Science.gov

Sample records for activities lessons learned

  1. Activities for Science: Cooperative Learning Lessons (Challenging).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasmine, Grace; Jasmine, Julia

    This book is designed to help advanced elementary students learn science skills while actively engaged in cooperative activities based on the earth sciences and natural disasters. The first section explains how to make cooperative learning a part of the curriculum and includes an overview, instructions and activities to bring cooperative learning…

  2. Live Scale Active Shooter Exercise: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ervin, Randy

    2008-01-01

    On October 23, 2007, the Lake Land College Public Safety Department conducted a full-scale live exercise that simulated an active shooter and barricaded hostage. In this article, the author will emphasize what they learned, and how they intend to benefit from it. He will list the law enforcement issues and general issues they encountered, and then…

  3. Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Norris M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses lessons learned in the implementation of James Comer's School Development Program including: (1) leadership; (2) overcoming resistance to change; (3) time required for change; (4) creating a supportive climate; (5) staff commitment and staff time; (6) personnel and staff training; (7) parent involvement; (8) connecting school and…

  4. Lessons Learned from Coordinating Relay Activities at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy E.; Hwang, Pauline; Waggoner, Bruce; McLaughlin, Bruce; Fieseler, Paul; Thomas, Reid; Bigwood, Maria; Herrera, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The Mission Management Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory was tasked with coordinating the relay of data between multiple spacecraft at Mars in support of the Mars Exploration Rover Missions in early 2004. The confluence of three orbiters (Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express), two rovers (Spirit and Opportunity), and one lander (Beagle 2) has provided a challenging operational scenario that required careful coordination between missions to provide the necessary support and to avoid potential interference during simultaneous relay sessions. As these coordination efforts progressed, several important lessons were learned that should be applied to future Mars relay activities.

  5. Lessons learned bulletin. Number 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T`he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel.

  6. A Rubric for Assessing Teachers' Lesson Activities with Respect to TPACK for Meaningful Learning with ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Joyce Hwee Ling

    2013-01-01

    Teachers' technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) for meaningful learning with ICT describes their knowledge for designing ICT lesson activities with respect to five dimensions: active, constructive, authentic, intentional, and cooperative. The ICT lesson activities designed by teachers can be assessed to determine the strengths and…

  7. Active Learning Institute: Energizing Science and Math Education. A Compilation of Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuyahoga Community Coll. - East, Cleveland, OH.

    The middle school and high school lessons featured in this collection were crafted by science and math teachers who participated in a week-long seminar sponsored by the Eisenhower Professional Development Program administered by the Ohio Board of Regents. The lessons showcase a variety of active learning strategies from using hands-on, low-tech…

  8. Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The public health nurses’ scope of practice explicitly includes child protection within their role, which places them in a prime position to identify child protection concerns. This role compliments that of other professions and voluntary agenices who work with children. Public health nurses are in a privileged position as they form a relationship with the child’s parent(s)/guardian(s) and are able to see the child in its own environment, which many professionals cannot. Child protection in Ireland, while influenced by other countries, has progressed through a distinct pathway that streamlined protocols and procedures. However, despite the above serious failures have occurred in the Irish system, and inquiries over the past 20 years persistently present similar contributing factors, namely, the lack of standardized and comprehensive service responses. Moreover, poor practice is compounded by the lack of recognition of the various interactional processes taking place within and between the different agencies of child protection, leading to psychological barriers in communication. This article will explore the lessons learned for public health nurses practice in safeguarding children in the Republic of Ireland. PMID:27335944

  9. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  10. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned, Active Mirror Telescope Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James E.

    2006-01-01

    The Active Mirror Telescope (AMT) task adopted the Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  11. Lesson Plans and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliffe, J. A.; Whitlock, L. A.; Boyd, P. T.; Lochner, J. C.; Granger, K.

    1997-12-01

    For the past 18 months, responding to a growing demand by the public, the X-ray branch of the Laboratory for High- Energy Astrophysics has created a successful web-based education/outreach program aimed at K-12 students. The High- Energy Astrophysics Learning Center and StarChild were launched in 1996; since then the sites have also been put on CD-ROM and distributed to over ten thousand teachers nationwide. In the Fall of 1997, the "High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center" was reincarnated as "Imagine the Universe!". The changes were brought about for a number of reasons, such as to expand the scope outside X-ray and and gamma-ray astronomy, to remove a name that often intimidated potential users, and to implement an abundance of user feedback. We present the new Imagine the Universe! web site and the lessons learned from our experience in the education/ outreach arena. Imagine the Universe! focuses on what scientists know about the structures in, and the evolution of, our Universe. It also investigates how scientists know these things, the remaining mysteries, and how answers might be found. At present, only the X-ray and gamma-ray approaches to these issues are active in the site. However, radio, microwave, infrared, ultraviolet, and cosmic ray information will be added over the next year. In keeping with the trend in education to base curriculum on national standards, all of the science topics presented are listed with the national mathematics and science standards to which they relate. The same is true of the revamped Teacher's Corner and the growing list of lesson plans found there. What works, what does not work, and the kind of feedback you get when you have a K-12 astronomy education web site will be presented.

  12. Army Acquisition Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    analysis on the lessons learned. Acquisition Lessons Learned Portal (ALLP) and Lessons Learned Collection CAALL has established the ALLP as the...PEOs) and their project offices, as well as the broader acquisition community. The primary function of the portal is to allow easy input and retrieval...download- able form that can be completed offline and then uploaded to the portal . This allows the form to be filled out and distrib- uted through

  13. St. Louis FUSRAP Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eberlin, J.; Williams, D.; Mueller, D.

    2003-02-26

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from fours years' experience conducting Remedial Investigation and Remedial Action activities at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Many FUSRAP sites are experiencing challenges conducting Remedial Actions within forecasted volume and budget estimates. The St. Louis FUSRAP lessons learned provide insight to options for cost effective remediation at FUSRAP sites. The lessons learned are focused on project planning (budget and schedule), investigation, design, and construction.

  14. Folding Our Way to Productivity. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranova, Daira; Bottomoley, Alice; Brock, John; Shappo, Natalia

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subject areas; instructional objectives; time required for lesson…

  15. Gross Domestic Pizza. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaleskiene, Irena; Venger, Anatoly; MacDonald, Rich; Davis, Debbie

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate age level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subject areas; instructional objectives; time…

  16. A Judicious Lesson: A Whole-Learning Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Describes a unique language learning activity using the whole language approach in a tertiary level lower advanced reading and speaking course. Following a semester long theme on crime and punishment, students were introduced to an authentic, idiomatic text dealing with a famous murder case in U.S. history. (Author/VWL)

  17. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  18. Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses my early years, education, and life experiences, including aspects of my career at McCormick & Co., Inc. A major intensive effort, one that greatly influenced my career, was helping the flavor industry cope with the passage of the Food Additives Amendment to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. It resulted in a program now in its 51st year that is unique in the food industry. Other activities took me further into the fields of toxicology, structure/activity relationships, food safety, nutrition, and biotechnology. The paper closes with some observations on current challenges, and the steps that, in my opinion, we must take to meet them.

  19. Sharing Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Mohler, Bryan L.

    2004-09-01

    Workplace safety is inextricably tied to the culture – the leadership, management and organization – of the entire company. Nor is a safety lesson fundamentally different from any other business lesson. With these points in mind, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recast its lessons learned program in 2000. The laboratory retained elements of a traditional lessons learned program, such as tracking and trending safety metrics, and added a best practices element to increase staff involvement in creating a safer, healthier work environment. Today, the Lessons Learned/Best Practices program offers the latest business thinking summarized from current external publications and shares better ways PNNL staff have discovered for doing things. According to PNNL strategic planning director Marilyn Quadrel, the goal is to sharpen the business acumen, project management ability and leadership skills of all staff and to capture the benefits of practices that emerge from lessons learned. A key tool in the PNNL effort to accelerate learning from past mistakes is one that can be easily implemented by other firms and tailored to their specific needs. It is the weekly placement of Lessons Learned/Best Practices articles in the lab’s internal electronic newsletter. The program is equally applicable in highly regulated environments, such as the national laboratories, and in enterprises that may have fewer external requirements imposed on their operations. And it is cost effective, using less than the equivalent of one fulltime person to administer.

  20. A Lesson about the Circular Flow. Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landfried, Janet

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education infrastructures in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate grade level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subjects; instructional objectives; time…

  1. A summary of lessons learned activities conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hallbert, B.P.

    1997-02-01

    A series of lessons learned studies have been conducted at the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The purpose of these lessons learned reports are to summarize knowledge and experience gained across a number of research project. This paper presents a summary of main issues addressed in four of these lessons learned projects. These are concerned with software development and quality assurance, software reliability, methods for test and evaluation of developed systems, and the evaluation of system design features.

  2. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael; Henderson, Gena; Stambolian, Damon

    2013-01-01

    NASA policy requires each Program or Project to develop a plan for how they will address Lessons Learned. Projects have the flexibility to determine how best to promote and implement lessons learned. A large project might budget for a lessons learned position to coordinate elicitation, documentation and archival of the project lessons. The lessons learned process crosses all NASA Centers and includes the contactor community. o The Office of The Chief Engineer at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C., is the overall process owner, and field locations manage the local implementation. One tool used to transfer knowledge between program and projects is the Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). Most lessons come from NASA in partnership with support contractors. A search for lessons that might impact a new design is often performed by a contractor team member. Knowledge is not found with only one person, one project team, or one organization. Sometimes, another project team, or person, knows something that can help your project or your task. Knowledge sharing is an everyday activity at the Kennedy Space Center through storytelling, Kennedy Engineering Academy presentations and through searching the Lessons Learned Information system. o Project teams search the lessons repository to ensure the best possible results are delivered. o The ideas from the past are not always directly applicable but usually spark new ideas and innovations. Teams have a great responsibility to collect and disseminate these lessons so that they are shared with future generations of space systems designers. o Leaders should set a goal for themselves to host a set numbers of lesson learned events each year and do more to promote multiple methods of lessons learned activities. o High performing employees are expected to share their lessons, however formal knowledge sharing presentation are not the norm for many employees.

  3. Lessons learned in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Olson, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper will explore lessons learned following a series of natural and man-made disasters affecting the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company and/or its subsidiaries. The company employs a team of certified continuity professionals who are charged with overseeing resilience on behalf of the enterprise and leading recovery activities wherever and whenever necessary.

  4. Constellation Program Lessons Learned. Volume 2; Detailed Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer; Neubek, Deborah J.; Thomas, L. Dale

    2011-01-01

    These lessons learned are part of a suite of hardware, software, test results, designs, knowledge base, and documentation that comprises the legacy of the Constellation Program. The context, summary information, and lessons learned are presented in a factual format, as known and described at the time. While our opinions might be discernable in the context, we have avoided all but factually sustainable statements. Statements should not be viewed as being either positive or negative; their value lies in what we did and what we learned that is worthy of passing on. The lessons include both "dos" and "don ts." In many cases, one person s "do" can be viewed as another person s "don t"; therefore, we have attempted to capture both perspectives when applicable and useful. While Volume I summarizes the views of those who managed the program, this Volume II encompasses the views at the working level, describing how the program challenges manifested in day-to-day activities. Here we see themes that were perhaps hinted at, but not completely addressed, in Volume I: unintended consequences of policies that worked well at higher levels but lacked proper implementation at the working level; long-term effects of the "generation gap" in human space flight development, the need to demonstrate early successes at the expense of thorough planning, and the consequences of problems and challenges not yet addressed because other problems and challenges were more immediate or manifest. Not all lessons learned have the benefit of being operationally vetted, since the program was cancelled shortly after Preliminary Design Review. We avoid making statements about operational consequences (with the exception of testing and test flights that did occur), but we do attempt to provide insight into how operational thinking influenced design and testing. The lessons have been formatted with a description, along with supporting information, a succinct statement of the lesson learned, and

  5. DSCOVR Contamination Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graziani, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    The Triana observatory was built at NASA GSFC in the late 1990's, then placed into storage. After approximately ten years it was removed from storage and repurposed as the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR). This presentation outlines the contamination control program lessons learned during the integration, test and launch of DSCOVR.

  6. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  7. EDSN Development Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James; Sanchez, Hugo S.; Hanson, John

    2014-01-01

    The Edison Demonstration of Smallsat Networks (EDSN) is a technology demonstration mission that provides a proof of concept for a constellation or swarm of satellites performing coordinated activities. Networked swarms of small spacecraft will open new horizons in astronomy, Earth observations and solar physics. Their range of applications include the formation of synthetic aperture radars for Earth sensing systems, large aperture observatories for next generation telescopes and the collection of spatially distributed measurements of time varying systems, probing the Earths magnetosphere, Earth-Sun interactions and the Earths geopotential. EDSN is a swarm of eight 1.5U Cubesats with crosslink, downlink and science collection capabilities developed by the NASA Ames Research Center under the Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP) within the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). This paper describes the concept of operations of the mission and planned scientific measurements. The development of the 8 satellites for EDSN necessitated the fabrication of prototypes, Flatsats and a total of 16 satellites to support the concurrent engineering and rapid development. This paper has a specific focus on the development, integration and testing of a large number of units including the lessons learned throughout the project development.

  8. Assuring that Lessons Learned Critical to Mission Success Get Used

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA has an established process for documenting and disseminating lessons learned from spaceflight missions and related activities. However, independent assessments of the NASA lessons learned process conducted in 2002, 2003, and 2011 have concluded that NASA programs and projects are failing to heed and apply these lessons learned. JPL recently completed implementation of a three-pronged approach to assure that NASA lessons learned get used by JPL spaceflight projects.

  9. Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Learning and Teaching of Activity-Based Lessons Supported with Spreadsheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agyei, Douglas D.; Voogt, Joke M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 12 pre-service mathematics teachers worked in teams to develop their knowledge and skills in using teacher-led spreadsheet demonstrations to help students explore mathematics concepts, stimulate discussions and perform authentic tasks through activity-based lessons. Pre-service teachers' lesson plans, their instruction of the…

  10. Responding To and Recovering From an Active Shooter Incident That Turns Into a Hostage Situation. Lessons Learned From School Crises and Emergencies, Volume 2, Issue 6, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on an active shooter situation that escalated to a hostage situation that required multiple law enforcement agencies and other first responders and agencies to coordinate response and recovery…

  11. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  12. Lessons Learned in Engineering. Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, James C.; Ryan, Robert S.; Schultzenhofer, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations. The supplemental CD contains accompanying PowerPoint presentations.

  13. GPS lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Global geodesy has improved dramatically over the past decade starting with the GPS for IERS and Geodynamics demonstration campaign in 1991 (GIG 91). At the time it took over a week of CPU time to process a network solution based on 21 global receivers and orbit overlaps were in the 40 cm range. Today it is possible to process a network solution based on 80 global receivers in less then one day of CPU time and orbit overlaps are in the 4 cm range. Special methods are under development for efficient processing of increasingly large regional networks which may contain hundreds or thousands of GPS receivers. Along the way there have been many lessons learned about GPS satellites, receivers, monuments, antennas, radomes, analysis, reference frames, error sources, and interpretation. A wide range of scientific disciplines have been impacted including studies of plate motion, post-glacial rebound, seasonal loading, deformation in plate boundary zones, coseismic displacements due to major earthquakes, postseiemic relaxation, and interseismic strain accumulation related to assessment of seismic hazards. Lessons learned will be presented in the context of new dense networks such as the Plate Boundary Observation (PBO).

  14. Lessons Learned from the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility Decommissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    NASA has been conducting decommissioning activities at its PBRF for the last decade. As a result of all this work there have been several lessons learned both good and bad. This paper presents some of the more exportable lessons.

  15. EMU Lessons Learned Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Kevin M., Jr.; Crocker, Lori; Cupples, J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    As manned space exploration takes on the task of traveling beyond low Earth orbit, many problems arise that must be solved in order to make the journey possible. One major task is protecting humans from the harsh space environment. The current method of protecting astronauts during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) is through use of the specially designed Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). As more rigorous EVA conditions need to be endured at new destinations, the suit will need to be tailored and improved in order to accommodate the astronaut. The Objective behind the EMU Lessons Learned Database(LLD) is to be able to create a tool which will assist in the development of next-generation EMUs, along with maintenance and improvement of the current EMU, by compiling data from Failure Investigation and Analysis Reports (FIARs) which have information on past suit failures. FIARs use a system of codes that give more information on the aspects of the failure, but if one is unfamiliar with the EMU they will be unable to decipher the information. A goal of the EMU LLD is to not only compile the information, but to present it in a user-friendly, organized, searchable database accessible to all familiarity levels with the EMU; both newcomers and veterans alike. The EMU LLD originally started as an Excel database, which allowed easy navigation and analysis of the data through pivot charts. Creating an entry requires access to the Problem Reporting And Corrective Action database (PRACA), which contains the original FIAR data for all hardware. FIAR data are then transferred to, defined, and formatted in the LLD. Work is being done to create a web-based version of the LLD in order to increase accessibility to all of Johnson Space Center (JSC), which includes converting entries from Excel to the HTML format. FIARs related to the EMU have been completed in the Excel version, and now focus has shifted to expanding FIAR data in the LLD to include EVA tools and support hardware such as

  16. Lessons Learned from FUSRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, Darina; Carpenter, Cliff; Miller, Michele

    2016-03-06

    The US DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) is the long-term steward for 90 sites remediated under numerous regulatory regimes including the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites. In addition, LM holds considerable historical information, gathered in the 1970s, to determine site eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP. To date, 29 FUSRAP sites are in LM’s inventory of sites for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M), and 25 are with the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for remediation or in the process of being transitioned to LM. It is forecasted that 13 FUSRAP sites will transfer from the USACE to LM over the next 10 years; however, the timing of the transfers is strongly dependent upon federal funding of the ongoing remedial actions. Historically, FUSRAP sites were generally cleaned up for “unrestricted” industrial use or remediated to the “cleanup standards” at that time, and their use remained unchanged. Today, these sites as well as the adjacent properties are now changing or envisioned to have changes in land use, typically from industrial to commercial or residential uses. The implication of land-use change affects DOE’s LTS&M responsibility for the sites under LM stewardship as well as the planning for the additional sites scheduled to transition in time. Coinciding with land-use changes at or near FUSRAP sites is an increased community awareness of these sites. As property development increases near FUSRAP sites, the general public and interested stakeholders regularly inquire about the sufficiency of cleanups that impact their neighborhoods and communities. LM has used this experience to address a series of lessons learned to improve our program management in light of the changing conditions of our sites. We describe these lessons learned as (1) improved stakeholder relations, (2) enhanced LTS&M requirements for the sites, and (3) greater involvement in the transition process.

  17. Lessons Learned In Technology Development for Supplemental Treatment of Low-Activity Waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Biyani, R.K.

    2008-07-01

    Hanford needs supplemental technology treatment of low-activity waste (LAW) in addition to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The Washington State Department of Ecology requires that supplemental technology provide the same protection to human health and the environment as WTP LAW glass. In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) evaluated supplemental treatment technologies for LAW treatment and looked more closely at three: bulk vitrification (BV), steam reforming, and tailored cementitious stabilization. US DOE with Ecology's support chose to design and test BV because it believed BV would offer rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility. This paper will describe the path taken in choosing and developing technologies for additional LAW treatment capacity and, more importantly, the lessons learned along the way. In conclusion: Contractors' off-the-shelf vitrification technology that worked elsewhere may not apply easily to Hanford's waste challenges. The BV development process could have been improved by first identifying and then focusing on primary areas of concern. Continuing integrated tests at the Horn Rapids facility offers a convenient option to test both the dryer and the SMF. But the plan for development of the SMF must be short term with well defined success criteria. US DOE has the responsibility to carefully evaluate each proposal and make critical decisions that will make optimum use of limited funds. The ERP provided valuable technical guidance on improving BV's design. This must be complemented by a similar study of cost effectiveness of a process. We must have a better understanding of life cycle costs before a path for supplemental treatment is chosen. US DOE has now gained five years of experience in developing BV. It is time for US DOE to make defensible economic evaluations before further funding towards developing supplemental treatment. It must reevaluate if the projected advantages of rapid deployment, low cost, and waste

  18. Higher Education ERP: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Dave; Orgill, Ken

    2001-01-01

    Shares experiences and lessons learned by chief information officers of large universities about enterprise resource planning (ERP). Specifically, provides a framework for approaching an ERP that could save universities millions of dollars. (EV)

  19. Lessons Learned: Mechanical Component and Tribology Activities in Support of Return to Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2017-01-01

    The February 2003 loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia resulted in NASA Management revisiting every critical system onboard this very complex, reusable space vehicle in a an effort to Return to Flight. Many months after the disaster, contact between NASA Johnson Space Center and NASA Glenn Research Center evolved into an in-depth assessment of the actuator drive systems for the Rudder Speed Brake and Body Flap Systems. The actuators are CRIT 1-1 systems that classifies them as failure of any of the actuators could result in loss of crew and vehicle. Upon further evaluation of these actuator systems and the resulting issues uncovered, several research activities were initiated, conducted, and reported to the NASA Space Shuttle Program Management. The papers contained in this document are the contributions of many researchers from NASA Glenn Research Center and Marshall Space Flight Center as part of a Lessons Learned on mechanical actuation systems as used in space applications. Many of the findings contained in this document were used as a basis to safely Return to Flight for the remaining Space Shuttle Fleet until their retirement.

  20. 24/7 Online Learning: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    It is evident that the more people believe, the more they can conquer. This is true especially in moving instructors and students into the world of online and blended learning environments. There are a number of things to consider when moving courses to an online learning format. In this article, the author writes about the lessons learned at…

  1. Logistics Lessons Learned in NASA Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, William A.; DeWeck, Olivier; Laufer, Deanna; Shull, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Information System (LLIS) and verified that we received the same result using the internal version of LLIS for our logistics lesson searches. In conducting the research, information from multiple databases was consolidated into a single spreadsheet of 300 lessons learned. Keywords were applied for the purpose of sorting and evaluation. Once the lessons had been compiled, an analysis of the resulting data was performed, first sorting it by keyword, then finding duplication and root cause, and finally sorting by root cause. The data was then distilled into the top 7 lessons learned across programs, centers, and activities.

  2. Learning the Blues. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This lesson introduces students to the "blues," one of the most distinctive and influential elements of African-American musical tradition. With this lesson plan, students can take a virtual field trip to Memphis, Tennessee, one of the prominent centers of blues activities, and explore the history of the blues in the work of W. C. Handy…

  3. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, R.

    2012-07-12

    The purpose of lessons learned is to identify insight gained during a project – successes or failures – that can be applied on future projects. Lessons learned can contribute to the overall success of a project by building on approaches that have worked well and avoiding previous mistakes. Below are examples of lessons learned during ERDF’s ARRA-funded expansion project.

  4. Lessons learned from RTG programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinstrom, Robert M.; Cockfield, Robert D.

    1998-01-01

    During the Cassini Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) program, the heritage RTG design was reviewed and modified to incorporate lessons learned. Design changes were made both to resolve problems as they occurred and to correct difficulties noted in earlier missions. Topics addressed in this paper included problems experienced previously at the launch facility in attaching the pressure relief device to the generators, and the open circuit conditions that occurred at times in the resistance temperature device wiring harness. Also discussed is a problem caused by mistakes in software configuration management. How lessons learned refined the RTG design and integration with the spacecraft are discussed and the adopted solutions are described.

  5. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 – Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new “Lessons Learned Corner” as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  6. NASA Materials Related Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for the nation's accomplishments for more than 200 years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Through the knowledge captured and recorded in Lessons Learned from more than 80 years of flight in the Earth's atmosphere, NASA's materials researchers are constantly working to develop stronger, lighter, and more durable materials that can withstand the challenges of space. The Agency's talented materials engineers and scientists continue to build on that rich tradition by using the knowledge and wisdom gained from past experiences to create futurist materials and technologies that will be used in the next generation of advanced spacecraft and satellites that may one day enable mankind to land men on another planet or explore our nearest star. These same materials may also have application here on Earth to make commercial aircraft more economical to build and fly. With the explosion in technical accomplishments over the last decade, the ability to capture knowledge and have the capability to rapidly communicate this knowledge at lightning speed throughout an organization like NASA has become critical. Use of Lessons Learned is a principal component of an organizational culture committed to continuous improvement.

  7. NASA Materials Related Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Danny; Gill, Paul S.; Vaughan, William W.

    2003-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for the nation s accomplishments for more than 200 years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Through the knowledge captured and recorded in Lessons Learned from more than 80 years of flight in the Earth s atmosphere, NASA s materials researchers are constantly working to develop stronger, lighter, and more durable materials that can withstand the challenges of space. The Agency s talented materials engineers and scientists continue to build on that rich tradition by using the knowledge and wisdom gained from past experiences to create futuristic materials and technologies that will be used in the next generation of advanced spacecraft and satellites that may one day enable mankind to land men on another planet or explore our nearest star. These same materials may also have application here on Earth to make commercial aircraft more economical to build and fly. With the explosion in technical accomplishments over the last decade, the ability to capture knowledge and have the capability to rapidly communicate this knowledge at lightning speed throughout an organization like NASA has become critical. Use of Lessons Learned is a principal component of an organizational culture committed to continuous improvement.

  8. Lessons learned from hospice care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2013-10-01

    Pharmaceutical care of the hospice patient offers unique challenges in the management of pain and other symptoms. Lessons learned in providing hospice care can be used in the care of nonterminal patients as well to optimize patient-specific care, regardless of care setting or life expectancy.

  9. Constellation Lessons Learned Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Neubek, Deb

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the lessons learned from the Constellation Program (CxP) and identified several factors that contributed to the inability of the CxP to meet the cost and schedule commitments. The review includes a significant section on the context in which the CxP operated since new programs are likely to experience the same constraints.

  10. Primary Care and Public Health Activities in Select US Health Centers: Documenting Successes, Barriers, and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu; Chowdhury, Joya; Sripipatana, Alek; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A. Seiji; Daly, Charles A.; Tomoyasu, Naomi; Nair, Suma; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary care and public health activities among federally funded health centers, to better understand their successes, the barriers encountered, and the lessons learned. Methods. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data from 9 health centers, stratified by administrative division, urban–rural location, and race/ethnicity of patients served. Descriptive data on patient and institutional characteristics came from the Uniform Data System, which collects data from all health centers annually. We administered questionnaires and conducted phone interviews with key informants. Results. Health centers performed well on primary care coordination and community orientation scales and reported conducting many essential public health activities. We identified specific needs for integrating primary care and public health: (1) more funding for collaborations and for addressing the social determinants of health, (2) strong leadership to champion collaborations, (3) trust building among partners, with shared missions and clear expectations of responsibilities, and (4) alignment and standardization of data collection, analysis, and exchange. Conclusions. Lessons learned from health centers should inform strategies to better integrate public health with primary care. PMID:22690975

  11. Shuttle Lesson Learned - Toxicology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    This is a script for a video about toxicology and the space shuttle. The first segment is deals with dust in the space vehicle. The next segment will be about archival samples. Then we'll look at real time on-board analyzers that give us a lot of capability in terms of monitoring for combustion products and the ability to monitor volatile organics on the station. Finally we will look at other issues that are about setting limits and dealing with ground based lessons that pertain to toxicology.

  12. Safeguards Culture: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Mladineo, Stephen V.

    2009-05-27

    Abstract: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper builds on that theoretical discussion to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Paper: At the 2005 INMM/ESARDA Workshop on “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges,” in Santa Fe, New Mexico, I presented a paper entitled “Changing the Safeguards Culture: Broader Perspectives and Challenges.” That paper, coauthored by Karyn R. Durbin and Andrew Van Duzer, described a set of theoretical models that can be used as a basis for evaluating changes to safeguards culture. This paper updates that theoretical discussion, and seeks to address practical methods for influencing culture. It takes lessons from methods used to influence change in safety culture and security culture, and examines the applicability of these lessons to changing safeguards culture. Implicit in this discussion is an understanding that improving a culture is not an end in itself, but is one method of improving the underlying discipline, that is safety, security, or safeguards. Culture can be defined as a way of life, or general customs and beliefs of a particular group of people at a particular time. There are internationally accepted definitions of safety culture and nuclear security culture. As yet, there is no official agreed upon definition of safeguards culture. At the end of the paper I will propose my definition. At the Santa Fe Workshop the summary by the Co-Chairs of Working Group 1, “The Further Evolution of Safeguards,” noted: “It is clear that ‘safeguards culture

  13. MSL Lessons Learned and Knowledge Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buxbaum, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Program has recently been informed of the Planetary Protection Subcommittee (PPS) recommendation, which was endorsed by the NAC, concerning Mars Science Lab (MSL) lessons learned and knowledge capture. The Mars Program has not had an opportunity to consider any decisions specific to the PPS recommendation. Some of the activities recommended by the PPS would involve members of the MSL flight team who are focused on cruise, entry descent & landing, and early surface operations; those activities would have to wait. Members of the MSL planetary protection team at JPL are still available to support MSL lessons learned and knowledge capture; some of the specifically recommended activities have already begun. The Mars Program shares the PPS/NAC concerns about loss of potential information & expertise in planetary protection practice.

  14. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in mssions to planets and their moons because for an undesirablei contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  15. Planetary protection: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, L.

    2004-01-01

    Planetary protection is a very wide subject because of the variety of physical conditions on individual planets and their moons. At present, we have good photographs or imagery, as well as other evidence, from most planets and from a selection of their moons. The most important factor is the presence or absence of any form of life. Material samples are available from the Moon and possibly, in the form of a few meteorites, from Mars. The danger of contamination has been recognized in the past and it became clear that some measures would have to be taken. The adoption of measures will have to be universal in missions to planets and their moons because for an undesirable contamination to occur, one failed measure of protection may be enough. The question is, if we can learn from experience gained in the last forty years in adopting laws, rules or unbinding recommendations for space activities. Several examples will be discussed, such as the amount of knowledge at a time when international treaties on space law were adopted, the consequences of the failed discussion at the United Nations on the definition of outer space, or of the break-up of Cosmos 954. Special attention will be devoted to the ongoing discussion of space debris in the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and its relevance for planetary protection, to the general compliance with the Registration Convention and to the experience gained with the recommendation to re-orbit geostationary satellites.

  16. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Lessons on and from the dihybrid cross: An activity-theoretical study of learning in coteaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Tobin, Kenneth; Zimmermann, Andrea; Bryant, Natasia; Davis, Charles

    2002-03-01

    During their training, future teachers usually learn the subject matter of science. However, they are largely left on their own when it comes to figuring out how to teach this subject matter, that is, how to find appropriate pedagogical forms. In this article we present a model of collective teaching and learning, which we term coteaching/cogenerative dialoguing, as a way to build deep learning of science concepts while learning about alternative ways to teach the same subject matter. As praxis, coteaching brings about a unity between teaching and learning to teach; cogenerative dialoguing brings about a unity between teaching and researching. Both are potential sites for deep learning. We articulate coteaching/cogenerative dialoguing in terms of activity theory and the associated first-person research methodology that has been developed by critical psychologists as a method of choice for dealing with the theory-praxis gap. Our detailed case study highlights opportunities of learning subject matter and pedagogy by university professors who participate in coteaching/cogenerative dialoguing in an urban high school.

  18. Lessons learned and applied

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Corey Joseph; Hall, Corey M.; Odoms, La’ Nyia J.

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines available in the United States (US) have been incorporated into vaccination schedules for infants and young children, age groups particularly at risk of contracting infectious diseases. High universal vaccination coverage is responsible for substantially reducing or nearly eliminating many of the diseases that once killed thousands of children each year in the US. Despite the success of infant vaccinations, periods of low vaccination coverage and the limited immunogenicity and duration of protection of certain vaccines have resulted in sporadic outbreaks, allowing some diseases to spread in communities. These challenges suggest that expanded vaccination coverage to younger infants and adolescents, and more immunogenic vaccines, may be needed in some instances. This review focuses on the importance of infant immunization and explores the successes and challenges of current early childhood vaccination programs and how these lessons may be applied to other invasive diseases, such as meningococcal disease. PMID:22617834

  19. What, How and for Whom To Produce? Active Learning Lessons. Economics International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Angela; Paul, Sara; Yevgushchenko, Anzhela; Yotkova, Vesselka

    This lesson plan was developed through "Economics International," an international program to help build economic education in the emerging market economies. It provides a lesson description; appropriate age level; economic concepts; content standards and benchmarks; related subject areas; instruction objectives; time required for…

  20. Science and Sandy: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy's impact on the mid-Atlantic region, President Obama established a Task Force to '...ensure that the Federal Government continues to provide appropriate resources to support affected State, local, and tribal communities to improve the region's resilience, health, and prosperity by building for the future.' The author was detailed from NOAA to the Task Force between January and June 2013. As the Task Force and others began to take stock of the region's needs and develop plans to address them, many diverse approaches emerged from different areas of expertise including: infrastructure, management and construction, housing, public health, and others. Decision making in this environment was complex with many interests and variables to consider and balance. Although often relevant, science and technical expertise was not always at the forefront of this process. This talk describes the author's experience with the Sandy Task Force focusing on organizing scientific expertise to support the work of the Task Force. This includes a description of federal activity supporting Sandy recovery efforts, the role of the Task Force, and lessons learned from developing a science support function within the Task Force.

  1. Evaluation of the Effects of the Medium of Instruction on Science Learning of Hong Kong Secondary Students: Instructional Activities in Science Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din-Yan; Coyle, Do; Tsang, Wing-Kwong

    2007-01-01

    This article reports part of the findings of a longitudinal study on the effects of a language policy implemented in 1998 on the science learning of junior secondary students. It focuses on the effects of the instructional medium on the instructional activities in science lessons. According to students' responses to a questionnaire, EMI (English…

  2. The Decovalex III Project: A Summary of Activities and LessonsLearned

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Jing, Lanru; Stephansson, Ove; Kautsky, Fritz

    2005-03-21

    Initiated in 1992, the DECOVALEX project is an international collaboration for advancing the understanding and modeling of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in geologic systems. The project has made important scientific achievements through three stages and is progressing in its fourth stage. It has played a key role in the development of mathematical modeling and in situ testing of coupled THM processes in fractured rock and buffer/backfill materials, a subject of importance for performance assessment of radioactive waste geologic repositories. This paper summarizes studies under the most recent stage of the project, DECOVALEX III (2000-2003). These studies include those of two major field experiments: (a) the FEBEX experiment at Grimsel, Switzerland, investigating coupled THM processes in a crystalline rock-bentonite system, and (b) the Drift Scale Test (DST) experiment at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, investigating coupled THM processes in unsaturated tuff. These are two of the largest multiyear heater tests undertaken to date for the study of coupled THM processes in geological systems. In addition, three so-called benchmark tests are also studied to evaluate the impact of coupled THM processes under different scenarios and geometries. Within the DECOVALEX project, multiple research teams participated in each of the studies, using different approaches and computer codes. Comparisons of results have provided insight into coupled THM processes, which in turn has stimulated further development of our modeling capabilities. Lessons learned from these studies are discussed. The scientific advances and enhanced insight gained through this kind of international cooperation illustrate the effectiveness of the DECOVALEX project.

  3. Software Carpentry: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into a worldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers' computing skills. This paper explains what we have learned along the way, the challenges we now face, and our plans for the future. PMID:24715981

  4. Lessons Learned (Vietnam)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-01-01

    bocn zzoc~zived czt orgcnizational level originally designated for eitYher -Ll., 20th lnoer Dattalion (CIA) or the 584th Engineer C~npc~r (LL) n~m~t!e...in standard field ranuals. Several are cited here only to con-firr that a les- son to Le learned is that these techniques and principles are b- asically

  5. Brownfields City of Cleveland: Deconstruction Lessons Learned Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical memorandum presents an overview of Cleveland’s current deconstruction initiative goals and lessons learned (in the Cleveland area) and potential strategies for addressing lessons learned.

  6. Somalia Operations: Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Ft. McNafr, Wauhingbon, DC ~ 44~Y _ _ A National Defense Unio-=ty Prea Publicatoks "To increase general knowledge and Inform discussion, the Ins Utute ...for National Strategic Studies . through its publication arrn the NDU Press. publishes McNalr Papers: proceedings of Unlvevsity- and Institute...in the spring of 1994. In the months that followed, we have studied what the Somalia cxpcrlericc can teach us about peace m !sslons and learned how we

  7. We Have Not Yet Learned Our Lesson

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Potential to Use Lessons Learned to Avoid Past Mistakes is Largely Untapped, 18. 20 Mark A. Silvia , Collection and Analysis Section Head...email message to the author, 10 April 10 2014. 25 Silvia , email message. 26 GAO Report, Potential to Use Lessons Learned to Avoid Past Mistakes

  8. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.

  9. Organizational safety factors research lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    This Paper reports lessons learned and state of knowledge gained from an organizational factors research activity involving commercial nuclear power plants in the United States, through the end of 1991, as seen by the scientists immediately involved in the research. Lessons learned information was gathered from the research teams and individuals using a question and answer format. The following five questions were submitted to each team and individual: (1) What organizational factors appear to influence safety performance in some systematic way, (2) Should organizational factors research focus at the plant level, or should it extend beyond the plant level to the parent company, rate setting commissions, regulatory agencies, (3) How important is having direct access to plants for doing organizational factors research, (4) What lessons have been learned to date as the result of doing organizational factors research in a nuclear regulatory setting, and (5) What organizational research topics and issues should be pursued in the future? Conclusions based on the responses provided for this report are that organizational factors research can be conducted in a regulatory setting and produce useful results. Technologies pioneered in other academic, commercial, and military settings can be adopted for use in a nuclear regulatory setting. The future success of such research depends upon the cooperation of regulators, contractors, and the nuclear industry.

  10. Lessons learned from Hurricane Ike.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Laurie; Anderle, Diane; Nastally, Kathleen; Sarver, Troy; Hafner-Burton, Tana; Owens, Sheron

    2009-06-01

    After the poorly planned evacuation for Hurricane Rita in 2005, many health care systems in the Houston area updated the disaster plans they would implement in the event of a major disaster. In September 2008, Texas health care systems in the Houston-Galveston area had the opportunity to execute those plans when Hurricane Ike made landfall. Despite hours of hurricane preparation at the Texas Orthopedic Hospital in Houston, TX, before the storm, we found that there were still lessons to be learned from Hurricane Ike that can be used by other health care systems to prepare for disaster.

  11. Implementing a lessons learned process at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Fosshage, Erik D.; Drewien, Celeste A.; Eras, Kenneth; Hartwig, Ronald Craig; Post, Debra S.; Stoecker, Nora Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Lessons Learned Process Improvement Team was tasked to gain an understanding of the existing lessons learned environment within the major programs at Sandia National Laboratories, identify opportunities for improvement in that environment as compared to desired attributes, propose alternative implementations to address existing inefficiencies, perform qualitative evaluations of alternative implementations, and recommend one or more near-term activities for prototyping and/or implementation. This report documents the work and findings of the team.

  12. Planning and scheduling lessons learned study, executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Toni

    1990-01-01

    The study was performed to document the lessons on planning and scheduling activities for a number of missions and institutional facilities in such a way that they can be applied to future missions; to provide recommendations to both projects and Code 500 that will improve the end-to-end planning and scheduling process; and to identify what, if any, mission characteristics might be related to certain lessons learned. The results are a series of recommendations of both a managerial and technical nature related to the underlying lessons learned.

  13. Implementing US Department of Energy lessons learned programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The DOE Lessons Learned Handbook is a two-volume publication developed to supplement the DOE Lessons Learned Standard (DOE-STD-7501-95) with information that will organizations in developing or improving their lessons learned programs. Volume 1 includes greater detail than the Standard in areas such as identification and documentation of lessons learned; it also contains sections on specific processes such as training and performance measurement. Volume 2 (this document) contains examples of program documents developed by existing lessons learned programs as well as communications material, functional categories, transmittal documents, sources of professional and industry lessons learned, and frequently asked questions about the Lessons Learned List Service.

  14. Lessons learned for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Lessons learned for composite structures are presented in three technology areas: materials, manufacturing, and design. In addition, future challenges for composite structures are presented. Composite materials have long gestation periods from the developmental stage to fully matured production status. Many examples exist of unsuccessful attempts to accelerate this gestation period. Experience has shown that technology transition of a new material system to fully matured production status is time consuming, involves risk, is expensive and should not be undertaken lightly. The future challenges for composite materials require an intensification of the science based approach to material development, extension of the vendor/customer interaction process to include all engineering disciplines of the end user, reduced material costs because they are a significant factor in overall part cost, and improved batch-to-batch pre-preg physical property control. Historical manufacturing lessons learned are presented using current in-service production structure as examples. Most producibility problems for these structures can be traced to their sequential engineering design. This caused an excessive emphasis on design-to-weight and schedule at the expense of design-to-cost. This resulted in expensive performance originated designs, which required costly tooling and led to non-producible parts. Historically these problems have been allowed to persist throughout the production run. The current/future approach for the production of affordable composite structures mandates concurrent engineering design where equal emphasis is placed on product and process design. Design for simplified assembly is also emphasized, since assembly costs account for a major portion of total airframe costs. The future challenge for composite manufacturing is, therefore, to utilize concurrent engineering in conjunction with automated manufacturing techniques to build affordable composite structures

  15. Downsizing with VXIbus - Lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlidge, Leslie A.

    AAI has adapted VXIbus technology under its internal research and development program for a broad range of military test system applications. The goals of this project are to provide optimum test capability, system interoperability, and a user-friendly test development environment, and to ensure ease of module interchangeability. Problem areas encountered during the development include: module interoperability/interchangeability; the unit under test (UUT) interface/interconnection device; and application software development ease. AAI has developed solutions and strategies to deal with each of these problem areas. The author discusses AAI's findings and the lessons learned in the development of downsized test equipment utilizing VXIbus technology. The following considerations in VXIbus instrument selection and test system design are examined: instrument performance, chassis considerations, interface connector assembly considerations, controller capabilities, compliance with VXIbus Specification 1.3, instrument interoperability and interchangeability, application software development tools, and manufacturer support.

  16. Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

    2005-01-01

    An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

  17. Lessons learned in organizing for performance

    SciTech Connect

    Long, R.L.

    1993-12-31

    Lessons learned from the Three Mile Island accident are described. The effectiveness of the General Public Utilities Corporation in the decontamination/support issues and restart of the three mile unit-1 reactor, is discussed.

  18. Stickybear's Early Learning Activities: School Version with Lesson Plans (Ages 2-6). [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Joni Bitman

    Aimed at children ages 2 to 6, this software product is designed to give preschoolers an essential skills head start with sight and sounds that will capture their interest. The courseware provides two modes of play, allowing children to learn through prompted direction or through discovery. The program is bilingual, offering skill development in…

  19. The Learning Wheel: Ideas and Activities for Multicultural and Holistic Lesson Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Annabelle

    This book describes a conceptual framework for multicultural education that is based on how various cultures lead their members to know about the world. This approach accounts for diverse ways of knowing and learning and is based on the symbol of the wheel as an ancient organizational model from Asia, Europe, Africa, and North America. This model…

  20. Lessons Learned in Building the Ares Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, John Phil

    2010-01-01

    Since being established in 2005, the Ares Projects at Marshall Space Flight Center have been making steady progress designing, building, testing, and flying the next generation of exploration launch vehicles. Ares is committed to rebuilding crucial capabilities from the Apollo era that made the first human flights to the Moon possible, as well as incorporating the latest in computer technology and changes in management philosophy. One example of an Apollo-era practice has been giving NASA overall authority over vehicle integration activities, giving civil service engineers hands-on experience in developing rocket hardware. This knowledge and experience help make the agency a "smart buyer" of products and services. More modern practices have been added to the management tool belt to improve efficiency, cost effectiveness, and institutional knowledge, including knowledge management/capture to gain better insight into design and decision making; earned value management, where Ares won a NASA award for its practice and implementation; designing for operability; and Lean Six Sigma applications to identify and eliminate wasted time and effort. While it is important to learn technical lessons like how to fly and control unique rockets like the Ares I-X flight test vehicle, the Ares management team also has been learning important lessons about how to manage large, long-term projects.

  1. Extension Learning Exchange: Lessons from Nicaragua

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treadwell, Paul; Lachapelle, Paul; Howe, Rod

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need to support global professional development, international education, and collaborative learning opportunities in Extension. The program described here established an international learning exchange in Nicaragua to lead to global professional development and future international collaboration. The primary lessons and outcomes…

  2. Building a Better Lessons Learned Program - White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Charles Frederick

    2002-04-01

    Lessons learned are more in vogue today than at any time in our history. You can’t tune into a news broadcast without hearing a reference to the concept – and for good reason. People are finally accepting the idea that they may be able to benefit from the experiences of others. Corporations, government departments, and even the military are actively using lessons learned information to help them to achieve their varied goals. The Department of Energy is one of the government departments that has a Lessons Learned Program and requires its contractors to develop a program of their own. Unfortunately, adequate guidance is not available to enable contractors to design a fully mature program (i.e., a program that will immediately meet their every need) and to ensure that it is implemented such that it will be deemed acceptable during subsequent assessments. The purpose of this paper is to present the reader with information that might help him or her better plan and develop a new or upgraded Lessons Learned Program. The information is based on the actual development and implementation of a “second generation” lessons learned program and is presented as a chronicle of the steps taken to build the rudimentary system and the subsequent events and problems that led to the programs present-day configuration.

  3. Summary of Planned Implementation for the HTGR Lessons Learned Applicable to the NGNP

    SciTech Connect

    Ian Mckirdy

    2011-09-01

    This document presents a reconciliation of the lessons learned during a 2010 comprehensive evaluation of pertinent lessons learned from past and present high temperature gas-cooled reactors that apply to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project along with current and planned activities. The data used are from the latest Idaho National Laboratory research and development plans, the conceptual design report from General Atomics, and the pebble bed reactor technology readiness study from AREVA. Only those lessons related to the structures, systems, and components of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), as documented in the recently updated lessons learned report are addressed. These reconciliations are ordered according to plant area, followed by the affected system, subsystem, or component; lesson learned; and finally an NGNP implementation statement. This report (1) provides cross references to the original lessons learned document, (2) describes the lesson learned, (3) provides the current NGNP implementation status with design data needs associated with the lesson learned, (4) identifies the research and development being performed related to the lesson learned, and (5) summarizes with a status of how the lesson learned has been addressed by the NGNP Project.

  4. Lessons Learned for Improving Spacecraft Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.; Stambolian, Damon B.; Henderson, Gena M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has a unique history in processing the Space Shuttle fleet for launches. Some of this experience has been captured in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System (LLIS). This tool provides a convenient way for design engineers to review lessons from the past to prevent problems from reoccurring and incorporate positive lessons in new designs. At the Kennedy Space Center, the LLIS is being used to design ground support equipment for the next generation of launch and crewed vehicles. This paper describes the LLIS process and offers some examples.

  5. Immune activation and induction of memory: lessons learned from controlled human malaria infection with Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Scholzen, Anja; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    Controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs) are a powerful tool to assess the efficacy of drugs and/or vaccine candidates, but also to study anti-malarial immune responses at well-defined time points after infection. In this review, we discuss the insights that CHMI trials have provided into early immune activation and regulation during acute infection, and the capacity to induce and maintain immunological memory. Importantly, these studies show that a single infection is sufficient to induce long-lasting parasite-specific T- and B-cell memory responses, and suggest that blood-stage induced regulatory responses can limit inflammation both in ongoing and potentially future infections. As future perspective of investigation in CHMIs, we discuss the role of innate cell subsets, the interplay between innate and adaptive immune activation and the potential modulation of these responses after natural pre-exposure.

  6. Lessons Learned from Outsourcing the Pearl Harbor MK-48 Intermediate Maintenance Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    this case study is to evaluate this effort and to show the applicability of market-based tools in the public sector, and especially by the Department... study was to conduct a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the model used to outsource the Intermediate Maintenance Activity (IMA) for the MK-48...torpedo, which is currently performed at in Pearl Harbor (Hawaii) by Raytheon Company. This research is oriented as a case study analysis for public

  7. Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities. Outcomes of the International Conference, 11-15 December 2006, Athens, Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Batandjieva, B.; Laraia, M.

    2008-01-15

    Full text of publication follows: decommissioning activities are increasing worldwide covering wide range of facilities - from nuclear power plant, through fuel cycle facilities to small laboratories. The importance of these activities is growing with the recognition of the need for ensuring safe termination of practices and reuse of sites for various purposes, including the development of new nuclear facilities. Decommissioning has been undertaken for more than forty years and significant knowledge has been accumulated and lessons have been learned. However the number of countries encountering decommissioning for the first time is increasing with the end of the lifetime of the facilities around the world, in particular in countries with small nuclear programmes (e.g. one research reactor) and limited human and financial resources. In order to facilitate the exchange of lessons learned and good practices between all Member States and to facilitate and improve safety of the planned, ongoing and future decommissioning projects, the IAEA in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency to OECD, European Commission and World Nuclear Association organised the international conference on Lessons Learned from the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities, held in Athens, Greece. The conference also highlighted areas where future cooperation at national and international level is required in order to improve decommissioning planning and safety during decommissioning and to facilitate decommissioning by selecting appropriate strategies and technologies for decontamination, dismantling and management of waste. These and other aspects discussed at the conference are presented in this paper, together with the planned IAEA measures for amendment and implementation of the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and its future programme on decommissioning.

  8. The role of photogeologic mapping in traverse planning: lessons learned from DRATS 2010 activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, James A.; Fortezzo, Corey M.

    2013-01-01

    We produced a 1:24,000 scale photogeologic map of the Desert Research and Technology Studies (DRATS) 2010 simulated lunar mission traverse area and surrounding environments located within the northeastern part of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), north-central Arizona. To mimic an exploratory mission, we approached the region "blindly" by rejecting prior knowledge or preconceived notions of the regional geologic setting and focused instead only on image and topographic base maps that were intended to be equivalent to pre-cursor mission "orbital returns". We used photogeologic mapping techniques equivalent to those employed during the construction of modern planetary geologic maps. Based on image and topographic base maps, we identified 4 surficial units (talus, channel, dissected, and plains units), 5 volcanic units (older cone, younger cone, older flow, younger flow, and block field units), and 5 basement units (grey-toned mottled, red-toned platy, red-toned layered, light-toned slabby, and light-toned layered units). Comparison of our remote-based map units with published field-based map units indicates that the two techniques yield pervasively similar results of contrasting detail, with higher accuracies linked to remote-based units that have high topographic relief and tonal contrast relative to adjacent units. We list key scientific questions that remained after photogeologic mapping and prior to DRATS activities and identify 13 specific observations that the crew and science team would need to make in order to address those questions and refine the interpreted geologic context. We translated potential observations into 62 recommended sites for visitation and observation during the mission traverse. The production and use of a mission-specific photogeologic map for DRATS 2010 activities resulted in strategic and tactical recommendations regarding observational context and hypothesis tracking over the course of an exploratory mission.

  9. MC-1 Engine Valves, Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laszar, John

    2003-01-01

    Many lessons were learned during the development of the valves for the MC-1 engine. The purpose of this report is to focus on a variety of issues related to the engine valves and convey the lessons learned. This paper will not delve into detailed technical analysis of the components. None of the lessons learned are new or surprising, but simply reinforce the importance of addressing the details of the design early, at the component level. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama developed the MC-1 engine, a LOX / FW-1, 60,000 pound thrust engine. This engine was developed under the Low Cost Boost Technology office at MSFC and proved to be a very successful project for the MSFC Propulsion team and the various subcontractors working the development of the engine and its components.

  10. X-31 Mishap: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    , and the program was successfully completed without incident. This presentation also shows a video of the mishap including lessons learned, and the changes that were made to resume the flight-test program are presented.

  11. Lessons learned from applied field research activities in Africa during the malaria eradication era

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, Leonard J.

    1984-01-01

    The Malaria Conference in Equatorial Africa, convened by the World Health Organization in 1950 in Kampala, Uganda, was a milestone in the history of modern malaria control activities on the continent of Africa. It presented and assessed the available international information on epidemiological aspects of this disease and attempted to coordinate the various methods of research and control of malaria. Its two main recommendations were that malaria should be controlled by all available methods, irrespective of the degree of endemicity of the disease, and that the benefits that malaria control might bring to the indigenous population should be evaluated. The first period of field research and pilot control projects in Africa was between 1950 and 1964. A large number of studies in several African countries showed that the use of residual insecticides such as DDT and HCH might decrease, at times considerably, the amount of malaria transmission, but interruption of transmission could not be achieved, except in two relatively small projects in the forest areas of Cameroon and Liberia. During the second period, from 1965 to 1974, the difficulties of malaria eradication and control in Africa became more evident because of the development of resistance of Anopheles gambiae to DDT, HCH, and dieldrin; moreover administrative, logistic, and financial problems had emerged. It became clear that the prospects for malaria control (let alone those for eradication) were related to the availability of a network of basic health services. A number of “pre-eradication” programmes were set up in order to develop better methods of malaria control and to improve the rural health infrastructures. Much field research on the chemotherapy of malaria was carried out and the value of collective or selective administration of antimalarial drugs was fully recognized, although it became obvious that this could not play an important part in the decrease of transmission of malaria in Africa. The

  12. Lessons Learned From Reactive Transport Modeling of a Low-Activity Waste Glass Disposal System

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B PETER.

    2003-04-01

    A set of reactive chemical transport calculations was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal system located on the Hanford Site. Two different trench designs were considered, one with four rows of small waste packages, the other with three layers of larger waste packages. One-dimensional simulations were carried out to 20,000 years, whereas two-dimensional simulations could only be carried out for several hundred years due to constraints on computational time. Both the 1-D and 2-D simulations predict that the Technetium release rate from the waste packages will be lower for the new trench design at later times. Because the glass corrosion rate is significantly higher at the backfill/glass interfaces, having less interfacial area in the new trench design offsets the effect of the slightly higher pH relative to the old trench design. In the two-dimensional simulations, water can flow around the waste packages, which causes a decrease in the water flux through the waste packages and lower release rates than predicted in the 1-D simulations. This result reinforces the importance of performing multi-dimensional waste form release simulations.

  13. Solar activity during the space weather incident of Nov 4., 2015 - Complex data and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, Hermann; Pulkkinen, Antti; Buchert, Stephan; Monstein, Christian; Klein, Karl Ludwig; Marqué, Christophe; Krucker, Säm

    2016-04-01

    During the afternoon of November 4, 2015 most southern Swedish aviation radar systems experienced heavy disturbances, which eventually forced an outing of the majority of the radars. In consequence the entire southern Swedish aerospace had to be closed for incoming and leaving air traffic for about 2 hours. Immediately after the incident space weather anomalies were made responsible for the radar disturbances, but it took a very thorough investigation to differentiate disturbances from an ongoing magnetic storm caused by earlier solar activity, which had no disturbing effects on the flight radars, from a new and, indeed, extreme radio-burst on the Sun, which caused the Swedish radar anomalies. Other systems in various European countries also experienced major radio-disturbances during this extreme event, but they were not of the gravity as experienced in Sweden, or at least not causing a similar damage. One of the problems in reaching the right conclusions about the incident was that the extreme radio-burst around 1400 UT on Nov 4 (more than 50000 SFU at GHz frequencies), emerged from a medium size M3.7 Flare on the Sun, which did not trigger any immediate warnings. We will report about the analysis leading to the improved understanding of this extreme space weather event, evaluate the importance of solar radio observations, and discuss possible mitigation strategies for future events of similar nature.

  14. Sellafield Decommissioning Programme - Update and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwyche, P. R.; Challinor, S. F.

    2003-02-24

    The Sellafield site in North West England has over 240 active facilities covering the full nuclear cycle from fuel manufacture through generation, reprocessing and waste treatment. The Sellafield decommissioning programme was formally initiated in the mid 1980s though several plants had been decommissioned prior to this primarily to create space for other plants. Since the initiation of the programme 7 plants have been completely decommissioned, significant progress has been made in a further 16 and a total of 56 major project phases have been completed. This programme update will explain the decommissioning arrangements and strategies and illustrate the progress made on a number of the plants including the Windscale Pile Chimneys, the first reprocessing plan and plutonium plants. These present a range of different challenges and requiring approaches from fully hands on to fully remote. Some of the key lessons learned will be highlighted.

  15. Designing Academic Audit: Lessons Learned in Europe and Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, David D.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews lessons learned from early experiments with academic audits in the United Kingdom, Sweden, New Zealand, and Hong Kong in areas such as: focus of audits, selection and training of audit teams, nature of audit self-studies, conduct of audit visits, audit reports, and audit follow-up and enhancement activities. Suggests guidelines for design…

  16. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  17. Lessons Learned In Developing The VACIS™ Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphan, Victor J.

    2011-06-01

    SAIC's development of VACIS™ provides useful "lessons learned" in bridging the gap from an idea to a security or contraband detection product. From a gamma densitometer idea for solving a specific Customs Service (CS) requirement (detection of drugs in near-empty tanker trucks) in mid-1990's, SAIC developed a broad line of vehicle and cargo inspections systems (over 500 systems deployed to date) based on a gamma-ray radiographic imaging technique. This paper analyzes the reasons for the successful development of VACIS and attempts to identify "lessons learned" useful for future security and contraband detection product developments.

  18. The lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deckert, Wallace H.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the highlights and results of a workshop held at NASA Ames Research Center in October 1992. The objective of the workshop was a thorough review of the lessons learned from past research on lift fans, and lift-fan aircraft, models, designs, and components. The scope included conceptual design studies, wind tunnel investigations, propulsion systems components, piloted simulation, flight of aircraft such as the SV-5A and SV-5B and a recent lift-fan aircraft development project. The report includes a brief summary of five technical presentations that addressed the subject The Lift-Fan Aircraft: Lessons Learned.

  19. Lessons learned from early criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1996-06-01

    Four accidents involving the approach to criticality occurred during the period July, 1945, through May, 1996. These have been described in the format of the OPERATING EXPERIENCE WEEKLY SUMMARY which is distributed by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety. Although the lessons learned have been incorporated in standards, codes, and formal procedures during the last fifty years, this is their first presentation in this format. It is particularly appropriate that they be presented in the forum of the Nuclear Criticality Technology Safety Project Workshop closest to the fiftieth anniversary of the last of the four accidents, and that which was most instrumental in demonstrating the need to incorporate lessons learned.

  20. Lessons Learned from the Construction of Upgrades to the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and Re-activation Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, David W.; Andracchio, Charles R.; Krivanek, Thomas M.; Spera, David A.; Austinson, Todd A.

    2001-01-01

    Major upgrades were made in 1999 to the 6- by 9-Foot (1.8- by 2.7-m) Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These included replacement of the electronic controls for the variable-speed drive motor, replacement of the heat exchanger, complete replacement and enlargement of the leg of the tunnel containing the new heat-exchanger, the addition of flow-expanding and flow-contracting turning vanes upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger, respectively, and the addition of fan outlet guide vanes (OGV's). This paper presents an overview of the construction and reactivation testing phases of the project. Important lessons learned during the technical and contract management work are documented.

  1. Management and integration of engineering and construction activities: Lessons learned from the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant China project

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, M. C.; Ebeling-Koning, D.; Evans, M. C.

    2012-07-01

    The lessons learned during the early phase of design engineering and construction activities for the AP1000 China Project can be applied to any project involving multiple disciplines and multiple organizations. Implementation of a first-of-a-kind design to directly support construction activities utilizing resources assigned to design development and design delivery creates challenges with prioritization of activities, successful closure of issues, and communication between site organizations and the home office. To ensure successful implementation, teams were assigned and developed to directly support construction activities including prioritization of activities, site communication and ensuring closure of site emergent issues. By developing these teams, the organization is better suited to meet the demands of the construction schedule while continuing with design evolution of a standard plant and engineering delivery for multiple projects. For a successful project, proper resource utilization and prioritization are key for overcoming obstacles and ensuring success of the engineering organization. (authors)

  2. Lessons Learned While Conducting Educational Program Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Olivia; Jones, Irma S.; Pena, Eli E.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment, accountability, and strategic planning are all processes that are included in accreditation for colleges and universities. For most colleges and universities, starting the reaffirmation process means identifying current assessment practices and reports from academic units and programs. This paper discusses the lessons learned during a…

  3. From Lessons Learned to Emerging Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baizerman, Michael; Roholt, Ross VeLure; Korum, Kathy; Rana, Sheetal

    2013-01-01

    Organizational development is based in part on knowledge development, both formal, scientifically proven and also nonscientific practice wisdom. This article brings together all of the lessons learned over our six years of work with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation, and suggests the practice utility of these.

  4. Library 101: Why, How, and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Michael; King, David Lee

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how and why the Library 101 Project was created and the lessons that the developers learned out of this project. The Library 101 is a project that challenges librarians to revise the paradigm of "basic" library services in order to remain relevant in this technology-driven world. It was developed by Michael Porter,…

  5. Commissioning MMS: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Reiter, Jennifer; Smith, Patrick; Stone, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  6. Lessons learned on the Skylab program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Lessons learned in the Skylab program and their application and adaptation to other space programs are summarized. Recommendations and action taken on particular problems are described. The use of Skylab recommendations to identify potential problems of future space programs is discussed.

  7. Building Community: Lessons Learned from Small Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokarz, Barb

    2010-01-01

    Establishing caring communities in child care centers is one of the most important, yet challenging undertakings for early childhood professionals. Lessons in accomplishing this goal can be learned from the inhabitants of the island communities of coastal Maine who work together to overcome the challenges of living in remote locations. In this…

  8. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  9. Developing a Workplace Skills Course: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holter, Norma C.; Kopka, Donald J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a multidisciplinary cornerstone business course focused on communication, teamwork, problem solving, professional demeanor, research, ethics, and diversity. Discusses lessons learned: change itself raises obstacles, appropriate faculty are crucial, and time frame and course content should not be overly ambitious. (SK)

  10. Developing and Sustaining Partnerships: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Joan L.; Kaufmann, Barbara A.

    This paper reports on a study that examined skill standards pilot programs to identify lessons learned in the selection and involvement of representatives from the various stakeholder communities and the potential for sustaining the efforts of the pilot programs. Data were gathered through structured conversations with staff and committee members…

  11. Lessons Learned on "Scaling Up" of Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Having developed a technology-based teaching unit on weather that appeared to work well for middle school students, Nancy Butler Songer and her colleagues at the University of Michigan decided in the late 1990s to take the next logical step in their research program: They scaled up. This article discusses lessons learned by several faculty…

  12. Teaching Community: Lessons Learned in Wartime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Darlene Haffner; Spencer, Ray C.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the lessons learned by the teaching community from the September 11 attack and the ongoing war on terror. The ongoing war against terrorism presents some unique challenges to the nation's educators. Classroom teachers must cope with explaining to their students the daily war news and acts of violence. Decisions…

  13. Lessons Learned: Reflections of a University President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, William G.

    2010-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" gives unprecedented access to the university president's office, providing a unique set of reflections on the challenges involved in leading both research universities and liberal arts colleges. In this landmark book, William Bowen, former president of Princeton University and of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and…

  14. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie C.

    2007-05-24

    This document provides requirements and guidelines for conducting a Lessons Learned and Best Practices Program within Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to ensure ongoing improvement of safety and reliability, prevent the recurrence of significant adverse events/trends, and determine implementation strategies that will help LBNL successfully meet the missions and goals set forth by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  15. Lessons Learned from the Clementine Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    According to BMDO, the Clementine mission achieved many of its technology objectives during its flight to the Moon in early 1994 but, because of a software error, was unable to test the autonomous tracking of a cold target. The preliminary analyses of the returned lunar data suggest that valuable scientific measurements were made on several important topics but that COMPLEX's highest-priority objectives for lunar science were not achieved. This is not surprising given that the rationale for Clementine was technological rather than scientific. COMPLEX lists below a few of the lessons that may be learned from Clementine. Although the Clementine mission was not conceived as a NASA science mission exactly like those planned for the Discovery program, many operational aspects of the two are similar. It is therefore worthwhile to understand the strengths and faults of the Clementine approach. Some elements of the Clementine operation that led to the mission's success include the following: (1) The mission's achievements were the responsibility of a single organization and its manager, which made that organization and that individual accountable for the final outcome; (2) The sponsor adopted a hands-off approach and set a minimum number of reviews (three); (3) The sponsor accepted a reasonable amount of risk and allowed the project team to make the trade-offs necessary to minimize the mission's risks while still accomplishing all its primary objectives; and (4) The development schedule was brief and the agreed-on funding (and funding profile) was adhered to. Among the operational shortcomings of Clementine were the following: (1) An overly ambitious schedule and a slightly lean budget (meaning insufficient time for software development and testing, and leading ultimately to human exhaustion); and (2) No support for data calibration, reduction, and analysis. The principal lesson to be learned in this category is that any benefits from the constructive application of higher

  16. M-learning in a geography lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirski, Katri

    2014-05-01

    We live in rapidly advancing world. Our homes and offices are invaded by new technological achievements. School is a part of the society and many students nowadays use smartphones and table pc's daily. Therefore it's important that schoolteachers advise them on how to manage in such a complex world of engineering miracles and show how to use this kind of equipment in their studies and everyday life. Geography is a natural substance and the best way to study nature is to see, touch and feel it directly. It's important to link the theoretical knowledge that students acquire in a classroom with a practical work in the nature. M-learning gives a great opportunity for that. M-learning, shortened from mobile learning is defined as learning across multiple contexts, through social and content interactions, using personal electronic devices. The main goal of M-learning is to bring new technological equipment to the studies for the purpose of diversifying the learning process. You can use M-learning whether students are doing individual or teamwork. By doing the practical work and thinking all the steps through the students are more actively involved in the learning process and can acquire and fix the knowledge more effectively. Personal electronic devices give the freedom to study anytime and anywhere. This means M-learning is really good for trails and other outdoor activities. In spring 2012 I did my Master's thesis about M-learning. For it I compiled a geographical trail in Tallinn city centre. There were many different geographical tasks that students had to solve. The trail included whether observation, practical work on a slope (measuring the height and the inclination of a slope), drawing a plan, questions about rocks, trees and many other tasks. The students had worksheets, where there were only geographical coordinates. They used GPS devices to get to the designated points. In every point they had a task to take a photo. After the exercises the students formed

  17. Lessons Learned from the Development and Implementation of Two Internet-enhanced Culturally Relevant Physical Activity Interventions for Young Overweight African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Rodney P.; Pekmezi, Dori W.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Durant, Nefertiti H.

    2014-01-01

    This research team has designed and implemented 2 culturally relevant, Internet-enhanced physical activity (PA) interventions for overweight/obese African-American female college students. Presumably, these are the only prospectively designed, culturally relevant interventions using the Internet to promote PA among African-American women. Due to the limited research on this topic, the experiences associated the design and implementation of these studies were syntesized and 5 key lessons learned from this research were formulated. Findings provide insight for researchers to consider when developing Internet-based PA promotion interventions for African-American women. Lessons learned included: 1) Elicit and incorporate feedback from the target population throughout development of an Internet-based PA promotion tool; 2) Incorporate new and emerging technologies into Internet-enhanced PA programs; 3) Maintain frequent participant contact and provide frequent incentives to promote participant engagement; 4) Supplement Internet-based efforts with face-to-face interactions; 5) Include diverse images of African-American women and culturally relevant PA-related information in Internet-based PA promotion materials. PMID:25653465

  18. The placebo effect revisited: lessons learned to date.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Irving

    2013-04-01

    This article summarizes six lessons that can be learned from over a half century of scientific research on the placebo effect. These lessons are that the placebo response is not the placebo effect, it is meaningless to ask what the magnitude of the placebo effect is, it is easy to be fooled by regression artifacts, expectancy and conditioning are not conflicting processes that can be pitted against each other, some of our questions can be answered by history, and the outcomes of active treatments can be enhanced by attention to placebo components.

  19. Iraq Reconstruction: Lessons from Auditing U.S.-funded Stabilization and Reconstruction Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Activities October 2012 Audit Lessons Learned_v10.indd 1 10/17/2012 6:27:00 PM Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iraq Reconstruction: Lessons from Auditing U.S.-funded Stabilization and Reconstruction Activities 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Lessons Learned from Auditing Stabilization and Reconstruction Activities in an SRO .................................................. 3 Part III

  20. From Lessons Learned Towards Disaster Reduction Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, S.

    2009-04-01

    Efforts have been undertaken over the past years in eliciting and collecting lessons as they could be derived from the outcome of natural disasters management. Lessons are viewed from various perspectives according to • the situation or triggering event which led to the disaster • the local or time-dependent characteristics of this situation and further analysed according to • their benefits • necessary actions to do in order to better implement a lesson. The explicit elicitation of all that information fosters the generation of good practices and the identification of bad practices. Hence the creation of appropriate measures concerning disaster reduction issues could be positively influenced. On the other hand, continuous efforts are undertaken in the field of establishing lists of disaster reduction measures for all major hazards. Those measures comprise both concrete techniques (e.g. a tool or a structure) and advisory techniques (teaching practices or procedural instructions). This paper gives an overview of ways to "produce" disaster reduction measures from lessons learned; moreover it will explain how context-dependent analysis of lessons can potentially lead to alterations of existing disaster reduction measures.

  1. Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul; Vaughan, William W.; Garcia, Danny; Gill, Maninderpal S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive database of lessons learned that corresponds with relevant technical standards would be a boon to technical personnel and standards developers. The authors discuss the emergence of one such database within NASA, and show how and why the incorporation of lessons learned into technical standards databases can be an indispensable tool for government and industry. Passed down from parent to child, teacher to pupil, and from senior to junior employees, lessons learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. Government and industry, too, have long recognized the need to systematically document And utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. The use of lessons learned is a principle component of any organizational culture committed to continuous improvement. They have formed the foundation for discoveries, inventions, improvements, textbooks, and technical standards. Technical standards are a very logical way to communicate these lessons. Using the time-honored tradition of passing on lessons learned while utilizing the newest in information technology, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has launched an intensive effort to link lessons learned with specific technical standards through various Internet databases. This article will discuss the importance of lessons learned to engineers, the difficulty in finding relevant lessons learned while engaged in an engineering project, and the new NASA project that can help alleviate this difficulty. The article will conclude with recommendations for more expanded cross-sectoral uses of lessons learned with reference to technical standards.

  2. LDCM Ground System. Network Lesson Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) and the lessons learned in implementing the network that was assembled to allow for the acquisition, archiving and distribution of the data from the Landsat mission. The objective of the LDCM is to continue the acquisition, archiving, and distribution of moderate-resolution multispectral imagery affording global, synoptic, and repetitive coverage of the earth's land surface at a scale where natural and human-induced changes can be detected, differentiated, characterized, and monitored over time. It includes a review of the ground network, including a block diagram of the ground network elements (GNE) and a review of the RF design and testing. Also included is a listing of the lessons learned.

  3. Turning Operational Lessons Learned into Design Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of a particular system design are well known by the people who operate it. Operational workarounds, operational notes and lessons learned are traditional methods for dealing with and documenting design shortcomings. The beginning of each new program brings the hope that hard-learned lessons will be incorporated into the next new system. But often operations personnel find their well-intentioned efforts frustrated by an inability to have their inputs considered by design personnel who have strictly-scoped requirements that are coupled with ambitious cost and schedule targets. There is a way for operational inputs to make it into the design, but the solution involves a combination of organizational culture and technical data. Any organization that utilizes this approach can realize significant benefits over the life cycle of their project.

  4. WHC significant lessons learned 1993--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bickford, J.C.

    1997-12-12

    A lesson learned as defined in DOE-STD-7501-95, Development of DOE Lessons Learned Programs, is: A ``good work practice`` or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat applications or an adverse work practice or experience that is captured and shared to avoid a recurrence. The key word in both parts of this definition is ``shared``. This document was published to share a wide variety of recent Hanford experiences with other DOE sites. It also provides a valuable tool to be used in new employee and continuing training programs at Hanford facilities and at other DOE locations. This manual is divided into sections to facilitate extracting appropriate subject material when developing training modules. Many of the bulletins could be categorized into more than one section, however, so examination of other related sections is encouraged.

  5. A Professional Learning Community Activity for Science Teachers: How to Incorporate Discourse-Rich Instructional Strategies into Science Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Baker, Dale; Watts, Nievita Bueno; Lang, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe current educational research underlying a comprehensive model for building a scientific classroom discourse community. We offer a professional development activity for a school-based professional learning community, providing specific science instructional strategies within this interactive teaching model. This design…

  6. Lessons learned from Action Schools! BC--an 'active school' model to promote physical activity in elementary schools.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Macdonald, Heather M; Zebedee, Janelle A; Reed, Katherine E; McKay, Heather A

    2006-10-01

    The 'active school' model offers promise for promoting school-based physical activity (PA); however, few intervention trials have evaluated its effectiveness. Thus, our purpose was to: (1) describe Action Schools! BC (AS! BC) and its implementation (fidelity and feasibility) and (2) evaluate the impact of AS! BC on school provision of PA. Ten elementary schools were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions: Usual Practice (UP, three schools), Liaison (LS, four schools) or Champion (CS, three schools). Teachers in LS and CS schools received AS! BC training and resources but differed on the level of facilitation provided. UP schools continued with regular PA. Delivery of PA during the 11-month intervention was assessed with weekly Activity Logs and intervention fidelity and feasibility were assessed using Action Plans, workshop evaluations, teacher surveys and focus groups with administrators, teachers, parents and students. Physical activity delivered was significantly greater in LS (+67.4 min/week; 95% CI: 18.7-116.1) and CS (+55.2 min/week; 95% CI: 26.4-83.9) schools than UP schools. Analysis of Action Plans and Activity Logs showed fidelity to the model and moderate levels of compliance (75%). Teachers were highly satisfied with training and support. Benefits of AS! BC included positive changes in the children and school climate, including provision of resources, improved communication and program flexibility. These results support the use of the 'active school' model to positively alter the school environment. The AS! BC model was effective, providing more opportunities for "more children to be more active more often" and as such has the potential to provide health benefits to elementary school children.

  7. VTEC: lessons learned from British outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Pennington, T H

    2000-01-01

    Important Escherichia coli O157 outbreaks in England and Scotland since 1982-83 are reviewed. The scientific lessons learned from them are described and their legal consequences outlined. The light shed by them on relationships between law and science is discussed, and questions of blame are analysed in the context of Reason's 'resident pathogen' metaphor and Vaughan's study of the 1986 Challenger Space Shuttle disaster.

  8. Operational Lessons Learned in the Korean War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    entire peninsula, however, suffers from cold in the winter, Yellow Dust from the Gobi Desert choking the air in the spring, monsoons in midsummer...Republic of Korea in an effort to deter further North Korean aggression. The purpose of this monograph is capture operational lessons learned during the...considers North Korea as a buffer protecting its region of Manchuria. Encroachment of this border by foreign forces is a threat to Chinese sovereignty

  9. SNS Cryomodule Production Progress & Key Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    John Hogan; Edward Daly; John Fischer; Joseph Preble; Timothy Whitlatch; Mark Wiseman

    2003-09-08

    Jefferson Lab has been commissioned to design and manufacture one prototype, eleven-.61 Beta and twelve-.81 Beta cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source project. The production process is up and running with half of the .61 Beta cryomodules complete to date. This paper will present an overview of the beginning of production, with an emphasis on key lessons learned, that have been used to refine cryomodule production.

  10. The Naval Campaign in Gallipoli - 1915 Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    AIR WAR COLLEGE() RESEARCH REPORT No. AU-AWC-86-188 THE NAVAL CAMPAIGN IN GALLIPOLI -1915 I LESSONS LEARNED By LT COL DOUGLAS J . SCOTT DTic s MARI...UNIVERSITY THE NAVAL CAMPAIGN IW GALLIPOLI - 1915 LESSONS LEARNED by DOUGLAS J . SCOTT LIEUTENANT COLONEL, USAF A RESEARCH REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE FACULTY...RESEARCH REPORT ABSTRACT TITLE: The Naval Campaign in Gallipoli - 1915 Lessons Learned AUTHOR: Douglas J . Scott , Lieutenant Colonel, USAF •An analysis

  11. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C.; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L.; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  12. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  13. An Evaluability Assessment of the West Virginia Physical Activity Plan, 2015: Lessons Learned for Other State Physical Activity Plans

    PubMed Central

    Shawley, Samantha; Owens, Sherry; Dyer, Angela; Bulger, Sean M.; Jones, Dina L.; Jones, Emily M.; Murphy, Emily; Olfert, Melissa D.; Elliott, Eloise

    2016-01-01

    Background The US National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) was released in 2009 as a national strategic plan to increase physical activity (PA). The NPAP emphasized implementing state and local PA programs. Dissemination of information about NPAP has been limited, however. Community Context West Virginia is a predominantly rural state with high rates of chronic diseases associated with physical inactivity. In 2015 an evaluability assessment (EA) of the West Virginia Physical Activity Plan (WVPAP) was conducted, and community stakeholders were invited to participate in updating the plan. Methods A good EA seeks stakeholder input, assists in identifying program areas that need improvement, and ensures that a full evaluation will produce useful information. Data for this EA were collected via national stakeholder interviews, document reviews, discussions among workgroups consisting of state and local stakeholders, and surveys to determine how well the WVPAP had been implemented. Outcome The EA highlighted the need for WVPAP leaders to 1) establish a specific entity to implement local PA plans, 2) create sector-specific logic models to simplify the WVPAP for local stakeholders, 3) evaluate the PA plan’s implementation frequently from the outset, 4) use quick and efficient engagement techniques with stakeholders when working with them to select strategies, tactics, and measurable outcomes, and 5) understand the elements necessary to implement, manage, and evaluate a good PA plan. Interpretation An EA process is recommended for other leaders of PA plans. Our project highlights the stakeholders’ desire to simplify the WVPAP so that it can be set up as a locally driven process that engages communities in implementation. PMID:28033092

  14. Savannah River Site environmental restoration lessons learned program

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.A.; Leibfarth, E.C.; Treger, T.M.; Blackmon, A.M.

    1993-10-01

    For the past three years environmental restoration has been formally consolidated at Savannah River Site. Accomplishments include waste site investigations to closure activities. Positive, as well as negatively impacting, events have occurred. Until recently, lessons learned were captured on a less than formal basis. Now, a program based upon critiques, evaluations and corrective actions is being used. This presentation reviews the development, implementation and use of that program.

  15. Lessons Learned from FIPSE Projects II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Dora; And Others

    This monograph describes 30 college and university programs funded by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education from 1989 to 1991. Each description includes information on program purpose, project activities, major insights and lessons, project continuation, and available information. The first group of 10 are programs focused on…

  16. Lessons Learned Study Final Report for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Laak, Jim; Brumfield, M. Larry; Moore, Arlene A.; Anderson, Brooke; Dempsey, Jim; Gifford, Bob; Holloway, Chip; Johnson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    -term work of the Exploration Directorate. These lessons frequently support the Executive lessons but are more general in nature; Part 3 consists of the reports of the center workshops that were conducted as part of this activity. These reports are included in their entirety (approximately 200 pages) in Appendix G and have significance for specific managers; Part 4 consists of the remainder of the lessons that have been selected by this effort and assembled into a database for the use of the Explorations Directorate. The database is archived and hosted in the Lessons Learned Knowledge Network, which provides a flexible search capability using a wide variety of search terms. Finally, a spreadsheet lists databases searched and a bibliography identifies reports that have been reviewed as sources of lessons for this task. NASA has been presented with many learning opportunities. We have conducted numerous programs, some extremely successful and others total failures. Most have been documented with a formal lessons learned activity, but we have not always incorporated these learning opportunities into our normal modes of business. For example, the Robbins Report of 2001 clearly indicates that many project failures of the past two decades were the result of violating well documented best practices, often in direct violation of management instructions and directives. An overarching lesson emerges: that disciplined execution in accordance with proven best practices is the greatest single contributor to a successful program. The Lessons Learned task team offers a sincere hope that the lessons presented herein will be helpful to the Exploration Systems Directorate in charting and executing their course. The success of the Directorate and of NASA in general depends on our collective ability to move forward without having to relearn the lessons of those who have gone before.

  17. Movie Lessons for New Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltmarsh, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2004 the Australia Council of Deans of Education (ACDE) released a report entitled "New teaching, new learning: A vision for Australian education". This report was prepared on behalf of the ACDE by Mary Kalantzis and Andrew Harvey, respectively the President and Executive Officer of the ACDE. The argument put forward in the report is…

  18. Lessons in Developing Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gant, Lenora Peters

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of video teletraining (VTT) for distance learning in the Department of Defense. Topics include planning and organizing the VTT facility, staff development, site facilitators, the necessity of protocol, instructional design and development strategies, student involvement and interactivity, and evaluation and assessment. (LRW)

  19. MODIS Science Algorithms and Data Systems Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Robert E.; Ridgway, Bill L.; Patt, Fred S.; Masuoka, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    For almost 10 years, standard global products from NASA's Earth Observing System s (EOS) two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors are being used world-wide for earth science research and applications. This paper discusses the lessons learned in developing the science algorithms and the data systems needed to produce these high quality data products for the earth sciences community. Strong science team leadership and communication, an evolvable and scalable data system, and central coordination of QA and validation activities enabled the data system to grow by two orders of magnitude from the initial at-launch system to the current system able to reprocess data from both the Terra and Aqua missions in less than a year. Many of the lessons learned from MODIS are already being applied to follow-on missions.

  20. Scheduling lessons learned from the Autonomous Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA LeRC is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Diagnosis, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The AIPS scheduler was tested within the APS system. This scheduler is able to efficiently assign available power to the requesting activities and share this information with other software agents within the APS system in order to implement the generated schedule. The AIPS scheduler is also able to cooperatively recover from fault situations by rescheduling the affected loads on the Brassboard in conjunction with the APEX FDIR system. AIPS served as a learning tool and an initial scheduling testbed for the integration of FDIR and automated scheduling systems. Many lessons were learned from the AIPS scheduler and are now being integrated into a new scheduler called SCRAP (Scheduler for Continuous Resource Allocation and Planning). This paper will service three purposes: an overview of the AIPS implementation, lessons learned from the AIPS scheduler, and a brief section on how these lessons are being applied to the new SCRAP scheduler.

  1. Recruitment Lessons Learned from a Tailored Web-Based Health Intervention Project Y.E.A.H. (Young Adults Eating and Active for Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Onikia; Quick, Virginia; Colby, Sarah; Greene, Geoffrey; Horacek, Tanya M.; Hoerr, Sharon; Koenings, Mallory; Kidd, Tandalayo; Morrell, Jesse; Olfert, Melissa; Phillips, Beatrice; Shelnutt, Karla; White, Adrienne; Kattelmann, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting college students for research studies can be challenging. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons learned in the various recruitment strategies used for enrolling college students in a theory-based, tailored, and web-delivered health intervention at 13 US universities. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  2. Papermaking and Poetry. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withroe, J.

    In this lesson, designed to be taught within a unit on China, primary-grade students will learn about the history of papermaking and its origins in China and even learn how to make their own paper. After learning about Chinese art and culture in the lesson, students will write their own "cinquain" poem about China. The lesson presents an…

  3. Best Practices for Researching and Documenting Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.

    2007-01-01

    Identification, resolution, and avoidance of technical and programmatic issues are important for ensuring safe and successful space missions. Although the importance of applying lessons learned to reduce risk is frequently stressed, there is little material available to help technical and management personnel research and document lessons learned. Collecting, researching, identifying, and documenting lessons learned that will be useful to current and future management and engineering personnel is not always a straightforward task. This white paper presents lessons learned and best practices concerning the research and documentation of technical and organizational lessons learned. It is intended to enable organizations to initiate or improve lessons learned research and documentation efforts. The content of this white paper is based on four technical lessons learned projects conducted by the United Space Alliance (USA) Flight Design and Dynamics Department, in support of the NASA/JSC Flight Design and Dynamics Division. Each project published a report, titled as follows: GPS Lessons Learned From the ISS, Space Shuttle and X-38; Lessons Learned From Seven Space Shuttle Missions; Space Shuttle Rendezvous and Proximity Operations Experience Report; and Navigation Technical History with Lessons Learned. The four projects were different in availability of subject matter experts and primary source material, subject scope, and the level of effort required to produce the final report. However, generic lessons can be drawn from all of them. The best practices will be discussed by the phases of report research and development: Defining Report Requirements, Project Organization, and Schedule, Collection and Analysis of Source Material, Writing and Integrating the Report, and Review and Revision of the Report.

  4. Solar Dynamics Observatory Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Rachel; Uhl, Andrew; Secunda, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Mission is to study how solar activity is created and how space weather results from that activity. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA): High Resolution Images of 10 wavelengths every 10 seconds. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE): Measure Sun's brightness in EUV. Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI): Measures Doppler shift to study waves of the Sun. Launched February 11, 2010.

  5. A Management Information System for Construction Management Lessons-Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    use of lessons-learned. The thesis examined the potential for developing an on-line management information system (MIS) to provide better storage and...that should be considered when developing a construction management oriented, lessons-learned management information system for the Civil Engineering

  6. International Space Station Materials: Selected Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) program is of such complexity and scale that there have been numerous issues addressed regarding safety of materials: from design to manufacturing, test, launch, assembly on-orbit, and operations. A selection of lessons learned from the ISS materials perspective will be provided. Topics of discussion are: flammability evaluation of materials with connection to on-orbit operations; toxicity findings for foams; compatibility testing for materials in fluid systems; and contamination control in precision clean systems and critical space vehicle surfaces.

  7. Lessons learned from commercial reactor safety analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragola, J. R.

    1992-07-01

    As design concepts involving nuclear power are developed for space missions, prudence requires a consideration of the historical perspective provided by the commerical nuclear power generating station industry. This would allow the aerospace industry to take advantage of relevant historical experience, drawing from the best features and avoiding the pitfalls which appear to have stifled the growth of the commercial nuclear industry as a whole despite its comparatively admirable safety performance record. This paper provides some history of the development of commercial nuclear plant designs, and discusses the lessons which have been learned and how they apply to the space nuclear propulsion situation.

  8. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A RECENT LASER ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-01-26

    A graduate student received a laser eye injury from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser beam while adjusting a polarizing beam splitter optic. The direct causes for the accident included failure to follow safe alignment practices and failure to wear the required laser eyewear protection. Underlying root causes included inadequate on-the-job training and supervision, inadequate adherence to requirements, and inadequate appreciation for dimly visible beams outside the range of 400-700nm. This paper describes how the accident occurred, discusses causes and lessons learned, and describes corrective actions being taken.

  9. Operations to Research: Communication of Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This presentation explores ways to build upon previous spaceflight experience and communicate this knowledge to prepare for future exploration. An operational approach is highlighted, focusing on selection and retention standards (disease screening and obtaining medical histories); pre-, in-, and post-flight monitoring (establishing degrees of bone loss, skeletal muscle loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, medical conditions, etc.); prevention, mitigation, or treatment (in-flight countermeasures); and, reconditioning, recovery, and reassignment (post-flight training regimen, return to pre-flight baseline and flight assignment). Experiences and lessons learned from the Apollo, Skylab, Shuttle, Shuttle-Mir, International Space Station, and Orion missions are outlined.

  10. Changing Smart Pump Vendors: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Karen J; Catlin, Ann Christine; Quebe, Amanda; Washington, Alana

    2016-10-01

    Smart infusion pump technology is a mainstay in health care, and the integration and use of those pumps is crucial for patient safety. An institution purchasing smart infusion pumps has the ability to trial the various vendors before purchase, however literature that documents a conversion from one pump to another is lacking. This article describes the conversion from one smart infusion pump platform to another at a government institution and a large multisite facility. The differences in 2 smart infusion pumps are described as well as lessons learned following the conversion in both organizations.

  11. MTI system design & operations lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Max Louis; Kay, Randolph Rex; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-06-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI's single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  12. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  13. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-12-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  14. Launch Vehicle Propulsion Life Cycle Cost Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar; Rhodes, Russell E.; Robinson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will review lessons learned for space transportation systems from the viewpoint of the NASA, Industry and academia Space Propulsion Synergy Team (SPST). The paper provides the basic idea and history of "lessons learned". Recommendations that are extremely relevant to NASA's future investments in research, program development and operations are"'provided. Lastly, a novel and useful approach to documenting lessons learned is recommended, so as to most effectively guide future NASA investments. Applying lessons learned can significantly improve access to space for cargo or people by focusing limited funds on the right areas and needs for improvement. Many NASA human space flight initiatives have faltered, been re-directed or been outright canceled since the birth of the Space Shuttle program. The reasons given at the time have been seemingly unique. It will be shown that there are common threads as lessons learned in many a past initiative.

  15. Team Learning in SMES: Learning the Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Ian

    2012-01-01

    This research identifies and explores the factors that influence team learning in the context of an SME management team. It examines the difficulties the team members face in attempting to share and combine their experiences to co-construct knowledge and understanding of their environment and future opportunities. The paper reveals a connection…

  16. ICT & Learning in Chilean Schools: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Jaime; Salinas, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    By the early nineties a Chilean network on computers and education for public schools had emerged. There were both high expectancies that technology could revolutionize education as well as divergent voices that doubted the real impact of technology on learning. This paper presents an evaluation of the Enlaces network, a national Information and…

  17. Mentoring through teamwork: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jerome A

    2013-07-01

    This essay is simply a highly personal account of how one mentor has joined with a team of mentors, combined with special "permanent" employees, lively group interactions and high expectations for trainees to provide a fertile environment for the training of scientists. I also need to acknowledge the deep personal friendships that have developed and intensified with the Rankin Lab trainees and their families over the past 47 years. How fortunate we mentors are to have the opportunity to experience and learn with continuously refreshed bands of young, eager minds every year. I am eternally grateful to my mentors for providing such broad shoulders to stand on, to my colleagues for sharing their passion for teaching and science and especially to all of our trainees who chose the Rankin Lab to begin their journey in science. I am especially grateful for having my wife Barbara to share with me the joy of having been a part of this team. Good on ya Babs! To comment on this article, go to www.the-aps.org/forum-teamwork.

  18. Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Jennifer B.; Scott, Tracy A.; Hyde, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allow the mission flight control teams and the astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission have been developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center. As the Space Shuttle Program ends, lessons learned have been collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines will be discussed, as well as techniques and methods used to solve complex spacecraft and instrument orientation problems. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in the improving the control teams effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from Mission Control to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons have been vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning that have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed as how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  19. Microplastics: addressing ecological risk through lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Kristian; Khan, Farhan R; Selck, Henriette; Palmqvist, Annemette; Banta, Gary T; Daley, Jennifer; Sano, Larissa; Duhaime, Melissa B

    2015-05-01

    Plastic litter is an environmental problem of great concern. Despite the magnitude of the plastic pollution in our water bodies, only limited scientific understanding is available about the risk to the environment, particularly for microplastics. The apparent magnitude of the problem calls for quickly developing sound scientific guidance on the ecological risks of microplastics. The authors suggest that future research into microplastics risks should be guided by lessons learned from the more advanced and better understood areas of (eco) toxicology of engineered nanoparticles and mixture toxicity. Relevant examples of advances in these two fields are provided to help accelerate the scientific learning curve within the relatively unexplored area of microplastics risk assessment. Finally, the authors advocate an expansion of the "vector effect" hypothesis with regard to microplastics risk to help focus research of microplastics environmental risk at different levels of biological and environmental organization.

  20. Engineering Quality while Embracing Change: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Marinovici, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Glass, Kevin A.; Carlsen, Leif C.

    2013-01-09

    In an increasingly complex technical environ-ment, failure is accepted as a way of maximizing potential, a way of growing up. Experience can be utilized to improve designs, advance product maturity, and at the same time, can increase team’s training and education. It is not enough to understand the development tools to ensure a project’s success. Understanding how to plan, measure, communicate, interact, and work in teams is mandatory to make a project successful. A manager cannot enforce a process of good communication between team members. Project teams have to work together in supporting each other and establish a constant communication environment. This paper presents lessons learned during the development process of operations research software. The team members have matured and learned during the process to plan successfully, adapt to changes, use Agile methodologies, and embrace a new attitude towards failures and communication.

  1. Receiver System: Lessons Learned From Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    LITWIN, ROBERT Z.; PACHECO, JAMES E.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565 C by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  2. 2010 CEOS Field Reflectance Intercomparisons Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Fox, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes lessons learned from the 2009 and 2010 joint field campaigns to Tuz Golu, Turkey. Emphasis is placed on the 2010 campaign related to understanding the equipment and measurement protocols, processing schemes, and traceability to SI quantities. Participants in both 2009 and 2010 used an array of measurement approaches to determine surface reflectance. One lesson learned is that even with all of the differences in collection between groups, the differences in reflectance are currently dominated by instrumental artifacts including knowledge of the white reference. Processing methodology plays a limited role once the bi-directional reflectance of the white reference is used rather than a hemispheric-directional value. The lack of a basic set of measurement protocols, or best practices, limits a group s ability to ensure SI traceability and the development of proper error budgets. Finally, rigorous attention to sampling methodology and its impact on instrument behavior is needed. The results of the 2009 and 2010 joint campaigns clearly demonstrate both the need and utility of such campaigns and such comparisons must continue in the future to ensure a coherent set of data that can span multiple sensor types and multiple decades.

  3. Receiver System: Lessons Learned from Solar Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, R. Z.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565DGC by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  4. Space Station Control Moment Gyroscope Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurrisi, Charles; Seidel, Raymond; Dickerson, Scott; Didziulis, Stephen; Frantz, Peter; Ferguson, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Four 4760 Nms (3510 ft-lbf-s) Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscopes (DGCMG) with unlimited gimbal freedom about each axis were adopted by the International Space Station (ISS) Program as the non-propulsive solution for continuous attitude control. These CMGs with a life expectancy of approximately 10 years contain a flywheel spinning at 691 rad/s (6600 rpm) and can produce an output torque of 258 Nm (190 ft-lbf)1. One CMG unexpectedly failed after approximately 1.3 years and one developed anomalous behavior after approximately six years. Both units were returned to earth for failure investigation. This paper describes the Space Station Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscope design, on-orbit telemetry signatures and a summary of the results of both failure investigations. The lessons learned from these combined sources have lead to improvements in the design that will provide CMGs with greater reliability to assure the success of the Space Station. These lessons learned and design improvements are not only applicable to CMGs but can be applied to spacecraft mechanisms in general.

  5. Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

    2010-11-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRAD’s excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRAD’s safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRAD’s conversion and reactivity.

  6. NASA Access Mechanism: Lessons learned document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, Lisa; Dunbar, Rick; Duncan, Denise; Generous, Curtis; Hunter, Judy; Lycas, John; Taber-Dudas, Ardeth

    1994-01-01

    The six-month beta test of the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype was completed on June 30, 1993. This report documents the lessons learned from the use of this Graphical User Interface to NASA databases such as the NASA STI Database, outside databases, Internet resources, and peers in the NASA R&D community. Design decisions, such as the use of XWindows software, a client-server distributed architecture, and use of the NASA Science Internet, are explained. Users' reactions to the interface and suggestions for design changes are reported, as are the changes made by the software developers based on new technology for information discovery and retrieval. The lessons learned section also reports reactions from the public, both at demonstrations and in response to articles in the trade press and journals. Recommendations are included for future versions, such as a World Wide Web (WWW) and Mosaic based interface to heterogeneous databases, and NAM-Lite, a version which allows customization to include utilities provided locally at NASA Centers.

  7. Learning from Lessons: Teachers' Insights and Intended Actions Arising from Their Learning about Student Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, Anne; Clarke, Doug; Clarke, David; Chan, Man Ching Esther

    2016-01-01

    A central premise of this project is that teachers learn from the act of teaching a lesson and that this learning is evident in the planning and teaching of a subsequent lesson. We are studying the knowledge construction of mathematics teachers utilising multi-camera research techniques during lesson planning, classroom interactions and…

  8. Seizing the Moment: State Lessons for Transforming Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Forward, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Explore this first look at lessons learned through Learning Forward's ongoing initiative to develop a comprehensive system of professional learning that spans the distance from the statehouse to the classroom. This policy brief underscores the importance of a coordinated state professional learning strategy, the adoption of professional learning…

  9. Mobile Learning vs. Traditional Classroom Lessons: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furió, D.; Juan, M.-C.; Seguí, I.; Vivó, R.

    2015-01-01

    Different methods can be used for learning, and they can be compared in several aspects, especially those related to learning outcomes. In this paper, we present a study in order to compare the learning effectiveness and satisfaction of children using an iPhone game for learning the water cycle vs. the traditional classroom lesson. The iPhone game…

  10. The computerization of programming: Ada (R) lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struble, Dennis D.

    1986-01-01

    One of the largest systems yet written in Ada has been constructed. This system is the Intermetrics Ada compiler. Many lessons have been learned during the implementation of this Ada compiler. Some of these lessons, concentrating on those lessons relevant to large system implementations are described. The characteristics of the Ada compiler implementation project at Intermetrics are also described. Some specific experiences during the implementation are pointed out.

  11. Designing remote operations strategies to optimize science mission goals: Lessons learned from the Moon Mars Analog Mission Activities Mauna Kea 2012 field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Russell, P.; ten Kate, I. L.; Noble, S.; Graff, T.; Graham, L. D.; Eppler, D.

    2015-08-01

    The Moon Mars Analog Mission Activities Mauna Kea 2012 (MMAMA 2012) field campaign aimed to assess how effectively an integrated science and engineering rover team operating on a 24-h planning cycle facilitates high-fidelity science products. The science driver of this field campaign was to determine the origin of a glacially-derived deposit: was the deposit the result of (1) glacial outwash from meltwater; or (2) the result of an ice dam breach at the head of the valley? Lessons learned from MMAMA 2012 science operations include: (1) current rover science operations scenarios tested in this environment provide adequate data to yield accurate derivative products such as geologic maps; (2) instrumentation should be selected based on both engineering and science goals; and chosen during, rather than after, mission definition; and (3) paralleling the tactical and strategic science processes provides significant efficiencies that impact science return. The MER-model concept of operations utilized, in which rover operators were sufficiently facile with science intent to alter traverse and sampling plans during plan execution, increased science efficiency, gave the Science Backroom time to develop mature hypotheses and science rationales, and partially alleviated the problem of data flow being greater than the processing speed of the scientists.

  12. Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn: How Facilitators Learn to Lead Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents research on how teacher developers in the United States learn to conduct lesson study. Although the practice of lesson study is expanding rapidly in the US, high-quality implementation requires skilled facilitation. In contexts such as the United States where this form of professional development is relatively novel, few…

  13. NASA's Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul; Vaughan, William W.; Garcia, Danny; Weinstein, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Lessons Learned have been the basis for our accomplishments throughout the ages. They have been passed down from father to son, mother to daughter, teacher to pupil, and older to younger worker. Lessons Learned have also been the basis for NASA's accomplishments for more than forty years. Both government and industry have long recognized the need to systematically document and utilize the knowledge gained from past experiences in order to avoid the repetition of failures and mishaps. Lessons Learned have formed the foundation for discoveries, inventions, improvements, textbooks, and Technical Standards.

  14. Considerations for implementing an organizational lessons learned process.

    SciTech Connect

    Fosshage, Erik D

    2013-05-01

    This report examines the lessons learned process by a review of the literature in a variety of disciplines, and is intended as a guidepost for organizations that are considering the implementation of their own closed-loop learning process. Lessons learned definitions are provided within the broader context of knowledge management and the framework of a learning organization. Shortcomings of existing practices are summarized in an attempt to identify common pitfalls that can be avoided by organizations with fledgling experiences of their own. Lessons learned are then examined through a dual construct of both process and mechanism, with emphasis on integrating into organizational processes and promoting lesson reuse through data attributes that contribute toward changed behaviors. The report concludes with recommended steps for follow-on efforts.

  15. Social support and child protection: Lessons learned and learning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ross A

    2015-03-01

    Social support has been a topic of research for nearly 50 years, and its applications to prevention and intervention have grown significantly, including programs advancing child protection. This article summarizes the central conclusions of the 1994 review of research on social support and the prevention of child maltreatment prepared for the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, and surveys advances in the field since its publication. Among the lessons learned twenty years ago are (a) the diversity of the social support needs of at-risk families and their association with child endangerment, (b) the need to supplement the emotionally affirmative aspects of social support with efforts to socialize parenting practices and monitor child well-being, (c) the desirability of integrating formal and informal sources of social support for recipients, and (d) the importance of considering the complex recipient reactions to receiving support from others. The lessons we are now learning derive from research exploring the potential of online communication to enhance social support, the neurobiology of stress and its buffering through social support, and the lessons of evaluation research that are identifying the effective ingredients of social support interventions.

  16. Lessons Learned from CFD Validation Study of Protuberance Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Brandon; Blaisdell, Greogory

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) Share lessons learned from a recent exercise in CFD validation of protuberance heating (2) Impact of experimental data reduction assumptions and techniques on validation activity (3) Advanced data reduction techniques may provide useful data from non-typical test methods (4) Significance of the recovery factor for high-speed flows (5) Show typical results of the Lag turbulence model on protuberances (6) Introduce and inform the listener of a protuberance heating dataset which will soon be available for comparison

  17. Space reactor safety, 1985--1995 lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatic, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration.

  18. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  19. Space reactor safety, 1985-1995 lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Albert C.

    1996-03-01

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatics, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration.

  20. Lessons Learned in Converting Residential Courseware to Transportable Courseware.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    GTE’ project, a Joint Services effort. The report presents recommendations to guide training managers and instructional development teams through an...instructional design and development process for creating transportable education and training materials. Lessons learned address such topics as team...and training , distributed educaon, authoring, computer-based instruction, CBI. lesson 90 specifications, training media, Instructional Systems

  1. Lessons Learned from the Kepler Mission and Space Telescope Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned over the course of several space telescope mission and instrument developments spanning two decades. These projects involved astronomical telescopes developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and were designed to further our understanding of the Universe. It is hoped that the lessons drawn from these experiences may be of use to future mission developers.

  2. New Horizons Risk Communication Strategy, Planning, Implementation, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Sandra A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the risk communication goals, strategy, planning process and product development for the New Horizons mission, including lessons from the Cassini mission that were applied in that effort, and presents lessons learned from the New Horizons effort that could be applicable to future missions.

  3. Evaluation, Knowledge Management, Best Practices, and High Quality Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2001-01-01

    Discusses lessons to be learned from evaluation and best practices in evaluation and some ways to bring increased rigor to evaluators' use of those terms. Suggests that "best" practices is a term to avoid, with "better" or "effective" being more realistic, and calls for more specificity when discussing lessons to be…

  4. Japanese Lesson Study Sustaining Teacher Learning in the Classroom Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loose, Crystal Corle

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this action research study were first to explore teacher perceptions of Japanese lesson study as a method of professional development, and second to take teachers through an action research process as they observed the implementation of a literacy lesson in the classroom. Situated Learning Theory, particularly related to teacher…

  5. Lessons learned during Type A Packaging testing

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.H.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    For the past 6 years, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Facility Safety Analysis (EH-32) has contracted Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct compliance testing on DOE Type A packagings. The packagings are tested for compliance with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A, general packaging, Type A requirements. The DOE has shared the Type A packaging information throughout the nuclear materials transportation community. During testing, there have been recurring areas of packaging design that resulted in testing delays and/or initial failure. The lessons learned during the testing are considered a valuable resource. DOE requested that WHC share this resource. By sharing what is and can be encountered during packaging testing, individuals will hopefully avoid past mistakes.

  6. ATLAS Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM) Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gosten, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. The high resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of the methodology to verify performance required significant effort. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite II Mission (ICESat II), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat II primary mission is to map the Earth's surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness and vegetation canopy thickness to establish long-term trends.

  7. ATLAS Beam Steering Mechanism Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gostin, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morrell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. The high resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of the methodology to verify performance required significant effort. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite II Mission (ICESat II), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat II primary mission is to map the earth's surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness and vegetation canopy thickness to establish long-term trends.

  8. Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM) Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Cramer, Alexander K.; Gostin, Alan B.; Hakun, Claef F.; Haney, Paul G.; Hinkle, Matthew R.; Lee, Kenneth Y.; Lugo, Carlos F.; Matuszeski, Adam J.; Morell, Armando; Armani, Nerses V.; Bonafede, Joseph; Jackson, Molly I.; Steigner, Peter J.; Stromsdorfer, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, testing, and lessons learned during the development of the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) Beam Steering Mechanism (BSM). The BSM is a 2 degree-of-freedom tip-tilt mechanism for the purpose of pointing a flat mirror to tightly control the co-alignment of the transmitted laser and the receiver telescope of the ATLAS instrument. High resolution needs of the mission resulted in sub-arcsecond pointing and knowledge requirements, which have been met. Development of methodology to verify performance was a significant effortadvancement. The BSM will fly as part of the Ice, Cloud, and Elevation Satellite 2 Mission (ICESat 2), which is scheduled to be launched in 2017. The ICESat 2 primary mission is to map the earths surface topography for the determination of seasonal changes of ice sheet thickness as well as vegetation canopy thickness.

  9. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  10. Evolutionary fire ecology: lessons learned from pines.

    PubMed

    Pausas, Juli G

    2015-05-01

    Macroevolutionary studies of the genus Pinus provide the oldest current evidence of fire as an evolutionary pressure on plants and date back to ca. 125 million years ago (Ma). Microevolutionary studies show that fire traits are variable within and among populations, especially among those subject to different fire regimes. In addition, there is increasing evidence of an inherited genetic basis to variability in fire traits. Added together, pines provide compelling evidence that fire can exert an evolutionary pressure on plants and, thus, shape biodiversity. In addition, evolutionary fire ecology is providing insights to improve the management of pine forests under changing conditions. The lessons learned from pines may guide research on the evolutionary ecology of other taxa.

  11. XML technology planning database : lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael R.; Neff, Jon M.

    2005-01-01

    A hierarchical Extensible Markup Language(XML) database called XCALIBR (XML Analysis LIBRary) has been developed by Millennium Program to assist in technology investment (ROI) analysis and technology Language Capability the New return on portfolio optimization. The database contains mission requirements and technology capabilities, which are related by use of an XML dictionary. The XML dictionary codifies a standardized taxonomy for space missions, systems, subsystems and technologies. In addition to being used for ROI analysis, the database is being examined for use in project planning, tracking and documentation. During the past year, the database has moved from development into alpha testing. This paper describes the lessons learned during construction and testing of the prototype database and the motivation for moving from an XML taxonomy to a standard XML-based ontology.

  12. Social support in cyberspace: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cudney, Shirley; Winters, Charlene; Weinert, Clarann; Anderson, Kerri

    2005-01-01

    The lessons learned from the implementation of phase one of Women to Women (WTW1), a research-based computer outreach program for rural women with chronic illness, and their influence on the development of phase two of Women to Women (WTW2) are discussed in this article. The changes implemented in WTW2 included moving from the FirstClass delivery platform to WebCT; increasing the intra- and interdisciplinary nature of the team by adding nurse experts in Web skills and women's health and non-nurse colleagues in family finance and nutrition; expanding the geographical area to be served from Montana to adjoining states; developing health teaching units that harness the internet as the major source of ever-current health information; including a control group in the study design; and selecting more pertinent, repeated measurement instruments to assess psychosocial variables.

  13. UAVs for Glacier Mapping: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, T.; McKinnon, K. A.; Anderson, B.

    2014-12-01

    Using two different unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) mounted with cameras, we created a digital elevation model (DEM) of the lower 12 km^2 of Tasman Glacier, South Island, New Zealand in March 2014. The project served primarily as a proof-of-concept, and here we discuss the lessons learned, emphasizing the practical, logistical, and flight issues. We tested two different fixed-wing airframes -- a twin-boom tradition and flying wing; two different camera types, both consumer-grade RGB; and various combinations of RC and telemetry radios. We used both commercial and open-source photogrammetry software to create the mosaic and DEM imagery. Some of the most critical UAV-specific issues are: access to a launch/landing site, adequate landing zones, range, airspace contention with manned aircraft, and hardware reliability. While UAVs provide a lower-cost method for photogrammetry access, it also comes with a unique set of challenges.

  14. Lessons learned from the 1994 Northridge Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M.W.; Sommer, S.C.

    1995-04-01

    Southern California has a history of major earthquakes and also has one of the largest metropolitan areas in the United States. The 1994 Northridge Earthquake challenged the industrial facilities and lifetime infrastructure in the northern Los Angeles (LA) area. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) sent a team of engineers to conduct an earthquake damage investigation in the Northridge area, on a project funded jointly by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). Many of the structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and lifelines that suffered damage are similar to those found in nuclear power plants and in USDOE facilities. Lessons learned from these experiences can have some applicability at commercial nuclear power plants.

  15. Lessons Learned from Mir - A Payload Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uri, John J.; Nygren, Richard W.; Cardenas, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Among the principal objectives of the Phase 1 NASA/Mir program were for the United States to gain experience working with an international partner, to gain working experience in long-duration space flight, and to gain working experience in planning for and executing research on a long-duration space platform. The Phase 1 program was to provide to the US early experience prior to the construction and operation of the International Space Station (Phase 2 and 3). While it can be argued that Mir and ISS are different platforms and that programmatically Phase 1 and ISS are organized differently, it is also clear that many aspects of operating a long-duration research program are platform independent. This can be demonstrated by a review of lessons learned from Skylab, a US space station program of the mid-1970's, many of which were again "learned" on Mir and are being "learned" on ISS. Among these are optimum crew training strategies, on-orbit crew operations, ground support, medical operations and crew psychological support, and safety certification processes

  16. Integrating the Core Curriculum through Cooperative Learning. Lesson Plans for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winget, Patricia L., Ed.

    Cooperative learning strategies are used to facilitate the integration of multicultural and multi-ability level students into California regular education classrooms. This handbook is a sampling of innovative lesson plans using cooperative learning activities developed by teachers to incorporate the core curriculum into their instruction. Three…

  17. Learning from Lessons: Studying the Construction of Teacher Knowledge Catalysed by Purposefully-Designed Experimental Mathematics Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Doug; Clarke, David; Roche, Anne; Chan, Man Ching Esther

    2015-01-01

    A central premise of this project is that teachers learn from the act of teaching a lesson and that this learning is evident in the planning and teaching of a subsequent lesson. In this project, the knowledge construction of mathematics teachers was examined utilising multi-camera research techniques during lesson planning, classroom interactions…

  18. Webinar Presentation: Phthalates Exposures through Diet: Lessons Learned

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Phthalates Exposures through Diet: Lessons Learned, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Phthalates in the Diet and in our Homes held on June 10, 2015.

  19. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lessons learned from heritage adoption designs. A general overview of cover deployment hardware that includes the three mechanisms of latch, hinge, and energy absorbers are also discussed.

  20. Web Cast on Arsenic Demonstration Program: Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered 10 Lessons Learned items selected from the Arsenic Demonstration Program with supporting information. The major items discussed include system design and performance items and the cost of the technologies.

  1. Retrieval Lesson Learned from NAST-I Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Mango, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    The retrieval lesson learned is important to many current and future hyperspectral remote sensors. Validated retrieval algorithms demonstrate the advancement of hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities to be achieved with current and future satellite instruments.

  2. CYGNSS: Lessons We are Learning from a Class D Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumlinson, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    CYGNSS: Lessons Learned from NASA Class D Mission and how they selected their parts for the program to include balance between cost, risk, schedule and technology available as well as balancing cost restraints with mission risk profile.

  3. Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) Program Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmoyer, Alan; Horkachuck, Mike; Shotwell, Gwynne; Manners, Bruce; Culbertson, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This report has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Risk Management team in close coordination with the COTS Program. This document provides a point-in-time, cumulative, summary of actionable key lessons learned derived from the design project. Lessons learned invariably address challenges and risks and the way in which these areas have been addressed. Accordingly the risk management thread is woven throughout the document.

  4. Heritage Adoption Lessons Learned: Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincentsen, James

    2006-01-01

    Within JPL, there is a technology thrust need to develop a larger Cover Deployment and Latch Mechanism (CDLM) for future missions. The approach taken was to adopt and scale the CDLM design as used on the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) project. The three separate mechanisms that comprise the CDLM will be discussed in this paper in addition to a focus on heritage adoption lessons learned and specific examples. These lessons learned will be valuable to any project considering the use of heritage designs.

  5. The Marine Corps Lesson Learned System: An Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    system. Organizational learning , Lessons learned, After action reports, Information systems....and investigates what changes in organizational functioning can be attributed to MCLLS. The research shows that MCLLS has improved organizational ... learning but has room for improvement. The thesis contains recommendations to improve program use by addressing the needs of the potential users of the

  6. The Clipper Project: Lessons Learned Teaching an Online Economics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, M. J.; Hyclak, Tom; Yerk-Zwickl, Sherri

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the three-year evolution of an online Economics I course, reports on student outcomes and evaluations, and discusses the lessons learned. Results show that, as the course evolved from an instructor-led to a student-centered learning pedagogical model, several indicators of completing students' learning and satisfaction with…

  7. Lessons learned from a regional strategy for resource allocation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Janine C; Stapley, Jonathan; Akins, Ralitsa; Silenas, Rasa; Williams, Josie R

    2005-01-01

    Two qualitative case studies focus on the allocation of CDC funds distributed during 2002 for bioterrorism preparedness in two Texas public health regions (each as populous and complex as many states). Lessons learned are presented for public health officials and others who work to build essential public health services and security for our nation. The first lesson is that personal relationships are the cornerstone of preparedness. A major lesson is that a regional strategy to manage funds may be more effective than allocating funds on a per capita basis. One regional director required every local department to complete a strategic plan as a basis for proportional allocation of the funds. Control of communicable diseases was a central component of the planning. Some funds were kept at the regional level to provide epidemiology services, computer software, equipment, and training for the entire region. Confirmation of the value of this regional strategy was expressed by local public health and emergency management officials in a focus group 1 year after the strategy had been implemented. The group members also pointed out the need to streamline the planning process, provide up-to-date computer networks, and receive more than minimal communication. This regional strategy can be viewed from the perspective of adaptive leadership, defined as activities to bring about constructive change, which also can be used to analyze other difficult areas of preparedness.

  8. Producing Learning Activities Packages. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, Holly; Cannon, Glenn

    This teachers' manual outlines the design, development, and evaluation processes for Learning Activities Packages (LAPS), including mediated learning activities. A lesson plan for the first day's instruction is provided, as well as a 20-item pre-post test. Each LAP has five components: concept, rationale, objectives, preassessment, activities, and…

  9. NASA Space Mechanisms Handbook: Lessons Learned Documented

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The need to improve space mechanism reliability is underscored by a long history of flight failures and anomalies caused by malfunctioning mechanisms on spacecraft and launch vehicles. Some examples of these failures are listed in a table. Because much experience has been gained over the years, many specialized design practices have evolved and many unsatisfactory design approaches have been identified.NASA and the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a Lessons Learned Study (refs. 1 and 2) and wrote a handbook to document what has been learned in the past. The primary goals of the handbook were to identify desirable and undesirable design practices for space mechanisms and to reduce the number of failures caused by the repetition of past design errors. Another goal was to identify a variety of design approaches for specific applications and to provide the associated considerations and caveats for each approach in an effort to help designers choose the approach most suitable for each application. This technical summary outlines the goals and objectives of the handbook and study as well as the contents of the handbook.

  10. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  11. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  12. Providing community education: lessons learned from Native Patient Navigators.

    PubMed

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Krebs, Linda U; Harjo, Lisa; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Pingatore, Noel; Isham, Debra; Duran, Florence Tinka; Denny, Loretta; Lindstrom, Denise; Crawford, Kim

    2014-09-01

    Native Navigators and the Cancer Continuum (NNACC) was a community-based participatory research study among five American Indian organizations. The intervention required lay Native Patient Navigators (NPNs) to implement and evaluate community education workshops in their local settings. Community education was a new role for the NPNs and resulted in many lessons learned. NPNs met quarterly from 2008 through 2013 and shared lessons learned with one another and with the administrative team. In July 2012, the NPNs prioritized lessons learned throughout the study that were specific to implementing the education intervention. These were shared to help other navigators who may be including community education within their scope of work. The NPNs identified eight lessons learned that can be divided into three categories: NPN education and training, workshop content and presentation, and workshop logistics and problem-solving. A ninth overarching lesson for the entire NNACC study identified meeting community needs as an avenue for success. This project was successful due to the diligence of the NPNs in understanding their communities' needs and striving to meet them through education workshops. Nine lessons were identified by the NPNs who provided community education through the NNACC project. Most are relevant to all patient navigators, regardless of patient population, who are incorporating public education into navigation services. Due to their intervention and budget implications, many of these lessons also are relevant to those who are developing navigation research.

  13. The Space Place: Adventures in Informal Education - and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2001-12-01

    Informal education settings provide unique opportunities to convey Earth and space science learning to a variety of audiences. The NASA Space Place suite of outreach products and activities include deliverables to both the formal and the informal education arenas. The question is, how can Earth and space science efforts best create high-quality products and activities for the informal education sector- and how can these products and activities be effectively disseminated to these audiences? This session will describe the approach by a small outreach team for NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) Space Place effort. The Space Place team's approach has been three-fold: 1) develop a suite of products designed to appeal to (and educate) the informal education audience, 2) disseminate these products through leveraged distribution channels which serve the informal education community, and 3) invite participation by missions beyond those within NMP, but rather NASA-wide - for a richer and broader message, and a greater variety of content The informal education audience served by the Space Place can be found in science centers, museums, planetariums, libraries, community centers, and community organizations. This informal education audience seeks to be entertained as well as to be educated, and this audience often includes multiple generations. Personnel at informal education venues may or may not have a science background, may or may not have significant training in conducting activities, and may, as often as not, be volunteers. As a result of valuable lessons learned, Space Place materials developed for informal education settings attempt to be adaptable for multiple age groups, and easy to administer. Dissemination to the informal education community could be a daunting effort. But another lesson learned by the Space Place team is the value of alliances with national organizations within that community. These alliances make distribution of the Space Place activities and

  14. The Evolution of Extravehicular Activity Operations to Lunar Exploration Based on Operational Lessons Learned During 2009 NASA Desert RATS Field Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ernest R., Jr.; Welsh, Daren; Coan, Dave; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; McDaniel, Randall; Looper, Chris; Guirgis, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will present options to evolutionary changes in several philosophical areas of extravehicular activity (EVA) operations. These areas will include single person verses team EVAs; various loss of communications scenarios (with Mission Control, between suited crew, suited crew to rover crew, and rover crew A to rover crew B); EVA termination and abort time requirements; incapacitated crew ingress time requirements; autonomous crew operations during loss of signal periods including crew decisions on EVA execution (including decision for single verses team EVA). Additionally, suggestions as to the evolution of the make-up of the EVA flight control team from the current standard will be presented. With respect to the flight control team, the major areas of EVA flight control, EVA Systems and EVA Tasks, will be reviewed, and suggested evolutions of each will be presented. Currently both areas receive real-time information, and provide immediate feedback during EVAs as well as spacesuit (extravehicular mobility unit - EMU) maintenance and servicing periods. With respect to the tasks being performed, either EMU servicing and maintenance, or the specific EVA tasks, daily revising of plans will need to be able to be smoothly implemented to account for unforeseen situations and findings. Many of the presented ideas are a result of lessons learned by the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate operations team support during the 2009 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS). It is important that the philosophy of both EVA crew operations and flight control be examined now, so that, where required, adjustments can be made to a next generation EMU and EVA equipment that will complement the anticipated needs of both the EVA flight control team and the crews.

  15. Operating Experience and Lessons Learned in the Use of Soft-Sided Packaging for Transportation and Disposal of Low Activity Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.; Gordon, S.; Goldston, W.

    2013-07-08

    This paper describes the operating experience and lessons learned at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites as a result of an evaluation of potential trailer contamination and soft-sided packaging integrity issues related to the disposal of low-level and mixed low-level (LLW/MLLW) radioactive waste shipments. Nearly 4.3 million cubic meters of LLW/MLLW will have been generated and disposed of during fiscal year (FY) 2010 to FY 2015—either at commercial disposal sites or disposal sites owned by DOE. The LLW/MLLW is packaged in several different types of regulatory compliant packaging and transported via highway or rail to disposal sites safely and efficiently in accordance with federal, state, and local regulations and DOE orders. In 1999, DOE supported the development of LLW containers that are more volumetrically efficient, more cost effective, and easier to use as compared to metal or wooden containers that existed at that time. The DOE Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), working in conjunction with the plastic industry, tested several types of soft-sided waste packaging systems that meet U.S. Department of Transportation requirements for transport of low specific activity and surface contaminated objects. Since then, soft-sided packaging of various capacities have been used successfully by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects to package, transport, and dispose D&D wastes throughout the DOE complex. The joint team of experts assembled by the Energy Facility Contractors Group from DOE waste generating sites, DOE and commercial waste disposal facilities, and soft-sided packaging suppliers conducted the review of soft-sided packaging operations and transportation of these packages to the disposal sites. As a result of this evaluation, the team developed several recommendations and best practices to prevent or minimize the recurrences of equipment contamination issues and proper use of soft-sided packaging for transport

  16. VLT/VLTI Second-Generation Instrumentation: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmozzi, R.; Pasquini, L.; Russell, A.

    2016-12-01

    The five second-generation instruments already delivered for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) represent worthy successors to the first generation of instrumentation development. Despite this success, it is still possible to learn many lessons for the future. A review, preceded by a workshop, on the lessons learned from the second-generation instrumentation for the VLT and VLT Interferometer took place in November 2015, following a previous review twelve years ago on lessons learned from the first-generation instruments. The aim of the workshop was to identify lessons in order to help define/refine good practice and make recommendations for the future. This article briefly reports on the workshop and summarises the findings of the review panel, their recommendations and some of the steps to implement them.

  17. Lessons learned -- NREL Village Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, L.

    1998-07-01

    In 1993, a workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss the issues of applying renewable energy in a sustainable manner to international rural development. One of the summary recommendations was that NREL could assist in the renewable energy for rural electrification effort by developing and supplying six related activities: resource assessment, comparative analysis and modeling, performance monitoring and analysis, pilot project development, internet-based project data, communications, and training. In response to this recommendation, NREL launched its Village Power Program consisting of these activities that cut across NREL technologies and disciplines. Currently NREL is active in 20 countries, with pilot projects in 12 of those countries. At this time the technologies include photovoltaics, wind, biomass, and hybrids. The rural applications include home lighting and communications, water pumping, schools and health posts, battery charging stations, ecotourism, and village systems. These pilot projects are central to the renewable energy village power development through the demonstration of three aspects critical to replication and implementation of the projects on a significant scale. The three aspects are technical functionality, economic competitiveness, and institutional sustainability. It is important to note that the pilot projects from which NREL's experience has been gained were funded and, in many cases, developed by other organizations and agencies. NREL's role has been one of technical assistance or project management or both. The purpose of this paper is to describe the lessons NREL staff has gleaned from their participation in the various pilot projects. The author hopes that these lessons will help the Renewable Energy-Based Rural Electrification (RERE) community in implementing sustainable projects that lead to replication.

  18. Effects of using nursing home residents to serve as group activity leaders: lessons learned from the RAP project.

    PubMed

    Skrajner, Michael J; Haberman, Jessica L; Camp, Cameron J; Tusick, Melanie; Frentiu, Cristina; Gorzelle, Gregg

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that persons with early to moderate stage dementia are capable of leading small group activities for persons with more advanced dementia. In this study, we built upon this previous work by training residents in long-term care facilities to fill the role of group activity leaders using a Resident-Assisted Programming (RAP) training regimen. There were two stages to the program. In the first stage, RAP training was provided by researchers. In the second stage, RAP training was provided to residents by activities staff members of long-term care facilities who had been trained by researchers. We examine the effects of RAP implemented by researchers and by activities staff member on long-term care resident with dementia who took part in these RAP activities. We also examined effects produced by two types of small group activities: two Montessori-based activities and an activity which focuses on persons with more advanced dementia, based on the work of Jitka Zgola. Results demonstrate that levels of positive engagement seen in players during RAP (resident-led activities) were typically higher than those observed during standard activities programming led by site staff. In general, Montessori-Based Dementia Programming® produced more constructive engagement than Zgola-based programming (ZBP), though ZBP did increase a positive form of engagement involving observing activities with interest. In addition, RAP implemented by activities staff members produced effects that were, on the whole, similar to those produced when RAP was implemented by researchers. Implications of these findings for providing meaningful social roles for persons with dementia residing in long-term care, and suggestions for further research in this area, are discussed.

  19. Gender Differences in Pain-Physical Activity Linkages among Older Adults: Lessons Learned from Daily Life Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Amy; Ashe, Maureen C.; DeLongis, Anita; Graf, Peter; Khan, Karim M.; Hoppmann, Christiane A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Many older adults know about the health benefits of an active lifestyle, but, frequently, pain prevents them from engaging in physical activity. The majority of older adults experience pain, a complex experience that can vary across time and is shaped by sociocultural factors like gender. Objectives. To describe the time-varying associations between daily pain and physical activity and to explore differences in these associations between women and men. Methods. One hundred and twenty-eight community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older were asked to report their pain levels three times daily over a 10-day period and wear an accelerometer to objectively capture their daily physical activity (step counts and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity). Results. Increased daily step counts and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity were associated with increased daily pain, especially among women. Confirming past literature and contrasting findings for daily pain reports, overall pain levels across the study period were negatively associated with minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Conclusions. Findings highlight that pain is significantly associated with physical activity in old age. The nature of this association depends on the time scale that is considered and differs between women and men. PMID:27445599

  20. Lessons learned from decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes lessons learned over the last 20 years from 12 decommissioning projects at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These lessons relate both to overall program management and to management of specific projects during the planning and operations phases. The issues include waste management; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); contracting; public involvement; client/customer interface; and funding. Key elements of our approach are to be proactive; follow the observation method; perform field activities concurrently; develop strategies to keep reportable incidents from delaying work; seek and use programs, methods, etc., in existence to shorten learning curves; network to help develop solutions; and avoid overstudying and overcharacterizing. This approach results in preliminary plans that require very little revision before implementation, reasonable costs and schedules, early acquisition of permits and NEPA documents, preliminary characterization reports, and contracting documents. Our track record is good -- the last four projects (uranium and plutonium-processing facility and three research reactors) have been on budget and on schedule.

  1. Four Variations on Drueke's Active Learning Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragains, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    A lesson structure for one-time bibliographic instruction (BI) sessions based on an active learning technique was developed. Active learning is discussed, and the "jigsaw method" is described. BI sessions presented to junior- and senior-level college students are examined, and considerations for librarians wishing to incorporate active…

  2. Workshop on Discovery Lessons-Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Discovery Program's continuous improvement effort, a Discovery Program Lessons-Learned workshop was designed to review how well the Discovery Program is moving toward its goal of providing low-cost research opportunities to the planetary science community while ensuring continued U.S. leadership in solar system exploration. The principal focus of the workshop was on the recently completed Announcement of Opportunity (AO) cycle, but the program direction and program management were also open to comment. The objective of the workshop was to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the process up to this point, with the goal of improving the process for the next AO cycle. The process for initializing the workshop was to solicit comments from the communities involved in the program and to use the feedback as the basis for establishing the workshop agenda. The following four sessions were developed after reviewing and synthesizing both the formal feedback received and informal feedback obtained during discussions with various participants: (1) Science and Return on Investment; (2) Technology vs. Risk; Mission Success and Other Factors; (3) Cost; and (4) AO.AO Process Changes and Program Management.

  3. Lessons learned in command environment development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Daniel F.; Collie, Brad E.

    2000-11-01

    As we consider the issues associated with the development of an Integrated Command Environment (ICE), we must obviously consider the rich history in the development of control rooms, operations centers, information centers, dispatch offices, and other command and control environments. This paper considers the historical perspective of control environments from the industrial revolution through the information revolution, and examines the historical influences and the implications that that has for us today. Environments to be considered are military command and control spaces, emergency response centers, medical response centers, nuclear reactor control rooms, and operations centers. Historical 'lessons learned' from the development and evolution of these environments will be examined to determine valuable models to use, and those to be avoided. What are the pitfalls? What are the assumptions that drive the environment design? Three case histories will be presented, examining (1) the control room of the Three Mile Island power plant, (2) the redesign of the US Naval Space Command operations center, and (3) a testbed for an ICE aboard a naval surface combatant.

  4. The VELA Success Story and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Mario R.; Belian, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    The VELA program was one of the first successful space programs in the U.S. This project was managed for the Department of Defense by the predecessor of DARPA, with the participation of the U.S. Air Force. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were in charge of providing nuclear surveillance sensors to verify compliance with the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty signed by President John F. Kennedy on October 7, 1963. The first two satellites were launched in tandem ten days later on October 17, 1963. A total of twelve satellites were launched from 1963 until 1970. Successful operations of some VELA on-board detectors continued until the early 1980s. We reviewed some of the many unique and valuable science achievements such as the discovery of gamma-ray bursts, galactic x-ray bursts, x-ray emission of solar flares, the plasma sheet and high Z ions in the solar wind, etc. Furthermore, a few lessons learned, both technical and managerial, are captured in this presentation.

  5. Lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Ricardo; Teles, Flavia; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Paster, Bruce; Haffajee, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by bacterial species living in polymicrobial biofilms at or below the gingival margin and progress largely as a result of the inflammation initiated by specific subgingival species. In the past few decades, efforts to understand the microbiota of periodontal diseases have led to an exponential increase in information about biofilms associated with periodontal health and disease. In fact, the oral microbiota is one of the best characterized microbiomes that colonize the human body. Despite this increased knowledge, one has to ask if our fundamental concepts of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases have really changed. In this chapter we will review how our comprehension of the structure and function of the subgingival microbiota evolved over the years in search of lessons learned and unlearned in periodontal microbiology. More specifically, this review focuses on: 1) how the data obtained through molecular techniques has impacted our knowledge of the etiology of periodontal infections; 2) the potential role of viruses in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases; 3) how concepts of microbial ecology have expanded our understanding of host microbial interactions that might lead to periodontal diseases; 4) the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases; and 5) the impact of these evolving concepts on treatment and preventive approaches to periodontal infections. We will conclude by reviewing how novel systems biology approaches promise to unravel new details of the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and, hopefully, lead to a better understanding of periodontal disease mechanisms. PMID:23574465

  6. Contamination and UV lasers: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, John G.

    2015-09-01

    Laser induced damage to optical elements has been a subject of significant research, development, and improvement, since the first lasers were built over the last 50 years. Better materials, with less absorption, impurities, and defects are available, as well as surface coatings with higher laser damage resistance. However, the presence of contamination (particles, surface deposition films, or airborne) can reduce the threshold for damage by several orders of magnitude. A brief review of the anticipated laser energy levels for damage free operation is presented as a lead into the problems associated with contamination for ultraviolet (UV) laser systems. As UV lasers become more common in applications especially in areas such as lithography, these problems have limited reliability and added to costs. This has been characterized as Airborne Molecular Contamination (AMC) in many published reports. Normal engineering guidelines such as screening materials within the optical compartment for low outgassing levels is the first step. The use of the NASA outgassing database (or similar test methods) with low Total Mass Loss (TML) and Condensed Collected Volatiles Collected Mass (CVCM) is a good baseline. Energetic UV photons are capable of chemical bond scission and interaction with surface contaminant or airborne materials results in deposition of obscuring film laser footprints that continue to degrade laser system performance. Laser systems with average powers less than 5 mW have been shown to exhibit aggressive degradation. Lessons learned over the past 15 years with UV laser contamination and steps to reduce risk will be presented.

  7. Resource Allocation Planning Helper (RALPH): Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Ralph; Reilly, Norman B.; Springer, Joe B.

    1990-01-01

    The current task of Resource Allocation Process includes the planning and apportionment of JPL's Ground Data System composed of the Deep Space Network and Mission Control and Computing Center facilities. The addition of the data driven, rule based planning system, RALPH, has expanded the planning horizon from 8 weeks to 10 years and has resulted in large labor savings. Use of the system has also resulted in important improvements in science return through enhanced resource utilization. In addition, RALPH has been instrumental in supporting rapid turn around for an increased volume of special what if studies. The status of RALPH is briefly reviewed and important lessons learned from the creation of an highly functional design team are focused on through an evolutionary design and implementation period in which an AI shell was selected, prototyped, and ultimately abandoned, and through the fundamental changes to the very process that spawned the tool kit. Principal topics include proper integration of software tools within the planning environment, transition from prototype to delivered to delivered software, changes in the planning methodology as a result of evolving software capabilities and creation of the ability to develop and process generic requirements to allow planning flexibility.

  8. CHIPS microsatellite optical system: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholl, M. J.; Gaines, Geoff; Sirk, Martin; Taylor, Ellen; Hurwitz, Mark

    2008-08-01

    The Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS) observatory launched on 12 January 2003, and was the first and only successful GSFC UNEX (NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center University Explorer class) mission. The UNEX program was conceived by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a new class of Explorer mission charged with demonstrating that significant science and/or technology experiments can be performed by small satellites with constrained budgets and a limited schedule. The purpose of the observatory was to examine details of the local bubble thermal pressure, spatial distribution and ionization history. The observatory was also used to observe solar spectra, both scattered from the Lunar surface and via a fortuitous 2nd order scattering path. CHIPS confirmed that spectral features within the 90-260Å band were much dimmer than was predicted by contemporary theories, and operated four years beyond its design lifetime. The observatory was placed in an extended safe-hold mode in April of 2008 for budgetary purposes. The spectrometer consisted of six spectrograph channels which delivered >λ/100 resolution spectra to a single detector. Cost constraints of UNEX led to a design based on a traditional aluminum structure, and an instrument with a large field of view (5° x 26°). All optical and optomechanical systems on the spectrometer performed flawlessly on orbit. We discuss the challenges, difficulties and lessons learned during the design, fabrication and execution stages of the mission.

  9. Protein Name Tagging Guidelines: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhangzhi; Jang, Seok Bae; Samuel, Ken; Krause, Matthew; Phillips, Jon; Wu, Cathy H.

    2005-01-01

    Interest in information extraction from the biomedical literature is motivated by the need to speed up the creation of structured databases representing the latest scientific knowledge about specific objects, such as proteins and genes. This paper addresses the issue of a lack of standard definition of the problem of protein name tagging. We describe the lessons learned in developing a set of guidelines and present the first set of inter-coder results, viewed as an upper bound on system performance. Problems coders face include: (a) the ambiguity of names that can refer to either genes or proteins; (b) the difficulty of getting the exact extents of long protein names; and (c) the complexity of the guidelines. These problems have been addressed in two ways: (a) defining the tagging targets as protein named entities used in the literature to describe proteins or protein-associated or -related objects, such as domains, pathways, expression or genes, and (b) using two types of tags, protein tags and long-form tags, with the latter being used to optionally extend the boundaries of the protein tag when the name boundary is difficult to determine. Inter-coder consistency across three annotators on protein tags on 300 MEDLINE abstracts is 0.868 F-measure. The guidelines and annotated datasets, along with automatic tools, are available for research use. PMID:18629297

  10. SOFIA Program SE and I Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ronald J.; Fobel, Laura J.; Brignola, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Once a "Troubled Project" threatened with cancellation, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) Program has overcome many difficult challenges and recently achieved its first light images. To achieve success, SOFIA had to overcome significant deficiencies in fundamental Systems Engineering identified during a major Program restructuring. This presentation will summarize the lessons learn in Systems Engineering on the SOFIA Program. After the Program was reformulated, an initial assessment of Systems Engineering established the scope of the problem and helped to set a list of priorities that needed to be work. A revised Systems Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) was written to address the new Program structure and requirements established in the approved NPR7123.1A. An important result of the "Technical Planning" effort was the decision by the Program and Technical Leadership team to re-phasing the lifecycle into increments. The reformed SOFIA Program Office had to quickly develop and establish several new System Engineering core processes including; Requirements Management, Risk Management, Configuration Management and Data Management. Implementing these processes had to consider the physical and cultural diversity of the SOFIA Program team which includes two Projects spanning two NASA Centers, a major German partnership, and sub-contractors located across the United States and Europe. The SOFIA Program experience represents a creative approach to doing "System Engineering in the middle" while a Program is well established. Many challenges were identified and overcome. The SOFIA example demonstrates it is never too late to benefit from fixing deficiencies in the System Engineering processes.

  11. CEBAF Upgrade: Cryomodule Performance And Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, Michael A.; Davis, G. Kirk; Hogan, John P.; Hovater, J. Curt; King, Lawrence; Marhauser, Frank; Park, HyeKyoung; Preble, Joe; Reece, Charles E.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Haipeng; Wiseman, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is currently engaged in the 12 GeV Upgrade Project. The goal of the 12 GeV Upgrade is a doubling of the available beam energy of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. This increase in beam energy will be due in large part to the addition of ten C100 cryomodules plus associated new RF in the CEBAF linacs. The C100 cryomodules are designed to deliver 100 MeV per installed cryomodule. Each C100 cryomodule is built around a string of eight seven-cell, electro-polished, superconducting RF cavities. While an average performance of 100MV per cryomodule is needed to achieve the overall 12 GeV beam energy goal, the actual performance goal for the cryomodules is an average energy gain of 108 MV to provide operational headroom. Cryomodule production started in December 2010. All ten of the C100 cryomodules are installed in the linac tunnels and are on schedule to complete commissioning by September 2013. Performance during Commissioning has ranged from 104 MV to 118 MV. In May, 2012 a test of an early C100 achieved 108 MV with full beam loading. This paper will discuss the performance of the C100 cryomodules along with operational challenges and lessons learned for future designs.

  12. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    G.H. Neilson, C.O. Gruber, J.H. Harris, D.J. Rej, R.T. Simmons, and R.L. Strykowsky

    2009-07-21

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  13. Lessons Learned in Risk Management on NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    G.H. Neilson, C.O. Gruber, J.H. Harris, D.J. Rej, R.T. Simmons, and R.L. Strykowsky

    2009-02-11

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative stellarator design developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Construction of some of the major components and sub-assemblies was completed, but the estimated cost and schedule for completing the project grew as the technical requirements and risks became better understood, leading to its cancellation in 2008. The project's risks stemmed from its technical challenges, primarily the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. The initial baseline, established in 2004, was supported by a risk management plan and risk-based contingencies, both of which proved to be inadequate. Technical successes were achieved in the construction of challenging components and subassemblies, but cost and schedule growth was experienced. As part of an effort to improve project performance, a new risk management program was devised and implemented in 2007-08. It led to a better understanding of project risks, a sounder basis for contingency estimates, and improved management tools. Although the risks ultimately were unacceptable to the sponsor, valuable lessons in risk management were learned through the experiences with the NCSX project.

  14. Teaching with Internet Telescopes: Some Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, Robert

    Observational astronomy is often difficult for pre-college students and teachers because: (1) school occurs in daytime and visual observing at night; (2) light pollution hides the stars from students living in cities; (3) few schools have teachers trained to use and maintain astronomy equipment; (4) there is lack of access to expertise when needed; (5) physically disabled students cannot easily access a telescope eypiece. Internet access to computer controlled telescopes with digital cameras can solve many of these difficulties. The Web enables students and teachers to access well-maintained internet-controllable telescopes at dark-site locations and to consult more readily with experts. This paper reports on a three-month pilot project exploring this situation conducted Feb-May 2002 which allowed high school students to access a CCD-equipped accurately-pointing and tracking telescope located in New Mexico controllable over the Web with a user-friendly skymap browser tool. User interest proved phenomenal and user statistics proved diverse. There were distinct lessons learned about how to enhance student participation in the research process. Details available at website www.du.edu/~rstencel/stn.htm. We thank the ICSRC for a grant to Denver University and acknowledge in-kind support from the estate of William Herschel Womble.

  15. Constellation Program: Lessons Learned. Volume 1; Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    This document (Volume I) provides an executive summary of the lessons learned from the Constellation Program. A companion Volume II provides more detailed analyses for those seeking further insight and information. In this volume, Section 1.0 introduces the approach in preparing and organizing the content to enable rapid assimilation of the lessons. Section 2.0 describes the contextual framework in which the Constellation Program was formulated and functioned that is necessary to understand most of the lessons. Context of a former program may seem irrelevant in the heady days of new program formulation. However, readers should take some time to understand the context. Many of the lessons would be different in a different context, so the reader should reflect on the similarities and differences in his or her current circumstances. Section 3.0 summarizes key findings developed from the significant lessons learned at the program level that appear in Section 4.0. Readers can use the key findings in Section 3.0 to peruse for particular topics, and will find more supporting detail and analyses in Section 4.0 in a topical format. Appendix A contains a white paper describing the Constellation Program formulation that may be of use to readers wanting more context or background information. The reader will no doubt recognize some very similar themes from previous lessons learned, blue-ribbon committee reviews, National Academy reviews, and advisory panel reviews for this and other large-scale human spaceflight programs; including Apollo, Space Shuttle, Shuttle/Mir, and the ISS. This could represent an inability to learn lessons from previous generations; however, it is more likely that similar challenges persist in the Agency structure and approach to program formulation, budget advocacy, and management. Perhaps the greatest value of these Constellation lessons learned can be found in viewing them in context with these previous efforts to guide and advise the Agency and its

  16. Lessons learned with the Active Phasing Experiment: comparison of four optical phasing sensors on a segmented Very Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Surdej, I.

    The adaptive optics capabilities are strongly limited by the quality of the phasing of the primary mirror of the extremely large telescope. Up to date, the Keck telescopes are the only segmented telescope phased with a quality enabling the application of adaptive optics. The Active Phasing Experiment has been installed at the Namyth focus of the Very Large Telescope Melipal during the last 6 months. Its purpose is to understand and compare different technological concepts for an optical phasing sensor dedicated to the European Extremely Large Telescope. The pupil of the telescope is segmented in 61 hexagonal segments by projecting it on an Active Segmented Mirror. The ASM is controlled by a dual wavenlength interferometer made by Fogale Nanotech with a nanometric precision. The segmented pupil is distributed in parallel to four optical phasing sensors. They are a pyramid sensor, a curvature sensor, a phase filtering sensor and a ShackHartmann sensor. They have been developed respectively by Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica in Florenze, Instituto Astrofisica Canarias in Tenerife, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille and ESO. The global behaviour of the optical phasing sensors will be described and preliminary results of the Active Phasing Experiments obtained on sky will be explained. The extrapolation of the results to the EELT and the potential consequences for the adaptive optics will be given. The Active Phasing Experiment has been financed by the European Union and the European Southern Observatory via the Sixth European Union Framework Program for Research and Technological Development under the contract number 011863.

  17. Mangroves Build Land. "Mangroves are a Valuable Resource." Grades 7 and 8. A Two Lesson Unit. Student Learning Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, James

    This module is an activity and film-oriented unit focusing on the importance of mangroves in the South Florida ecosystem. The module is part of a series designed to be used by teachers, students, and community members to help them utilize community resources in developing and teaching environmental concepts and responsibility, and in seeking ways…

  18. Microbiological Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Ott, C. Mark; Bruce, Rebekah; Castro, Victoria A.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2011-01-01

    functions were found to be altered. Selected microorganisms were found to become more virulent during spaceflight. The increased knowledge gained on the Space Shuttle resulted in further studies of the host-microbe interactions on the ISS to determine if countermeasures were necessary. Lessons learned from the Space Shuttle Program were integrated into the ISS resulting in the safest space habitat to date.

  19. School Planning: Lessons Learned at the Celebration School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the lessons learned from Disney's K-12 Celebration School when trying to apply the latest research on teaching and learning to the school's design. Explores the future of business/school partnering in school planning, and offers expert advice on the school-planning process. (GR)

  20. Applying Universal Design for Learning to Instructional Lesson Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Sung, Andrew N.

    2013-01-01

    Universal Design for Learning is a framework for developing inclusive instructional lesson plans. The effects of introducing Universal Design for Learning Principles and Guidelines in a university teacher education program with pre-service and practicing teachers were explored in a mixed methods approach. The results indicate that the study…

  1. Engaging youth in food activism in New York City: lessons learned from a youth organization, health department, and university partnership.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Emma; Bylander, Kim; Cho, Milyoung; Maybank, Aletha; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2012-10-01

    Research indicates that insufficient emphasis on community collaboration and partnership can thwart innovative community-driven work on the social determinants of health by local health departments. Appreciating the importance of enhancing community participation, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) helped lead the development of the Health Equity Project (HEP), an intervention aimed at increasing the capacity of urban youth to identify and take action to reduce food-related health disparities. DOHMH partnered with the City University of New York School of Public Health and several local youth organizations to design and implement the intervention. HEP was conducted with 373 young people in 17 cohorts at 14 unique sites: six in Brooklyn, six in the Bronx, and two in Harlem. Partnered youth organizations hosted three stages of work: interactive workshops on neighborhood health disparities, food environments, and health outcomes; food-focused research projects conducted by youth; and small-scale action projects designed to change local food environments. Through these activities, HEP appears to have been successful in introducing youth to the social, economic, and political factors that shape food environments and to the influence of food on health outcomes. The intervention was also somewhat successful in providing youth with community-based participatory research skills and engaging them in documenting and then acting to change their neighborhood food environments. In the short term, we are unable to assess how successful HEP has been in building young leaders who will continue to engage in this kind of activism, but we suspect that more extended interactions would be needed to achieve this more ambitious goal. Experiences at these sites suggest that youth organizations with a demonstrated capacity to engage youth in community service or activism and a commitment to improving food or other health-promoting community resources make the

  2. Lessons Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    This poster offers some of the major lessons learned by key members of the Chandra Telescope team. These lessons are gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process. This poster offers some opinions on how these lessons can affect future missions.

  3. Lessons Learned in Introducing MBSE: 2009 to 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED DSTO-GD-0734 4. Lessons Learned in Introducing MBSE : 2009 to 2012 – A. Peter Campbell University of South Australia Abstract An...overview of the lessons that are emerging from recent efforts to employ MBSE in the development of large complex projects in both the defence and...civilian sectors. A broad interpretation of MBSE will be taken to encompass tool systems that embody the spirit of MBSE , if not the specific modern

  4. Army Contracting Command--Picatinny Telework Policy: Applying Lessons Learned from the Federal Government

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Training in the ACC-PICA Telework Policy ..................................65 2. Application of Lessons Learned...66 3. Application of the Star Model ...........................................................69 B. MANAGEMENT ACCEPTANCE AND...71 2. Application of Lessons Learned .......................................................71 3

  5. Synthetic oligosaccharides as active pharmaceutical ingredients: lessons learned from the full synthesis of one heparin derivative on a large scale.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Pierre-Alexandre; Potier, Pierre; Trouilleux, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    Covering: up to November 2013. Heparin and heparan sulfate are natural polysaccharides with strong structural variations, which are responsible for their numerous specific biological properties. One key target of heparin, among others, is antithrombin, a serine protease inhibitor that, upon activation, mainly targets anticoagulation factors IIa and Xa. It is well documented that inhibition of the latter is due to a specific pentasaccharidic sequence, its synthetic analog being the registered drug fondaparinux. The replacement of hydroxyls by methoxy groups, N-sulfates by O-sulfonates and the modulation of the sulfation pattern gave rise to both idraparinux and its neutralizable form, idrabiotaparinux, two pentasaccharides with a significantly increased half-life compared to fondaparinux. Although numerous efforts have been devoted to improving the chemoenzymatic preparation of heparin fragments, enzymes are usually selective for their natural substrates, which limits the generation of some specific non-natural structures. Up to now, total synthesis has proved to be a valuable approach for the preparation of tailor-made and pure saccharides in the milligram to gram scale. This highlight will focus on the synthesis and the technical challenges associated with the development and the production of complex carbohydrates which will be exemplified with idrabiotaparinux. Particular attention will be paid to the process improvements needed in order to implement the production in a pilot plant, achieving batch generation on a multi-kilogram scale with a purity higher than 99.5%, and with no unknown impurity over 0.1%.

  6. Lessons learned from four years of actively using River Forecast Center Ensemble Streamflow Predictions to inform reservoir management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polebitski, A.; Palmer, R.; Meaker, B.

    2012-12-01

    The National Weather Service's River Forecast Centers (RFCs), located throughout the US, produce operational streamflow forecasts for short term application and long-term lead forecasts at selected locations. These forecasts are targeted for a variety of users, including water supply management, flood control, hydropower production, navigation, and recreation. This presentation highlights the challenges and successes associated with the use of RFC produced ensemble streamflow predictions (ESP) in generating system operations forecasts over the past four years for Snohomish County Public Utility District #1's (SnoPUD) Henry Jackson hydropower system. This research documents a multiyear collaboration between SnoPUD and academic researchers. The collaboration began with a proof of concept study in 2007 and evolved into a weekly decision support activity that has been ongoing since 2008 ( documented in Alemu et al. 2010). The Alemu et al. paper demonstrates the usefulness of ESP forecasts in hydropower operations decision making. This paper focuses on the value of forecasts and a decision support system (DSS) in improving skills in operating reservoir systems. During the application period, the model provided weekly guidance on meeting operational objectives and a probabilistic approach to quantifying system vulnerability during critical periods such as floods and drought. The ESP forecasts and the DSS were heavily used during periods of uncertainty and less so during periods of high system constraint or low system risk.

  7. Connecting Learning & Technology for Effective Lesson Plan Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seamon, Mary P.

    This paper focuses on the design of effective lesson plans using the Internet. Effective lesson design helps students to explore ideas, acquire and synthesize information, and frame and solve problems. The creative problem solving which depends upon context, interrelationships, and real-world activities is available through Internet projects.…

  8. WebDB Component Builder - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, C.

    2000-02-15

    Oracle WebDB is the easiest way to produce web enabled lightweight and enterprise-centric applications. This concept from Oracle has tantalized our taste for simplistic web development by using a purely web based tool that lives nowhere else but in the database. The use of online wizards, templates, and query builders, which produces PL/SQL behind the curtains, can be used straight ''out of the box'' by both novice and seasoned developers. The topic of this presentation will introduce lessons learned by developing and deploying applications built using the WebDB Component Builder in conjunction with custom PL/SQL code to empower a hybrid application. There are two kinds of WebDB components: those that display data to end users via reporting, and those that let end users update data in the database via entry forms. The presentation will also discuss various methods within the Component Builder to enhance the applications pushed to the desktop. The demonstrated example is an application entitled HOME (Helping Other's More Effectively) that was built to manage a yearly United Way Campaign effort. Our task was to build an end to end application which could manage approximately 900 non-profit agencies, an average of 4,100 individual contributions, and $1.2 million dollars. Using WebDB, the shell of the application was put together in a matter of a few weeks. However, we did encounter some hurdles that WebDB, in it's stage of infancy (v2.0), could not solve for us directly. Together with custom PL/SQL, WebDB's Component Builder became a powerful tool that enabled us to produce a very flexible hybrid application.

  9. Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-26

    Building the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned A Monograph by MAJ...2016 Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ’ Building the Anny of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned Sb. GRANT NUMBER...Building of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam’s Logistical System: Lessons Learned Approved by: __________________________________, Monograph Director

  10. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  11. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite - Performance, Reliability and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawczyk, Richard J.; Ignaczak, Louis R.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Satellite (ACTS) was conceived and developed in the mid- 1980s as an experimental satellite to demonstrate unproven Ka-band technology, and potential new commercial applications and services. Since launch into geostationary orbit in September 1993. ACTS has accumulated almost seven years of essentially trouble-free operation and met all program objectives. The unique technology, service experiments. and system level demonstrations accomplished by ACTS have been reported in many forums over the past several years. As ACTS completes its final experiments activity, this paper will relate the top-level program goals that have been achieved in the design, operation, and performance of the particular satellite subsystems. Pre-launch decisions to ensure satellite reliability and the subsequent operational experiences contribute to lessons learned that may be applicable to other comsat programs.

  12. Pollution prevention program for new projects -- Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, J.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to relay the experience of the Office of New Production Reactors (NP) in developing and implementing its pollution prevention program. NP was established to plan, design, and construct a new safe and environmentally acceptable nuclear reactor capacity necessary to provide an assured supply of tritium to maintain the nation`s long-term deterrent capability. The Program offered the Department of Energy an opportunity to demonstrate its commitment to environmental protection via minimization of environmental releases; new design offers the best opportunity for pollution prevention. The NP pollution prevention program was never fully implemented because NP`s tritium production design activity was recovery terminated. The information in this paper represented lessons learned from the last three years of NP operation.

  13. Remote maintenance lessons learned'' on prototypical reprocessing equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Kring, C.T.; Schrock, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Hardware representative of essentially every major equipment item necessary for reprocessing breeder reactor nuclear fuel has been installed and tested for remote maintainability. This testing took place in a cold mock-up of a remotely maintained hot cell operated by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) within the Fuel Recycle Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The reprocessing equipment tested included a Disassembly System, a Shear System, a Dissolver System, an Automated Sampler System, removable Equipment Racks on which various chemical process equipment items were mounted, and an advanced servomanipulator (ASM). These equipment items were disassembled and reassembled remotely by using the remote handling systems that are available within the cold mock-up area. This paper summarizes the lessons learned'' as a result of the numerous maintenance activities associated with each of these equipment items. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Stardust Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    These are science and mission design and operations lessons learned from the Stardust Mission, which returned grains from comet Wild-2 and fresh interstellar dust to Earth in 2006 [1]. Science Lessons: Major discoveries of the Stardust Wild-2 samples include the presence of numerous chondrules and CAI in a comet, which requires a much more dynamic early solar system than many had envisaged, and verified predictions made by models requiring outward flow of early solar system solids before the early nebular gas had dissipated [1-3]. No evidence has been found for the presence of live Al-26 in the comet, suggesting late accretion [4]. Carbonates and unusual sulfides were found which potentially require activity of liquid water within the comet, but to only a minor degree at best [5-6]. The presence of abundant thermally-metamorphosed silicates in Wild-2 appears to require assembly from an earlier generation of bodies [7]. The abundance of presolar grains in the Wild-2 samples appears to be below what has been found in most chondritic IDPs and primitive chondrites [1]. The bulk mineralogy of Wild-2 grains does not match the mineralogy from any single other known astromaterial [7], and is also strikingly unlike that inferred from Spitzer Telescope spectra of Comet Temple 1 dust [8]. Amino acids and other fragile organics have been detected among the Wild-2 samples [9], which highlights the critical importance of further developing techniques for organic analysis in small samples, and cleaning outbound spacecraft.

  15. Taking a Second Look at the Role of IEC in Population Programmes: Some Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roque, Francisco

    1994-01-01

    Identifies two factors contributing toward the low impact of information, education, and communication (IEC) activities on population programs: (1) inadequate collaboration in IEC planning, management, monitoring, and evaluation; and (2) lack of quality in training and in materials development and production. Presents five lessons learned from…

  16. Conservation Learning in Wildlife Tourism Settings: Lessons from Research in Zoos and Aquariums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Roy; Packer, Jan; Hughes, Karen; Dierking, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have shifted their focus over recent years, taking a much more active role in wildlife conservation and in promoting conservation learning among their visitors. Research in these settings provides a valuable foundation for the emerging field of non-captive wildlife tourism. In particular, valuable lessons regarding the potential…

  17. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials.

  18. Lessons Learned: The "Pale Horse" Bioterrorism Response Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    to define what the professional and personal liability of private health care providers is for Table 1. Participants in Pale Horse Tabletop Planning...Lessons Learned Lessons Learned: The “Pale Horse ” Bioterrorism Response Exercise Col. David Jarrett, MD, FACEP The city of San Antonio, Texas, and...Editorial, see p. 98 And I looked, and behold, a pale horse : and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. Book of Revelation 6:8 I n

  19. Learning Lessons from the X-37 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan; Spanyer, Karen

    2005-01-01

    engineering to management. Some members have been with the project since its inception. All have gained priceless experience during the design, manufacturing, and testing of the ALTV, as well as through developing advanced orbital flight technologies, such as state-of-the-art Thermal Protection Systems and hot structures. Throughout this process, the X-37 Project team captures lessons that are directly applicable to other such efforts. The upcoming ALTV flights offer another dimension of data and first-hand experience that will prove invaluable to those designing new generations of reusable spacecraft. And ongoing technology developments will expand the aerospace knowledge base. Delivering prototype hardware is always a risky proposition. During the course of this effort, the X-37 team has experienced many challenging opportunities, delivering significant accomplishments and learning numerous lessons in the process. The ability to manage the risk landscape is key to overcoming obstacles, especially technical hurdles that are encountered in progressing hardware from design to flight. The approach to managing risk under this partnership is evolving but, in general, the team allocates resources to reduce the likelihood of severe-consequence risks, thus maximizing mission success and ensuring that the X-37 Project delivers value to its stakeholders. As the team sharpens its focus on operations, it continues to contribute knowledge to those who would undertake high-risk, high-payoff R&D and provides valuable experience to implement the Vision for Space Exploration.

  20. Learning Lessons from the X-37 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Susan; Spanyer, Karen

    2005-01-01

    engineering to management. Some members have been with the project since its inception. All have gained priceless experience during the design, manufacturing, and testing of the ALTV, as well as through developing advanced orbital flight technologies, such as state-of-the-art Thermal Protection Systems and hot structures. Throughout this process, the X-37 Project team captures lessons that are directly applicable to other such efforts. The upcoming ALTV flights offer another dimension of data and first-hand experience that will prove invaluable to those designing new generations of reusable spacecraft. And ongoing technology developments will expand the aerospace knowledge base. Delivering prototype hardware is always a risky proposition. During the course of the X-37 effort, the team has experienced many challenging opportunities, delivering significant accomplishments and learning numerous lessons in the process. The ability to manage the risk landscape is key to overcoming obstacles, especially technical hurdles that are encountered in progressing hardware from design to flight. The approach to managing risk under this partnership is evolving but, in general, the team allocates resources to reduce the likelihood of severe-consequence risks, thus maximizing mission success and ensuring that the X-37 Project delivers value to its stakeholders. As the team sharpens its focus on operations, it continues to contribute knowledge to those who would undertake high-risk, high-payoff research and development and provides valuable experience to implement the exploration vision.

  1. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    accompanied by and were an integral part of sweeping ``culture changes,`` the story of the lessons learned during the PUREX Deactivation Project are worth recounting. Foremost among the lessons is recognizing the benefits of ``right to left`` project planning. A deactivation project must start by identifying its end points, then make every task, budget, and organizational decision based on reaching those end points. Along with this key lesson is the knowledge that project planning and scheduling should be tied directly to costing, and the project status should be checked often (more often than needed to meet mandated reporting requirements) to reflect real-time work. People working on a successful project should never be guessing about its schedule or living with a paper schedule that does not represent the actual state of work. Other salient lessons were learned in the PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project that support these guiding principles. They include recognizing the value of independent review, teamwork, and reengineering concepts; the need and value of cooperation between the DOE, its contractors, regulators, and stakeholders; and the essential nature of early and ongoing communication. Managing a successful project also requires being willing to take a fresh look at safety requirements and to apply them in a streamlined and sensible manner to deactivating facilities; draw on the enormous value of resident knowledge acquired by people over years and sometimes decades of working in old plants; and recognize the value of bringing in outside expertise for certain specialized tasks.This approach makes possible discovering the savings that can come when many creative options are pursued persistently and the wisdom of leaving some decisions to the future. The essential job of a deactivation project is to place a facility in a safe, stable, low-maintenance mode, for an interim period. Specific end points are identified to recognize and document this state. Keeping the limited

  2. SRMS History, Evolution and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Glenn; Bains, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    . Evolution of the simulations, guided by the Math Model Working Group, showed the utility of input from multiple modeling groups with a structured forum for discussion.There were many unique development challenges in the areas of hardware, software, certification, modeling and simulation. Over the years, upgrades and enhancements were implemented to increase the capability, performance and safety of the SRMS. The history and evolution of the SRMS program provided many lessons learned that can be used for future space robotic systems.

  3. Lessons learned from LNG safety research.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Ronald P; Ermak, Donald L

    2007-02-20

    During the period from 1977 to 1989, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted a liquefied gaseous fuels spill effects program under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Gas Research Institute and others. The goal of this program was to develop and validate tools that could be used to predict the effects of a large liquefied gas spill through the execution of large scale field experiments and the development of computer models to make predictions for conditions under which tests could not be performed. Over the course of the program, three series of LNG spill experiments were performed to study cloud formation, dispersion, combustion and rapid phase transition (RPT) explosions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this program, the lessons learned from 12 years of research as well as some recommendations for the future. The general conclusion from this program is that cold, dense gas related phenomena can dominate the dispersion of a large volume, high release rate spill of LNG especially under low ambient wind speed and stable atmospheric conditions, and therefore, it is necessary to include a detailed and validated description of these phenomena in computer models to adequately predict the consequences of a release. Specific conclusions include: * LNG vapor clouds are lower and wider than trace gas clouds and tend to follow the downhill slope of terrain due to dampened vertical turbulence and gravity flow within the cloud. Under low wind speed, stable atmospheric conditions, a bifurcated, two lobed structure develops. * Navier-Stokes models provide the most complete description of LNG dispersion, while more highly parameterized Lagrangian models were found to be well suited to emergency response applications. * The measured heat flux from LNG vapor cloud burns exceeded levels necessary for third degree burns and were large enough to ignite most flammable materials. * RPTs are of two

  4. Lessons Learned about Liquid Metal Reactors from FFTF Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Wootan, David W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Burke, Thomas M.; Grandy, Christopher

    2016-09-20

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent liquid-metal reactor (LMR) to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992. FFTF is located on the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The 400-MWt sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission test reactor was designed specifically to irradiate Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) fuel and components in prototypical temperature and flux conditions. FFTF played a key role in LMFBR development and testing activities. The reactor provided extensive capability for in-core irradiation testing, including eight core positions that could be used with independent instrumentation for the test specimens. In addition to irradiation testing capabilities, FFTF provided long-term testing and evaluation of plant components and systems for LMFBRs. The FFTF was highly successful and demonstrated outstanding performance during its nearly 10 years of operation. The technology employed in designing and constructing this reactor, as well as information obtained from tests conducted during its operation, can significantly influence the development of new advanced reactor designs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, fuel design and performance, prototype testing, site construction, and reactor operations. The FFTF complex included the reactor, as well as equipment and structures for heat removal, containment, core component handling and examination, instrumentation and control, and for supplying utilities and other essential services. The FFTF Plant was designed using a “system” concept. All drawings, specifications and other engineering documentation were organized by these systems. Efforts have been made to preserve important lessons learned during the nearly 10 years of reactor operation. A brief summary of Lessons Learned in the following areas will be discussed: Acceptance and Startup Testing of FFTF FFTF Cycle Reports

  5. Human Factors Lessons Learned on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances E.

    2006-01-01

    Experience on International Space Station (ISS) provides many important lessons for future space flight. NASA human factors engineers have been systematically collecting lessons learned from crew debriefs, as well as working with ground support teams to continuously improve crew operations. This paper describes the methods for collecting data from debriefs, lessons learned through that process, and an example of a technology development task funded through the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) program element in response to an identified operational need. Each ISS increment crew spends many hours after the flight answering questions from the various subsystem leads. The Flight Crew Integration subsystem lead asks questions specific to human factors and habitability issues. In addition, crew comments on many other subsystems provide insight into interface designs, operability and maintainability. The debrief comments are unique to each crew, and must be categorized to provide operational lessons learned. Personal identifiers are removed and comments aggregated to separate consistent issues from personal preferences. Examples will be given, and the procedure for incorporating the lessons into requirements and guidelines for the next human space vehicle will be described. In flight, very few astronauts are medical doctors. Written medical procedures during flight need to be easy to follow and quick to understand. The problem was analyzed as part of a SHFE task. Organization was analyzed and reorganizations were created and tested. Results will be reported. The ISS is a very important analog for planning future long-term missions. Collection of data from debriefs, studying the lessons learned and focusing on requirements for future missions are examples of the accomplishments through the SHFE program.

  6. Sociology: Learning lessons on carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, David

    2011-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage demonstration projects are focused on learning about technologies through conventional 'learning by doing'. Analysis of three case studies indicates that including other types of learning could bring significant rewards.

  7. AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned Daniel F. Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA...rocket propulsion technologies, the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) Propulsion Directorate (RZ- West), located at EAFB routinely manufactures, tests...Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, Edwards AFB 2010 DDESB Seminar Portland, OR 13-15

  8. Learning Style Responses to an Online Soil Erosion Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamo, Martha; Kettler, Timothy; Hussman, Dann

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate responses from students with different learning styles to the use of computer technology as a supplemental tool in teaching soil erosion concepts. The online lesson utilized photographs, illustrations, animations, and an interactive model that allowed students to manipulate factors influencing soil erosion. Students…

  9. Lessons Learned About Providing Laptops for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifaz, Alejandra; Zucker, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    As a way of helping states and districts interested in laptop initiatives, the Northeast and the Islands Regional Technology in Education Consortium (NEIRTEC) has reviewed lessons learned to date from many laptop initiatives around the country and has prepared this guide. Drawn from articles and reports about current and past programs (see…

  10. Writing Learning Outcomes for English Language Lessons in Multilingual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogic innovation in teacher education by articulating a method for writing learning outcomes for English language lessons in multilingual school contexts. The argument for this approach is founded on curriculum studies; however, the practice also draws specifically on applied psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic…

  11. Participatory Action Research: Lessons Learned with Aboriginal Grandmothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Geraldine; Green, Kathryn L.

    2001-01-01

    Twelve older Aboriginal women in a Canadian city were trained to be co-researchers as part of a participatory health assessment and health promotion project involving 40 such women. Lessons were learned about project ownership, Native perceptions of research, use of traditions, participants' capacity to engage in research and analysis, conflict…

  12. My Time as a Professor in Residence: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Josephine Peyton

    2013-01-01

    This commentary is based on two of the lessons the author learned as the professor in residence at ASU Preparatory Academy-Phoenix (ASU Prep), a Title I school operated in partnership with the Phoenix Elementary School District. Her role as a university professor on special assignment as a literacy coach, staff developer, and co-researcher. The…

  13. Sinclair Community College Fast Forward Center-Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, David L., II

    2011-01-01

    Many journal articles provide success stories of initiatives or programs. However, few outline the lessons learned in the building of those programs that may be beneficial to any reader who is interested in duplicating a similar initiative. Thus, the purpose of this article is threefold. The first section will provide the reader with history of…

  14. Graph analytics-lessons learned and challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Pak Chung Wong; Chaomei Chen; Gorg, C; Shneiderman, B; Stasko, J; Thomas, J

    2011-01-01

    Lessons learned from developing four graph analytics applications reveal good research practices and grand challenges for future research. The application domains include electric-power-grid analytics, social-network and citation analytics, text and document analytics, and knowledge domain analytics.

  15. Transforming Effective Army Units: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Lessons Learned (CALL), EBSCOhost (e.g., PsycINFO, 5 ERIC, and Military & Government Collection), ARI, Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC...Each session provided two to three challenges for a total of 29 challenges. These were entered into an Excel database and analyzed using descriptive

  16. Circulating Laptops: Lessons Learned in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Laptops have become ubiquitous in academic libraries, as has the practice of circulating laptops for student use. Several studies have analyzed the how-to of loaning laptops, and a number of surveys have focused on how they are being used. However, little has been written of the practical lessons learned; the trial and error of those on the…

  17. AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-19

    AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned Daniel F. Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory ...9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS...provide the United States Air Force with advanced rocket propulsion technologies, the Air Force Research

  18. Issues in Violent Risk Assessment: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroner, Daryl G.

    2005-01-01

    Realizing that the assessment of dangerousness with a yes/no format as a poor form of violent risk assessment has been the most important lesson learned about violence in the last 20 years. Further examining (a) what outcome and (b) how the indicators of the outcome should be measured has resulted in better violent risk assessment. The most…

  19. Military First Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    capable of providing information to 48 George Cloutier, "U-2 Aids in Katrina Relief," Air Force Link, http://www.af.mil. 49 Mark Haviland , "After Katrina... Haviland , Mark. "After Katrina: ACC’s Intel Team Applies Lessons Learned." Air Combat Command Public Affairs, http://www.af.mil (accessed 11 November

  20. Lessons Learned from a Tiered Service Delivery Implementation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Evelyn S.; Pool, Juli L.; Carter, Deborah R.

    2012-01-01

    Tiered models of service delivery for both academics and behavior are being increasingly adopted across the nation, and discussions of how to implement these models effectively and simultaneously are growing. In this article, the authors share some lessons learned from a 2-year implementation project to implement a comprehensive (both academic and…

  1. Lessons Learned? School Leadership and Curriculum Reform in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tong, Siu Yin Annie

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the processes of implementing curriculum reform in schools. Specifically, it investigates how schools learn lessons from previous experiences of reform and apply them when challenged by new reforms. The context for this study is Hong Kong's New Secondary School Curriculum (NSSC), with particular reference to the subject of…

  2. Helios Prototype Vehicle Mishap: Technical Findings, Recommendations, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelFrate, John

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the findings of the "Investigation of the Helios Prototype Aircraft Mishap." The presentation examines the background of the Helios project, a description of the mishap, observations concerning the mishap and analysis results, proximate and root causes and technical recommendations and lessons learned.

  3. Lessons Learned from the Analysis of Ingredients in Dietary Supplements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lessons learned and findings from the analysis of caffeine in dietary supplements and the analysis of vitamins and minerals in adult multivitamin products will be included in this discussion. Fifty-four dietary supplement products for weight loss or sports performance listing at least caffeine-cont...

  4. Implementation of the Generic Safety Analysis Report - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-06-02

    The Savannah River Site has completed the development, review and approval process for the Generic Safety Analysis Report (GSAR) and implemented this information in facility SARs and BIOs. This includes the yearly revision of the GSAR and the facility-specific SARs. The process has provided us with several lessons learned.

  5. Change in Chaos: Seven Lessons Learned from Katrina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr-Chellman, Alison A.; Beabout, Brian; Alkandari, Khaled A.; Almeida, Luis C.; Gursoy, Husra T.; Ma, Ziyan; Modak, Rucha S.; Pastore, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses seven lessons learned from Katrina, suggesting that after chaos: (1) there is hope; (2) there is a strong atmosphere of indeterminacy; (3) things tend to break apart and reform in somewhat similar ways but with different values; (4) there is a desire for organization, leadership, and familiarity; (5) there is a sense of…

  6. Qualification and Lessons Learned with Space Flight Fiber Optic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    This presentation covers lessons learned during the design, development, manufacturing and qualification of space flight fiber optic components. Changes at NASA, including short-term projects and decreased budgets have brought about changes to vendors and parts. Most photonics for NASA needs are now commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. The COTS Tecnology Assurance approach for space flight and qualification plans are outlined.

  7. Authentic Leadership: Lessons Learned on the Journey to Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Cecelia

    2004-01-01

    The author offers lessons learned from three related initiatives of the Wheelock College Institute for Leadership and Career Initiatives from 1997 to 2003 that aimed to promote authentic early care and education leadership by people who came from the community and who hold the same values as the population being served: "Taking the Lead",…

  8. Lessons learned from Hurricane Mitch: a guide for holistic practice.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Josie A; Holcomb, Lygia; Crigger, Nancy J

    2006-01-01

    Hurricanes are often devastating for the victims. Although millions of dollars and hours are invested, relief efforts could be more effective. The purpose of this article is to utilize the lessons learned from Hurricane Mitch as a guide for holistic practice in both hurricane preparation and response planning.

  9. Forum, Thoughts to Share: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Beth V.

    2011-01-01

    During the author's second year of teaching seventh- through 12th-grade art, she read a brief article by Elliot Eisner on the NAEA website, "10 Lessons the Arts Teach." Eisner is a noted proponent on the development of the arts as an integral part of an overall curriculum. It is his advocacy that has made modern art education a content-oriented…

  10. Jackie Steals Home. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulda, Arnold

    In this lesson, students draw on their previous studies of American history and culture as they analyze primary sources from "Jackie Robinson and Other Baseball Highlights, 1860s-1960s" in the American Memory collection. A close reading of two documents relating to Jackie Robinson's breaking of the racial barrier in professional baseball…

  11. Twain's "Hannibal." Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jan; Thiese, Norma

    Writers are influenced by their environment including family, community, lifestyle, or location. One such writer was Mark Twain. With this lesson plan the learner will become familiar with and analyze life around Mark Twain's hometown, Hannibal, Missouri, during the latter half of the 19th century by using various online and print resources to…

  12. Teaching about Terrorism: Lessons Learned at SWOTT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Gregory D.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses some of the challenges and lessons for teaching undergraduate-level courses related to terrorism. The author outlines some of the primary issues that instructors can expect to face, and provides strategies for dealing with several of these challenges. The goal is to relay useful information to those teaching, or planning to…

  13. Lessons Learned from a Consultation Process Overseas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merino-Soto, César

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary I discuss three international school consultation experiences, highlighting aspects that serve as lessons for professional development and the implementation of effective and helpful strategies that meet the needs of children and youth in school systems. Relationships developed and maintained between the consulting teams and the…

  14. Effective Broader Impacts - Lessons Learned by the Ocean Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G.

    2014-12-01

    Effective broader impact activities have the potential for scientists to engage with educators, students, and the public in meaningful ways that lead to increased scientific literacy. These interactions provide opportunities for the results and discoveries of federally funded research projects, along with their implications for society, to reach non-scientist audiences. This is especially important for climate, ocean, and environmental science research that will aid citizens in better understanding how they affect Earth's systems and how these systems affect their daily lives. The National Centers for Ocean Sciences Excellence (COSEE) Network has over 12 years of experience in conducting successful broader impact activities and has provided thousands of ocean scientists the opportunity to share the fruits of their research well beyond the scientific enterprise. COSEE evaluators and principal investigators collaborated over several years to determine the impacts of COSEE broader impact activities and to identify best practices. The lessons learned by the ocean science community can help to inform other disciplines. Fruitful broader impact activities require key elements, no matter the composition of the audience. For example, a high degree of success can be achieved when a "bridge builder" facilitates the interactions between scientists and non-science audiences. This presentation will offer other examples of best practices and successful strategies for engaging scientists in broader impact activities, increasing societal impacts of scientific research, and providing opportunities for collaboration on a national scale. http://www.cosee.net

  15. Building an internationalized content delivery architecture: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Brutlag, Pauline; Dev, Parvati; Podchiyska, Tanya

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, small development teams are building internationalized architectures for delivering large amounts of content. The AIM e-Learning project is one such example: in 2 years, 4 people built a system which currently delivers the print equivalent of 1500 pages of text, in 4 languages, to users in over 140 countries world wide. Here we discuss the lessons we have learned through development, including issues surrounding staffing, process, technologies and next steps.

  16. Flipped Learning, MOOCs and Learning Analytics: Lessons learnt from a Web Map Design course redesign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treves, R.

    2013-12-01

    Five weeks content of a 12 week course in web map design were converted to 'flipped learning': Lecture sessions were replaced by online short video lectures and multiple choice questions to be completed outside class. Class time was taken up with activities and exercises linked to the online learning. Students use of the online content was carefully tracked and detailed student feedback gathered. The response from students was good, 90% of them completed all the out of class activities and their feedback was very positive. The format has the advantage of being easily repurposed as a MOOC or scaled up in other ways. Lessons learnt from the implementation of the materials and the analysis of the VLE logs will be discussed as will ongoing efforts to reuse the materials in a MOOC.

  17. Art & Music Appreciation. A to Z Active Learning Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forte, Imogene; Schurr, Sandra

    This workbook includes high-interest activities, lessons, and projects to further students' interest in and understanding of important exploratory and enrichment topics essential to a balanced middle grades program. The workbook includes lessons and activities that encourage students to learn more about the arts. Instructional strategies are…

  18. Plastics in Our Environment: A Jigsaw Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Elaine; Wallace, Mary Ann; Lee, Wen-Yee

    2009-01-01

    In this lesson, a ready-to-teach cooperative reading activity, students learn about the effects of plastics in our environment, specifically that certain petrochemicals act as artificial estrogens and impact hormonal activities. Much of the content in this lesson was synthesized from recent medical research about the impact of xenoestrogens and…

  19. On the Evolution of a Lesson: Group Preparation for Teaching Contest as Teacher Professional Development Activity for Chinese Elementary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Xiaowei; Shao, Faxian

    2014-01-01

    Group preparation for teaching contest, or lesson polishing, is a teacher professional development activity unique to China. Through participant observation and discourse analysis of a typical case, this study explores how a science lesson evolved through lesson-polishing process and how such process influenced individual learning and the…

  20. Algebraic Activities Aid Discovery Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace-Gomez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    After a unit on the rules for positive and negative numbers and the order of operations for evaluating algebraic expressions, many students believe that they understand these principles well enough, but they really do not. They clearly need more practice, but not more of the same kind of drill. Wallace-Gomez provides three graphing activities that…

  1. Lessons Learned from the NREL Village Power Program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.

    1998-07-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NRELs recent experiences and lessons learned.

  2. Lessons learned from the NREL village power program

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.W.

    1998-09-01

    Renewable energy solutions for village power applications can be economical, functional, and sustainable. Pilot projects are an appropriate step in the development of a commercially viable market for rural renewable energy solutions. Moreover, there are a significant number of rural electrification projects under way that employ various technologies, delivery mechanisms, and financing arrangements. These projects, if properly evaluated, communicated, and their lessons incorporated in future projects and programs, can lead the way to a future that includes a robust opportunity for cost-effective, renewable-based village power systems. This paper summarizes some of NREL`s recent experiences and lessons learned.

  3. Lessons We Learned Designing and Building the Chandra Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenberg, Jonathan; Matthews, Gary; Atkinson, C.; Cohen, L.; Golisano, C.; Havey, K.; Hefner, K.; Jones, C.; Kegley, J.; Knollenberg, P.; Lavoie, T.; Oliver, J.; Plucinsky, P.; Tananbaun, H.; Texter, S.; Weisskopf, M.

    2014-01-01

    2014 marks the crystal (15th) anniversary of the launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This paper offers some of the major lessons learned by some of the key members of the Chandra Telescope team. We offer some of the lessons gleaned from our experiences developing, designing, building and testing the telescope and its subsystems, with 15 years of hindsight. Among the topics to be discussed are the early developmental tests, known as VETA-I and VETA-II, requirements derivation, the impact of late requirements and reflection on the conservatism in the design process.

  4. Tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project: Progress and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Hansmire, W.H.; Rogers, D.J.; Wightman, W.D.

    1996-06-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is the US`s effort to confirm the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high-level nuclear waste. A key part of the site characterization project is the construction of a 7.8-km-long, 7.6-m-diameter tunnel for in-depth geologic and other scientific investigations. The work is governed in varying degrees by the special requirements for nuclear quality assurance, which imposes uncommon and often stringent limitations on the materials which can be used in construction, the tunneling methods and procedures used, and record-keeping for many activities. This paper presents the current status of what has been learned, how construction has adapted to meet the requirements, and how the requirements were interpreted in a mitigating way to meet the legal obligations, yet build the tunnel as rapidly as possible. With regard to design methodologies and the realities of tunnel construction, ground support with a shielded Tunnel Boring Machine is discussed. Notable lessons learned include the need for broad design analyses for a wide variety of conditions and how construction procedures affect ground support.

  5. Global polio eradication initiative: lessons learned and legacy.

    PubMed

    Cochi, Stephen L; Freeman, Andrew; Guirguis, Sherine; Jafari, Hamid; Aylward, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    The world is on the verge of achieving global polio eradication. During >25 years of operations, the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has mobilized and trained millions of volunteers, social mobilizers, and health workers; accessed households untouched by other health initiatives; mapped and brought health interventions to chronically neglected and underserved communities; and established a standardized, real-time global surveillance and response capacity. It is important to document the lessons learned from polio eradication, especially because it is one of the largest ever global health initiatives. The health community has an obligation to ensure that these lessons and the knowledge generated are shared and contribute to real, sustained changes in our approach to global health. We have summarized what we believe are 10 leading lessons learned from the polio eradication initiative. We have the opportunity and obligation to build a better future by applying the lessons learned from GPEI and its infrastructure and unique functions to other global health priorities and initiatives. In so doing, we can extend the global public good gained by ending for all time one of the world's most devastating diseases by also ensuring that these investments provide public health dividends and benefits for years to come.

  6. Lessons in Community Health Activism

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study employed historical methodologies to explore the means through which the Maternity Care Coalition used grassroots activism to dismantle the power structures and other obstacles that contributed to high infant mortality rates in Philadelphia’s health districts 5 and 6 during the 1980s. Infant mortality within the black community has been a persistent phenomenon in the United States. Refusing to accept poverty as a major determinant of infant mortality within marginalized populations of women, activists during the 1980s harnessed momentum from a postcivil rights context and sought alternative methods toward change and improvement of infant mortality rates. PMID:24892861

  7. Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen; Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Melaina, M. W.; McQueen, S.; Brinch, J.

    2008-07-01

    DOE sponsored the Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons Learned for Hydrogen workshop to understand how lessons from past experiences can inform future efforts to commercialize hydrogen vehicles. This report contains the proceedings from the workshop.

  8. Lift-fan aircraft: Lessons learned-the pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerdes, Ronald M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is written from an engineering test pilot's point of view. Its purpose is to present lift-fan 'lessons learned' from the perspective of first-hand experience accumulated during the period 1962 through 1988 while flight testing vertical/short take-off and landing (V/STOL) experimental aircraft and evaluating piloted engineering simulations of promising V/STOL concepts. Specifically, the scope of the discussions to follow is primarily based upon a critical review of the writer's personal accounts of 30 hours of XV-5A/B and 2 hours of X-14A flight testing as well as a limited simulator evaluation of the Grumman Design 755 lift-fan aircraft. Opinions of other test pilots who flew these aircraft and the aircraft simulator are also included and supplement the writer's comments. Furthermore, the lessons learned are presented from the perspective of the writer's flying experience: 10,000 hours in 100 fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft including 330 hours in 5 experimental V/STOL research aircraft. The paper is organized to present to the reader a clear picture of lift-fan lessons learned from three distinct points of view in order to facilitate application of the lesson principles to future designs. Lessons learned are first discussed with respect to case histories of specific flight and simulator investigations. These principles are then organized and restated with respect to four selected design criteria categories in Appendix I. Lastly, Appendix Il is a discussion of the design of a hypothetical supersonic short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) fighter/attack aircraft.

  9. Capturing flight system test engineering expertise: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, Irene Wong

    1991-01-01

    Within a few years, JPL will be challenged by the most active mission set in history. Concurrently, flight systems are increasingly more complex. Presently, the knowledge to conduct integration and test of spacecraft and large instruments is held by a few key people, each with many years of experience. JPL is in danger of losing a significant amount of this critical expertise, through retirement, during a period when demand for this expertise is rapidly increasing. The most critical issue at hand is to collect and retain this expertise and develop tools that would ensure the ability to successfully perform the integration and test of future spacecraft and large instruments. The proposed solution was to capture and codity a subset of existing knowledge, and to utilize this captured expertise in knowledge-based systems. First year results and activities planned for the second year of this on-going effort are described. Topics discussed include lessons learned in knowledge acquisition and elicitation techniques, life-cycle paradigms, and rapid prototyping of a knowledge-based advisor (Spacecraft Test Assistant) and a hypermedia browser (Test Engineering Browser). The prototype Spacecraft Test Assistant supports a subset of integration and test activities for flight systems. Browser is a hypermedia tool that allows users easy perusal of spacecraft test topics. A knowledge acquisition tool called ConceptFinder which was developed to search through large volumes of data for related concepts is also described and is modified to semi-automate the process of creating hypertext links.

  10. Challenges and Lessons Learned From a Prevention Research Center Partnership.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Lesley; Northrup, Karen; Wittberg, Richard

    2017-03-01

    For more than a decade, the West Virginia Prevention Research Center, Mid-Ohio Valley Health Department, and the Wood County Schools have built and sustained a partnership to reduce health disparities and promote population health. Specifically, this partnership has contributed significantly to the peer-reviewed literature on children's physical activity, fitness, and academic achievement, as well as identifying possible areas for physical activity interventions (within the school and community settings) that would improve health and academic outcomes. This case study describes the partnership among a University Prevention Research Center, a local health department, and a local school system. In the description of the partnership, this paper sequentially explores characteristics of the partnership that were advantageous or challenging over time. It details the interface among state and local partner interest, resources, and goals all directed toward enhancing children's physical activity, fitness, cardiovascular risk, and academic improvement. The paper concludes with lessons learned that may contribute to the science and practice of multilevel collaborations in child health.

  11. Communication and Collaboration During Natural Disasters: The Lessons Learned From Past Experience. Lessons Learned From School Crises and Emergencies, Volume 3, Issue 2, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on the response and recovery efforts to wildfires by the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) and its school and community partners. Natural disasters such as floods,…

  12. Unintended Learning in Primary School Practical Science Lessons from Polanyi's Perspective of Intellectual Passion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Song, Jinwoong; Abrahams, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This study explored, from the perspective of intellectual passion developed by Michael Polanyi, the unintended learning that occurred in primary practical science lessons. We use the term `unintended' learning to distinguish it from `intended' learning that appears in teachers' learning objectives. Data were collected using video and audio recordings of a sample of twenty-four whole class practical science lessons, taught by five teachers, in Korean primary schools with 10- to 12-year-old students. In addition, video and audio recordings were made for each small group of students working together in order to capture their activities and intra-group discourse. Pre-lesson interviews with the teachers were undertaken and audio-recorded to ascertain their intended learning objectives. Selected key vignettes, including unintended learning, were analysed from the perspective of intellectual passion developed by Polanyi. What we found in this study is that unintended learning could occur when students got interested in something in the first place and could maintain their interest. In addition, students could get conceptual knowledge when they tried to connect their experience to their related prior knowledge. It was also found that the processes of intended learning and of unintended learning were different. Intended learning was characterized by having been planned by the teacher who then sought to generate students' interest in it. In contrast, unintended learning originated from students' spontaneous interest and curiosity as a result of unplanned opportunities. Whilst teachers' persuasive passion comes first in the process of intended learning, students' heuristic passion comes first in the process of unintended learning. Based on these findings, we argue that teachers need to be more aware that unintended learning, on the part of individual students, can occur during their lesson and to be able to better use this opportunity so that this unintended learning can be

  13. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration (SAFER): Development, implementation, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, J.D.; Amaya, J.P.

    1994-05-01

    This report reviews the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) effort during FY 1992, FY 1993, and the first quarter of FY 1994. The report comprises three sections: Introduction, Activities Summary, and Lessons Learned and Related Activities. This section provides context for the report by briefly reviewing the development of SAFER and its operational assumptions. Section 2 describes SAFER workshops and site-specific SAFER implementation support. Additionally, Section 2 provides an update on the status of sites that initially received support from either Observational Approach or SAFER teams and subsequently implemented either of these two related approaches to site restoration streamlining. Section 3 describes lessons learned and upcoming SAFER activities.

  14. Safety and Mission Assurance for In-House Design Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.

    2011-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation identifies lessons learned in the course of the Ares I Upper Stage design and in-house development effort. The contents include: 1) Constellation Organization; 2) Upper Stage Organization; 3) Presentation Structure; 4) Lesson-Importance of Systems Engineering/Integration; 5) Lesson-Importance of Early S&MA Involvement; 6) Lesson-Importance of Appropriate Staffing Levels; 7) Lesson-Importance S&MA Team Deployment; 8) Lesson-Understanding of S&MA In-Line Engineering versus Assurance; 9) Lesson-Importance of Close Coordination between Supportability and Reliability/Maintainability; 10) Lesson-Importance of Engineering Data Systems; 11) Lesson-Importance of Early Development of Supporting Databases; 12) Lesson-Importance of Coordination with Safety Assessment/Review Panels; 13) Lesson-Implementation of Software Reliability; 14) Lesson-Implementation of S&MA Technical Authority/Chief S&MA Officer; 15) Lesson-Importance of S&MA Evaluation of Project Risks; 16) Lesson-Implementation of Critical Items List and Government Mandatory Inspections; 17) Lesson-Implementation of Critical Items List Mandatory Inspections; 18) Lesson-Implementation of Test Article Safety Analysis; and 19) Lesson-Importance of Procurement Quality.

  15. Food based dietary guidelines in Vietnam: progress and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Hop, Le Thi; Van, Tran Khanh; Thanh, Hoang Kim

    2011-01-01

    The food based dietary guidelines (FBDGs) is a crucial tool for nutrition education and communication in Vietnam. Together with the changes of socio-economic situation, Vietnam needs to deal with different nutritional problems including malnutrition, overweight and undiversified diets at the same time. From 1995 to the present, three versions of FBDGs have been developed and revised in a period of every 5 years. The FBDGs, Food Guide Pyramid and Food Square made a good set of nutritional education tool which were disseminated through a wide range of activities and communication channels. The evaluation of FBDGs will be carried out before its revisions to reflect eating patterns and lifestyles of consumers whom the nutritional education programs wish to reach. In developing countries like Vietnam, the socio-economic situation is changing over short period of time. Therefore, the assessment of appropriateness and implementation progress of the FBDGs is necessary and should be done after a period of every 5 or 10 years. The implementation of the FBDGs should be closely connected with the activities of the National Plan for Nutrition and should have involvement from multi-sectoral organizations. Training, monitoring and evaluation for implementation of the FBDGs are essential for the success of guiding consumers to convert advices into action. The lessons learned from previous FBDGs' implementation can be used to develop a new version of FBDGs that is more appropriate.

  16. Lessons Learned and Lessons To Be Learned: An Overview of Innovative Network Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Michael J.; Jacobson, Phoebe Chen

    This paper provides an overview of five innovative projects involving network learning technologies in the United States: (1) the MicroObservatory Internet Telescope is a collection of small, high-quality, and low-maintenance telescopes operated by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Massachusetts), which may be used remotely via the…

  17. Lessons Learned Implementing Multi-Mission Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the software and its uses to provide context for its criticality. The different approaches that have been taken to implement the software in a multi-mission format will be outlined. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the lessons learned during development and maintenance of these different architectures will be discussed, Finally. the use of multi-mission software in operations and the lessons learned from using it will be discussed.This paper will provide valuable information to organizations exploring the use of multi-mission software. regardless of whether the change is to minimize spacecraft ground software development time or cost reduction. Similarly. the paper will provide insight into some of the steps that can be taken during software development and operational use that will minimize difficulty later.

  18. Safety Assurances at Space Test Centres: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Ruiz, Raul; O'Neil, Sean; Valls, Rafel Prades

    2010-09-01

    The European Space Agency’s(ESA) experts in quality, cleanliness and contamination control, safety, test facilities and test methods have accumulated valuable experience during the performance of dedicated audits of space test centres in Europe over a period of 10 years. This paper is limited to a summary of the safety findings and provides a valuable reference to the lessons learned, identifying opportunities for improvement in the areas of risk prevention measures associated to the safety of all test centre personnel, the test specimen, the test facilities and associated infrastructure. Through the analysis of the audit results the authors present what are the main lessons learned, and conclude how an effective safety management system will contribute to successful test campaigns and have a positive impact on the cost and schedule of space projects.

  19. LESSONS LEARNED Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition (Summer 2013)

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, Christine F.; Henry, Michael J.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2014-01-14

    The purpose of the lessons learned document for the BEOWulf Biosurveillance Mobile App Development Intern Competition is to capture the project’s lessons learned in a formal document for use by other project managers on similar future projects. This document may be used as part of new project planning for similar projects in order to determine what problems occurred and how those problems were handled and may be avoided in the future. Additionally, this document details what went well with the project and why, so that other project managers may capitalize on these actions. Project managers may also use this document to determine who the project team members were in order to solicit feedback for planning their projects in the future. This document will be formally communicated with the organization and will become a part of the organizational assets and archives.

  20. Ares I-X Thermal Model Correlation and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    The Ares I-X vehicle launched and flew successfully on October 28, 2009. This paper will describe the correlation of the vehicle thermal model to both ground testing and flight data. A main purpose of the vehicle model and ground testing was to ensure that the avionics within the vehicle were held within their thermal limits prior to launch and during flight. The correlation of the avionics box temperatures will be shown. Also, the lessons learned in the thermal discipline during the modeling, test, correlation to test, and flight of the Ares I-X flight test vehicle will be described. Lessons learned will cover thermal modeling, as well as management of the thermal discipline, thermal team, and thermal-related actions in design, testing, and flight.

  1. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  2. Distance Learning: Lessons from the Early Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of distance education. Topics include land grant colleges and agricultural extension efforts; the use of radio and television for learning; use of the Web; lifelong learning needs fueled by a changing job market; infrastructure and user support; the role of faculty; and student responsibility. (LRW)

  3. Learning in Plants: Lessons from Mimosa pudica

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Charles I.; Chicas-Mosier, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the early Mimosa pudica literature; much of which is in journals not easily accessible to the reader. In contrast to the contemporary plant learning literature which is conducted primarily by plant biologists, this early literature was conducted by comparative psychologists whose goal was to search for the generality of learning phenomena such as habituation, and classical conditioning using experimental designs based on animal conditioning studies. In addition to reviewing the early literature, we hope to encourage collaborations between plant biologists and comparative psychologists by familiarizing the reader with issues in the study of learning faced by those working with animals. These issues include no consistent definition of learning phenomena and an overreliance on the use of cognition. We suggested that greater collaborative efforts be made between plant biologists and comparative psychologists if the study of plant learning is to be fully intergraded into the mainstream behavior theory. PMID:27065905

  4. Learning lessons from natural disasters - sectorial or holistic perspectives?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Blumenthal, B.; Nyberg, L.

    2009-04-01

    Lessons learning from systematic analyses of past natural disasters is of great importance for future risk reduction and vulnerability management. It is one crucial piece of a puzzle towards disaster resilient societies, together with e.g. models of future emerging climate-related risks, globalization or demographic changes. Systematic analyses of impact and management of past events have commonly been produced in many sectors, but the knowledge is seldom shared outside the own organization or produced for other actors. To increase the availability of reports and documents, the Swedish Rescue Services Agency has created the Swedish Natural Hazards Information System, in accordance with a government commission from 2005. The system gathers accident reports, investigations and in-depth analyses, together with societal additional costs and mappings of consequences from central and local governments, NGO's and private actors. Evaluation of the collection reveals large differences in quality, systematic approach, depth and extent, clearly consistent with the lack of coherent harmonization of investigation and reporting approaches. Type of hazard, degree of impact and time elapsed since present are decisive for the collected volume. LPHC (low probability high consequences) disasters usually comprise most data and analytical activities, since they often are met with surprise and highlight the failure to integrate resilience into normal societal planning. During the last 50 years, several LPHC events in Sweden have functioned as alarm clocks and entailed major changes and improvements in government policies or legislations, safety management systems, risk assessments, response training, stakeholder communication, etc. Such an event occurred in January 2005 when Northern Europe was confronted with one of the most severe storms in modern history. Accidents that caused 24 fatalities occurred (17 in Sweden), several regions in UK and Germany were flooded and extensive areas of

  5. Incorporating Lessons Learned into the Army Competency Assessment Prototype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Drills In September 2003, the new Army Chief of Staff ( ACOS ) initiated a review of Soldier preparation for the War on Terrorism. One of his concerns was...was the directive of the ACOS that the Warrior Tasks and Battle Drills be tasked to all Soldiers, it should be noted that as official policy, training...training publications (STP), training support packages ( TSP ), tactics, techniques and procedures (TTP), and lessons learned (LL). 10. Know the

  6. Lessons learned from modal testing of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, David L.; Brillhart, Ralph D.

    1993-02-01

    The primary factors affecting the accuracy and the time required to perform modal tests on aerospace structures are discussed, and the lessons learned from modal tests performed over the past 15 yrs are examined. Case histories of modal testing on aerospace structures are reviewed, including the Galileo satellite and the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor and test stand. Currently recommended approaches to the modal testing are addressed.

  7. Evaluation of a potential nuclear fuel repository criticality: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Evans, D.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the potential for a criticality in a repository containing spent nuclear fuel with high enriched uranium. The insights gained consisted of remarkably detailed conclusions about design issues, failure mechanisms, frequencies and source terms for events up to 10,000 years in the future. Also discussed are the approaches taken by the analysts in presenting this very technical report to a nontechnical and possibly antagonistic audience.

  8. Chandra monitoring and trends analysis: status and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzbart, Bradley D.; Wolk, Scott J.; Isobe, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory was launched in July, 1999 and has yielded extraordinary scientific results. Behind the scenes, our Monitoring and Trends Analysis (MTA) approach has proven to be a valuable resource in providing telescope diagnostic information and analysis of scientific data to access Observatory performance. We have created and maintain real-time monitoring and long-term trending tools. This paper will update our 2002 SPIE paper on the design of the system and discuss lessons learned.

  9. Resuscitation of combat casualties: unique challenges and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Marshall, William B

    2010-01-01

    Resuscitation and trauma anesthesia of combat casualties is very similar to trauma care in any US hospital--except for the setting. Using case examples, this article describes the principles of trauma anesthesia and resuscitation and the lessons learned regarding the modifications required when caring for a combat casualty. Examples of a massive trauma resuscitation (>10 units of packed red blood cells in 24 hours) and burn resuscitation are presented.

  10. Lessons Learned from Experiments Conducted on Radar Data Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Element Number I Project No. Task -- Work Unit Accession No. 11 Title (Include Security Classification) LESSONS LEARNED FROM EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED ON...firmly established, an analysis of the experiment can be conducted. The experimental plan and report will be analyzed in Chapter III . 16 III . ANALYSIS...equipped with an ATS and when not, are expected. However, whether or not the ATS eliminates valid air targets remains to be seen. 23 iii 4) :4 I... U C

  11. Environmental effects consideration: A case study - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, William W.; Anderson, B. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance for serious consideration of environmental effects and associated risks by management early in the development cycle of a facility. A case study on the Space Shuttle provides information with regard to some of the environmental effects issues encountered and the lesson learned. The importance of early management action to enable the acceptance of known environmental risks, or to make program adjustments to avoid their potential consequences, is emphasized.

  12. Officer Performance Evaluation Systems. Lessons Learned from Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    halting inflation, renewing the importance of the OER in the selection program and improving feedback to officers, were not enough to overcome the...appraisal": In many organizations, supervisors report that they hold p>eriodic appraisal interviews and give honest feedback , while their subordin- ates...OJEaNo 521.80^ 521.806 ’r631 WOMuMnMO ?J;?5^^ PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEMS: LESSONS LEARNED FROM EXPERI- ENCE W ^RSONAL AUTXORlSl Larson

  13. Mobile clinics in Haiti, part 2: Lessons learned through service.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M; Cone, Pamela H

    2016-11-01

    Learning from experience is a positive approach when preparing for mobile clinic service in a developing country. Mobile clinics provide healthcare services to people in hard to reach areas around the world, but preparation for their use needs to be done in collaboration with local leaders and healthcare providers. For over 16 years, Azusa Pacific University School of Nursing has sponsored mobile clinics to rural northern Haiti with the aim to provide culturally sensitive healthcare in collaboration with Haitian leaders. Past Haiti mobile clinic experiences have informed the APU-SON approach on best practices in study abroad, service-learning, and mission trips providing healthcare services. Hopefully, lessons learned from these experiences with mobile clinic service-learning opportunities in Haiti will benefit others who seek to plan study abroad service-learning trips for students in healthcare majors who desire to serve the underserved around the world.

  14. Learning Cycle Model of a Science Lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, Jim; Nelson, Jane

    2006-09-01

    Editor's note: One of the goals of AAPT is to provide support and encouragement to those new to teaching physics by sharing ideas that experienced physics teachers have found helpful. I hope you will look to this column throughout the year to find help with lesson planning, ideas for classroom management, and opportunities for professional growth. This month's contributing authors, Jane and Jim Nelson, are award-winning physics teachers with years of experience in the classroom, conducting PTRA workshops, and serving as leaders for local, state, and national AAPT organizations. Their contributions to physics teaching are much too numerous to list here, but their joy in sharing ideas with you is typical of the support you will find from AAPT.

  15. Propulsion Ground Testing with High Test Peroxide: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Robert; Taylor, Gary; Taliancich, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Propulsion Ground Testing with High Test Peroxide (85 to 98% concentration) began at the NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in calendar year 1998, when the E3 Test Facility was modified to accomodate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to suport the research and development testing of the USAF Upper Stage Flight Experiment rocket engine. Since that time, efforts have continued to provide actual and planned test services to various customers, both U.S. Government and Commercial, in the ground test of many test articles, ranging from gas generators, to catalyst beds, to turbomachinery, to main injectors, to combustion chambers, to integrated rocket engines, to integrated stages. Along this path, and over the past 4 years, there has been both the rediscovery of previously learned lessons, through literature search, archive review, and personal interviews, as well as the learning of many new lessons as new areas are explored and new endeavors are tried. This paper will summarize those lessons learned in an effort to broaden the knowledge base as High Test Peroxide is considered more widely for use in rocket propulsion applications.

  16. Reflections on Designing a MPA Service-Learning Component: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Alexandru V.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the "lessons learned" from the experience of redesigning two sections (face-to-face and online) of a core master of public administration class as a service-learning course. The suggestions made here can be traced to the entire process of the project, from the "seed idea" through its conceptualization and…

  17. Experiential Learning: Lessons Learned from the UND Business and Government Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harsell, Dana Michael; O'Neill, Patrick B.

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe lessons learned from a limited-duration experiential learning component of a Master's level course. The course is open to Master's in Business and Master's in Public Administration students and explores the relationships between government and business. A complete discussion of the Master's in Business and Master's in Public…

  18. Lessons for Community College Leaders in the Development of a Cooperative Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Teng's (2007) article entitled "Lessons Learned from Initiating a Community College Learning Community Program" provided a foundation for community college leaders who are interested in working with faculty in creating a learning community on campus. Teng (2007) listed the five lessons that may be useful guidelines to other colleges who…

  19. Geocuration Lessons Learned from the Climate Data Initiative Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin; Tilmes, Curt; Pinheiro Privette, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Curation is traditionally defined as the process of collecting and organizing information around a common subject matter or a topic of interest and typically occurs in museums, art galleries, and libraries. The task of organizing data around specific topics or themes is a vibrant and growing effort in the biological sciences but to date this effort has not been actively pursued in the Earth sciences. This presentation will introduce the concept of geocuration, which we define it as the act of searching, selecting, and synthesizing Earth science data/metadata and information from across disciplines and repositories into a single, cohesive, and useful compendium. We also present the Climate Data Initiative (CDI) project as an prototypical example. The CDI project is a systematic effort to manually curate and share openly available climate data from various federal agencies. CDI is a broad multi-agency effort of the U.S. government and seeks to leverage the extensive existing federal climate-relevant data to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship to support national climate change preparedness. The geocuration process used in the CDI project, key lessons learned, and suggestions to improve similar geocuration efforts in the future will be part of this presentation.

  20. Lessons learned with ISO 14001 at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C. H., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    ISO 14001 is the international standard for environmental management systems (EMS). The standard applies the `plan, do, check, act` management system model to assure that the environmental impacts of operations are fully considered in planning and facility operations. ISO 14001 has grown in popularity in both the public and the private sector and has seen increasing utility within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). While there is no final DOE policy or requirement for ISO 14001 EMS implementation, ISO 14001 commands an active presence at many DOE sites. In general, the impetus for ISO 14001 in the DOE complex has been either an initiative by site management contractors to improve performance, or an actual requirement in the new management contracts for the sites. Several DOE sites now are committed to implement EMS`s in conformance with ISO 14001: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Hanford, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Kansas City Plant, Nevada Test Site, Savannah River Site (SRS), Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP), West Valley. Several other DOE sites are expected to proceed in the near future with an EMS consistent with ISO 14001. However, not all sites are proceeding with an ISO 14001 EMS based on individual site business considerations. This paper describes the status of EMS implementation at these sites and identifies lessons learned that may be of use to other DOE sites.

  1. Geocuration Lessons Learned from the Climate Data Initiative Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, R.; Bugbee, K.; Tilmes, C.; Privette, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Curation is traditionally defined as the process of collecting and organizing information around a common subject matter or a topic of interest and typically occurs in museums, art galleries, and libraries. The task of organizing data around specific topics or themes is a vibrant and growing effort in the biological sciences but to date this effort has not been actively pursued in the Earth sciences. This presentation will introduce the concept of geocuration, which we define it as the act of searching, selecting, and synthesizing Earth science data/metadata and information from across disciplines and repositories into a single, cohesive, and useful compendium.We also present the Climate Data Initiative (CDI) project as an exemplar example. The CDI project is a systematic effort to manually curate and share openly available climate data from various federal agencies. CDI is a broad multi-agency effort of the U.S. government and seeks to leverage the extensive existing federal climate-relevant data to stimulate innovation and private-sector entrepreneurship to support national climate-change preparedness. The geocuration process used in CDI project, key lessons learned, and suggestions to improve similar geocuration efforts in the future will be part of this presentation.

  2. Synthetic vision system flight test results and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Honeywell Systems and Research Center developed and demonstrated an active 35 GHz Radar Imaging system as part of the FAA/USAF/Industry sponsored Synthetic Vision System Technology Demonstration (SVSTD) Program. The objectives of this presentation are to provide a general overview of flight test results, a system level perspective that encompasses the efforts of the SVSTD and Augmented VIsual Display (AVID) programs, and more importantly, provide the AVID workshop participants with Honeywell's perspective on the lessons that were learned from the SVS flight tests. One objective of the SVSTD program was to explore several known system issues concerning radar imaging technology. The program ultimately resolved some of these issues, left others open, and in fact created several new concerns. In some instances, the interested community has drawn improper conclusions from the program by globally attributing implementation specific issues to radar imaging technology in general. The motivation for this presentation is therefore to provide AVID researchers with a better understanding of the issues that truly remain open, and to identify the perceived issues that are either resolved or were specific to Honeywell's implementation.

  3. Technological learning through international collaboration: Lessons from the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2013-02-01

    Countries on every continent are making new or renewed commitments to domestic satellite programs. These programs have the potential to address national needs by enhancing access to information, improving infrastructure and providing inspiration to the public. How do countries without local expertise in space technology begin a new satellite program? What is the role of international collaboration in supporting the efforts of a new space fairing country? This paper explores such questions by highlighting outputs from intensive field work in Africa and Asia. Specifically, the study explores case studies of early space activity in these countries to search for lessons about the management of a young space program. The observations from field work are compared to ideas from scholarly literature on technological learning. The findings are organized using principles from systems architecture. The paper presents a model that captures many of the influences and strategic decision areas for a collaborative satellite development project. The paper also highlights the growth of capability among African countries in the area of satellite technology.

  4. Launch Vehicle Design Process: Characterization, Technical Integration, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.; Humphries, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    Engineering design is a challenging activity for any product. Since launch vehicles are highly complex and interconnected and have extreme energy densities, their design represents a challenge of the highest order. The purpose of this document is to delineate and clarify the design process associated with the launch vehicle for space flight transportation. The goal is to define and characterize a baseline for the space transportation design process. This baseline can be used as a basis for improving effectiveness and efficiency of the design process. The baseline characterization is achieved via compartmentalization and technical integration of subsystems, design functions, and discipline functions. First, a global design process overview is provided in order to show responsibility, interactions, and connectivity of overall aspects of the design process. Then design essentials are delineated in order to emphasize necessary features of the design process that are sometimes overlooked. Finally the design process characterization is presented. This is accomplished by considering project technical framework, technical integration, process description (technical integration model, subsystem tree, design/discipline planes, decision gates, and tasks), and the design sequence. Also included in the document are a snapshot relating to process improvements, illustrations of the process, a survey of recommendations from experienced practitioners in aerospace, lessons learned, references, and a bibliography.

  5. Implementation of emergency obstetric care training in Bangladesh: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Haque, Yasmin Ali; Waxman, Rachel; Bhuiyan, Abdul Bayes

    2006-05-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health project aimed to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh through provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in the country's district and sub-district hospitals. Human resources development was one of the project's major activities. This paper describes the project in 2000-2004 and lessons learned. Project documents, the training database, reports and training protocols were reviewed. Medical officers, nurses, facility managers and laboratory technicians received training in the country's eight medical college hospitals, using nationally accepted curricula. A 17-week competency-based training course for teams of medical officers and nurses was introduced in 2003. At baseline in 1999, only three sub-district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC and 33 basic EmOC, mostly due to lack of trained staff and necessary equipment. In 2004, 105 of the 120 sub-district hospitals had become functional for EmOC, 70 with comprehensive EmOC and 35 with basic EmOC, while 53 of 59 of the district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC compared to 35 in 1999. The scaling up of competency-based training, innovative incentives to retain trained staff, evidence-based protocols to standardise practice and improve quality of care and the continuing involvement of key stakeholders, especially trainers, will all be needed to reach training targets in future.

  6. Suit Port Aft Bulkhead Mockup Test Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romig, Barbara A.; Allton, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Small Pressurized Rover (SPR) is currently being carried as an integral part of the current Lunar Surface Architectures under consideration in the Constellation program. One element of the SPR is the suit port, the means by which the crew performs Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Two suit port deliverables were produced in fiscal year 2008: an aft bulkhead mockup for functional integrated testing with the 1-G SPR mockup and a functional and pressurizable engineering unit. This paper focuses on the test results and lessons learned on the aft bulkhead mockup. The suit port aft bulkhead mockup was integrated with the mockup of the SPR cabin and chassis. It is located on the aft bulkhead of the SPR cabin structure and includes hatches, a locking mechanism, seals, interior and exterior suit don/doff aids, and exterior platforms to accommodate different crewmember heights. A lightweight mockup of the Mark III suit was tested with the suit port aft bulkhead mockup. There are several limitations to the suit port and mockup suits, and results of the suit port evaluation are presented and interpreted within the context of the limitations.

  7. Regenerative periodontal therapy: 30 years of lessons learned and unlearned.

    PubMed

    Susin, Cristiano; Wikesjö, Ulf M E

    2013-06-01

    In this review, we reflect upon advances and hindrances encountered over the last three decades in the development of strategies for periodontal regeneration. In this soul-searching pursuit we focus on revisiting lessons learned that should guide us in the quest for the reconstruction of the lost periodontium. We also examine beliefs and traditions that should be unlearned so that we can continue to advance the field. This learned/unlearned body of knowledge is consolidated into core principles to help us to develop new therapeutic approaches to benefit our patients and ultimately our society.

  8. Lessons Learned from Using Design Patterns in Industry Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Dirk

    Design patterns help in the creative act of designing, implementing, and documenting software systems. They have become an important part of the vocabulary of experienced software developers. This article reports about the author's experiences and lessons learned with using and applying design patterns in industry projects. The article not only discusses how using patterns benefits the design of software systems, but also how firms can benefit further from developing a firm-specific design language and how firms can motivate and educate developers to learn and develop this shared language.

  9. Operational Lessons Learned from NASA Analog Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Larissa S.

    2010-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) efforts in human space flight are currently focused on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs, with efforts beginning on the future exploration opportunities. Both the Space Shuttle and ISS programs are important to the development of a capability for human exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The ISS provides extensive research capabilities to determine how the human body reacts to long duration stays in space. Also, the ISS and Shuttle can serve as a limited testbed for equipment or entire systems that may be used on missions to the Moon, Mars, or to a near-Earth asteroid. It has been nearly 35 years since the Apollo astronauts visited the Moon. Future space explorers will have to re-learn how to work and live on planetary surfaces, and how to do that for extended periods of time. Exploration crews will perform a wide assortment of scientific tasks, including material sampling and emplacement of automated instruments. Surface mission operations include the activities of the crew living and working, mission support from the Earth, and the operation of robotic and other remotely commanded equipment on the surface and in planetary orbit. Other surface activities will include the following: exploring areas surrounding a habitat; using rovers to collect rock and soil samples; setting up experiments on the surface to monitor the radiation environment and any seismic or thermal activity; and conducting scientific analyses and experiments inside a habitat laboratory. Of course, the astronauts will also have to spend some of their surface time "doing chores" and maintaining their habitat and other systems. In preparation for future planetary exploration, NASA must design the answers to many operational questions. What will the astronauts do on the surface? How will they accomplish this? What tools will they require for their tasks? How will robots and astronauts work together? What

  10. International Naval Technology Transfer: Lessons Learned from the Spanish and Chilean Shipbuilding Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-30

    Transfer: Lessons Learned from the Spanish and Chilean Shipbuilding Experience Larrie Ferreiro Defense Acquisition University Published April 30...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Acquisition University ,9820 Belvoir Rd...www.acquisitionresearch.net, at a rate of roughly 140 reports per year. This activity has engaged researchers at over 60 universities and other institutions, greatly

  11. Lessons learned from case studies of inhalation exposures of workers to radioactive aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Fencl, A.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    Various Department of Energy requirements, rules, and orders mandate that lessons learned be identified, evaluated, shared, and incorporated into current practices. The recently issued, nonmandatory DOE standard for Development of DOE Lessons Learned Program states that a DOE-wide lessons learned program will {open_quotes}help to prevent recurrences of negative experiences, highlight best practices, and spotlight innovative ways to solve problems or perform work more safely, efficiently, and cost effectively.{close_quotes} Additional information about the lessons learned program is contained in the recently issued DOE handbook on Implementing U.S. Department of Energy Lessons Learned Programs and in October 1995 DOE SAfety Notice on Lessons Learned Programs. This report summarizes work in progress at ITRI to identify lessons learned for worker exposures to radioactive aerosols, and describes how this work will be incorporated into the DOE lessons learned program, including a new technical guide for measuring, modeling, and mitigating airborne radioactive particles. Follow-on work is focusing on preparation of {open_quotes}lessons learned{close_quotes} training materials for facility designers, managers, health protection professionals, line supervisors, and workers.

  12. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  13. Chinese haze versus Western smog: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Samet, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution in many Chinese cities has been so severe in recent years that a special terminology, the "Chinese haze", was created to describe China's air quality problem. Historically, the problem of Chinese haze has developed several decades after Western high-income countries have significantly improved their air quality from the smog-laden days in the early- and mid-20(th) century. Hence it is important to provide a global and historical perspective to help China combat the current air pollution problems. In this regard, this article addresses the followings specific questions: (I) What is the Chinese haze in comparison with the sulfurous (London-type) smog and the photochemical (Los Angeles-type) smog? (II) How does Chinese haze fit into the current trend of global air pollution transition? (III) What are the major mitigation measures that have improved air quality in Western countries? and (IV) What specific recommendations for China can be derived from lessons and experiences from Western countries?

  14. Chinese haze versus Western smog: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution in many Chinese cities has been so severe in recent years that a special terminology, the “Chinese haze”, was created to describe China’s air quality problem. Historically, the problem of Chinese haze has developed several decades after Western high-income countries have significantly improved their air quality from the smog-laden days in the early- and mid-20th century. Hence it is important to provide a global and historical perspective to help China combat the current air pollution problems. In this regard, this article addresses the followings specific questions: (I) What is the Chinese haze in comparison with the sulfurous (London-type) smog and the photochemical (Los Angeles-type) smog? (II) How does Chinese haze fit into the current trend of global air pollution transition? (III) What are the major mitigation measures that have improved air quality in Western countries? and (IV) What specific recommendations for China can be derived from lessons and experiences from Western countries? PMID:25694813

  15. A Planetary Geophysicist Does EPO: Lessons Learned Along the Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    2011-12-01

    My "day job" is numerical modeling of the interiors of the terrestrial planets, but I have also done EPO projects for the last 17 years while at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. These range from single, hour long talks in classrooms or astronomy clubs, to week-long summer workshops for teachers and librarians, and even semester-long programs, along with a number of curriculum development projects. EPO projects are a great way to help develop both the next generation of scientists and, more importantly, of scientifically literate citizens and taxpayers. Here are a few lessons learned along the way in the school of hard knocks. (1) An engaging delivery style is even more important in EPO presentations than it is in college lectures or conference presentations. Emphasize a few key concepts rather than numerous facts, and keep the jargon out. Good analogies can go a long way towards explaining a concept to any age group. I teach the role of size in planetary cooling by first asking students how long it takes to cook food of various sizes (a hamburger, roast beef, turkey). (2) If you will be working with a group of students for more than one class period, classroom friendly activities strengthen the learning process. Such activities do not need to be elaborate - when teaching about the Moon, I sometimes assign students to take their parents outside at night and show them how to find lava flows on the Moon. Teachers usually need to have classroom activities that are aligned to state or national teaching standards. Fortunately, many effective, standards-aligned activities already exist, so you don't need to reinvent the wheel. For a useful listing of planetary science and astronomy activities, see the LPI website www.lpi.usra.edu/education/resources/ (3) Although EPO work can be personally rewarding, it is not always well rewarded in a professional context, and it can be difficult to find the time and financial resources to sustain major projects. We sometimes use a

  16. Lessons Learned from One-to-One

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2011-01-01

    When in 2002 Maine launched its pioneering Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI) that equipped every one of the state's 30,000 seventh- and eighth-grade public school students and teachers with their own Apple iBook, all eyes were on the endeavor. As the first statewide one-to-one deployment, MLTI's $37 million education experiment…

  17. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social…

  18. Secondary Teacher Candidates' Lesson Planning Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoyo, Christina; Zhang, Shaoan

    2016-01-01

    Teacher candidates (TCs) use clinical experiences to enact concepts taught in their university courses; therefore field experiences may be the most important component of teacher preparation (Hammerness et al., 2005). TCs require support and guidance as they learn to adapt curriculum materials for effective use in the classroom (Davis, 2006). They…

  19. A Lesson Learned About Multiple Intelligences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Sharon S.

    1998-01-01

    As one high school teacher found, allowing students to use preferred learning modalities can increase their enthusiasm, raise their achievement levels, and foster growth in other intelligences. This article shows how two students demonstrated their mastery of nuclear and organic chemistry by using kinesthetic and spatial problem-solving…

  20. Lessons from a Global Learning Virtual Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lynn M.; Carrillo, Paula Botero; Salinas, Rigoberto Solano

    2012-01-01

    As institutions of higher education adopt more global learning initiatives to improve global competencies and increase global citizenship among their students, the creative implementation of intercultural exchanges is critical. This article is a reflection on the experiences of implementing a virtual classroom linking students at Kennesaw State…

  1. Facilitating Interdisciplinary Learning: Lessons from Project Kaleidoscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Elrod, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Many major funding organizations, policymakers, government agencies, and other higher education stakeholders want higher education to encourage interdisciplinary learning so that students graduate with the requisite skills to take on complex jobs in science, policy, business, and industry. Calls for this kind of change have been most urgent within…

  2. Learning from Babies: Vital Lessons for Schoolchildren

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puriefoy-Brinkley, Jacquelynn; Bardige, Betty

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the positive outcomes from the Philadelphia-based Educating Children for Parenting (ECP) program, founded in 1978, which aims to take advantage of children's fascination with babies and their easily triggered emotional investment in learning how to care for them. The program brings a parent and infant into the classroom…

  3. Lessons learned from the Apple stores.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Henry; Baum, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Medical practices have an opportunity to improve the services that they offer their patients. Practices can look at other businesses and industries for examples of outstanding customer service. This article will discuss the services provided by Apple, Inc., and how medical practices can learn from this industry giant and improve the services that they offer patients.

  4. Lessons Learned from Transformational Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Twyla T.

    2012-01-01

    What is transformative professional development for educators? Ideally, teachers and school leaders are given multiple opportunities to revisit schemas about themselves and their learning communities, with the intent to transform practice, the school environment, and even themselves. In practice, three cohorts of teachers and school leaders…

  5. LED Lighting: Applying Lessons Learned from the CFL Experience

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Gordon, Kelly L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Ton, My K.

    2008-08-20

    Light emitting diode (LED) technology has emerged as an exciting new lighting alternative with the potential for significant energy savings. There is concern, however, that white light LEDs for general illumination could take a long, bumpy course similar to another energy-efficient lighting technology – compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Recognizing the significant potential energy-efficient lighting has to reduce U.S. energy consumption, Congress mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) develop Solid State Lighting (SSL) through a Next Generation Lighting Initiative. DOE’s first step was to analyze the market introduction of compact fluorescent lighting to determine what lessons could be learned to smooth the introduction of SSL in the United States (Sandahl et al. 2006). This paper summarizes applicable lessons learned from the market introduction of CFLs and describe how DOE and others are applying those lessons to speed the development and market introduction of energy-efficient LED lighting for general illumination applications. A description of the current state of LED technology and compares LEDs to incandescent, fluorescent, and halogen lights is also provided.

  6. Junior Achievement Lesson Plans and Activity Ideas, 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior Achievemnt, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO.

    This packet contains economics lesson plans and activities for the high school student. Detailed lesson plans and worksheets address the following concepts: (1) stock market; (2) economics of water; (3) diaper economics; (4) quality; (5) scarcity; (6) steps to success; (7) effective marketing; (8) careers and success; (9) interviewing tips and…

  7. K12 Education Program Lessons Learned at the Center for Earthquake Research and Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G. L.; Dry, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis has been committed to increasing awareness for Seismic Hazard, Earthquake Engineering, and Earth Science among Mid-America's policy-makers, engineers, emergency managers, the general public, and K-12 teachers and students for nearly three decades. During that time we have learned many lessons related to providing effective education and outreach programs, especially for K-12 students. The lessons learned from these activities may be particularly appropriate for other regions where large earthquakes occur infrequently but have disproportionately high consequence areas due to low attenuation of seismic waves. Effective education programs in these settings must provide a consistent message across many states to a wide variety of socio-economic groups and professional communities through the leveraged resources of various groups and agencies. It is also beneficial to hire and train staff with K-12 teaching experience to work directly K-12 education organizations, and science curriculum coordinators.

  8. Youth-Led Tobacco Prevention: Lessons Learned for Engaging Southeast Asian American Youth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliet P.; Lipperman-Kreda, Sharon; Saephan, Sang; Kirkpatrick, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Background Southeast Asian Americans are highly at risk for tobacco use. Youth-led, environmentally focused tobacco prevention programs have been identified as highly effective in engaging youth in tobacco research and prevention, but may be challenging for the most at-risk youths. Objectives We report on lessons learned in a pilot tobacco prevention program with Southeast Asian youth in Northern California. Methods We reviewed meeting notes, participatory research products, and a transcribed focus group with tobacco prevention project participants. Lessons Learned Challenges to the youths’ participation related to structural issues (limited time, scheduling conflicts, financial difficulties, aging out of programs) and personal issues (school and work pressure, family stressors). Coordinating with ongoing program activities and the county coalition enabled some supports as well as challenges. Conclusions Key supports for youth were youth leaders, social and financial rewards, and the ability to interpret tobacco prevention information in culturally and age-relevant media. PMID:22820228

  9. Straw into Gold: Lessons Learned (and Still Being Learned) at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Patricia J.

    2011-01-01

    What lessons have we learned at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) about knowledge translation (KT) over the past 20 years, and what is our vision for the future? How does that KT interrelate with our other activities – research and the Population Health Data Repository? Who first noticed that “there's gold in them thar hills,” and what did they do about it? How did we weave administrative database “straw” into gold, how have we panned for gold and how do we look for the pot of gold in the future? This paper describes how MCHP began with an integrated KT research relationship with government, and through The Need to Know Team, extended KT to regional health authority planners. It describes the various push–pull KT mechanisms that MCHP has used, including dissemination of research to planners through interactive workshops, and to other researchers through Web-based resources. PMID:24933372

  10. Lesson learned from Co-60 accident in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thongpraparn, T; Chaudakshetrin, P; Buranapong, P

    2002-12-01

    The causes and consequences of a Co-60 radiation accident in Samutprakarn Province, Thailand, were scrutinized to learn lessons aimed at preventing future radiation accidents. "Orphan sources" may end up in scrapyards. An out-of-use Co-60 medical teletherapy source, left unattended in a disused parking area belonging to a Medical Dealer, was stolen and sold to a scrap dealer in Samutprakarn Province at the end of January 2000. Because of its valuable appearance, a number of workers in the scrap trade who were not aware of radiation hazards managed to dismantle all parts. The Co-60 source was removed and left unshielded among pieces of scrap metal in the yard of the scrap shop. Some workers immediately became sick. Eighteen days later when they went to a local hospital their symptoms were recognized as radiation sickness and the incident was reported to the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) in Thailand. The unshielded source, with an estimated activity of 15.7 TBq (425 Ci), was retrieved soon after by an emergency team and placed in safe storage at the OAEP premises. Ten victims developed radiation sickness symptoms, of which three died soon after the accident. The accident alarmed the public, and has raised national concerns. The accident is similar in some ways to the 1987 radiation accident at Goiania, Brazil, involving a Cs-137 radiotherapy source. If not properly disposed of orphan radiation sources can lead to serious injury or even death. The accident highlights the need for security of spent high activity sources and the importance of regulatory controls.

  11. Lessons Learned from Deploying an Analytical Task Management Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.; Welch, Clara; Arceneaux, Joshua; Bulgatz, Dennis; Hunt, Mitch; Young, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Defining requirements, missions, technologies, and concepts for space exploration involves multiple levels of organizations, teams of people with complementary skills, and analytical models and simulations. Analytical activities range from filling a To-Be-Determined (TBD) in a requirement to creating animations and simulations of exploration missions. In a program as large as returning to the Moon, there are hundreds of simultaneous analysis activities. A way to manage and integrate efforts of this magnitude is to deploy a centralized database that provides the capability to define tasks, identify resources, describe products, schedule deliveries, and generate a variety of reports. This paper describes a web-accessible task management system and explains the lessons learned during the development and deployment of the database. Through the database, managers and team leaders can define tasks, establish review schedules, assign teams, link tasks to specific requirements, identify products, and link the task data records to external repositories that contain the products. Data filters and spreadsheet export utilities provide a powerful capability to create custom reports. Import utilities provide a means to populate the database from previously filled form files. Within a four month period, a small team analyzed requirements, developed a prototype, conducted multiple system demonstrations, and deployed a working system supporting hundreds of users across the aeros pace community. Open-source technologies and agile software development techniques, applied by a skilled team enabled this impressive achievement. Topics in the paper cover the web application technologies, agile software development, an overview of the system's functions and features, dealing with increasing scope, and deploying new versions of the system.

  12. Learning To Serve, Serving To Learn: A View from Higher Education. Integrating Service-Learning into Curriculum: Lessons Learned. Teacher Education Consortium in Service-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This collection of papers includes lessons learned from a 3-year collaboration among faculty who had pursued a scholarly inquiry of service-learning, integrated service-learning into their curricula, altered their teaching, forged partnerships with community based organizations, and developed measures and methodologies for assessing results. The…

  13. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  14. Competencies: from deconstruction to reconstruction and back again, lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Leach, David C

    2008-09-01

    I address the potential impact of the Association of Schools of Public Health's development of a competency model for the graduate Master of Public Health. I reflect on the model in relation to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's adoption of a competency-based model for medical education. Six lessons learned by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education that the Association of Schools of Public Health might consider in moving forward are how learning outcomes can be enhanced by using competency models, the effect of competency development processes in "creating a common language" among educators, the benefits and challenges of numerous competencies within a model, the usefulness of the Dreyfus model for progressive competency development, the need for multiple assessment tools used over time, and the value of learning portfolios.

  15. The Archstone Foundation Elder Abuse and Neglect Initiative: outcomes and lessons learned in three years from 2006 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Huba, George J; Melchior, Lisa A; Philyaw, Meredith L; Northington, Kendra R

    2010-07-01

    An independent evaluation of the Archstone Foundation Elder Abuse and Neglect Initiative was conducted to identify major outcomes and lessons learned collectively by 20 funded projects, as well as to document innovative program models for dissemination. Data from the first three years of this initiative show these projects have been productive and have had a measurable impact on services for elder abuse and neglect. Major lessons learned address issues in recruiting, engaging, and maintaining active involvement of diverse stakeholders, as well as innovative and effective models of education, training, and direct services for elder abuse and neglect.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Trasportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    SciTech Connect

    M. Keister; K, McBride

    2006-08-28

    , and stakeholders as important issues that arise repeatedly. In addition, the review identifies lessons learned or activities/actions which were found not to be productive to the planning and conduct of SNF shipments (i.e., negative impacts). This paper is a 'looking back' summary of lessons learned across multiple transportation campaigns. Not all lessons learned are captured here, and participants in some of the campaigns have divergent opinions and perspectives about which lessons are most critical. This analysis is part of a larger OCRWM benchmarking effort to identify best practices to consider in future transportation of radioactive materials ('looking forward'). Initial findings from this comprehensive benchmarking analysis are expected to be available in late fall 2006.

  17. LESSONS LEARNED, HEADQUARTERS, CORPS ARTILLERY (PROVISIONAL) VIETNAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    artillery units operating in the northern portion of I Corps Tactical Zone came under OPCON of PCV and continued operational activities in progress. Personnel...equipment. At the time of activation, the major operations in the Corps Zone included JEB STUART, KENTUCKY, LANCASTER II, SCOTLAND I and NAPOLEON SALINE

  18. Sustainability, Organizational Learning, and Lessons Learned from Aviation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pourdehnad, John; Smith, Peter A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: While the importance of organizational learning for sustainability has been stressed by a number of authors in the literature, the practicalities of how organizational leaders might foster such learning are seldom treated. This paper seeks to demonstrate that there is much that could be learned from the aviation industry about…

  19. Reinventing Teacher Professional Norms and Identities: The Role of Lesson Study and Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    The present article addresses how lesson study can facilitate changing traditional norms of individualism, conservatism and presentism that constrain American teachers from learning from one another. The article investigates how lesson study can serve as a vehicle for developing teacher learning communities by developing or redeveloping teachers'…

  20. Lessons Learned from School Crises and Emergencies, Vol. 1, Issue 2, Fall 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. School and student names have been changed to protect identities. Information for this publication was gathered through a series of interviews with school stakeholders involved in the actual incident. This "Lessons Learned" issue…

  1. Using the Learning Cycle To Teach Acronyms, a Language Arts Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.

    The Learning Cycle, a popular medium for teaching science lessons, can be used to teach a language arts lesson on acronyms, an appropriate skill topic for students in grades four through six. Acronyms are fascinating words that can challenge students to solve the puzzle of what the letters stand for. The three-phase Learning Cycle arranges…

  2. Lessons learned on utilizing the SEI/CMM in the federal government work for others environment

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on lessons learned on utilizing the Software Engineering Institute Capability Maturity Model in the federal government work for others environment. These viewgraphs outline: data systems research and development; what is the SEI/CMM; Data Systems Research and Development process improvement approach; accomplishments; and lessons learned.

  3. Solid-State Lighting. Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, L. J.; Cort, K. A.; Gordon, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of issues and lessons learned during the early stages of solid-state lighting market introduction in the U.S., which also summarizes early actions taken to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps.

  4. Generating a Two-Phase Lesson for Guiding Beginners to Learn Basic Dance Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang; Leung, Howard; Yue, Lihua; Deng, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an automated lesson generation system for guiding beginners to learn basic dance movements is proposed. It analyzes the dance to generate a two-phase lesson which can provide a suitable cognitive load thus offering an efficient learning experience. In the first phase, the dance is divided into small pieces which are patterns, and…

  5. Lessons Learned in Student Venture Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner, Edward

    The Physics Entrepreneurship Master's Program (PEP) at Case Western Reserve University is now in its 15th year of operation. PEP is a 27 credit-hour Master of Science in Physics, Entrepreneurship Track. The curriculum can be tailored to the needs of each student. Coursework consists of graduate-level classes in science, business, intellectual property law, and innovation. A master's thesis is required that is based on a real-world project in innovation or entrepreneurship within an existing company or startup (possibly the student's). PEP faculty help students connect with mentors, advisors, partners, funding sources and job opportunities. In this talk I will chronicle several pitfalls that we have encountered with our ''real world'' student projects and start-up businesses, several of which met their complete demise despite showing great promise for success. I will discuss how we have learned to avoid most of these pitfalls by taking surprisingly simple actions.

  6. Implementing a regional oncology information system: approach and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W.K.; Ashbury, F.D.; Hogue, G.L.; Smith, A.; Pun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Paper-based medical record systems are known to have major problems of inaccuracy, incomplete data, poor accessibility, and challenges to patient confidentiality. They are also an inefficient mechanism of record-sharing for interdisciplinary patient assessment and management, and represent a major problem for keeping current and monitoring quality control to facilitate improvement. To address those concerns, national, regional, and local health care authorities have increased the pressure on oncology practices to upgrade from paper-based systems to electronic health records. Objectives Here, we describe and discuss the challenges to implementing a region-wide oncology information system across four independent health care organizations, and we describe the lessons learned from the initial phases that are now being applied in subsequent activities of this complex project. Results The need for change must be shared across centres to increase buy-in, adoption, and implementation. It is essential to establish physician leadership, commitment, and engagement in the process. Work processes had to be revised to optimize use of the new system. Culture change must be included in the change management strategy. Furthermore, training and resource requirements must be thoroughly planned, implemented, monitored, and modified as required for effective adoption of new work processes and technology. Interfaces must be established with multiple existing electronic systems across the region to ensure appropriate patient flow. Periodic assessment of the existing project structure is necessary, and adjustments are often required to ensure that the project meets its objectives. Conclusions The implementation of region-wide oncology information systems across different health practice locations has many challenges. Leadership is essential. A strong, collaborative information-sharing strategy across the region and with the supplier is essential to identify, discuss, and resolve

  7. Spitzer Space Telescope Sequencing Operations Software, Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, David A.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was launched in August, 2003, and renamed to the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2004. Two years of observing the universe in the wavelength range from 3 to 180 microns has yielded enormous scientific discoveries. Since this magnificent observatory has a limited lifetime, maximizing science viewing efficiency (ie, maximizing time spent executing activities directly related to science observations) was the key operational objective. The strategy employed for maximizing science viewing efficiency was to optimize spacecraft flexibility, adaptability, and use of observation time. The selected approach involved implementation of a multi-engine sequencing architecture coupled with nondeterministic spacecraft and science execution times. This approach, though effective, added much complexity to uplink operations and sequence development. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) manages Spitzer s operations. As part of the uplink process, Spitzer s Mission Sequence Team (MST) was tasked with processing observatory inputs from the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) into efficiently integrated, constraint-checked, and modeled review and command products which accommodated the complexity of non-deterministic spacecraft and science event executions without increasing operations costs. The MST developed processes, scripts, and participated in the adaptation of multi-mission core software to enable rapid processing of complex sequences. The MST was also tasked with developing a Downlink Keyword File (DKF) which could instruct Deep Space Network (DSN) stations on how and when to configure themselves to receive Spitzer science data. As MST and uplink operations developed, important lessons were learned that should be applied to future missions, especially those missions which employ command-intensive operations via a multi-engine sequence architecture.

  8. Lessons Learned from Recent Failure and Incident Investigations of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. B.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Raju, L. S.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reeder, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    During the past few decades, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has supported several large-scale failure and incident investigations and numerous requests for engineering consultations. Although various extenuating circumstances contributed to each of these incidents, in all cases, the failure resulted from accumulation and/or propagation of damage that reduced the load carrying capability of the structure to a level below that which was needed to sustain structural loads. A brief overview of various failure and incident investigations supported by LaRC, including some of the computational and experimental methodologies that have been applied, is presented. An important outcome of many of these failure and incident investigations is the development of an improved understanding of not only the state-of-the-art in experimental and analytical methods but also the state-of-the-art in the design and manufacturing processes that may contribute to such failures. In order to provide insight into such large-scale investigations, a series of lessons learned were captured. Awareness of these lessons learned is highly beneficial to engineers involved in similar investigations. Therefore, it is prudent that the lessons learned are disseminated such that they can be built upon in other investigations and in ensuing research and development activities.

  9. Polonium-210: lessons learned from the contamination of individual Canadians.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Jack; Tracy, Bliss; Kramer, Gary; Whyte, Jeff; Moodie, Gerry; Auclair, J P; Thomson, Daniele

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the radioactive poisoning episode in London in 2006 and the Health Canada response to locate and test any Canadians who might have been contaminated by this event. The search strategies and testing methods are explained and the results given. The lessons learned are summarised and implications for vulnerable populations are discussed. The greatest public health impact was probably the generation of fear and concern, especially among those prone to health-related anxiety disorders. The groups of individuals at risk were effectively managed by a single point of contact system combined with rapid triage and counselling that was provided to everyone to address their individual concerns.

  10. Lessons Learned Using a Relational Database for System Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; McCallie, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Before a new system is brought on-line, data from an old system frequently needs to be massaged prior to loading into the new system. To determine if 4-GL tools could be used in these projects, a relational database management system, Oracle, was used to convert our old ADT system's data into the format required by the new system. In doing so, we learned several important performance lessons regarding proper structuring of SQL statements and database tuning. Although the ADT system data were successfully manipulated using this 4-GL product, one should understand database tuning and consider the options carefully before embarking on a large-scale conversion.

  11. Computational design of ICCP systems: Lessons learned and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGiorgi, V.G.; Lucas, K.E.

    1999-07-01

    Computational modeling using boundary element techniques has been proposed for design and evaluation of shipboard impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems. LaPlace's equation, the governing differential equation for electrochemical corrosion, is well suited for solution by the boundary element method. There has been much work performed in this field during the past two decades. Computational modeling efforts designed to validate boundary element procedures are reviewed. US Navy ship systems discussed are CG-59, CG-66, and CVN-068. Computational analysis accuracy is determined by comparison with physical scale modeling experimental results. Lessons learned from the analysis described are summarized. Advantages and disadvantages of boundary element modeling are discussed.

  12. Lessons Learned Concerning the Human Element in Events and Training

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Sandvig

    2006-02-01

    As the number and complexity of responses to hazardous material incidents have increased, government regulators have implemented a national incident command system, bolstered by a host of protective measures and response equipment. Special advanced technical equipment has also been developed and made available to on-scene responders and command staff. Yet with all the investment in organizational and technical advance, the human element of emergency response remains critical and also needs our continued attention to ensure effective operation and success. This paper focuses on lessons learned from radiological events and training exercises that pertain to these human elements.

  13. Two gimbal bearing case studies: Some lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, Stuart H.

    1988-01-01

    Two troublesome, torque related problems associated with gimbal actuators are discussed. Large, thin section angular contact bearings can have a surprisingly high torque sensitivity to radial thermal gradients. A predictive thermal-mechanical bearing analysis, as described, was helpful in establishing a safe temperature operating envelope. In the second example, end-of-travel torque limits of an oscillatory gimbal bearing appoached motor stall during limit cycling life tests. Bearing modifications required to restore acceptable torque performance are described. The lessons learned from these case studies should benefit designers of precision gimbals where singular bearing torque related problems are not uncommon.

  14. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  15. MILSTAR's flexible substrate solar array: Lessons learned, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibb, John

    1990-01-01

    MILSTAR's Flexible Substrate Solar Array (FSSA) is an evolutionary development of the lightweight, flexible substrate design pioneered at Lockheed during the seventies. Many of the features of the design are related to the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE), flown on STS-41D in 1984. FSSA development has created a substantial technology base for future flexible substrate solar arrays such as the array for the Space Station Freedom. Lessons learned during the development of the FSSA can and should be applied to the Freedom array and other future flexible substrate designs.

  16. Closure of a mixed waste landfill: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    Much experience has been gained during the closure of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and many lessons were learned. This knowledge was applied to other closures at SRS yielding decreased costs, schedule enhancement, and increased overall project efficiency. The next major area of experience to be gained at SRS in the field of waste site closures will be in the upkeep, maintenance, and monitoring of clay caps. Further test programs will be required to address these requirements.

  17. Closure of a mixed waste landfill: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Much experience has been gained during the closure of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and many lessons were learned. This knowledge was applied to other closures at SRS yielding decreased costs, schedule enhancement, and increased overall project efficiency. The next major area of experience to be gained at SRS in the field of waste site closures will be in the upkeep, maintenance, and monitoring of clay caps. Further test programs will be required to address these requirements.

  18. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  19. Evidence for Ancient Life in Mars Meteorites: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    The lines of evidence we first proposed as supporting a hypothesis of early life on Mars are discussed by Treiman, who presents pros and cons of our hypothesis in the light of subsequent research by many groups. Our assessment of the current status of the many controversies over our hypothesis is given in reports by Gibson et al. Rather than repeat or elaborate on that information, I prefer to take an overview and present what I think are some of the "lessons learned" by our team in particular, and by the science community in general.

  20. Satellite Ground Operations Automation: Lessons Learned and Future Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catena, John; Frank, Lou; Saylor, Rick; Weikel, Craig; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Reducing spacecraft ground system operations costs is a major goal in all missions. The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) flight operations team at the NASA/Goddard Spacecraft Flight Center developed in-house scripts and procedures to automate monitoring of critical spacecraft functions. The initial staffing profile of 16x7 was reduced first to 8x5 and then to 'lights out'. Operations functions became an offline review of system performance and the generation of future science plans for subsequent upload to the spacecraft. Lessons learned will be applied to the challenging Triana mission, where 24x7 contact with the spacecraft will be necessary at all times.

  1. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease usually pursues a self-limited course, at least from the immunological perspective. In addition, circulating antibodies to cryptic, conformational epitopes within the NC1 domain of the alpha 3 chain of Type IV Collagen are commonly found at the zenith of the clinical disease. However, exceptions to these general rules do occur, as exemplified by two remarkable cases reported in this issue of the Clinical Kidney Journal. The possible explanations for and the lessons learned from these uncommon occurrences are discussed in this short commentary. PMID:27679709

  2. Stardust-next : Lessons Learned from a Comet Flyby Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Aron A.; Larson, Timothy; Thompson, Paul; McElrath, Timothy; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven; Klaasen, Kenneth P.; Cheuvront, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The Stardust-NExT (New Exploration of Tempel) mission, a follow-on to the Stardust prime mission, successfully completed a flyby of comet Tempel-1 on 2/14/11. However there were many challenges along the way, most significantly low propellant margin and detection of the comet in imagery later than antici-pated. These challenges and their ramifications forced the project to respond with flexibility and ingenuity. As a result, the flyby at an altitude of 178 km was nearly flawless, accomplishing all its science objectives. Lessons learned on Stardust-NExT may have relevance to other spacecraft missions.

  3. TOPEX/Poseidon electrical power system -- Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, P.R.K.; Richardson, R.; Sherwood, R.

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the TOPEX/Poseidon Spacecraft is to monitor the world`s oceans for scientific study of weather and climate prediction, coastal storm warning and maritime safety. The operational conditions of this satellite imposed challenging requirements for the on-board Electrical Power System (EPS). Going through various phases of its development and on-orbit performance verifications, there were certain events and/or circumstances the authors would have liked to avoid. Some circumstances were avoided with preventative measures, other potentially detrimental events were not. Thus, a number of very valuable lessons were learned which are presented in this paper.

  4. STGT program: Ada coding and architecture lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usavage, Paul; Nagurney, Don

    1992-01-01

    STGT (Second TDRSS Ground Terminal) is currently halfway through the System Integration Test phase (Level 4 Testing). To date, many software architecture and Ada language issues have been encountered and solved. This paper, which is the transcript of a presentation at the 3 Dec. meeting, attempts to define these lessons plus others learned regarding software project management and risk management issues, training, performance, reuse, and reliability. Observations are included regarding the use of particular Ada coding constructs, software architecture trade-offs during the prototyping, development and testing stages of the project, and dangers inherent in parallel or concurrent systems, software, hardware, and operations engineering.

  5. Fifteen Years of Chandra Operation: Scientific Highlights and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Tucker, Wallace; Wilkes, Belinda; Baggett, Randy; Brissenden, Roger; Edmonds, Peter; Mattison, Edward

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory, designed for three years of operation with a goal of five years is now entering its 15-th year of operation. Thanks to its superb angular resolution, the Observatory continues to yield new and exciting results, many of which were totally unanticipated prior to launch. We discuss the current technical status, review recent scientific highlights, indicate a few future directions, and present what we feel is the most important lesson learned from our experience of building and operating this great observatory.

  6. Ballistic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Emily H.; Sabino, Jennifer M.; Nanos, George P.; Valerio, Ian L.

    2015-01-01

    Management of upper extremity injuries secondary to ballistic and blast trauma can lead to challenging problems for the reconstructive surgeon. Given the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, advancements in combat-casualty care, combined with a high-volume experience in the treatment of ballistic injuries, has led to continued advancements in the treatment of the severely injured upper extremity. There are several lessons learned that are translatable to civilian trauma centers and future conflicts. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the physics of ballistic injuries and principles in the management of such injuries through experience gained from military involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan. PMID:25685099

  7. Mars Exploration Rover potentiometer problems, failures and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    During qualification testing of three types of nonwire-wound precision potentiometers for the Mars Exploration Rover, a variety of problems and failures were encountered. This paper will describe some of the more interesting problems, detail their investigations and present their final solutions. The failures were found to be caused by design errors, manufacturing errors, improper handling, test errors, and carelessness. A trend of decreasing total resistance was noted, and a resistance histogram was used to identify an outlier. A gang fixture is described for simultaneously testing multiple pots, and real time X-ray imaging was used extensively to assist in the failure analyses. Lessons learned are provided.

  8. Mars Exploration Rover Potentiometer Problems, Failures and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balzer, Mark

    2006-01-01

    During qualification testing of three types of non-wire-wound precision potentiometers for the Mars Exploration Rover, a variety of problems and failures were encountered. This paper will describe some of the more interesting problems, detail their investigations and present their final solutions. The failures were found to be caused by design errors, manufacturing errors, improper handling, test errors, and carelessness. A trend of decreasing total resistance was noted, and a resistance histogram was used to identify an outlier. A gang fixture is described for simultaneously testing multiple pots, and real time X-ray imaging was used extensively to assist in the failure analyses. Lessons learned are provided.

  9. Lessons Learned From Community-Based Approaches to Sodium Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby PhD, Jan L.; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S.; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. Design A multiple case study design was used. Setting This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Subjects Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. Analysis The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semi structured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Results Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. Conclusion The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption. PMID:24575726

  10. Unpressurized Logistics Carriers for the International Space Station: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station has been in development since 1984, and has recently begun on orbit assembly. Most of the hardware for the Space Station has been manufactured and the rest is well along in design. The major sets of hardware that are still to be developed for Space Station are the pallets and interfacing hardware for resupply of unpressurized spares and scientific payloads. Over the last ten years, there have been numerous starts, stops, difficulties and challenges encountered in this effort. The Space Station program is now entering the beginning of orbital operations. The Program is only now addressing plans to design and build the carriers that will be needed to carry the unpressurized cargo for the Space Station lifetime. Unpressurized carrier development has been stalled due to a broad range of problems that occurred over the years. These problems were not in any single area, but encompassed budgetary, programmatic, and technical difficulties. Some lessons of hindsight can be applied to developing carriers for the Space Station. Space Station teams are now attempting to incorporate the knowledge gained into the current development efforts for external carriers. In some cases, the impacts of these lessons are unrecoverable for Space Station, but can and should be applied to future programs. This paper examines the progress and problems to date with unpressurized carrier development identifies the lessons to be learned, and charts the course for finally accomplishing the delivery of these critical hardware sets.

  11. Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Present generation students are primarily active learners with varied learning experiences and lecture courses may not suit all their learning needs. Effective learning involves providing students with a sense of progress and control over their own learning. This requires creating a situation where learners have a chance to try out or test their…

  12. Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage for Future Space Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database of engineering lessons learned that corresponds with relevant technical standards will be a valuable asset to those engaged in studies on future space vehicle developments, especially for structures, materials, propulsion, control, operations and associated elements. In addition, this will enable the capturing of technology developments applicable to the design, development, and operation of future space vehicles as planned in the Space Launch Initiative. Using the time-honored tradition of passing on lessons learned while utilizing the newest information technology, NASA has launched an intensive effort to link lessons learned acquired through various Internet databases with applicable technical standards. This paper will discuss the importance of lessons learned, the difficulty in finding relevant lessons learned while engaged in a space vehicle development, and the new NASA effort to relate them to technical standards that can help alleviate this difficulty.

  13. The teaching learning collaborative's influence on lesson plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Riva, Yanette

    With a growing population of English Language Learners in our schools, their specialized classroom needs must be addressed. California state testing shows that English Language Learners (ELL) consistently perform below proficiency as compared to other students who are not English Language Learners. Many times, in response to pressure placed by the state testing requirements, administrators and educators focus on English Language development strategies at the cost of other content areas such as science. The Science and English Learning Development Blended Program is a professional development project that combines English Language Development (ELD) strategies within science lesson plans to address the language needs of English Language Learners through science content. The Blended Program was in place for four years in an urban school district in southern California. During its initial year of implementation, a research study focused on the types of changes teachers made to their science lesson plans as a result of their professional development: all of the changes made had to do with English Language Development and not Science. Implications of this study suggest that at the start of the program changes to support science content were not made because the teachers did not have the science knowledge to be comfortable enough to make changes to address the science portion of the lesson. The data analyzed for this study was collected during the Blended Program's third and fourth year of implementation. The findings show changes which reflect the following themes: science concept acquisition, oral language development, and scaffolding instruction. These themes reflect changes . that address both English Language Development and science. The individuals involved with the Blended Program have now had training for ELD and Science content for three or four years. Results suggest that the training not only equipped the teachers with English Language Development strategies

  14. NASA Flight Planning Branch Space Shuttle Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenger, Jennifer D.; Bristol, Douglas J.; Whitney, Gregory R.; Blanton, Mark R.; Reynolds, F. Fisher, III

    2011-01-01

    Planning products and procedures that allowed the mission Flight Control Teams and the Astronaut crews to plan, train and fly every Space Shuttle mission were developed by the Flight Planning Branch at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. As the Space Shuttle Program came to a close, lessons learned were collected from each phase of the successful execution of these Space Shuttle missions. Specific examples of how roles and responsibilities of console positions that develop the crew and vehicle attitude timelines have been analyzed and will be discussed. Additionally, the relationships and procedural hurdles experienced through international collaboration have molded operations. These facets will be explored and related to current and future operations with the International Space Station and future vehicles. Along with these important aspects, the evolution of technology and continual improvement of data transfer tools between the Space Shuttle and ground team has also defined specific lessons used in improving the control team s effectiveness. Methodologies to communicate and transmit messages, images, and files from the Mission Control Center to the Orbiter evolved over several years. These lessons were vital in shaping the effectiveness of safe and successful mission planning and have been applied to current mission planning work in addition to being incorporated into future space flight planning. The critical lessons from all aspects of previous plan, train, and fly phases of Space Shuttle flight missions are not only documented in this paper, but are also discussed regarding how they pertain to changes in process and consideration for future space flight planning.

  15. Assessment of Continuing Interprofessional Education: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Brian; Wagner, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Although interprofessional education (IPE) and continuing interprofessional education (CIPE) are becoming established activities within the education of health professions, assessment of learners continues to be limited. Arguably, this in part is due to a lack of IPE and CIPE within in the clinical workplace. The accountability of…

  16. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fobes, James L.

    A major challenge confronting the United States Army is to obtain optimal performance from both its human and machine resources. This study examines episodes of peak performance in soldiers and athletes. Three cognitive components were found to enable episodes of peak performance: psychological readiness (activating optimal arousal and emotion…

  17. CNES Experiments on MEDET: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durin, Ch.; Remaury, S.; Mandeville, J. C.; Rejsek-Riba, V.; Duzellier, S.; Duffours, L.; Colombel, P.; Woignier, T.; Labat, L.

    The Material Exposure and Degradation ExperimenT MEDET has been successfully launched and retrieved with EuTEF from the Columbus External Payload Facility of the ISS (18 months, from February 2008 to September 2009). All experiments have been providing data as expected during the operations phase. MEDET is an active experiment that was exposed to the Low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. It combines seven sub-experiments. CNES has been proposed two experiments devoted to the measure of μ-particles:

  18. Lessons learned from IRIS EPO program evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the overall impact of EPO programs that include activities ranging from formal education through broad public outreach, is a complex issue. The impact of education activities targeted at narrowly defined audiences is generally easier to quantify than the national impact of outreach activities conducted by a relatively small program. For educational activities, our approach has been to leverage the best-practices identified through research and to continuously assess the individual elements internally with the intention of making improvements based on the data generated and the existing research. By constructing our elements on the best practices identified by the research community we feel that internal formative evaluation is a valid means to determine if an activity is effective, particularly when the results are compared to similar programs. For example, effective practices of professional development are well documented in the literature. As a result, this allows us to shape our programs and our evaluations to monitor elements that have been identified as key by the educational research community. Further, such actions allow us to avoid allocating significant resources with the intention of pinning down direct causal relationships between our programs and consumers, when similar interventions (conducted by others) have already shown such relationships. Ongoing review by an EPO advisory committee also provides regular oversight of program impact. While we find internal and external formative evaluation extremely useful in shaping the program and documenting its impact, we also recognize the value of a summative evaluation process. For example, an external summative evaluation of the IRIS EPO program was conducted in 2009, followed by an external panel review, as part of the regular review of IRIS programs. We found that the most valuable part of the external evaluation was our preparation, including clarifying the goals of each of the elements of the

  19. Computerized physician order entry: lessons learned from the trenches.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Anne; Carlson, Debra; Estes, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of computer physician order entry (CPOE) demands planning, teamwork, and a steep learning curve. The nurse-driven team at the hospital unit level is pivotal to a successful launch. This article describes the experience of one NICU in planning, building, training, and implementing CPOE. Pitfalls and lessons learned are described. Communication between the nurse team at the unit and the clinical informatics team needs to be ongoing. Self-paced training with realistic practice scenarios and one-on-one "view then practice" modules help ease the transition. Many issues are not apparent until after CPOE has been implemented, and it is vital to have a mechanism to fix problems quickly. We describe the experience of "going live" and the reality of day-to-day order entry.

  20. User observations on information sharing (corporate knowledge and lessons learned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Ronald A.; Gregg, Lawrence A.; Martin, Shirley A.; Underwood, Leroy H.; Mcgee, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The sharing of 'corporate knowledge' and lessons learned in the NASA aerospace community has been identified by Johnson Space Center survey participants as a desirable tool. The concept of the program is based on creating a user friendly information system that will allow engineers, scientists, and managers at all working levels to share their information and experiences with other users irrespective of location or organization. The survey addresses potential end uses for such a system and offers some guidance on the development of subsequent processes to ensure the integrity of the information shared. This system concept will promote sharing of information between NASA centers, between NASA and its contractors, between NASA and other government agencies, and perhaps between NASA and institutions of higher learning.

  1. Lessons learned at the intersection of immunology and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2012-04-01

    Neurobiologists and immunologists study concepts often signified with identical terminology. Scientists in both fields study a structure known as the synapse, and each group analyzes a subject called memory. Is this a quirk of human language, or are there real similarities between these two physiological systems? Not only are the linguistic concepts expressed in the words "synapse" and "memory" shared between the fields, but the actual molecules of physiologic importance in one system play parallel roles in the other: complement, the major histocompatibility molecules, and even "neuro"-transmitters all have major impacts on health and on disease in both the brain and the immune system. Not only are the same molecules found in diverse roles in each system, but we have learned that there is real "hard-wired" crosstalk between nerves and lymphoid organs. This issue of the JCI highlights some of the lessons learned from experts who are working at this scintillating intersection between immunology and neuroscience.

  2. Cybernetic Service-Learning Course Development: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jonathan I.; Miller, Lee Q.

    2009-01-01

    Although the title of the course, Combating Loneliness among Older People in Contemporary Society, states a clear goal, our service-learning class was shaped by five guiding parameters. By avoiding certain things, we allowed the course to self-organize and evolve into a learning experience beyond the one originally envisioned. This paper…

  3. Design and Evaluation of Two Blended Learning Approaches: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Wing Sum; Hew, Khe Foon

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we share two blended learning approaches used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore. We have been using these two approaches in the last twelve years in many courses ranging from the diploma to graduate programs. For the first blended learning approach, we integrated one asynchronous communication tool with face to…

  4. Tracking technology: lessons learned in two health care sites.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Mary Elizabeth; Wingrave, Chadwick A; Klanchar, Angel; Craighead, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the process of staff and patient adoption and compliance of a real-time locating system (RTLS) across two health care settings and present lessons learned. While previous work has examined the technological feasibility of tracking staff and patients in a health care setting in real-time, these studies have not described the critical adoption issues that must be overcome for deployment. The ability to track and monitor individual staff and patients presents new opportunities for improving workflow, patient health and reducing health care costs. A RTLS is introduced in both a long-term care and a polytrauma transitional rehabilitation program (PTRP) in a Veterans Hospital to track staff and patient locations and five lessons learned are presented from our experiences and responses to emergent technological, work-related and social barriers to adoption. We conclude that successful tracking in a health care environment requires time and careful consideration of existing work, policies and stakeholder needs which directly impact the efficacy of the technology.

  5. Lessons Learned from Shuttle Payload Verification Loads Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, Erica

    2011-01-01

    When a system experiences a loading environment characterized by rapidly varying forces, such as a rocket launch, a transient analysis is used to analyze the response of the system. The most common transient analysis methodology is the Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA). CLAs are used by the automotive and aerospace industry to analyze cars, trucks, planes, helicopters, spacecraft, etc. The Space Shuttle program also uses the CLA methodology to assess the compatibility of the payload with the Orbiter and the flight environment. The Space Shuttle Verification Loads Analysis (VLA) was a standardized process that started between ten and thirteen months prior to launch, and included several meetings as well as analysis by both the Shuttle Program and the payload developers. Over the course of the Space Shuttle Program, many improvements were made to the process which helped to reduce cycle time and improve manifest flexibility. There were also several issues which were never properly addressed, but a work-around would be developed to keep the process flowing. The lessons learned included automation of some processes and standardization of others, early assessments, improved documentation and better coordination with all stakeholders in the process. Lessons learned also included the limitations in the current process, and what needs to be planned for in the future to avoid the same issues.

  6. Lcross Lunar Impactor - Lessons Learned from a Small Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) launched with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) on June 18, 2009. While the science purpose of the LCROSS mission was to determine the presence of water-ice in a permanently-shadowed crater on the moon, the functional purpose was to be a pioneer for future low-cost, risk-tolerant small satellite NASA missions. Recent strategic changes at the Agency level have only furthered the importance of small satellite missions. NASA Ames Research Center and its industry partner, Northrop-Grumman, initiated this spacecraft project two-years after its co-manifest mission had started, with less than one-fifth the budget. With a $79M total cost cap (including operations and reserves) and 31-months until launch, LCROSS needed a game-changing approach to be successful. At the LCROSS Confirmation Review, the ESMD Associate Administrator asked the Project team to keep a close record of lessons learned through the course of the mission and share their findings with the Agency at the end of the mission. This paper summarizes the Project, the mission, its risk position, and some of the more notable lessons learned.

  7. Ebola: lessons learned and future challenges for Europe.

    PubMed

    Quaglio, GianLuca; Goerens, Charles; Putoto, Giovanni; Rübig, Paul; Lafaye, Pierre; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Dario, Claudio; Delaunois, Paul; Zachariah, Rony

    2016-02-01

    The Ebola virus epidemic has topped media and political agendas for months; several countries in west Africa have faced the worst Ebola epidemic in history. At the beginning of the disease outbreak, European Union (EU) policies were notably absent regarding how to respond to the crisis. Although the epidemic is now receding from public view, this crisis has undoubtedly changed the European public perception of Ebola virus disease, which is no longer regarded as a bizarre entity confined in some unknown corner in Africa. Policy makers and researchers in Europe now have an opportunity to consider the lessons learned. In this Personal View, we discuss the EU's response to the Ebola crisis in west Africa. Unfortunately, although ample resources and opportunities for humanitarian and medical action existed, the EU did not use them to promote a rapid and well coordinated response to the Ebola crisis. Lessons learned from this crisis should be used to improve the role of the EU in similar situations in the future, ensuring that European aid can be effectively deployed to set up an improved emergency response system, and supporting the establishment of sustainable health-care services in west Africa.

  8. The Network Operations Control Center upgrade task: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, J. S.; Tran, T.-L.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article synthesizes and describes the lessons learned from the Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) upgrade project, from the requirements phase through development and test and transfer. At the outset, the NOCC upgrade was being performed simultaneously with two other interfacing and dependent upgrades at the Signal Processing Center (SPC) and Ground Communications Facility (GCF), thereby adding a significant measure of complexity to the management and overall coordination of the development and transfer-to-operations (DTO) effort. Like other success stories, this project carried with it the traditional elements of top management support and exceptional dedication of cognizant personnel. Additionally, there were several NOCC-specific reasons for success, such as end-to-end system engineering, adoption of open-system architecture, thorough requirements management, and use of appropriate off-the-shelf technologies. On the other hand, there were several difficulties, such as ill-defined external interfaces, transition issues caused by new communications protocols, ambivalent use of two sets of policies and standards, and mistailoring of the new JPL management standard (due to the lack of practical guidelines). This article highlights the key lessons learned, as a means of constructive suggestions for the benefit of future projects.

  9. LESSONS LEARNED IN AEROSOL MONITORING WITH THE RASA

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, Joel B.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Carty, Fitz; Comes, Laura; Eslinger, Paul W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Litke, Kevin E.; Miley, Harry S.; Morris, Scott J.; Schrom, Brian T.; Van Davelaar, Peter; Woods, Vincent T.

    2011-09-14

    The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) is an automated aerosol collection and analysis system designed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the 1990's and is deployed in several locations around the world as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) required under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The RASA operates unattended, save for regularly scheduled maintenance, iterating samples through a three-step process on a 24-hour interval. In its 15-year history, much has been learned from the operation and maintenance of the RASA that can benefit engineering updates or future aerosol systems. On 11 March 2011, a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami rocked the eastern coast of Japan, resulting in power loss and cooling failures at the Daiichi nuclear power plants in Fukushima Prefecture. Aerosol collections were conducted with the RASA in Richland, WA. We present a summary of the lessons learned over the history of the RASA, including lessons taken from the Fukushima incident, regarding the RASA IMS stations operated by the United States.

  10. LCROSS Lunar Impactor - Lessons Learned from a Small Satellite Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) launched with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) on June 18, 2009. While the science function of the LCROSS mission was to determine the presence of water-ice in a permanently-shadowed crater on the moon, the operational purpose was to be a pioneer for future low-cost, risk-tolerant small satellite NASA missions. Recent strategic changes at the Agency level have only furthered the importance of small satellite missions. NASA Ames Research Center and its industry partner, Northrop-Grumman, initiated this spacecraft project two-years after its co-manifest mission had started, with less than one-fifth the budget. With a $79M total cost cap (including operations and reserves) and 31-months until launch, LCROSS needed a game-changing approach to be successful. At the LCROSS Confirmation Review, the ESMD Associate Administrator asked the Project team to keep a close record of lessons learned through the course of the mission and share their findings with the Agency at the end of the mission. This paper summarizes the Project, the mission, its risk position, and some of the more notable lessons learned.

  11. Favorite Lesson Plans: Powerful Standards-Based Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilen, William W., Ed.

    This collection of lesson plans helps social studies teachers and teacher educators implement the various national and state standards in their classrooms. The collection illustrates how classroom implementation can be achieved through the application of the powerful teaching and learning principles devised by National Council for the Social…

  12. Student Learning Styles in Advanced Instrumental Music Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhukov, Katie

    2007-01-01

    Despite a large body of research into learning styles from cognitive, personality and activity perspectives, the definition of learning style is still unclear. The assessment instruments commonly in use have methodological problems. The learning styles of conservatorium instrumentalists are scarcely known and are best studied using an…

  13. Applying a quality assurance system model to curriculum transformation: transferable lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Kayyal, Mohamad; Gibbs, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    As curricula are transformed throughout the world in response to the need for modern medical education, much attention is given to curriculum content and associated teaching, learning and assessment methodologies. However, an important component of any curriculum is its organisational management, how it is all held together, the way the process is conducted and what mechanisms are applied to ensure quality. In 2008, the Faculty of Medicine at Damascus University embarked on a journey of curriculum transformation. The transformation process was specifically and initially based on a quality assurance model. This entailed a concept for realising curriculum transformation; a framework for organisational management, which ensures that the necessary enabling conditions are met and issues of conflicts in roles and responsibilities are resolved; a plan for securing resources and creating the necessary governance structures needed to carry the transformation process forward; and a systematic analysis of risks facing the effective realisation of the transformation process and the corresponding mitigation measures to alleviate their impacts. Although a full evaluation of such an activity produces reliable results only after a period of time, this article demonstrates the principles and structures applied to the initial process based on some of the early lessons learned. We perceive that the lessons learned from this activity are capable of being translated to other Universities, in other similar developing countries; our hope is that others can learn from our experiences.

  14. Lessons-Learned from D and D Activities at the Five Gaseous Diffusion Buildings (K-25, K- 27, K-29, K-31 and K-33) East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN - 13574

    SciTech Connect

    Kopotic, James D.; Ferri, Mark S.; Buttram, Claude

    2013-07-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) is the site of five former gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings that were used to enrich uranium from 1945 to 1985. The process equipment in the original two buildings (K-25 and K-27) was used for the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU), while that in the three later buildings (K-29, K-31 and K-33) produced low enriched uranium (LEU). Equipment was contaminated primarily with uranium and to a lesser extent technetium (Tc). Decommissioning of the GDP process buildings has presented several unique challenges and produced many lessons-learned. Among these is the importance of good, up-front characterization in developing the best demolition approach. Also, chemical cleaning of process gas equipment and piping (PGE) prior to shutdown should be considered to minimize the amount of hold-up material that must be removed by demolition crews. Another lesson learned is to maintain shutdown buildings in a dry state to minimize structural degradation which can significantly complicate characterization, deactivation and demolition efforts. Perhaps the most important lesson learned is that decommissioning GDP process buildings is first and foremost a waste logistics challenge. Innovative solutions are required to effectively manage the sheer volume of waste generated from decontamination and demolition (D and D) of these enormous facilities. Finally, close coordination with Security is mandatory to effectively manage Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and classified equipment issues. (authors)

  15. Chernobyl lessons learned review of N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.T.; McNeece, J.P.; Omberg, R.P.; Stepnewski, D.D.; Lutz, R.J.; Henry, R.E.; Bonser, K.D.; Miller, N.R.

    1987-10-01

    A broad-base review of the N Reactor plant, design characteristics, administrative controls and responses unique to upset conditions has been completed. The review was keyed to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-defined issues associated with the Chernobyl accident. Physical features of N Reactor that preclude an accident like Chernobyl include: lack of autocatalytic reactivity insertion (i.e., negative coolant void and power coefficents) and two separate, fast-acting scram systems. Administrative controls in place at N Reactor would effectively protect against the operator errors and safety violations that set up the Chernobyl accident. Several items were identified where further near-term action is appropriate to ensure effectiveness of existing safety features: Resolve a question concerning the exact point at which Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) activation by manual actions should be implemented or deferred if automatic ECCS trip fails. Ensure appropriate revision of the Emergency Response Guides and full communication of the correct procedure to all Operations, Safety and cognizant Technology staff. Train reactor operators in the currently recognized significance of the Graphite and Shield Cooling System (GSCS) in severe accident situations and cover this appropriately in the Emergency Response Guides. Complete reviews which establish an independent verification that pressure tube rupture will not propagate to other tubes. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Next Generation Launch Technology Program Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Stephen; Tyson, Richard

    2005-01-01

    In November 2002, NASA revised its Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP) to evolve the Space Launch Initiative (SLI) to serve as a theme for two emerging programs. The first of these, the Orbital Space Plane (OSP), was intended to provide crew-escape and crew-transfer functions for the ISS. The second, the NGLT Program, developed technologies needed for safe, routine space access for scientific exploration, commerce, and national defense. The NGLT Program was comprised of 12 projects, ranging from fundamental high-temperature materials research to full-scale engine system developments (turbine and rocket) to scramjet flight test. The Program included technology advancement activities with a broad range of objectives, ultimate applications/timeframes, and technology maturity levels. An over-arching Systems Engineering and Analysis (SE&A) approach was employed to focus technology advancements according to a common set of requirements. Investments were categorized into three segments of technology maturation: propulsion technologies, launch systems technologies, and SE&A.

  17. Laser Incident Lessons Learned and Action List

    SciTech Connect

    Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch

    2016-02-29

    On Thursday November 19, 2015, LANL postdoc received an eye injury from a reflected, nonvisible laser beam (Class 4, pulsed, wavelength 800 nanometer). The setup is configured to split the laser output into two work areas in which qualified operators conduct research experiments. During this incident, the laser output beam was being projected to both experimental work areas, although only one experimental area was actively being used. The second laser beam directed to the second work area was blocked by an inappropriate device (Plexiglas, reflective, non-normal incidence) that reflected substantial portion of the beam toward the first setup. In preparation for the measurements, worker stepped on the stepstool and decided to remove the laser goggles to better see the micrometer readings which were difficult to see due to insufficient lighting. Immediately, he noticed a flash of light in his eye. The operator quickly replaced the laser eye-wear and then, using an infrared viewer, located a stray laser beam being reflected from the plexiglas beam block. The operator did not think he had sustained any injury and continued working. Later that day, however, he noticed a blurry spot in the vision of his left eye. He notified his supervisor on Friday morning, November 20, 2015, and was taken by CINT management to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) medical facility for evaluation. SNL Medical did not find any abnormalities, but referred the operator to a local ophthalmologist for further evaluation. Further evaluations by the ophthalmologist on November 21 and November 23 identified a small spot of inflammation near the fovea on the retina in his left eye. The ophthalmologist stated that this spot would most likely heal on its own and that the blurry spot on the operator's vision would go away. A follow-up visit was scheduled. The employee was released back to work without restrictions.

  18. Transmediterranean flights: lessons learned/perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Francisco; Spoto, Domenico; Ibba, Roberto; Amaro, Francesco; Del Barrio, Luis; Sabau, Maria Dolores; Cardillo, Andrea; Ivano, Musso

    The paper presents a thorough description of the transmediterranean balloon campaigns as an opportunity to carry out astronomical,biological and atmospheric experiments.Also the balloons may serve as technology demonstrators, in the field of planetary exploration ,as occurred with the Huygens probe.An additional possibility,initiated already with secondary school/university students,is the use for space education and public outreach in Southern Europe. The set of operational requirements include among others the following: Stratospheric weather prediction mainly for strata between 20 and 50 Km supported by updated atmospheric models and more frequent and sparse soundings along the Mediterranean area giving punctual measurements for wind,temperature,etc. Digital cartography 1/50.000 supporting density population data and risk zones representation is of utmost interest when flying over land. The latitude control aim is to maintain l between 37° and 39° N on account of geographical,radioelectrical and safety considerations.Detailed study of the IR radiative fluxes influence altitude control through ballast/vanes. TM/TC should be oriented toward standards compliance.Experimenters should have a quick look to their payloads,through the Internet.TM/TC systems using a commercial satellite network will be taken into consideration. Power system could be improved by better batteries and equipping gondolas with solar panels and/or fuel cells.Advanced criteria on flight train and stratospheric gondola design will be discussed. The availability of an augmented localization system could improve both flight operations and recovery.The future trend for recovery is to use a GPS augmented unit as guidance sensor for a parasail. Economic considerations to resume the activity are outlined.

  19. Selected Lessons Learned in Space Shuttle Orbiter Propulsion and Power Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Francisco J.; Martinez, Hugo; Ryan, Abigail; Westover, Shayne; Davies, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Over its 30 years of space flight history, plus the nearly 10 years of design, development test and evaluation, the Space Shuttle Orbiter is full of lessons learned in all of its numerous and complex subsystems. In the current paper, only selected lessons learned in the areas of the Orbiter propulsion and power subsystems will be described. The particular Orbiter subsystems include: Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), Hydraulics and Water Spray Boiler (WSB), Mechanical Flight Controls, Main Propulsion System (MPS), Fuel Cells and Power Reactant and Storage Devices (PRSD), Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), Reaction Control System (RCS), Electrical Power Distribution (EPDC), electrical wiring and pyrotechnics. Given the complexity and extensive history of each of these subsystems, and the limited scope of this paper, it is impossible to include most of the lessons learned; instead the attempt will be to present a selected few or key lessons, in the judgment of the authors. Each subsystem is presented separate, beginning with an overview of the hardware and their function, a short description of a few historical problems and their lessons, followed by a more comprehensive table listing of the major subsystem problems and lessons. These tables serve as a quick reference for lessons learned in each subsystem. In addition, this paper will establish common lessons across subsystems as well as concentrate on those lessons which are deemed to have the highest applicability to future space flight programs.

  20. Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle Engine Cutoff System (ECO) Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Hugo E.; Welzyn, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter's main engine cutoff (ECO) system first failed ground checkout in April, 2005 during a first tanking test prior to Return-to-Flight. Despite significant troubleshooting and investigative efforts that followed, the root cause could not be found and intermittent anomalies continued to plague the Program. By implementing hardware upgrades, enhancing monitoring capability, and relaxing the launch rules, the Shuttle fleet was allowed to continue flying in spite of these unexplained failures. Root cause was finally determined following the launch attempts of STS-122 in December, 2007 when the anomalies repeated, which allowed drag-on instrumentation to pinpoint the fault (the ET feedthrough connector). The suspect hardware was removed and provided additional evidence towards root cause determination. Corrective action was implemented and the system has performed successfully since then. This white paper presents the lessons learned from the entire experience, beginning with the anomalies since Return-to-Flight through discovery and correction of the problem. To put these lessons in better perspective for the reader, an overview of the ECO system is presented first. Next, a chronological account of the failures and associated investigation activities is discussed. Root cause and corrective action are summarized, followed by the lessons learned.

  1. The implementation of discovery learning model based on lesson study to increase student's achievement in colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyanti, Retno Dwi; Purba, Deby Monika

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this research are to get the increase student's achievement on the discovery learning model based on lesson study. Beside of that, this research also conducted to know the cognitive aspect. This research was done in three school that are SMA N 3 Medan. Population is all the students in SMA N 11 Medan which taken by purposive random sampling. The research instruments are achievement test instruments that have been validated. The research data analyzed by statistic using Ms Excell. The result data shows that the student's achievement taught by discovery learning model based on Lesson study higher than the student's achievement taught by direct instructional method. It can be seen from the average of gain and also proved with t-test, the normalized gain in experimental class of SMA N 11 is (0.74±0.12) and control class (0.45±0.12), at significant level α = 0.05, Ha is received and Ho is refused where tcount>ttable in SMA N 11 (9.81>1,66). Then get the improvement cognitive aspect from three of school is C2 where SMA N 11 is 0.84(high). Then the observation sheet result of lesson study from SMA N 11 92 % of student working together while 67% less in active using media.

  2. Lesson Imaging in Math and Science: Anticipating Student Ideas and Questions for Deeper STEM Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephan, Michelle; Pugalee, David; Cline, Julie; Cline, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Help turn students into problem solvers. With lesson imaging, teachers anticipate how chosen activities will unfold in real time--what solutions, questions, and misconceptions students might have and how teachers can promote deeper reasoning. When lesson imaging occurs before instruction, students achieve lesson objectives more naturally and…

  3. Unintended Learning in Primary School Practical Science Lessons from Polanyi's Perspective of Intellectual Passion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jisun; Song, Jinwoong; Abrahams, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study explored, from the perspective of intellectual passion developed by Michael Polanyi, the unintended learning that occurred in primary practical science lessons. We use the term "unintended" learning to distinguish it from "intended" learning that appears in teachers' learning objectives. Data were collected using…

  4. Science: Videotapes for Inservice Training for Active Learning. VITAL Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissock, Craig, Ed.

    This handbook, and the VITAL Science Series videotapes, contain 12 lessons that are examples of some of the many ways of organizing elementary school classrooms for science instruction. The videotapes that are available separately demonstrate full class and small group activities, the use of learning centers, cooperative learning, and outdoor…

  5. Hand Gesture and Mathematics Learning: Lessons From an Avatar.

    PubMed

    Cook, Susan Wagner; Friedman, Howard S; Duggan, Katherine A; Cui, Jian; Popescu, Voicu

    2016-04-29

    A beneficial effect of gesture on learning has been demonstrated in multiple domains, including mathematics, science, and foreign language vocabulary. However, because gesture is known to co-vary with other non-verbal behaviors, including eye gaze and prosody along with face, lip, and body movements, it is possible the beneficial effect of gesture is instead attributable to these other behaviors. We used a computer-generated animated pedagogical agent to control both verbal and non-verbal behavior. Children viewed lessons on mathematical equivalence in which an avatar either gestured or did not gesture, while eye gaze, head position, and lip movements remained identical across gesture conditions. Children who observed the gesturing avatar learned more, and they solved problems more quickly. Moreover, those children who learned were more likely to transfer and generalize their knowledge. These findings provide converging evidence that gesture facilitates math learning, and they reveal the potential for using technology to study non-verbal behavior in controlled experiments.

  6. Lessons Learned from Radioactive Waste Storage and Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Esh, David W.; Bradford, Anna H.

    2008-01-15

    The safety of radioactive waste disposal facilities and the decommissioning of complex sites may be predicated on the performance of engineered and natural barriers. For assessing the safety of a waste disposal facility or a decommissioned site, a performance assessment or similar analysis is often completed. The analysis is typically based on a site conceptual model that is developed from site characterization information, observations, and, in many cases, expert judgment. Because waste disposal facilities are sited, constructed, monitored, and maintained, a fair amount of data has been generated at a variety of sites in a variety of natural systems. This paper provides select examples of lessons learned from the observations developed from the monitoring of various radioactive waste facilities (storage and disposal), and discusses the implications for modeling of future waste disposal facilities that are yet to be constructed or for the development of dose assessments for the release of decommissioning sites. Monitoring has been and continues to be performed at a variety of different facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. These include facilities for the disposal of commercial low-level waste (LLW), reprocessing wastes, and uranium mill tailings. Many of the lessons learned and problems encountered provide a unique opportunity to improve future designs of waste disposal facilities, to improve dose modeling for decommissioning sites, and to be proactive in identifying future problems. Typically, an initial conceptual model was developed and the siting and design of the disposal facility was based on the conceptual model. After facility construction and operation, monitoring data was collected and evaluated. In many cases the monitoring data did not comport with the original site conceptual model, leading to additional investigation and changes to the site conceptual model and modifications to the design of the facility. The following cases are discussed

  7. Planning to Serve: Using Backwards Planning to Design Service-Learning Lesson Plans in the Preservice Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiler, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The author describes how the Understanding by Design (backwards planning) lesson plan format was used by his preservice K-12 students to develop service-learning lesson plans. Preservice teachers in a multicultural education course were given an assignment to develop service-learning lesson plans using the Understanding by Design planning process.…

  8. Lesson Study-Building Communities of Learning Among Pre-Service Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzeh, Fouada

    Lesson Study is a widely used pedagogical approach that has been used for decades in its country of origin, Japan. It is a teacher-led form of professional development that involves the collaborative efforts of teachers in co-planning and observing the teaching of a lesson within a unit for evidence that the teaching practices used help the learning process (Lewis, 2002a). The purpose of this research was to investigate if Lesson Study enables pre-service teachers to improve their own teaching in the area of science inquiry-based approaches. Also explored are the self-efficacy beliefs of one group of science pre-service teachers related to their experiences in Lesson Study. The research investigated four questions: 1) Does Lesson Study influence teacher preparation for inquiry-based instruction? 2) Does Lesson Study improve teacher efficacy? 3) Does Lesson Study impact teachers' aspiration to collaborate with colleagues? 4) What are the attitudes and perceptions of pre-service teachers to the Lesson Study idea in Science? The 12 participants completed two pre- and post-study surveys: STEBI- B, Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (Enochs & Riggs, 1990) and ASTQ, Attitude towards Science Teaching. Data sources included student teaching lesson observations, lesson debriefing notes and focus group interviews. Results from the STEBI-B show that all participants measured an increase in efficacy throughout the study. This study added to the body of research on teaching learning communities, professional development programs and teacher empowerment.

  9. Lessons learned from the 2010 evacuations at Merapi volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Estuning Tyas Wulan; Lavigne, Franck; Picquout, Adrien; de Bélizal, Edouard; Brunstein, Daniel; Grancher, Delphine; Sartohadi, Junun; Cholik, Noer; Vidal, Céline

    2013-07-01

    The rapid onset and large magnitude of the 2010 eruption of Merapi posed significant challenges for evacuations and resulted in a peak number of almost 400,000 Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs). A pre-existing hazard map and an evacuation plan based on the relatively small magnitude of previous eruptions of the 20th century were utilized by emergency officials during the initial phase of the eruption (25 October-3 November, 2010). However, when the magnitude of the eruption increased greatly on 3-5 November 2010, the initial evacuation plan had to be abandoned as danger zones were expanded rapidly and the scale and pace of the evacuation increased dramatically. Fortunately, orders to evacuate were communicated quickly through a variety of communication methods and as a result many thousands of lives were saved. However, there were also problems that resulted from this rapid and larger-than-expected evacuation; and there were lessons learned that can improve future mass evacuations at Merapi and other volcanoes. We analyzed the results of 1969 questionnaires and conducted a series of interviews with community leaders and emergency officials. Results were compiled for periods both during and after the 2010 eruption. Our results show that: (1) trust in the Indonesian government and volcanologists was very high after the eruption; (2) multiple modes of communication were used to relay warnings and evacuation orders; (3) 50% to 70% of IDPs returned to the danger zone during the crisis despite evacuation orders; (4) preparation before the eruption was critical to the successes and included improvements to roads and education programs, (5) public education about hazards and evacuation protocols before the eruption was focused in the perceived highest danger zone where it was effective yet, confusion and loss of life in other areas demonstrated that education programs in all hazard zones are needed to prepare for larger-than-normal eruptions, and (6) improvements in

  10. Pitfalls of Transparency: Lessons Learned from the Milford Flats Fire

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hartwell; D. Shafer; J. Tappen; G. McCurdy; B. Hurley; D. Farmer

    2008-01-16

    2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ This paper will review the data from the PIC and the analytical results of air filter samples collected at Milford, and present lessons learned from the Milford Flats Fire Incident on providing real-time access to monitoring data for the public.

  11. The International Year of Planet Earth: Lessons learned.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mulder, E. F.; Janoschek, W. R.

    2007-12-01

    In 2001, the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) developed an initiative to launch an International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE). This was followed up directly by UNESCO's Earth Science Division. As politicians, decision makers, the media and the public at large were chosen as the main targets, obtaining a proclamation by the General Assembly of the United Nations was crucial. Not only did the beauty and usefulness of Geosciences have to be demonstrated, but also the potential of the timely use of Geoscientific knowledge to minimise loss of life and property, e.g. during the Tsunami and Katrina disasters, had to be made crystal clear. Some of the lessons learned during the preparation for the IYPE (2007-2009) may be summarized as follows. - Support from scientific organisations: from the onset very positive, many joining as Founding or Associate Partners. - Individual geoscientists: some were sceptical, many (very) positive. - UN diplomats: the major natural disasters in 2004-2005 helped trigger their support throughout the UN proclamation process; so-called small countries proved to be more open-minded in lodging this initiative in the UN Agenda. - Politicians: Support for UN proclamations must be decided at the Ministerial level. This procedure may consume considerable time and cannot be influenced from outside. - National Committees: UN proclamation strongly stimulated the creation of National Committees for the IYPE; on August 31st they number 48 with a potential to reach 60 or more. Most of the actions planned at national level comprise outreach activities. - Fundraising: Significant funds have already been raised by National IYPE Committees. Fundraising for international events and to bolster the infrastructure of the International Year have proved to be more difficult. - Patrons, Goodwill Ambassadors, and Senior Advisors have proved to be essential in promoting the ambitions of the IYPE and in the vital process of fundraising. - Good examples

  12. Lessons Learned the Hard Way but Learned Well

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirksen, Debra J.

    2014-01-01

    The author spins a tale of how she learned classroom management largely by trial and error and by making a commitment to never give up on her students. Classroom management done well provides the signposts that give students direction and enables them to reach their destination as learners and human beings. Classroom management is one of the most…

  13. Caring for the Family Caregiver: Lessons Learned in Child Health.

    PubMed

    Keilty, Krista; Cohen, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Policy to support informal caregivers is a critical health policy issue in Canada. Lessons may be learned from the perspectives and experience in the child health field with applicability for all cared-for persons and their informal caregivers. Familycentred care addresses the centrality of the family caregiver in the design and delivery of health services. A life course approach focuses on key periods of transition and downstream effects facing caregivers over their lifetime. The medical home model where care delivery is more coordinated offers potential direct cost savings for both family caregivers and the healthcare system. Models of pediatric home care that focus on promoting caregiver capacity and integration of unregulated providers show the promise of being acceptable and sustainable solutions to increasing demands for caregiver respite. Finally, a number of assumptions that are somewhat unique to the pediatric caregiver experience are explored and/or challenged. These lessons and assumptions may provide insight for policymakers in the development of systems and supports for all cared-for persons and their caregivers in Canada.

  14. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  15. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  16. Massachusetts nuclear power referendum: Lessons learned from the campaign trail

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    Last November, Massachusetts voters cast their ballots on a binding initiative which, if passed, would have prohibited the production of high-level waste, thereby permanently shutting down the state's two nuclear power plants: Yankee and Pilgrim. Question 4, as the initiative became known, posed an unprecedented challenge for the state's six major utilities. Essentially, Question 4 was defeated for two reasons: compelling arguments and a well-founded strategy for communicating those arguments. One part of that strategy was the use of debates and public-speaking engagements before both civic groups and on radio/television. These debates and presentations were clearly the most interesting part of the campaign and provided many insights that may be applied to long-term public policy and informational programs. Obviously, there is a significant difference between an intense, focused campaign and an ongoing, diverse public information program-but many of the principles are the same. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the key lessons learned from over 300 debates and presentations in the highly emotional atmosphere of the Question 4 campaign. Throughout the campaign, debaters and speakers submitted after action reports, and it is from these as well as the overall campaign results that the lessons and anecdotes are derived.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  18. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  19. Welding in Space: Lessons Learned for Future In Space Repair Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. K.; Nunes, A. C.; Zimmerman, F. R.

    2005-01-01

    Welds have been made in the harsh environment of space only twice in the history of manned space flight. The United States conducted the M5 12 experiment on Skylab and the former Soviet Union conducted an Extravehicular Activity. Both experiments demonstrated electron beam welding. A third attempt to demonstrate and advance space welding was made by the Marshall Space Flight Center in the 90's but the experiment was demanifested as a Space Shuttle payload. This presentation summarizes the lessons learned from these three historical experiences in the areas of safety, design, operations and implementation so that welding in space can become an option for in space repair applications.

  20. Lessons learned from evaluating launch-site processing problems of Space Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Carlos A.; Heuser, Robert E.; Sales, Johnny R.; Smith, Anthony M.

    1992-01-01

    The authors discuss a trend analysis program that is being conducted on the problem reports written during the processing of Space Shuttle payloads at Kennedy Space Center. The program is aimed at developing lessons learned that can both improve the effectiveness of the current payload processing cycles as well as help to guide the processing strategies for Space Station Freedom. The payload processing reports from STS 26R and STS 41 are used. A two-tier evaluation activity is described, and some typical results from the tier one analyses are presented.

  1. Evaluation of the usage of an object-oriented lesson model to be implemented in medical virtual learning environments.

    PubMed

    Staccini, Pascal; Joubert, Michel; Fieschi, Marius

    2006-01-01

    One of the main aims of learning platforms is to guide students towards interaction with learning activities. Pedagogically, these activities should be connected and well-integrated in a coherent environment. Faced with the increasing demand of medical school faculty and for online delivery of course materials, we designed an integrated and generic lesson model. This was implemented in an original virtual-learning environment. The platform was programmed within an object-oriented content management system embedding a workflow engine. This paper provides a description of the lesson model and the comparative evaluation of its usage by students of two medical curricula. Web usage mining techniques were applied to identify navigation patterns. The monitoring of student behavior in terms of usage is discussed to help student follow-up and optimize tutoring arrangements.

  2. Five Important Lessons I Learned during the Process of Creating New Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, R. Ann

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes her experiences of developing new child care sites and offers five important lessons that she learned through her experiences which helped her to create successful child care centers. These lessons include: (1) Finding an appropriate area and location; (2) Creating realistic financial projections based on real…

  3. Hugh Mehan's "Learning Lessons" Reconsidered: On the Differences between Naturalistic and Critical Analysis of Classroom Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macbeth, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses Hugh Mehan's "Learning Lessons" in the development of the naturalistic study of classroom discourse studies and considers the emergence of an alternative program for classroom discourse studies in critical discourse analysis. Critiques some studies of classroom discourse and analyzes a fourth-grade lesson on fractions to show how the…

  4. What Positive Lessons Have You Learned from English Class about Working with Other People?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bailey; Keefe, Bailey; Gray, Angela; Li, Justin; Miller, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a forum for students to share their experiences and lessons learned from English class about working with other people. The first author thinks it is a good idea to have split-level classes because it opens up new opportunities to meet people and teaches one many good lessons about working with other people. The second author…

  5. Psychometric Analysis of a 5E Learning Cycle Lesson Plan Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, M. Jenice; Day, Jeanelle Bland; Sundberg, Cheryl; Dantzler, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the procedures and the analysis of an instrument designed to measure preservice teachers' ability to develop appropriate 5E learning cycle lesson plans. The 5E "inquiry lesson plan" (ILP) rubric is comprised of 12 items with a scoring range of zero to four points per item. Content validity was…

  6. Lessons Learned from Web-Enhanced Teaching in Landscape Architecture Studios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming-Han

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to summarize lessons learned from implementing web-enhanced teaching in landscape architecture studio courses. The lessons are documented as challenges and opportunities based on a two-year assessment study of web-enhanced landscape architecture construction studios. This article will help landscape architecture…

  7. Lessons learned from "the skeptical environmentalist": an environmental health perspective.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Agnes; Castorina, Rosemary; Desai, Manish; Duramad, Paurene; Fischer, Susan; Klepeis, Neil; Liang, Song; Mehta, Sumi; Naumoff, Kyra; Noth, Elizabeth M; Schei, Morten; Tian, Linwei; Vork, Kathleen L; Smith, Kirk R

    2004-01-01

    Few books about the environment have generated as much heated debate as Bjørn Lomborg's 'The Skeptical Environmentalist: Measuring the Real State of the World', published by Cambridge University Press in 2001. A flavor of the controversy can be gleaned from a series of reviews and rebuttals published in 'Scientific American' (Rennie 2002). In general, most positive reviews appeared in the popular press (e.g., 'The Economist', 'Washington Post Book Review', 'The Wall Street Journal') and most negative reviews appeared in the scientific press (e.g., 'Science', 'Nature', 'Bioscience'). Although 'The Skeptical Environmentalist' (TSE) addresses a number of environmental health issues, voices from the environmental health community have not been prominent among the participants in this debate. Now that the dust from the initial stampede to praise and condemn the book has settled, we will explore lessons to be learned from TSE and the associated debate from an environmental health perspective.

  8. Radiological accident and incident in Thailand: lesson to be learned.

    PubMed

    Ya-anant, Nanthavan; Tiyapun, Kanokrat; Saiyut, Kittiphong

    2011-07-01

    Radioactive materials in Thailand have been used in medicine, research and industry for more than 50 y. Several radiological accident and incidents happened in the past 10 y. A serious one was the radiological accident that occurred in Samut Prakan, Thailand in 2000. The serious radiological accident occurred when the (60)Co head was partially dismantled, taken from that storage to sell as scrap metal. Three victims died and 10 people received high dose from the source. The lesson learned from the radiological accident in Samut Prakan was to improve in many subjects, such as efficiency in Ministerial Regulations and Atomic Energy Act, emergency response and etc. In addition to the serious accident, there are also some small incidents that occurred, such as detection of contaminated scrap metals from the re-cycling of scrap metals from steel factories. Therefore, the radiation protection infrastructure was established after the accident. Laws and regulations of radiation safety and the relevant regulatory procedures must be revised.

  9. Acid in the environment: lessons learned and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Visgilio, Gerald R.; Whitelaw, Diana M.

    2007-07-01

    This book is the result of a conference held biannually at the Goodwin-Niering Center for Conservation Biology and Environmental Studies at Connecticut College. It uses an interdisciplinary approach to focus on important ecological impacts of acid deposition, the transboundary nature of the pollutants that cause acid rain, and domestic and international policies designed to reduce the emission of these pollutants. The book combines research findings and the policy analyses of experts from different academic disciplines with the positions advanced by representatives of various nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). The sixteen papers are arranged in four parts entitled: ecological impacts of acid deposition; acid emissions energy and policy; sulfur dioxide and the market; and lessons learned and future prospects.

  10. Lessons Learned from PEP-II LLRF and Longitudinal Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.H.; Van Winkle, D.; Teytelman, D.; /Dimtel, Redwood City

    2010-08-26

    The PEP-II B-Factory collider ended the final phase of operation at nearly twice the design current and 4X the design luminosity. To highlight the evolution from the original conceptual design through to the 1.2E34 final machine we choose one example each from the broadband feedback and from the LLRF system. They illustrate the original design estimation missed some very significant details, and how in the course of PEP-II operation unexpected difficulties led to significant insights and new approaches which allowed higher machine performance. We present valuable 'lessons learned' which are of interest to designers of next generation feedback and impedance controlled LLRF systems.

  11. Project Northland in Croatia: results and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    West, Bernadette; Abatemarco, Diane; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela A; Zec, Vezna; Russo, Andrea; Milic, Ranko

    2008-01-01

    As part of an international public health partnership formed in 2001 we assessed the impact of Project Northland in Croatia--an adolescent alcohol school-based prevention intervention implemented in Split--on students. The curriculum was implemented in 13 randomly selected schools with another 13 schools serving as controls. The evaluation included quantitative and qualitative methods, using pre/post-tests to compare intervention and controls and follow-up focus groups with parents and teachers. Quantitative data showed the intervention was more successful in changing attitudes in the first two years, but had less impact on older students. Qualitative data suggest benefits from the program overall. Given the intervention was successful in the earlier grades it should be initiated earlier to have a greater impact. Challenges and lessons learned are offered.

  12. Lessons Learned and Challenges in Building a Filipino Health Coalition

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, David E.; Abesamis-Mendoza, Noilyn; Ursua, Rhodora; Divino, Lily Ann M.; Cadag, Kara; Gavin, Nicholas P.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, community-based coalitions have become an effective channel to addressing various health problems within specific ethnic communities. The purpose of this article is twofold: (a) to describe the process involved in building the Kalusugan Coalition (KC), a Filipino American health coalition based in New York City, and (b) to highlight the lessons learned and the challenges from this collaborative venture. The challenges described also offer insights on how the coalition development process can be greatly affected by the partnership with an academic institution on a community-based research project. Because each cultural group has unique issues and concerns, the theoretical framework used by KC offers creative alternatives to address some of the challenges regarding coalition infrastructures, leadership development, unexpected change of coalition dynamics, and cultural nuances. PMID:19098260

  13. Development of a public health reporting data warehouse: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Rizi, Seyed Ali Mussavi; Roudsari, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Data warehouse projects are perceived to be risky and prone to failure due to many organizational and technical challenges. However, often iterative and lengthy processes of implementation of data warehouses at an enterprise level provide an opportunity for formative evaluation of these solutions. This paper describes lessons learned from successful development and implementation of the first phase of an enterprise data warehouse to support public health surveillance at British Columbia Centre for Disease Control. Iterative and prototyping approach to development, overcoming technical challenges of extraction and integration of data from large scale clinical and ancillary systems, a novel approach to record linkage, flexible and reusable modeling of clinical data, and securing senior management support at the right time were the main factors that contributed to the success of the data warehousing project.

  14. Lessons Learned in Thermal Coatings from the DSCOVR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    Finding solutions to thermal coating issues on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) mission was a very challenging and unique endeavor. As a passive thermal control system, coatings provide the desired thermal, optical, and electrical charging properties, while surviving a harsh space environment. DSCOVR mission hardware was repurposed from the late 1990s satellite known as Triana. As a satellite that was shelved for over a decade, the coating surfaces consequently degraded with age, and became fairly outdated. Although the mission successfully launched in February 2015, there were unfamiliar observations and unanticipated issues with the coating surfaces during the revival phases of the project. For example, the thermal coatings on DSCOVR experienced particulate contamination and resistivity requirement problems, among other issues. While finding solutions to these issues, valuable lessons were learned in thermal coatings that may provide great insight to future spaceflight missions in similar situations.

  15. Testing Planetary Rovers: Technologies, Perspectives, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Hans; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Rovers are a vital component of NASA's strategy for manned and unmanned exploration of space. For the past five years, the Intelligent Mechanisms Group at the NASA Ames Research Center has conducted a vigorous program of field testing of rovers from both technology and science team productivity perspective. In this talk, I will give an overview of the the last two years of the test program, focusing on tests conducted in the Painted Desert of Arizona, the Atacama desert in Chile, and on IMG participation in the Mars Pathfinder mission. An overview of autonomy, manipulation, and user interface technologies developed in response to these missions will be presented, and lesson's learned in these missions and their impact on future flight missions will be presented. I will close with some perspectives on how the testing program has affected current rover systems.

  16. Hypergolic Propellants: The Handling Hazards and Lessons Learned from Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Several unintentional hypergolic fluid related spills, fires, and explosions from the Apollo Program, the Space Shuttle Program, the Titan Program, and a few others have occurred over the past several decades. Spill sites include the following government facilities: Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Johnson Space Center (JSC), White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS), Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), Little Rock AFB, and McConnell AFB. Until now, the only method of capturing the lessons learned from these incidents has been "word of mouth" or by studying each individual incident report. Through studying several dozen of these incidents, certain root cause themes are apparent. Scrutinizing these themes could prove to be highly beneficial to future hypergolic system testing, checkout, and operational use.

  17. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  18. OSTA-1 lessons learned and recommendations for future payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R. R.; Brizzolara, F. W.; Demas, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Five remote sensing experiments, together with one air pollution and one bioengineering experiment, were incorporated into the first Space Shuttle scientific payload of the NASA Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications (OSTA-1). The instrument package, experimental procedures, and specialized personnel teams all performed satisfactorily. Attention is presently given to the lessons learned during the OSTA-1-incorporating mission, STS-2 of November 12, 1981. Payload test and integration teams should never take unfamiliar facilities for granted. Training, especially if it employs hands-on experience with full-scale mockups and mission simulations, is found to be highly effective. Ephemeris data is too important to trust to table-top calculators, since errors propagate in repeated calculations. Terminal access to an off-line computer is required.

  19. Leadership lessons learned in tactical combat casualty care.

    PubMed

    Butler, Frank K

    2017-03-22

    The US Military has achieved remarkable success in improving survival for our nation's combat wounded throughout the 14 years of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. For the prehospital phase of care, where most combat fatalities occur, these advances have been embodied in Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC.) TCCC is a set of evidence-based, best-practice, prehospital trauma care guidelines that are customized for use on the battlefield. The TCCC Guidelines have been updated on an ongoing basis over the last 15 years through the work of the Committee on TCCC and the TCCC Working Group. The process of developing improvements in battlefield trauma care and advocating for them to be implemented throughout the US Military was lengthy, challenging, and evolutionary. This paper describes the major leadership lessons learned in the TCCC effort during the 20 years from its inception to the present.

  20. Acting on Lessons Learned: A NASA Glenn Acoustics Branch Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Lessons learned from the International Space Station have indicated that early attention to acoustics will be key to achieving safer, more productive environments for new long duration missions. Fans are known to be dominant noise sources, and reducing fan noise poses challenges for fan manufacturers and systems engineers. The NASA Glenn Acoustics Branch has considered ways in which expertise and capabilities traditionally used to understand and mitigate aircraft engine noise can be used to address small fan noise issues in Exploration and Information Technology applications. Many could benefit if NASA can capture what is known about small fan aero and acoustic performance in a "Guide for the Design, Selection, and Installation of Fans for Spaceflight Applications." A draft outline for this document will be offered as a useful starting point for brainstorming ideas for the various smaller, near-term research projects that would need to be addressed first.

  1. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  2. Lessons learned from CIRFT testing on SNF vibration integrity study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Hao; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L.; Scaglione, John M.

    2015-01-01

    A cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) was developed to support U.S. NRC and DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign studies on high burn-up (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transportation during normal conditions of transport (NCT). Two devices were developed; the first CIRFT was successfully installed and operated in the ORNL hot-cells in September 2013. Since hot cell testing commenced several HBU SNF samples from both Zr-4 and M5 clads were investigated. The second CIRFT device was developed in February 2014, and has been used to test clad/fuel surrogate rods (stainless steel with alumina pellet inserts). The second CIRFT machine has also been used for sensor development and test sensitivity analyses, as well as loading boundary condition parameter studies. The lessons learned from CIRFT testing will be presented in this paper.

  3. Small grant management in health and behavioral sciences: Lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Sakraida, Teresa J; D'Amico, Jessica; Thibault, Erica

    2010-08-01

    This article describes considerations in health and behavioral sciences small grant management and describes lessons learned during post-award implementation. Using the components by W. Sahlman [Sahlman, W. (1997). How to write a great business plan. Harvard Business Review, 75(4), 98-108] as a business framework, a plan was developed that included (a) building relationships with people in the research program and with external parties providing key resources, (b) establishing a perspective of opportunity for research advancement, (c) identifying the larger context of scientific culture and regulatory environment, and (d) anticipating problems with a flexible response and rewarding teamwork. Small grant management included developing a day-to-day system, building a grant/study program development plan, and initiating a marketing plan.

  4. Food security in China: lessons learned and future expectations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, X.

    2011-12-01

    Population expansion and rapid economic development have been and will continue placing dramatic pressure on Chinese land resources to provide food, water, and energy. Globalisation and international cooperation makes China land use system inseparable from the rest of the world. In this study, we will first analyze the historic changes of food supply/demand in China during the past by ensemble all the available dataset and information from literature. During the past 60 years, China has been self-fed its own population benefiting from the increase of productivity which helps provide enough food. By analyzing the factors behind of the increase of productivity, it raises quite some concerns with future development. Projections of possible pathways of development will be discussed in this paper. Lessons learn from the past will help study food security in other countries particularly in countries like India or African countries.

  5. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  6. Contamination lessons learned from the Midcourse Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uy, O. Manuel; Benson, Richard C.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Silver, David M.; Lesho, Jeffrey C.; Galica, Gary E.; Green, B. David; Boies, Mark T.; Wood, Bob E.; Hall, David F.

    1998-10-01

    Many contamination lessons have been learned since the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite was launched on April 24, 1996. FOremost is the inclusion of spacecraft design and thermal engineers with the contamination team early in the program, which resulted in the placement of vents away from the optical sensors, the separation into clean and 'dirty' sections, the exclusion of thrusters, the use of non- perforated silver/Teflon on the optical sensor axis, and the outgassing procedures instituted for all subsystem suppliers. The use of contamination instruments as monitors during integration and testing enabled correct technical decision to be made during several contamination incidents. In space, the contamination monitoring instruments supported programmatic decisions during the early mission planning. During the warm-up of the cryogenic telescope, it was learned that a small gap between the multilayer insulation and the internal baffles contributed to mass redistribution of water vapor. Consequently, it was also learned that a careful warming procedure may potentially be used to clean space-based cryogenic mirrors of condensed water vapor. Particles brought from the ground can be released by mechanical motions such as door openings as well as by thermal shock induced by the Sun during umbra exit. Solar- induced water evaporation from multilayer insulation can dominate the gaseous environment over the spacecraft's lifetime of several years.

  7. Lessons learned from Mir--a payload perspective.

    PubMed

    Uri, John J; Nygren, Richard W; Cardenas, Jeffery A

    2005-01-01

    Among the principal objectives of the Phase 1 NASA/Mir program were for the United States to gain experience working with an international partner, to gain working experience in long-duration space flight, and to gain working experience in planning for and executing research on a long-duration space platform. The Phase 1 program was to provide the US early experience prior to the construction and operation of the International Space Station (Phase 2 and 3). While it can be argued that Mir and ISS are different platforms and that programmatically Phase 1 and ISS are organized differently, it is also clear that many aspects of operating a long-duration research program are platform independent. This can be demonstrated by a review of lessons learned from Skylab, a US space station program of the mid-1970s, many of which were again "learned" on Mir and are being "learned" on ISS. Among these are optimum crew training strategies, on-orbit crew operations, ground support, medical operations and crew psychological support, and safety certification processes.

  8. Capturing lessons learned from evidence-to-policy initiatives through structured reflection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation platforms (KTPs), which are partnerships between policymakers, stakeholders, and researchers, are being established in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to enhance evidence-informed health policymaking (EIHP). This study aims to gain a better understanding of the i) activities conducted by KTPs, ii) the way in which KTP leaders, policymakers, and stakeholders perceive these activities and their outputs, iii) facilitators that support KTP work and challenges, and the lessons learned for overcoming such challenges, and iv) factors that can help to ensure the sustainability of KTPs. Methods This paper triangulated qualitative data from: i) 17 semi-structured interviews with 47 key informants including KTP leaders, policymakers, and stakeholders from 10 KTPs; ii) document reviews, and iii) observation of deliberations at the International Forum on EIHP in LMICs held in Addis Ababa in August 2012. Purposive sampling was used and data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Deliberative dialogues informed by evidence briefs were identified as the most commendable tools by interviewees for enhancing EIHP. KTPs reported that they have contributed to increased awareness of the importance of EIHP and strengthened relationships among policymakers, stakeholders, and researchers. Support from policymakers and international funders facilitated KTP activities, while the lack of skilled human resources to conduct EIHP activities impeded KTPs. Ensuring the sustainability of EIHP initiatives after the end of funding was a major challenge for KTPs. KTPs reported that institutionalization within the government has helped to retain human resources and secure funding, whereas KTPs hosted by universities highlighted the advantage of autonomy from political interests. Conclusions The establishment of KTPs is a promising development in supporting EIHP. Real-time lesson drawing from the experiences of KTPs can support improvements in the

  9. Blended learning: strengths, challenges, and lessons learned in an interprofessional training program.

    PubMed

    Lotrecchiano, G R; McDonald, P L; Lyons, L; Long, T; Zajicek-Farber, M

    2013-11-01

    This field report outlines the goals of providing a blended learning model for an interdisciplinary training program for healthcare professionals who care for children with disabilities. The curriculum blended traditional face-to-face or on-site learning with integrated online interactive instruction. Credit earning and audited graduate level online coursework, community engagement experiences, and on-site training with maternal and child health community engagement opportunities were blended into a cohesive program. The training approach emphasized adult learning principles in different environmental contexts integrating multiple components of the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities Program. This paper describes the key principles adopted for this blended approach and the accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned. The discussion offers examples from training content, material gathered through yearly program evaluation, as well as university course evaluations. The lessons learned consider the process and the implications for the role of blended learning in this type of training program with suggestions for future development and adoption by other programs.

  10. Lessons learned from ten years of distance learning outreach*

    PubMed Central

    Locatis, Craig; Gaines, Cynthia; Liu, Wei-Li; Gill, Michael; Ackerman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study tested the efficacy of providing distance learning with real-time videoconferencing to broaden high school student knowledge of health careers. Methods: A pilot program was tried out and extended over ten years to include other schools in four different time zones and the National Library of Medicine. Survey results, site visits, and continued school participation were used as effectiveness indicators. Student ratings, site visits, and ongoing discussions were used to evaluate critical factors in the program. Results: Nine program factors contributed to success. Conclusions: Synchronous communication can be effective for outreach to special populations given appropriate infrastructure, technology, program design, and implementation. PMID:25918486

  11. Lessons learned about coordinating academic partnerships from an international network for health education.

    PubMed

    Luo, Airong; Omollo, Kathleen Ludewig

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing trend of academic partnerships between U.S., Canadian, and European health science institutions and academic health centers in low- and middle-income countries. These partnerships often encounter challenges such as resource disparities and power differentials, which affect the motivations, expectations, balance of benefits, and results of the joint projects. Little has been discussed in previous literature regarding the communication and project management processes that affect the success of such partnerships. To fill the gap in the literature, the authors present lessons learned from the African Health Open Educational Resources Network, a multicountry, multiorganizational partnership established in May 2008. The authors introduce the history of the network, then discuss actively engaging stakeholders throughout the project's life cycle (design, planning, execution, and closure) through professional development, relationship building, and assessment activities. They focus on communication and management practices used to identify mutually beneficial project goals, ensure timely completion of deliverables, and develop sustainable sociotechnical infrastructure for future collaborative projects. These activities yielded an interactive process of action, assessment, and reflection to ensure that project goals and values were aligned with implementation. The authors conclude with a discussion of lessons learned and how the partnership project may serve as a model for other universities and academic health centers in high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries that are interested in or currently pursuing international academic partnerships.

  12. University Hospital Struck Deaf and Silent by Lightning: Lessons to Learn.

    PubMed

    Dami, Fabrice; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Yersin, Bertrand; Hugli, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    We describe how an electromagnetic wave after a lightning strike affected a university hospital, including the communication shutdown that followed, the way it was handled, and the lessons learned from this incident.

  13. Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case. This study... management information system to automate manual Naval aviation maintenance tasks-NALCOMIS. With the use of a fourth-generation programming language

  14. Lessons Learned from Ares I Upper Stage Structures and Thermal Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    The Ares 1 Upper Stage was part of the vehicle intended to succeed the Space Shuttle as the United States manned spaceflight vehicle. Although the Upper Stage project was cancelled, there were many lessons learned that are applicable to future vehicle design. Lessons learned that are briefly detailed in this Technical Memorandum are for specific technical areas such as tank design, common bulkhead design, thrust oscillation, control of flight and slosh loads, purge and hazardous gas system. In addition, lessons learned from a systems engineering and vehicle integration perspective are also included, such as computer aided design and engineering, scheduling, and data management. The need for detailed systems engineering in the early stages of a project is emphasized throughout this report. The intent is that future projects will be able to apply these lessons learned to keep costs down, schedules brief, and deliver products that perform to the expectations of their customers.

  15. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs. 1

  16. Program Evaluation: Lessons To be Learned from a District-Wide Middle School Tutorial Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Candace; LeBlanc, Patrice; Collins, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates Palm Beach County School District's Safe School Center tutorial program, a summer-school program for middle-school students who failed subjects during the academic year. Describes program successes, failures, and lessons learned. (Contains 38 references.) (PKP)

  17. From Lessons Learned the Hard Way to Lessons Learned the Harder Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwegler, Andria Foote

    2013-01-01

    My departure from traditional methods of teaching and assessment (i.e., lecture and close-ended exams) was prompted years ago by a "gut feeling" that has morphed into an explicit examination of my teaching practice and students' reactions to it. The scholarly approach and empirical evidence in "Teachers and Learning"…

  18. Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind power provides a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed and in deeper water, but there is still much that is unknown about the effects on the environment. Here we describe the lessons learned based on the recent literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals and seabirds, and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world. The four key lessons learned that we discuss are: 1) Identifying the area over which biological effects may occur to inform baseline data collection and determining the connectivity between key populations and proposed wind energy sites, 2) The need to put impacts into a population level context to determine whether they are biologically significant, 3) Measuring responses to wind farm construction and operation to determine disturbance effects and avoidance responses, and 4) Learn from other industries to inform risk assessments and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. As the number and size of offshore wind developments increases, there will be a growing need to consider the population level consequences and cumulative impacts of these activities on marine species. Strategically targeted data collection and modeling aimed at answering questions for the consenting process will also allow regulators to make decisions based on the best available information, and achieve a balance between climate change targets and environmental legislation. PMID:25250175

  19. Assessing environmental impacts of offshore wind farms: lessons learned and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen; Brookes, Kate L; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind power provides a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed and in deeper water, but there is still much that is unknown about the effects on the environment. Here we describe the lessons learned based on the recent literature and our experience with assessing impacts of offshore wind developments on marine mammals and seabirds, and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world. The four key lessons learned that we discuss are: 1) Identifying the area over which biological effects may occur to inform baseline data collection and determining the connectivity between key populations and proposed wind energy sites, 2) The need to put impacts into a population level context to determine whether they are biologically significant, 3) Measuring responses to wind farm construction and operation to determine disturbance effects and avoidance responses, and 4) Learn from other industries to inform risk assessments and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. As the number and size of offshore wind developments increases, there will be a growing need to consider the population level consequences and cumulative impacts of these activities on marine species. Strategically targeted data collection and modeling aimed at answering questions for the consenting process will also allow regulators to make decisions based on the best available information, and achieve a balance between climate change targets and environmental legislation.

  20. Learning about Mason: A Collaborative Lesson with a Struggling Reader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    In this "Struggling Readers" department, the author describes a collaborative lesson--a professional development strategy adapted from Reading Recovery. Collaborative lessons involve a small group of educators who collaborate to help a student who is struggling with reading. While collaborative lessons were initially designed by Reading Recovery…