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  1. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  2. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  3. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  4. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... activities involving human subjects. 3452.224-71 Section 3452.224-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-71 Notice about research activities involving human subjects... contract will include, or is likely to include, research activities involving human subjects covered...

  5. Active stream segregation specifically involves the left human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Deike, Susann; Scheich, Henning; Brechmann, André

    2010-06-14

    An important aspect of auditory scene analysis is the sequential grouping of similar sounds into one "auditory stream" while keeping competing streams separate. In the present low-noise fMRI study we presented sequences of alternating high-pitch (A) and low-pitch (B) complex harmonic tones using acoustic parameters that allow the perception of either two separate streams or one alternating stream. However, the subjects were instructed to actively and continuously segregate the A from the B stream. This was controlled by the additional instruction to listen for rare level deviants only in the low-pitch stream. Compared to the control condition in which only one non-separable stream was presented the active segregation of the A from the B stream led to a selective increase of activation in the left auditory cortex (AC). Together with a similar finding from a previous study using a different acoustic cue for streaming, namely timbre, this suggests that the left auditory cortex plays a dominant role in active sequential stream segregation. However, we found cue differences within the left AC: Whereas in the posterior areas, including the planum temporale, activation increased for both acoustic cues, the anterior areas, including Heschl's gyrus, are only involved in stream segregation based on pitch.

  6. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... about the regulations for the protection of human subjects and related policies and guidelines... activities involving human subjects. 3452.224-71 Section 3452.224-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-71 Notice about research activities involving human...

  7. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Research activities... OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As...

  8. Involvement of ER stress and activation of apoptotic pathways in fisetin induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Lall, Rahul K; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Haidar, Omar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of malignant melanoma remains poor in spite of recent advances in therapeutic strategies for the deadly disease. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid is currently being investigated for its growth inhibitory properties in various cancer models. We previously showed that fisetin inhibited melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we evaluated the molecular basis of fisetin induced cytotoxicity in metastatic human melanoma cells. Fisetin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in highly aggressive A375 and 451Lu human melanoma cells, as revealed by up-regulation of ER stress markers including IRE1α, XBP1s, ATF4 and GRP78. Time course analysis indicated that the ER stress was associated with activation of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Fisetin treated 2-D melanoma cultures displayed autophagic response concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Prolonged treatment (16days) with fisetin in a 3-D reconstituted melanoma model resulted in inhibition of melanoma progression with significant apoptosis, as evidenced by increased staining of cleaved Caspase-3 in the treated constructs. However, no difference in the expression of autophagic marker LC-3 was noted between treated and control groups. Fisetin treatment to 2-D melanoma cultures resulted in phosphorylation and activation of the multifunctional AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including autophagy and apoptosis. Silencing of AMPK failed to prevent cell death indicating that fisetin induced cytotoxicity is mediated through both AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Taken together, our studies confirm apoptosis as the primary mechanism through which fisetin inhibits melanoma cell growth and that activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways contributes to fisetin induced cytotoxicity.

  9. Transient neural activation in human amygdala involved in aversive conditioning of face and voice.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Saito, Daisuke N; Komeda, Hidetsugu; Mano, Yoko; Kanayama, Noriaki; Osumi, Takahiro; Ozaki, Norio; Sadato, Norihiro

    2010-09-01

    Elucidating the neural mechanisms involved in aversive conditioning helps find effective treatments for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorder and phobia. Previous studies using fMRI and human subjects have reported that the amygdala plays a role in this phenomenon. However, the noxious stimuli that were used as unconditioned stimuli in previous studies (e.g., electric shock) might have been ecologically invalid because we seldom encounter such stimuli in daily life. Therefore, we investigated whether a face stimulus could be conditioned by using a voice that had negative emotional valence and was collected from a real-life environment. A skin conductance response showed that healthy subjects were conditioned by using these stimuli. In an fMRI study, there was greater amygdala activation in response to the faces that had been paired with the voice than to those that had not. The right amygdala showed transient activity in the early stage of acquisition. A psychophysiological interaction analysis indicated that the subcortical pathway from the medial geniculate body to the amygdala played a role in conditioning. Modulation of the subcortical pathway by voice stimuli preceded the transient activity in the amygdala. The finding that an ecologically valid stimulus elicited the conditioning and amygdala response suggests that our brain is automatically processing unpleasant stimuli in daily life.

  10. Inhibition of proteasome activity is involved in cobalt-induced apoptosis of human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Araya, Jun; Maruyama, Muneharu; Inoue, Akira; Fujita, Tadashi; Kawahara, Junko; Sassa, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Ryuji; Kawagishi, Yukio; Yamashita, Naohiro; Sugiyama, Eiji; Kobayashi, Masashi

    2002-10-01

    Inhalation of particulate cobalt has been known to induce interstitial lung disease. There is growing evidence that apoptosis plays a crucial role in physiological and pathological settings and that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Cadmium, the same transitional heavy metal as cobalt, has been reported to accumulate ubiquitinated proteins in neuronal cells. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesized that cobalt would induce apoptosis in the lung by disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To evaluate this, we exposed U-937 cells and human alveolar macrophages (AMs) to cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) and examined their apoptosis by DNA fragmentation assay, 4',6-diamidino-2'-phenylindol dihydrochloride staining, and Western blot analysis. CoCl(2) induced apoptosis and accumulated ubiquitinated proteins. Exposure to CoCl(2) inhibited proteasome activity in U-937 cells. Cobalt-induced apoptosis was mediated via mitochondrial pathway because CoCl(2) released cytochrome c from mitochondria. These results suggest that cobalt-induced apoptosis of AMs may be one of the mechanisms for cobalt-induced lung injury and that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins might be involved in this apoptotic process.

  11. Mechanisms involved in the antiplatelet activity of magnesium in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Joen-Rong; Hsiao, George; Shen, Ming-Yi; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Yi-Win; Lin, Chien-Huang; Chou, Duen-Suey

    2002-12-01

    In this study, magnesium sulphate dose-dependently (0.6-3.0 mmol/l) inhibited platelet aggregation in human platelets stimulated by agonists. Furthermore, magnesium sulphate (3.0 mmol/l) markedly interfered with the binding of fluorescein isothiocanate-triflavin to the glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa complex in platelets stimulated by collagen. Magnesium sulphate (1.5 and 3.0 mmol/l) also inhibited phosphoinositide breakdown and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization in human platelets stimulated by collagen. Magnesium sulphate (3.0 mmol/l) significantly inhibited thromboxane A2 formation stimulated by collagen in platelets. Moreover, magnesium sulphate (1.5 and 3.0 mmol/l) obviously increased the fluorescence of platelet membranes tagged with diphenylhexatriene. In addition, magnesium sulphate (1.5 and 3.0 mmol/l) increased the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) in platelets. Phosphorylation of a protein of Mr 47 000 (P47) was markedly inhibited by magnesium sulphate (1.5 mmol/l). In conclusion, the antiplatelet activity of magnesium sulphate may involve the following two pathways. (1) Magnesium sulphate may initially induce membrane fluidity changes with resulting interference of fibrinogen binding to the GPIIb/IIIa complex, followed by inhibition of phosphoinositide breakdown and thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of both intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and phosphorylation of P47. (2) Magnesium sulphate might also trigger the formation of cyclic AM, ultimately resulting in inhibition of the phosphorylation of P47 and intracellular Ca+2 mobilization.

  12. Novel DNA mismatch-repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Mason, Penelope A; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-04

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch-binding and recognition steps.

  13. Human high intelligence is involved in spectral redshift of biophotonic activities in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Niting; Li, Zehua; Xiao, Fangyan; Dai, Jiapei

    2016-01-01

    Human beings hold higher intelligence than other animals on Earth; however, it is still unclear which brain properties might explain the underlying mechanisms. The brain is a major energy-consuming organ compared with other organs. Neural signal communications and information processing in neural circuits play an important role in the realization of various neural functions, whereas improvement in cognitive function is driven by the need for more effective communication that requires less energy. Combining the ultraweak biophoton imaging system (UBIS) with the biophoton spectral analysis device (BSAD), we found that glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in the brain, which has recently been demonstrated as a novel neural signal communication mechanism, present a spectral redshift from animals (in order of bullfrog, mouse, chicken, pig, and monkey) to humans, even up to a near-infrared wavelength (∼865 nm) in the human brain. This brain property may be a key biophysical basis for explaining high intelligence in humans because biophoton spectral redshift could be a more economical and effective measure of biophotonic signal communications and information processing in the human brain. PMID:27432962

  14. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis.

  15. Involvement of nitric oxide donor compounds in the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klink, Magdalena; Cedzyński, Maciej; St Swierzko, Anna; Tchórzewski, Henryk; Sulowska, Zofia

    2003-04-01

    The bactericidal activity of human neutrophils against extracellular and facultatively intracellular bacteria was studied in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molsidomine metabolite. SNP and molsidomine are drugs commonly used as nitrovasodilators in coronary heart disease. It is demonstrated here that the NO donor compounds themselves did not affect the viability and survival of the bacterial strains tested. Neither SNP nor SIN-1 had any effect on the process of bacteria ingestion. In contrast, NO donors enhanced the ability of neutrophils to kill Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella Anatum. However, strains differed in their susceptibility to SNP- and SIN-1-mediated killing by neutrophils. Removal of the superoxide anion reduced the bactericidal activity of SNP- and SIN-1-treated neutrophils against E. coli and S. Anatum. This suggests that the NO derivatives formed in the reaction of NO generated from donors with the reactive oxygen species released by phagocytosed neutrophils potentiate the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro. The above original observation discussed here suggests clinical significance for the treatment of patients with nitrovasodilators in the course of coronary heart disease therapy.

  16. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Bocci, Velio; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Gardi, Concetta; Virgili, Fabio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  17. Identification of serum component involved in generation of neo-lectin with agglutinating and phenoloxidase activities in human serum.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Beulaja; Ramar, Manikandan; Munusamy, Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was identified as the component involved in generation of neo-lectin molecules with both lectin and phenoloxidase activities. Pronase treated HSA was able to agglutinate hen RBC and oxidize hydroquinone. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) treated HSA agglutinated both hen and sheep RBC as well as oxidized dopamine. The hemagglutinating activities of pronase/SDS treated HSA observed against hen RBC were dosimetric. The oxidation of pronase/SDS treated HSA with hydroquinone/dopamine, respectively, was inhibitable by inhibitors of phenoloxidase, namely, phenylthiourea and tropolone. Very low concentrations of HSA could generate these humoral neo-lectin molecules.

  18. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests....101(b)(2) continues to apply, unmodified by 34 CFR 97.401(b), to— (i) Educational tests; and (ii... (physical, psychological, social, financial, legal, or other) and assess their likelihood and...

  19. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... children, the exemption at 34 CFR 97.101(b)(2) (i.e., research involving the use of educational tests....101(b)(2) continues to apply, unmodified by 34 CFR 97.401(b), to— (i) Educational tests; and (ii... (physical, psychological, social, financial, legal, or other) and assess their likelihood and...

  20. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  1. Changes in expression of genes involved in apoptosis in activated human T-cells in response to modeled microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Nancy E.; Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diana; Risin, Semyon A.; Liu, Wenbin

    2006-09-01

    Space flights result in remarkable effects on various physiological systems, including a decline in cellular immune functions. Previous studies have shown that exposure to microgravity, both true and modeled, can cause significant changes in numerous lymphocyte functions. The purpose of this study was to search for microgravity-sensitive genes, and specifically for apoptotic genes influenced by the microgravity environment and other genes related to immune response. The experiments were performed on anti-CD3 and IL-2 activated human T cells. To model microgravity conditions we have utilized the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor. Control lymphocytes were cultured in static 1g conditions. To assess gene expression we used DNA microarray chip technology. We had shown that multiple genes (approximately 3-8% of tested genes) respond to microgravity conditions by 1.5 and more fold change in expression. There is a significant variability in the response. However, a certain reproducible pattern in gene response could be identified. Among the genes showing reproducible changes in expression in modeled microgravity, several genes involved in apoptosis as well as in immune response were identified. These are IL-7 receptor, Granzyme B, Beta-3-endonexin, Apo2 ligand and STAT1. Possible functional consequences of these changes are discussed.

  2. Public Involvement in BOSC Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA policy and the Federal Advisory Committee Act provide for public involvement in committee activities primarily by open access to meetings and records and by providing the public an opportunity to submit comments to the committee.

  3. NADPH oxidase derived reactive oxygen species are involved in human neutrophil IL-1β secretion but not in inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gabelloni, María Laura; Sabbione, Florencia; Jancic, Carolina; Fuxman Bass, Juan; Keitelman, Irene; Iula, Leonardo; Oleastro, Matías; Geffner, Jorge R; Trevani, Analía S

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential players in acute inflammatory responses. Upon stimulation, neutrophils activate NADPH oxidase, generating an array of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a major proinflammatory cytokine synthesized as a precursor that has to be proteolytically processed to become biologically active. The role of ROS in IL-1β processing is still controversial and has not been previously studied in neutrophils. We report here that IL-1β processing in human neutrophils is dependent on caspase-1 and on the serine proteases elastase and/or proteinase 3. NADPH oxidase deficient neutrophils activated caspase-1 and did not exhibit differences in NALP3 expression, indicating that ROS are neither required for inflammasome activation nor for its priming, as has been reported for macrophages. Strikingly, ROS exerted opposite effects on the processing and secretion of IL-1β; whereas ROS negatively controlled caspase-1 activity, as reported in mononuclear phagocytes, ROS were found to be necessary for the exportation of mature IL-1β out of the cell, a role never previously described. The complex ROS-mediated regulation of neutrophil IL-1β secretion might constitute a physiological mechanism to control IL-1β-dependent inflammatory processes where neutrophils play a crucial role.

  4. Promoter-specific trans activation and repression by human cytomegalovirus immediate-early proteins involves common and unique protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, R M; Fortney, J; Barlow, S W; Magrane, B P; Nelson, J A; Ghazal, P

    1990-01-01

    trans activation of promoters by viral regulatory proteins provides a useful tool to study coordinate control of gene expression. Immediate-early (IE) regions 1 and 2 of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) code for a series of proteins that originate from differentially spliced mRNAs. These IE proteins are proposed to regulate the temporal expression of the viral genome. To examine the structure and function of the IE proteins, we used linker insertion mutagenesis of the IE gene region as well as cDNA expression vector cloning of the abundant IE mRNAs. We showed that IE1 and IE2 proteins of CMV exhibit promoter-specific differences in their modes of action by either trans activating early and IE promoters or repressing the major IE promoter (MIEP). Transient cotransfection experiments with permissive human cells revealed a synergistic interaction between the 72- and the 86-kilodalton (kDa) IE proteins in trans activating an early promoter. In addition, transfection studies revealed that the 72-kDa protein was capable of trans activating the MIEP. In contrast, the 86-kDa protein specifically repressed the MIEP and this repression was suppressed by the 72-kDa protein. Furthermore, observations based on the primary sequence structure revealed a modular arrangement of putative regulatory motifs that could either potentiate or repress gene expression. These modular domains are either shared or unique among the IE proteins. From these data, we propose a model for IE protein function in the coordinate control of CMV gene expression. Images PMID:2157043

  5. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  6. Rotavirus Stimulates Release of Serotonin (5-HT) from Human Enterochromaffin Cells and Activates Brain Structures Involved in Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Engblom, David; Karlsson, Thommie; Rodriguez-Diaz, Jesus; Buesa, Javier; Taylor, John A.; Loitto, Vesa-Matti; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Ahlman, Håkan; Lundgren, Ove; Svensson, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children. A virus-encoded enterotoxin, NSP4 is proposed to play a major role in causing RV diarrhoea but how RV can induce emesis, a hallmark of the illness, remains unresolved. In this study we have addressed the hypothesis that RV-induced secretion of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) by enterochromaffin (EC) cells plays a key role in the emetic reflex during RV infection resulting in activation of vagal afferent nerves connected to nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and area postrema in the brain stem, structures associated with nausea and vomiting. Our experiments revealed that RV can infect and replicate in human EC tumor cells ex vivo and in vitro and are localized to both EC cells and infected enterocytes in the close vicinity of EC cells in the jejunum of infected mice. Purified NSP4, but not purified virus particles, evoked release of 5-HT within 60 minutes and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a human midgut carcinoid EC cell line (GOT1) and ex vivo in human primary carcinoid EC cells concomitant with the release of 5-HT. Furthermore, NSP4 stimulated a modest production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3), but not of cAMP. RV infection in mice induced Fos expression in the NTS, as seen in animals which vomit after administration of chemotherapeutic drugs. The demonstration that RV can stimulate EC cells leads us to propose that RV disease includes participation of 5-HT, EC cells, the enteric nervous system and activation of vagal afferent nerves to brain structures associated with nausea and vomiting. This hypothesis is supported by treating vomiting in children with acute gastroenteritis with 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. PMID:21779163

  7. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  8. Kallikrein-related Peptidase-8 (KLK8) Is an Active Serine Protease in Human Epidermis and Sweat and Is Involved in a Skin Barrier Proteolytic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Eissa, Azza; Amodeo, Vanessa; Smith, Christopher R.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is a relatively uncharacterized epidermal protease. Although proposed to regulate skin-barrier desquamation and recovery, the catalytic activity of KLK8 was never demonstrated in human epidermis, and its regulators and targets remain unknown. Herein, we elucidated for the first time KLK8 activity in human non-palmoplantar stratum corneum and sweat ex vivo. The majority of stratum corneum and sweat KLK8 was catalytically active, displaying optimal activity at pH 8.5 and considerable activity at pH 5. We also showed that KLK8 is a keratinocyte-specific protease, not secreted by human melanocytes or dermal fibroblasts. KLK8 secretion increased significantly upon calcium induction of terminal keratinocyte differentiation, suggesting an active role for this protease in upper epidermis. Potential activators, regulators, and targets of KLK8 activity were identified by in vitro kinetic assays using pro-KLK8 and mature KLK8 recombinant proteins produced in Pichia pastoris. Mature KLK8 activity was enhanced by calcium and magnesium ions and attenuated by zinc ions and by autocleavage after Arg164. Upon screening KLK8 cleavage of a library of FRET-quenched peptides, trypsin-like specificity was observed with the highest preference for (R/K)(S/T)(A/V) at P1-P1′-P2′. We also demonstrated that KLK5 and lysyl endopeptidase activate latent pro-KLK8, whereas active KLK8 targets pro-KLK11, pro-KLK1, and LL-37 antimicrobial peptide activation in vitro. Together, our data identify KLK8 as a new active serine protease in human stratum corneum and sweat, and we propose regulators and targets that augment its involvement in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade. The implications of KLK8 elevation and hyperactivity in desquamatory and inflammatory skin disease conditions remain to be studied. PMID:20940292

  9. Oroxylin A induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was involved in its antitumor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yang; Yang Yong; You Qidong . E-mail: qdyou@cpu.edu.cn; Liu Wei; Gu Hongyan; Zhao Li; Zhang Kun; Wang Wei; Wang Xiaotang; Guo Qinglong . E-mail: qinglongguo@hotmail.com

    2006-12-15

    We previously reported that wogonin, a flavonoid compound, was a potent apoptosis inducer of human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells and murine sarcoma S180 cells. In the present study, the effect of oroxylin A, one wogonin structurally related flavonoid isolated from Scutellariae radix, on human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 was examined and molecular mechanisms were also investigated. Oroxylin A inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner measured by MTT-assay. Treatment with an apoptosis-inducing concentration of oroxylin A caused typical morphological changes and apoptotic blebbing in HepG2 cells. DNA fragmentation assay was used to examine later apoptosis induced by oroxylin A. FACScan analysis revealed a dramatic increase in the number of apoptotic and G{sub 2}/M phase arrest cells after oroxylin A treatment. The pro-apoptotic activity of oroxylin A was attributed to its ability to modulate the concerted expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and pro-caspase-3 proteins. The expression of Bcl-2 protein and pro-caspase-3 protein was dramatically decreased after treatment with oroxylin A. These results demonstrated that oroxylin A could effectively induce programmed cell death and suggested that it could be a promising antitumor drug.

  10. Fluorescence- and magnetic-activated cell sorting strategies to separate spermatozoa involving plural contributors from biological mixtures for human identification

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Xie, Jianhui; Chen, Ronghua; Cao, Yu; Ping, Yuan; Xu, Qingwen; Hu, Wei; Wu, Dan; Gu, Lihua; Zhou, Huaigu; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Ziqin; Zhong, Jiang; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    No effective method has been developed to distinguish sperm cells originating from different men in multi-suspect sexual assault cases. Here we combined MACS and FACS to isolate single donor sperm cells from forensic mixture samples including female vaginal epithelial cells and sperm cells from multiple contributors. Sperms from vaginal swab were isolated by MACS using FITC-conjugated A kinase anchor protein 3 (AKAP3) antibody; target individual sperm cells involving two or three donors were separated by FACS using FITC-labeled blood group A/B antigen antibody. This procedure was further tested in two mock multi-suspect sexual assault samples and one practical casework sample. Our results showed that complete single donor STR profiles could be successfully obtained from sperm/epithelial cell and sperm mixtures from two contributors. For unbalanced sperm/epithelial cells and sperm cells mixtures, sensitivity results revealed that target cells could be detected at as low as 1:32 and 1:8 mixed ratios, respectively. Although highly relies on cell number and blood types or secretor status of the individuals, this procedure would still be useful tools for forensic DNA analysis of multi-suspect sexual assault cases by the combined use of FACS and MACS based on sperm-specific AKAP3 antigen and human blood type antigen. PMID:27857155

  11. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  12. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in lipocalin-2-promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Ma, Ning; Meng, Liukun; Wei, Yingjie; Gui, Jingang

    2015-12-01

    Over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling, a pathway strongly related to cancer survival and proliferation, has been reported recently to be involved in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation in pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, we observed greatly increased lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) expression accompanied with over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in a standard rat model of PH induced by monocrotaline. In view of the close relationship between Lcn2 and PI3K/Akt pathway, we hypothesized that the up-regulated Lcn2 might be a trigger of over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH. Our results showed that Lcn2 significantly activated the PI3K/Akt pathway (determined by augmented Akt phosphorylation and up-regulated Mdm2) and significantly promoted proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining) in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation (LY294002) abrogated the Lcn2-promoted proliferation in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. Further study on the role and mechanism of Lcn2 will help explore novel therapeutic strategies based on attenuating over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH.

  13. Bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signaling in human subcutaneous fibroblasts involves ATP release via hemichannels leading to P2Y12 receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain involves connective tissue remodeling triggered by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin. Fibroblast cells signaling involve changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). ATP has been related to connective tissue mechanotransduction, remodeling and chronic inflammatory pain, via P2 purinoceptors activation. Here, we investigated the involvement of ATP in bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signals in human subcutaneous fibroblasts. Results Bradykinin, via B2 receptors, caused an abrupt rise in [Ca2+]i to a peak that declined to a plateau, which concentration remained constant until washout. The plateau phase was absent in Ca2+-free medium; [Ca2+]i signal was substantially reduced after depleting intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin. Extracellular ATP inactivation with apyrase decreased the [Ca2+]i plateau. Human subcutaneous fibroblasts respond to bradykinin by releasing ATP via connexin and pannexin hemichannels, since blockade of connexins, with 2-octanol or carbenoxolone, and pannexin-1, with 10Panx, attenuated bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas inhibitors of vesicular exocytosis, such as brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1, were inactive. The kinetics of extracellular ATP catabolism favors ADP accumulation in human fibroblast cultures. Inhibition of ectonucleotidase activity and, thus, ADP formation from released ATP with POM-1 or by Mg2+ removal from media reduced bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau. Selective blockade of the ADP-sensitive P2Y12 receptor with AR-C66096 attenuated bradykinin [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas the P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor antagonists, respectively MRS 2179 and MRS 2211, were inactive. Human fibroblasts exhibited immunoreactivity against connexin-43, pannexin-1 and P2Y12 receptor. Conclusions Bradykinin induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via connexin and pannexin-1-containing hemichannels leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization through the cooperation of B2 and P2Y12 receptors. PMID

  14. ZN2+-INDUCED IL-8 EXPRESSION INVOLVES AP-1, JNK, AND ERK ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter (PM) in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. IL-8 is an important proinflammatory cytokine in the human lung and is induced in human airway epithelial cells exposed to zin...

  15. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  16. Selective inhibition of extracellular oxidants liberated from human neutrophils--A new mechanism potentially involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of hydroxychloroquine.

    PubMed

    Jančinová, Viera; Pažoureková, Silvia; Lucová, Marianna; Perečko, Tomáš; Mihalová, Danica; Bauerová, Katarína; Nosáľ, Radomír; Drábiková, Katarína

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine is used in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis or lupus erythematosus. Although these diseases are often accompanied by activation of neutrophils, there are still few data relating to the impact of hydroxychloroquine on these cells. We investigated the effect of orally administered hydroxychloroquine on neutrophil oxidative burst in rats with adjuvant arthritis. In human neutrophils, extra- and intracellular formation of oxidants, mobilisation of intracellular calcium and the phosphorylation of proteins regulating NADPH oxidase assembly were analysed. Administration of hydroxychloroquine decreased the concentration of oxidants in blood of arthritic rats. The inhibition was comparable with the reference drug methotrexate, yet it was not accompanied by a reduction in neutrophil count. When both drugs were co-applied, the effect became more pronounced. In isolated human neutrophils, treatment with hydroxychloroquine resulted in reduced mobilisation of intracellular calcium, diminished concentration of external oxidants and in decreased phosphorylation of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C isoforms PKCα and PKCβII, which regulate activation of NADPH oxidase on plasma membrane. On the other hand, no reduction was observed in intracellular oxidants or in the phosphorylation of p40(phox) and PKCδ, two proteins directing the oxidase assembly to intracellular membranes. Hydroxychloroquine reduced neutrophil-derived oxidants potentially involved in tissue damage and protected those capable to suppress inflammation. The observed effects may represent a new mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of this drug.

  17. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  18. TLR9 and NF-κB Are Partially Involved in Activation of Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and Its Purified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils. PMID:24987851

  19. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4(+) T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ(9)-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ(9)-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ(9)-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ(9)-THC suppresses human T cell function.

  20. The anti-adipogenic effect of angiotensin II on human preadipose cells involves ERK1,2 activation and PPARG phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Paula; Acuña, María José; Cifuentes, Mariana; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2010-07-01

    Despite the importance of adipocyte formation for adipose tissue physiology, current knowledge about the mechanisms that regulate the recruitment of progenitor cells to undergo adipogenic differentiation is limited. A role for locally generated angiotensin II emerged from studies with human and murine cells. Preadipose cells from different human fat depots show reduced response to adipogenic stimuli when exposed to angiotensin II. This investigation sought to gain an insight into the intracellular mechanisms involved in the anti-adipogenic response of human preadipose cells from omental fat to angiotensin II. Its effect was evaluated on cells stimulated to adipogenic differentiation in vitro, by assessment of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and expression of early markers of adipogenesis. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase(1,2) (ERK(1,2)) pathway activation was inferred from the phosphorylated to total ERK(1,2) ratio determined by western blot. Exposure to angiotensin II throughout the 10-day differentiation period resulted in a reduced adipogenic response. A similar anti-adipogenic effect was observed when this hormone was present during the first 48 h of induction to differentiation. Angiotensin II treatment had no consequences on CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) induction, but increased the phosphorylated form of the key adipogenic regulator PPARG. Upon angiotensin II exposure, a raise of phosphorylated ERK(1,2) was determined, which was more prominent 8-20 h after induction of adipogenesis (when controls reached negligible values). Chemical inhibition of ERK(1,2) phosphorylation prevented angiotensin II-dependent reduction in adipogenesis. These results support the participation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK(1,2) pathway in the anti-adipogenic effect of angiotensin II on preadipose cells from human omental adipose tissue.

  1. Signal transduction of receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells involves dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Stephen Y W; Pang, Bo; Tam, Chun W; Yao, Kwok-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of malignant and transformed human prostate epithelial cells by transcriptional up-regulation of p27(Kip1) expression via MTNR1A receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in parallel. Given that melatonin MTNR1A receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor, this study was conducted to identify the specific G proteins that mediate the antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells. In 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells, knockdown of either Gα(s) or Gα(q) , but not Gα(i2) expression by RNA interference, abrogated the effects of melatonin on p27(Kip1) and cell proliferation. Conversely, cellular overexpression of activated mutants of Gα(s) and Gα(q) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells mimicked the effects of melatonin on prostate epithelial cell antiproliferation by increasing p27(Kip1) expression through downstream activation of PKA and PKC in parallel. Moreover, melatonin or 2-iodomelatonin induced elevation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells. The effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP were blocked by the nonselective MTNR1A/MTNR1B receptor antagonist luzindole but were not affected by the selective MTNR1B receptor antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4-P-PDOT). Furthermore, knockdown of Gα(s) mitigated the stimulatory effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP. Collectively, the data demonstrated, for the first time, functional coupling of MTNR1A receptor to Gα(s) in cancerous or transformed human cells expressing endogenous melatonin receptors. Our results also showed that dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins is involved in the signal transduction of MTNR1A receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells.

  2. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Nosal, Radomir; Svitekova, Klara; Drabikova, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role) were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular) membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC)—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues. PMID:24288583

  3. The activity of French Research Ethics Committees and characteristics of biomedical research protocols involving humans: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Decullier, Evelyne; Lhéritier, Véronique; Chapuis, François

    2005-01-01

    Background Clinical trials throughout the world must be evaluated by research ethics committees. No one has yet attempted to clearly quantify at the national level the activity of ethics committees and describe the characteristics of the protocols submitted. The objectives of this study were to describe 1) the workload and the activity of Research Ethics Committees in France, and 2) the characteristics of protocols approved on a nation-wide basis. Methods Retrospective cohort of 976 protocols approved by a representative sample of 25/48 of French Research Ethics Committees in 1994. Protocols characteristics (design, study size, investigator), number of revisions requested by the ethics committee before approval, time to approval and number of amendments after approval were collected for each protocol by trained research assistant using the committee's files and archives. Results Thirty-one percent of protocols were approved with no modifications requested in 16 days (95% CI: 14–17). The number of revisions requested by the committee, and amendments submitted by the investigator was on average respectively 39 (95% CI: 25–53) and 37 (95% CI: 27–46), per committee and per year. When revisions were requested, the main reasons were related to information to the patient (28%) and consent modalities (18%). Drugs were the object of research in 68% of the protocols examined. The majority of the research was national (80%) with a predominance of single-centre studies. Workload per protocol has been estimated at twelve and half hours on average for administrative support and at eleven and half hours for expertise. Conclusion The estimated workload justifies specific and independent administrative and financial support for Research Ethics Committees. PMID:16229743

  4. Involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type relaxation in human penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Király, István; Pataricza, János; Bajory, Zoltán; Simonsen, Ulf; Varro, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pajor, Lászlo; Kun, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels (BKC a ), located on the vascular smooth muscle, play an important role in regulation of vascular tone. In penile corpus cavernosum tissue, opening of BKC a channels leads to relaxation of corporal smooth muscle, which is essential during erection; however, there is little information on the role of BKC a channels located in penile vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of BKC a channels in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of human intracavernous penile arteries. In human intracavernous arteries obtained in connection with transsexual operations, change in isometric force was recorded in microvascular myographs, and endothelium-dependent [nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type] and endothelium-independent (NO-donor) relaxations were measured in contracted arteries. In penile small arteries contracted with phenylephrine, acetylcholine evoked NO- and EDH-type relaxations, which were sensitive to iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of BKC a channels. Iberiotoxin also inhibited relaxations induced by a NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside. NS11021, a selective opener of BKC a channels, evoked pronounced relaxations that were inhibited in the presence of IbTX. NS13558, a BKC a -inactive analogue of NS11021, failed to relax human penile small arteries. Our results show that BKC a channels are involved in both NO- and EDH-type relaxation of intracavernous penile arteries obtained from healthy men. The effect of a selective opener of BKC a channels also suggests that direct activation of the channel may be an advantageous approach for treatment of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation often associated with erectile dysfunction.

  5. Paroxetine-induced apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells: Activation of p38 MAP kinase and caspase-3 pathways without involvement of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.-T.; He Shiping; Jan, C.-R. . E-mail: crjan@isca.vghks.gov.tw

    2007-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a group of antidepressants, are generally used for treatment of various mood and anxiety disorders. There has been much research showing the anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities of some antidepressants; but the detailed mechanisms were unclear. In cultured human osteosarcoma cells (MG63), paroxetine reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Paroxetine caused apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide-stained cells and increased caspase-3 activation. Although immunoblotting data revealed that paroxetine could activate the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), only SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) partially prevented cells from apoptosis. Paroxetine also induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases which involved the mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stored in the endoplasmic reticulum and Ca{sup 2+} influx from extracellular medium. However, pretreatment with BAPTA/AM, a Ca{sup 2+} chelator, to prevent paroxetine-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases did not protect cells from death. The results suggest that in MG63 cells, paroxetine caused Ca{sup 2+}-independent apoptosis via inducing p38 MAPK-associated caspase-3 activation.

  6. Hyperforin Inhibits Akt1 Kinase Activity and Promotes Caspase-Mediated Apoptosis Involving Bad and Noxa Activation in Human Myeloid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merhi, Faten; Tang, Ruoping; Piedfer, Marion; Mathieu, Julie; Bombarda, Isabelle; Zaher, Murhaf; Kolb, Jean-Pierre; Billard, Christian; Bauvois, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Background The natural phloroglucinol hyperforin HF displays anti-inflammatory and anti-tumoral properties of potential pharmacological interest. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells abnormally proliferate and escape apoptosis. Herein, the effects and mechanisms of purified HF on AML cell dysfunction were investigated in AML cell lines defining distinct AML subfamilies and primary AML cells cultured ex vivo. Methodology and Results HF inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner the growth of AML cell lines (U937, OCI-AML3, NB4, HL-60) by inducing apoptosis as evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 population, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA fragmentation. HF also induced apoptosis in primary AML blasts, whereas normal blood cells were not affected. The apoptotic process in U937 cells was accompanied by downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Noxa, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, activation of procaspases and cleavage of the caspase substrate PARP-1. The general caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk and the caspase-9- and -3-specific inhibitors, but not caspase-8 inhibitor, significantly attenuated apoptosis. HF-mediated apoptosis was associated with dephosphorylation of active Akt1 (at Ser473) and Akt1 substrate Bad (at Ser136) which activates Bad pro-apoptotic function. HF supppressed the kinase activity of Akt1, and combined treatment with the allosteric Akt1 inhibitor Akt-I-VIII significantly enhanced apoptosis of U937 cells. Significance Our data provide new evidence that HF's pro-apoptotic effect in AML cells involved inhibition of Akt1 signaling, mitochondria and Bcl-2 members dysfunctions, and activation of procaspases -9/-3. Combined interruption of mitochondrial and Akt1 pathways by HF may have implications for AML treatment. PMID:21998731

  7. p38MAPK activation is involved in androgen-independent proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by regulating IL-6 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shida, Yohei; Igawa, Tsukasa . E-mail: tigawa@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hakariya, Tomoaki; Sakai, Hideki; Kanetake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) are frequently observed in patients with advanced, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 regulation is still largely unknown. Since prostate cancer gradually progresses to an androgen-independent state despite the stress caused by various therapeutic agents, we hypothesized the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) involvement in androgen-independent growth or IL-6 secretion of prostate cancer cells. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells, we analyzed the role of SAPKs in IL-6 mediated cell growth and found that the p38MAPK and JNK are involved in androgen-independent cancer cell growth. Furthermore, IL-6 secretion by PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly suppressed by SAPKs inhibitor, especially by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK inhibitor, PD98059. These results raised the possibility that the IL-6 mediated androgen-independent proliferation of PC-3 and DU145 cells is regulated at least partly via SAPKs signaling pathway especially through p38MAPK activation.

  8. Induction apoptosis of luteolin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells involving mitochondria translocation of Bax/Bak and activation of JNK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.-J.; Wang, C.-J.; Kuo, H.-C.; Chou, F.-P.; Jean, L.-F.; Tseng, T.-H. . E-mail: tht@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-03-01

    Since hepatocellular carcinoma remains a major challenging clinical problem in many parts of the world including Eastern Asia and Southern Africa, it is imperative to develop more effective chemopreventive and chemotherapy agents. Herein, we present an investigation regarding the anticancer potential of luteolin, a natural flavonoid, and the mechanism of its action in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Using DNA fragmentation assay and nuclear staining assay, it showed that luteolin induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Luteolin induced the cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activated CPP32. We found that Bax and Bak translocated to mitochondria apparently, whereas Fas ligand (FasL) was unchanged after a treatment with luteolin for 3 h. In addition, it showed that c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal kinase (JNK) was activated after the treatment of luteolin for 3-12 h. Further investigation showed that a specific JNK inhibitor, SP600125, reduced the activation of CPP 32, the mitochondrial translocation of Bax, as well as the cytosolic release of cytochrome c that induced by luteolin. Finally, the apoptosis induced by luteolin was suppressed by a pretreatment with SP600125 via evaluating annexin V-FITC binding assay. These data suggest that luteolin induced apoptosis via mechanisms involving mitochondria translocation of Bax/Bak and activation of JNK.

  9. High D-glucose reduces SLC29A1 promoter activity and adenosine transport involving specific protein 1 in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Farías, Marcelo; González, Marcelo; Vecchiola, Andrea; Aguayo, Claudio; Krause, Bernardo; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2008-06-01

    High D-glucose reduces human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1)-mediated adenosine uptake involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinases 1 and 2/MAP kinases p42/44 (MEK/ERKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) activation in human umbilical vein endothelium (HUVEC). Since NO represses SLC29A1 gene (hENT1) promoter activity we studied whether D-glucose-reduced hENT1-adenosine transport results from lower SLC29A1 expression in HUVEC primary cultures. HUVEC incubation (24 h) with high D-glucose (25 mM) reduced hENT1-adenosine transport and pGL3-hENT1(-1114) construct SLC29A1 reporter activity compared with normal D-glucose (5 mM). High D-glucose also reduced pGL3-hENT1(-1114) reporter activity compared with cells transfected with pGL3-hENT1(-795) construct. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, NOS inhibitor), PD-98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), and/or calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) blocked D-glucose effects. Insulin (1 nM) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 100 nM, PKC activator), but not 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4alphaPDD, 100 nM, PMA less active analogue) reduced hENT1-adenosine transport. L-NAME and PD-98059 blocked insulin effects. L-NAME, PD-98059, and calphostin C increased hENT1 expression without altering protein or mRNA stability. High D-glucose increased Sp1 transcription factor protein abundance and binding to SLC29A1 promoter, phenomena blocked by L-NAME, PD-98059, and calphostin C. Sp1 overexpression reduced SLC29A1 promoter activity in normal D-glucose, an effect reversed by L-NAME and further reduced by S-nitroso-N-acetyl-L,D-penicillamine (SNAP, NO donor) in high D-glucose. Thus, reduced hENT1-mediated adenosine transport in high D-glucose may result from increased Sp1 binding to SLC29A1 promoter down-regulating hENT1 expression. This phenomenon depends on eNOS, MEK/ERKs, and PKC activity, suggesting potential roles for these molecules in hyperglycemia-associated endothelial

  10. MicroRNA-21 activation of ERK signaling via PTEN is involved in arsenite-induced autophagy in human hepatic L-02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinlu; Luo, Fei; Ling, Min; Lu, Lu; Shi, Le; Lu, Xiaolin; Xu, Hui; Chen, Chao; Yang, Qianlei; Xue, Junchao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Aihua; Liu, Qizhan

    2016-06-11

    Autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved cellular process, has diverse physiological and pathological roles in biological functions. Whether autophagy is induced by arsenite, a well-established human carcinogen, and the molecular mechanisms involved, remain to be established. Further, microRNAs (miRNAs) act as regulators in various cancers, but how miRNAs regulate autophagy remains largely unexplored. We have found that, in human hepatic epithelial (L-02) cells, arsenite increases levels of autophagy-related proteins in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and elevates the number of autophagic vacuoles (AVs). Arsenite also activates the ERK pathway in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In L-02 cells exposed to arsenite, microRNA-21 (miRNA-21) is over-expressed, and its target proteins, PTEN, PDCD4, and Spry1, are decreased. Moreover, inhibition of miR-21 increases levels of PTEN, and reduces levels of Beclin 1 and LC3 II/I, indicating that miR-21 is involved in arsenite-induced autophagy. In addition, ectopic expression of PTEN blocks the effect of miR-21 on the arsenite-induced autophagy and decreases p-ERK levels. Also, ERK promotes the autophagy induced by arsenite. In sum, upon exposure of cells to arsenite, over-expression of miR-21 activates ERK through PTEN, factors that participate in arsenite-induced autophagy. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for the development of autophagy that is associated with arsenic toxicity. Such information contributes to an understanding of the liver toxicity caused by arsenite.

  11. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein

    PubMed Central

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G.

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5′-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the −105/−100 and −148/−143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the −160/−100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  12. Isolation and structural characterization of the human 4F2 heavy-chain gene, an inducible gene involved in T-lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesdiener, K M; Karpinski, B A; Lindsten, T; Strominger, J L; Jones, N H; Thompson, C B; Leiden, J M

    1988-01-01

    The human 4F2 cell surface antigen is a 120-kilodalton (kDa) disulfide-linked heterodimer which is composed of an 80- to 90-kDa glycosylated heavy chain (4F2HC) and a 35- to 40-kDa nonglycosylated light chain (4F2LC). 4F2 belongs to a family of inducible cell surface molecules which are involved in T-lymphocyte activation and growth. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) that controls 4F2HC gene expression in both resting and activated T cells, a 4F2HC human genomic clone was isolated and structurally characterized. The 4F2HC gene spans 8 kilobases of chromosome 11 and is composed of nine exons. The 5' upstream region of the gene displays several properties which are characteristic of housekeeping genes. It is G+C rich and hypomethylated in peripheral blood lymphocyte DNA and contains multiple binding sites for the Sp1 transcription factor while lacking TATA or CCAAT sequences. This region of the gene also displays sequence homologies with several other inducible T-cell genes, including the interleukin-2, interleukin-2 receptor alpha chain, dihydrofolate reductase, thymidine kinase, and transferrin receptor genes. A 255-base-pair fragment of the 4F2HC gene which contains 154 base pairs of the 5' flanking sequence was able to efficiently promote expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in human Jurkat T cells, indicating that it contains promoter or enhancer (or both) sequences. Analyses of chromatin structure in resting and lectin-activated T cells revealed the presence of stable DNase I-hypersensitive sites within both the 5' flanking and intron 1 regions of the 4F2HC gene. Although the 4F2HC gene displayed many of the structural features characteristic of a constitutively expressed gene, lectin-mediated activation of resting peripheral blood T lymphocytes resulted in a dramatic increase in steady-state levels of 4F2HC mRNA. Images PMID:3265470

  13. The Society's Involvement in the Defense of Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The history of the Society's involvement in the defense of human rights, a history of which the Society can be proud, will be summarized; the summary will include illustrative specific APS human rights defense actions in illustrative specific cases. As will be emphasized, the aforesaid involvement has been primarily through the activities of the APS Committee on International Freedom of Scientists (CIFS). It is noteworthy-and one of the reasons the Society can be proud-that CIFS is charged with ``monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists,'' not solely for physicists, and that CIFS indeed has sought to protect the human rights of nonphysicists.

  14. CD4 down-modulation during infection of human T cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves independent activities of vpu, env, and nef.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B K; Gandhi, R T; Baltimore, D

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes vpu, env, and nef have all been implicated in modulating the levels of cell surface CD4 on infected cells. To quantitatively assess the relative contribution of each gene product to the regulation of CD4 during HIV infection of Jurkat T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we have developed an infectious HIV reporter system which expresses different combinations of these genes. To distinguish infected cells in the early or late stages of infection from uninfected cells, these viruses were designed to express human placental alkaline phosphatase with the kinetics of either early or late viral genes. Flow cytometry to detect placental alkaline phosphatase and CD4 in infected cells showed that vpu, env, and nef are independently capable of down-modulation of CD4. As predicted by their respective expression patterns, nef down-modulated CD4 rapidly during the early phase of virus infection whereas vpu and env functioned late in the infection. In both Jurkat cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a combination of the three genes was more efficient than any one or two genes, demonstrating that all three genes are required to achieve maximal CD4 down-modulation. In primary cells, down-modulation of CD4 was less efficient than in Jurkat cells and there was a stronger dependence on nef function for reducing cell surface CD4. HIV therefore has three genes that are able to independently down-modulate CD4; together, they can eliminate the bulk of cell surface CD4. PMID:8709227

  15. Involvement of β3-adrenoceptors in the inhibitory control of cholinergic activity in human bladder: Direct evidence by [(3)H]-acetylcholine release experiments in the isolated detrusor.

    PubMed

    D' Agostino, Gianluigi; Maria Condino, Anna; Calvi, Paolo

    2015-07-05

    Bladder overactivity (OAB) is a multifactorial bladder disorder that requires therapeutics superior to the current pharmacological treatment with muscarinic antagonists. β3-adrenoceptor (β3-ADR) agonists represent a novel promising approach that differently addresses the parasympathetic pathway, but the clinical efficacy of these drugs has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, we aimed to study the pharmacological mechanisms activated by β3-ADR agonists at muscular and neural sites in the isolated human bladder. Detrusor smooth muscle strips obtained from male patients undergoing total cystectomy were labelled with tritiated choline and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS). EFS produced smooth muscle contraction and simultaneous acetylcholine ([(3)H]-ACh) release, which mostly reflects the neural origin of acetylcholine. Isoprenaline (INA), BRL37344 and mirabegron inhibited the EFS-evoked contraction and [(3)H]-ACh release in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding concentration-response curves (CRCs) that were shifted to the right by the selective β3-ADR antagonists L-748,337 and SR59230A. Based on the agonist potency estimates (pEC50) and apparent affinities (pKb) of antagonists evaluated from the CRCs of agonists, our data confirm the occurrence of β3-ADRs at muscle sites. Moreover, our data are consistent with the presence of inhibitory β3-ADRs that are functionally expressed at the neural site. Taken together, these findings elucidate the mechanisms activated by β3-ADR agonists because neural β3-ADRs participate in the inhibition of detrusor motor drive by reducing the amount of acetylcholine involved in the cholinergic pathway.

  16. Human labour is associated with nuclear factor-kappaB activity which mediates cyclo-oxygenase-2 expression and is involved with the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

    PubMed

    Allport, V C; Pieber, D; Slater, D M; Newton, R; White, J O; Bennett, P R

    2001-06-01

    Human labour is associated with the up-regulation of prostaglandins within the uterus, synthesized via the type-2 cyclo-oxygenase enzyme (COX-2). These lead to remodelling of the fetal membranes and cervix and to stimulation of myometrial contractions. In the human, the principal source of prostaglandins is the amnion. Progesterone acts to promote myometrial quiescence, and in many species the onset of labour is preceded by withdrawal of progesterone. Humans show no systemic progesterone withdrawal, although biochemical changes within the uterus are similar to those in other species. A mutual negative interaction between the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and the progesterone receptor (PR) has been reported. Using transient transfections and assays for transcriptional activation and promoter binding, we have shown that there is constitutive activity of NF-kappaB in amnion cells at the time of labour, and that COX-2 expression depends upon NF-kappaB. In cells obtained before labour, in which NF-kappaB activity is low, increasing the concentration of PR represses NF-kappaB dependent transcription, while stimulation with IL-1beta both increases NF-kappaB activity and represses PR activity. Our data suggest that human labour is associated with constitutive NF-kappaB activity within the amnion, which functions to increase the expression of COX-2 and appears to contribute to the 'functional progesterone withdrawal'.

  17. In vitro identification of human cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the metabolism of Geissoschizine methyl ether, an active component of the traditional Japanese medicine Yokukansan.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Kushida, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Takeshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    1. Yokukansan (YKS) is a traditional Japanese medicine also called kampo, which has been used to treat neurosis, insomnia, and night crying and peevishness in children. Geissoschizine methyl ether (GM), a major indole alkaloid found in Uncaria hook, has been identified as a major active component of YKS with psychotropic effects. Recently, GM was reported to have a partial agonistic effect on serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. However, there is little published information on GM metabolism in humans, although several studies reported the blood kinetics of GM in rats and humans. In this study, we investigated the GM metabolic pathways and metabolizing enzymes in humans. 2. Using recombinant human cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms and polyclonal antibodies to CYP isoforms, we found that GM was metabolized into hydroxylated, dehydrogenated, hydroxylated+dehydrogenated, demethylated and water adduct forms by some CYP isoforms. 3. The relative activity factors in human liver microsomes were calculated to determine the relative contributions of individual CYP isoforms to GM metabolism in human liver microsomes (HLMs). We identified CYP3A4 as the CYP isoform primarily responsible for GM metabolism in human liver microsomes. 4. These findings provide an important basis for understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GM and YKS.

  18. Autophagy-related proteins are functionally active in human spermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of cell survival and motility

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, I. M.; Espino, J.; Bejarano, I.; Gallardo-Soler, A.; Campo, M. L.; Salido, G. M.; Pariente, J. A.; Peña, F. J.; Tapia, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is an evolutionarily highly conserved cellular process that participates in the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis through the degradation of most long-lived proteins and entire organelles. Autophagy participates in some reproductive events; however, there are not reports regarding the role of autophagy in the regulation of sperm physiology. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether autophagy-related proteins are present and functionally active in human spermatozoa. Proteins related to autophagy/mitophagy process (LC3, Atg5, Atg16, Beclin 1, p62, m-TOR, AMPKα 1/2, and PINK1) were present in human spermatozoa. LC3 colocalized with p62 in the middle piece of the spermatozoa. Autophagy activation induced a significant increase in motility and a decrease in PINK1, TOM20 expression and caspase 3/7 activation. In contrast, autophagy inhibition resulted in decreased motility, viability, ATP and intracellular calcium concentration whereas PINK1, TOM20 expression, AMPK phosphorylation and caspase 3/7 activation were significantly increased. In conclusion our results show that autophagy related proteins and upstream regulators are present and functional in human spermatozoa. Modification of mitochondrial proteins expression after autophagy activation/inhibition may be indicating that a specialized form of autophagy named mitophagy may be regulating sperm function such as motility and viability and may be cooperating with apoptosis. PMID:27633131

  19. Active compound of Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. down-regulates the expression of genes involved in joint erosion in a human synovial fibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongsa, Rujirek; Ongchai, Siriwan; Boonsing, Phorani; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Panthong, Ampai; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovium. It is involved in up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), resulting in joint inflammation and erosion. Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. has long been used to reduce joint pain and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory activities of an active compound of Z. cassumunar, (E)-4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)but-3-en-1-ol (compound D), against cytokine-induced up-regulation of catabolic genes involved in cartilage degradation in RA. Synovial fibroblast cell line, SW982, was cultured in media containing interleukin-1β (IL-1β), in the presence or absence of compound D at the concentration range of 1 to 100 µM. After 24 hours, the cells were analyzed for the expressions of MMPs, IL-1β and interleukin-1β-converting enzyme (ICE) by RT-PCR. MMPs activities in the culture media were analyzed by zymographic techniques. Dexamethasone was used as the positive control. It was found that compound D at the concentration of 10 - 100 µM significantly decreased the mRNA expressions of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -13 which was induced by IL-1β (P<0.05) concomitantly with a decrease in activities of these MMPs in the culture media. An increase in the mRNA expression of IL-1β and ICE was also suppressed by compound D. The results suggest that the potent activities of this compound may be involved in the reduction of IL-1β protein synthesis in both pro-form and active form which played an important role in up-regulation of MMPs. This study first revealed the chondroprotective activity of Z. cassumunar in the transcriptional level by suppressing cytokine-induced catabolic genes which caused cartilage erosion in RA.

  20. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  1. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  2. Suppression of human B cell activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin involves altered regulation of B cell lymphoma-6.

    PubMed

    Phadnis-Moghe, Ashwini S; Crawford, Robert B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2015-03-01

    The environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) produces marked suppression of the primary humoral immune response in virtually every animal species evaluated thus far. In addition, epidemiological studies performed in areas of dioxin contamination have identified an association between TCDD exposure and an increased incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Recent studies using an in vitro CD40 ligand model of human B cell differentiation have shown that TCDD impairs both B cell activation and differentiation. The present study extends these findings by identifying B cell lymphoma-6 [BCL-6] as a putative cellular target for deregulation by TCDD, which may contribute to suppression of B cell function as well as NHL. BCL-6 is a multifunctional transcriptional repressor frequently mutated in NHLs and known to regulate critical events of B cell activation and differentiation. In the presence of TCDD, BCL-6 protein levels were elevated and concurrently the same population of cells with high BCL-6 levels showed decreased CD80 and CD69 expression indicative of impaired cellular activation. The elevated BCL-6 levels resulted in a concomitant increase in BCL-6 DNA binding activity at its cognate binding site within an enhancer region for CD80. Furthermore, a small molecule inhibitor of BCL-6 activity reversed TCDD-mediated suppression of CD80 expression in human B cells. In the presence of a low-affinity ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), suppression of B cell activation and altered BCL-6 regulation were not observed. These results provide new mechanistic insights into the role of BCL-6 in the suppression of human B cell activation by TCDD.

  3. TNF-α has tropic rather than apoptotic activity in human hematopoietic progenitors: involvement of TNF receptor-1 and caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Keren; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Kaplan, Offer; Askenasy, Nadir

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been suggested to exert detrimental effects on hematopoietic progenitor function that might limit the success of transplants. In this study, we assessed the influences of TNF-α and its two cognate receptors on the function of fresh umbilical cord blood (UCB) and cryopreserved mobilized peripheral blood (mPB). CD34(+) progenitors from both sources are less susceptible to spontaneous apoptosis than lineage-committed cells and are not induced into apoptosis by TNF-α. Consequently, the activity of UCB-derived severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) reconstituting cells and long-term culture-initiating cells is unaffected by this cytokine. On the contrary, transient exposure of cells from both sources to TNF-α stimulates the activity of myeloid progenitors, which persists in vivo in UCB cell transplants. Progenitor stimulation is selectively mediated by TNF-R1 and involves activation of caspase-8, without redundant activity of TNF-R2. Despite significant differences between fresh UCB cells and cryopreserved mPB cells in susceptibility to apoptosis and time to activation, TNF-α is primarily involved in tropic signaling in hematopoietic progenitors from both sources. Cytokine-mediated tropism cautions against TNF-α neutralization under conditions of stress hematopoiesis and may be particularly beneficial in overcoming the limitations of UCB cell transplants.

  4. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  5. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  6. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  7. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  8. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  9. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  10. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  11. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Research Subjects § 46.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human... for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  12. 10 CFR 745.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 745.118 Section 745.118 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  13. Modulation of rat and human cytochromes P450 involved in PhIP and 4-ABP activation by an aqueous extract of Phyllanthus orbicularis.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Mirle; Cristófol, Carles; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel; Fuentes, Jorge Luís; Barbé, Jordi; Llagostera, Montserrat

    2004-02-01

    Phyllanthus orbicularis HBK (Euphorbiaceae) is a medicinal plant, endemic to Cuba, whose aqueous extract has proven antimutagenic effects against hydrogen peroxide and some promutagenic aromatic amines (AAs), in addition to its antiviral properties. In this paper, antimutagenesis of this extract against two carcinogenic AAs, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) has been studied. Liver microsomal fractions from both induced rats and humans were used to metabolise both procarcinogenic compounds in the Salmonella assay. The plant extract was effective in reducing the mutagenesis of these AAs, activated by both kinds of fractions. The optimal antimutagenic effect was obtained when both AAs were metabolised by human enzymes, with an almost total reduction of 4-ABP mutagenesis and a decrease of about 75% of PhIP mutagenicity. Mutagenicity of both AAs, activated by induced rat fraction, was only decreased by about 50%. Inhibition by plant extract of alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation activities, dependent on CYP1A, of both fractions was determined. In accordance with the results obtained, the inhibition or modulation of CYP1A subfamily activities, and possibly of CYP1A2, is thought to be the main mechanism of antimutagenesis of the aqueous extract of Phyllanthus orbicularis against 4-ABP and PhIP.

  14. Thimerosal-induced apoptosis in human SCM1 gastric cancer cells: activation of p38 MAP kinase and caspase-3 pathways without involvement of [Ca2+]i elevation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiuh-Inn; Huang, Chorng-Chih; Huang, Chun-Jen; Wang, Being-Whey; Chang, Po-Min; Fang, Yi-Chien; Chen, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Jue-Long; Lu, Yih-Chau; Chu, Sau-Tung; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2007-11-01

    Thimerosal is a mercury-containing preservative in some vaccines. The effect of thimerosal on human gastric cancer cells is unknown. This study shows that in cultured human gastric cancer cells (SCM1), thimerosal reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Thimerosal caused apoptosis as assessed by propidium iodide-stained cells and caspase-3 activation. Although immunoblotting data revealed that thimerosal could activate the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), only SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) partially prevented cells from apoptosis. Thimerosal also induced [Ca2+](i) increases via Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space. However, pretreatment with (bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate)/AM, a Ca2+ chelator, to prevent thimerosal-induced [Ca2+](i) increases did not protect cells from death. The results suggest that in SCM1 cells, thimerosal caused Ca2+-independent apoptosis via phosphorylating p38 MAPK resulting in caspase-3 activation.

  15. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  16. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  17. Whole transcriptome profiling of the human hippocampus suggests an involvement of the KIBRA rs17070145 polymorphism in differential activation of the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Piras, I S; Krate, J; Schrauwen, I; Corneveaux, J J; Serrano, G E; Sue, L; Beach, T G; Huentelman, M J

    2017-04-05

    The rs17070145-T variant of the WWC1 gene, coding for the KIBRA protein, has been associated with both increased episodic memory performance and lowered risk for late onset Alzheimer's disease, although the mechanism behind this protective effect has not been completely elucidated. To achieve a better understanding of the pathways modulated by rs17070145 and its associated functional variant(s), we used laser capture microdissection (LCM) and RNA-sequencing to investigate the effect of rs17070145 genotypes on whole transcriptome expression in the human hippocampus (HP) of 22 neuropathologically normal individuals, with a specific focus on the dentate gyrus (DG) and at the pyramidal cells (PC) of CA1 and CA3 sub-regions. Differential expression analysis of RNA-seq data within the HP based on the rs17070145 genotype revealed an overexpression of genes involved in the MAPK signaling pathway, potentially driven by the T/T genotype. The most important contribution comes from genes dysregulated within the DG region. Other genes significantly dysregulated, and not involved in the MAPK1 pathway (Adj P < 0.01 and Fold Change > |1.00|) were: RSPO4 (HP); ARC, DUSP5, DNAJB5, EGR4, PPP1R15A, WBP11P1, EGR1, GADD45B (DG); CH25H, HSPA1A, HSPA1B, TNFSF9 and NPAS4 (PC). Several evidences suggested that the MAPK signaling pathway is linked with memory and learning processes. In non-neuronal cells, the KIBRA protein is phosphorylated by ERK1/2 (involved in the MAPK signaling) in cells as well as in vitro. Several of the other dysregulated genes are involved in memory and learning processes, as well as in Alzheimer's Disease. In conclusion, our results suggest that the effect of the WWC1 rs17070145 polymorphism on memory performance and Alzheimer's disease might be due to a differential regulation of the MAPK signaling, a key pathway involved in memory and learning processes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Promoting Active Involvement in Today's Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In today's diverse classrooms and age of accountability, teachers need to use efficient, research-based instructional approaches that engage all students, promote interest and variety in learning and teaching, and provide immediate and continuous informal assessment data. This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques,…

  19. NF-κB Is Involved in Regulation of CD40 Ligand Expression on Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Activated Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia; Ayala, Hilda; Vázquez, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Interaction between CD40L (CD154) on activated T cells and its receptor CD40 on antigen-presenting cells has been reported to be important in the resolution of infection by mycobacteria. However, the mechanism(s) by which Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) up-regulates membrane expression of CD40L molecules is poorly understood. This study was done to investigate the role of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in the regulation of CD40L expression in human CD4+ T cells stimulated with BCG. Specific pharmacologic inhibition of the NF-κB pathway revealed that this signaling cascade was required in the regulation of CD40L expression on the surface of BCG-activated CD4+ T cells. These results were further supported by the fact that treatment of BCG-activated CD4+ T cells with these pharmacological inhibitors significantly down-regulated CD40L mRNA. In this study, inhibitor κBα (IκBα) and IκBβ protein production was not affected by the chemical protease inhibitors and, more importantly, BCG led to the rapid but transient induction of NF-κB activity. Our results also indicated that CD40L expression on BCG-activated CD4+ T cells resulted from transcriptional up-regulation of the CD40L gene by a mechanism which is independent of de novo protein synthesis. Interestingly, BCG-induced activation of NF-κB and the increased CD40L cell surface expression were blocked by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors 1-[5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-2-methylpiperazine and salicylate, both of which block phosphorylation of IκB. Moreover, rottlerin a Ca2+-independent PKC isoform inhibitor, significantly down-regulated CD40L mRNA in BCG-activated CD4+ T cells. These data strongly suggest that CD40L expression by BCG-activated CD4+ T cells is regulated via the PKC pathway and by NF-κB DNA binding activity. PMID:12738634

  20. ZIKA virus elicits P53 activation and genotoxic stress in human neural progenitors similar to mutations involved in severe forms of genetic microcephaly and p53

    PubMed Central

    Ghouzzi, Vincent El; Bianchi, Federico T; Molineris, Ivan; Mounce, Bryan C; Berto, Gaia E; Rak, Malgorzata; Lebon, Sophie; Aubry, Laetitia; Tocco, Chiara; Gai, Marta; Chiotto, Alessandra MA; Sgrò, Francesco; Pallavicini, Gianmarco; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Passemard, Sandrine; Vignuzzi, Marco; Gressens, Pierre; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence from the current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) and recent studies in animal models indicate a strong causal link between ZIKV and microcephaly. ZIKV infection induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in proliferating neural progenitors. However, the mechanisms leading to these phenotypes are still largely obscure. In this report, we explored the possible similarities between transcriptional responses induced by ZIKV in human neural progenitors and those elicited by three different genetic mutations leading to severe forms of microcephaly in mice. We found that the strongest similarity between all these conditions is the activation of common P53 downstream genes. In agreement with these observations, we report that ZIKV infection increases total P53 levels and nuclear accumulation, as well as P53 Ser15 phosphorylation, correlated with genotoxic stress and apoptosis induction. Interestingly, increased P53 activation and apoptosis are induced not only in cells expressing high levels of viral antigens but also in cells showing low or undetectable levels of the same proteins. These results indicate that P53 activation is an early and specific event in ZIKV-infected cells, which could result from cell-autonomous and/or non-cell-autonomous mechanisms. Moreover, we highlight a small group of P53 effector proteins that could act as critical mediators, not only in ZIKV-induced microcephaly but also in many genetic microcephaly syndromes. PMID:27787521

  1. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: involvement of interleukin-2 system.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell-cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth.

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist attenuates nicotine suppression effect on human mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteogenesis and involves increased expression of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Liu, Jiayong; Bhat, Samerna; Benedict, Gregory; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Peterson, Stephen J; Ebraheim, Nabil A; Heck, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Smoking has long been associated with osteoporosis, decreased bone mineral density, increased risk of bone fracture, and increased health costs. Nicotine, the main component of cigarette smoke, has major negative effects on bone metabolism and skeletal remodeling in vivo. Although osteoblasts and osteoblast-like cells have been used extensively to study the impact of nicotine, few studies have been performed on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). In this context, we examined the impact of nicotine on (a) hMSCs proliferation, (b) osteoblastic differentiation, (c) alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and (d) expression of canonical genes during differentiation of hMSCs. MSCs isolated from human bone marrow were treated with different concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10 μM) of nicotine for 7 days. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, decreased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression (p < 0.05) and attenuated osteogenesis (p < 0.05) in hMSCs (45 % reduction at day 14). In addition, nicotine caused a dose-dependent decrease in alizarin red staining for calcium and staining for ALP. Induction of HO-1 by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta agonist (GW0742) prevented the effect of nicotine. Nicotine caused a dose-dependent reduction in the expression of BMP-2, a well-known marker for bone formation; however, this was prevented by GW0742 treatment. Therefore, induction of HO-1 prevents the deleterious effects of nicotine on osteogenesis in hMSC. This offers insight into both how nicotine affects bone remodeling and a therapeutic approach to prevent fracture and osteoporosis in smokers.

  3. Mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase are involved in Prevotella intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su-Min; Zhang, Ming; He, Jian-Jun; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2009-08-28

    Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal connective tissues and alveolar bone. Proinflammatory mediators induced by periodontal pathogens play vital roles in the initiation and progression of the disease. In this study, we examined whether Prevotella intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs). The mRNA expression and protein production were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. P. intermedia treatment dose- and time-dependently increased IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF, but not IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression and protein secretion. Preincubation of hPDLs with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors PD98059, SP600125, SB203580 and LY294002 resulted in significant reduction in P. intermedia-induced IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF expression. Blocking the synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by indomethacin also abolished the stimulatory effects of P. intermedia on cytokines expression. Our results indicate that P. intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines through MAPKs and PI3K signaling pathways, and PGE(2) is involved in the P. intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines upregulation.

  4. Changes in the Expression of Transcription Factors Involved in Modulating the Expression of EPO-R in Activated Human CD4-Positive Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Frackowiak, Joanna E; Mikosik, Anna; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described the presence of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) on CD4(+) lymphocytes and demonstrated that its expression increases during their activation, reaching a level reported to be typical for erythroid progenitors. This observation suggests that EPO-R expression is modulated during lymphocyte activation, which may be important for the cells' function. Here we investigated whether the expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors is correlated with the expression of EPO-R in human CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody. The expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors in CD4(+) cells was estimated before and after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody by Western Blot and flow cytometry. The expression of EPO-R was measured using real-time PCR and flow cytometry. There was no change in the expression of GATA1 and GATA3 in CD4(+) lymphocytes after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. However, stimulation resulted in the significantly increased expression of the Sp1 factor. CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody exhibited an increase in both the expression level of EPOR gene and the number of EPO-R molecules on the cells' surface, the latter being significantly correlated with the increased expression of Sp1. Sp1 is noted to be the single transcription factor among the ones studied whose level changes as a result of CD4(+) lymphocyte stimulation. It seems that Sp1 may significantly affect the number of EPO-R molecules present on the surface of activated CD4(+) lymphocytes.

  5. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  6. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  7. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts... institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to...

  8. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  9. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts... institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to...

  10. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts... institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to...

  11. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts... institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to...

  12. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  13. 7 CFR 1c.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involvement of human subjects. 1c.118 Section 1c.118 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of... responsibility; research training grants in which the activities involving subjects remain to be selected;...

  14. Antitumor properties of salinomycin on cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: involvement of p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Wang, Xueya; Cai, Fengfeng; Chen, Weijie; Loesch, Uli; Zhong, Xiao Yan

    2013-04-01

    In order to search for alternative agents to overcome chemoresistance during the treatment of ovarian cancer, this study aimed to examine the anticancer effects and action mechanism of salinomycin, a selective inhibitor of cancer stem cells, on cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. The concentration- (0.01-200 µM) and time‑dependent (24-72 h) growth inhibitory effects of salinomycin were observed in the ovarian cancer cell lines OV2008, C13, A2780, A2780-cp, SKOV3 and OVCAR3, by measuring cell viability using the resazurin reduction assay. The IC50 (24 h) range of salinomycin on the six cell lines was found to be 1.7-7.4 µM. After cisplatin-resistant C13 cells were treated with salinomycin, the percentage of apoptotic cells determined by flow cytometry was significantly increased, in a concentration- and time‑dependent manner. However, no cell cycle arrest was detected in the G1/G0, S and G2/M phases in the salinomycin‑treated and control cells. The Bio-Plex phosphoprotein 5-plex assay (Akt, IκB-α, ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK) demonstrated a marked time- and concentration‑dependent increase in the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, subsequent to salinomycin treatment. Moreover, salinomycin significantly suppressed tumor growth in a tumor xenograft model. These findings suggested that salinomycin efficiently inhibits the cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line growth through the induction of apoptosis, potentially associated with the p38 MAPK activation.

  15. Oncogenic transformation of human lung bronchial epithelial cells induced by arsenic involves ROS-dependent activation of STAT3-miR-21-PDCD4 mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen. The present study explored the role of the onco-miR, miR-21 and its target protein, programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) in arsenic induced malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Our results showed that treatment of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells with arsenic induces ROS through p47phox, one of the NOX subunits that is the key source of arsenic-induced ROS. Arsenic exposure induced an upregulation of miR-21 expression associated with inhibition of PDCD4, and caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis of BEAS-2B cells. Indispensably, STAT3 transcriptional activation by IL-6 is crucial for the arsenic induced miR-21 increase. Upregulated miR-21 levels and suppressed PDCD4 expression was also observed in xenograft tumors generated with chronic arsenic exposed BEAS-2B cells. Stable shut down of miR-21, p47phox or STAT3 and overexpression of PDCD4 or catalase in BEAS-2B cells markedly inhibited the arsenic induced malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Similarly, silencing of miR-21 or STAT3 and forced expression of PDCD4 in arsenic transformed cells (AsT) also inhibited cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, arsenic suppressed the downstream protein E-cadherin expression and induced β-catenin/TCF-dependent transcription of uPAR and c-Myc. These results indicate that the ROS-STAT3-miR-21-PDCD4 signaling axis plays an important role in arsenic -induced carcinogenesis. PMID:27876813

  16. Activation of IL-8 via PI3K/Akt-dependent pathway is involved in leptin-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Tang, Cuiping; Cao, Hong; Li, Kuangfa; Pang, Xueli; Zhong, Liang; Dang, Weiqi; Tang, Hao; Huang, Yunxiu; Wei, Lan; Su, Min; Chen, Tingmei

    2015-01-01

    Background Information: Previous studies have revealed that leptin may be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial initiator of cancer progression to facilitate metastatic cascade, increase tumor recurrence, and ultimately cause poor prognosis. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The aim of our present study was to investigate the effect of leptin on EMT of breast cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Results: Our data demonstrated that leptin significantly increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, Akt, and ERK1/2, elevated the expression of IL-8, and induced breast cancer cells to undergo EMT. The effect of leptin on IL-8 could visibly abolished by the inhibitor of PI3K LY294002. In addition, leptin-induced EMT of breast cancer cells was blocked by anti-IL-8 antibodies. Examination of the expression of ObR, leptin, IL-8 and EMT-related biomarkers in patient specimens demonstrated that malignant breast carcinoma with lymph node metastases (LNM), which represents poor prognosis, expressed higher levels of ObR, leptin, IL-8 than other types of breast cancer, and displayed more obvious EMT transversion. In vivo xenograft experiment revealed that leptin signally promoted tumor growth and metastasis and increased the expressions of IL-8 and EMT-related biomarkers. Conclusions: Our results support that leptin-induced EMT in breast cancer cells requires IL-8 activation via the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. PMID:26121010

  17. Regulating hematology/oncology research involving human participants.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2002-12-01

    The conduct of hematology/oncology research, particularly clinical trials involving human participants, is an extensively regulated enterprise. Professionals in the specialty of hematology/oncology have important stakes in the success of biomedical research endeavors. Knowledge about and compliance strategies regarding the pertinent regulatory parameters are essential for avoiding negative legal repercussions for involved professionals. At the same time, there is a need to be aware of and actively resist the danger that strong [legal] protectionism might inadvertently result in undermining physician investigators' sense of personal moral responsibility in the conduct of human experiments. For all the limitations of that virtue in the protection of human subjects, it is surely not one that we would want medical scientists to be without [47]. Members of the potential participant pool, financial sponsors, and the general public must be convinced that everyone involved in the research enterprise is committed to operating within acceptable legal and ethical boundaries if the atmosphere of confidence and trust that is indispensable to the continued process and progress of investigation aimed at extending and improving quality of life for all of us in the future is to continue and flourish [48].

  18. Cow's milk increases the activities of human nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and delta and retinoid X receptor alpha involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, obesity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Suhara, W; Koide, H; Okuzawa, T; Hayashi, D; Hashimoto, T; Kojo, H

    2009-09-01

    The nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) have been shown to play crucial roles in regulating energy homeostasis including lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, inflammatory responses, and cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Because PPAR agonists have the potential to prevent or ameliorate diseases such as hyperlipidemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis, and obesity, we have explored new natural agonists for PPAR. For this purpose, cow's milk was tested for agonistic activity toward human PPAR subtypes using a reporter gene assay. Milk increased human PPARalpha activity in a dose-dependent manner with a 3.2-fold increase at 0.5% (vol/vol). It also enhanced human PPARdelta activity in a dose-dependent manner with an 11.5-fold increase at 0.5%. However, it only slightly affected human PPARgamma activity. Ice cream, butter, and yogurt also increased the activities of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas vegetable cream affected activity of PPARdelta but not PPARalpha. Skim milk enhanced the activity of PPAR to a lesser degree than regular milk. Milk and fresh cream increased the activity of human retinoid X receptor (RXR)alpha as well as PPARalpha and PPARdelta, whereas neither affected vitamin D3 receptor, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or thyroid receptors alpha and beta. Both milk and fresh cream were shown by quantitative real-time PCR to increase the quantity of mRNA for uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an energy expenditure gene, in a dose-dependent manner. The increase in UCP2 mRNA was found to be reduced by treatment with PPARdelta-short interfering (si)RNA. This study unambiguously clarified at the cellular level that cow's milk increased the activities of human PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha. The possible role in enhancing the activities of PPARalpha, PPARdelta, and RXRalpha, and the health benefits of cow's milk were discussed.

  19. ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, H; West, M D; Allsopp, R C; Davison, T S; Wu, Y S; Arrowsmith, C H; Poirier, G G; Benchimol, S

    1997-01-01

    Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells. We show that the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of p53 protein increases with cell age in the absence of any marked increase in the level of p53 protein, and that p21(WAF1) promoter activity in senescent cells is dependent on both p53 and the transcriptional co-activator p300. Moreover, we detected increased specific activity of p53 protein in AT fibroblasts, which exhibit accelerated telomere loss and undergo premature senescence, compared with normal fibroblasts. We investigated the possibility that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is involved in the post-translational activation of p53 protein in aging cells. We show that p53 protein can associate with PARP and inhibition of PARP activity leads to abrogation of p21 and mdm2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, inhibition of PARP activity leads to extension of cellular lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxia, an activator of PARP, is associated with accelerated telomere loss, activation of p53 and premature senescence. We propose that p53 is post-translationally activated not only in response to DNA damage but also in response to the critical shortening of telomeres that occurs during cellular aging. PMID:9312059

  20. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  1. S-benzyl-cysteine-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent caspase cascade through the p53 pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua-Jun; Meng, Lin-Yi; Shen, Yang; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Liu, Hong-Rui

    2013-01-01

    S-benzyl-cysteine (SBC) is a structural analog of S-allylcysteine (SAC), which is one of the major water- soluble compounds in aged garlic extract. In this study, anticancer activities and the underlying mechanisms of SBC action were investigated and compared these with those of SAC using human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. SBC significantly suppressed the survival rate of SGC-7901 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and the inhibitory activities of SBC were stronger than those of SAC. Flow cytometry revealed that SBC induced G2-phase arrest and apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. Typical apoptotic morphological changes were observed by Hoechst 33258 dye assay. SBC-treatment dramatically induced the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), and enhanced the enzymatic activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3 whilst hardly affecting caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, Western blotting indicated that SBC-induced apoptosis was accompanied by up-regulation of the expression of p53, Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2. Taken together, this study suggested that SBC exerts cytotoxic activity involving activation of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis through p53 and Bax/Bcl-2 pathways in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

  2. Impaired NFAT and NFκB activation are involved in suppression of CD40 ligand expression by Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in human CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-11-15

    We have previously reported that Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), the main psychoactive cannabinoid in marijuana, suppresses CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression by activated mouse CD4{sup +} T cells. CD40L is involved in pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Δ{sup 9}-THC-mediated suppression of CD40L expression using peripheral blood human T cells. Pretreatment with Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in human CD4{sup +} T cells activated by anti-CD3/CD28 at both the protein and mRNA level, as determined by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed the DNA-binding activity of both NFAT and NFκB to their respective response elements within the CD40L promoter. An assessment of the effect of Δ{sup 9}-THC on proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling induced by anti-CD3/CD28 showed significant impairment in the rise of intracellular calcium, but no significant effect on the phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β. Collectively, these findings identify perturbation of the calcium-NFAT and NFκB signaling cascade as a key mechanistic event by which Δ{sup 9}-THC suppresses human T cell function. - Highlights: • Δ{sup 9}-THC attenuated CD40L expression in activated human CD4+ T cells. • Δ{sup 9}-THC suppressed DNA-binding activity of NFAT and NFκB. • Δ{sup 9}-THC impaired elevation of intracellular Ca2+. • Δ{sup 9}-THC did not affect phosphorylation of ZAP70, PLCγ1/2, Akt, and GSK3β.

  3. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  4. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  5. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  6. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  7. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  8. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  9. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  10. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  11. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  12. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  13. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  14. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  15. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  16. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  17. 22 CFR 225.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 225.118 Section 225.118 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR... plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  18. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  19. 28 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  20. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  1. 15 CFR 27.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 27.118 Section 27.118 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  2. Retinoic acid-induced IgG production in TLR-activated human primary B cells involves ULK1-mediated autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Agnete Bratsberg; Torgersen, Maria Lyngaas; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Abrahamsen, Greger; Spurkland, Anne; Moskaug, Jan Øivind; Simonsen, Anne; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have established a vital role of autophagy in retinoic acid (RA)-induced differentiation of toll-like receptor (TLR)-stimulated human B cells into Ig-secreting cells. Thus, RA enhanced autophagy in TLR9- and CD180-stimulated peripheral blood B cells, as revealed by increased levels of the autophagosomal marker LC3B-II, enhanced colocalization between LC3B and the lysosomal marker Lyso-ID, by a larger percentage of cells with more than 5 characteristic LC3B puncta, and by the concomitant reduction in the level of SQSTM1/p62. Furthermore, RA induced expression of the autophagy-inducing protein ULK1 at the transcriptional level, in a process that required the retinoic acid receptor RAR. By inhibiting autophagy with specific inhibitors or by knocking down ULK1 by siRNA, the RA-stimulated IgG production in TLR9- and CD180-mediated cells was markedly reduced. We propose that the identified prominent role of autophagy in RA-mediated IgG-production in normal human B cells provides a novel mechanism whereby vitamin A exerts its important functions in the immune system.

  3. Trypsin activity is not involved in premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation.

    PubMed

    Halangk, Walter; Krüger, Burkhard; Ruthenbürger, Manuel; Stürzebecher, Jörg; Albrecht, Elke; Lippert, Hans; Lerch, Markus M

    2002-02-01

    A premature and intracellular activation of digestive zymogens is thought to be responsible for the onset of pancreatitis. Because trypsin has a critical role in initiating the activation cascade of digestive enzymes in the gut, it has been assumed that trypsin also initiates intracellular zymogen activation in the pancreas. We have tested this hypothesis in isolated acini and lobules from rat pancreas. Intracellular trypsinogen activation was induced by supramaximal secretagogue stimulation and measured using either specific trypsin substrates or immunoreactivity of the trypsinogen activation peptide (TAP). To prevent a trypsin-induced trypsinogen activation, we used the cell-permeant, highly specific, and reversible inhibitor Nalpha-(2-naphthylsulfonyl)-3-amidinophenylalanine-carboxymethylpiperazide (S124), and to prevent cathepsin-induced trypsinogen activation, we used the cysteine protease inhibitor E-64d. Incubation of acini or lobules in the presence of S124 completely prevented the generation of trypsin activity in response to supramaximal caerulein but had no effect whatsoever on the generation of TAP. Conversely, when trypsin activity was recovered at the end of the experiment by either washout of S124 from acini or extensive dilution of lobule homogenates, it was up to 400% higher than after caerulein alone and corresponded, in molar terms, to the generation of TAP. Both trypsin activity and TAP release were inhibited in parallel by E-64d. We conclude that caerulein-induced trypsinogen activation in the pancreas is caused by an E-64d-inhibitable mechanism such as cathepsin-induced trypsinogen activation, and neither involves nor requires intracellular trypsin activity. Specific trypsin inhibition, on the other hand, prevents 80% of trypsin inactivation or autodegradation in the pancreas.

  4. Human Infrastructure & Human Activity Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    researchers are developing sensors systems that detect footfalls (or gait ) [1, 2], speech, the spectral response of human skin, etc [3]. Little work has...cone shaped field of view. • Visible imagers can capture color or grayscale video for human gait detection and object recognition. • Infrared...his/her gait produces a unique signature [13]. Indirect means of detecting personnel include the usage of acoustic, seismic, magnetic, passive

  5. Serum factors involved in human microvascular endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kevin; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Sliva, Daniel; Garcia, Joe G N; English, Denis

    2002-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that lipid and protein angiogenic factors operate in tandem to induce optimal angiogenic responses in vivo. This study was undertaken to clarify the nature of the substances in human serum that are responsible for its remarkable ability to promote capillary morphogenesis in vitro. The ability of dilute (2%) human serum to promote the morphogenic differentiation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells on Matrigel supports was depleted by more than 50% by treatment of the serum with activated charcoal, a procedure that effectively removes biologically active lipid growth factors. The remainder of the activity within serum was lost on heating to 60 degrees C for 60 minutes, indicating the involvement of a protein in the response. The ability of charcoal-treated serum to promote capillary morphogenesis was completely restored by the addition of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP, 500 nmol/L), but other lipids thought to be released into serum during clotting were ineffective. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) effectively restored the ability of heat-treated serum to promote endothelial cell morphogenesis, but other protein growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, were ineffective. Together, SPP and bFGF were as effective as whole serum in promoting capillary morphogenesis. Responses to purified SPP were entirely sensitive to the effects of preexposure of the cells to pertussis toxin, whereas responses to bFGF were entirely pertussis toxin-resistant. Consistent with our hypothesis that two distinct factors in serum play a role in promoting capillary morphogenesis, responses induced by serum were inhibited approximately 50% by preexposure of endothelial cells to pertussis toxin. We conclude that platelet-released SPP acts in conjunction with circulating bFGF to promote capillary formation by microvascular endothelial cells. Lipid and protein growth factors

  6. Esculetin, a natural coumarin compound, evokes Ca(2+) movement and activation of Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved cell cycle arrest in ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong-Tai; Chou, Chiang-Ting; Lin, You-Sheng; Shieh, Pochuen; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Jan, Chung-Ren; Liang, Wei-Zhe

    2016-04-01

    Esculetin (6,7-dihydroxycoumarin), a derivative of coumarin compound, is found in traditional medicinal herbs. It has been shown that esculetin triggers diverse cellular signal transduction pathways leading to regulation of physiology in different models. However, whether esculetin affects Ca(2+) homeostasis in breast cancer cells has not been explored. This study examined the underlying mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by esculetin and established the relationship between Ca(2+) signaling and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. The results showed that esculetin induced concentration-dependent rises in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in ZR-75-1 (but not in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) human breast cancer cells. In ZR-75-1 cells, this Ca(2+) signal response was reduced by removing extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by the store-operated Ca(2+) channel blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). In Ca(2+)-free medium, pre-treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin (TG) abolished esculetin-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Conversely, incubation with esculetin abolished TG-induced [Ca(2+)]i rises. Esculetin induced cytotoxicity that involved apoptosis, as supported by the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and the release of cytochrome c and the proteolytic activation of caspase-9/caspase-3, which were partially reversed by pre-chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid-acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM). Moreover, esculetin increased the percentage of cells in G2/M phase and regulated the expressions of p53, p21, CDK1, and cyclin B1. Together, in ZR-75-1 cells, esculetin induced [Ca(2+)]i rises by releasing Ca(2+) from the ER and causing Ca(2+) influx through 2-APB-sensitive store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Furthermore, esculetin activated Ca(2+)-associated mitochondrial apoptotic pathways that involved G2/M cell cycle arrest. Graphical abstract The summary of esculetin

  7. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  8. Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Human Beings In Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Novaes, Maria Rita Garbi; Guilhem, Dirce; Lolas, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective Diagnose ethical conduct in research involving human beings in Brazil and the last 10 years of activity by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Health Department - Federal District - CEP/SES/DF. Methods This work was based on a documentary research, descriptive and retrospective. It examined the database containing records of cases brought before the CEP/SES/DF, corresponding the period of June 1997 to December 2007. Results were generated in Excel program, version 2007. Results CEP/SES/DF has presented increasing number of research projects submitted to appreciation (n = 1129), composing: 90.4% approved 1.7% disapproved, 7.4% removed/filed and 0.5% excluded. Of these projects, 83% belonged to Group III, 18% multi-centered projects and 10% protocols with foreign participation. Time for approval has decreased over the years (30 to 60 days). Frequent pendencies: End of Free and Informed Consent (30%), Cover Sheet (25%), Methodology (20%), Curriculum vitae (12%), Budget (9%), and Others (4%). Conclusion The assessment of the CEP/SES/DF activities, during a ten-year period has shown its commitment to the legitimacy of research ethics review and scientific production SES/DF. There were some weaknesses such as difficulty in monitoring the accompaniment of the research; interruption of works due to adverse drug reaction; gaps or errors in the protocol submitted by the researcher. These situations are the achieving targets for the elaboration of specific criteria. PMID:20981277

  9. MicroRNAs: potential regulators involved in human anencephaly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiping; Chang, Huibo; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ting; Zou, Jizhen; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Jianxin

    2010-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional regulators of messenger RNA activity. Neural tube defects (NTDs) are severe congenital anomalies that substantially impact an infant's morbidity and mortality. The miRNAs are known to be dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment; their role in human NTDs, however, is still unknown. In this study, we show the presence of a specific miRNA expression profile from tissues of fetuses with anencephaly, one of the most severe forms of NTDs. Furthermore, we map the target genes of these miRNAs in the human genome. In comparison to healthy human fetal brain tissues, tissues from fetuses with anencephaly exhibited 97 down-regulated and 116 up-regulated miRNAs. The microarray findings were extended using real-time qRT-PCR for nine miRNAs. Specifically, of these validated miRNAs, miR-126, miR-198, and miR-451 were up-regulated, while miR-9, miR-212, miR-124, miR-138, and miR-103/107 were down-regulated in the tissues of fetuses with anencephaly. A bioinformatic analysis showed 881 potential target genes that are regulated by the validated miRNAs. Seventy-nine of these potential genes are involved in a protein interaction network. There were 6 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim process and 7 co-occurrence annotations within the GOSlim function found by GeneCodis 2.0. Our results suggest that miRNA dysregulation is possibly involved in the pathogenesis of anencephaly.

  10. The ROS-mediated activation of STAT-3/VEGF signaling is involved in the 27-hydroxycholesterol-induced angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongmei; Shen, Zhaoxia; Liu, Jiao; Chen, Juan; Liu, Yun; Hu, Chunyan; Li, Zhong; Li, Yuan

    2016-12-15

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among females worldwide, and angiogenesis plays a crucial role in BC progression. 27-Hydroxycholesterol (27HC) is an endogenous selective estrogen receptor modulator, which promotes the growth and metastasis of BC. Here, we further found that, 27HC improved the angiogenic ability of BC in a VEGF-dependent manner. For the molecular mechanisms, on one hand, as an estrogen-like factor, 27HC enhanced the expression of VEGF by the classical ERα/VEGF signaling in ER-positive BC cells; on the other hand, in both ER-positive and ER-negative BC cells, 27HC enhanced the generation of ROS, which in turn activated the STAT-3/VEGF signaling in an ER independent manner. Either blocking the generation of ROS or knockdown of STAT-3 attenuated the 27HC-induced autocrine of VEGF and angiogenesis. These findings not only suggested a mechanism whereby 27HC enhanced the angiogenesis, but also helped to recognize the 27HC as a novel potential harmful factor in BC, especially in the menopause patients.

  11. Asymmetry within and around the human planum temporale is sexually dimorphic and influenced by genes involved in steroid hormone receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Guadalupe, Tulio; Zwiers, Marcel P; Wittfeld, Katharina; Teumer, Alexander; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hoogman, Martine; Hagoort, Peter; Fernandez, Guillen; Buitelaar, Jan; van Bokhoven, Hans; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Grabe, Hans J; Francks, Clyde

    2015-01-01

    The genetic determinants of cerebral asymmetries are unknown. Sex differences in asymmetry of the planum temporale (PT), that overlaps Wernicke's classical language area, have been inconsistently reported. Meta-analysis of previous studies has suggested that publication bias established this sex difference in the literature. Using probabilistic definitions of cortical regions we screened over the cerebral cortex for sexual dimorphisms of asymmetry in 2337 healthy subjects, and found the PT to show the strongest sex-linked asymmetry of all regions, which was supported by two further datasets, and also by analysis with the FreeSurfer package that performs automated parcellation of cerebral cortical regions. We performed a genome-wide association scan (GWAS) meta-analysis of PT asymmetry in a pooled sample of 3095 subjects, followed by a candidate-driven approach which measured a significant enrichment of association in genes of the 'steroid hormone receptor activity' and 'steroid metabolic process' pathways. Variants in the genes and pathways identified may affect the role of the PT in language cognition.

  12. Ethics Review of Research Projects Involving Human Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Maltreatment of subjects has led to the introduction of an ethics review process for research involving humans. Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) require investigators to justify their human research to peers prior to recruiting participants. This paper describes the composition, functions, and duties of IRBs; the effectiveness and…

  13. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1997-03-14

    The authors have examined the role of integrins and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). Increased {beta}{sub 1} integrin and fibronectin (FN) gene expression was observed in PMA-treated HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treated monocytes, even at a time preceding the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} (PKC{beta}) and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, failed to express FN after PMA treatment. Restoration of PKC{beta} resulted in PMA-induced FN gene expression and macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells or monocytes was attenuated by anti-{beta}{sub 1} integrin or anti-FN MAbs. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation involves activation of PKC and expression of specific integrins and ECM proteins. The stimulated cells, through their integrins, attach and spread on these substrates by binding to the deposited ECM proteins. This attachment and spreading in turn, through integrin signaling, leads to the macrophage phenotype.

  14. Human Genetic Evidence for Involvement of CD137 in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Leif Å; Gertow, Karl; Folkersen, Lasse; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Sundman, Eva; Sheikine, Yuri; Goel, Anuj; Baldassarre, Damiano; Humphries, Steve E; de Faire, Ulf; Watkins, Hugh; Tremoli, Elena; Veglia, Fabrizio; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Göran K; Olofsson, Peder S

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and the main cause of cardiovascular disease. Inflammation promotes plaque instability and clinical disease, such as myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Subclinical atherosclerosis begins with thickening of the arterial intimal layer, and increased intima-media thickness (IMT) in the carotid artery is a widely used measurement of subclinical atherosclerosis. Activation of CD137 (tumor necrosis factor receptor super family 9) promotes inflammation and disease development in murine atherosclerosis. CD137 is expressed in human atherosclerosis, but its role is largely unknown. This study uses a genetic approach to investigate CD137 in human atherosclerotic disease. In publicly available data on genotype and gene expression from the HapMap project, the minor T allele of rs2453021, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CD137, was significantly associated with CD137 gene expression. In the PROCARDIS and Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) cohorts of 13,029 cases and controls, no significant association was detected between the minor T allele of rs2453021 and risk for coronary artery disease or myocardial infarction. However, in the IMPROVE multicenter study of 3,418 individuals, the minor T allele of rs2453021 was associated with increased IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA), as measured by ultrasonography, with presence of plaque in CCA and with increased incidence of adverse noncardiac vascular events. Taken together, this study shows that the minor T allele of rs2453021 is associated with increased IMT in the CCA and increased risk of incident noncardiac vascular events, thus providing the first human genetic evidence for involvement of CD137 in atherosclerosis. PMID:25032953

  15. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions.

    PubMed

    Norris, Anne E; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-05-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design.

  16. Quantifying Engagement: Measuring Player Involvement in Human-Avatar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Anne E.; Weger, Harry; Bullinger, Cory; Bowers, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the merits of using an established system for rating behavioral cues of involvement in human dyadic interactions (i.e., face-to-face conversation) to measure involvement in human-avatar interactions. Gameplay audio-video and self-report data from a Feasibility Trial and Free Choice study of an effective peer resistance skill building simulation game (DRAMA-RAMA™) were used to evaluate reliability and validity of the rating system when applied to human-avatar interactions. The Free Choice study used a revised game prototype that was altered to be more engaging. Both studies involved girls enrolled in a public middle school in Central Florida that served a predominately Hispanic (greater than 80%), low-income student population. Audio-video data were coded by two raters, trained in the rating system. Self-report data were generated using measures of perceived realism, predictability and flow administered immediately after game play. Hypotheses for reliability and validity were supported: Reliability values mirrored those found in the human dyadic interaction literature. Validity was supported by factor analysis, significantly higher levels of involvement in Free Choice as compared to Feasibility Trial players, and correlations between involvement dimension sub scores and self-report measures. Results have implications for the science of both skill-training intervention research and game design. PMID:24748718

  17. Reporting results of research involving human subjects: an ethical obligation.

    PubMed

    Alley, Allison Baer; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-06-01

    Researchers have an ethical responsibility to report the results of research involving human subjects. Dissemination of results ensures that patient care is based on good science and that the field of medicine advances based on complete and accurate knowledge. However, current evidence suggests that publication is often neglected or substantially delayed, especially in the case of negative and inconclusive results. Researchers, editors and reviewers should value all high-quality research regardless of the conclusiveness of the results and ensure that all research involving human subjects is registered in a publicly accessible database.

  18. Measuring psychological engagement in youth activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Heather L; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A; Gadbois, Shannon; Bowker, Anne; Findlay, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    Although psychological engagement (e.g., enjoyment, concentration) may be critical in fostering positive outcomes of youth activity participation, too few studies have been conducted to establish its role in development. Furthermore, an established measurement tool is lacking. In the current study, we evaluated a brief engagement measure with two Canadian samples of youth (Sample 1, N = 290, mean age = 16.9 years, 62% female; Sample 2, N = 1827, mean age = 13.1 years, 54% female). We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized structure of the model. We also assessed the measure's validity by testing relations between engagement and both perceived outcomes and positive features of activity settings. Psychological engagement was best captured by three latent cognitive, affective, and relational/spiritual factors and a second-order latent factor. Also, as anticipated, psychological engagement was associated with features of the activity setting and perceived impact.

  19. Security and Privacy Preservation in Human-Involved Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asher, Craig; Aumasson, Jean-Philippe; Phan, Raphael C.-W.

    This paper discusses security within human-involved networks, with a focus on social networking services (SNS). We argue that more secure networks could be designed using semi-formal security models inspired from cryptography, as well as notions like that of ceremony, which exploits human-specific abilities and psychology to assist creating more secure protocols. We illustrate some of our ideas with the example of the SNS Facebook.

  20. Recruitment and proliferation of T lymphocytes is supported by IFNgamma- and TNFalpha-activated human osteoblasts: Involvement of CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD106 (VCAM-1) adhesion molecules and CXCR3 chemokine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lisignoli, Gina; Toneguzzi, Stefania; Piacentini, Anna; Cristino, Sandra; Cattini, Luca; Grassi, Francesco; Facchini, Andrea

    2004-03-01

    The mechanism by which osteoblasts (OB) interact and modulate the phenotype and proliferation of T lymphocytes during inflammation is not well known. The effects of two regulatory cytokines, TNFalpha and IFNgamma, on the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD106 (VCAM-1) adhesion molecules and the CXCR3 ligands (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11), were assessed in a primary culture of human OB by real-time PCR, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. In addition, we functionally evaluated the recruitment and proliferation of T lymphocytes grown with resting or stimulated OB. According to the present data IFNgamma, either alone or in combination with TNFalpha, significantly up-regulates the expression of CD54 and CD106 and induces the expression and release of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 in OB. The supernatant of TNFalpha- and IFNgamma-activated OB induces the recruitment of T lymphocytes more significantly than stimulation by CXCR3 ligands. T lymphocyte proliferation is significantly enhanced by direct contact with TNFalpha- and IFNgamma-activated OB or by incubation with the supernatant of TNFalpha- and IFNgamma-activated OB. Blocking experiments with anti-CD11a, anti-CD49d, anti-CXCR3, and Bordetella pertussis toxin demonstrate that adhesion molecules and the CXCR3 chemokine receptor play a key role in the proliferation of T lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates the involvement of adhesion molecules (CD11a and CD49d) and chemokine receptor (CXCR3) in the mechanism by which OB recruit, interact, and modulate T lymphocyte proliferation under inflammatory conditions.

  1. Attacks by packs of dogs involving predation on human beings.

    PubMed

    Borchelt, P L; Lockwood, R; Beck, A M; Voith, V L

    1983-01-01

    Dog bites are a medical problem for millions of people, children being the most common victims. Human deaths attributable to dog bite injury (not rabies) are relatively infrequent. There have been some epidemiologic reviews, but this study is the first attempt to arrive at an understanding of bites involving predation on human beings by conducting behavioral examinations under controlled conditions of the dogs involved, and by interviewing victims, witnesses, and people familiar with the animals.The three cases studied involved two fatalities and an attack that was nearly fatal. The victims were 11, 14, and 81. In each case, owned pet dogs consumed some human tissue. The severity of the victims' injuries was not the consequence of a single dog bite, but the result of repeated attacks by dogs behaving as a social group. Factors that might contribute to a dog's regarding human beings as potential prey were examined, including hunger, prior predation, group behaviors, defense of territory, previous interactions with people, the presence of estrous female dogs, and environmental stimuli. In two of the cases, it was possible, by using similar stimuli, to duplicate the circumstances at the time of the attack.The results of the observations showed the value of behavioral analysis and simulations methods in evaluating possible factors in dog attacks.Among the many factors probably involved in severe dog attacks are the size, number, and nutritional status of the dogs; the dogs' previous aggressive contacts with people; the victim's age, size, health, and behavior; and the absence of other human beings in the vicinity.

  2. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.…

  3. Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Adjustment to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Tae O.; Bilynsky, Julie

    Past research has supported the idea that involvement in extracurricular activities has a positive impact on students' evaluation of their college lives. This study investigated whether involvement, as measured by time commitment to campus activities, had a differential impact on the students' adjustment to various aspects of college life,…

  4. Proteolytic degradation of the RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding conformers of human platelet integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa: clues for identification of regions involved in the receptor's activation.

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, J J; Mann, K; Schäfer, W; Fernandez-Lafuente, R; Guisán, J M

    1994-01-01

    The human integrin glycoprotein (GP)IIb/IIIa plays a central role in haemostasis as an inducible receptor for fibrinogen and other RGD-containing adhesive proteins at the platelet plasma membrane. Expression of the fibrinogen receptor on platelet activation involves conformational changes in the quaternary structure of GPIIb/IIIa. Little is known, however, about the nature of this conformational transition. Given that isolated GPIIb/IIIa contains a mixture of RGD-binding and non-RGD-binding heterodimers, we used limited proteolysis as a tool for investigating the structural differences between the two conformers. Comparison of their fragmentation patterns shows that, whereas in the non-RGD-binding form of GPIIb/IIIa the N-terminal half of the heavy chain of GPIIb (GPIIbH) and the central region of GPIIIa are cleaved by endoproteinase Arg-C, these domains associate tightly with one another in the RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa and are thus protected from proteolysis. In addition, the C-terminal half of GPIIb becomes more susceptible to degradation in the non-RGD-binding GPIIb/IIIa conformer. Our interpretation, in the context of available structural and functional data, is that a major relative reorientation of the GPIIbH and GPIIIa extracellular domains takes place along the subunit interface during the conformational transition of the platelet integrin. Images Figure 1 PMID:8129707

  5. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates TNF-α-induced iNOS expression in human endothelial cells: Involvement of Syk-mediated activation of PI3K-IKK-IκB signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhen; Li, Zhiliang; Chen, Song; Pan, Jieyi; Ma, Xiaochun

    2013-08-15

    Endothelial cells produce nitric oxide (NO) by activation of constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and transcription of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We explored the effect of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a compound derived from chuanxiong, on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced iNOS in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and explored the signal pathways involved by using RT-PCR and Western blot. TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IκB kinase (IKK) phosphorylation, IκB degradation and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, which were required for NO gene transcription. Exposure to wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression, suggesting activation of such a signal pathway might be phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) dependent. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) inhibitor piceatannol significantly inhibited NO production. Furthermore, piceatannol obviously suppressed TNF-α-induced IκB phosphorylation and the downstream NF-κB activation, suggesting that Syk is an upstream key regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. TMP significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of Syk and PI3K. Our data indicate that TMP might repress iNOS expression, at least in part, through its inhibitory effect of Syk-mediated PI3K phosphorylation in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. -- Highlights: •TMP suppressed TNF-α-induced expression of iNOS by inhibiting IKK/IκB/NF-κB pathway. •PI3K inhibitor wortmannin abrogated IKK/IκB/NF-κB-mediated iNOS expression. •Syk inhibitor piceatannol repressed PI3K/IKK/IκB mediated NO production. •Syk is an upstream regulator in the activation of PI3K/IKK/IκB-mediated signaling. •TMP might repress iNOS expression through Syk-mediated PI3K pathway.

  6. 16 CFR 1702.10 - Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects. 1702.10 Section 1702.10 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS; PETITION PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS § 1702.10 Human experimental data...

  7. 16 CFR 1702.10 - Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects. 1702.10 Section 1702.10 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION... PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS; PETITION PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS § 1702.10 Human experimental data...

  8. [Reflections for having bioethics involved in the human rights culture].

    PubMed

    Brussino, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bioethics can be interpreted as a critical reflection on life and health, a new way to make decisions in these fields, a social reform movement, and an academic discipline. In any case, Bioethics implies an interdisciplinary and intercultural dialogue. At the same time, human rights, as universal moral guidelines, provide a plausible basis for this intercultural dialogue, for they enable the identification of a core of transcultural values that can work as "moral minima" in the dialogue among different cultures and the search for international consensuses. This article sets forth the triple connection (historical-genealogical, conceptual and practical) between bioethics and human rights, and reflects on some of the conditions that should be taken into account for bioethics to be involved in the human rights culture.

  9. Basic Business and Economics: Varied Activities Encourage Active Student Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Robert Lee, Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a variety of activities for the basic business classroom, such as having guest speakers, question-and-answer sessions, simulations, role playing, debates, small group work, field trips, games, and individualized instruction. Includes a report of business teachers' knowledge of and attitudes toward these activities. (MF)

  10. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens C; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species.

  11. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species. PMID:26063571

  12. Empirical Evidence or Intuition? An Activity Involving the Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overway, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Students need to have basic understanding of scientific method during their introductory science classes and for this purpose an activity was devised which involved a game based on famous Monty Hall game problem. This particular activity allowed students to banish or confirm their intuition based on empirical evidence.

  13. 16 CFR 1702.10 - Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects. 1702.10 Section 1702.10 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON...

  14. 16 CFR 1702.10 - Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects. 1702.10 Section 1702.10 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON...

  15. 16 CFR 1702.10 - Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human experimental data involving the testing of human subjects. 1702.10 Section 1702.10 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON...

  16. Elevated expression of activated forms of Neu/ErbB-2 and ErbB-3 are involved in the induction of mammary tumors in transgenic mice: implications for human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, P M; Ryan, E D; Cardiff, R D; Muller, W J

    1999-01-01

    To assess the importance of Neu activation during mammary tumorigenesis, altered receptors harboring in-frame deletions within the extracellular domain were expressed in transgenic mice. Females from several independent lines develop multiple mammary tumors that frequently metastasize to the lung. Tumor progression in these strains was associated with elevated levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated Neu and ErbB-3. Consistent with these observations, a survey of primary human breast tumors revealed frequent co-expression of both erbB-2 and erbB-3 transcripts. The ability of altered Neu receptors to induce mammary tumorigenesis in transgenic mice prompted us to examine whether similar mutations occurred in ErbB-2 during human breast cancer progression. Interestingly, an alternatively spliced form of erbB-2, closely resembling spontaneous activated forms of neu, was detected in human breast tumors. The ErbB-2 receptor encoded by this novel transcript harbors an in-frame deletion of 16 amino acids in the extracellular domain and can transform Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together, these observations argue that co-expression of ErbB-2 and ErbB-3 may play a critical role in the induction of human breast tumors, and raise the possibility that activating mutations in the ErbB-2 receptor may also contribute to this process. PMID:10205169

  17. Identification of human cytochrome P450 isoforms involved in the 7-hydroxylation of chlorpromazine by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, K; Kobayashi, K; Tsumuji, M; Tani, M; Shimada, N; Chiba, K

    2000-01-01

    Studies to identify the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoform(s) involved in chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation were performed using human liver microsomes and cDNA-expressed human CYPs. The kinetics of chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation in human liver microsomes showed a simple Michaelis-Menten behavior. The apparent Km and Vmax values were 3.4+/-1.0 microM and 200.5+/-83.7 pmol/min/mg, respectively. The chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in human liver microsomes showed good correlations with desipramine 2-hydroxylase activity (r = 0.763, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP2D6, and phenacetin O-deethylase activity (r = 0.638, p < 0.05), a marker activity for CYP1A2. Quinidine (an inhibitor of CYP2D6) completely inhibited while alpha-naphthoflavone (an inhibitor of CYP1A2) marginally inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity in a human liver microsomal sample showing high CYP2D6 activity. On the other hand, alpha-naphthoflavone inhibited the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylase activity to 55-65% of control in a human liver microsomal sample showing low CYP2D6 activity. Among eleven cDNA-expressed CYPs studied, CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 exhibited significant activity for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation. The Km values for the chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation of both cDNA-expressed CYP2D6 and CYP1A2 were in agreement with the Km values of human liver microsomes. These results suggest that chlorpromazine 7-hydroxylation is catalyzed mainly by CYP2D6 and partially by CYP1A2.

  18. THE CONCEPT OF RISK IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMAN SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    VAN NESS, PETER H.

    2015-01-01

    An established ethical principle of biomedical research involving human subjects stipulates that risk to subjects should be proportionate to an experiment’s potential benefits. Sometimes this principle is imprecisely stated as a requirement that ‘risks and benefits’ be balanced. First, it is noted why this language is imprecise. Second, the persistence of such language is attributed to how it functions as a rhetorical trope. Finally, an argument is made that such a trope is infelicitous because it may not achieve its intended persuasive purposes. More importantly, it should be avoided because it masks the important role that chance plays in clinical research. Risk is the possibility of harm. As a precondition of harm it is unintended and undesirable in projects of biomedical research. It requires ethical vigilance. As a vehicle of chance, however, it is both intended and desirable. It requires methodological appreciation. PMID:11697390

  19. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Benavente, O R; Patiño, O L; Peña, L B; Lugònes, H; Kalala, E; Meneclier, C R; Genovese, O; Sica, R E

    1989-09-01

    Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs) and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  20. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  1. 10 CFR 745.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... human subjects. 745.119 Section 745.119 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it is later proposed to involve...

  2. 16 CFR 1028.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... involving human subjects. 1028.119 Section 1028.119 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1028.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  3. 16 CFR 1028.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... involving human subjects. 1028.119 Section 1028.119 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1028.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  4. 28 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  5. 28 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  6. 10 CFR 745.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... human subjects. 745.119 Section 745.119 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it is later proposed to involve...

  7. 49 CFR 11.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 11.119 Section 11.119 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  8. 49 CFR 11.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 11.119 Section 11.119 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  9. 28 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  10. 22 CFR 225.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... involving human subjects. 225.119 Section 225.119 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  11. 49 CFR 11.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 11.119 Section 11.119 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  12. 14 CFR 1230.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involving human subjects. 1230.119 Section 1230.119 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  13. 10 CFR 745.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... human subjects. 745.119 Section 745.119 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it is later proposed to involve...

  14. 22 CFR 225.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... involving human subjects. 225.119 Section 225.119 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  15. 28 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  16. 28 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  17. 16 CFR 1028.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involving human subjects. 1028.119 Section 1028.119 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1028.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  18. 22 CFR 225.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... involving human subjects. 225.119 Section 225.119 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 225.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it...

  19. Trends in research involving human beings in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ricardo Eccard da; Novaes, Maria Rita Carvalho; Pastor, Elza Martínez; Barragan, Elena; Amato, Angélica Amorim

    2015-02-01

    Developing countries have experienced a dramatic increase in the number of clinical studies in the last decades. The aim of this study was to describe 1) the number of clinical trials submitted to the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária, Anvisa) from 2007 to 2012 and the number of human-subject research projects approved by research ethics committees (RECs) and the National Research Ethics Committee (Comissão Nacional de Ética em Pesquisa, CONEP) in Brazil from 2007 to 2011 and 2) the diseases most frequently studied in Brazilian states in clinical trials approved in the country from 2009 to 2012, based on information from an Anvisa databank. Two databases were used: 1) the National Information System on Research Ethics Involving Human Beings (Sistema Nacional de Informação Sobre Ética em Pesquisa envolvendo Seres Humanos, SISNEP) and 2) Anvisa's Clinical Research Control System (Sistema de Controle de Pesquisa Clínica, SCPC). Data from the SCPC indicated an increase of 32.7% in the number of clinical trials submitted to Anvisa, and data from the SISNEP showed an increase of 69.9% in those approved by RECs and CONEP (from 18 160 in 2007 to 30 860 in 2011). Type 2 diabetes (26.0%) and breast cancer (20.5%)-related to the main causes of mortality in Brazil-were the two most frequently studied diseases. The so-called “neglected diseases,” such as dengue fever, were among the least studied diseases in approved clinical trials, despite their significant impact on social, economic, and health indicators in Brazil. Overall, the data indicated 1) a clear trend toward more research involving human beings in Brazil, 2) good correspondence between diseases most studied in clinical trials approved by Anvisa and the main causes of death in Brazil, and 3) a low level of attention to neglected diseases, an issue that should be considered in setting future research priorities, given their socioeconomic and health effects.

  20. Induction of apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes by the ether phospholipid ET-18-OCH3: Involvement of the Fas receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Cabaner, Christelle; Gajate, Consuelo; Macho, Antonio; Muñoz, Eduardo; Modolell, Manuel; Mollinedo, Faustino

    1999-01-01

    Activated T-cells constitute a target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. We have found that the antitumour ether phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3; edelfosine) induced dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes, but not in resting T-cells. T-lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 or with concanavalin A. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation through cell cycle and TUNEL analyses, as well as through visualization of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in agarose gels.The ET-18-OCH3-mediated apoptotic response in activated T-lymphocytes was less intense than in human leukaemic T cell lines, such as Jurkat cells and Peer cells; namely about 25% apoptosis in activated T-cells versus about 46–61% apoptosis in T leukaemic cells after 24 h treatment with 10 μM ET-18-OCH3.The ET-18-OCH3 thioether analogue BM 41.440 (ilmofosine) showed a similar apoptotic capacity to that found with ET-18-OCH3 in activated T-cells, whereas the phospholipid analogue hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) failed to promote this response.The uptake of [3H]-ET-18-OCH3 was much larger in activated T-cells than in resting lymphocytes.Using a cytofluorimetric approach we have found that ET-18-OCH3 induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species in activated T-cells, but not in resting lymphocytes.ET-18-OCH3 induced an increase in Fas (APO-1/CD95) ligand mRNA expression in activated T-cells, and incubation with a blocking anti-Fas (APO-1/CD95) antibody partially inhibited the ET-18-OCH3-induced apoptosis of activated T-lymphocytes.These results demonstrate that mitogen-activated T-cells, unlike resting lymphocytes, are able to take up significant amounts of ET-18-OCH3, and are susceptible to undergo apoptosis by the ether lipid via, in part, the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor/ligand system. This ET-18-OCH3

  1. Novel human neutrophil agonistic properties of arsenic trioxide: involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or c-jun NH2-terminal MAPK but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Girard, Denis

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and for inducing apoptosis and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in promyelocytes and cancer cells. We recently reported that ATO induces neutrophil apoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not ATO recruits MAPKs in neutrophils, as well as to further investigate its agonistic properties. We found that ATO activates p38 and that, unlike H2O2, this response was not inhibited by exogenous catalase. Also, we demonstrated that ATO-induced p38 activation occurs before H2O2 generation and without a calcium burst. We next established that ATO recruits c-jun NH2-terminal (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk-1/2). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO occurs by a MAPK-independent mechanism. In contrast, the ability of ATO to enhance adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, release, and activity of gelatinase and degranulation of secretory, specific, and gelatinase, but not azurophilic granules, is dependent upon activation of p38 and/or JNK. This is the first study establishing that ATO possesses important agonistic properties in human neutrophils. Given the central role of neutrophils in various inflammatory disorders, we propose that ATO might have broader therapeutic implications in clinics, especially for regulating inflammation.

  2. Bringing Person-Centeredness and Active Involvement into Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torenholt, Rikke; Engelund, Gitte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and applicability of cultural probes--an explorative participatory method to gain insights into a person's life and thoughts--to achieve person-centeredness and active involvement in self-management education for people with chronic illness. Design/methodology/approach: An education toolkit…

  3. Identifying Associations between Student Achievement and Parental Involvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddle, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    The revision and renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 will likely expand its parental involvement component to engage educators, parents, and community partners in supporting public education for children. This revisions call for best practices, but current literature fails to identify specific activities associated…

  4. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  5. 40 CFR 26.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 26.119 Section 26.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human... human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  6. 45 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the...

  7. 40 CFR 26.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 26.119 Section 26.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human... human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  8. 40 CFR 26.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 26.119 Section 26.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human... human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  9. 45 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the...

  10. 45 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the...

  11. 45 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the...

  12. 40 CFR 26.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 26.119 Section 26.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human... human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  13. 40 CFR 26.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 26.119 Section 26.119 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human... human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human...

  14. 45 CFR 46.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 46.119 Section 46.119 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the...

  15. Identification of the main human cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in safrole 1'-hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Ueng, Yune-Fang; Hsieh, Chih-Hang; Don, Ming-Jaw; Chi, Chin-Wen; Ho, Li-Kang

    2004-08-01

    Safrole is a natural plant constituent, found in sassafras oil and certain other essential oils. The carcinogenicity of safrole is mediated through 1'-hydroxysafrole formation, followed by sulfonation to an unstable sulfate that reacts to form DNA adducts. To identify the main cytochrome P450 (P450) involved in human hepatic safrole 1'-hydroxylation (SOH), we determined the SOH activities of human liver microsomes and Escherichia coli membranes expressing bicistronic human P450s. Human liver (n = 18) microsomal SOH activities were in the range of 3.5-16.9 nmol/min/mg protein with a mean value of 8.7 +/- 0.7 nmol/min/mg protein. In human liver (n = 3) microsomes, the mean K(m) and V(max) values of SOH were 5.7 +/- 1.2 mM and 0.14 +/- 0.03 micromol/min/nmol P450, respectively. The mean intrinsic clearance (V(max)/K(m)) was 25.3 +/- 2.3 microL/min/nmol P450. SOH was sensitive to the inhibition by a CYP2C9 inhibitor, sulfaphenazole, and CYP2E1 inhibitors, 4-methylpyrazole and diethyldithiocarbamate. The liver microsomal SOH activity showed significant correlations with tolbutamide hydroxylation (r = 0.569) and chlorzoxazone hydroxylation (r = 0.770) activities, which were the model reactions catalyzed by CYP2C9 and CYP2E1, respectively. Human CYP2C9 and CYP2E1 showed SOH activities at least 2-fold higher than the other P450s. CYP2E1 showed an intrinsic clearance 3-fold greater than CYP2C9. These results demonstrated that CYP2C9 and CYP2E1 were the main P450s involved in human hepatic SOH.

  16. Lipolytic Enzymes Involved in the Virulence of Human Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minji; Do, Eunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes secrete various enzymes with lipolytic activities to facilitate their survival within the host. Lipolytic enzymes include extracellular lipases and phospholipases, and several lines of evidence have suggested that these enzymes contribute to the virulence of pathogenic fungi. Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans are the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogens, and several biochemical and molecular approaches have identified their extracellular lipolytic enzymes. The role of lipases and phospholipases in the virulence of C. albicans has been extensively studied, and these enzymes have been shown to contribute to C. albicans morphological transition, colonization, cytotoxicity, and penetration to the host. While not much is known about the lipases in C. neoformans, the roles of phospholipases in the dissemination of fungal cells in the host and in signaling pathways have been described. Lipolytic enzymes may also influence the survival of the lipophilic cutaneous pathogenic yeast Malassezia species within the host, and an unusually high number of lipase-coding genes may complement the lipid dependency of this fungus. This review briefly describes the current understanding of the lipolytic enzymes in major human fungal pathogens, namely C. albicans, C. neoformans, and Malassezia spp. PMID:23874127

  17. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  18. ANALYSIS OF DISCRIMINATING FACTORS IN HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT AFFECT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling exposure to particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants ultimately involves the utilization of human location-activity databases to assist in understanding the potential variability of microenvironmental exposures. This paper critically considers and stati...

  19. 16 CFR 1028.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 1028.118 Section 1028.118 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants, cooperative... subjects remain to be selected; and projects in which human subjects' involvement will depend...

  20. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human...

  1. 15 CFR 27.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 27.119 Section 27.119 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving...

  2. 15 CFR 27.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 27.119 Section 27.119 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving...

  3. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human...

  4. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Research involving human... Provisions and Clauses 1352.235-73 Research involving human subjects—after initial contract award. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(d), insert the following clause: Research Involving Human...

  5. 15 CFR 27.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... intention of involving human subjects. 27.119 Section 27.119 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving...

  6. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  7. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  8. Involvement of miR-30c and miR-301a in immediate induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by placenta growth factor in human pulmonary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nitin; Tahara, Stanley M.; Malik, Punam; Kalra, Vijay K.

    2010-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key physiological inhibitor of fibrinolysis. Previously, we reported placenta growth factor (PlGF) mediated transcriptional upregulation of PAI-1 mRNAexpression via activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and activator protein-1 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMVEC); which resulted in elevated PAI-1 in humans with sickle cell anemia (SCA). Herein, we identified the role of post-transcriptional mechanism(s) of PlGF-mediated accumulation of PAI-1 mRNA in HPMVEC by examining the role of microRNAs in PlGF-induced PAI-1 mRNA stability. Our results show reduced expression of miR-30c and miR-301a, but not of miR-99a in response to PlGF, which have evolutionarily conserved binding sites in the 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) of PAI-1 mRNA. Transfection of anti-miR-30c or anti-miR-301a oligonucleotides resulted in increased PAI-1 mRNA levels, which were further increased with PlGF stimulation. Conversely, overexpression of pre-miR-30c or pre-miR-301a resulted in attenuation of PlGF-induced PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels. Luciferase reporter assays using wild-type and mutant 3′UTR constructs confirmed that PAI-1-3′UTR is indeed a direct target of miR-30c and miR-301a. Finally, plasma levels of miR-30c and miR-301a were significantly downregulated in patients with SCA, compared to normal controls. These data provide a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of PlGF-inducedPAI-1elevation. PMID:21175428

  9. Human macrophage differentiation involves an interaction between integrins and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Laouar, A.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Collart, F.; Huberman, E.

    1996-11-15

    The authors have examined the role of the {beta}{sub 1} integrin family of adhesion receptors (VLA) and the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) in macrophage differentiation of (1) human HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and (2) human peripheral blood monocytes induced by either PMA or macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M=CSF). Increased VLA and FN gene expression was observed as early as 4 h after PMA treatment of HL-60 cells and PMA- or M-CSF-treatment of monocytes, and it preceded the manifestation of macrophage markers. Treated HL-60 cells and monocytes also released and deposited FN on the surface of the tissue culture dishes. An HL-60 cell variant, HL-525, which is deficient in protein kinase C {beta} and resistant to PMA-induced differentiation, exhibited elevated levels of the VLA antigen but failed to express the FN gene. Incubation of HL-525 cells on dishes precoated with exogenous FN resulted in a macrophage differentiation. The macrophage phenotype induced in HL-60 cells, HL-525 cells, or monocytes was attenuated to various degrees by anti-VLA or anti-FN MAbs or by exogenous RGDS, a VLA-binding motif on FN. The authors suggest that macrophage differentiation is initiated by the activation of protein kinase C, which leads to the expression of the integrin, FN and related genes. The integrins mediate cell attachment and spreading on appropriate substrates by binding to deposited extracellular proteins such as FN. This attachment and spreading, in turn, leads to the expression of genes that code for the macrophage functions.

  10. 7 CFR 1c.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... human subjects. 1c.119 Section 1c.119 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it is later...

  11. 7 CFR 1c.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... human subjects. 1c.119 Section 1c.119 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1c.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects, but it is later...

  12. Human fetal inner ear involvement in congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). The mechanisms of pathogenesis of CMV-related SNHL are still unclear. The aim is to study congenital CMV-related damage in the fetal inner ear, in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology behind CMV-SNHL. Results We studied inner ears and brains of 20 human fetuses, all at 21 week gestational age, with a high viral load in the amniotic fluid, with and without ultrasound (US) brain abnormalities. We evaluated histological brain damage, inner ear infection, local inflammatory response and tissue viral load. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CMV was positive in 14/20 brains (70%) and in the inner ears of 9/20 fetuses (45%). In the cases with inner ear infection, the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis was always infected, followed by infection in the Reissner’s membrane. The highest tissue viral load was observed in the inner ear with infected Organ of Corti. Vestibular labyrinth showed CMV infection of sensory cells in the utricle and in the crista ampullaris. US cerebral anomalies were detected in 6 cases, and in all those cases, the inner ear was always involved. In the other 14 cases with normal brain scan, histological brain damage was present in 8 fetuses and 3 of them presented inner ear infection. Conclusions CMV-infection of the marginal cell layer of the stria vascularis may alter potassium and ion circulation, dissipating the endocochlear potential with consequent SNHL. Although abnormal cerebral US is highly predictive of brain and inner ear damage, normal US findings cannot exclude them either. PMID:24252374

  13. Human Factors in Accidents Involving Remotely Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merlin, Peter William

    2013-01-01

    This presentation examines human factors that contribute to RPA mishaps and provides analysis of lessons learned. RPA accident data from U.S. military and government agencies were reviewed and analyzed to identify human factors issues. Common contributors to RPA mishaps fell into several major categories: cognitive factors (pilot workload), physiological factors (fatigue and stress), environmental factors (situational awareness), staffing factors (training and crew coordination), and design factors (human machine interface).

  14. Hippocampal slow EEG frequencies during NREM sleep are involved in spatial memory consolidation in humans.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Fabio; Nobili, Lino; Iaria, Giuseppe; Sartori, Ivana; Marzano, Cristina; Tempesta, Daniela; Proserpio, Paola; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Gozzo, Francesca; Cipolli, Carlo; De Gennaro, Luigi; Ferrara, Michele

    2014-10-01

    The hypothesis that sleep is instrumental in the process of memory consolidation is currently largely accepted. Hippocampal formation is involved in the acquisition of declarative memories and particularly of spatial memories. Nevertheless, although largely investigated in rodents, the relations between spatial memory and hippocampal EEG activity have been scarcely studied in humans. Aimed to evaluate the effects of spatial learning on human hippocampal sleep EEG activity, we recorded hippocampal Stereo-EEG (SEEG) in a group of refractory epilepsy patients undergoing presurgical clinical evaluation, after a training on a spatial navigation task. We observed that hippocampal high-delta (2-4 Hz range) activity increases during the first NREM episode after learning compared to the baseline night. Moreover, the amount of hippocampal NREM high-delta power was correlated with task performance at retest. The effect involved only the hippocampal EEG frequencies inasmuch no differences were observed at the neocortical electrodes and in the traditional polysomnographic measures. The present findings support the crucial role of hippocampal slow EEG frequencies during sleep in the memory consolidation processes. More generally, together with previous results, they suggest that slow frequency rhythms are a fundamental characteristic of human hippocampal EEG during both sleep and wakefulness, and are related to the consolidation of different types of memories.

  15. TOXICOLOGICAL RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMANS: ETHICAL AND REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the need for the Society of Toxicology (SOT) to develop a policy for ethical research in humans, and a review for publication of these studies. Observations on human beings have been the foundation upon which toxicologic knowledge has been built since the in...

  16. Environmental Health Research Involving Human Subjects: Ethical Issues.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2008-07-14

    This article reviews some of the ethical issues that arise in environmental health research with human subjects, such as minimizing risks to subjects, balancing benefits and risks in research, intentional exposure studies with human subjects, protecting third parties in research, informing subjects about environmental hazards, communicating health information to subjects, and protecting privacy and confidentiality.

  17. Environmental Health Research Involving Human Subjects: Ethical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews some of the ethical issues that arise in environmental health research with human subjects, such as minimizing risks to subjects, balancing benefits and risks in research, intentional exposure studies with human subjects, protecting third parties in research, informing subjects about environmental hazards, communicating health information to subjects, and protecting privacy and confidentiality. PMID:20401332

  18. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  19. A steady-state-kinetic model for formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver. A mechanism involving NAD+ and the hemimercaptal adduct of glutathione and formaldehyde as substrates and free glutathione as an allosteric activator of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Uotila, L; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    The steady-state kinetics of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from human liver have been explored. Non-linearities were obtained in v-versus-v[S] plots. It was necessary and sufficient to consider two reactants of the equilibrium mixture of formaldehyde, glutathione and their hemimercaptal adduct for a complete description of the kinetics. A random sequential reaction scheme is proposed in which adduct and beta-NAD+ are the substrates. In addition, glutathione can bind to an allosteric regulatory site and only the glutathione-containing enzyme is considered productive. Various alternative reaction models were examined but no simple alterative was superior to the model chosen. The discrimination was largely based on results of non-linear regression analysis. Several S-substituted glutathione derivatives were tested as activators or inhibitors of the enzyme, but all were without effect. Thio-NAD+, nicotinamide--hypoxanthine dinucleotide and 3-acetylpyridine-adenine dinucleotide could substitute for beta-NAD+ as the nucleotide substrate. alpha-NAD+ and ADP-ribose were competitive inhibitors with respect to beta-NAD+ and non-competitive with glutathione and the adduct. When used simultaneously, the inhibitors were linear competitive versus each other, indicating a single nucleotide-binding site or, if more than one, non-co-operative binding sites. PMID:220952

  20. 38 CFR 16.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... without the intention of involving human subjects. 16.119 Section 16.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  1. 38 CFR 16.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... without the intention of involving human subjects. 16.119 Section 16.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  2. 45 CFR 690.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 690.119 Section 690.119 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  3. 45 CFR 690.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 690.119 Section 690.119 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  4. 32 CFR 219.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... involving human subjects. 219.119 Section 219.119 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without...

  5. 14 CFR § 1230.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of involving human subjects. § 1230.119 Section § 1230.119 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS (Eff. until 2-14-14) § 1230.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without...

  6. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  7. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  8. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  9. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 26.118 Section 26.118 Protection of Environment... in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications for grants,...

  10. 45 CFR 690.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 690.119 Section 690.119 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  11. 14 CFR 1230.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of involving human subjects. 1230.119 Section 1230.119 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the intention of...

  12. 45 CFR 690.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 690.119 Section 690.119 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  13. 32 CFR 219.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... involving human subjects. 219.119 Section 219.119 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without...

  14. 38 CFR 16.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... without the intention of involving human subjects. 16.119 Section 16.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  15. 38 CFR 16.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... without the intention of involving human subjects. 16.119 Section 16.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  16. 32 CFR 219.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... involving human subjects. 219.119 Section 219.119 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without...

  17. 45 CFR 690.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 690.119 Section 690.119 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 690.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  18. 38 CFR 16.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... without the intention of involving human subjects. 16.119 Section 16.119 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without the...

  19. 32 CFR 219.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... involving human subjects. 219.119 Section 219.119 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. In the event research is undertaken without...

  20. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  1. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  2. Involvement of human papillomavirus infections in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2008-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are sexually transmitted and have been associated with several human carcinomas especially cervical and colorectal. On the other hand, a small number of studies have examined the presence of high-risk HPV in human prostate cancer tissues. Currently, the presence and role of high-risk HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis remain unclear because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question whether high-risk HPV infections play any role in human prostate cancer development. However, other investigators and our group were able to immortalize normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro by E6/E7 of HPV type 16. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells are susceptible to persistent HPV infections; therefore, high-risk HPV infections play an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. We believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological studies and more molecular biology investigations are necessary to answer these important questions.

  3. Molecular Genetic Approaches to Human Diseases Involving Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latt, Samuel A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Recombinant DNA techniques provide new approaches to the diagnosis and analysis of inherited human diseases associated with mental retardation, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, phenylketonauria, the Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, and those associated with deletions or duplications of subchromosomal regions. (Author/CL)

  4. 76 FR 5735 - Revisions to EPA's Rule on Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...EPA proposes to amend the portions of its rules for the protection of human subjects of research applying to third parties who conduct or support research with pesticides involving intentional exposure of human subjects and to persons who submit the results of human research with pesticides to EPA. The proposed amendments would broaden the applicability of the rules to cover human testing with......

  5. 34 CFR 97.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... human subjects. 97.119 Section 97.119 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving...

  6. 78 FR 10538 - Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 26 RIN 2070-AJ76 Protections for Subjects in Human Research Involving Pesticides... tailored amendments to the portions of its rules for the protection of human subjects of research applying... human subjects and to persons who submit the results of human research with pesticides to EPA....

  7. 34 CFR 97.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... human subjects. 97.119 Section 97.119 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.119 Research undertaken without the intention of involving...

  8. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  9. Research involving human subjects: ethical and regulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Menikoff, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    A history of past abuses on research with human subjects has led to various sets of rules that are designed to insure ethical practices to protect research subjects appropriately. To understand these rules, it is important to appreciate the significant differences between being a patient, where protecting the best interests of that patient is the primary goal, and being a research subject, where that is generally not the case. In the research setting, there can be a conflict between attempting to answer the research question, and doing what is best for the subject. The rules for conducting research with human subjects attempt to manage this conflict in an ethically acceptable manner. This chapter provides an overview of those rules, including a somewhat extended discussion of the U.S. "Common Rule" as a particular example.

  10. School Involvement Leave: Providing Leave for Parental Involvement in School Activities. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curlew, Mary; Weber, Julie

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important factors in school performance is parental involvement. However, many parents do not have the flexibility in their work schedules or the leave policies necessary to attend school functions. As a result, legislators are creating policies to address this issue. School involvement leave policies provide parents with…

  11. Catalytic and regulatory roles of species involved in metal-nucleotide equilibriums in human pyridoxal kinase.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Freddy; Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A; Guixé, Victoria

    2013-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is the active form of vitamin B6 and its deficiency is directly related with several human disorders, which make human pyridoxal kinase (hPLK) an important pharmacologic target. In spite of this, a carefully kinetic characterization of hPLK including the main species that regulates the enzymatic activity is at date missing. Here we analyse the catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of hPLK as a function of a precise determination of the species involved in metal-nucleotide equilibriums and describe new regulatory mechanisms for this enzyme. hPLK activity is supported by several metals, being Zn(2+) the most effective, although the magnitude of the effect observed is highly dependent on the relative concentrations of metal and nucleotide used. The true substrate for the reaction catalyzed by hPLK is the metal nucleotide complex, while ATP(4-) and HATP(3-) did not affect the activity. The enzyme presents substrate inhibition by both pyridoxal (PL) and ZnATP(2-), although the latter behaves as a weakly inhibitor. Our study also established, for the first time, a dual role for free Zn(2+); as an activator at low concentrations (19 μM optimal concentration) and as a potent inhibitor with a IC50 of 37 μM. These results highlighted the importance of an accurate estimation of the actual concentration of the species involved in metal-nucleotide equilibriums in order to obtain reliable values for the kinetic parameters, and for determine the true regulators of the PLK activity. They also help to explain the dissimilar kinetic parameters reported in the literature for this enzyme.

  12. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum.

  13. Expression profile of critical genes involved in FGF signaling pathway in the developing human primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Chunni; Liu, Hong; Lin, Chensheng; Zhang, Yanding; Hu, Xuefeng

    2015-11-01

    Mammalian tooth development is regulated by paracrine signal molecules of several conserved family interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme. The expression patterns and regulative roles of FGF signaling have been extensively studied in the mouse odontogenesis; however, that is not well known in human tooth development. In order to unveil the molecular mechanisms that regulate human tooth morphogenesis, we examined the expression patterns of the critical molecules involved in FGF signaling pathway in the developing human tooth germ by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR, including FGF ligands, receptors, and intracellular transducer. We found overlapping but distinct expression pattern of FGF ligands and receptors in the different stages and components. Expression of FGF4, FGF7, FGF8, and FGF9 persists widespread in human tooth mesenchyme, which is quite different to that of in mouse. FGFR1 may be the major receptor in regulate mechanisms of FGF signals in human tooth development. Real-time RT-PCR indeed confirmed the results of in situ hybridization. Results of K-Ras, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, p-JNK, and p-PDK1 expression reveal spatial and temporal patterns of FGF signaling during morphogenesis and organogenesis of human tooth germ. Activity of the FGF signaling transducer protein in human tooth germ was much higher than that of in mouse. Our results provided important FGF singling information in the developing process, pinpoint to the domains where the downstream target genes of FGF signaling can be sought, and enlightened our knowledge about the nature of FGF signaling in human tooth germ.

  14. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  15. CHL1 is involved in human breast tumorigenesis and progression

    SciTech Connect

    He, Li-Hong; Ma, Qin; Shi, Ye-Hui; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Shu-Fen; Tong, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •CHL1 is down-regulation in breast cancer tissues. •Down-regulation of CHL1 is related to high grade. •Overexpression of CHL1 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. •CHL1 deficiency induces breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Neural cell adhesion molecules (CAM) play important roles in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. The L1 family of CAMs is comprised of L1, Close Homolog of L1 (CHL1, L1CAM2), NrCAM, and Neurofascin, which are structurally related trans-membrane proteins in vertebrates. Although the L1CAM has been demonstrated play important role in carcinogenesis and progression, the function of CHL1 in human breast cancer is limited. Here, we found that CHL1 is down-regulated in human breast cancer and related to lower grade. Furthermore, overexpression of CHL1 suppresses proliferation and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells and knockdown of CHL1 expression results in increased proliferation and invasion in MCF7 cells in vitro. Finally, CHL1 deficiency promotes tumor formation in vivo. Our results may provide a strategy for blocking breast carcinogenesis and progression.

  16. Epo is involved in angiogenesis in human glioma.

    PubMed

    Nico, Beatrice; Annese, Tiziana; Guidolin, Diego; Finato, Nicoletta; Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the extent of angiogenesis, evaluated as microvascular density, and the immunoreactivity of tumor cells to erythropoietin (Epo) and of endothelial cells to Epo receptor (EpoR) have been correlated in human glioma specimens, and the effect of anti-Epo antibody on glioma-induced angiogenesis in vivo in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has been investigated. Results show that: (1) Epo/EpoR expression correlates with angiogenesis, (2) in the CAM assay, tumor bioptic specimens induce a strong angiogenic response, comparable to that induced by VEGF, and (3) an anti-Epo antibody co-administered with tumor bioptic specimens significantly inhibits the angiogenic response. These findings suggest the presence of a loop in the Epo/EpoR system, i.e. Epo is secreted by glioma tumor cells and it affects glioma vascular endothelial cells via its receptor and promotes angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Moreover, as demonstrated by in vivo experiments, Epo is responsible for the strong angiogenic response induced by human glioma bioptic specimens, because an anti-Epo antibody is able to significantly inhibit this response.

  17. Pedigree models for complex human traits involving the mitochrondrial genome

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Guo, S.W. )

    1993-12-01

    Recent biochemical and molecular-genetic discoveries concerning variations in human mtDNA have suggested a role for mtDNA mutations in a number of human traits and disorders. Although the importance of these discoveries cannot be emphasized enough, the complex natures of mitochondrial biogenesis, mutant mtDNA phenotype expression, and the maternal inheritance pattern exhibited by mtDNA transmission make it difficult to develop models that can be used routinely in pedigree analyses to quantify and test hypotheses about the role of mtDNA in the expression of a trait. In the present paper, the authors describe complexities inherent in mitochondrial biogenesis and genetic transmission and show how these complexities can be incorporated into appropriate mathematical models. The authors offer a variety of likelihood-based models which account for the complexities discussed. The derivation of the models is meant to stimulate the construction of statistical tests for putative mtDNA contribution to a trait. Results of simulation studies which make use of the proposed models are described. The results of the simulation studies suggest that, although pedigree models of mtDNA effects can be reliable, success in mapping chromosomal determinants of a trait does not preclude the possibility that mtDNA determinants exist for the trait as well. Shortcomings inherent in the proposed models are described in an effort to expose areas in need of additional research. 58 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Carbohydrate in the mouth enhances activation of brain circuitry involved in motor performance and sensory perception.

    PubMed

    Turner, Clare E; Byblow, Winston D; Stinear, Cathy M; Gant, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The presence of carbohydrate in the human mouth has been associated with the facilitation of motor output and improvements in physical performance. Oral receptors have been identified as a potential mode of afferent transduction for this novel form of nutrient signalling that is distinct from taste. In the current study oral exposure to carbohydrate was combined with a motor task in a neuroimaging environment to identify areas of the brain involved in this phenomenon. A mouth-rinsing protocol was conducted whilst carbohydrate (CHO) and taste-matched placebo (PLA) solutions were delivered and recovered from the mouths of 10 healthy volunteers within a double-blind, counterbalanced design. This protocol eliminates post-oral factors and controls for the perceptual qualities of solutions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was used to identify cortical areas responsive to oral carbohydrate during rest and activity phases of a hand-grip motor task. Mean blood-oxygen-level dependent signal change experienced in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex was larger for CHO compared with PLA during the motor task when contrasted with a control condition. Areas of activation associated with CHO exclusively were observed over the primary taste cortex and regions involved in visual perception. Regions in the limbic system associated with reward were also significantly more active with CHO. This is the first demonstration that oral carbohydrate signalling can increase activation within the primary sensorimotor cortex during physical activity and enhance activation of neural networks involved in sensory perception.

  19. Involvement of Interleukin-18 in the pathogenesis of human eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Rajavelu, Priya; Ventateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Shukla, Jai Shankar; Zaidi, Asifa; Mariswamy, Siddesha Jalahalli; Mattner, Jochen; Fortgang, Ilana; Kowalczyk, Monika; Balart, Luis; Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is one of the major causes that promote EoE; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that IL-18 is involved in food allergen-induced EoE pathogenesis. Accordingly, we examined normal SPT+ and SPT− EoE patient blood and biopsy samples for IL-18, IL-18Rα, ICAM and VCAM expression Herein, we show increased IL-18 level is highly significant in food allergen SPT+ compared to SPT− EoE patients. We also report that IL-18Rα+ cells and mRNA levels are induced in the esophageal biopsies of EoE patients and blood IL-18 levels correlate with esophageal eosinophilia (p<0.01). Additionally, we report that the levels of esophageal eosinophil and mast cells correlate with ICAM expression in human EoE. Mechanistically, we show that IL-18 in vitro stimulates iNKT cells and endothelial cells and induce eosinophil active cytokines IL-5, IL-13. We provide the evidence that IL-18 is critical cytokine involved in activation of iNKT cells and ICAM in promoting human EoE.. PMID:25638412

  20. Involvement of interleukin-18 in the pathogenesis of human eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Rituraj; Rajavelu, Priya; Ventateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Shukla, Jai Shankar; Zaidi, Asifa; Mariswamy, Siddesha Jalahalli; Mattner, Jochen; Fortgang, Ilana; Kowalczyk, Monika; Balart, Luis; Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Anil

    2015-04-01

    IL-18 is induced in food allergy and EoE is food allergen-induced disease. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis whether IL-18 is involved in food allergen-induced EoE pathogenesis. Accordingly, we examined normal SPT+ and SPT- EoE patient blood and biopsy samples for IL-18, IL-18Rα, ICAM and VCAM expression. Herein, we show increased IL-18 level is highly significant in food allergen SPT+ compared to SPT- EoE patients. We also report that IL-18Rα+ cells and mRNA levels are induced in the esophageal biopsies of EoE patients and blood IL-18 levels correlate with esophageal eosinophilia (P<0.01). Additionally, we report that the levels of esophageal eosinophil and mast cells correlate with ICAM expression in human EoE. Mechanistically, we show that IL-18 in vitro stimulates iNKT cells and endothelial cells and induce eosinophil active cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. We provide the evidence that IL-18 is critical cytokine involved in activation of iNKT cells and ICAM in promoting human EoE.

  1. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  2. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  3. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  4. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  5. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  6. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  7. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  8. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  9. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  10. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  11. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  12. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  13. 32 CFR 219.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... plans for involvement of human subjects. 219.118 Section 219.118 National Defense Department of Defense....118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types... institutional type grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility;...

  14. 45 CFR 690.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for involvement of human subjects. 690.118 Section 690.118 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to... Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  15. 38 CFR 16.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 16.118 Section 16.118 Pensions, Bonuses... and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. Certain types of applications... grants when selection of specific projects is the institution's responsibility; research training...

  16. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  17. Osterix transcriptional factor is involved in the metastasis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qiang-Sheng; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Wu, Zhuang-Hong; Long, Jian-Ting; Shao, Nan; Cheang, Tuck-Yun; Wang, Shen-Ming

    2015-09-01

    The transcriptional factor Osterix is specifically expressed in bone tissues to regulate the differentiation and maturation of osteoblasts. Recent studies have also identified the expression of Osterix in a number of cancer tissues, such as kidney and lung cancers. However, the association of Osterix with the metastasis of breast cancers has never been reported. The present study, for the first time, provides evidence supporting the involvement of Osterix in breast cancer metastasis. Western blotting was employed to investigate the expression of Osterix in a number of human breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic features. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments were performed in MCF7 cells (low level of metastasis) and MDA-MB-361 cells (high level of metastasis). The expression of several metastasis-associated genes was analyzed by western blotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A firefly luciferase-based reporter gene assay was conducted in order to study whether Osterix regulated the promoter activities of the MMP2 and MMP9 genes, which play critical roles in cancer metastasis. The results showed that Osterix was highly expressed in the MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 cells, but was not detectable in the MCF7 cells. The overexpression of Osterix in the MCF7 cells promoted the expression of VEGF, MMP9 and β-catenin, while downregulating the expression of E-cadherin. In addition, suppression of Osterix expression in the MDA-MB-361 cells reversed the alteration of VEGF, MMP9, β-catenin and E-cadherin expression. A reporter gene assay suggested that Osterix activated MMP2 and MMP9 promoter activity. In conclusion, Osterix is involved in the metastasis of human breast cancer and may be a target for the efficient treatment of human breast cancers.

  18. Involvement of human liver cytochrome P4502B6 in the metabolism of propofol

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yutaka; Hamaoka, Naoya; Hiroi, Toyoko; Imaoka, Susumu; Hase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kazuo; Funae, Yoshihiko; Ishizaki, Takashi; Asada, Akira

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. Methods The rate constant calculated from the disappearance of propofol in an incubation mixture with human liver microsomes and recombinant human CYP isoforms was used as a measure of the rate of metabolism of propofol. The correlation of these rate constants with rates of metabolism of CYP isoform-selective substrates by liver microsomes, the effect of CYP isoform-selective chemical inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies on propofol metabolism by liver microsomes, and its metabolism by recombinant human CYP isoforms were examined. Results The mean rate constant of propofol metabolism by liver microsomes obtained from six individuals was 4.2 (95% confidence intervals 2.7, 5.7) nmol min−1 mg−1 protein. The rate constants of propofol by microsomes were significantly correlated with S-mephenytoin N-demethylation, a marker of CYP2B6 (r = 0.93, P < 0.0001), but not with the metabolic activities of other CYP isoform-selective substrates. Of the chemical inhibitors of CYP isoforms tested, orphenadrine, a CYP2B6 inhibitor, reduced the rate constant of propofol by liver microsomes by 38% (P < 0.05), while other CYP isoform-selective inhibitors had no effects. Of the recombinant CYP isoforms screened, CYP2B6 produced the highest rate constant for propofol metabolism (197 nmol min−1 nmol P450−1). An antibody against CYP2B6 inhibited the disappearance of propofol in liver microsomes by 74%. Antibodies raised against other CYP isoforms had no effect on the metabolism of propofol. Conclusions CYP2B6 is predominantly involved in the oxidation of propofol by human liver microsomes. PMID:11298076

  19. Multibiological life support system experiments with humans partially involved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Dawei; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu

    To establish bioregenerative life support system in lunar or mars bases in the future, manned stimulation experiments including several kinds of creatures are needed to be conducted first. Gas exchange relation, element transfer and transformation principles, etc. between human beings and the multibiological system composed of plants, animals, Chlorella vulgaris and so on must be investigated in order to place different organisms with appropriate numbers and proportions. This research cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) in the Closed Integrative Cultivating System (CICS) of the Integrative Experimental Sys-tem (IES) with Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in the Plate Photo Bioreactor (PPB) of the IES. Gas exchange between testers and the IES were conducted periodically. The automotive control system of the PPB changed the illumination intensity of the photo bioreactor according to the CO2 concentration in the IES to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels by regu-lating the photosynthesis of alga. The conveyor-type cultivation method which was harvesting the biggest batch of lettuce and silkworms through the mass exchange chamber of IES every four days and transferring the smallest batch of lettuce and silkworms into the system; carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with nutrient liquid replenished into the system was implemented in the experiments. In terms of gas circulation, CO2 /O2 concentration changes in the system with trace gas contaminants (CH4 , NH3 and C2 H4 ) were measured. As to the mass transfer and transformation, element (C, H, O, N) contents, height, crown width and biomasses of lettuce in different developing stages, silkworms' bioconversion rates, alga's biomass changes, the amount and community change trends of the microorganism in different positions of the system, the quality of condensates gained under different running conditions and so on were studied. Results showed

  20. Genes involved in immortalization of human mammary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2001-09-27

    Breast cancer progression is characterized by inappropriate cell growth. Normal cells cease growth after a limited number of cell divisions--a process called cellular senescence-while tumor cells may acquire the ability to proliferate indefinitely (immortality). Inappropriate expression of specific oncogenes in a key cellular signaling pathway (Ras, Raf) can promote tumorigenicity in immortal cells, while causing finite lifespan cells to undergo a rapid senescence-like arrest. We have studied when in the course of transformation of cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), the response to overexpressed oncogenic Raf changes from being tumor-suppressive to tumor enhancing, and what are the molecular underpinnings of this response. Our data indicate: (1) HMEC acquire the ability to maintain growth in the presence of oncogenic Raf not simply as a consequence of overcoming senescence, but as a result of a newly discovered step in the process of immortal transformation uncovered by our lab, termed conversion. Immortal cells that have not undergone conversion (e.g., cells immortalized by exogenous introduction of the immortalizing enzyme, telomerase) remain growth inhibited. (2) Finite lifespan HMEC growth arrest in response to oncogenic Raf using mediators of growth inhibition that are very different from those used in response to oncogenic Raf by rodent cells and certain other human cell types, including the connective tissue cells from the same breast tissue. While many diverse cell types appear to have in common a tumor-suppressive response to this oncogenic signal, they also have developed multiple mechanisms to elicit this response. Understanding how cancer cells acquire the crucial capacity to be immortal and to abrogate normal tumor-suppressive mechanisms may serve both to increase our understanding of breast cancer progression, and to provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. Our results indicate that normal HMEC have novel means of enforcing a Raf

  1. Head Start Parent Involvement Activities: Measuring the Effect of School Based Parent Involvement Activities on Parent Efficacy in Early Childhood Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Khadijat O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this position paper was to examine the impact of school based parent involvement activities on parent efficacy. Methodology: The paper explores research studies into school based activities on long term parent efficacy. Conclusions: Most schools are involving parents in school-based activities in a variety of ways but the…

  2. Involvement of the mitochondrial compartment in human NCL fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzini, Francesco; Gismondi, Floriana; Tessa, Alessandra; Tonin, Paola; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Mole, Sara E.; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Simonati, Alessandro

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial reticulum fragmentation occurs in human CLN1 and CLN6 fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Likewise mitochondrial shift-to periphery and decreased mitochondrial density are seen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced caspase-mediated apoptosis occurs following STS treatment in CLN1 fibroblasts. -- Abstract: Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) are a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders of childhood, characterized by the endo-lysosomal storage of autofluorescent material. Impaired mitochondrial function is often associated with neurodegeneration, possibly related to the apoptotic cascade. In this study we investigated the possible effects of lysosomal accumulation on the mitochondrial compartment in the fibroblasts of two NCL forms, CLN1 and CLN6. Fragmented mitochondrial reticulum was observed in all cells by using the intravital fluorescent marker Mitotracker, mainly in the perinuclear region. This was also associated with intense signal from the lysosomal markers Lysotracker and LAMP2. Likewise, mitochondria appeared to be reduced in number and shifted to the cell periphery by electron microscopy; moreover the mitochondrial markers VDCA and COX IV were reduced following quantitative Western blot analysis. Whilst there was no evidence of increased cell death under basal condition, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic nuclei following Staurosporine treatment in CLN1 cells only. In conclusion, the mitochondrial compartment is affected in NCL fibroblasts invitro, and CLN1 cells seem to be more vulnerable to the negative effects of stressed mitochondrial membrane than CLN6 cells.

  3. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  4. Consumer involvement in research projects: the activities of research funders.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Máire; Entwistle, Vikki

    2004-08-01

    This paper reports findings from a postal questionnaire survey and in-depth interviews with UK funders of health-related research that explored whether, why and how they promote consumer involvement in research projects. Many UK funders of health-related research are adopting a policy of promoting consumer involvement in research projects. Telephone interviews revealed they have several reasons for doing so, and that they vary in the ways they encourage and support researchers to involve consumers. For some, descriptions of consumer involvement in a research proposal are important for project funding decisions. They recognized a need for flexibility when assessing consumer involvement in different contexts. We suggest that funders should continue to work to clarify what they consider to be the parameters of acceptability in terms of consumer involvement and ensure that 'flexible' criteria are fairly applied. Researchers should be aware of particular funders' views when applying for project funding.

  5. 45 CFR 46.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 46.118 Section 46.118 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of...

  6. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  7. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  8. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  9. 34 CFR 97.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. 97.119 Section 97.119 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy...

  10. 34 CFR 97.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. 97.119 Section 97.119 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy...

  11. 34 CFR 97.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. 97.119 Section 97.119 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED Policy...

  12. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  13. 34 CFR 97.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 97.118 Section 97.118 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (Basic ED...

  14. STRIPAK complexes: structure, biological function, and involvement in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juyeon; Pallas, David C

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian striatin family consists of three proteins, striatin, S/G2 nuclear autoantigen, and zinedin. Striatin family members have no intrinsic catalytic activity, but rather function as scaffolding proteins. Remarkably, they organize multiple diverse, large signaling complexes that participate in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, they appear to be regulatory/targeting subunits for the major eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A. In addition, striatin family members associate with germinal center kinase III kinases as well as other novel components, earning these assemblies the name striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complexes. Recently, there has been a great increase in functional and mechanistic studies aimed at identifying and understanding the roles of STRIPAK and STRIPAK-like complexes in cellular processes of multiple organisms. These studies have identified novel STRIPAK and STRIPAK-like complexes and have explored their roles in specific signaling pathways. Together, the results of these studies have sparked increased interest in striatin family complexes because they have revealed roles in signaling, cell cycle control, apoptosis, vesicular trafficking, Golgi assembly, cell polarity, cell migration, neural and vascular development, and cardiac function. Moreover, STRIPAK complexes have been connected to clinical conditions, including cardiac disease, diabetes, autism, and cerebral cavernous malformation. In this review, we discuss the expression, localization, and protein domain structure of striatin family members. Then we consider the diverse complexes these proteins and their homologs form in various organisms, emphasizing what is known regarding function and regulation. Finally, we explore possible roles of striatin family complexes in disease, especially cerebral cavernous malformation.

  15. Involvement of F-BOX proteins in progression and development of human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Shahab; Bhat, Ajaz A; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Mir, Fayaz; Kulinski, Michal; Mohammad, Ramzi M

    2016-02-01

    The Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) is a core regulator with various protein components (ubiquitin-activating E1 enzymes, ubiquitin-conjugating E2 enzymes, ubiquitin-protein E3 ligases, and the 26S proteasome) which work together in a coordinated fashion to ensure the appropriate and efficient proteolysis of target substrates. E3 ubiquitin ligases are essential components of the UPS machinery, working with E1 and E2 enzymes to bind substrates and assist the transport of ubiquitin molecules onto the target protein. As the UPS controls the degradation of several oncogenes and tumor suppressors, dysregulation of this pathway leads to several human malignancies. A major category of E3 Ub ligases, the SCF (Skp-Cullin-F-box) complex, is composed of four principal components: Skp1, Cul1/Cdc53, Roc1/Rbx1/Hrt1, and an F-box protein (FBP). FBPs are the substrate recognition components of SCF complexes and function as adaptors that bring substrates into physical proximity with the rest of the SCF. Besides acting as a component of SCF complexes, FBPs are involved in DNA replication, transcription, cell differentiation and cell death. This review will highlight the recent literature on three well characterized FBPs SKP2, Fbw7, and beta-TRCP. In particular, we will focus on the involvement of these deregulated FBPs in the progression and development of various human cancers. We will also highlight some novel substrates recently identified for these FBPs.

  16. Activation of human peroxisome-activated receptor-gamma ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Obesity in children has become an epidemic and recent research suggests a possible contribution from exposure to environmental chemicals. Several chemicals, such as phthalates, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated chemicals, are common in house dust on floors where children play and are suspected obesogens. Obesogens can act via a mechanism that involves activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARy). A previous study found that dust collected from children’s homes binds to PPARy. Here, we investigated the ability of house dust to activate PPARy in a transiently transfected cell assay. Dust samples were collected in 2012 from carpeted and hardwood floors in children’s homes using thimbles fitted into a vacuum cleaner hose (“TEO” samples), or from homes in an adult cohort NIEHS study. Dust was extracted with 50:50 hexane:acetone, sonicated, centrifuged, and the organic layer collected. This was repeated 2X. The extracts were filtered to remove particulates, dried with purified nitrogen, and reconstituted in DMS0 at 200 ug/ul. COS-1 cells were transfected for 24 hrs with a human PPARy vector containing a luciferase reporter, and exposed for 24 hrs to negative controls water or DMSO (0.1%), positive controls Troglitazone (3 uM in water) or Rosiglitazone (100 nM in DMSO), or dust extracts serially diluted in DMEM at 50, 100, and 200 ug/ml in 0.1% DMSO. Cells were lysed and luciferase activity was measured. Data were log-tra

  17. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  18. Organized Activity Involvement among Rural Youth: Gender Differences in Associations between Activity Type and Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Kaitlyn A.; Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Metzger, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined associations between organized activity involvement, academic achievement, and problem behavior in a sample of youth from a non-agricultural based rural community (M[subscript age] = 15.26, Age range = 11-19 years, N = 456). Analyses examined whether associations varied as a function of adolescent gender and age.…

  19. Attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in childhood: Distinguishing between targets.

    PubMed

    van Noorden, Tirza H J; Haselager, Gerbert J T; Lansu, Tessa A M; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Bukowski, William M

    2016-07-01

    This investigation researched the association between the attribution of human characteristics and bullying involvement in children by distinguishing between targets. Study 1 focused on the attribution of human characteristics by bullies, victims, bully/victims, and non-involved children toward friends and non-friends. The data from 405 children (M = 10.7 years old) showed that they attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than to friends. Moreover, boy victims attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to non-friends than boy bullies and non-involved boys did. In addition, victims attributed more antisocial human characteristics to non-friends than non-involved children did. Study 2 addressed bullies', victims', bully/victims', and non-involved children's attribution of human characteristics to each other. The data of 264 children (M = 10.0 years old) showed that bullies, victims, and bully/victims attributed fewer prosocial and more antisocial human characteristics to each other than to non-involved children. Non-involved children attributed fewer prosocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to bullies and victims, and more antisocial human characteristics to bully/victims than to victims. In addition, girls attributed more prosocial and fewer antisocial human characteristics to girls than to boys, whereas boys did not distinguish between girls and boys. Based on these findings, suggestions for future research are provided and implications for bullying prevention and intervention are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 42:394-403, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A novel human receptor involved in bitter tastant detection identified using Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Robery, Steven; Tyson, Richard; Dinh, Christopher; Kuspa, Adam; Noegel, Angelika A; Bretschneider, Till; Andrews, Paul L R; Williams, Robin S B

    2013-12-01

    Detection of substances tasting bitter to humans occurs in diverse organisms including the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. To establish a molecular mechanism for bitter tastant detection in Dictyostelium, we screened a mutant library for resistance to a commonly used bitter standard, phenylthiourea. This approach identified a G-protein-coupled receptor mutant, grlJ(-), which showed a significantly increased tolerance to phenylthiourea in growth, survival and movement. This mutant was not resistant to a structurally dissimilar potent bitter tastant, denatonium benzoate, suggesting it is not a target for at least one other bitter tastant. Analysis of the cell-signalling pathway involved in the detection of phenylthiourea showed dependence upon heterotrimeric G protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, suggesting that this signalling pathway is responsible for the cellular effects of phenylthiourea. This is further supported by a phenylthiourea-dependent block in the transient cAMP-induced production of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) in wild-type but not grlJ(-) cells. Finally, we have identified an uncharacterized human protein γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B receptor subunit 1 isoform with weak homology to GrlJ that restored grlJ(-) sensitivity to phenylthiourea in cell movement and PIP3 regulation. Our results thus identify a novel pathway for the detection of the standard bitter tastant phenylthiourea in Dictyostelium and implicate a poorly characterized human protein in phenylthiourea-dependent cell responses.

  1. Colorado court involvement in chemical spill clean-up activities.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D

    1981-01-01

    Judicial involvement was utilized to force the owners of a pesticide formulation plant to decontaminate property that had been covered with toxic pesticides having the potential to contaminate both surface and groundwater supplies in the East Denver metropolitan area. This case represented the first use of the Colorado state court system in dealing with a hazardous waste "spill." In this case, judicial intervention was unsatisfactory because of the delays involved. Other courses of action will be considered in future cases of a similar nature. PMID:7270771

  2. Colorado court involvement in chemical spill clean-up activities.

    PubMed

    Rice, D

    1981-09-01

    Judicial involvement was utilized to force the owners of a pesticide formulation plant to decontaminate property that had been covered with toxic pesticides having the potential to contaminate both surface and groundwater supplies in the East Denver metropolitan area. This case represented the first use of the Colorado state court system in dealing with a hazardous waste "spill." In this case, judicial intervention was unsatisfactory because of the delays involved. Other courses of action will be considered in future cases of a similar nature.

  3. Autophagy is involved in anticancer effects of matrine on SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Yumin; Chen, Xiaohui; Liu, Tao; Chen, Yingtai; He, Wenting; Zhang, Quanbao; Liu, Shiyuan

    2011-07-01

    Matrine has a wide range of pharmacological effects including antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Autophagy is closely associated with tumors and plays an important role in human tumor suppression, so inducing autophagy is a potential therapeutic strategy in adjuvant chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not autophagy is involved in antitumor effects of matrine on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells, and to further elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. Sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assay was used to examine matrine's cytotoxicity against SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The effects of matrine on the cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry, and cellular morphology was observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope and transmission electron microscope. Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining was used to detect autophagy. The expression levels of Bax and Beclin 1 in SGC-7901 cells were monitored by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that matrine significantly inhibited the proliferation of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells and induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, both autophagy and apoptosis were activated during the matrine-induced death of SGC-7901 cells. Beclin 1 is involved in matrine-induced autophagy and the pro-apoptotic mechanisms of matrine may be associated with its up-regulation of Bax expression. These findings indicate that matrine is a potent antitumor agent for treating gastric cancer. The ability of matrine to induce autophagy underlines its potential utility as a new gastric cancer treatment modality.

  4. Human Development Program: Level V Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade 5. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. The activity guide presents topics and directions for 180 sequential Human…

  5. Involvement of the plasminogen activation system in cow endometritis.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, S; Taitzoglou, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Boscos, C M; Kaldrimidou, E; Saratsis, Ph

    2004-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the: (a) presence and activity of components of the "plasminogen activators/plasmin" system in dairy cows with or without endometritis; (b) variations in enzyme activity according to the degree of endometritis; and (c) associations between these enzymes and changes in endometrial histology after intrauterine antibiotic treatment. Endometrial biopsies were collected from anestrus (no palpable ovarian structures and milk progesterone <1 ng/ml) Holstein cows, 30-40 days postpartum. On the basis of a vaginoscopic examination, rectal palpation of the cervix and uterus, and endometrial histology, there were 92 cows with endometritis and 20 cows without endometritis. After biopsy collection, each cow was given an intrauterine infusion of 1.5x10(6) IU of procaine penicillin G. In cows with endometritis, genital tract examinations and biopsies were repeated 2 weeks later. Both plasminogen activators (PAs), tissue type (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA), were immunologically identified in all uterine biopsies. Plasminogen activator activity (PAA) increased, whereas plasminogen activator inhibition (PAI) and plasmin inhibition (PI) decreased in proportion to the degree of inflammation. Two weeks after intrauterine treatment, PAA had decreased significantly in all cows that had reduced severity of endometrial inflammation and had increased significantly in all cows with increased severity of inflammation. The change in the degree of inflammation depended upon plasminogen activator activity; cows with higher PAA were more likely to improve. In conclusion, there was evidence for a role of the plasminogen activation proteolytic system in bovine endometritis.

  6. HTLV-1 Tax-mediated TAK1 activation involves TAB2 adapter protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Qingsheng; Minoda, Yasumasa; Yoshida, Ryoko; Yoshida, Hideyuki; Iha, Hidekatsu; Kobayashi, Takashi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Takaesu, Giichi

    2008-01-04

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax is an oncoprotein that plays a crucial role in the proliferation and transformation of HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes. It has recently been reported that Tax activates a MAPKKK family, TAK1. However, the molecular mechanism of Tax-mediated TAK1 activation is not well understood. In this report, we investigated the role of TAK1-binding protein 2 (TAB2) in Tax-mediated TAK1 activation. We found that TAB2 physically interacts with Tax and augments Tax-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Tax and TAB2 cooperatively activate TAK1 when they are coexpressed. Furthermore, TAK1 activation by Tax requires TAB2 binding as well as ubiquitination of Tax. We also found that the overexpression of TRAF2, 5, or 6 strongly induces Tax ubiquitination. These results suggest that TAB2 may be critically involved in Tax-mediated activation of TAK1 and that NF-{kappa}B-activating TRAF family proteins are potential cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases toward Tax.

  7. Radiation protection in radiologic technology: Apathy versus active involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, K.H.

    1982-11-01

    The lack of active participation in radiation protection is a serious problem in Radiologic Technology today. Underlying the problem is professional apathy. An overview of the historical changes, as well as various recent developments in radiology, accentuate the importance of necessary changes in technologists' attitudes and activities. 22 references.

  8. 101 Activities for Building More Effective School-Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Dorothy; Mattox, Beverly

    This booklet contains a collection of more than 100 activities designed to promote school-home and school-community relations. Activities are organized into seven categories: (1) communicating word from home to school, (2) people to people, (3) educational events, (4) volunteers--hands on in the classroom, (5) utilizing community resources, (6)…

  9. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  10. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  11. 14 CFR 1230.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. 1230.119 Section 1230.119 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.119 Research undertaken without the...

  12. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  13. 14 CFR 1230.119 - Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Research undertaken without the intention of involving human subjects. 1230.119 Section 1230.119 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.119 Research undertaken without the...

  14. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  15. 14 CFR 1230.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 1230.118 Section 1230.118 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 1230.118 Applications and...

  16. 48 CFR 1352.235-73 - Research involving human subjects-after initial contract award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of... Protection of Human Subjects (the “Common Rule”), adopted by the Department of Commerce at 15 CFR part 27.... (e) Should research involving human subjects become necessary for carrying out this...

  17. 49 CFR 11.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects. 11.118 Section 11.118 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 11.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite plans...

  18. Involvement of multiple elements in FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of FGF19.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Kagawa, Tatehiro; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2012-10-01

    The intestinal endocrine hormone human fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is involved in the regulation of not only hepatic bile acid metabolism but also carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In the present study, bile acid/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) responsiveness in the FGF19 promoter region was investigated by a reporter assay using the human colon carcinoma cell line LS174T. The assay revealed the presence of bile acid/FXR-responsive elements in the 5'-flanking region up to 8.8 kb of FGF19. Deletion analysis indicated that regions from -1866 to -1833, from -1427 to -1353, and from -75 to +262 were involved in FXR responsiveness. Four, four, and two consecutive half-sites of nuclear receptors were observed in the three regions, respectively. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed FXR/retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer binding in these three regions. EMSA and reporter assays using mutated constructs indicated that the nuclear receptor IR1, ER2, and DR8 motifs in the 5'-flanking region were involved in FXR responsiveness of FGF19. Lithocholic acid (LCA) (10 μM), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) (10 μM), or GW4064 (0.1 μM) treatment increased reporter activity in a construct including the three motifs under FXR-expressing conditions whereas LCA and not CDCA or GW4064 treatment increased the reporter activity under pregnane X receptor (PXR)-expressing conditions. These results suggest that FGF19 is transcriptionally activated through multiple FXR-responsive elements in the promoter region.

  19. AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway is critically involved in human pluripotent stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Romorini, Leonardo; Garate, Ximena; Neiman, Gabriel; Luzzani, Carlos; Furmento, Verónica Alejandra; Guberman, Alejandra Sonia; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Scassa, María Elida; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent stem cells (PSC) that can differentiate into a wide range of specialized cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor is essential for PSC survival, stemness and self-renewal. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates cell viability and apoptosis in many cell types. Although it has been demonstrated that PI3K/AKT activation by bFGF is relevant for PSC stemness maintenance its role on PSC survival remains elusive. In this study we explored the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PSC survival by AKT. We found that inhibition of AKT with three non-structurally related inhibitors (GSK690693, AKT inhibitor VIII and AKT inhibitor IV) decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis. We observed a rapid increase in phosphatidylserine translocation and in the extent of DNA fragmentation after inhibitors addition. Moreover, abrogation of AKT activity led to Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and PARP cleavage. Importantly, we demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown that GSK3β signaling is responsible, at least in part, of the apoptosis triggered by AKT inhibition. Moreover, GSK3β inhibition decreases basal apoptosis rate and promotes PSC proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AKT activation prevents apoptosis, partly through inhibition of GSK3β, and thus results relevant for PSC survival. PMID:27762303

  20. Thrombin selectively induces transcription of genes in human monocytes involved in inflammation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Bruges, Gustavo; Crespo, Gustavo; Salazar, Victor; Deglesne, Pierre-Antoine; Schneider, Heike; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Preissner, Klaus T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombin is essential for blood coagulation but functions also as a mediator of cellular signalling. Gene expression microarray experiments in human monocytes revealed thrombin-induced upregulation of a limited subset of genes, which are almost exclusively involved in inflammation and wound healing. Among these, the expression of F3 gene encoding for tissue factor (TF) was enhanced indicating that this physiological initiator of coagulation cascade may create a feed-forward loop to enhance blood coagulation. Activation of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR1) was shown to play a main role in promoting TF expression. Moreover, thrombin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an event that is required for expression of thrombin-regulated genes. Thrombin also increased the expression of TF at the protein level in monocytes as evidenced by Western blot and immunostaining. Furthermore, FXa generation induced by thrombin-stimulated monocytes was abolished by a TF blocking antibody and therefore it is entirely attributable to the expression of tissue factor. This cellular activity of thrombin provides a new molecular link between coagulation, inflammation and wound healing.

  1. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts.

  2. Identification of an ovarian voltage-activated Na+-channel type: hints to involvement in luteolysis.

    PubMed

    Bulling, A; Berg, F D; Berg, U; Duffy, D M; Stouffer, R L; Ojeda, S R; Gratzl, M; Mayerhofer, A

    2000-07-01

    An endocrine type of voltage-activated sodium channel (eNaCh) was identified in the human ovary and human luteinized granulosa cells (GC). Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that the eNaCh in GC is functional and tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive. The luteotrophic hormone human CG (hCG) was found to decrease the peak amplitude of the sodium current within seconds. Treatment with hCG for 24-48 h suppressed not only eNaCh mRNA levels, but also mean Na+ peak currents and resting membrane potentials. An unexpected role for eNaChs in regulating cell morphology and function was indicated after pharmacological modulation of presumed eNaCh steady-state activity in GC cultures for 24-48 h using TTX (NaCh blocker) and veratridine (NaCh activator). TTX preserved a highly differentiated cellular phenotype. Veratridine not only increased the number of secondary lysosomes but also led to a significantly reduced progesterone production. Importantly, endocrine cells of the nonhuman primate corpus luteum (CL), which represent in vivo counterparts of luteinized GC, also contain eNaCh mRNA. Although the mechanism of channel activity under physiological conditions is not clear, it may include persistent Na+ currents. As observed in GC in culture, abundant secondary lysosomes were particularly evident in the regressing CL, suggesting a functional link between eNaCh activity and this form of cellular regression in vivo. Our results identify eNaCh in ovarian endocrine cells and demonstrate that their expression is under the inhibitory control of hCG. Activation of eNaChs in luteal cells, due to loss of gonadotropin support, may initiate a cascade of events leading to decreased CL function, a process that involves lysosomal activation and autophagy. These results imply that ovarian eNaChs are involved in the physiological demise of the temporary endocrine organ CL in the primate ovary during the menstrual cycle. Because commonly used drugs, including phenytoin, target NaChs, these results

  3. Structural insights into human Kif7, a kinesin involved in Hedgehog signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Klejnot, Marta Kozielski, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The human Kif7 motor domain structure provides insights into a kinesin of medical significance. Kif7, a member of the kinesin 4 superfamily, is implicated in a variety of diseases including Joubert, hydrolethalus and acrocallosal syndromes. It is also involved in primary cilium formation and the Hedgehog signalling pathway and may play a role in cancer. Its activity is crucial for embryonic development. Kif7 and Kif27, a closely related kinesin in the same subfamily, are orthologues of the Drosophila melano@@gaster kinesin-like protein Costal-2 (Cos2). In vertebrates, they work together to fulfil the role of the single Cos2 gene in Drosophila. Here, the high-resolution structure of the human Kif7 motor domain is reported and is compared with that of conventional kinesin, the founding member of the kinesin superfamily. These data are a first step towards structural characterization of a kinesin-4 family member and of this interesting molecular motor of medical significance.

  4. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to

  5. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Bachnoff, Niv; Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Atlas, Daphne

    2011-01-01

    A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s) at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2. PMID:22216029

  6. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1177.4 Section 1177.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves...

  7. Social Work with Religious Volunteers: Activating and Sustaining Community Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Diana R.; Myers, Dennis M.; Wolfer, Terry A.

    2008-01-01

    Social workers in diverse community practice settings recruit and work with volunteers from religious congregations. This article reports findings from two surveys: 7,405 congregants in 35 Protestant congregations, including 2,570 who were actively volunteering, and a follow-up survey of 946 volunteers. It compares characteristics of congregation…

  8. Transportation as a "Related Service": Issues that Involve Transition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper discusses transportation as a related service for students with disabilities expecially as related to school-to-work transition activities. First, the legislative and legal basis for providing transportation services is discussed in the form of answers to frequently asked questions: why provide transportation? what is the basis for…

  9. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  10. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  11. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile; Salle, Valéry; Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  12. Mineralocorticoid receptor is involved in the aldosterone pathway in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Bordin, Luciana; Saccardi, Carlo; Donà, Gabriella; Sabbadin, Chiara; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Plebani, Mario; Brunati, Anna Maria; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Gizzo, Salvatore; Armanini, Decio

    2016-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that excessive aldosterone (Aldo) secretion in primary aldosteronism (PA) is associated with red blood cells (RBC) senescence. These alterations were prevented/inhibited by cortisol (Cort) or canrenone (Can) raising the hypothesis that Aldo effects in RBC may be mediated by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), though to date MR has never been demonstrated in human RBC. The aim of this multicenter comparative study was to investigate whether Aldo effects were mediated by MR in these a-nucleated cells. We included 12 healthy controls (HC) and 22 patients with PA. MR presence and activation were evaluated in RBC cytosol by glycerol gradient sedimentation, Western blotting, immuno-precipitation and radioimmunoassay. We demonstrated that RBC contained cytosolic MR, aggregated with HSP90 and other proteins to form multiprotein complex. Aldo induced MR to release from the complex and to form MR dimers which were quickly proteolyzed. Cort induced MR release but not dimers formation while Can was not able to induce MR release. In addition, RBC cytosol from PA patients contained significantly higher amounts of both MR fragments (p<0.0001) and Aldo (p<0.0001) concentrations. In conclusion, in RBC a genomic-like Aldo pathway is proposed involving MR activation, dimerization and proteolysis, but lacking nuclear transcription. In addition, dimers proteolysis may ensure a sort of Aldo scavenging from circulation by entrapping Aldo in MR fragments. PMID:27158328

  13. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas.

  14. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin αvβ3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin αvβ3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer. PMID:11172040

  15. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-02-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin v3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin v3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer.

  16. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Alves, Letícia S.; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L.; de Oliveira, Rosane B.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K+ efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release. PMID:25225402

  17. Metformin-suppressed differentiation of human visceral preadipocytes: Involvement of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Iwama, Hisakazu; Oura, Kyoko; Tadokoro, Tomoko; Hirose, Kayo; Watanabe, Miwako; Sakamoto, Teppei; Katsura, Akiko; Mimura, Shima; Nomura, Takako; Tani, Joji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Morishita, Asahiro; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Okano, Keiichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Himoto, Takashi; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    Visceral adipose tissue contributes to the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome. Metformin has been reported to suppress lipogenesis in a murine preadipocyte cell line. However, the effect of metformin on the differentiation of human visceral adipose tissue remains unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been suggested as therapeutic targets because of their involvement in the differentiation and maturation of fatty cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether metformin suppresses the differentiation of human preadipocytes and to identify miRNAs associated with the regulation of lipid metabolism. Human visceral preadipocytes (HPrAD-vis) were preincubated in growth media and then cultured with differentiation media containing metformin for 1 or 2 weeks. Adipogenic differentiation of the cells was assessed by Oil Red O staining, and soluble adiponectin in the culture media was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cell proliferation was assessed using a WST-8 assay, and the gene and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT‑enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) was determined by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis, respectively. miRNAs were profiled using human miRNA Oligo chips after total RNA was extracted and labeled. Oil Red O staining showed that metformin suppressed the accumulation of lipid droplets in HPrAD-vis cells. The adiponectin concentration in the culture media was also decreased in metformin-treated cells. The WST-8 assay revealed no effect on proliferation or growth inhibition following metformin treatment, although metformin suppressed the expression of PPARγ and C/EBPα. miRNA profiling further revealed differences between the metformin-treated group and control HPrAD-vis cells. Thus, the findings of the present study demonstrated that metformin suppressed the differentiation of human preadipocytes in vitro and altered the miRNA profile of these cells. Thus, the mi

  18. Organized activity involvement, depressive symptoms, and social adjustment in adolescents: ethnicity and socioeconomic status as moderators.

    PubMed

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M

    2009-10-01

    The current cross-sectional study investigated the links between various dimensions of organized activity involvement and depressive symptoms, loneliness, and peer victimization in an ethnically and economically diverse sample of adolescents (N = 152; 58% female). Results indicate that adolescents who were involved in organized activities for more years also reported lower levels of loneliness. There was evidence of diminishing returns when adolescents were very highly involved in organized activities; those who were either under- or over-involved reported the highest levels of depressive symptoms. Conversely, findings indicate that adolescents who participated in a narrow or wide range of activity contexts reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. In addition, results suggested that the relation between organized activity involvement and adjustment differs among adolescents from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Findings from the current study also underscore the importance of considering multiple indices of activity involvement when assessing its association with adjustment.

  19. Impaired enzymatic defensive activity, mitochondrial dysfunction and proteasome activation are involved in RTT cell oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cervellati, Carlo; Sticozzi, Claudia; Romani, Arianna; Belmonte, Giuseppe; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Cervellati, Franco; Milanese, Chiara; Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Savelli, Vinno; Forman, Henry J; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    A strong correlation between oxidative stress (OS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting females in the 95% of the cases, has been well documented although the source of OS and the effect of a redox imbalance in this pathology has not been yet investigated. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have demonstrated in RTT cells high levels of H2O2 and HNE protein adducts. These findings correlated with the constitutive activation of NADPH-oxidase (NOX) and that was prevented by a NOX inhibitor and iron chelator pre-treatment, showing its direct involvement. In parallel, we demonstrated an increase in mitochondrial oxidant production, altered mitochondrial biogenesis and impaired proteasome activity in RTT samples. Further, we found that the key cellular defensive enzymes: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductases activities were also significantly lower in RTT. Taken all together, our findings suggest that the systemic OS levels in RTT can be a consequence of both: increased endogenous oxidants as well as altered mitochondrial biogenesis with a decreased activity of defensive enzymes that leads to posttranslational oxidant protein modification and a proteasome activity impairment.

  20. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  1. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  2. Involvement of BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in leukotriene B4-induced neutrophil degranulation.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Thompson, Charles; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-03-15

    One of the important biological activities of human neutrophils is degranulation, which can be induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we investigated the intracellular signaling events involved in neutrophil degranulation mediated by the high affinity LTB4 receptor, BLT1. Peripheral blood neutrophils as well as the promyeloid PLB-985 cell line, stably transfected with BLT1 cDNA and differentiated into a neutrophil-like cell phenotype, were used throughout this study. LTB4-induced enzyme release was inhibited by 50-80% when cells were pretreated with the pharmacological inhibitors of endocytosis sucrose, Con A and NH4Cl. In addition, transient transfection with a dominant negative form of dynamin (K44A) resulted in approximately 70% inhibition of ligand-induced degranulation. Pretreating neutrophils or BLT1-expressing PLB-985 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 resulted in a 30-60% inhibition in BLT1-mediated degranulation. Yes kinase, but not c-Src, Fgr, Hck, or Lyn, was found to exhibit up-regulated kinase activity after LTB4 stimulation. Moreover, BLT1 endocytosis was found to be necessary for Yes kinase activation in neutrophils. LTB4-induced degranulation was also sensitive to inhibition of PI3K. In contrast, it was not affected by inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase MEK kinase, the Janus kinases, or the receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Taken together, our results suggest an essential role for BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in LTB4-mediated degranulation of human neutrophils.

  3. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1,040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model tested longitudinal paths between three categories of involvement (team sports, school clubs and activities, and religious activities, measured at baseline and 15 months), problem peer associations (baseline and 15 months), and cigarette smoking behavior (baseline and 24 months). Multi-group analyses indicated pathways differed by type of activity and adolescent gender. Boys’ baseline team sports and religious involvement predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via continued activity involvement at 15 months. Girls’ involvement in school clubs and activities and religious activities indirectly predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via reduced exposure to problem peers at 15 months. PMID:21603061

  4. Involvement of a Non-Human Sialic Acid in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samraj, Annie N.; Läubli, Heinz; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are common monosaccharides that are widely expressed as outer terminal units on all vertebrate cell surfaces, and play fundamental roles in cell–cell and cell–microenvironment interactions. The predominant sialic acids on most mammalian cells are N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Neu5Gc is notable for its deficiency in humans due to a species-specific and species-universal inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene encoding the hydroxylase that converts CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc. However, Neu5Gc is metabolically incorporated into human tissues from dietary sources (particularly red meat), and detected at even higher levels in some human cancers. Early life exposure to Neu5Gc-containing foods in the presence of certain commensal bacteria that incorporate dietary Neu5Gc into lipooligosaccharides can lead to generation of antibodies that are also cross-reactive against Neu5Gc-containing glycans in human tissues (“xeno-autoantigens”). Such anti-Neu5Gc “xeno-autoantibodies” are found in all humans, although ranging widely in levels among individuals, and displaying diverse and variable specificities for the underlying glycan. Experimental evidence in a human-like Neu5Gc-deficient Cmah−/−mouse model shows that inflammation due to “xenosialitis” caused by this antigen–antibody interaction can promote tumor progression, suggesting a likely mechanism for the well-known epidemiological link between red meat consumption and carcinoma risk. In this review, we discuss the history of this field, mechanisms of Neu5Gc incorporation into tissues, the origin and specificities of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies, their use as possible cancer biomarkers, implications of xenosialitis in cancer initiation and progression, and current and future approaches toward immunotherapy that could take advantage of this unusual human-specific phenomenon. PMID:24600589

  5. Involvement of a non-human sialic Acid in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are common monosaccharides that are widely expressed as outer terminal units on all vertebrate cell surfaces, and play fundamental roles in cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions. The predominant sialic acids on most mammalian cells are N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). Neu5Gc is notable for its deficiency in humans due to a species-specific and species-universal inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene encoding the hydroxylase that converts CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc. However, Neu5Gc is metabolically incorporated into human tissues from dietary sources (particularly red meat), and detected at even higher levels in some human cancers. Early life exposure to Neu5Gc-containing foods in the presence of certain commensal bacteria that incorporate dietary Neu5Gc into lipooligosaccharides can lead to generation of antibodies that are also cross-reactive against Neu5Gc-containing glycans in human tissues ("xeno-autoantigens"). Such anti-Neu5Gc "xeno-autoantibodies" are found in all humans, although ranging widely in levels among individuals, and displaying diverse and variable specificities for the underlying glycan. Experimental evidence in a human-like Neu5Gc-deficient Cmah(-) (/) (-) mouse model shows that inflammation due to "xenosialitis" caused by this antigen-antibody interaction can promote tumor progression, suggesting a likely mechanism for the well-known epidemiological link between red meat consumption and carcinoma risk. In this review, we discuss the history of this field, mechanisms of Neu5Gc incorporation into tissues, the origin and specificities of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies, their use as possible cancer biomarkers, implications of xenosialitis in cancer initiation and progression, and current and future approaches toward immunotherapy that could take advantage of this unusual human-specific phenomenon.

  6. Involvement of CYP2D6 in oxidative metabolism of cinnarizine and flunarizine in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, S; Kariya, S; Isozaki, S; Ohmori, S; Kitada, M; Hosokawa, S; Masubuchi, Y; Suzuki, T

    1993-06-30

    Oxidative metabolism of cinnarizine (CZ) and its fluorine derivative flunarizine (FZ), both of which are selective calcium entry blockers, was examined in human liver microsomes. The ring-hydroxylations and the N-desalkylations constituted primary metabolic pathways in microsomal metabolism of CZ and FZ. Among these pathways, the ring-hydroxylase (p-hydroxylation) activities at the cinnamyl moiety of both drugs were highly correlated with debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase activity and CYP2D6 content. Quinidine, a selective inhibitor of CYP2D6, suppressed the ring-hydroxylase activities of CZ and FZ. These results suggest that CYP2D6 is involved in the ring-hydroxylation of the cinnamyl moiety of both CZ and FZ in human liver microsomes.

  7. Predicting involvement in prison gang activity: street gang membership, social and psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jane L; Alleyne, Emma; Mozova, Katarina; James, Mark

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether street gang membership, psychological factors, and social factors such as preprison experiences could predict young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Data were collected via individual interviews with 188 young offenders held in a Young Offenders Institution in the United Kingdom. Results showed that psychological factors such as the value individuals attached to social status, a social dominance orientation, and antiauthority attitudes were important in predicting young offenders' involvement in prison gang activity. Further important predictors included preimprisonment events such as levels of threat, levels of individual delinquency, and levels of involvement in group crime. Longer current sentences also predicted involvement in prison gang activity. However, street gang membership was not an important predictor of involvement in prison gang activity. These findings have implications for identifying prisoners involved in prison gang activity and for considering the role of psychological factors and group processes in gang research.

  8. Protein Folding Activity of the Ribosome is involved in Yeast Prion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Marc; Soubigou, Flavie; Evrard, Justine; Nguyen, Phu hai; Hasin, Naushaba; Chédin, Stéphane; Gillet, Reynald; Contesse, Marie-Astrid; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Stahl, Guillaume; Jones, Gary W.; Voisset, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    6AP and GA are potent inhibitors of yeast and mammalian prions and also specific inhibitors of PFAR, the protein-folding activity borne by domain V of the large rRNA of the large subunit of the ribosome. We therefore explored the link between PFAR and yeast prion [PSI+] using both PFAR-enriched mutants and site-directed methylation. We demonstrate that PFAR is involved in propagation and de novo formation of [PSI+]. PFAR and the yeast heat-shock protein Hsp104 partially compensate each other for [PSI+] propagation. Our data also provide insight into new functions for the ribosome in basal thermotolerance and heat-shocked protein refolding. PFAR is thus an evolutionarily conserved cell component implicated in the prion life cycle, and we propose that it could be a potential therapeutic target for human protein misfolding diseases. PMID:27633137

  9. 40 CFR 26.118 - Applications and proposals lacking definite plans for involvement of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.118 Applications and proposals lacking definite... projects is the institution's responsibility; research training grants in which the activities...

  10. 16 CFR 1031.5 - Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.5 Criteria for Commission involvement in voluntary standards activities... share of product production. (g) Provisions in the standard for marking products conforming to...

  11. 75 FR 69630 - Impact of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities Involving...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ...-0543-02] Impact of Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention on Commercial Activities Involving... Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), through the Chemical Weapons Convention Implementation Act (CWCIA) and the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR), has had on commercial activities...

  12. Perceiving emotions in human-human and human-animal interactions: Hemodynamic prefrontal activity (fNIRS) and empathic concern.

    PubMed

    Vanutelli, Maria Elide; Balconi, Michela

    2015-09-25

    In the last years social neuroscience research attempted to identify the neural networks underlying the human ability to perceive others' emotions, a core process in establishing meaningful social bonds. A large amount of papers arose and identified common and specific empathy-based networks with respect to stimulus type and task. Despite the great majority of studies focused on human-human contexts, we do not establish relations with only other humans, but also with non-human animals. The aim of the present work was to explore the brain mechanisms involved in empathic concern for people who interacts with both peers and other species. Participants have been assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) while viewing pictures depicting humans interacting with both other men and women (human-human condition: HH), or with dogs and cats (human-animal: HA). Results showed that aggressive HH interactions elicited greater prefrontal activity (PFC) than HA ones while, when considering HA interactions, friendly ones were related to higher cortical activity. Finally, oxy (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) increasing related to the processing of aggressive interactions positively correlated with different empathic measures, within more specific brain regions. Results were elucidated with respect to available evidence on emotion perception, empathic neural mechanisms and their functional meaning for human-animal contexts.

  13. Human neurocysticercosis: immunological features involved in the host's susceptibility to become infected and to develop disease.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, Edda; Cárdenas, Graciela; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fragoso, Gladis; Larralde, Carlos; Fleury, Agnes

    2013-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous disease caused by the establishment of Taenia solium larvae in the central nervous system. Herein, the immunological and endocrinological features involved in resistance to infection and severe forms of the disease are reviewed, and their clinical relevance is discussed.

  14. The Human Rights Context for Ethical Requirements for Involving People with Intellectual Disability in Medical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacono, T.; Carling-Jenkins, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The history of ethical guidelines addresses protection of human rights in the face of violations. Examples of such violations in research involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) abound. We explore this history in an effort to understand the apparently stringent criteria for the inclusion of people with ID in research, and…

  15. Bacterial species involved in the conversion of dietary flavonoids in the human gut

    PubMed Central

    Braune, Annett; Blaut, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiota plays a crucial role in the conversion of dietary flavonoids and thereby affects their health-promoting effects in the human host. The identification of the bacteria involved in intestinal flavonoid conversion has gained increasing interest. This review summarizes available information on the so far identified human intestinal flavonoid-converting bacterial species and strains as well as their enzymes catalyzing the underlying reactions. The majority of described species involved in flavonoid transformation are capable of carrying out the O-deglycosylation of flavonoids. Other bacteria cleave the less common flavonoid-C-glucosides and/or further degrade the aglycones of flavonols, flavanonols, flavones, flavanones, dihydrochalcones, isoflavones and monomeric flavan-3-ols. To increase the currently limited knowledge in this field, identification of flavonoid-converting bacteria should be continued using culture-dependent screening or isolation procedures and molecular approaches based on sequence information of the involved enzymes. PMID:26963713

  16. Determination of cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of (-)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Haigou, R

    2011-12-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (-)-terpinen-4-ol was examined in human liver microsomes and recombinant enzymes. The biotransformation of (-)-terpinen-4-ol was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. (-)-Terpinen-4-ol was found to be oxidized to (-)-(1S,2R,4R)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol, major metabolic product by human liver microsomal P450 enzymes. The formation of metabolites of (-)-terpinen-4-ol was determined by relative abundance of mass fragments and retention times on GC. CYP2A6 in human liver microsomes was a major enzyme involved in the oxidation of (-)-terpinen-4-ol by human liver microsomes, based on the following lines of evidence. First, of 11 recombinant human P450 enzymes tested, CYP2A6 had the highest activity for oxidation of (-)-terpinen-4-ol. Second, oxidation of (-)-terpinen-4-ol was inhibited by (+)-menthofuran. Finally, there was a good correlation between CYP2A6 maker activity and (-)-terpinen-4-ol oxidation activities in liver microsomes of 10 human samples. Kinetic analysis showed that the V(max)/K(m) values for (-)-(1S,2R,4R)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol catalysed by liver microsomes of human sample HH-18 was 2.49 μL/min/nmol. Human recombinant CYP2A6 catalysed (-)-(1S,2R,4R)-1,2-epoxy-p-menthan-4-ol with V(max) values of 13.9 nmol/min/nmol P450 and apparent K(m) values of 91 μM.

  17. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS.

  18. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  19. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  20. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  1. Breadth and Intensity of Youth Activity Involvement as Contexts for Positive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Research has linked youth activity involvement to positive development. However, past studies have confounded at least two separable dimensions of involvement: breadth (number of activities) and intensity (participation frequency). Theory and the limited available evidence suggest that these dimensions may make independent contributions to…

  2. Ego Strength Development of Adolescents Involved in Adult-Sponsored Structured Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markstrom, Carol A.; Li, Xaioming; Blackshire, Shana L.; Wilfong, Juanita J.

    2005-01-01

    A psychosocial conception of ego strengths is presented in relation to adolescent involvement in adult-sponsored structured youth activities. Five-hundred and seventeen high school students completed measures on their involvement in structured activities and on 8 ego strengths. Gender, age, and SES were controlled in a MANCOVA procedure and it was…

  3. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. 1215.24 Section 1215.24 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct....

  4. Breadth and Intensity: Salient, Separable, and Developmentally Significant Dimensions of Structured Youth Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an impressive volume of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that youth involvement in structured, organized activities (e.g. school sports, community clubs) may facilitate positive youth development. We present a theory-based framework for studying structured activity involvement (SAI) as a context for positive youth…

  5. Physical environment virtualization for human activities recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poshtkar, Azin; Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2015-05-01

    Human activity recognition research relies heavily on extensive datasets to verify and validate performance of activity recognition algorithms. However, obtaining real datasets are expensive and highly time consuming. A physics-based virtual simulation can accelerate the development of context based human activity recognition algorithms and techniques by generating relevant training and testing videos simulating diverse operational scenarios. In this paper, we discuss in detail the requisite capabilities of a virtual environment to aid as a test bed for evaluating and enhancing activity recognition algorithms. To demonstrate the numerous advantages of virtual environment development, a newly developed virtual environment simulation modeling (VESM) environment is presented here to generate calibrated multisource imagery datasets suitable for development and testing of recognition algorithms for context-based human activities. The VESM environment serves as a versatile test bed to generate a vast amount of realistic data for training and testing of sensor processing algorithms. To demonstrate the effectiveness of VESM environment, we present various simulated scenarios and processed results to infer proper semantic annotations from the high fidelity imagery data for human-vehicle activity recognition under different operational contexts.

  6. Understanding human dynamics in microblog posting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yubao; Wang, Hui; Li, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Human activity patterns are an important issue in behavior dynamics research. Empirical evidence indicates that human activity patterns can be characterized by a heavy-tailed inter-event time distribution. However, most researchers give an understanding by only modeling the power-law feature of the inter-event time distribution, and those overlooked non-power-law features are likely to be nontrivial. In this work, we propose a behavior dynamics model, called the finite memory model, in which humans adaptively change their activity rates based on a finite memory of recent activities, which is driven by inherent individual interest. Theoretical analysis shows a finite memory model can properly explain various heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions, including a regular power law and some non-power-law deviations. To validate the model, we carry out an empirical study based on microblogging activity from thousands of microbloggers in the Celebrity Hall of the Sina microblog. The results show further that the model is reasonably effective. We conclude that finite memory is an effective dynamics element to describe the heavy-tailed human activity pattern.

  7. Deep Human Parsing with Active Template Regression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodan; Liu, Si; Shen, Xiaohui; Yang, Jianchao; Liu, Luoqi; Dong, Jian; Lin, Liang; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the human parsing task, namely decomposing a human image into semantic fashion/body regions, is formulated as an active template regression (ATR) problem, where the normalized mask of each fashion/body item is expressed as the linear combination of the learned mask templates, and then morphed to a more precise mask with the active shape parameters, including position, scale and visibility of each semantic region. The mask template coefficients and the active shape parameters together can generate the human parsing results, and are thus called the structure outputs for human parsing. The deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is utilized to build the end-to-end relation between the input human image and the structure outputs for human parsing. More specifically, the structure outputs are predicted by two separate networks. The first CNN network is with max-pooling, and designed to predict the template coefficients for each label mask, while the second CNN network is without max-pooling to preserve sensitivity to label mask position and accurately predict the active shape parameters. For a new image, the structure outputs of the two networks are fused to generate the probability of each label for each pixel, and super-pixel smoothing is finally used to refine the human parsing result. Comprehensive evaluations on a large dataset well demonstrate the significant superiority of the ATR framework over other state-of-the-arts for human parsing. In particular, the F1-score reaches 64.38 percent by our ATR framework, significantly higher than 44.76 percent based on the state-of-the-art algorithm [28].

  8. The Human Intermediate Filament Database: comprehensive information on a gene family involved in many human diseases.

    PubMed

    Szeverenyi, Ildiko; Cassidy, Andrew J; Chung, Cheuk Wang; Lee, Bernett T K; Common, John E A; Ogg, Stephen C; Chen, Huijia; Sim, Shu Yin; Goh, Walter L P; Ng, Kee Woei; Simpson, John A; Chee, Li Lian; Eng, Goi Hui; Li, Bin; Lunny, Declan P; Chuon, Danny; Venkatesh, Aparna; Khoo, Kian Hoe; McLean, W H Irwin; Lim, Yun Ping; Lane, E Birgitte

    2008-03-01

    We describe a revised and expanded database on human intermediate filament proteins, a major component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. The family of 70 intermediate filament genes (including those encoding keratins, desmins, and lamins) is now known to be associated with a wide range of diverse diseases, at least 72 distinct human pathologies, including skin blistering, muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, premature aging syndromes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cataract. To date, the database catalogs 1,274 manually-curated pathogenic sequence variants and 170 allelic variants in intermediate filament genes from over 459 peer-reviewed research articles. Unrelated cases were collected from all of the six sequence homology groups and the sequence variations were described at cDNA and protein levels with links to the related diseases and reference articles. The mutations and polymorphisms are presented in parallel with data on protein structure, gene, and chromosomal location and basic information on associated diseases. Detailed statistics relating to the variants records in the database are displayed by homology group, mutation type, affected domain, associated diseases, and nucleic and amino acid substitutions. Multiple sequence alignment algorithms can be run from queries to determine DNA or protein sequence conservation. Literature sources can be interrogated within the database and external links are provided to public databases. The database is freely and publicly accessible online at www.interfil.org (last accessed 13 September 2007). Users can query the database by various keywords and the search results can be downloaded. It is anticipated that the Human Intermediate Filament Database (HIFD) will provide a useful resource to study human genome variations for basic scientists, clinicians, and students alike.

  9. Involvement of the left insula in the ecological validity of the human voice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Yuri; Kuriki, Shinji; Nakano, Tamami

    2015-01-01

    A subtle difference between a real human and an artificial object that resembles a human evokes an impression of a large qualitative difference between them. This suggests the existence of a neural mechanism that processes the sense of humanness. To examine the presence of such a mechanism, we compared the behavioral and brain responses of participants who listened to human and artificial singing voices created from vocal fragments of a real human voice. The behavioral experiment showed that the song sung by human voices more often elicited positive feelings and feelings of humanness than the same song sung by artificial voices, although the lyrics, melody, and rhythm were identical. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significantly higher activation in the left posterior insula in response to human voices than in response to artificial voices. Insular activation was not merely evoked by differences in acoustic features between the voices. Therefore, these results suggest that the left insula participates in the neural processing of the ecological quality of the human voice. PMID:25739519

  10. Listening to humans walking together activates the social brain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Miiamaaria V; Hari, Riitta

    2008-01-01

    Human footsteps carry a vast amount of social information, which is often unconsciously noted. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we analyzed brain networks activated by footstep sounds of one or two persons walking. Listening to two persons walking together activated brain areas previously associated with affective states and social interaction, such as the subcallosal gyrus bilaterally, the right temporal pole, and the right amygdala. These areas seem to be involved in the analysis of persons' identity and complex social stimuli on the basis of auditory cues. Single footsteps activated only the biological motion area in the posterior STS region. Thus, hearing two persons walking together involved a more widespread brain network than did hearing footsteps from a single person.

  11. Scaling behavior of online human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Huang, Junming; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-11-01

    The rapid development of the Internet technology enables humans to explore the web and record the traces of online activities. From the analysis of these large-scale data sets (i.e., traces), we can get insights about the dynamic behavior of human activity. In this letter, the scaling behavior and complexity of human activity in the e-commerce, such as music, books, and movies rating, are comprehensively investigated by using the detrended fluctuation analysis technique and the multiscale entropy method. Firstly, the interevent time series of rating behaviors of these three types of media show similar scaling properties with exponents ranging from 0.53 to 0.58, which implies that the collective behaviors of rating media follow a process embodying self-similarity and long-range correlation. Meanwhile, by dividing the users into three groups based on their activities (i.e., rating per unit time), we find that the scaling exponents of the interevent time series in the three groups are different. Hence, these results suggest that a stronger long-range correlations exist in these collective behaviors. Furthermore, their information complexities vary in the three groups. To explain the differences of the collective behaviors restricted to the three groups, we study the dynamic behavior of human activity at the individual level, and find that the dynamic behaviors of a few users have extremely small scaling exponents associated with long-range anticorrelations. By comparing the interevent time distributions of four representative users, we can find that the bimodal distributions may bring forth the extraordinary scaling behaviors. These results of the analysis of the online human activity in the e-commerce may not only provide insight into its dynamic behaviors but may also be applied to acquire potential economic interest.

  12. Phenyl valerate esterase activity of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2017-03-15

    Phenyl valerate is used for detecting and measuring neuropathy target esterase (NTE) and has been used for discriminating esterases as potential target in hen model of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy. In previous studies we observed that phenyl valerate esterase (PVase) activity of an enzymatic fraction in chicken brain might be due to a butyrylcholinesterase protein (BuChE), and it was suggested that this enzymatic fraction could be related to the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of the organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). In this work, PVase activity of purified human butyrylcholinesterase (hBuChE) is demonstrated and confirms the novel observation that a relationship of BuChE with PVase activities is also relevant for humans, as is, therefore the potential role in toxicity for humans. The KM and catalytic constant (kcat) were estimated as 0.52/0.72 µM and 45,900/49,200 min(-1) respectively. Furthermore, this work studies the inhibition by preincubation of PVase and cholinesterase activities of hBuChE with irreversible inhibitors (mipafox, iso-OMPA or PMSF), showing that these inhibitors interact similarly in both activities with similar second-order inhibition constants. Acethylthiocholine and phenyl valerate partly inhibit PVase and cholinesterase activities, respectively. All these observations suggest that both activities occur in the same active center. The interaction with a reversible inhibitor (ethopropazine) showed that the cholinesterase activity was more sensitive than the PVase activity, showing that the sensitivity for this reversible inhibitor is affected by the nature of the substrate. The present work definitively establishes the capacity of BuChE to hydrolyze the carboxylester phenyl valerate using a purified enzyme (hBuChE). Therefore, BuChE should be considered in the research of organophosphorus targets of toxicity related with PVase proteins.

  13. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  14. The SMC5/6 complex is involved in crucial processes during human spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verver, Dideke E; Langedijk, Nathalia S M; Jordan, Philip W; Repping, Sjoerd; Hamer, Geert

    2014-07-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for safe reproduction. Therefore, chromatin structure and dynamics should be tightly regulated during germ cell development. Chromatin structure and function are in large part determined by the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes, of which SMC5/6 recently has been shown to be involved in both spermatogonial differentiation and meiosis during mouse spermatogenesis. We therefore investigated the role of this complex in human spermatogenesis. We found SMC6 to be expressed in the human testis and present in a subset of type Adark and type Apale spermatogonia, all spermatocytes, and round spermatids. During human meiosis, SMC5/6 is located at the synaptonemal complex (SC), the XY body, and at the centromeres during meiotic metaphases. However, in contrast to mouse spermatogenesis, SMC6 is not located at pericentromeric heterochromatin in human spermatogenic cells, indicating subtle but perhaps important differences in not only SMC5/6 function but maybe also in maintenance of genomic integrity at the repetitive pericentromeric regions. Nonetheless, our data clearly indicate that the SMC5/6 complex, as shown in mice, is involved in numerous crucial processes during human spermatogenesis, such as in spermatogonial development, on the SC between synapsed chromosomes, and in DNA double-strand break repair on unsynapsed chromosomes during pachynema.

  15. Transcription factor 7-like 1 is involved in hypothalamo–pituitary axis development in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gaston-Massuet, Carles; McCabe, Mark J.; Scagliotti, Valeria; Young, Rodrigo M.; Carreno, Gabriela; Gregory, Louise C.; Jayakody, Sujatha A.; Pozzi, Sara; Gualtieri, Angelica; Basu, Basudha; Koniordou, Markela; Wu, Chun-I; Bancalari, Rodrigo E.; Rahikkala, Elisa; Veijola, Riitta; Lopponen, Tuija; Graziola, Federica; Turton, James; Signore, Massimo; Mousavy Gharavy, Seyedeh Neda; Charolidi, Nicoletta; Sokol, Sergei Y.; Merrill, Bradley J.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant embryonic development of the hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland in humans results in congenital hypopituitarism (CH). Transcription factor 7-like 1 (TCF7L1), an important regulator of the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, is expressed in the developing forebrain and pituitary gland, but its role during hypothalamo–pituitary (HP) axis formation or involvement in human CH remains elusive. Using a conditional genetic approach in the mouse, we first demonstrate that TCF7L1 is required in the prospective hypothalamus to maintain normal expression of the hypothalamic signals involved in the induction and subsequent expansion of Rathke’s pouch progenitors. Next, we reveal that the function of TCF7L1 during HP axis development depends exclusively on the repressing activity of TCF7L1 and does not require its interaction with β-catenin. Finally, we report the identification of two independent missense variants in human TCF7L1, p.R92P and p.R400Q, in a cohort of patients with forebrain and/or pituitary defects. We demonstrate that these variants exhibit reduced repressing activity in vitro and in vivo relative to wild-type TCF7L1. Together, our data provide support for a conserved molecular function of TCF7L1 as a transcriptional repressor during HP axis development in mammals and identify variants in this transcription factor that are likely to contribute to the etiology of CH. PMID:26764381

  16. On universality in human correspondence activity.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R Dean; Stouffer, Daniel B; Campanharo, Andriana S L O; Amaral, Luís A Nunes

    2009-09-25

    The identification and modeling of patterns of human activity have important ramifications for applications ranging from predicting disease spread to optimizing resource allocation. Because of its relevance and availability, written correspondence provides a powerful proxy for studying human activity. One school of thought is that human correspondence is driven by responses to received correspondence, a view that requires a distinct response mechanism to explain e-mail and letter correspondence observations. We demonstrate that, like e-mail correspondence, the letter correspondence patterns of 16 writers, performers, politicians, and scientists are well described by the circadian cycle, task repetition, and changing communication needs. We confirm the universality of these mechanisms by rescaling letter and e-mail correspondence statistics to reveal their underlying similarity.

  17. The RNA binding protein TIAR is involved in the regulation of human iNOS expression.

    PubMed

    Fechir, M; Linker, K; Pautz, A; Hubrich, T; Kleinert, H

    2005-09-05

    Human inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression is regulated by post-transcriptional mechanisms. The 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human iNOS mRNA contains AU-rich elements (ARE), which are known to be important for the regulation of mRNA stability. The 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA has been shown to regulate human iNOS mRNA expression post-transcriptionally. One RNA-binding protein known to interact with AREs and to regulate mRNA stability is the T cell intracellular antigen-1-related protein (TIAR). In RNA binding studies TIAR displayed high affinity binding to the human iNOS 3'-UTR sequence. In RNase protection experiments, the cytokine incubation needed for iNOS expression did not change TIAR expression in DLD-1 cells. However, overexpression of TIAR in human DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells resulted in enhanced cytokine-induced iNOS expression. In conclusion, TIAR seems to be involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of human iNOS expression.

  18. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  19. The Human Activity of Evaluation Theorizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Ellett, Frederick, Jr.

    Theorizing about evaluation should be conceptualized as a human activity governed by certain strategies and principles. The theories advanced by various evaluators have changed over the years, thus illustrating ten principles of evaluation. The starting point for theory development or modification is self-reflection and review of one's own…

  20. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  1. Food & Fitness. Directory. Human Nutrition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    Activities of the following regulatory and food service agencies of the Department of Agriculture are described: (1) Agricultural Research Service; (2) Cooperative State Research Service; (3) Economic Research Service; (4) Human Nutrition Information Service; (5) Office of Grants and Program Systems; (6) Office of International Cooperation and…

  2. Scaling laws of human interaction activity.

    PubMed

    Rybski, Diego; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2009-08-04

    Even though people in our contemporary technological society are depending on communication, our understanding of the underlying laws of human communicational behavior continues to be poorly understood. Here we investigate the communication patterns in 2 social Internet communities in search of statistical laws in human interaction activity. This research reveals that human communication networks dynamically follow scaling laws that may also explain the observed trends in economic growth. Specifically, we identify a generalized version of Gibrat's law of social activity expressed as a scaling law between the fluctuations in the number of messages sent by members and their level of activity. Gibrat's law has been essential in understanding economic growth patterns, yet without an underlying general principle for its origin. We attribute this scaling law to long-term correlation patterns in human activity, which surprisingly span from days to the entire period of the available data of more than 1 year. Further, we provide a mathematical framework that relates the generalized version of Gibrat's law to the long-term correlated dynamics, which suggests that the same underlying mechanism could be the source of Gibrat's law in economics, ranging from large firms, research and development expenditures, gross domestic product of countries, to city population growth. These findings are also of importance for designing communication networks and for the understanding of the dynamics of social systems in which communication plays a role, such as economic markets and political systems.

  3. Identification of CMS as a cytosolic adaptor of the human pTalpha chain involved in pre-TCR function.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María N; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Fuentes, Patricia; González-García, Sara; Alcain, Juan; Toribio, María L

    2007-12-15

    The T-cell receptor beta (TCRbeta)/pre-TCRalpha (pTalpha) pre-TCR complex (pre-TCR) signals the expansion and differentiation of de-veloping thymocytes. Functional pro-perties of the pre-TCR rely on its unique pTalpha chain, which suggests the participation of specific intracellular adaptors. However, pTalpha-interacting molecules remain unknown. Here, we identified a polyproline-arginine sequence in the human pTalpha cytoplasmic tail that interacted in vitro with SH3 domains of the CIN85/CMS family of adaptors, and mediated the recruitment of multiprotein complexes involving all (CMS, CIN85, and CD2BP3) members. Supporting the physiologic relevance of this interaction, we found that 1 such adaptor, CMS, interacted in vivo with human pTalpha, and its expression was selectively up-regulated during human thymopoiesis in pre-TCR-activated thymocytes. Upon activation, pre-TCR clustering was induced, and CMS and polymerized actin were simultaneously recruited to the pre-TCR activation site. CMS also associated via its C-terminal region to the actin cytoskeleton in the endocytic compartment, where it colocalized with internalized pTalpha in traffic to lysosomal degradation. Notably, deletion of the pTalpha CIN85/CMS-binding motif impaired pre-TCR-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization and NFAT transcriptional activity, and precluded activation induced by overexpression of a CMS-SH3 N-terminal mutant. These results provide the first molecular evidence for a pTalpha intracellular adaptor involved in pre-TCR function.

  4. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  5. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Li, Xichun; Zou, Xiaohan; Greenwood, Michael; Gerwick, William H.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria. PMID:25675001

  6. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  7. Multiple mechanisms are involved in 6-gingerol-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Ho; Cekanova, Maria; Baek, Seung Joon

    2008-03-01

    6-Gingerol, a natural product of ginger, has been known to possess anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities. However, the mechanisms by which it prevents cancer are not well understood in human colorectal cancer. Cyclin D1 is a proto-oncogene that is overexpressed in many cancers and plays a role in cell proliferation through activation by beta-catenin signaling. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-activated gene-1 (NAG-1) is a cytokine associated with pro-apoptotic and anti-tumorigenic properties. In the present study, we examined whether 6-gingerol influences cyclin D1 and NAG-1 expression and determined the mechanisms by which 6-gingerol affects the growth of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. 6-Gingerol treatment suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and G(1) cell cycle arrest. Subsequently, 6-gingerol suppressed cyclin D1 expression and induced NAG-1 expression. Cyclin D1 suppression was related to inhibition of beta-catenin translocation and cyclin D1 proteolysis. Furthermore, experiments using inhibitors and siRNA transfection confirm the involvement of the PKCepsilon and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta pathways in 6-gingerol-induced NAG-1 expression. The results suggest that 6-gingerol stimulates apoptosis through upregulation of NAG-1 and G(1) cell cycle arrest through downregulation of cyclin D1. Multiple mechanisms appear to be involved in 6-gingerol action, including protein degradation as well as beta-catenin, PKCepsilon, and GSK-3beta pathways.

  8. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  9. Legal regime of human activities in outer space law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golda, Carlo

    1994-01-01

    Current developments in space activities increasingly involve the presence of humans on board spacecraft and, in the near future, on the Moon, on Mars, on board Space Stations, etc. With respect to these challenges, the political and legal issues connected to the status of astronauts are largely unclear and require a new doctrinal attention. In the same way, many legal and political questions remain open in the structure of future space crews: the need for international standards in the definition and training of astronauts, etc.; but, first of all, an international uniform legal definition of astronauts. Moreover, the legal structure for human life and operations in outer space can be a new and relevant paradigm for the definition of similar rules in all the situations and environments in which humans are involved in extreme frontiers. The present article starts from an overview on the existing legal and political definitions of 'astronauts', moving to the search of a more useful definition. This is followed by an analysis of the concrete problems created by human space activities, and the legal and political responses to them (the need for a code of conduct; the structure of the crew and the existing rules in the US and ex-USSR; the new legal theories on the argument; the definition and structure of a code of conduct; the next legal problems in fields such as privacy law, communications law, business law, criminal law, etc.).

  10. Involvement of the human midbrain and thalamus in auditory deviance detection.

    PubMed

    Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Escera, Carles; Slabu, Lavinia; Grimm, Sabine; Sanjuán, Ana; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Ávila, César

    2015-02-01

    Prompt detection of unexpected changes in the sensory environment is critical for survival. In the auditory domain, the occurrence of a rare stimulus triggers a cascade of neurophysiological events spanning over multiple time-scales. Besides the role of the mismatch negativity (MMN), whose cortical generators are located in supratemporal areas, cumulative evidence suggests that violations of auditory regularities can be detected earlier and lower in the auditory hierarchy. Recent human scalp recordings have shown signatures of auditory mismatch responses at shorter latencies than those of the MMN. Moreover, animal single-unit recordings have demonstrated that rare stimulus changes cause a release from stimulus-specific adaptation in neurons of the primary auditory cortex, the medial geniculate body (MGB), and the inferior colliculus (IC). Although these data suggest that change detection is a pervasive property of the auditory system which may reside upstream cortical sites, direct evidence for the involvement of subcortical stages in the human auditory novelty system is lacking. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during a frequency oddball paradigm, we here report that auditory deviance detection occurs in the MGB and the IC of healthy human participants. By implementing a random condition controlling for neural refractoriness effects, we show that auditory change detection in these subcortical stations involves the encoding of statistical regularities from the acoustic input. These results provide the first direct evidence of the existence of multiple mismatch detectors nested at different levels along the human ascending auditory pathway.

  11. Phosphorylation of human INO80 is involved in DNA damage tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Dai; Waki, Mayumi; Umezawa, Masaki; Aoki, Yuka; Utsugi, Takahiko; Ohtsu, Masaya; Murakami, Yasufumi

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced PCNA ubiquitination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of hINO80 significantly reduced nuclear dots intensity of RAD18 after UV irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Western blot analyses showed phosphorylated hINO80 C-terminus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of phosphorylation mutant hINO80 reduced PCNA ubiquitination. -- Abstract: Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious type of DNA damage. DSBs can be generated directly by exposure to ionizing radiation or indirectly by replication fork collapse. The DNA damage tolerance pathway, which is conserved from bacteria to humans, prevents this collapse by overcoming replication blockages. The INO80 chromatin remodeling complex plays an important role in the DNA damage response. The yeast INO80 complex participates in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. The mechanisms regulating yINO80 complex are not fully understood, but yeast INO80 complex are necessary for efficient proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) ubiquitination and for recruitment of Rad18 to replication forks. In contrast, the function of the mammalian INO80 complex in DNA damage tolerance is less clear. Here, we show that human INO80 was necessary for PCNA ubiquitination and recruitment of Rad18 to DNA damage sites. Moreover, the C-terminal region of human INO80 was phosphorylated, and overexpression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of human INO80 resulted in decreased ubiquitination of PCNA during DNA replication. These results suggest that the human INO80 complex, like the yeast complex, was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway and that phosphorylation of human INO80 was involved in the DNA damage tolerance pathway. These findings provide new insights into the DNA damage tolerance pathway in mammalian cells.

  12. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  13. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging.

  14. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  15. Factors involved in adherence of lactobacilli to human Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, J D; Klaenhammer, T R

    1994-01-01

    A quantitative assay performed with bacterial cells labelled with [3H]thymidine was used to investigate factors involved in the adherence of human isolates Lactobacillus acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 and Lactobacillus gasseri ADH to human Caco-2 intestinal cells. For all three strains, adherence was concentration dependent, greater at acidic pH values, and significantly greater than adherence of a control dairy isolate, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 1489. Adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 was decreased by protease treatment of the bacterial cells, whereas adherence of L. gasseri ADH either was not affected or was enhanced by protease treatment. Putative surface layer proteins were identified on L. acidophilus BG2FO4 and NCFM/N2 cells but were not involved in adherence. Periodate oxidation of bacterial cell surface carbohydrates significantly reduced adherence of L. gasseri ADH, moderately reduced adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4, and had no effect on adherence of L. acidophilus NCFM/N2. These results indicate that Lactobacillus species adhere to human intestinal cells via mechanisms which involve different combinations of carbohydrate and protein factors on the bacterial cell surface. The involvement of a secreted bridging protein, which has been proposed as the primary mediator of adherence of L. acidophilus BG2FO4 in spent culture supernatant (M.-H. Coconnier, T. R. Klaenhammer, S. Kernéis, M.-F. Bernet, and A. L. Servin, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:2034-2039, 1992), was not confirmed in this study. Rather, a pH effect on Caco-2 cells contributed significantly to the adherence of this strain in spent culture supernatant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7811085

  16. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by ultraviolet A radiation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Dubertret, Louis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin reaching both the epidermis and the dermis. We thus investigated the effects of naturally occurring doses of UVA radiation on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities in human dermal fibroblasts. We demonstrated that UVA selectively activates p38 MAPK with no effect on extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK1-ERK2) or JNK-SAPK (cJun NH2-terminal kinase-stress-activated protein kinase) activities. We then investigated the signaling pathway used by UVA to activate p38 MAPK. L-Histidine and sodium azide had an inhibitory effect on UVA activation of p38 MAPK, pointing to a role of singlet oxygen in transduction of the UVA effect. Afterward, using prolonged cell treatments with growth factors to desensitize their signaling pathways or suramin to block growth factor receptors, we demonstrated that UVA signaling pathways shared elements with growth factor signaling pathways. In addition, using emetine (a translation inhibitor altering ribosome functioning) we detected the involvement of ribotoxic stress in p38 MAPK activation by UVA. Our observations suggest that p38 activation by UVA in dermal fibroblasts involves singlet oxygen-dependent activation of ligand-receptor signaling pathways or ribotoxic stress mechanism (or both). Despite the activation of these two distinct signaling mechanisms, the selective activation of p38 MAPK suggests a critical role of this kinase in the effects of UVA radiation.

  17. Involvement of mitochondrial and B-RAF/ERK signaling pathways in berberine-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Burgeiro, Ana; Gajate, Consuelo; Dakir, El Habib; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2011-07-01

    The natural isoquinoline alkaloid berberine exhibits a wide spectrum of biological activities including antitumor activity, but its mechanism of action remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we report that berberine induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells, through a process that involved mitochondria and caspase activation. Berberine-induced activation of a number of caspases, including caspases 3, 4, 7, 8, and 9. Pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, and caspase-8 and caspase-9 inhibitors prevented apoptosis. Berberine also led to the generation of the p20 cleavage fragment of BAP31, involved in directing proapoptotic signals between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Treatment of SK-MEL-2 melanoma cells with berberine induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria to the cytosol, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and a decreased ATP/ADP ratio. Overexpression of bcl-xL by gene transfer prevented berberine-induced cell death, mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss, and cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor release, but not ROS generation. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited the production of ROS, but did not abrogate the berberine-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, by using the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059, and reduction of B-RAF levels by silencing RNA induced cell death of SK-MEL-2 cells, and diminished the berberine concentration required to promote apoptosis. These data show that berberine-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells involves mitochondria and caspase activation, but ROS generation was not essential. Our results indicate that inhibition of B-RAF/ERK survival signaling facilitates the cell death response triggered by berberine.

  18. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Besides their putative usage for therapies, stem cells are a promising tool for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis. For this purpose induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from patients harbouring specific mutations. In contrast to adult stem cells, iPS cells are pluripotent and can efficiently be grown in culture. However, iPS cells are modulated due to the ectopic induction of pluripotency, harbour other somatic mutations accumulated during the life span of the source cells, exhibit only imperfectly cleared epigenetic memory of the source cell, and are often genomically instable. In addition, iPS cells from patients only allow the investigation of mutations, which are not prenatally lethal. Embryonic stem (ES) cells have a high proliferation and differentiation potential, but raise ethical issues. Human embryos, which are not transferred in the course of in vitro fertilization, because of preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a genetic defect, are still rarely donated for the establishment of ES cell lines. In addition, their usage for studies on gene functions for oncogenesis is hampered by the fact the ES cells are already tumorigenic per se. In 2003 amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells have been discovered, which meanwhile have been demonstrated to harbour the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Monoclonal human AFS cell lines derived from amniocenteses have a high proliferative potential, are genomically stable and are not associated with ethical controversies. Worldwide amniocenteses are performed for routine human genetic diagnosis. We here discuss how generation and banking of monoclonal human AFS cell lines with specific chromosomal aberrations or monogenic disease mutations would allow to study the functional consequences of disease causing mutations. In addition, recently a protocol for efficient and highly reproducible siRNA-mediated long-term knockdown of endogenous gene

  19. MERTK as negative regulator of human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Raquel; Carrera-Silva, E. Antonio; Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Errasti, Andrea E.; Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lozano, Juan José; España, Carolina; Ricart, Elena; Panés, Julián; Rothlin, Carla Vanina; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether MERTK, which is up-regulated in human DCs treated with immunosuppressive agents, is directly involved in modulating T cell activation. MERTK is a member of the TAM family and contributes to regulating innate immune response to ACs by inhibiting DC activation in animal models. However, whether MERTK interacts directly with T cells has not been addressed. Here, we show that MERTK is highly expressed on dex-induced human tol-DCs and participates in their tolerogenic effect. Neutralization of MERTK in allogenic MLR, as well as autologous DC–T cell cultures, leads to increased T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Additionally, we identify a previously unrecognized noncell-autonomous regulatory function of MERTK expressed on DCs. Mer-Fc protein, used to mimic MERTK on DCs, suppresses naïve and antigen-specific memory T cell activation. This mechanism is mediated by the neutralization of the MERTK ligand PROS1. We find that MERTK and PROS1 are expressed in human T cells upon TCR activation and drive an autocrine proproliferative mechanism. Collectively, these results suggest that MERTK on DCs controls T cell activation and expansion through the competition for PROS1 interaction with MERTK in the T cells. In conclusion, this report identified MERTK as a potent suppressor of T cell response. PMID:25624460

  20. Effects of aircraft noise on human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, M. D.; Gilfillan, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of aircrft noise on human activities was investigated by developing a battery of tasks (1) representative of a range of human activities and (2) sensitive to the disruptive effects of noise. The noise used were recordings of jet aircraft and helicopter sounds at three lvels of loudness--60, 70, and 80 dB(A). Experiment 1 investigated 12 different cognitive tasks, along with two intelligibility tasks included to validate that the noises were being effective. Interference with intelligibility was essentially the same as found in the research literature, but only inconsistent effects were found on either accuracy or latency of performance on the cognitive tasks. When the tasks were grouped into four categories (Intelligibility, Matching, Verbal, and Arithmetic), reliable differences in rated annoyingness of the noises were related to the task category and to the type of noise (jet or helicopter).

  1. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    PubMed

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  2. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  3. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  4. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity during Language: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojemann, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from recordings of human temporal cortical single neuron activity during several measures of language, including object naming and word reading are reviewed and related to changes in activity in the same neurons during recent verbal memory and verbal associative learning measures, in studies conducted during awake neurosurgery for the treatment of epilepsy. The proportion of neurons changing activity with language tasks was similar in either hemisphere. Dominant hemisphere activity was characterized by relative inhibition, some of which occurred during overt speech, possibly to block perception of one’s own voice. However, the majority seems to represent a dynamic network becoming active with verbal memory encoding and especially verbal learning, but inhibited during performance of overlearned language tasks. Individual neurons are involved in different networks for different aspects of language, including naming or reading and naming in different languages. The majority of the changes in activity were tonic sustained shifts in firing. Patterned phasic activity for specific language items was very infrequently recorded. Human single neuron recordings provide a unique perspective on the biologic substrate for language, for these findings are in contrast to many of the findings from other techniques for investigating this. PMID:24961418

  5. Prostanoid EP1- and TP-receptors involved in the contraction of human pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; de Montpreville, Vincent; Brink, Charles; Norel, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    To characterize the prostanoid receptors (TP, FP, EP1 and/or EP3) involved in the vasoconstriction of human pulmonary veins, isolated venous preparations were challenged with different prostanoid-receptor agonists in the absence or presence of selective antagonists. The stable thromboxane A2 mimetic, U46619, was a potent constrictor agonist on human pulmonary veins (pEC50=8.60±0.11 and Emax=4.61±0.46 g; n=15). The affinity values for two selective TP-antagonists (BAY u3405 and GR32191B) versus U46619 were BAY u3405: pA2=8.94±0.23 (n=3) and GR32191B: apparent pKB=8.25±0.34 (n=3), respectively. These results are consistent with the involvement of TP-receptor in the U46619 induced contractions. The two EP1-/EP3- agonists (17-phenyl-PGE2 and sulprostone) induced contraction of human pumonary veins (pEC50=8.56±0.18; Emax=0.56±0.24 g; n=5 and pEC50=7.65±0.13; Emax=1.10±0.12 g; n=14, respectively). The potency ranking for these agonists: 17-phenyl-PGE2>sulprostone suggests the involvement of an EP1-receptor rather than EP3. In addition, the contractions induced by sulprostone, 17-phenyl-PGE2 and the IP-/EP1- agonist (iloprost) were blocked by the DP-/EP1-/EP2-receptor antagonist (AH6809) as well as by the EP1 antagonist (SC19220). PGF2α induced small contractions which were blocked by AH6809 while fluprostenol was ineffective. These results indicate that FP-receptors are not implicated in the contraction of human pulmonary veins. These data suggest that the contractions induced by prostanoids involved TP- and EP1-receptors in human pulmonary venous smooth muscle. PMID:11739243

  6. Identification and Isolation of Brucella suis Virulence Genes Involved in Resistance to the Human Innate Immune System▿

    PubMed Central

    Liautard, Janny; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Lafont, Virginie; Köhler, Stephan; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Brucella strains are facultative intracellular pathogens that induce chronic diseases in humans and animals. This observation implies that Brucella subverts innate and specific immune responses of the host to develop its full virulence. Deciphering the genes involved in the subversion of the immune system is of primary importance for understanding the virulence of the bacteria, for understanding the pathogenic consequences of infection, and for designing an efficient vaccine. We have developed an in vitro system involving human macrophages infected by Brucella suis and activated syngeneic γ9δ2 T lymphocytes. Under these conditions, multiplication of B. suis inside macrophages is only slightly reduced. To identify the genes responsible for this reduced sensitivity, we screened a library of 2,000 clones of transposon-mutated B. suis. For rapid and quantitative analysis of the multiplication of the bacteria, we describe a simple method based on Alamar blue reduction, which is compatible with screening a large library. By comparing multiplication inside macrophages alone and multiplication inside macrophages with activated γ9δ2 T cells, we identified four genes of B. suis that were necessary to resist to the action of the γ9δ2 T cells. The putative functions of these genes are discussed in order to propose possible explanations for understanding their exact role in the subversion of innate immunity. PMID:17709411

  7. Human CB1 Receptor Isoforms, present in Hepatocytes and β-cells, are Involved in Regulating Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M.; Doyle, Máire E.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Ghosh, Soumita; Cieśla, Łukasz; Moaddel, Ruin; Carlson, Olga D.; Witek, Rafal P.; O’Connell, Jennifer F.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutics aimed at blocking the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor for treatment of obesity resulted in significant improvements in liver function, glucose uptake and pancreatic β-cell function independent of weight loss or CB1 receptor blockade in the brain, suggesting that peripherally-acting only CB1 receptor blockers may be useful therapeutic agents. Neuropsychiatric side effects and lack of tissue specificity precluded clinical use of first-generation, centrally acting CB1 receptor blockers. In this study we specifically analyzed the potential relevance to diabetes of human CB1 receptor isoforms in extraneural tissues involved in glucose metabolism. We identified an isoform of the human CB1 receptor (CB1b) that is highly expressed in β-cells and hepatocytes but not in the brain. Importantly, CB1b shows stronger affinity for the inverse agonist JD-5037 than for rimonabant compared to CB1 full length. Most relevant to the field, CB1b is a potent regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity in peripheral metabolic tissues. CB1b blockade by JD-5037 results in stronger adenylyl cyclase activation compared to rimonabant and it is a better enhancer of insulin secretion in β-cells. We propose this isoform as a principal pharmacological target for the treatment of metabolic disorders involving glucose metabolism. PMID:27641999

  8. Human CB1 Receptor Isoforms, present in Hepatocytes and β-cells, are Involved in Regulating Metabolism.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Doyle, Máire E; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Ghosh, Soumita; Cieśla, Łukasz; Moaddel, Ruin; Carlson, Olga D; Witek, Rafal P; O'Connell, Jennifer F; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-09-19

    Therapeutics aimed at blocking the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor for treatment of obesity resulted in significant improvements in liver function, glucose uptake and pancreatic β-cell function independent of weight loss or CB1 receptor blockade in the brain, suggesting that peripherally-acting only CB1 receptor blockers may be useful therapeutic agents. Neuropsychiatric side effects and lack of tissue specificity precluded clinical use of first-generation, centrally acting CB1 receptor blockers. In this study we specifically analyzed the potential relevance to diabetes of human CB1 receptor isoforms in extraneural tissues involved in glucose metabolism. We identified an isoform of the human CB1 receptor (CB1b) that is highly expressed in β-cells and hepatocytes but not in the brain. Importantly, CB1b shows stronger affinity for the inverse agonist JD-5037 than for rimonabant compared to CB1 full length. Most relevant to the field, CB1b is a potent regulator of adenylyl cyclase activity in peripheral metabolic tissues. CB1b blockade by JD-5037 results in stronger adenylyl cyclase activation compared to rimonabant and it is a better enhancer of insulin secretion in β-cells. We propose this isoform as a principal pharmacological target for the treatment of metabolic disorders involving glucose metabolism.

  9. Evidence for involvement of multiple forms of cytochrome P-450 in aflatoxin B sup 1 metabolism in human liver

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, L.M.; Wolf, C.R. ); Neal, G.E.; Judah, D.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Liver cancer is a major cause of premature death in many areas of Africa and Asia and its incidence is strongly correlated with exposure to aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}). Because AFB{sub 1} requires metabolic activation to achieve a biological response, there is a need for detailed knowledge of the mechanism of activation to assess individual risk. The authors carried out an extensive study using a total of 19 human liver samples to determine the individual variability in the metabolism of the toxin to mutagenic or detoxification products and to identify the specific cytochrome P-450 forms involved in these processes. Metabolism to the toxic 8,9-epoxide or to products mutagenic in the Ames test was found to exhibit very large individual variation. These data demonstrate that, although P450IIIA probably plays an important role in AFB{sub 1} activation, several other cytochrome P-450 forms have the capacity to activate the toxin. Similar considerations apply to detoxifying metabolism to aflatoxin Q{sub 1} and aflatoxin M{sub 1}. The levels of expression of many of the forms of cytochrome P-450 involved in AFB{sub 1} metabolism are known to be highly sensitive to environmental factors. This indicates that such factors will be an important determinant in individual susceptibility to the tumorigenic action of AFB{sub 1}.

  10. Involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis: insight into the gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-08-01

    Regucalcin, which its gene is located on the X chromosome, plays a multifunctional role as a suppressor protein in cell signal transduction in various types of cells and tissues. The suppression of regucalcin gene expression has been shown to involve in carcinogenesis. Regucalcin gene expression was uniquely downregulated in carcinogenesis of rat liver in vivo, although the expression of other many genes was upregulated, indicating that endogenous regucalcin plays a suppressive role in the development of hepatocarcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin was found to suppress proliferation of rat cloned hepatoma cells in vitro. Moreover, the regucalcin gene and its protein levels were demonstrated specifically to downregulate in human hepatocellular carcinoma by analysis with multiple gene expression profiles and proteomics. Regucalcin gene expression was also found to suppress in human tumor tissues including kidney, lung, brain, breast and prostate, suggesting that repressed regucalcin gene expression leads to the development of carcinogenesis in various tissues. Regucalcin may play a role as a suppressor protein in carcinogenesis. Overexpression of endogenous regucalcin is suggested to reveal preventive and therapeutic effects on carcinogenesis. Delivery of the regucalcin gene may be a novel useful tool in the gene therapy of carcinogenesis. This review will discuss regarding to an involvement of regucalcin as a suppressor protein in human carcinogenesis in insight into the gene therapy.

  11. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  12. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  13. Getting Involved: Exploring Latino GBT Volunteerism and Activism in AIDS and LGBT Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M.; Vázquez, Raquel; Benjamin, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the community involvement (e.g., volunteerism, activism) of Latino gay and bisexual men and transgender persons (GBT) in two areas: AIDS/GLBT and other general causes. Drawing from volunteering and identity theories, we explore: Who is likely to get involved? What factors affect variation in the levels of involvement? Where do Latino GBT participate and what do they do? Data come from a cross-sectional sample (N=643) of Latino GBT in Chicago and San Francisco. We find high levels of involvement, but primarily focused on AIDS/GLBT. Involvement appears to be driven by income, early involvement, role modeling, and childhood stigmatization of gender nonconformity. PMID:26451081

  14. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  15. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N.; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility. PMID:25970615

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation.

    PubMed

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H; Marín-Briggiler, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility.

  17. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  18. 15 CFR 712.2 - Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.2 Section 712.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.2 Restrictions on activities...

  19. 15 CFR 712.2 - Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.2 Section 712.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.2 Restrictions on activities...

  20. Middle-Class Parental Involvement in the Summer Activities of Four Elementary Students: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Iva B.; Chappell, Manya; Johnson, Susan; Ngassam, Marlise DePaul

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we explore middle-class parental involvement in summer activities of four elementary students. Many researchers discuss summer programs initiated by institutions, but fail to explain how parents' availability, experiences, and related criteria affect student summer activities. From our interviews, observations, and artifacts, we…

  1. 15 CFR 712.2 - Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.2 Section 712.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.2 Restrictions on activities...

  2. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... misconduct. 13.5 Section 13.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of suspected criminal activity or misconduct to the EPA Office of Inspector...

  3. Understanding Threshold Effects of Organized Activity Involvement in Adolescents: Sex and Family Income as Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Edin T.; Bohnert, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the curvilinear links between involvement in organized activities (OA) and sport activities specifically and various indicators of psychological and social development. Participants included 150 9th and 10th graders (57% females) from an urban, selective-enrollment high school. Eligibility for admission is based on city…

  4. 15 CFR 712.2 - Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.2 Section 712.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.2 Restrictions on activities...

  5. Human kallikrein 6 activity is regulated via an autoproteolytic mechanism of activation/inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bayés, Alex; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Ventura, Salvador; Vendrell, Josep; Aviles, Francesc X; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2004-06-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (protease M/zyme/neurosin) is a serine protease that has been suggested to be a serum biomarker for ovarian cancer and may also be involved in pathologies of the CNS. The precursor form of human kallikrein 6 (pro-hK6) was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and found to be autoprocessed to an active but unstable mature enzyme that subsequently yielded the inactive, self-cleavage product, hK6 (D81-K244). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the basis for the intrinsic catalytic activity and the activation mechanism of pro-hK6. A single substitution R80 --> Q stabilized the activity of the mature enzyme, while substitution of the active site serine (S197 --> A) resulted in complete loss of hK6 proteolytic activity and facilitated protein production. Our data suggest that the enzymatic activity of hK6 is regulated by an autoactivation/autoinactivation mechanism. Mature hK6 displayed a trypsin-like activity against synthetic substrates and human plasminogen was identified as a putative physiological substrate for hK6, as specific cleavage at the plasminogen internal bond S460-V461 resulted in the generation of angiostatin, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and metastatic growth.

  6. Coordinated activities of human dicer domains in regulatory RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Enbo; Zhou, Kaihong; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2012-09-28

    The conserved ribonuclease Dicer generates microRNAs and short-interfering RNAs that guide gene silencing in eukaryotes. The specific contributions of human Dicer's structural domains to RNA product length and substrate preference are incompletely understood, due in part to the difficulties of Dicer purification. Here, we show that active forms of human Dicer can be assembled from recombinant polypeptides expressed in bacteria. Using this system, we find that three distinct modes of RNA recognition give rise to Dicer's fidelity and product length specificity. The first involves anchoring one end of a double-stranded RNA helix within the PAZ domain, which can assemble in trans with Dicer's catalytic domains to reconstitute an accurate but non-substrate-selective dicing activity. The second entails nonspecific RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain, an interaction that is essential for substrate recruitment in the absence of the PAZ domain. The third mode of recognition involves hairpin RNA loop recognition by the helicase domain, which ensures efficient processing of specific substrates. These results reveal distinct interactions of each Dicer domain with different RNA structural features and provide a facile system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of human microRNA biogenesis.

  7. The gamma-carboxyglutamic acid domain of anticoagulant protein S is involved in activated protein C cofactor activity, independently of phospholipid binding.

    PubMed

    Saller, François; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Amelot, Aymeric; Kaabache, Tahar; Le Bonniec, Bernard F; Aiach, Martine; Gandrille, Sophie; Borgel, Delphine

    2005-01-01

    We expressed 2 chimeras between human protein S (PS) and human prothrombin (FII) in which the prothrombin gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain replaced the PS Gla domain in native PS (Gla(FII)-PS) or in PS deleted of the thrombin-sensitive region (TSR) (Gla(FII)-DeltaTSR-PS). Neither PS/FII chimera had activated protein C (APC) cofactor activity in plasma clotting assays or purified systems, but both bound efficiently to phospholipids. This pointed to a direct involvement of the PS Gla domain in APC cofactor activity through molecular interaction with APC. Using computational methods, we identified 2 opposite faces of solvent-exposed residues on the PS Gla domain (designated faces 1 and 2) as potentially involved in this interaction. Their importance was supported by functional characterization of a PS mutant in which the face 1 and face 2 PS residues were reintroduced into Gla(FII)-PS, leading to significant APC cofactor activity, likely through restored interaction with APC. Furthermore, by characterizing PS mutants in which PS face 1 and PS face 2 were individually replaced by the corresponding prothrombin faces, we found that face 1 was necessary for efficient phospholipid binding but that face 2 residues were not strictly required for phospholipid binding and were involved in the interaction with APC.

  8. Melatonin in humans: Possible involvement in SIDS, and use in contraceptives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Lynch, Harry J.; Sturner, William Q.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively few tools exist for assessing the possible involvement of melatonin in normal or abnormal physiologlcal and behavioral states. One cannot perform the classic ablation experiment of endocrinologists by cavalierly removing the human's pineal, nor derive the same effect pharmacologically by administering a drug which blocks the actions of the indole on its receptors (because no such drugs, demonstrated to work in humans, exist). About all that can be done is to administer the melatonin and see what happens, or measure its levels in a body fluid and determine whether its temporal patterns track those of the physiological or behavioral variable being examined. The clinical state of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) which apparently is associated with abnormalities in melatonin concentrations within body fluids obtained at autopsy is described. New data which suggest that exogenous melatonin has sufficient antigonadal potency to allow it to replace estrogen and, acting in combination with norethisterone, serve as a useful contraceptive agent is summarized.

  9. Human coronaviruses: viral and cellular factors involved in neuroinvasiveness and neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Desforges, Marc; Le Coupanec, Alain; Stodola, Jenny K; Meessen-Pinard, Mathieu; Talbot, Pierre J

    2014-12-19

    Among the various respiratory viruses infecting human beings, coronaviruses are important pathogens, which usually infect the upper respiratory tract, where they are mainly associated with common colds. However, in more vulnerable populations, such as newborns, infants, the elderly and immune-compromised individuals, these opportunistic pathogens can also affect the lower respiratory tract, leading to pneumonia, exacerbations of asthma, and various types of respiratory distress syndrome. The respiratory involvement of human coronaviruses has been clearly established since the 1960s. Nevertheless, for almost three decades now, data reported in the scientific literature has also demonstrated that, like it was described for other human viruses, coronaviruses have neuroinvasive capacities since they can spread from the respiratory tract to the central nervous system (CNS). Once there, infection of CNS cells (neurotropism) could lead to human health problems, such as encephalitis and long-term neurological diseases. Neuroinvasive coronaviruses could damage the CNS as a result of misdirected host immune responses that could be associated with autoimmunity in susceptible individuals (virus-induced neuroimmunopathology) and/or viral replication, which directly induces damage to CNS cells (virus-induced neuropathology). Given all these properties, it has been suggested that these opportunistic human respiratory pathogens could be associated with the triggering or the exacerbation of neurologic diseases for which the etiology remains poorly understood. Herein, we present host and viral factors that participate in the regulation of the possible pathogenic processes associated with CNS infection by human coronaviruses and we try to decipher the intricate interplay between virus and host target cells in order to characterize their role in the virus life cycle as well as in the capacity of the cell to respond to viral invasion.

  10. Aquaporin-Mediated Water and Hydrogen Peroxide Transport Is Involved in Normal Human Spermatozoa Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, Umberto; Pellavio, Giorgia; Marchetti, Anna Lisa; Omes, Claudia; Todaro, Federica; Gastaldi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different aquaporins (AQPs) are expressed in human sperm cells and with a different localization. Their function has been related to cell volume control in response to the osmotic changes encountered passing from the epididymal fluid to the cervical mucus or involved in the end stage of cytoplasm removal during sperm maturation. Recently, AQPs have also shown hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) permeability properties. Here, we investigate the expression, localization and functioning of AQPs in human sperm cells with particular attention to their role as peroxiporins in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging in both normospermic and sub-fertile human subjects. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were used to confirm and clarify the AQPs expression and localization. Water and H2O2 permeability was tested by stopped flow light scattering method and by the CM-H2DCFDA (5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydro-fluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester) H2O2 fluorescence probe, respectively. AQP3, -7, -8, and -11 proteins were found in human sperm cells and localized in the head (AQP7), in the middle piece (AQP8) and in the tail (AQP3 and -11) in both the plasma membrane and in intracellular structures. Sperm cells showed water and H2O2 permeability which was reversibly inhibited by H2O2, heat stress and the AQP inhibitor HgCl2. Reduced functionality was observed in patients with compromised basal semen parameters. Present findings suggest that AQPs are involved in both volume regulation and ROS elimination. The relationship between sperm number and motility and AQP functioning was also demonstrated. PMID:28042826

  11. Cathepsin V is involved in the degradation of invariant chain in human thymus and is overexpressed in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Eva; Li, Weijie; Yasuda, Yoshiyuki; Wienhold, Wolfgang; Denzin, Lisa K; Lautwein, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph; Schnorrer, Petra; Weber, Ekkehard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Kurek, Raffael; Melms, Arthur; Bromme, Dieter

    2003-08-01

    Stepwise degradation of the invariant chain (Ii) is required for the binding of antigenic peptides to MHC class II molecules. Cathepsin (Cat) L in the murine thymus and Cat S in peripheral APCs have both been implicated in the last step of Ii degradation that gives rise to the class II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP). Cat V has been recently described as highly homologous to Cat L and exclusively expressed in human thymus and testis, but with no mouse orthologue. We report that Cat V is the dominant cysteine protease in cortical human thymic epithelial cells, while Cat L and Cat S seem to be restricted to dendritic and macrophage-like cells. Active Cat V in thymic lysosomal preparations was demonstrated by active-site labeling. Recombinant Cat V was capable of converting Ii into CLIP efficiently, suggesting that Cat V is the protease that controls the generation of alphabeta-CLIP complexes in the human thymus, in analogy to Cat L in mouse. Comparison of Cat V expression between thymi from patients with myasthenia gravis and healthy controls revealed a significantly higher expression level in the pathological samples, suggesting a potential involvement of this protease in the immunopathogenesis of myasthenia gravis, an autoimmune disease almost invariably associated with thymic pathology.

  12. An animal model to study human muscular diseases involving mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Hélène; Warren, Blair E

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondria are producing most of the energy needed for many cellular functions by a process named oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). It is now well recognized that mitochondrial dysfunctions are involved in several pathologies or degenerative processes, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and aging. Animal models are currently used to try to understand the role of mitochondria in human diseases but a major problem is that mitochondria from different species and tissues are variable in terms of regulation. Analysis of mitochondrial function in three species of planarian flatworms (Tricladia, Platyhelminthes) shows that they share a very rare characteristic with human mitochondria: a strong control of oxidative phosphorylation by the phosphorylation system. The ratio of coupled OXPHOS over maximal electron transport capacity after uncoupling (electron transport system; ETS) well below 1.0 indicates that the phosphorylation system is limiting the rate of OXPHOS. The OXPHOS/ETS ratios are 0.62 ± 0.06 in Dugesia tigrina, 0.63 ± 0.05 in D. dorotocephala and 0.62 ± 0.05 in Procotyla fluviatilis, comparable to the value measured in human muscles. To our knowledge, no other animal model displays this peculiarity. This new model offers a venue in which to test the phosphorylation system as a potential therapeutic control point within humans.

  13. Possible involvement of ERK 1/2 in UVA-induced melanogenesis in cultured normal human epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Yanase, H; Ando, H; Horikawa, M; Watanabe, M; Mori, T; Matsuda, N

    2001-04-01

    UV-induced melanogenesis is a well known physiological response of human skin exposed to solar radiation; however, the signaling molecules involved in the stimulation of melanogenesis in melanocytes following UV exposure remain unclear. In this study we induced melanogenesis in vitro in normal human epidermal melanocytes using a single irradiation with UVA at 1 kJ/m2 and examined the potential involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) as UVA-responsive signaling molecules in those cells. UVA irradiation did not affect the proliferation of melanocytes, but it did increase tyrosinase mRNA expression, which reached a maximum level 4 hr after UVA irradiation. The amount of tyrosinase protein, as quantitated by immunoblotting, was also increased at 24 hr following UVA irradiation. Among the MAPK examined, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) 1/2 was phosphorylated within 15 min of UVA irradiation, but no such phosphorylation was observed for c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) or p38. Accordingly, the activity of ERK1/2 was also increased shortly after UVA irradiation. These responses of ERK1/2 to UVA irradiation were markedly inhibited when cells were pre-treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine, an antioxidant, or with suramin, a tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The formation of (6-4)photoproducts or cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers was not detected in cellular DNA after UVA irradiation. These findings suggest that a single UVA irradiation-induced melanogenesis is associated with the activation of ERK1/2 by upstream signals that originate from reactive oxygen species or from activated tyrosine kinase receptors, but not from damaged DNA.

  14. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  15. Evidence for the Involvement of p38 MAPK Activation in Barnacle Larval Settlement

    PubMed Central

    He, Li-Sheng; Xu, Ying; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Gen; Qi, Shu-Hua; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts. PMID:23115639

  16. Reduced amygdala activity during aversive conditioning in human narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Aurélie; Khatami, Ramin; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Boesiger, Peter; Schwartz, Sophie; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2010-03-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep-wake disorder caused by a loss of hypothalamic hypocretins. Here we assessed the time course of amygdala activation during aversive conditioning in unmedicated patients with narcolepsy. Unlike healthy matched control subjects, narcolepsy patients had no enhancement of amygdala response to conditioned stimuli and no increase in functional coupling between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that human narcolepsy is accompanied by abnormal emotional learning, and that, in line with animal data, the hypocretin system and the amygdala are involved in this process.

  17. Fibroblasts, glial, and neuronal cells are involved in extravascular prothrombin activation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Y; Shikamoto, Y; Fukudome, K; Kimoto, M; Morita, T

    1999-10-01

    A membrane-associated prothrombin activator (MAPA) was found on various cultured cells derived from non-hematopoietic cells [Sekiya, F. et al. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 32441-32445]. In this study, we investigated the enzymatic properties of this enzyme using protease inhibitors. While the metalloproteinase inhibitor, o-phenanthroline, had no effect, some Kunitz type serine protease inhibitors attenuated MAPA activity. Recombinant tissue factor pathway inhibitor (rTFPI) also markedly reduced the activity (IC(50), 1. 3+/-0.6 x 10(-10) M). MAPA activity is, therefore, most likely to be due to factor Xa. We evaluated the effect of exogenous factor Xa on MAPA activity. Factor Xa-dependent prothrombin activation was observed on fibroblast cells (apparent K(d), 1.47+/-0.72 nM). Activation was also observed on glial and neuronal cells, which expressed MAPA activity. These results imply that membrane-bound factor Xa results in MAPA activity on these cells. Therefore, we considered the involvement of factor Va, a component of prothrombinase, in this activity. We examined whether or not the prothrombinase complex is assembled on these cells. Prothrombin was activated in a manner dependent on both exogenous factor Xa and factor Va (apparent K(d) of 0.51-1.81 nM for factor Va). These results indicate that the prothrombinase complex forms specifically on various extravascular cells. Although the prothrombinase complex can be assembled on monocytes and lymphocytes, it is not known why these cells can activate prothrombin specifically. These cells which have the capacity for prothrombin activator activity could also activate factor X; i.e. cells with factor X activation activity were able to convert prothrombin. These observations suggest that thrombin was generated via two procoagulant activities; factor X activation and subsequent prothrombinase complex formation on the surface of these cells. This mechanism may explain the various pathological states involving or resulting

  18. FKBP52 is involved in the regulation of SOCE channels in the human platelets and MEG 01 cells.

    PubMed

    López, Esther; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A; Redondo, Pedro C

    2013-03-01

    Immunophilins are FK506-binding proteins that have been involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis, either by modulating Ca(2+) channels located in the plasma membrane or in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RE). We have investigated whether immunophilins would participate in the regulation of stored-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in human platelets and MEG 01. Both cell types were loaded with fura-2 for determining cytosolic calcium concentration changes ([Ca(2+)](c)), or stimulated and fixed to evaluate the protein interaction profile by performing immunoprecipitation and western blotting. We have found that incubation of platelets with FK506 increases Ca(2+) mobilization. Thapsigargin (TG)-evoked, Thr-evoked SOCE and TG-evoked Mn(2+) entry resulted in significant reduction by treatment of platelets with immunophilin antagonists. We confirmed by immunoprecipitation that immunophilins interact with transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) and Orai1 in human platelets. FK506 and rapamycin reduced the association between TRPC1 and Orai1 with FK506 binding protein (52) (FKBP52) in human platelets, and between TRPC1 and the type II IP(3)R, which association is known to be crucial for the maintenance of SOCE in human platelets. FKBP52 role in SOCE activation was confirmed by silencing FKBP52 using SiRNA FKBP52 in MEG 01 as demonstrated by single cell configuration imaging technique. TRPC1 silencing and depletion of cell of TRPC1 and FKBP52 simultaneously, impair activation of SOCE evoked by TG in MEG 01. Finally, in MEG 01 incubated with FK506 we observed a reduction in TRPC1/FKBP52 coupling, and similarly, FKBP52 silencing reduced the association between IP3R type II and TRPC1 during SOCE. All together, these results demonstrate that immunophilins participate in the regulation of SOCE in human platelets.

  19. Differences in Neural Activation for Object-Directed Grasping in Chimpanzees and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Lauren E.; Gutman, David A.; Votaw, John R.; Schuster, David M.; Preuss, Todd M.; Orban, Guy A.; Stout, Dietrich; Parr, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The human faculty for object-mediated action, including tool use and imitation, exceeds that of even our closest primate relatives and is a key foundation of human cognitive and cultural uniqueness. In humans and macaques, observing object-directed grasping actions activates a network of frontal, parietal, and occipitotemporal brain regions, but differences in human and macaque activation suggest that this system has been a focus of selection in the primate lineage. To study the evolution of this system, we performed functional neuroimaging in humans' closest living relatives, chimpanzees. We compare activations during performance of an object-directed manual grasping action, observation of the same action, and observation of a mimed version of the action that consisted of only movements without results. Performance and observation of the same action activated a distributed frontoparietal network similar to that reported in macaques and humans. Like humans and unlike macaques, these regions were also activated by observing movements without results. However, in a direct chimpanzee/human comparison, we also identified unique aspects of human neural responses to observed grasping. Chimpanzee activation showed a prefrontal bias, including significantly more activity in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas human activation was more evenly distributed across more posterior regions, including significantly more activation in ventral premotor cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and inferotemporal cortex. This indicates a more “bottom-up” representation of observed action in the human brain and suggests that the evolution of tool use, social learning, and cumulative culture may have involved modifications of frontoparietal interactions. PMID:23986247

  20. Cortico-basal ganglia circuits involved in different motivation disorders in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Sgambato-Faure, Véronique; Worbe, Yulia; Epinat, Justine; Féger, Jean; Tremblay, Léon

    2016-01-01

    The ventral striatum (VS) is of particular interest in the study of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, performed on non-human primates, we associated local perturbation with monosynaptic axonal tracer injection into medial, central and lateral VS to characterize anatomo-functional circuits underlying the respective expression of sexual manifestations, stereotyped behaviors and hypoactive state associated with loss of food motivation. For the three behavioral effects, we demonstrated the existence of three distinct cortico-basal ganglia (BG) circuits that were topographically organized and overlapping at some cortical (orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex) and subcortical (caudal levels of BG) levels, suggesting interactions between motivation domains. Briefly, erection was associated with a circuit involving the orbitofrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex (areas 10, 11) and limbic parts of BG, i.e. medial parts of the pallidal complex and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr). Stereotyped behavior was linked to a circuit involving the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (area 12/47) and limbic parts of the pallidal complex and of the SNr, while the apathetic state was underlined by a circuit involving not only the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex but also the lateral prefrontal cortex (area 8, 45), the anterior insula and the lateral parts of the medial pallidal complex and of the ventro-medial SNr. For the three behavioral effects, the cortico-BG circuits mainly involved limbic regions of the external and internal pallidum, as well as the limbic part of the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), suggesting the involvement of both direct and indirect striatal pathways and both output BG structures. As these motivation disorders could still be induced in dopamine (DA)-depleted monkeys, we suggest that DA issued from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) modulates their expression rather than causes them. Finally, this study may give some

  1. Galectin-9 is Involved in Immunosuppression Mediated by Human Bone Marrow-derived Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Yi, TacGhee; Song, Sun U

    2015-10-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunomodulatory properties and can suppress exaggerated pro-inflammatory immune responses. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, a variety of soluble factors are known to contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. However, functional redundancy in the immunosuppressive properties of MSCs indicates that other uncharacterized factors could be involved. Galectin-9, a member of the β-galactoside binding galectin family, has emerged as an important regulator of innate and adaptive immunity. We examined whether galectin-9 contributes to MSC-mediated immunosuppression. Galectin-9 was strongly induced and secreted from human MSCs upon stimulation with pro-inflammatory cytokines. An in vitro immunosuppression assay using a knockdown approach revealed that galectin-9-deficient MSCs do not exert immunosuppressive activity. We also provided evidence that galectin-9 may contribute to MSC-mediated immunosuppression by binding to its receptor, TIM-3, expressed on activated lymphocytes, leading to apoptotic cell death of activated lymphocytes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that galectin-9 is involved in MSC-mediated immunosuppression and represents a potential therapeutic factor for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  2. Involvement of ACSL in local synthesis of neutral lipids in cytoplasmic lipid droplets in human hepatocyte HuH7.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Tetsuaki; Homma, Koichi J; Onoduka, Jun; Mori, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Makita, Minoru; Higashi, Yusuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Takano, Tatsuya

    2007-06-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) function as intracellular storage depots of neutral lipids. Recently, we identified long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase 3 (ACSL3) as a major LD-associated protein in the human hepatocyte cell line HuH7. In this study, we investigated whether droplet-associated ACSL is involved in lipid metabolism in LDs. Addition of oleic acid (OA) to culture medium was shown to enhance the intracellular accumulation of LDs in the cells, which was accompanied by an increase of droplet ACSL3. When LD-enriched cells induced by OA were further incubated without OA for 3 days, approximately 80% of LDs were retained in the cells. Conversely, cellular LD content was greatly decreased after the addition of an ACSL inhibitor, triacsin C. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease of the droplet ACSL3. Incubation of isolated LD fractions with (14)C-labeled OA or palmitic acid resulted in [(14)C]acyl-CoA generation in vitro, indicating the presence of ACSL activity in LDs. The droplet ACSL activity varied according to the quantity of LDs in their emergence and disappearance in cells. Incubation of the LD fraction with [(14)C]oleoyl-CoA resulted in radioactive triacylglycerol and cholesteryl esters. These results suggest that LD ACSL activity is involved in local synthesis of neutral lipids and LD formation.

  3. Activities involving aeronautical, space science, and technology support for minority institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report addressed the activities with which the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity (ICBO) was involved over the past 12 months. ICBO was involved in the design and development of a CARES Student Tracking System Software (CARES). Cares is intended to provide an effective means of maintaining relevant current and historical information on NASA-funded students through a range of educational program initiatives. ICBP was extensively involved in the formation of a minority university consortium amd implementation of collaborative research activities by the consortium as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth/Earth Observing System. ICBO was involved in the formation of an HBCU/MI Consortium to facilitate technology transfer efforts to the small and minority business community in their respective regions.

  4. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-12-11

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors' placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  5. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject. PMID:26690450

  6. NIK is involved in constitutive activation of the alternative NF-{kappa}B pathway and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishina, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Gohda, Jin; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2009-10-09

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among human neoplasms. Constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer cells and is involved in their malignancy. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation. Here, we show that the alternative pathway is constitutively activated and NF-{kappa}B-inducing kinase (NIK), a mediator of the alternative pathway, is significantly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of NIK expression followed by subcellular fractionation revealed that NIK is constitutively involved in the processing of p100 and nuclear transport of p52 and RelB in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, NIK silencing significantly suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. These results clearly indicate that NIK is involved in the constitutive activation of the alternative pathway and controls cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, NIK might be a novel target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Prostanoids are not involved in postocclusive reactive hyperaemia in human skin.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Marcin; Gaillard-Bigot, Florence; Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    Several mediators contribute to postocclusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH) in the skin, including sensory nerves and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. The main objective of this study was to investigate the specific involvement of prostanoids in human skin PORH. We tested the effect of the inhibition of cyclo-oxygenases (COX) by 4 mm ketoprofen, infused through microdialysis fibers inserted into the healthy volunteers forearm skin, following 5 min brachial artery occlusion. Skin microvascular blood flux was recorded using two-dimensional Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging. Maximal cutaneous vascular conductance (CVCmax ) was obtained following the perfusion of 29 mm sodium nitroprusside. A systematic review of the effects of COX inhibitors on skin peak PORH was also performed. We observed no significant difference between ketoprofen and placebo for the PORH peak (78 ± 8 and 71 ± 19% CVCmax , respectively) and area under the curve (2951 ± 721 and 2490 ± 936% CVCmax .s). A meta-analysis showed a substantial heterogeneity between studies, with overall a neutral effect of COX inhibition on peak PORH. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition does not alter skin PORH, suggesting no involvement of prostanoids in cutaneous postocclusive vasodilatation in healthy humans.

  8. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  9. Individual differences in dispositional mindfulness and brain activity involved in reappraisal of emotion

    PubMed Central

    Ormel, Johan; Aleman, André

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of negative emotion through reappraisal has been shown to induce increased prefrontal activity and decreased amygdala activity. Individual differences in dispositional mindfulness reflect differences in typical recognition, detachment and regulation of current experience, thought to also operate as top–down control mechanism. We sought to investigate whether such individual differences would be associated with brain activity elicited during reappraisal of negative emotion. Eighteen healthy participants completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging task that involved attending to or reappraising negative stimuli, and provided emotion experience ratings after each trial. Dispositional mindfulness was assessed with a self-report questionnaire. Reappraisal induced activity in a brain network involving predominantly dorsal portions of the prefrontal cortex, replicating previous studies. A voxelwise regression analysis showed that individual differences in the tendency to be mindful predicted activity in neural regions underlying reappraisal, with dorsomedial prefrontal cortex activation increasing with more mindfulness traits. Notably, this prefrontal activation was inversely correlated with the amygdala response to negative scenes, further supporting its role in down-regulating emotion-generation regions. These findings suggest that individual differences in dispositional mindfulness, which reflect the tendency to recognize and regulate current states, may modulate activity in neural systems involved in the effective cognitive control of negative emotion. PMID:20147457

  10. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  11. Calretinin as a Marker for Premotor Neurons Involved in Upgaze in Human Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Christopher; Strupp, Michael; Jahn, Klaus; Horn, Anja K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Eye movements are generated by different premotor pathways. Damage to them can cause specific deficits of eye movements, such as saccades. For correlative clinico-anatomical post-mortem studies of cases with eye movement disorders it is essential to identify the functional cell groups of the oculomotor system in the human brain by marker proteins. Based on monkey studies, the premotor neurons of the saccadic system can be identified by the histochemical markers parvalbumin (PAV) and perineuronal nets in humans. These areas involve the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) and the rostral interstitial nucleus of the medial longitudinal fascicle (RIMLF), which both contain premotor neurons for upgaze and downgaze. Recent monkey and human studies revealed a selective excitatory calretinin (CR)-positive input to the motoneurons mediating upgaze, but not to those for downgaze. Three premotor regions were identified as sources of CR input in monkey: y-group, INC and RIMLF. These findings suggest that the expression pattern of parvalbumin and CR may help to identify premotor neurons involved in up- or downgaze. In a post-mortem study of five human cases without neurological diseases we investigated the y-group, INC and RIMLF for the presence of parvalbumin and CR positive neurons including their co-expression. Adjacent thin paraffin sections were stained for the aggrecan (ACAN) component of perineuronal nets, parvalbumin or CR and glutamate decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of scanned thin sections of INC and RIMLF revealed medium-sized parvalbumin positive neurons with and without CR coexpression, which were intermingled. The parvalbumin/CR positive neurons in both nuclei are considered as excitatory premotor upgaze neurons. Accordingly, the parvalbumin-positive neurons lacking CR are considered as premotor downgaze neurons in RIMLF, but may in addition include inhibitory premotor upgaze neurons in the INC as indicated by co-expression of glutamate decarboxylase in a

  12. Spreading dynamics following bursty human activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Goh, K.-I.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    We study the susceptible-infected model with power-law waiting time distributions P(τ)~τ-α, as a model of spreading dynamics under heterogeneous human activity patterns. We found that the average number of new infections n(t) at time t decays as a power law in the long-time limit, n(t)~t-β, leading to extremely slow prevalence decay. We also found that the exponent in the spreading dynamics β is related to that in the waiting time distribution α in a way depending on the interactions between agents but insensitive to the network topology. These observations are well supported by both the theoretical predictions and the long prevalence decay time in real social spreading phenomena. Our results unify individual activity patterns with macroscopic collective dynamics at the network level.

  13. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household's Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household's health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women's personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions.

  14. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    PubMed

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  15. Pseudo-esterase Activity of Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Oksana; Xue, Weihua; Gaydess, Andrea; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ding, Shi-Jian; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Masson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Human albumin is thought to hydrolyze esters because multiple equivalents of product are formed for each equivalent of albumin. Esterase activity with p-nitrophenyl acetate has been attributed to turnover at tyrosine 411. However, p-nitrophenyl acetate creates multiple, stable, acetylated adducts, a property contrary to turnover. Our goal was to identify residues that become acetylated by p-nitrophenyl acetate and determine the relationship between stable adduct formation and turnover. Fatty acid-free human albumin was treated with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 5 min to 2 weeks, or with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 48 h to 2 weeks. Aliquots were digested with pepsin, trypsin, or GluC and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify labeled residues. Only Tyr-411 was acetylated within the first 5 min of reaction with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate. After 0.5–6 h there was partial acetylation of 16–17 residues including Asp-1, Lys-4, Lys-12, Tyr-411, Lys-413, and Lys-414. Treatment with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate resulted in acetylation of 59 lysines, 10 serines, 8 threonines, 4 tyrosines, and Asp-1. When Tyr-411 was blocked with diisopropylfluorophosphate or chlorpyrifos oxon, albumin had normal esterase activity with β-naphthyl acetate as visualized on a nondenaturing gel. However, after 82 residues had been acetylated, esterase activity was almost completely inhibited. The half-life for deacetylation of Tyr-411 at pH 8.0, 22 °C was 61 ± 4 h. Acetylated lysines formed adducts that were even more stable. In conclusion, the pseudo-esterase activity of albumin is the result of irreversible acetylation of 82 residues and is not the result of turnover. PMID:18577514

  16. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  17. The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Rinn, John L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Hartman, Stephen; Harrison, Paul M.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A DNA microarray representing nearly all of the unique sequences of human Chromosome 22 was constructed and used to measure global-transcriptional activity in placental poly(A)+ RNA. We found that many of the known, related and predicted genes are expressed. More importantly, our study reveals twice as many transcribed bases as have been reported previously. Many of the newly discovered expressed fragments were verified by RNA blot analysis and a novel technique called differential hybridization mapping (DHM). Interestingly, a significant fraction of these novel fragments are expressed antisense to previously annotated introns. The coding potential of these novel expressed regions is supported by their sequence conservation in the mouse genome. This study has greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome. To facilitate the dissemination of these results to the scientific community, we have developed a comprehensive Web resource to present the findings of this study and other features of human Chromosome 22 at http://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. PMID:12600945

  18. Characterization of early events involved in human dendritic cell maturation induced by sensitizers: Cross talk between MAPK signalling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Trompezinski, Sandra; Migdal, Camille; Tailhardat, Magalie; Le Varlet, Beatrice; Courtellemont, Pascal; Haftek, Marek; Serres, Mireille

    2008-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), efficient-antigen presenting cells play an important role in initiating and regulating immune responses. DC maturation following exposure to nickel or DNCB induced an up-regulation of phenotypic markers and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Early intracellular mechanisms involved in DC maturation required to be precise. To address this purpose, DCs derived from human monocytes were treated with sensitizers (nickel, DNCB or thimerosal) in comparison with an irritant (SDS). Our data confirming the up-regulation of CD86, CD54 and cytokine secretion (IL-8 and TNF{alpha}) induced by sensitizers but not by SDS, signalling transduction involved in DC maturation was investigated using these chemicals. Kinase activity measurement was assessed using two new sensitive procedures (Face{sup TM} and CBA) requiring few cells. SDS did not induce changes in signalling pathways whereas NiSO{sub 4}, DNCB and thimerosal markedly activated p38 MAPK and JNK, in contrast Erk1/2 phosphorylation was completely inhibited by DNCB or thimerosal and only activated by nickel. A pre-treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) suppressed Erk1/2 inhibition induced by DNCB or thimerosal demonstrating a direct interaction between p38 MAPK and Erk1/2. A pre-treatment with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) markedly reduced Erk1/2 inhibition and p38 MAPK phosphorylation induced by DNCB and thimerosal, suggesting a direct activation of p38 MAPK via an oxidative stress and a regulation of MAPK signalling pathways depending on chemicals. Because of a high sensitivity of kinase activity measurements, these procedures will be suitable for weak or moderate sensitizer screening.

  19. Human ZCCHC12 activates AP-1 and CREB signaling as a transcriptional co-activator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liu, Qian; Hu, Xiang; Feng, Du; Xiang, Shuanglin; He, Zhicheng; Hu, Xingwang; Zhou, Jianlin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Chang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Mouse zinc finger CCHC domain containing 12 gene (ZCCHC12) has been identified as a transcriptional co-activator of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and human ZCCHC12 was reported to be related to non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR). However, the details of how human ZCCHC12 involve in the NS-XLMR still remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the middle of human ZCCHC12 protein which is responsible for the nuclear localization. Multiple-tissue northern blot analysis indicated that ZCCHC12 is highly expressed in human brain. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that ZCCHC12 is specifically expressed in neuroepithelium of forebrain, midbrain, and diencephalon regions of mouse E10.5 embryos. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that ZCCHC12 enhanced the transcriptional activities of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) as a coactivator. In conclusion, we identified a new NLS in ZCCHC12 and figured out that ZCCHC12 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of AP-1 and CREB.

  20. Telomerase activity in human pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Dhaene, K.; Hubner, R.; Kumar-Singh, S.; Weyn, B.; Van Marck, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Gradual telomere erosion eventually limits the replicative life span of somatic cells and is regarded as an ultimate tumour suppressor mechanism, eliminating cells that have accumulated genetic alterations. Telomerase, which has been found in over 85% of human cancers, elongates telomeres and may be required for tumorigenesis by the process of immortalisation. Malignant mesothelioma is an incurable malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease becomes symptomatic decades after exposure to carcinogenic asbestos fibres, suggesting the long term survival of pre-malignant cell clones. This study investigated the presence of telomerase in pleural malignant mesothelioma, which may be the target for future anti-telomerase drugs.
METHODS—Telomerase activity was semi-quantitatively measured in extracts from 22 primary pleural mesotheliomas, two benign solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura, four mesothelioma cell lines, and six short term mesothelial cell cultures from normal pleura using a non-isotopic dilution assay of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol.
RESULTS—Twenty of the 22 primary mesotheliomas (91%) and all tumour derived mesothelioma cell lines were telomerase positive. Different levels of enzyme activity were observed in the tumours of different histological subtypes. Telomerase activity could not be detected in the six normal mesothelial cell cultures or in the two mesotheliomas. Both benign solitary fibrous tumours showed strong telomerase activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Telomerase activity is found in a high proportion of mesotheliomas and anti-telomerase drugs might therefore be useful clinically. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that telomerase activity may be a feature of carcinogenesis in mesotheliomas and possibly in many other cancers.

 PMID:10193387

  1. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  2. Inhibition of human natural killer cell functional activity by human aspartyl β-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Huyan, Ting; Li, Qi; Ye, Lin-Jie; Yang, Hui; Xue, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ming-Jie; Huang, Qing-Sheng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a key component of the innate immune system and play pivotal roles as inflammatory regulators and in tumor surveillance. Human aspartyl β-hydroxylase (HAAH) is a plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum protein with hydroxylation activity, which is over-expressed in many malignant neoplasms and can be detected from the sera of tumor patients. HAAH is involved in regulating tumor cell infiltration and metastasis. Escaping from immune surveillance may help tumor cell infiltration and metastasis. However, the effects of HAAH on tumor immune surveillance have not yet been investigated carefully. The present study investigated the potential use of HAAH as an immune regulator of human NK cells. We assessed the effects of recombinant HAAH (r-HAAH) on primary human NK cell morphology, viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, receptors expression and cytokine/cytolytic proteins production. Our results demonstrated that r-HAAH negatively affects NK cell activity in a time and dose-dependent manner. It noticeably reduces the viability of the NK cells by increasing apoptosis and necrosis via caspase signaling pathways. Moreover, r-HAAH reduces the NK cell cytotoxicity by inhibiting surface expression of NKG2D, NKp44 and IFN-γ secretion. These findings suggest that one of the ways by which HAAH actively promotes tumor formation and proliferation is by inhibiting NK cell-surveillance activity.

  3. Mitochondrial involvement in propofol-induced cardioprotection: An in vitro study in human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lan; Gress, Steeve; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Allouche, Stéphane; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Propofol has been shown to exert cardioprotection, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We examined: (1) whether propofol-induced cardioprotection depended on the time and the dose of administration; (2) the role of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, nitric oxide synthase, and mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in propofol-induced cardioprotection. Human right atrial trabeculae were obtained during cardiopulmonary bypass for coronary artery bypass and aortic valve replacement. Isometric force of contraction of human right atrial trabeculae hanged in an oxygenated Tyrode’s solution was recorded during 30-min hypoxia and 60-min reoxygenation (Control). Propofol 0.1, 1, and 10 µM was administered: (1) 5 min before hypoxia until the end of the experiment; (2) 5 min followed by 5-min washout before hypoxia; (3) during the reoxygenation period, propofol 10 µM was administered in presence of 5-hydroxydecanoate (antagonist of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels), and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase). In addition, mitochondria were isolated from human right atrial at 15 min of reoxygenation. The effect of propofol on activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was evaluated by spectrophotometry. The force of contraction (% of baseline) and the complex activity between the different groups were compared with an analysis of variance and post hoc test. Propofol 10 µM administered during the reoxygenation period significantly improved the recovery of force of contraction at the end of reoxygenation (82 ± 6% of baseline value vs. 49 ± 6% in Control; P < 0.001). The beneficial effects of propofol 10 µM were abolished by co-administration with 5-hydroxydecanoate (53 ± 8%) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (57 ± 6%). Propofol 10 µM significantly increased enzymatic activities of the

  4. Critical involvement of the α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase in multidrug resistance of human chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuxuan; Ren, Xing; Xu, Liye; Ding, Xiaolei; Zhang, Xuan; Sun, Xiuhua

    2016-05-01

    The fucosyltransferases are key enzymes in cell surface antigen synthesis during multidrug resistance (MDR) development. The aim of the present study was to analyze the alteration of α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase involved in MDR development in human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). FUT1 was overexpressed in three CML/MDR cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of CML patients. However, no significant changes of FUT2 were observed. The altered levels of FUT1 had a significant impact on the phenotypic variation of MDR of K562 and K562/ADR cells, the activity of EGFR/MAPK pathway and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Blocking the EGFR/MAPK pathway by its specific inhibitor PD153035 or EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in the reduced MDR of K562/ADR cells. This study indicated that α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase involved in the development of MDR of CML cells probably through FUT1 regulated the activity of EGFR/MAPK signaling pathway and the expression of P-gp.

  5. Sensitization of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to Shiga toxin: involvement of protein kinase C and NF-kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Louise, C B; Tran, M C; Obrig, T G

    1997-01-01

    Infection of humans with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shigella dysenteriae 1 is strongly associated with vascular endothelial cell damage and the development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The cytotoxic effect of Shiga toxins on vascular endothelial cells in vitro is enhanced by prior exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or either of the host cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). The purpose of this study was to examine individual signal transduction components involved in the sensitization of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to Shiga toxin 1. The results demonstrate that class I and II protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are required for sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or LPS but not by TNF or IL-1. Thus, the specific competitive inhibitor of class I/II PKC, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (AMG), prevented only the action of PMA and LPS on HUVEC. Additional data obtained with ATP binding site inhibitors which affect all PKCs (i.e., classes I, II, and III) suggest that TNF may utilize class III PKC isozymes in the Shiga toxin sensitization of HUVEC. Transcriptional activator NF-kappaB did not appear to be involved in the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by LPS, TNF, IL-1, or PMA. Thus, the specific serine protease inhibitor L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not inhibit the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by LPS, TNF, IL-1, or PMA despite its ability to inhibit NF-kappaB activation and the induction of the NF-kappaB-dependent tissue factor gene by these agents. Finally, all-trans retinoic acid partially inhibited the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin, by unknown mechanisms which also appeared to be independent of NF-kappaB activation. These results indicate that PKC plays a role in the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin in response to some, but not all, sensitizing agents. In contrast, NF

  6. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hijazi, Mohamad Ali; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  7. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    PubMed Central

    El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. PMID:28280516

  8. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  9. An Active Self-Determination Technique: Involving Students in Effective Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denison, Grace L.

    This paper discusses creating story boards to help students with disabilities to develop effective career plans. It describes storyboarding as a technique for project planning which requires active involvement of both hemispheres of the brain. A group of 6-8 people, including students, teachers, counselors, and vocational rehabilitation…

  10. Emotional Creativity and Real-Life Involvement in Different Types of Creative Leisure Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trnka, Radek; Zahradnik, Martin; Kuška, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional creativity in practicing creative leisure activities and in the preference of college majors remains unknown. This study aims to explore how emotional creativity measured by the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI; Averill, 1999) is interrelated with the real-life involvement in different types of specific creative leisure…

  11. Regrouping: organized activity involvement and social adjustment across the transition to high school.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Amy M; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Arola, Nicole T

    2013-01-01

    Although organized activities (OAs) have been established as important contexts of development, limited work has examined the role of OAs across the high school transition in buffering adolescents' social adjustment by providing opportunities for visibility and peer affiliation. The transition to high school is characterized by numerous changes and OAs may provide an important setting for establishing and maintaining peer relationships during this tumultuous time. This study included 151 8th grade U.S. students (58% male) who were assessed across the transition to high school (spring of 8th and 9th grade). Continuous involvement in academic activities across the transition and becoming involved (i.e., initiation) in community/service activities following the transition was associated with fewer depressive symptoms in the spring of 9th grade. Continuous involvement in sports and initiation of academic activities was associated with having more friendships. In addition, links between OAs and loneliness were only evident among females. There appear to be significant social benefits for OA involvement.

  12. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  13. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  14. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model…

  15. 15 CFR 712.2 - Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restrictions on activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.2 Section 712.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL...

  16. Involving Your Child or Teen with ASD in Integrated Community Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Participating in outside activities and community-based endeavors can be tricky for people with special needs, like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Families meet more than a few obstacles attempting to integrate their children or teens who have special needs like ASD. Most typical children are highly involved in sports, clubs and camps. If a…

  17. A human case of otoacariasis involving a histiostomatid mite (Acari: Histiostomatidae).

    PubMed

    Al-Arfaj, Ahmed M; Mullen, Gary R; Rashad, Rafiaa; Abdel-Hameed, Ahmed; OConnor, Barry M; Alkhalife, Ibrahim S; Dute, Roland R

    2007-05-01

    A 31-year-old Saudi man was seen at an ear, nose, and throat clinic at Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, with bilateral itching in the external auditory canal. On otoscopic examination, the skin lining the ear canal was thickened with whitish sheets of sloughed cells and thick discharge. Large numbers of mites of an undescribed species closely related to members of the genus Loxanoetus (Histiostomatidae) were present. The patient underwent successive washings of the ear canal with saline and 70% ethanol at intervals of 2-3 months and was treated with antibiotics. Treatment with Eurax (crotamiton) ear drops for one week cleared the mite infestation. This represents the first reported case of human otoacariasis involving a histiostomatid mite. Based on the known biology of histiostomatid mites and the associated hosts of Loxanoetus and related genera, there is reason to speculate that the patient acquired the infestation while swimming in a lake or pond where this mite was present.

  18. Cells and secretagogues involved in the human late-phase response.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, E N; Iliopoulos, O; MacDonald, S M; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Lichtenstein, L M

    1989-01-01

    Those scientists interested in allergic inflammatory processes have recently been focusing on the late-phase response, since it appears most similar to the chronic disease states observed in allergic patients. In this review we will focus on the pattern of mediator release and cellular traffic observed in two in vivo human models of the late-phase reaction, one involving the upper airways and the other the skin. We have observed in these models, as had been observed earlier in blood, that the late-phase reaction is associated with a second increase in the level of mediators. We also describe our studies of the secretagogues responsible for this late-phase mediator release and, in so doing, introduce the subjects of histamine-releasing factors and IgE heterogeneity.

  19. Involvement of chromosome X in primary cytogenetic change in human neoplasia: nonrandom translocation in synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Turc-Carel, C.; Cin, P.D.; Limon, J.; Rao, U.; Li, F.P.; Corson, J.M.; Zimmerman, R.; Parry, D.M.; Cowan, J.M.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1987-04-01

    A translocation that involves chromosome X (band p11.2) and chromosome 18 (band q11.2) was observed in short-term in vitro cultures of cells from five synovial sarcomas and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma. In four of these tumors, the translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) was reciprocal. The two other tumors had complex translocations: t(X;18;21)(p11.2;q11.2;p13) and t(X;15;18)(p11.2;q23;q11.2). A translocation between chromosomes X and 18 was not detected in other histological types of soft tissue sarcoma. The X;18 rearrangement appears to characterize the synovial sarcoma and is the first description of a primary, nonrandom change in the sex chromosome of a human solid tumor.

  20. TCR-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells involves Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA.

    PubMed

    Manes, Thomas D; Pober, Jordan S

    2013-04-01

    Human effector memory (EM) CD4 T cells may be recruited from the blood into a site of inflammation in response either to inflammatory chemokines displayed on or specific Ag presented by venular endothelial cells (ECs), designated as chemokine-driven or TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM), respectively. We have previously described differences in the morphological appearance of transmigrating T cells as well as in the molecules that mediate T cell-EC interactions distinguishing these two pathways. In this study, we report that TCR-driven TEM requires ZAP-70-dependent activation of a pathway involving Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA. Chemokine-driven TEM also uses ZAP-70, albeit in a quantitatively and spatially different manner of activation, and is independent of Vav, Rac, and mysosin IIA, depending instead on an as-yet unidentified GTP exchange factor that activates Cdc42. The differential use of small Rho family GTPases to activate the cytoskeleton is consistent with the morphological differences observed in T cells that undergo TEM in response to these distinct recruitment signals.

  1. Involvement of RB-1, p53, p16INK4 and telomerase in immortalisation of human cells.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, N J; Bryan, T M; Bonnefin, P; Chang, A C; Musgrove, E A; Braithwaite, A W; Reddel, R R

    1995-09-07

    Involvement of the retinoblastoma susceptibility (RB-1), p16INK4, p53 and telomerase genes in immortalisation was examined by determining their status in 15 human cell lines representing four immortalisation complementation groups. No abnormalities of RB-1, p53 and p16INK4 were detected in cell lines containing DNA tumour virus proteins known to bind to the protein products of the RB-1 and p53 genes. In contrast, in all other cell lines from each of the four groups either RB-1 was mutant or p16INK4 protein was undetectable and there were cell lines containing p53 mutations in three of the groups. Telomerase activity was detected in 12/15 lines, including some of the virally immortalised lines and in some lines from each group. Since none of these changes correlated with complementation group, other genetic changes must be required for immortalisation.

  2. Twenty-first Century ethics of medical research involving human subjects: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Raj, Dominic S C; Murata, Glen H; Glew, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    The field of ethics in medical research has seen important developments in the last three decades, but it also faces great challenges in the new century. The purposes of this report are to examine the current status of ethics of medical research involving human subjects and the nature of the ethical challenges facing this research, to identify the weakness of the current system of safeguards for ethical research, and to stress the importance of the ethical character of the researcher, which is the safeguard that has the greatest potential for protecting the research subjects. Researchers appreciate the risks of human medical research that create ethical dilemmas and the need for an ethical compromise in order to proceed with the research. The main elements of the compromise, formulated primarily from experiences in the Second World War, include: (1) the dominant position of the ethical principle of autonomy; (2) the demand for a signed informed consent; (3) the likelihood of improving health with the research protocol, which must be approved by a duly appointed supervising committee; and (4) an acceptable risk/benefit ratio. The main weakness of this set of safeguards is the difficulty with obtaining a truly informed consent. The new challenges to ethical medical research stem from certain types of research, such as genetic and stem cell research, and from the increasing involvement of the industry in planning and funding the research studies. Developing medical researchers with an ethical character and knowledge about ethics in medicine may be the most effective safeguard in protecting participants of medical research experiments.

  3. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hollborn, Margrit . E-mail: hollbm@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Bringmann, Andreas; Faude, Frank; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon

    2006-06-09

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses.

  4. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  5. Human-in-the-loop active electrosense.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sandra; Peshkin, Michael; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2016-12-20

    Active electrosense is a non-visual, short range sensing system used by weakly electric fish, enabling such fish to locate and identify objects in total darkness. Here we report initial findings from the use of active electrosense for object localization during underwater teleoperation with a virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display (HMD). The advantage of electrolocating with a VR system is that it naturally allows for aspects of the task that are difficult for a person to perform to be allocated to the computer. However, interpreting weak and incomplete patterns in the incoming data is something that people are typically far better at than computers. To achieve human-computer synergy, we integrated an active electrosense underwater robot with the Oculus Rift HMD. The virtual environment contains a visualization of the electric images of the objects surrounding the robot as well as various virtual fixtures that guide users to regions of higher information value. Initial user testing shows that these fixtures significantly reduce the time taken to localize an object, but may not increase the accuracy of the position estimate. Our results highlight the advantages of translating the unintuitive physics of electrolocation to an intuitive visual representation for accomplishing tasks in environments where imaging systems fail, such as in dark or turbid water.

  6. Ip deletions in human pheochromocytomas share a common pericentromeric breakpoint and do not involve imprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Moley, J.F.; Marshall, H.N.

    1994-09-01

    We previously reported that loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 1p is found in all pheochromocytomas from patients with the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 syndromes and in 40% of sporadic pheochromocytomas. We used 24 polymorphic DNA markers to map the deleted region in 27 tumors and found that in all tumors with 1p LOH, the deletion involves the entire short arm. LOH of 1q has not been found. The common breakpoint in these tumors is between D1S514 and D1S442 which defines a 2 centiMorgan interval which includes the centromere. To determine whether genomic imprinting plays a role in 1p deletion in these tumors, parental DNA was obtained for eight individuals with pheochromocytomas and the parental DNA was obtained for eight individuals with pheochromocytomas and the parental origin of allelic loss determined. In four cases the paternal allele was lost and in four cases, the maternal allele was lost. In addition, allelic loss was examined in multifocal or bilateral tumors from five individuals. 1p LOH was demonstrated in all tumors examined, but in two patients, tumors from different sites demonstrated opposite patterns of allelic loss, indicating that either maternal or paternal alleles may be lost in different tumors from the same individual. These data show that deletion of 1p is a significant event in the development of human pheochromocytomas, and involves a common breakpoint in the pericentromeric area. Allelic deletion is not influenced by the parent of origin.

  7. Alternative 5' untranslated regions are involved in expression regulation of human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marcel; Sponholz, Christoph; Slaba, Monique; Wissuwa, Bianka; Claus, Ralf A; Menzel, Uwe; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2071746 and a (GT)n microsatellite within the human gene encoding heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) are associated with incidence or outcome in a variety of diseases. Most of these associations involve either release of heme or oxidative stress. Both polymorphisms are localized in the promoter region, but previously reported correlations with heme oxygenase-1 expression remain not coherent. This ambiguity suggests a more complex organization of the 5' gene region which we sought to investigate more fully. We evaluated the 5' end of HMOX1 and found a novel first exon 1a placing the two previously reported polymorphisms in intronic or exonic positions within the 5' untranslated region respectively. Expression of exon 1a can be induced in HepG2 hepatoma cells by hemin and is a repressor of heme oxygenase-1 translation as shown by luciferase reporter assays. Moreover, minigene approaches revealed that the quantitative outcome of alternative splicing within the 5' untranslated region is affected by the (GT)n microsatellite. This data supporting an extended HMOX1 gene model and provide further insights into expression regulation of heme oxygenase-1. Alternative splicing within the HMOX1 5' untranslated region contributes to translational regulation and is a mechanistic feature involved in the interplay between genetic variations, heme oxygenase-1 expression and disease outcome.

  8. Chromosomal localisation of two putative 11p oncosuppressor genes involved in human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Viel, A.; Giannini, F.; Tumiotto, L.; Sopracordevole, F.; Visentin, M. C.; Boiocchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, 44 primary or metastatic human ovarian tumours were tested for allelic deletions on the short arm of chromosome 11. Analysis of 12 polymorphic loci by Southern blotting evidenced loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in at least one locus in 41% of cases. Moreover, two hot spots of deletions were tentatively mapped on 11p13 and 11p15.5. Our results demonstrated that LOH at 11p is a common event in ovarian carcinomas and were indicative of the possible existence in 11p of two oncosuppressor genes involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. The similarity observed with 11p allelic losses in Wilms tumours, clustered in 11p13 and 11p15.5 too, suggests that deletion and possibly inactivation of the same growth regulatory genes (WT genes) could also contribute to development of the malignant phenotype in ovarian carcinomas. Finally, a statistically significant association (P = 0.005) between 11p deletions and hepatic involvement was suggested by the analysis of distribution of 11p LOH relative to different clinical and pathological parameters of the tumour patients. Images Figure 1 PMID:1360809

  9. Strengthening protections for human subjects: proposed restrictions on the publication of transplant research involving prisoners.

    PubMed

    Valapour, Maryam; Paulson, Kristin M; Hilde, Alisha

    2013-04-01

    Publication is one of the primary rewards in the academic research community and is the first step in the dissemination of a new discovery that could lead to recognition and opportunity. Because of this, the publication of research can serve as a tacit endorsement of the methodology behind the science. This becomes a problem when vulnerable populations that are incapable of giving legitimate informed consent, such as prisoners, are used in research. The problem is especially critical in the field of transplant research, in which unverified consent can enable research that exploits the vulnerabilities of prisoners, especially those awaiting execution. Because the doctrine of informed consent is central to the protection of vulnerable populations, we have performed a historical analysis of the standards of informed consent in codes of international human subject protections to form the foundation for our limit and ban recommendations: (1) limit the publication of transplant research involving prisoners in general and (2) ban the publication of transplant research involving executed prisoners in particular.

  10. Possible involvement of infection with human coronavirus 229E, but not NL63, in Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Kazuya; Imada, Yoshio; Kawase, Miyuki; Nakagaki, Keiko; Matsuyama, Shutoku; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2014-12-01

    Although human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 was once considered a possible causative agent of Kawasaki disease based on RT-PCR analyses, subsequent studies could not confirm the result. In this study, this possibility was explored using serological tests. To evaluate the role of HCoV infection in patients with Kawasaki disease, immunofluorescence assays and virus neutralizing tests were performed. Paired serum samples were obtained from patients with Kawasaki disease who had not been treated with γ-globulin. HCoV-NL63 and two antigenically different isolates of HCoV-229E (ATCC-VR740 and a new isolate, Sendai-H) were examined as controls. Immunofluorescence assays detected no difference in HCoV-NL63 antibody positivity between the patients with Kawasaki disease and controls, whereas the rate of HCoV-229E antibody positivity was higher in the patients with Kawasaki disease than that in controls. The neutralizing tests revealed no difference in seropositivity between the acute and recovery phases of patients with Kawasaki disease for the two HCoV-229Es. However, the Kawasaki disease specimens obtained from patients in recovery phase displayed significantly higher positivity for Sendai-H, but not for ATCC-VR740, as compared to the controls. The serological test supported no involvement of HCoV-NL63 but suggested the possible involvement of HCoV-229E in the development of Kawasaki disease.

  11. Ribonomic analysis of human DZIP1 reveals its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes and stress granules

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background DZIP1 (DAZ-interacting protein 1) has been described as a component of the Hh signaling pathway with a putative regulatory role in ciliogenesis. DZIP1 interacts with DAZ RNA binding proteins in embryonic stem cells and human germ cells suggesting a role in mRNA regulation. Results We investigated DZIP1 function in HeLa cells and its involvement in ribonucleoprotein complexes. DZIP1 was predominantly located in granules in the cytoplasm. Under oxidative stress conditions, DZIP1 re-localized to stress granules. DZIP appears to be important for the formation of stress granules during the stress response. We used immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies against DZIP1 and microarray hybridization to identify mRNAs associated with DZIP1. The genetic networks formed by the DZIP1-associated mRNAs were involved in cell cycle and gene expression regulation. DZIP1 is involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway. We used cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of this pathway, to analyze the expression of DZIP1 and its associated mRNAs. The abundance of DZIP1-associated mRNAs increased with treatment; however, the silencing or overexpression of DZIP1 in HeLa cells had no effect on the accumulation of the associated mRNAs. Polysomal profile analysis by sucrose gradient centrifugation demonstrated the presence of DZIP1 in the polysomal fraction. Conclusions Our results suggest that DZIP1 is part of an RNP complex that occupies various subcellular locations. The diversity of the mRNAs associated with DZIP1 suggests that this protein is a component of different RNPs associated with translating polysomes and with RNA granules. PMID:24993635

  12. Human activity and damaging landslides and floods on Madeira Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few decades, the island of Madeira has become an important offshore tourism and business center, with rapid economic and demographic development that has caused changes to the landscape due to human activity. In Madeira's recent history, there has been an increase over time in the frequency of occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events. As a result, the costs of restoration work due to damage caused by landslide and flood events have become a larger and larger component of Madeira's annual budget. Landslides and floods in Madeira deserve particular attention because they represent the most serious hazard to human life, to property, and to the natural environment and its important heritage value. The work reported on in this paper involved the analysis of historical data regarding damaging landslide and flood events on Madeira (in particular from 1941 to 1991) together with data on geological characteristics, topographic features, and climate, and from field observations. This analysis showed that the main factor triggering the occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events is rainfall, but that the increase in the number of damaging events recorded on Madeira Island, especially in recent times, seems to be related mostly to human activity, specifically to economic development and population growth, rather than to natural factors.

  13. A human skeletal muscle interactome centered on proteins involved in muscular dystrophies: LGMD interactome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complexity of the skeletal muscle and the identification of numerous human disease-causing mutations in its constitutive proteins make it an interesting tissue for proteomic studies aimed at understanding functional relationships of interacting proteins in both health and diseases. Method We undertook a large-scale study using two-hybrid screens and a human skeletal-muscle cDNA library to establish a proteome-scale map of protein-protein interactions centered on proteins involved in limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD). LGMD is a group of more than 20 different neuromuscular disorders that principally affect the proximal pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. Results and conclusion The interaction network we unraveled incorporates 1018 proteins connected by 1492 direct binary interactions and includes 1420 novel protein-protein interactions. Computational, experimental and literature-based analyses were performed to assess the overall quality of this network. Interestingly, LGMD proteins were shown to be highly interconnected, in particular indirectly through sarcomeric proteins. In-depth mining of the LGMD-centered interactome identified new candidate genes for orphan LGMDs and other neuromuscular disorders. The data also suggest the existence of functional links between LGMD2B/dysferlin and gene regulation, between LGMD2C/γ-sarcoglycan and energy control and between LGMD2G/telethonin and maintenance of genome integrity. This dataset represents a valuable resource for future functional investigations. PMID:23414517

  14. Epiphyseal fusion in the human growth plate does not involve classical apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Emons, Joyce; Chagin, Andrei S; Hultenby, Kjell; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Wit, Jan M; Karperien, Marcel; Sävendahl, Lars

    2009-12-01

    By the end of puberty, growth ceases and epiphyseal fusion occurs through mechanisms not yet completely understood. Human growth plate tissues were collected in various pubertal stages including a unique late pubertal growth plate, which was about to fuse. Apoptosis was studied by TUNEL staining, immunolocalization of pro- and antiapoptotic proteins, and electron microscopy (EM). Morphologic analyses of the fusing growth plate revealed disorganized, large chondrocytes surrounded by a border of dense, cortical-like bone. In the unfused growth plates, few chondrocytes were TUNEL positive. In contrast, the fusing growth plate contained no single TUNEL-positive cell. Antiapoptotic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL) and proapoptotic (Bax, Bad, and cleaved caspase-3) proteins were detected in all growth plate zones without change in intensity during pubertal progression. Expression of antiapoptotic proteins was found in the fusing growth plate but of the proapoptotic proteins only Bad was detected. EM revealed no typical signs of apoptosis or autophagy in any of the growth plates. In contrast, morpohological signs of hypoxia and necrosis were observed. We conclude that classical apoptosis is not likely to be involved in the process of human growth plate fusion.

  15. Human factors involvement in bringing the power of AI to a heterogeneous user population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwinski, Mary; Nguyen, Trung

    1994-01-01

    The Human Factors involvement in developing COMPAQ QuickSolve, an electronic problem-solving and information system for Compaq's line of networked printers, is described. Empowering customers with expert system technology so they could solve advanced networked printer problems on their own was a major goal in designing this system. This process would minimize customer down-time, reduce the number of phone calls to the Compaq Customer Support Center, improve customer satisfaction, and, most importantly, differentiate Compaq printers in the marketplace by providing the best, and most technologically advanced, customer support. This represents a re-engineering of Compaq's customer support strategy and implementation. In its first generation system, SMART, the objective was to provide expert knowledge to Compaq's help desk operation to more quickly and correctly answer customer questions and problems. QuickSolve is a second generation system in that customer support is put directly in the hands of the consumers. As a result, the design of QuickSolve presented a number of challenging issues. Because the produce would be used by a diverse and heterogeneous set of users, a significant amount of human factors research and analysis was required while designing and implementing the system. Research that shaped the organization and design of the expert system component as well.

  16. CD99 expressed on human mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells is involved in transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Anne-Marie; Belaaloui, Ghania; Bardin, Florence; Tonnelle, Cecile; Lopez, Marc; Chabannon, Christian

    2006-10-15

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell trafficking is an important phenomenon throughout life. It is thought to occur in sequential steps, similar to what has been described for mature leukocytes. Molecular actors have been identified for each step of leukocyte migration; recently, CD99 was shown to play a part during transendothelial migration. We explored the expression and role of CD99 on human hematopoietic progenitors. We demonstrate that (1) CD34+ cells express CD99, albeit with various intensities; (2) subsets of CD34+ cells with high or low levels of CD99 expression produce different numbers of erythroid, natural killer (NK), or dendritic cells in the in vitro differentiation assays; (3) the level of CD99 expression is related to the ability to differentiate toward B cells; (4) CD34+ cells that migrate through an endothelial monolayer in response to SDF-1alpha and SCF display the highest level of CD99 expression; (5) binding of a neutralizing antibody to CD99 partially inhibits transendothelial migration of CD34+ progenitors in an in vitro assay; and (6) binding of a neutralizing antibody to CD99 reduces homing of CD34+ progenitors xenotransplanted in NOD-SCID mice. We conclude that expression of CD99 on human CD34+ progenitors has functional significance and that CD99 may be involved in transendothelial migration of progenitors.

  17. Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Grubert, Fabian; Zaugg, Judith B.; Kasowski, Maya; Ursu, Oana; Spacek, Damek V.; Martin, Alicia R.; Greenside, Peyton; Srivas, Rohith; Phanstiel, Doug H.; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Heidari, Nastaran; Euskirchen, Ghia; Huber, Wolfgang; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Kundaje, Anshul; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements. PMID:26300125

  18. Genes involved in cell cycle G1 checkpoint control are frequently mutated in human melanoma metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Platz, A.; Sevigny, P.; Norberg, T.; Ring, P.; Lagerlöf, B.; Ringborg, U.

    1996-01-01

    A common characteristic of cancer cells is unrestrained cell division. This may be caused by mutational changes in genes coding for components of cell cycle-controlling networks. Alterations in genes involved in G1 checkpoint control have been registered in many human tumours, and investigations from several laboratories show that such alterations, taken together, are the most frequent changes detected in cancer cells. The present paper describes mutational analysis by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR/SSCP) and nucleotide sequence analysis of the genes coding for the p15, p53 and N-ras proteins in 26 metastases from 25 melanoma patients. The registered mutation frequencies add together with previously registered mutations in p16 in the same patient samples to a substantial total frequency of 44% of patients with mutation in at least one of the investigated genes. These results show the occurrence of heterogeneous defects among components of the cell cycle controlling machinery in a human melanoma tumour sample collection and demonstrate that the total frequency of detected alterations increases with the number of cell cycle controlling genes included in the screening panel. Images Figure 1 PMID:8826861

  19. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  20. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide is involved in human malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vellecco, Valentina; Mancini, Antonio; Ianaro, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Attanasio, Chiara; Cantalupo, Anna; Andria, Barbara; Savoia, Gennaro; Panza, Elisabetta; Di Martino, Antonietta; Cirino, Giuseppe; Bucci, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous gasotransmitter and its mechanism of action involves activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and phosphodiesterase inhibition. As both mechanisms are potentially involved in malignant hyperthermia (MH), in the present study we addressed the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 25 MH-susceptible (MHS) and 56 MH-negative (MHN) individuals have been used to perform the in vitro contracture test (IVCT). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting studies have also been performed. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured in both tissue samples and plasma. In MHS biopsies an increase in cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) occurs, as both mRNA and protein expression compared with MHN biopsies. Hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis is increased in MHS biopsies (0.128±0.12 compared with 0.943±0.13 nmol/mg of protein per min for MHN and MHS biopsies, respectively; P<0.01). Addition of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) to MHS samples evokes a response similar, in the IVCT, to that elicited by either caffeine or halothane. Incubation of MHN biopsies with NaHS, before caffeine or halothane challenge, switches an MHN to an MHS response. In conclusion we demonstrate the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH, giving new insight into MH molecular mechanisms. This finding has potential implications for clinical care and could help to define less invasive diagnostic procedures.