibitors or dominant-negative mutants abrogated the RNS60-mediated up-regulation of IκBα. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNS60 induced the activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) via the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway and that RNS60 up-regulated IκBα via CREB. These results describe a novel anti-inflammatory property of RNS60 via type IA PI 3-kinase-Akt-CREB-mediated up-regulation of IκBα, which may be of therapeutic benefit in neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Suppression of Nuclear Factor-κB Activation and Inflammation in Microglia by Physically Modified Saline*

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Jana, Arundhati; Roy, Avik; Mazumder, Monalisa; Bhushan, Bharat; Wood, Tony; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation involving activated microglia and astroglia is becoming a hallmark of many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders. Although NF-κB is a multifunctional transcription factor, it is an important target for controlling inflammation as the transcription of many proinflammatory molecules depends on the activation of NF-κB. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate NF-κB activation and associated inflammation in activated glial cells. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing charge-stabilized nanostructures that are generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen), and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification) were found to inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated microglia. Similarly, RNS60 also inhibited the expression of inducible NO synthase in activated astroglia. Inhibition of NF-κB activation by RNS60 suggests that RNS60 exerts its anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NF-κB. Interestingly, RNS60 induced the activation of type IA phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase and Akt and rapidly up-regulated IκBα, a specific endogenous inhibitor of NF-κB. Inhibition of PI 3-kinase and Akt by either chemical inhibitors or dominant-negative mutants abrogated the RNS60-mediated up-regulation of IκBα. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RNS60 induced the activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) via the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway and that RNS60 up-regulated IκBα via CREB. These results describe a novel anti-inflammatory property of RNS60 via type IA PI 3-kinase-Akt-CREB-mediated up-regulation of IκBα, which may be of therapeutic benefit in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22753407

  7. Elevated nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and decreased histone deacetylase activity after fumonisin B1 treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nicole M; Riley, Ronald T; Showker, Jency L; Voss, Kenneth A; Sachs, Andrew J; Maddox, Joyce R; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B

    2016-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Administration of FB1 to pregnant LM/Bc mice induces exencephaly in embryos, and ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in humans. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase enzymes in sphingolipid biosynthesis, causing sphinganine (Sa) and bioactive sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P) accumulation in blood, cells, and tissues. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) phosphorylate Sa to form Sa1P. Upon activation, Sphk1 associates primarily with the plasma membrane, while Sphk2 is found predominantly in the nucleus. In cells over-expressing Sphk2, accumulation of Sa1P in the nuclear compartment inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, causing increased acetylation of histone lysine residues. In this study, FB1 treatment in LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in significant accumulation of Sa1P in nuclear extracts relative to cytoplasmic extracts. Elevated nuclear Sa1P corresponded to decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and increased histone acetylation at H2BK12, H3K9, H3K18, and H3K23. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with a selective Sphk1 inhibitor, PF-543, or with ABC294640, a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear Sa1P accumulation after FB1, although Sa1P levels remained significantly increased relative to basal levels. Concurrent treatment with both PF-543 and ABC294640 prevented nuclear accumulation of Sa1P in response to FB1. Other HDAC inhibitors are known to cause NTDs, so these results suggest that FB1-induced disruption of sphingolipid metabolism leading to nuclear Sa1P accumulation, HDAC inhibition, and histone hyperacetylation is a potential mechanism for FB1-induced NTDs. PMID:26905748

  8. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    international) programs in biology, geology, geophysics, hydrology, and mapping. Therefore, the USGS was the obvious choice for these tasks, because it already had a professional staff of experienced mapmakers, scientists, and program managers with the foresight, dedication, and understanding of the need for accurate maps to support the science programs in Antarctica when asked to do so by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Public Laws 85-743 and 87-626, signed in August 1958, and in September 1962, respectively, authorized the Secretary, U.S. Department of the Interior, through the USGS, to support mapping and scientific work in Antarctica (Meunier, 1979 [2007], appendix A). Open-File Report 2006-1116 includes scanned facsimiles of postal cachets. It has become an international practice to create postal cachets to commemorate special events and projects in Antarctica. A cachet is defined as a seal or commemorative design printed or stamped on an envelope to mark a philatelic or special event. The inked impression illustrates to the scientist, historian, stamp collector, and general public the multidisciplinary science projects staffed by USGS and collaborating scientists during the field season. Since 1960, philatelic cachets have been created by team members for each USGS field season and, in most cases, these cachets depict the specific geographic areas and field season program objectives. The cachets become a convenient documentation of the people, projects, and geographic places of interest for that year. Because the cachets are representative of USGS activities, each year's cachet is included as a digital facsimile in that year's Open-File Report. In the 1980s, multiple USGS cachets were prepared each year, one for use by the winter team at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and the other for the project work areas of the austral summer field season programs.

  10. The intergenic region of maize streak virus contains a GC-rich element that activates rightward transcription and binds maize nuclear factors.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, C; Schwarz, J J; Black, D M; Schneider, M; Howell, S H

    1990-12-01

    Maize streak virus (MSV) is transcribed bidirectionally from an intergenic region and rightward transcription produces an RNA that encodes the coat protein. The intergenic region contains promoter elements required for rightward transcription including an upstream activating sequence (UAS) which endows the promoter with full activity in a maize transient expression system. The UAS contains two GC-rich repeats (GC boxes) and a long inverted repeat or hairpin with a loop harboring a TAATATTAC sequence common to all geminiviruses. Deletions through the UAS demonstrated the presence of an element, called the rightward promoter element (rpe1), which is responsible for transcriptional activation. Rpe1 includes the two GC-rich boxes, which are similar in sequence to Sp1 binding sites in mammalian cells, but not the conserved hairpin loop. Rpe1 binds maize nuclear factors in vitro and the characteristics of the binding interaction have been determined by 1) binding competition with oligonucleotides, 2) methidiumpropyl-EDTA footprinting and 3) methylation interference assays. Binding of maize nuclear factors to the UAS generates two major bands, slow and fast migrating bands, in gel retardation assays. Footprinting and factor titration data suggest that the fast bands arise by the binding of factors to one GC box while the slow bands are generated by factors binding to both boxes. The data further indicate that the factors bind to the two GC-rich boxes with little cooperativity and bind on opposite faces of the DNA helix.

  11. In vitro activity of ceftazidime/avibactam against Gram-negative pathogens isolated from pneumonia in hospitalised patients, including ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Robert K; Nichols, Wright W; Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-03-01

    The activities of the novel β-lactam/non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor combination ceftazidime/avibactam and comparators were evaluated against isolates from pneumonia in hospitalised patients including ventilated patients (PHP, pneumonia not designated as VABP; VABP, pneumonia in ventilated patients). Isolates were from the European-Mediterranean region (EuM), China and the USA collected in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program between 2009 and 2011 inclusive. A total of 2393 organisms from PHP were from the EuM, 888 from China and 3213 from the USA; from VABP patients there were 918, 97 and 692 organisms collected, respectively. Among Enterobacteriaceae from PHP, ceftazidime/avibactam MIC90 values against Escherichia coli ranged from 0.25-0.5mg/L and Klebsiella spp. MIC90 values were 0.5mg/L in each region. Among VABP isolates, MIC90 values for ceftazidime/avibactam against E. coli were 0.25mg/L; for Klebsiella spp. from VABP patients, MIC90 values were similar to those obtained against PHP isolates. The MIC of ceftazidime/avibactam was ≤8mg/L against 92-96% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from PHP patients. Isolates of P. aeruginosa from VABP patients were of lower susceptibility to all antibacterial agents (e.g. depending on region, meropenem susceptibilities were 51.2-69.4% in contrast to 68.3-76.7% among PHP patients). However, ceftazidime/avibactam inhibited 79.2-95.4% of VABP isolates at an MIC of ≤8mg/L. Acinetobacter spp. were resistant to many agents and only rates of susceptibility to colistin were >90% across all regions both for PHP and VABP isolates. Ceftazidime/avibactam was generally active against a high proportion of isolates resistant to ceftazidime from PHP and VAPB patients.

  12. Ribonucleotide reductase activity is coupled to DNA synthesis via proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Shepherd, Marianne E A; Deegan, Tom D; Havens, Courtney G; MacNeill, Stuart A; Walter, Johannes C; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2012-04-24

    Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is required for both DNA replication and DNA repair and is catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductases (RNR), which convert ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms [1, 2]. Maintaining the correct levels of dNTPs for DNA synthesis is important for minimizing the mutation rate [3-7], and this is achieved by tight regulation of RNR [2, 8, 9]. In fission yeast, RNR is regulated in part by a small protein inhibitor, Spd1, which is degraded in S phase and after DNA damage to allow upregulation of dNTP supply [10-12]. Spd1 degradation is mediated by the activity of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase complex [5, 13, 14]. This has been reported to be dependent on modulation of Cdt2 levels, which are cell cycle regulated, peaking in S phase, and which also increase after DNA damage in a checkpoint-dependent manner [7, 13]. We show here that Cdt2 level fluctuations are not sufficient to regulate Spd1 proteolysis and that the key step in this event is the interaction of Spd1 with the polymerase processivity factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), complexed onto DNA. This mechanism thus provides a direct link between DNA synthesis and RNR regulation. PMID:22464192

  13. Brain activity mapping in Mecp2 mutant mice reveals functional deficits in forebrain circuits, including key nodes in the default mode network, that are reversed with ketamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kron, Miriam; Howell, C James; Adams, Ian T; Ransbottom, Michael; Christian, Diana; Ogier, Michael; Katz, David M

    2012-10-01

    Excitatory-inhibitory imbalance has been identified within specific brain microcircuits in models of Rett syndrome (RTT) and other autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, macrocircuit dysfunction across the RTT brain as a whole has not been defined. To approach this issue, we mapped expression of the activity-dependent, immediate-early gene product Fos in the brains of wild-type (Wt) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2)-null (Null) mice, a model of RTT, before and after the appearance of overt symptoms (3 and 6 weeks of age, respectively). At 6 weeks, Null mice exhibit significantly less Fos labeling than Wt in limbic cortices and subcortical structures, including key nodes in the default mode network. In contrast, Null mice exhibit significantly more Fos labeling than Wt in the hindbrain, most notably in cardiorespiratory regions of the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS). Using nTS as a model, whole-cell recordings demonstrated that increased Fos expression in Nulls at 6 weeks of age is associated with synaptic hyperexcitability, including increased frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs and increased amplitude of evoked EPSCs in Nulls. No such effect of genotype on Fos or synaptic function was seen at 3 weeks. In the mutant forebrain, reduced Fos expression, as well as abnormal sensorimotor function, were reversed by the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In light of recent findings that the default mode network is hypoactive in autism, our data raise the possibility that hypofunction within this meta-circuit is a shared feature of RTT and other ASDs and is reversible. PMID:23035095

  14. Structures and metal-binding properties of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Fujii, Satoshi

    2014-06-26

    Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps) family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC) by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56) at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  15. Flesh-eating Streptococcus pyogenes triggers the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Hidenori; Nakatani, Yuriko; Yoshida, Haruno; Takizawa, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Øverby, Anders; Takahashi, Takashi; Murayama, Somay Y; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-10-01

    Human CD46 is a receptor for the M protein of group A streptococcus (GAS). The emm1 GAS strain GAS472 was isolated from a patient suffering from streptococcal toxic shock-like syndrome. Human CD46-expressing transgenic (Tg) mice developed necrotizing fasciitis associated with osteoclast-mediated progressive and severe bone destruction in the hind paws 3 days after subcutaneous infection with 5 × 10(5) colony-forming units of GAS472. GAS472 infection induced expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) while concomitantly reducing osteoprotegerin expression in the hind limb bones of CD46 Tg mice. Micro-computed tomography analysis of the bones suggested that GAS472 infection induced local bone erosion and systemic bone loss in CD46 Tg mice. Because treatment with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes did not inhibit osteoclastogenesis, T lymphocyte-derived RANKL was not considered a major contributor to massive bone loss during GAS472 infection. However, immunohistochemical analysis of the hind limb bones showed that GAS472 infection stimulated RANKL production in various bone marrow cells, including fibroblast-like cells. Treatment with a mAb against mouse RANKL significantly inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption. These data suggest that increased expression of RANKL in heterogeneous bone marrow cells provoked bone destruction during GAS infection.

  16. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  17. Activation of nuclear factor kappa B pathway and reduction of hypothalamic oxytocin following hypothalamic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Christian L.; D’Ambrosio, Gabrielle; Elfers, Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic obesity (HO) occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. In this study, a hyperphagic rat model of combined medial hypothalamic lesions (CMHL) was used to test which specific inflammatory molecules are involved. Methods In order to target specific homeostatic medial hypothalamic nuclei (arcuate, ventromedial, and dorsomedial nuclei), male Sprague-Dawley rats (age of 8 weeks, ~250 g body weight) received four electrolytic lesions or sham surgery. Post-surgery food intake and weight changes were tracked and hypothalamic gene expression for inflammatory molecules as well as anorexigenic peptide oxytocin 7 days and 7 months post-surgery were tested. Results Seven days post-surgery, average food intake increased by 23%, and body weight gain had increased by 68%. Toll-like 4 receptor/nuclear factor–κB (TLR4/NF–κB)—pathway was specifically activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), resulting in 3-fold higher tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, 10-fold higher interleukin (IL) 1-β mRNA levels, and higher expression of suppression of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 3, while oxytocin mRNA levels were significantly reduced in CMHL rats versus sham surgery rats 7 days post-surgery. At 7 months, inflammation was less stimulated in MBH of CMHL rats compared to 7 days post-surgery and SOCS 3 as well as oxytocin mRNA levels were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Medial hypothalamic lesions are associated with strong post-surgery hyperphagia and activation of TLR4/NF–κB—pathway as well as reduced expression of oxytocin in the hypothalamus. PMID:27512604

  18. Nuclear heparanase-1 activity suppresses melanoma progression via its DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Gorzelanny, C; Bauer, A T; Halter, N; Komljenovic, D; Bäuerle, T; Borsig, L; Roblek, M; Schneider, S W

    2015-11-19

    Heparanase-1 (HPSE) plays a pivotal role in structural remodeling of the ECM and the glycocalyx, thus conferring protumorigenic, proangiogenic and prometastatic properties to many cancer entities. In addition to its extracellular function, recent studies suggest an intracellular activity of HPSE with a largely unknown significance during tumor progression. Therefore, we investigated the relevance of the dual functions of HPSE to malignant melanoma in vitro, as well as in different mouse melanoma models based on the intradermal or intravenous injection of melanoma cells. Consistent with its extracellular action, an HPSE deficiency led to a reduced shedding of the glycocalyx accompanied by a reduced availability of vascular endothelial growth factor, affecting tumor growth and vascularization. In contrast, we measured an elevated expression of the protumorigenic factors pentraxin-3, tissue factor, TNF-α and most prominently, MMP-9, upon HPSE knockdown. In vivo, an HPSE deficiency was related to increased lymph node metastasis. Since the inhibition of its extracellular function with heparin was unable to block the gene regulatory impact of HPSE, we proposed an intracellular mechanism. Immunostaining revealed a counter-staining of HPSE and NF-κB in the nucleus, suggesting a close relationship between both proteins. This finding was further supported by the discovery of a direct charge-driven molecular interaction between HPSE and DNA by using atomic force microscopy and a co-precipitation approach. Our findings are novel and point towards a dual function for HPSE in malignant melanoma with a protumorigenic extracellular activity and a tumor-suppressive nuclear action. The identification of molecular strategies to shuttle extracellular HPSE into the nuclei of cancer cells could provide new therapeutic options. PMID:25745999

  19. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin; Juneau, Stephanie; McLean, Ian S.; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor

    2013-01-20

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  20. RECENT ACTIVITIES OF THE NUCLEAR SMUGGLING INTERNATIONAL TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP TO THWART ILLICIT TRAFFICKING

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D K; Biro, T; Chartier, B; Mayer, K; Niemeyer, S; Thompson, P

    2007-10-25

    The Nuclear Smuggling International Technical Working Group (ITWG) is an informal association of nuclear forensic practitioners working in partnership with law enforcement, first responder, and nuclear regulatory professionals that cooperate to deter the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objective of the ITWG is to advance the science of nuclear forensics and to provide a common approach and effective technical solutions to governments who request assistance. the ITWG was chartered in 1996 and since that time 30 nations and organizations have participated in 12 annual meetings and two analytical round-robin trials involving plutonium and highly enriched uranium. A third analytical round-robin as well as several table-top exercises are planned for later in 2007-2008. International interest in the ITWG has grown in over the past five years measured by the number of participants at its annual meetings. This growth has spawned the ITWG Nuclear Forensics Laboratories as a companion technical affiliate focusing exclusively on the scientific aspects of nuclear forensics and nuclear smuggling incident response.

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission activities to prepare for reviewing license applications and issuing licenses

    SciTech Connect

    Uleck, R.B.; DeFino, C.V.

    1991-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) assigned States the responsibility to provide for disposal of commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) by 1993. The LLRWPAA also required the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish procedures and develop the technical review capability to process license applications for new LLRW disposal facilities. Under the LLRWPAA, NRC is required, to the extent practicable, to complete its review of an LLRW disposal facility license application within 15 months of its submittal by a State. This provision of the LLRWPAA helps ensure that NRC, in addition to protecting public health and safety and the environment, facilitates States` achievement of LLRWPAA milestones for new facility development. A timely NRC review is needed for States to accomplish their objective of having new disposal facilities in operation on the dates prescribed in the LLRWPAA. To help assure NRC and States` compliance with the provisions of the LLRWPAA, NRC has developed a licensing review strategy that includes: (1) the further development of regulatory guidance, (2) enhancement of licensing review capability, and (3) prelicensing regulatory consultation with potential applicants.

  2. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  3. Anti-immunoglobulin M activates nuclear calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in human B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the nuclear protein, Ets-1, is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner after ligation of immunoglobulin (Ig) M on B lymphocytes. As this phosphorylation was independent of protein kinase C activity, we tested whether a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) might phosphorylate the Ets-1 protein after elevation of intracellular free calcium concentrations. The dephosphorylated form of Ets-1 has been shown to bind to chromatin, suggesting that the operative kinase should be detectable in the nucleus. We prepared nuclear extracts from two human B cell lines in which increased intracellular free calcium levels correlated with increased phosphorylation of the Ets-1 protein. Activity of the CaM kinases was determined using a synthetic peptide substrate both in the absence and presence of an inhibitor specific for the CaM kinase family, KN-62. Stimulation of cells with anti-IgM led to increased activity of a nuclear kinase that could phosphorylate the peptide, and this activity was reduced by 10 microM KN-62. Kinase activity was reduced in lysates preadsorbed using an antibody specific for CaM kinase II. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide maps of the Ets-1 protein from cells incubated with ionomycin or anti-IgM contained two unique phosphopeptides that were absent in untreated cells. Incubation of isolated Ets-1 protein with purified CaM kinase II produced phosphorylation of peptides that migrated identically to those found in cells incubated with either anti-IgM or ionomycin. These data suggest a model of signal transduction by the antigen receptor on B lymphocytes in which increased intracellular free calcium can rapidly activate nuclear CaM kinase II, potentially resulting in phosphorylation and regulation of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:7500040

  4. Utility activities for nuclear power plant life cycle management and license renewal

    SciTech Connect

    Negin, C.A.; Klein, D.J.; Fleck, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides guidance to a utility on what steps should be taken, what industry activities have been undertaken, and what products have been developed or are under development for life cycle management and license renewal (LCM/LR) activities. The report identifies those activities a utility may undertake when initially considering the license renewal option through issuance of a renewed license by the NRC, and beyond. Utility activities are distributed in four phases which are: Phase I, Investigate and Determine Corporate Need, Feasibility, and Decision to Proceed; Phase II, Establish the License Renewal Program; Phase III, Implement the License Renewal Program; Phase IV, Obtain a Renewed License. The four phases are first illustrated in a broad, integrated overview and then in a level of detail adequate for input to management planning. The report will prove useful for utility managers who are beginning a program as well as for those who have a program in progress and want to make sure they have considered the experience of others and available industry products. Each activity in each phase is described along with reference to products that can support an individual utility`s conduct of that activity. Associated industry products for life cycle management evaluations of plant systems, structures, and components are further delineated. The final section of the report identifies the conclusions to date and discusses how some utilities have determined that aging is adequately managed for specific components. The products referenced in the body of the report are included in an appendix along with others that have been conducted under related programs, but may not be directly useful for support of license renewal activities.

  5. H2O2 Activates the Nuclear Localization of Msn2 and Maf1 through Thioredoxins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Boisnard, Stéphanie; Lagniel, Gilles; Garmendia-Torres, Cecilia; Molin, Mikael; Boy-Marcotte, Emmanuelle; Jacquet, Michel; Toledano, Michel B.; Labarre, Jean; Chédin, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is characterized by a repression of growth-related processes and an enhanced expression of genes important for cell defense. In budding yeast, this response requires the activation of a set of transcriptional effectors. Some of them, such as the transcriptional activator Yap1, are specific to oxidative stress, and others, such as the transcriptional activators Msn2/4 and the negative regulator Maf1, are activated by a wide spectrum of stress conditions. How these general effectors are activated in response to oxidative stress remains an open question. In this study, we demonstrate that the two cytoplasmic thioredoxins, Trx1 and Trx2, are essential to trigger the nuclear accumulation of Msn2/4 and Maf1, specifically under H2O2 treatment. Contrary to the case with many stress conditions previously described for yeast, the H2O2-induced nuclear accumulation of Msn2 and Maf1 does not correlate with the downregulation of PKA kinase activity. Nevertheless, we show that PP2A phosphatase activity is essential for driving Maf1 dephosphorylation and its subsequent nuclear accumulation in response to H2O2 treatment. Interestingly, under this condition, the lack of PP2A activity has no impact on the subcellular localization of Msn2, demonstrating that the H2O2 signaling pathways share a common route through the thioredoxin system and then diverge to activate Msn2 and Maf1, the final integrators of these pathways. PMID:19581440

  6. Recruitment of activated IRF-3 and CBP/p300 to herpes simplex virus ICP0 nuclear foci: Potential role in blocking IFN-{beta} induction

    SciTech Connect

    Melroe, Gregory T.; Silva, Lindsey; Schaffer, Priscilla A.; Knipe, David M. . E-mail: david_knipe@hms.harvard.edu

    2007-04-10

    The host innate response to viral infection includes the production of interferons, which is dependent on the coordinated activity of multiple transcription factors. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has been shown to block efficient interferon expression by multiple mechanisms. We and others have demonstrated that HSV-1 can inhibit the transcription of genes promoted by interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3), including interferon beta (IFN-{beta}), and that the immediate-early ICP0 protein is sufficient for this function. However, the exact mechanism by which ICP0 blocks IRF-3 activity has yet to be determined. Unlike some other viral proteins that inhibit IRF-3 activity, ICP0 does not appear to affect phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF-3. Here, we show that a portion of activated IRF-3 co-localizes with nuclear foci containing ICP0 at early times after virus infection. Co-localization to ICP0-containing foci is also seen with the IRF-3-binding partners and transcriptional co-activators, CBP and p300. In addition, using immunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates, we can immunoprecipitate a complex containing ICP0, IRF-3, and CBP. Thus we hypothesize that ICP0 recruits activated IRF-3 and CBP/p300 to nuclear structures, away from the host chromatin. This leads to the inactivation and accelerated degradation of IRF-3, resulting in reduced transcription of IFN-{beta} and an inhibition of the host response. Therefore, ICP0 provides an example of how viruses can block IFN-{beta} induction by sequestration of important transcription factors essential for the host response.

  7. Recruitment of Activated IRF-3 and CBP/p300 to Herpes Simplex Virus ICP0 Nuclear Foci: Potential Role in Blocking IFN-β Induction

    PubMed Central

    Melroe, Gregory T.; Silva, Lindsey; Schaffer, Priscilla A.; Knipe, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The host innate response to viral infection includes the production of interferons, which is dependent on the coordinated activity of multiple transcription factors. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has been shown to block efficient interferon expression by multiple mechanisms. We and others have demonstrated that HSV-1 can inhibit the transcription of genes promoted by Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3), including interferon beta (IFN-β), and that the immediate-early ICP0 protein is sufficient for this function. However, the exact mechanism by which ICP0 blocks IRF-3 activity has yet to be determined. Unlike some other viral proteins that inhibit IRF-3 activity, ICP0 does not appear to affect phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF-3. Here, we show that a portion of activated IRF-3 co-localizes with nuclear foci containing ICP0 at early times after virus infection. Co-localization to ICP0-containing foci is also seen with the IRF-3-binding partners and transcriptional co-activators, CBP and p300. In addition, using immunoprecipitation of infected cell lysates, we can immunoprecipitate a complex containing ICP0, IRF-3, and CBP. Thus we hypothesize that ICP0 recruits activated IRF-3 and CBP/p300 to nuclear structures, away from the host chromatin. This leads to the inactivation and accelerated degradation of IRF-3, resulting in reduced transcription of IFN-β and an inhibition of the host response. Therefore, ICP0 provides an example of how viruses can block IFN-β induction by sequestration of important transcription factors essential for the host response. PMID:17126870

  8. Identification of Modulators of the Nuclear Receptor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in a Mouse Liver Gene Expression Compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Rosen, Mitch; Abbott, Barbara; Lau, Christopher; Guo, Grace; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Klaassen, Curtis; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is activated by therapeutic hypolipidemic drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals to regulate genes involved in lipid transport and catabolism. Chronic activation of PPARα in rodents increases liver cancer incidence, whereas suppression of PPARα activity leads to hepatocellular steatosis. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets (i.e., gene expression differences between two conditions) in a genomic database in which PPARα activity was altered. A gene expression signature of 131 PPARα-dependent genes was built using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and PPARα-null mice after exposure to three structurally diverse PPARα activators (WY-14,643, fenofibrate and perfluorohexane sulfonate). A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher’s test (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the PPARα signature and a test set of 48 and 31 biosets positive or negative, respectively for PPARα activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 98%. The signature was then used to identify factors that activate or suppress PPARα in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1850 biosets. In addition to the expected activation of PPARα by fibrate drugs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, and perfluorinated compounds, PPARα was activated by benzofuran, galactosamine, and TCDD and suppressed by hepatotoxins acetaminophen, lipopolysaccharide, silicon dioxide nanoparticles, and trovafloxacin. Additional factors that activate (fasting, caloric restriction) or suppress (infections) PPARα were also identified. This study 1) developed methods useful for future screening of environmental chemicals, 2) identified chemicals that activate or suppress PPARα, and 3) identified factors including diets and infections that modulate PPARα activity and would be hypothesized to affect chemical-induced PPAR

  9. Monitoring microbial growth and activity using spectral induced polarization and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Keating, Kristina; Revil, Andre

    2015-04-01

    Microbes and microbial activities in the Earth's subsurface play a significant role in shaping subsurface environments and are involved in environmental applications such as remediation of contaminants in groundwater and oil fields biodegradation. Stimulated microbial growth in such applications could cause wide variety of changes of physical/chemical properties in the subsurface. It is critical to monitor and determine the fate and transportation of microorganisms in the subsurface during such applications. Recent geophysical studies demonstrate the potential of two innovative techniques, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for monitoring microbial growth and activities in porous media. The SIP measures complex dielectric properties of porous media at low frequencies of exciting electric field, and NMR studies the porous structure of geologic media and characterizes fluids subsurface. In this laboratory study, we examined both SIP and NMR responses from bacterial growth suspension as well as suspension mixed with silica sands. We focus on the direct contribution of microbes to the SIP and NMR signals in the absence of biofilm formation or biomineralization. We used Zymomonas mobilis and Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1) for SIP and NMR measurements, respectively. The SIP measurements were collected over the frequency range of 0.1 - 1 kHz on Z. mobilis growth suspension and suspension saturated sands at different cell densities. SIP data show two distinct peaks in imaginary conductivity spectra, and both imaginary and real conductivities increased as microbial density increased. NMR data were collected using both CPMG pulse sequence and D-T2 mapping to determine the T2-distribution and diffusion properties on S. oneidensis suspension, pellets (live and dead), and suspension mixed with silica sands. NMR data show a decrease in the T2-distribution in S. oneidensis suspension saturated sands as microbial density increase. A

  10. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  11. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  12. Soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk when compared with healthy individuals, due to distinct factors and mechanisms. Bone remodeling is a tightly orchestrated process dependent on several factors, including the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Our aim was to assess serum OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) levels as well as sRANKL/OPG ratio in female SLE patients and compare it with female controls. Methods We have evaluated 103 SLE patients and 114 healthy controls, all Caucasian females. All participants underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation. sRANKL and OPG were quantified in serum by ELISA based methods. sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels were compared between SLE patients and age, sex and race matched healthy controls. For SLE patients, a multivariate analysis was performed, to find the possible predictors of the changes in sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels. Results Although sRANKL levels did not differ between the two groups, serum OPG was lower in SLE patients (P < 0.001). This led to an increased sRANKL/OPG ratio (P = 0.010) in the patients' group. The multivariate analysis was performed considering age and other clinical and laboratorial potential confounders for these variations in the SLE patients group. We have showed that age (P = 0.001) and levels of anti-Sm antibodies (P = 0.016) were independent predictors of sRANKL/OPG ratio variations in SLE patients. No relationship with therapy or disease activity measured by SLEDAI2K was found. Conclusions These results are suggestive of increased osteoclastic stimuli driven by the SLE disease mechanisms. PMID:22027240

  13. The EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma activates the PPARG nuclear receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Filion, C; Motoi, T; Olshen, A B; Laé, M; Emnett, R J; Gutmann, D H; Perry, A; Ladanyi, M; Labelle, Y

    2009-01-01

    The NR4A3 nuclear receptor is implicated in the development of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC), primitive sarcoma unrelated to conventional chondrosarcomas, through a specific fusion with EWSR1 resulting in an aberrant fusion protein that is thought to disrupt the transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We performed an expression microarray analysis of EMC tumours expressing the EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein, comparing their expression profiles to those of other sarcoma types. We thereby identified a set of genes significantly overexpressed in EMC relative to other sarcomas, including PPARG and NDRG2. Western blot or immunohistochemical analyses confirm that PPARG and NDRG2 are expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3. Bioinformatic analysis identified a DNA response element for EWSR1/NR4A3 in the PPARG promoter, and band-shift experiments and transient transfections indicate that EWSR1/NR4A3 can activate transcription through this element. Western blots further show that an isoform of the native NR4A3 receptor lacking the C-terminal domain is very highly expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3, and co-transfections of this isoform along with EWSR1/NR4A3 indicate that it may negatively regulate the activity of the fusion protein on the PPARG promoter. These results suggest that the overall expression of PPARG in EMC may be regulated in part by the balance between EWSR1/NR4A3 and NR4A3, and that PPARG may play a crucial role in the development of these tumours. The specific up-regulation of PPARG by EWSR1/NR4A3 may also have potential therapeutic implications.

  14. Nuclear Material Management Abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse C. Schreiber

    2007-07-10

    Nevada Test Site (NTS) has transitioned from its historical and critical role of weapons testing to another critical role for the nation. This new role focuses on being a integral element in solving the multiple challenges facing the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) with nuclear material management. NTS is positioned to be a solution for other NNSA sites challenged with safe nuclear materials storage and disposition. NNSA, with site involvement, is currently transforming the nuclear stockpile and supporting infrastructure to meet the 2030 vision. Efforts are under way to consolidate and modernize the production complex . With respect to the nuclear material stockpile, the NNSA sites are currently reducing the complex nuclear material inventory through disposition and consolidation. This includes moving material from other sites to NTS. State of the art nuclear material management and control practices at NTS are essential for NTS to ensure that assigned activities are accomplished in a safe, secure, efficient, and environmentally responsible manner. NTS activities and challenges will be addressed.

  15. Nucleoporin 62-Like Protein Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling through Facilitating the Nuclear Import of β-Catenin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojie; Gu, Qilin; Lin, Li; Li, Shaoyang; Zhong, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporin p62 (Nup62) localizes in the central channel of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and regulates nuclear pore permeability and nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the developmental roles of Nup62 in vertebrates remain largely unclear. Zebrafish Nup62-like protein (Nup62l) is a homolog of mammalian Nup62. The nup62l gene is maternally expressed, but its transcripts are ubiquitously distributed during early embryogenesis and enriched in the head, pharynx, and intestine of developing embryos. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway positively modulates nup62l transcription, while Bmp signaling acts downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to negatively regulate nup62l expression. Overexpression of nup62l dorsalized embryos and enhanced gastrula convergence and extension (CE) movements. In contrast, knockdown of Nup62l led to ventralized embryos, an impediment to CE movements, and defects in specification of midline organ progenitors. Mechanistically, Nup62l acts as an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through interaction with and facilitation of nuclear import of β-catenin-1/2 in zebrafish. Thus, Nup62l regulates dorsoventral patterning, gastrula CE movements, and proper specification of midline organ precursors through mediating the nuclear import of β-catenins in zebrafish. PMID:25605329

  16. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. PMID:27329811

  17. Nuclear pore complex evolution: a trypanosome Mlp analogue functions in chromosomal segregation but lacks transcriptional barrier activity

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Jennifer M.; Koreny, Ludek; Obado, Samson; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Chen, Wei-Ming; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kelly, Steven; Chait, Brian T.; Aitchison, John D.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) has dual roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport and chromatin organization. In many eukaryotes the coiled-coil Mlp/Tpr proteins of the NPC nuclear basket have specific functions in interactions with chromatin and defining specialized regions of active transcription, whereas Mlp2 associates with the mitotic spindle/NPC in a cell cycle–dependent manner. We previously identified two putative Mlp-related proteins in African trypanosomes, TbNup110 and TbNup92, the latter of which associates with the spindle. We now provide evidence for independent ancestry for TbNup92/TbNup110 and Mlp/Tpr proteins. However, TbNup92 is required for correct chromosome segregation, with knockout cells exhibiting microaneuploidy and lowered fidelity of telomere segregation. Further, TbNup92 is intimately associated with the mitotic spindle and spindle anchor site but apparently has minimal roles in control of gene transcription, indicating that TbNup92 lacks major barrier activity. TbNup92 therefore acts as a functional analogue of Mlp/Tpr proteins, and, together with the lamina analogue NUP-1, represents a cohort of novel proteins operating at the nuclear periphery of trypanosomes, uncovering complex evolutionary trajectories for the NPC and nuclear lamina. PMID:24600046

  18. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.