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Sample records for activities marine seismic

  1. 75 FR 13498 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Dumbarton Bridge Seismic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Specified Activities; Dumbarton Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project, California AGENCY: National Marine... Dumbarton Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project. DATES: Effective August 15, 2010, through August 14, 2011... Seismic Retrofit Project. NMFS issued a notice in the Federal Register ] on December 4, 2009 (74 FR...

  2. 75 FR 39335 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Seismic Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ...NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take small numbers of marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a marine seismic survey in the Arctic Ocean during August to September, 2010. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS requests comments on its proposal to authorize USGS to......

  3. 75 FR 18160 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Antioch Bridge Seismic Retrofit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... existing bridge structure. This is where water depths are less than 10-ft below mean lower-low water (MLLW... Specified Activities; Antioch Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project, California AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Bridge Seismic Retrofit Project. DATES: Effective August 15, 2010, through August 14, 2011. ADDRESSES:...

  4. 75 FR 54095 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Seismic Survey in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ...NMFS has received an application from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) of the University of California for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine seismic survey. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to SIO to take, by......

  5. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  6. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.

  7. TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES an active seismic and passive seismic experiment at Mt. Etna volcano. An integrated marine and onland geophysical survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesus. M.; Patane, Domenico; Puglisi, Guisseppe; Zuccarello, Lucciano; Bianco, Francesca; Luehr, Birger; Diaz-Moreno, Alejandro; Prudencio, Janire; Koulakov, Ivan; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Cocina, Ornella; Coltelli, Mauro; Scarfi, Lucciano; De Gori, Pascuale; Carrion, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    An active seismic experiment to study the internal structure of Etna Volcano is going to carried out on Sicily and Aeolian islands. The main objective of the TOMO-ETNA MED-SUV.ISES experiment, beginning in summer 2014, is to perform a high resolution seismic tomography, in velocity and attenuation, in Southern Italy, by using active and passive seismic data, in an area encompassing outstanding volcanoes as Mt. Etna, and Aeolian volcanoes. The achievement of this objective is based on the integration and sharing of the in-situ marine and land experiments and observations and on the implementation of new instruments and monitoring systems. For the purpose, onshore and offshore seismic stations and passive and active seismic data generated both in marine and terrestrial environment will be used. Additionally, other geophysical data, mainly magnetic and gravimetric data will be considered to obtain a joint Upper Mantle-Crust structure that could permit to make progress in the understanding of the dynamic of the region. This multinational experiment which involves institutions from Spain, Italy, Germany, United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Portugal, Russia, USA and Mexico. During the experiment more than 6.600 air gun shots performed by the Spanish Oceanographic vessel "Sarmiento de Gamboa" will be recorder on a dense local seismic network consisting of 100 on land non-permanent stations, 70 on land permanent stations and 20-25 OBSs. Contemporaneously other marine geophysical measures will be performed using a marine Gravimeter LaCoste&Romberg Air-Sea Gravity System II and a Marine Magnetometer SeaSPY. The experiments will provide a unique data set in terms of data quantity and quality, and it will provide a detailed velocity and attenuation structural image of volcano edifice. The results will be essential in the development and interpretation of future volcanic models. It is noteworthy that this project is fully transversal, multidisciplinary and crosses several

  8. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting, San Diego, Oct. 23-26.

  9. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  10. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N.; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R.; Louie, J.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 35, 7 pp. Preprint at http://crack.seismo.unr.edu/geothermal/Eisses-GRCpaper-sm.pdf The Pyramid Lake fault zone lies within a vitally important area of the northern Walker Lane where not only can transtension can be studied through a complex arrangement of strike-slip and normal faults but also geothermal activity can be examined in the extensional regime for productivity. This study used advanced and economical seismic methods in attempt to develop the Paiute Tribe’s geothermal reservoir and to expand upon the tectonics and earthquake hazard knowledge of the area. 500 line-kilometers of marine CHIRP data were collected on Pyramid Lake combined with 27 kilometers of vibrator seismic on-land data from the northwest side of the basin were collected in 2010 that highlighted two distinct phases of faulting. Preliminary results suggest that the geothermal fluids in the area are controlled by the late Pleistoceneto Holocene-aged faults and not through the mid-Miocene-aged conduits as originally hypothesized.

  11. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A. M.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. W.; Karlin, R. E.; Baskin, R. L.; Louie, J. N.; Smith, K. D.; Pullammanappallil, S.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary slip rates measured across the East Pyramid Lake fault, or the Lake Range fault, help provide new estimates of extension across the Pyramid Lake basin. Multiple stratigraphic horizons spanning 48 ka were tracked throughout the lake, with layer offsets measured across all significant faults in the basin. A chronstratigraphic framework acquired from four sediment cores allows slip rates of the Lake Range and other faults to be calculated accurately. This region of the northern Walker Lake, strategically placed between the right-lateral strike-slip faults of Honey and Eagle Lakes to the north, and the normal fault bounded basins to the southwest (e.g., Tahoe, Carson), is critical in understanding the underlying structural complexity that is not only necessary for geothermal exploration, but also earthquake hazard assessment due to the proximity of the Reno-Sparks metropolitan area. In addition, our seismic CHIRP imaging with submeter resolution allows the construction of the first fault map of Pyramid Lake. The Lake Range fault can be obviously traced west of Anahoe Island extending north along the east end of the lake in numerous CHIRP lines. Initial drafts of the fault map reveal active transtension through a series of numerous, small, northwest striking, oblique-slip faults in the north end of the lake. A previously field mapped northwest striking fault near Sutcliff can be extended into the west end of Pyramid Lake. This fault map, along with the calculated slip rate of the Lake Range, and potentially multiple other faults, gives a clearer picture into understanding the geothermal potential, tectonic regime and earthquake hazards in the Pyramid Lake basin and the northern Walker Lane. These new results have also been merged with seismicity maps, along with focal mechanisms for the larger events to begin to extend our fault map in depth.

  12. The MARINER Integrated Seismic and Geophysical Mapping Experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Canales, J.; Sohn, R. A.; Paulatto, M.; Arai, R.; Szitkar, F.

    2013-12-01

    The MARINER (Mid-Atlantic Ridge INtegrated Experiments at Rainbow) seismic and geophysical mapping experiment was designed to examine the relationship between tectonic rifting, heat/melt supply, and oceanic core complex formation at a non-transform offset (NTO) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 36°N, the site of the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow hydrothermal system. We present an overview of the components of the experiment and the various projects stemming from it. The 5-week experiment was carried out aboard the R/V M. G. Langseth in April-May 2013, and consisted of a 3D active-source seismic tomography experiment, 2D multi-channel seismic profiles, an on-going nine month passive micro-seismicity study, dense acoustic mapping of the seafloor (including depth and amplitude information), gravity field mapping, and magnetic field mapping. During the tomography experiment, we deployed 46 ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) over a 35 x 80 sq. km area centered on Rainbow. Twenty-six wide-angle seismic lines were carried out using the Langseth's 36-element source, generating ~175,000 seismic records. The MCS experiment, which was also recorded on 20 OBS, consisted of twenty-one densely spaced seismic lines using an 8-km-long hydrophone streamer. Bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic surveys were carried out over a broader, 80x105 sq. km, area centered on Rainbow. Overall, the experiment extends across two segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge separated by the Rainbow NTO massif. MARINER multi-beam bathymetry and acoustic imagery provide a broad view of the geologic and geophysical character of the ridge system, emphasizing the strong variability of ridge morphology, tectonics, and lava emplacement. The magnetization map shows a clear central anomaly with normal polarity, flanked by regions of negative polarity, consistent with the Brunhes-Matuyama reversal (~780,000 Ma). Rainbow itself lies in a region of weaker magnetization strength, which could be linked to a decrease in the depth of the

  13. Extracting physical parameters from marine seismic data: New methods in seismic oceanography and velocity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Will F. J.

    The utility and meaning of a geophysical dataset is dependent on good interpretation informed by high-quality data, processing, and attribute examination via technical methodologies. Active source marine seismic reflection data contains a great deal of information in the location, phase, and amplitude of both pre- and post-stack seismic reflections. Using pre- and post-stack data, this work has extracted useful information from marine reflection seismic data in novel ways in both the oceanic water column and the sub-seafloor geology. In chapter 1 we develop a new method for estimating oceanic turbulence from a seismic image. This method is tested on synthetic seismic data to show the method's ability to accurately recover both distribution and levels of turbulent diffusivity. Then we apply the method to real data offshore Costa Rica where we observe lee waves. Our results find elevated diffusivities near the seafloor as well as above the lee waves five times greater than surrounding waters and 50 times greater than open ocean diffusivities. Chapter 2 investigates subsurface geology in the Cascadia Subduction Zone and outlines a workflow for using pre-stack waveform inversion to produce highly detailed velocity models and seismic images. Using a newly developed inversion code, we achieve better imaging results as compared to the product of a standard, user-intensive method for building a velocity model. Our results image the subduction interface ~30 km farther landward than previous work and better images faults and sedimentary structures above the oceanic plate as well as in the accretionary prism. The resultant velocity model is highly detailed, inverted every 6.25 m with ~20 m vertical resolution, and will be used to examine the role of fluids in the subduction system. These results help us to better understand the natural hazards risks associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Chapter 3 returns to seismic oceanography and examines the dynamics of nonlinear

  14. Development of Towed Marine Seismic Vibrator as an Alternative Seismic Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozasa, H.; Mikada, H.; Murakami, F.; Jamali Hondori, E.; Takekawa, J.; Asakawa, E.; Sato, F.

    2015-12-01

    The principal issue with respect to marine impulsive sources to acquire seismic data is if the emission of acoustic energy inflicts harm on marine mammals or not, since the volume of the source signal being released into the marine environment could be so large compared to the sound range of the mammals. We propose a marine seismic vibrator as an alternative to the impulsive sources to mitigate a risk of the impact to the marine environment while satisfying the necessary conditions of seismic surveys. These conditions include the repeatability and the controllability of source signals both in amplitude and phase for high-quality measurements. We, therefore, designed a towed marine seismic vibrator (MSV) as a new type marine vibratory seismic source that employed the hydraulic servo system for the controllability condition in phase and in amplitude that assures the repeatability as well. After fabricating a downsized MSV that requires the power of 30 kVA at a depth of about 250 m in water, several sea trials were conducted to test the source characteristics of the downsized MSV in terms of amplitude, frequency, horizontal and vertical directivities of the generated field. The maximum sound level satisfied the designed specification in the frequencies ranging from 3 to 300 Hz almost omnidirectionally. After checking the source characteristics, we then conducted a trial seismic survey, using both the downsized MSV and an airgun of 480 cubic-inches for comparison, with a streamer cable of 2,000m long right above a cabled earthquake observatory in the Japan Sea. The result showed that the penetration of seismic signals generated by the downsized MSV was comparable to that by the airgun, although there was a slight difference in the signal-to-noise ratio. The MSV could become a versatile source that will not harm living marine mammals as an alternative to the existing impulsive seismic sources such as airgun.

  15. 78 FR 37209 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC564 Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea,...

  16. Seismic Holography of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The basic goal of the project was to extend holographic seismic imaging techniques developed under a previous NASA contract, and to incorporate phase diagnostics. Phase-sensitive imaging gives us a powerful probe of local thermal and Doppler perturbations in active region subphotospheres, allowing us to map thermal structure and flows associated with "acoustic moats" and "acoustic glories". These remarkable features were discovered during our work, by applying simple acoustic power holography to active regions. Included in the original project statement was an effort to obtain the first seismic images of active regions on the Sun's far surface.

  17. Oil fill procesure for seismic marine streamer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckles, J.J.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a method for improving signal quality in urethane foam mounts utilized on hydrophones in conjunction with a seismic streamer. It comprises: purging a urethane foam mount with a fluid miscible with air and hydrocarbonaceous liquid having a selected density which liquid is used to dampen noise in a hydrophone where the fluid is a member selected from the group consisting of carbon dioxide, fluorocarbons, C{sub 1}{minus}C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, and mixtures thereof which member alone substantially displaces air from the streamer; and thereafter filling the seismic streamer with the hydrocarbonaceous liquid which mixes with the fluid and substantially retains the density of the liquid thereby maintaining neutral buoyancy of the streamer, substantially isolating the hydrophones from noise, and improving signal quality.

  18. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  19. Seismic Forecasting of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Douglas; Lindsey, Charles

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and improved helioseismic imaging techniques of the far-side of the Sun as part of a synoptic monitor of solar activity. In collaboration with the MIDI team at Stanford University we are routinely applying our analysis to images within 24 hours of their acquisition by SOHO. For the first time, real-time seismic maps of large active regions on the Sun's far surface are publicly available. The synoptic images show examples of active regions persisting for one or more solar rotations, as well as those initially detected forming on the solar far side. Until recently, imaging the far surface of the Sun has been essentially blind to active regions more than about 50 degrees from the antipode of disk center. In a paper recently accepted for publication, we have demonstrated how acoustic travel-time perturbations may be mapped over the entire hemisphere of the Sun facing away from the Earth, including the polar regions. In addition to offering significant improvements to ongoing space weather forecasting efforts, the procedure offers the possibility of local seismic monitoring of both the temporal and spatial variations in the acoustic properties of the Sun over the entire far surface.

  20. The suppression of coherent noise from another airgun source in marine multi-channel seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ho-Han; Liu, Char-Shine; Chang, Jih-Hsin; Tsai, You-Tsung; Chiu, Shye-Donq

    2016-12-01

    During seismic investigations, multiple and unexpected sources may cause serious interference on seismic records, and coherent noise generated by another unwanted active source could result in extremely poor data quality. Because airgun arrays have been widely used as the sound source in marine seismic surveys, the noise generated by another airgun array usually has similar characteristics to the primary signals in both frequency bands and wave forms, so the suppression of this type of coherent noise is very difficult. In practice, seismic crews try to avoid conducting multiple surveys simultaneously in a same area, so the source interference problem normally does not occur, and suppression of coherent noise from another active source has rarely been discussed and proposed before. This paper presents a dataset in which part of the records are contaminated by shot noise from another seismic vessel, and proposes a hybrid approach to suppress the coherent noise from that unwanted seismic source. Noise subtraction and primary signal preservation within different data properties are considered to begin the noise suppression. Based on different noise characteristics from various source directions and wave propagation paths, coherence noise can be separated from primary signals in frequency-wave number (F-K), frequency-time (F-T) and intercept time-slowness (tau-p) domains, respectively. This hybrid coherent noise suppression approach involves applying three different filters, F-K, F-T and tau-p, to the contaminated dataset. Our results show that most of the coherent noise generated by another seismic source could be suppressed, and seismic images could be substantially improved.

  1. Marine Science Activities, Grade Six.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, James A.

    This unit, one of a series designed to develop and foster an understanding of the marine environment, presents marine science activities for grade 6 students. The unit is divided into the following sections: (1) Pagoo (story of a hermit crab); (2) introduction to marine environments; (3) salt water environment; (4) sea water investigations; (5)…

  2. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed seismic waveform with explosive sources before and after the 1998 northern Iwate prefecture earthquake, and they showed that the decrease in seismic wave speed approximately 0.1-0.9 % by the earthquake occurrence. Justin et al. (2007) reported the reduction in seismic wave speed accompanied with the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake around the rupture area by using the four repeating earthquakes that occurred before and after the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake. However, seismograms of explosive sources or repeating earthquakes are hard to be frequently recorded, which makes the time intervals of estimated seismic wave speed be too long to distinguish preseismic changes from coseismic and post seismic changes. In order to monitor crustal structures and detecting the variation of rock properties in the crust, a kind of active seismic source systems ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) has been developed(e.g., Kunitomo and Kumazawa, 2004). We used the controlled seismic source ACROSS, which installed at the Tono mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan and has been routinely operated by Tono Geoscience center of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), automatically. Frequency modulated seismic waves are continuously radiated from approximately 10-20 Hz by eccentric rotation of the source. In order to investigate the stability of ACROSS signals, we used seismograms recorded at the 110m depth of Shobasama observing site, which is

  3. Effects of Large and Small-Source Seismic Surveys on Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, M.; Richardson, W. J.; Koski, W. R.; Smultea, M. A.; Haley, B.; Fitzgerald, M. W.; Rawson, M.

    2006-05-01

    L-DEO implements a marine mammal and sea turtle monitoring and mitigation program during its seismic surveys. The program consists of visual observations, mitigation, and/or passive acoustic monitoring (PAM). Mitigation includes ramp ups, powerdowns, and shutdowns of the seismic source if marine mammals or turtles are detected in or about to enter designated safety radii. Visual observations for marine mammals and turtles have taken place during all 11 L-DEO surveys since 2003, and PAM was done during five of those. Large sources were used during six cruises (10 to 20 airguns; 3050 to 8760 in3; PAM during four cruises). For two interpretable large-source surveys, densities of marine mammals were lower during seismic than non- seismic periods. During a shallow-water survey off Yucatán, delphinid densities during non-seismic periods were 19x higher than during seismic; however, this number is based on only 3 sightings during seismic and 11 sightings during non-seismic. During a Caribbean survey, densities were 1.4x higher during non-seismic. The mean closest point of approach (CPA) for delphinids for both cruises was significantly farther during seismic (1043 m) than during non-seismic (151 m) periods (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.001). Large whales were only seen during the Caribbean survey; mean CPA during seismic was 1722 m compared to 1539 m during non-seismic, but sample sizes were small. Acoustic detection rates with and without seismic were variable for three large-source surveys with PAM, with rates during seismic ranging from 1/3 to 6x those without seismic (n = 0 for fourth survey). The mean CPA for turtles was closer during non-seismic (139 m) than seismic (228 m) periods (P < 0.01). Small-source surveys used up to 6 airguns or 3 GI guns (75 to 1350 in3). During a Northwest Atlantic survey, delphinid densities during seismic and non-seismic were similar. However, in the Eastern Tropical Pacific, delphinid densities during non-seismic were 2x those during

  4. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  5. 78 FR 35851 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Sources The acoustic sources of primary concern are the airguns that will be deployed from the seismic... on Marine Mammals Operating active acoustic sources such as airgun arrays, navigational sonars, and... desirable acoustic environment; and Cease feeding or social interaction. For example, at the Guerreo...

  6. Marine Science Activities, Grade Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, James A.

    This unit, one of a series designed to develop and foster an understanding of the marine environment, presents marine science activities for second grade students. The unit, focusing on awareness of living/non-living factors shaping life of the sea, is divided into sections dealing with: physical characteristics of oceans; fish; sea anemone;…

  7. Patterns of seismic activity preceding large earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Bruce E.; Carlson, J. M.; Langer, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mechanical model of seismic faults is employed to investigate the seismic activities that occur prior to major events. The block-and-spring model dynamically generates a statistical distribution of smaller slipping events that precede large events, and the results satisfy the Gutenberg-Richter law. The scaling behavior during a loading cycle suggests small but systematic variations in space and time with maximum activity acceleration near the future epicenter. Activity patterns inferred from data on seismicity in California demonstrate a regional aspect; increased activity in certain areas are found to precede major earthquake events. One example is given regarding the Loma Prieta earthquake of 1989 which is located near a fault section associated with increased activity levels.

  8. 78 FR 8497 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey Off the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... geophysical (seismic) survey off the central coast of California, November to December, 2012. ADDRESSES: The... incidental to conducting a marine seismic survey within the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone of the central coast... (Langseth) and a seismic airgun array to collect seismic data as part of the Offshore Central...

  9. Seismic activation of tectonic stresses by mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcak, Henryk; Mutke, Grzegorz

    2013-10-01

    Hard coal mining in the area of the Bytom Syncline (Upper Silesia Coal Basin, Poland) has been associated with the occurrence of high-energy seismic events (up to 109 J; local magnitude up to 4.0), which have been recorded by the local mining seismological network and regional seismological network. It has been noticed that the strongest seismic events occur when the mine longwall alignments coincide with the syncline axis. Data recorded by the improved local seismic network in the Bobrek Mine allow the estimation of the depths of the events’ hypocentres during excavation of longwall panel 3 as it approached the syncline axis. The recorded data were also used to estimate the location of the rupture surface and stress distribution in the seismic focus region. It was concluded that tectonic stresses, particularly horizontal stress components, are essential in the distribution of seismic tremors resulting from reverse faulting. The stresses induced by mining activity are only triggering tectonic deformations. The hypocentres of the strongest seismic events during mining of longwall panel 3/503 were located 300-800 m deeper than the level of coal seam 503.

  10. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  11. Apollo 14 active seismic experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, J. S.; Kovach, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Explosion seismic refraction data indicate that the lunar near-surface rocks at the Apollo 14 site consist of a regolith 8.5 meters thick and characterized by a compressional wave velocity of 104 meters per second. The regolith is underlain by a layer with a compressional wave velocity of 299 meters per second. The thickness of this layer, which we interpret to be the Fra Mauro Formation, is between 16 and 76 meters. The layer immediately beneath this has a velocity greater than 370 meters per second. We found no evidence of permafrost.

  12. Regional Observation of Seismic Activity in Baekdu Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geunyoung; Che, Il-Young; Shin, Jin-Soo; Chi, Heon-Cheol

    2015-04-01

    Seismic unrest in Baekdu Mountain area between North Korea and Northeast China region has called attention to geological research community in Northeast Asia due to her historical and cultural importance. Seismic bulletin shows level of seismic activity in the area is higher than that of Jilin Province of Northeast China. Local volcanic observation shows a symptom of magmatic unrest in period between 2002 and 2006. Regional seismic data have been used to analyze seismic activity of the area. The seismic activity could be differentiated from other seismic phenomena in the region by the analysis.

  13. Broadband Sound Pressure Field Characteristics of Marine Seismic Sources Used by R/V Polarstern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Boebel, O.; El Naggar, S.; Jokat, W.; Kuhn, G.; Niessen, F.; Schenke, H.; Werner, B.; Diebold, J.

    2006-05-01

    Single airguns and airgun arrays of different size and volume are used as sound sources for scientific marine seismic reflection and refraction surveys conducted by R/V Polarstern in the Arctic and Antarctic Ocean. To ensure that these research activities do not affect marine wildlife and particularly marine mammals in the Antarctic Treaty Area south of 60°S knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broadband marine seismic source characterization study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range in the Herdlefjord, Norway in October 2003. The objectives were (1) to determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels emitted by Polarstern's seismic sources, (2) to compute the source levels assuming a spherical amplitude decay, (3) to determine mitigation radii, within which at least some species of marine mammals might possibly experience behavioral or physiological disturbance due to the received sound pressure levels. The thresholds currently in use to determine mitigation radii are 160 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential behavioral disturbance and 180 dBRMS re 1 μPa for potential physiological and hearing effects like temporary threshold shifts. To determine the spatial distribution of the sound pressure levels each airgun (array) was shot along a line of 2- 3 km length running between 2 hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 267 m depth. A GI-Gun (2.4 l), a G-Gun (8.5 l) and a Bolt PAR CT800 (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, and 3 GI-Guns (7.4 l), 3 G-Guns (25.6 l) and 8 VLF-Guns (24 l) as arrays. The measurements are complemented by a modeling approach for an 8 G-Gun (68.2 l) and 8 G-Gun+1 Bolt PAR CT800 array (100.1 l). The data analysis includes a determination of peak-peak, zero-peak and RMS-amplitudes, sound exposure levels and amplitude spectra as function of source-receiver distance. The amplitude vs distance graphs, analyzed for the 4 hydrophone depths, show the typical

  14. 76 FR 37066 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... in or near the proposed seismic survey areas. This document presents a new table with corrections... densities of marine mammals that may occur in or near the proposed seismic survey area. Accordingly, Table...

  15. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  16. Marine seismic profiling and shallow marine sand resistivity investigations in Broken Bay, NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrbancich, Julian; Whiteley, Robert J.; Caffi, Peter; Emerson, Don W.

    2011-11-01

    A marine continuous seismic profiling (CSP) study and a resistivity study of vibrocore samples of shallow marine sands were undertaken in Broken Bay, NSW, Australia, to characterise the seabed. The overall aims were to provide an estimate of the sediment thickness using CSP and an estimate of sediment resistivity in the upper 4 m of the seabed at selected sites. This information can provide a simplified geo-electrical model to assess the accuracy of interpreted seabed and bedrock depths obtained independently from AEM data and to assist the calibration of AEM instrumentation for bathymetric surveys. The acoustic impedance contrast between deeper sediments and the anticipated basement sandstone was variable suggesting irregularly layered sediments. These sediments contained very dense (tightly packed) sands, owing to marine regression and transgression of sea level, and variably weathered underlying sandstones. Interpreted bedrock levels vary considerably across the survey area and represent drowned river valleys of the inner continental shelf. A broad deep channel representing a high-energy palaeo-fluvial drainage system in the Hawkesbury River outreaches was identified; it extended to approximately -80 m AHD. Another area revealed a dendritic fluvial pattern extending to approximately -70 m AHD. A moderately narrow palaeovalley extending to -90 m AHD either side of the Palm Beach tombolo was clearly identified. This same feature was also clearly identified from airborne electromagnetic data which, when interpreted, showed very good agreement with seismic depths. Sand samples from 17 sites were obtained from vibrocores with a penetration depth of 4.5m. The laboratory resistivity values, obtained from four-electrode measurements on 64 seawater saturated subsamples ranged from 1.3 to 0.6Ωm (20°C) 0.92Ωm average. Inter- and intra-site changes in composition (shell/sand), grain packing, grain size, grain shape, cohesion, and inferred porosity were thought to be

  17. Magnetic activity of seismic solar analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Beck, P. G.

    2016-12-01

    We present our latest results on the solar-stellar connection by studying 18 solar analogs that we identified among the Kepler seismic sample tep{salabert16a}. We measured their magnetic activity properties using observations collected by the Kepler satellite and the ground-based, high-resolution HERMES spectrograph. The photospheric (S{_ph}) and chromospheric (S) magnetic activity proxies of these seismic solar analogs are compared in relation to solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is actually comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs. Furthermore, we report on the discovery of temporal variability in the acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years, which agrees with the derived photospheric activity tep{salabert16b}. It could actually be the signature of the short-period modulation, or quasi-biennal oscillation, of its magnetic activity as observed in the Sun and the 1-Gyr-old solar analog HD 30495. In addition, the lithium abundance and the chromospheric activity estimated from HERMES confirms that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.

  18. Signatures of lightning activity in seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiszely, Márta; Bór, József; Mónus, Péter; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    A thunderstorm with intense lightning activity swept through Hungary on 28th August, 2013 between 00:00-09:00 UTC from the west towards north-east. Characteristic signal patterns could be observed in the time series recorded by seismometers in Hungary during the time the thunderstorm was close to a recording station. The signal patterns occurred coherently both in the vertical and in the horizontal seismic records. The patterns are composed of a sharp spike and a longer lasting disturbance which followed the spike after a gap of several seconds. This disturbance was of increased amplitude and lasted for up to a few tens of seconds. Detection times of spikes in the seismic records were compared to occurrence times of lightning strokes in the thunderstorm. Information on the occurrence time, polarity, type (CG or IC), peak current, and geographical location (including height estimation for IC events) of lightning strokes was provided by the LINET lightning detection network which uses magnetic loop antennas sensitive in the VLF-LF radio bands. A single lightning stroke could be unambiguously associated with each spike in the seismic records. This one-to-one correspondence suggests that the spike was caused by the electromagnetic shock wave from the lightning return stroke. The longer lasting disturbance is, on the other hand, most probably the signature of the subsequent air pressure wave which induced ground waves, too. In more than half of the examined cases, the time between the spike and the detection of a wave packet (peak amplitude) in the disturbance matched the expected propagation time of sound waves between the source location given by LINET and the seismic station. The direct sound wave associated wave packet, however, was not always the first arriving one in the seismic disturbance which suggests that coupling of sound waves and ground waves may not only occur at the seismic detector. The poster shows case studies of lightning associated seismic records

  19. Seismic activity of Erebus volcano, antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada

    1987-11-01

    Mount Erebus is presently the only Antarctic volcano with sustained eruptive activity in the past few years. It is located on Ross Island and a convecting anorthoclase phonolite lava lake has occupied the summit crater of Mount Erebus from January 1973 to September 1984. A program to monitor the seismic activity of Mount Erebus named IMESS was started in December 1980 as an international cooperative program among Japan, the United States and New Zealand. A new volcanic episode began on 13 September, 1984 and continued until December. Our main observations from the seismic activity from 1982 1985 are as follows: (1) The average numbers of earthquakes which occurred around Mount Erebus in 1982, 1983 and January August 1984 were 64, 134 and 146 events per day, respectively. Several earthquake swarms occurred each year. (2) The averag number of earthquakes in 1985 is 23 events per day, with only one earthquake swarm. (3) A remarkable decrease of the background seismicity is recognized before and after the September 1984 activity. (4) Only a few earthquakes were located in the area surrounding Erebus mountain after the September 1984 activity. A magma reservoir is estimated to be located in the southwest area beneath the Erebus summit, based on the hypocenter distributions of earthquakes.

  20. A critical review of the potential impacts of marine seismic surveys on fish & invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Carroll, A G; Przeslawski, R; Duncan, A; Gunning, M; Bruce, B

    2017-01-15

    Marine seismic surveys produce high intensity, low-frequency impulsive sounds at regular intervals, with most sound produced between 10 and 300Hz. Offshore seismic surveys have long been considered to be disruptive to fisheries, but there are few ecological studies that target commercially important species, particularly invertebrates. This review aims to summarise scientific studies investigating the impacts of low-frequency sound on marine fish and invertebrates, as well as to critically evaluate how such studies may apply to field populations exposed to seismic operations. We focus on marine seismic surveys due to their associated unique sound properties (i.e. acute, low-frequency, mobile source locations), as well as fish and invertebrates due to the commercial value of many species in these groups. The main challenges of seismic impact research are the translation of laboratory results to field populations over a range of sound exposure scenarios and the lack of sound exposure standardisation which hinders the identification of response thresholds. An integrated multidisciplinary approach to manipulative and in situ studies is the most effective way to establish impact thresholds in the context of realistic exposure levels, but if that is not practical the limitations of each approach must be carefully considered.

  1. 78 FR 22239 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey on the Mid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean, April 2013... on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the north Atlantic Ocean in international waters, from April 2013... authorized takes for the seismic survey on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The results of...

  2. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  3. Marine Seismic System (MSS). Development, Deployment and Recovery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    Recommendations) * Although only 40 hours of seismic and hydroacoustic dan were collected with the system fu’lly deployed, the MSS program can certainly...GARBAGE RESULTS DESERVED FOR SUCH A BONEH - EAD MISTAKE. THE FORMAT OF THE COMMAND IS AS FOLLOWS:- STD<RET> COMPUTE STANDARD DEVIATION ; AND MEAN FOR ENTIRE

  4. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  5. Predicting Seismic Velocities in Marine Sesiments Using Clay Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroujkova, A.; Pratson, L. F.

    2001-12-01

    The ability to calculate seismic velocity accurately over the extent of a survey is a problem of interest to the seismic record. Velocity and other lithologic properties can be well resolved in boreholes, but due to structural and stratigraphic variations, these measurements are limited to very near the borehole. Clay content is shown to be the chief variable that affects velocity in sand/shale systems. It controls porosity and bulk density, and plays a major role in determining seismic wave velocity. Despite its importance, high-resolution measurements of clay content are frequently unavailable for many boreholes. As such, a proxy for clay content, such as gamma ray measurements, must be used in estimating clay volumes near a borehole. A forward model is presented that calculates lithologic and acoustic properties of sediment using several petrophysical formulations. The model's primary input is clay content (or gamma ray measurements), and modeled values include porosity, bulk density, overburden pressure, elastic moduli, and wave velocity. Seismic velocities are estimated based on self-consistent elastic moduli by Berryman (1980). The unknown geometric factors needed for Berryman's model are found using simulated annealing optimization. The model is then applied to five wells from the Amazon Fan with measured gamma, porosities, bulk densities and P-wave velocities. The model performs well for porosity, bulk density and velocity predictions for binary mixtures with high contrast in particle sizes (sand/clay). However, if a significant volume of silt or intermediate size particles are present (for example for mass flow deposits), the models fails to predicts these properties.

  6. The seismicity of Ethiopia; active plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohr, P.

    1981-01-01

    Ethiopia, descended from the semimythical Kingdom of Punt, lies at the strategic intersection of Schmidt's jigsaw puzzle where the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the African Rift System meet. Because of geologically recent uplift combined with rapid downcutting erosion by rivers, notably the Blue Nile (Abbay), Ethiopia is the most mountainous country in Africa. It is also the most volcanically active, while its historical seismicity matches that of the midocean ridges. And, in a sense, Ethiopia is host to an evoloving ocean ridge system. 

  7. Seismic stratigraphy in high resolution shallow marine seismic data of the Gemlik Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtulus, C. . Dept. of Geophysical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Seismic stratigraphy and sedimentological studies of the Gemlik Gulf in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey, have been carried out. For this purpose, 19 lines totaling 189 km of excellent quality, high-resolution seismic data were recorded. Four major acoustic units were identified in the seismic profiles. Three were sedimentary units: irregular layered, cross-layered and well-layered; and the fourth was an acoustic basement which is probably composed of crystalline volcanic rocks. Some local areas in the Neogene formation contain gas accumulations. The formation of faults in E--W and N--S directions can be explained by the existence of shear stresses in the Gulf. The bathymetric map shows good accommodation with the shore line as does the tectonic map.

  8. 75 FR 49759 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Statoil USA E&P Inc. (Statoil) to take, by harassment, small numbers of 12 species of marine mammals incidental to a marine seismic survey program in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, during the 2010 Arctic open water...

  9. 77 FR 65059 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to ION Geophysical (ION) to take, by harassment, small numbers of nine species of marine mammals incidental to in-ice marine seismic surveys in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, Alaska, during the fall and winter of...

  10. Proposed criteria for recognizing intrastratal deformation features in marine high resolution seismic reflection profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Leary, D. W.; Laine, E.

    1996-01-01

    Intrastratal deformation of marine strata is ordinarily recorded in high-resolution seismic reflection profiles as acoustically transparent or "chaotic" intervals marked by hyperbolic echoes. Intrastratal deformation is easily confused with buried slump or slide deposits formed initially at the sea floor. Correct identification of intrastratal deformation depends on the presence of a warped continuously reflective layer overlying a chaotic/transparent layer. Decollement is the key criterion for identification in seismic reflection profiles. Other criteria include intrusive structures or faults rooted in a chaotic/transparent layer and thickening and thinning of a chaotic/transparent layer with transitions to reflective intervals.

  11. Marine deep seismic reflection profiles off central California

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX ); Talwani, M. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX )

    1991-04-10

    A strong reflection horizon at two-way travel time of approximately 6 s is observed in a deep seismic profile across the outer continental shelf of central California. It is interpreted as the seismic image of subducted oceanic crust emplaced prior to the change from principally convergent to principally transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North American plates during the late Paleogene. The reflector dips landward at a very shallow angle and is at a depth of 14-15 km under Santa Lucia Bank. The reflection is not observed, or at best is very discontinuous, under the inner shelf (Santa Maria Basin). This suggests that tectonic or other processes have produced significantly different structural styles or compositions on the two sides of the Santa Lucia Bank fault. Under the outer shelf a prominent, apparently deeper (later arrival time) horizon dips more steeply and diverges from the 6-s reflector. The deep horizon is at least partially composed of diffracted energy but is nearly linear after migration. Possible interpretations are that the horizon indicates crustal imbrication or out-of-plane diffractions. Alternatively, it is a relict feature imparted to the crust at the now inactive Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge. Reflective zones at intermediate depths are observed in apparently accreted sediments in parts of the Santa Lucia and Santa Maria basins. These features could represent tectonically induced fabrics within the accretionary complex, or they could be coherent depositional sequences.

  12. Crustal Structure and Deformation of the Yakutat Microplate: New Insights From STEEP Marine Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, L. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G.; van Avendonk, H.; Reece, R.; Elmore, R.; Pavlis, T.

    2008-12-01

    In fall 2008, we will conduct an active source marine seismic experiment of the offshore Yakutat microplate in the northern Gulf of Alaska. The survey will be conducted aboard the academic research vessel, R/V Marcus Langseth, collecting deep-penetrating multi-channel seismic reflection survey using an 8-km, 640 channel hydrophone streamer and a 6600 cu. in., 36 airgun array. The survey is the concluding data acquisition phase for the ST. Elias Erosion and tectonics Project (STEEP), a multi-institution NSF-Continental Dynamics project investigating the interplay of climate and tectonics in the Chugach-St. Elias Mountains in southern Alaska. The experiment will also provide important site survey information for possible future Integrated Ocean Drilling Program investigations. Two profiles coincident with wide-angle refraction data (see Christeson, et al., this session) will image structural changes across the Dangerous River Zone from east to west and the Transition Fault from south to north. We will also image the western portion of the Transition Fault to determine the nature of faulting along this boundary including whether or not the Pacific Plate is underthrusting beneath the Yakutat microplate as part of this collision. Our westernmost profile will image the Kayak Island Zone, typically described as the northern extension of the Aleutian megathrust but which may be a forming suture acting as a deformation backstop for the converging Yakutat and North American plates. Profiles across the Pamplona Zone, the current Yakutat-North America deformation front, will further constrain relative timing of structural development and the depth of deformation on the broad folds and thrust faults that comprise the area. This new dataset will allow further insight into regional tectonics of the St. Elias region as well as provide more detail regarding the development of the south Alaskan margin during major Plio-Pleistocene glacial- interglacial periods.

  13. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of marine seismic data: A case study from offshore Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyoun; Jang, Seonghyung

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface imaging is difficult without removing the multiples intrinsic to most marine seismic data. Choosing the right multiple suppression method when working with marine data depends on the type of multiples and sometimes involves trial and error. A major amount of multiple energy in seismic data is related to the large reflectivity of the surface. Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is effective for suppressing free-surface-related multiples. Although SRME has some limitations, it is widely used because it requires no assumptions about the subsurface velocities, positions, and reflection coefficients of the reflector causing the multiples. The common reflector surface (CRS) stacking technique uses CRS reflectors rather than common mid-point (CMP) reflectors. It stacks more traces than conventional stacking methods and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The purpose of this study is to address a process issue for multiple suppression with SRME and Radon filtering, and to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by using CRS stacking on seismic data from the eastern continental margin of Korea. To remove free surface multiples, SRME and Radon filtering are applied to attenuate the interbed multiples. Results obtained using synthetic data and field data show that the combination of SRME and Radon filtering is effective for suppressing free-surface multiples and peg-leg multiples. Applying CRS stacking to seismic data in which multiples have been eliminated increases the signal-to-noise ratio for the area examined, which is being considered for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

  14. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures

  15. [Biologically active metabolites of the marine actinobacteria].

    PubMed

    Sobolevskaia, M P; Kuznetsova, T A

    2010-01-01

    This review systematically data on the chemical structure and biological activity of metabolites of obligate and facultative marine actinobacteria, published from 2000 to 2007. We discuss some structural features of the five groups of metabolites related to macrolides and compounds containing lactone, quinone and diketopiperazine residues, cyclic peptides, alkaloids, and compounds of mixed biosynthesis. Survey shows a large chemical diversity of metabolites actinobacteria isolated from marine environment. It is shown that, along with metabolites, identical to previously isolated from terrestrial actinobacteria, marine actinobacteria synthesize unknown compounds not found in other natural sources, including micro organisms. Perhaps the biosynthesis of new chemotypes bioactive compounds in marine actinobacteria is one manifestation of chemical adaptation of microorganisms to environmental conditions at sea. Review stresses the importance of the chemical study of metabolites of marine actinobacteria. These studies are aimed at obtaining new data on marine microorganisms producers of biologically active compounds and chemical structure and biological activity of new low-molecular bioregulators of natural origin.

  16. Recent high-resolution seismic reflection studies of active faults in the Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Pratt, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    In the past four years, new high-resolution seismic surveys have filled in key gaps in our understanding of active structures beneath the Puget Lowland, western Washington State. Although extensive regional and high-resolution marine seismic surveys have been fundamental to understanding the tectonic framework of the area, these marine profiles lack coverage on land and in shallow or restricted waterways. The recent high-resolution seismic surveys have targeted key structures beneath water bodies that large ships cannot navigate, and beneath city streets underlain by late Pleistocene glacial deposits that are missing from the waterways. The surveys can therefore bridge the gap between paleoseismic and marine geophysical studies, and test key elements of models proposed by regional-scale geophysical studies. Results from these surveys have: 1) documented several meters of vertical displacement on at least two separate faults in the Olympia area; 2) clarified the relationship between the Catfish Lake scarp and the underlying kink band in the Tacoma fault zone; 3) provided a first look at the structures beneath the north portion of the western Tacoma fault zone, north of previous marine profiles; 4) documented that deformation along the Seattle fault extends well east of Lake Sammamish; 5) imaged the Seattle fault beneath the Vasa Park trench; and 6) documented multiple fault strands in and south of the Seattle fault zone south of Bellevue. The results better constrain interpretations of paleoseismic investigations of past earthquakes on these faults, and provide targets for future paleoseismic studies.

  17. Marine and estuarine protection: Programs and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    The booklet describes: the mission of the current problems and threats to the coastal and marine waters of the US; the Office of Marine and Estuarine Protection of EPA; EPA's ocean dumping and plastics programs; EPA's point source control activities; near-coastal waters activities; and associated federal legislation.

  18. Marine Science Activities for Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Dennis; And Others

    These marine education materials are based on the approach that students learn best when given a multisensory experience. The activities are intended to develop such experiences for the visually impaired child. Activities are intended to supplement an upper-elementary science curriculum or be the basis of a unit on marine biology. The guide is…

  19. Termination of the Batholiths marine seismic experiment: the scientific method loses to hearsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollister, L. S.

    2007-12-01

    The marine seismic component of the NSF-Continental Dynamics funded project Batholiths was terminated by Canadian authorities due to environmental concerns. Socioeconomic benefits of the project were not taken into account, nor were findings by the National Research Council on effects of ocean noise on marine mammal populations. The marine seismic component of Batholiths was to have been done using sound from airguns towed behind the R/V Langseth in order to seismically image the geologic structures below the Coast Mountains of British Columbia. The project was nearly identical in timing, location, and scope to the ACCRETE project, which was successfully permitted and done in the early fall of 1994, with no detected or known damage to the environment. However, what changed in the last 13 years was a dramatic increase of concern by eNGOs (environmental non- government organizations) that airguns produced sound that might be harmful to marine species, marine mammals in particular. The marine noise concerns were amplified by eNGO agendas and campaigns to prevent oil exploration along continental margins and to shut down naval exercises involving sonar to detect submarines. Compared to these agendas, Batholiths was an easy target because the PIs (Principal Investigators) did not have the manpower or financial or legal resources (in contrast to the Navy and oil companies) to push back against an organized campaign set on stopping Batholiths. The main concern used to mobilize public opinion against Batholiths was that, if we were permitted, then oil exploration in the nearby region would be permitted; and, if oil were found, drilling would proceed: the slippery slope argument. Thus, by stopping Batholiths with the speculation that airgun noise, as used in a marine seismic study, might damage marine life, the eNGOs believe they have stopped oil exploration in British Columbia coastal waters. It is widely recognized that everything was done right to get the permits for

  20. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  1. 77 FR 40007 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BP) to take, by harassment, small numbers of 10 species of marine mammals incidental to ocean bottom cable (OBC) seismic surveys in the Simpson Lagoon area of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, during the......

  2. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  3. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  4. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  5. Seafloor bathymetry and gravity from the ALBACORE marine seismic experiment offshore southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, N.; Weeraratne, D. S.; Kohler, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Although the North America side of the plate boundary surrounding the southern California San Andreas fault region is well studied and instrumented, the Pacific side of this active tectonic boundary is poorly understood. In order to better understand this complex plate boundary offshore, its microplate structures, deformation, and the California Borderland formation, we have recently conducted the first stage of a marine seismic experiment (ALBACORE - Asthenospheric and Lithospheric Broadband Architecture from the California Offshore Region Experiment) deploying 34 ocean bottom seismometers offshore southern California in August 2010. We present preliminary data consisting of seafloor bathymetry and free air gravity collected from this experiment. We present high-resolution maps of bathymetry and gravity from the ALBACORE experiment compiled with previous ship track data obtained from the NGDC (National Geophysical Data Center) and the USGS. We use gravity data from Smith and Sandwell and study correlations with ship track bathymetry data for the features described below. We observe new seafloor geomorphological features far offshore and within the Borderland. Steep canyon walls which line the edges of the Murray fracture zone with possible volcanic flows along the canyon floor were mapped by multibeam bathymetry for the first time. Deep crevices juxtaposed with high edifices of intensely deformed plateaus indicate high strain deformation along the arcuate boundary of the Arguello microplate. Small volcanic seamounts are mapped which straddle the Ferrelo fault (Outer Borderland) and San Pedro fault (Inner Borderland), and appear to exhibit fracture and fault displacement of a portion of the volcanic centers in a left-lateral sense. A large landslide is also imaged extending approximately 6 miles in length and 3 miles in width in the Santa Cruz basin directly south of Santa Rosa Island. Deformation associated with capture of Arguello and Patton microplates by the

  6. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of marine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, B; El Amraoui, M; Cohen, N; Fassouane, A

    2014-03-01

    In order to explore marine microorganisms with pharmaceutical potential, marine bacteria, collected from different coastal areas of the Moroccan Atlantic Ocean, were previously isolated from seawater, sediment, marine invertebrates and seaweeds. The antimicrobial activities of these microorganisms were investigated against the pathogens involved in human pathologies. Whole cultures of 34 marine microorganisms were screened for antimicrobial activities using the method of agar diffusion against three Gram-positive bacteria, two Gram-negative bacteria, and against yeast. The results showed that among the 34 isolates studied, 28 (82%) strains have antimicrobial activity against at least one pathogen studied, 11 (32%) strains have antifungal activity and 24 (76%) strains are active against Gram-positive bacteria, while 21 (62%) strains are active against Gram-negative bacteria. Among isolates having antimicrobial activity, 14 were identified and were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Chromobacterium, Enterococcus, Pantoea and Pseudomonas. Due to a competitive role for space and nutrient, the marine microorganisms can produce antibiotic substance; therefore, these marine microorganisms were expected to be potential resources of natural antibiotic products.

  7. Seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of TOC content in shallow marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Arthur Ayres; Mota, Bruno Bourguignon; Belem, André Luiz; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza; Capilla, Ramsés

    2016-10-01

    Acoustic remote sensing is a highly effective tool for exploring the seafloor of both deep and shallow marine settings. Indeed, the acoustic response depends on several physicochemical factors such as sediment grain size, bulk density, water content, and mineralogy. The objective of the present study is to assess the suitability of seismic peak amplitude as a predictor of total organic carbon (TOC) content in shallow marine sediments, based on data collected in the Cabo Frio mud belt in an upwelling zone off southeastern Brazil. These comprise records of P-wave velocity ( V P) along 680 km of high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys, combined with analyses of grain size, wet bulk density, absolute water content and TOC content for four piston-cores. TOC contents of sediments from 13 box-cores served to validate the methodology. The results show well-defined positive correlations between TOC content and mean grain size (phi scale) as well as absolute water content, and negative correlations with V P, wet bulk density, and acoustic impedance. These relationships yield a regression equation by which TOC content can be satisfactorily predicted on the basis of acoustic impedance for this region: y = - 4.84 ln( x) + 40.04. Indeed, the derived TOC contents differ by only 5% from those determined by geochemical analysis. After appropriate calibration, acoustic impedance can thus be conveniently used as a predictor of large-scale spatial distributions of organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. This not only contributes to optimizing scientific project objectives, but also enhances the cost-effectiveness of marine surveys by greatly reducing the ship time commonly required for grid sampling.

  8. Seismic surveys negatively affect humpback whale singing activity off northern Angola.

    PubMed

    Cerchio, Salvatore; Strindberg, Samantha; Collins, Tim; Bennett, Chanda; Rosenbaum, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Passive acoustic monitoring was used to document the presence of singing humpback whales off the coast of Northern Angola, and opportunistically test for the effect of seismic survey activity in the vicinity on the number of singing whales. Two Marine Autonomous Recording Units (MARUs) were deployed between March and December 2008 in the offshore environment. Song was first heard in mid June and continued through the remaining duration of the study. Seismic survey activity was heard regularly during two separate periods, consistently throughout July and intermittently in mid-October/November. Numbers of singers were counted during the first ten minutes of every hour for the period from 24 May to 1 December, and Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs) were used to assess the effect of survey day (seasonality), hour (diel variation), moon phase and received levels of seismic survey pulses (measured from a single pulse during each ten-minute sampled period) on singer number. Application of GAMMs indicated significant seasonal variation, which was the most pronounced effect when assessing the full dataset across the entire season (p<0.001); however seasonality almost entirely dropped out of top-ranked models when applied to a reduced dataset during the July period of seismic survey activity. Diel variation was significant in both the full and reduced datasets (from p<0.01 to p<0.05) and often included in the top-ranked models. The number of singers significantly decreased with increasing received level of seismic survey pulses (from p<0.01 to p<0.05); this explanatory variable was included among the top ranked models for one MARU in the full dataset and both MARUs in the reduced dataset. This suggests that the breeding display of humpback whales is disrupted by seismic survey activity, and thus merits further attention and study, and potentially conservation action in the case of sensitive breeding populations.

  9. Seismic activity of the San Francisco Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Moment magnitude M with objective confidence-level uncertainties are estimated for felt San Francisco Bay region earthquakes using Bakun and Wentworth's (1997) analysis strategy for seismic intensity observations. The frequency-magnitude distribution is well described for M ???5.5 events since 1850 by a Gutenberg-Richter relation with a b-value of 0.90. The seismic moment rate ??M0/yr since 1836 is 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr (95% confidence range = 1.29 X 1018 N-m/yr to 4.07 X 1018 N-m/yr); the seismic moment rate since 1850 is nearly the same. ??M0/yr in the 56 years before 1906 is about 10 times that in the 70 years after 1906. In contrast, ??M0/yr since 1977 is about equal that in the 56 years before 1906. 80% (1?? = 14%) of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate is available for release in earthquakes. The historical ??M0/yr and the portion of the plate-motion moment accumulation rate available for release in earthquakes are used in a seismic cycle model to estimate the rate of seismic activity in the twenty-first century. High and low rates of future seismic activity are both permissible given the range of possible seismic-cycle recurrence times T and the uncertainties in the historical ??M0 and in the percentage of plate motion available for release in earthquakes. If the historical seismic moment rate is not greater than the estimated 2.68 X 1018 N-m/yr and the percentage of the plate-motion moment accumulation available for release in earthquakes is not less than the estimated 80%, then for all T, the rate of seismic moment release from now until the next 1906-sized shock will be comparable to the rate from 1836 to 1905 when M 6 1/2 shocks occurred every 15 to 20 years.

  10. Modeling acoustic wave propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bohlen, T.

    2007-12-01

    According to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, adopted 1991, seismic surveys in the Southern Ocean south of 60°S are exclusively dedicated to academic research. The seismic surveys conducted by the Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany during the last 20 years focussed on two areas: The Wedell Sea (60°W - 0°W) and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea (120°W - 60°W). Histograms of the Julian days and water depths covered by these surveys indicate that maximum activities occurred in January and February, and most lines were collected either in shallow waters of 400 - 500 m depth or in deep waters of 2500 - 4500 m depth. To assess the potential risk of future seismic research on marine mammal populations an acoustic wave propagation modeling study is conducted for the Wedell and the Amundsen/ Bellinghausen Sea. A 2.5D finite-difference code is used. It allows to simulate the spherical amplitude decay of point sources correctly, considers P- and S-wave velocities at the sea floor and provides snapshots of the wavefield at any spatial and temporal resolution. As source signals notional signatures of GI-, G- and Bolt guns, computed by the NUCLEUS software (PGS) are used. Based on CTD measurements, sediment core samplings and sediment echosounder recordings two horizontally-layered, range-independent generic models are established for the Wedell and the Amundsen/Bellinghausen Sea, one for shallow (500 m) and one for deep water (3000 m). They indicate that the vertical structure of the water masses is characterized by a 100 m thick, cold, low sound velocity layer (~1440 - 1450 m/s), centered in 100 m depth. In the austral summer it is overlain by a warmer, 50 m thick surface layer with slightly higher sound velocities (~1447 - 1453 m/s). Beneath the low-velocity layer sound velocities increase rapidly to ~1450 - 1460 m/s in 200 m depth, and smoothly to ~1530 m/s in 4700 m depth. The sea floor is mainly

  11. Multiple Suppression and Imaging of Marine Seismic Data from The Shallow Water Area in Southern East China Sea Shelf Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Luan, X.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Neither surface-related multiple elimination(SRME) nor predictive de-convolution method is effective to suppress the multiple of marine seismic data from the shallow water area. The former method needs the accurate reflection of seafloor, which is mixed with the direct wave in the near offset range. The other one could probably lose the primary wave when applied to the shallow water seismic data. We introduced the new method: deterministic water-layer de-multiple method (DWD) which is capable for the poor extrapolate result of near-offset traces. Firstly, the data shifts as downward continuation in tau-p domain with a water-layer period and the multiple model will be obtained. Then, the original seismic subtracts adaptively with the multiple model. Finally, we would get the de-multiple data after inverse tau-p transform. Marine seismic real data is from southern part of East China Sea Shelf Basin. This area has become the potential target for marine hydrocarbon exploration, it is located in the junction of the Eurasian plate pacific plate and Indian plate. Because the average water depth is less than 100 meters, seismic data contains abundant of multiple, especially the surface-related multiple. As a result it is difficult to distinguish the strata structure clearly. We used DWD approach to remove the water-layer multiple, cut off the seafloor reflection events and then suppressed the residual surface-related multiple by the traditional SRME. At last , the radon transform was applied to eliminate the multiple with long period . With these steps, we suppressed the multiple of marine seismic data from this area effectively. After multiple is removed , we acquired more accurate velocity to build the velocity model of migration. With the pre-stack migration technique, reflections from each geological period are shown clearly in the seismic section. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China(grant no. 41476053).

  12. Marine High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Data in Southeastern Florida: Indications of a Regional Seal Bypass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K. J.; Walker, C.; Reich, C. D.

    2008-05-01

    In southeastern Florida during 2007, about 108 km of marine, multichannel, high-resolution, seismic-reflection data were acquired almost entirely inside Biscayne National Park at water depths ranging from about 0.9 to 100 m. Fourteen profiles were acquired between the shoreline of the Florida peninsula and a series of small keys that separate Biscayne Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. Additionally, three profiles were collected eastward of the islands with two extending seaward of the present-day shelf margin and its discontinuous reefs. The set of seismic images from the 17 profiles is providing recognition of intriguing geologic features beneath and beyond Biscayne Bay. For example, the seismic sections provide clues as to the sealing capacity of confining units above a highly permeable zone (Boulder Zone) in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer system used on the southeastern peninsula for deep well injection of treated wastewater. Many of the seismic profiles exhibit continuous vertical disturbances in parallel seismic reflections that correspond to the rocks of the karst Floridan aquifer system and overlying intermediate confining unit. These features indicate fractures that disrupt seismic reflections representative of confining units and may allow ground water to flow across confinement. Combined, the fractures could act as a regional seal bypass system. If this bypass system allows cross-stratal fluid migration, it could provide many pathways for upward directed ground- water flow with leakage to higher hydrostratigraphic levels or to the surface as submarine ground-water discharge. Future research will include acquisition of additional marine seismic profiles and the use of streaming marine resistivity profiling and radon water column mapping. These data will be used to investigate the source waters of submarine ground-water discharge to Biscayne Bay, which could be associated with the fractures imaged on the seismic sections.

  13. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  14. Joint Inversion of Marine Seismic and CSEM Data for Fluid Saturation Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoversten, G. M.; Gasperikova, E.; Chen, J.; Newman, G.

    2005-12-01

    Recent developments in the application of controlled source marine electromagnetic (CSEM) data in petroleum exploration have brought this technology to the attention of many in exploration and production within the oil and gas industry. These developments are founded on more than two decades of research carried out in academia and at U.S. national laboratories. The commercial availability of CSEM data now makes it possible to consider integrating this new data with existing seismic data in ways that will add considerable value. In particular, the sensitivity of CSEM data to water saturation (Sw), when combined with the spatial and reservoir parameter sensitivity (porosity, Sw, gas saturation [Sg], and oil saturation [So]) of seismic data, can provide enhanced prediction of fluid saturations within existing or prospective reservoirs. There are many ways in which CSEM and seismic data can be combined to estimate reservoir parameters. The possibilities range from what we term cooperative inversion, in which both data sets are used without any formal linkage in the inversion of either, to fully coupled joint inversion, in which both data sets are inverted simultaneously to directly estimate reservoir parameters. Hoversten et al. (2003) present an example of the former, in which crosswell EM and seismic travel-time tomography are used to estimate reservoir parameters using time-lapse changes in shear velocity, electrical conductivity, and acoustic velocity to sequentially strip off the effects of pressure and water saturation before estimating oil and CO2 saturations. Direct reservoir parameter estimation by joint inversion was demonstrated by Hoversten et al. (2004) and Chen et al. (2004), where marine CSEM and AVA data were used in a formal joint inverse to estimate reservoir Sw, So, Sg, and porosity (φ). The formal joint inversion is currently being extended to replace the 1D CSEM solution with full 3D. While the development and testing of more computationally

  15. Studies on marine algae for haemagglutinic activity.

    PubMed

    Alam, M T; Usmanghani, K

    1994-07-01

    Lectins (agglutinins) are important in medical and immunological applications. Phytohaemagglutinins have been found useful in blood banking. Keeping in view of these facts, the marine algae found at Karachi coastal region have been screened for agglutinic activity by using human erythrocytes of A, B, AB and 0 group. Altogether 53 algal samples were collected and subjected to extraction, fractionation serial dilution and titre determinations. The total marine algae screened for haemagglutinic activity were 44 out of these 14, 13 and 17 belonged to Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta, and Rhodophyta respectively. Among these three groups the Rhodophyta showed the highest number of lytic activity. The green marine alga Valoniopsis pachynema showed a titre value between 2(2) and 2(3), which is statistically significant. In case of brown marine algae Colpomenia sinuosa was found to be active (titre 2(3)), while Dictyota dichotoma, D. indica and Iyengaria stellata, furnished week titre value as 2(2). The red marine algae screened were 17, out of these 4 spp. showed significant activity (titre 2(3)), and these are Gelidium usmanghani, Gracilaria foliifera Hypnea pannosa and Hynea valentiae. While Scinaia fascicularis, Scinaia indica and Champia parvula were found to be weak in their onset on human erythrocytes. The results obtained were quite in agreement with those reported in the literature.

  16. Marine geophysical research helps to assess the seismic hazard at the Hispaniola Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Granja Bruña, J.; Llanes Estrada, M.; Munoz Martin, A.; Gómez Ballesteros, M.; Druet, M.; Martín-Dávila, J.; Pazos, A.; Catalan, M.; ten Brink, U. S.; Hernaiz-Huerta, P.; Olaiz, A. J.; Torres, R.; Brothers, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Detailed swath bathymetry mapping of complete geological provinces together with high-resolution seismic profiles provide critical perspective for the detection and study of active faults and their seismic and tsunami hazard. Since 2003 the Universidad Complutense de Madrid has been leading an international research group to study the north-eastern Caribbean, from the Lesser Antilles to Jamaica. This area comprises the 200 km-wide boundary zone between the North American and the Caribbean plates, where the relative plate motion is 18-20 ±3 mm/year towards 070-075. The highly-oblique convergence between the plates in Hispaniola is accommodated by strain partitioning on seismic fault systems sub-parallel to the plate boundary: strike-slip (the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and the Septentrional fault zones) and the compressive deformed belts (the Muertos thrust belt and the North Hispaniola thrust belt). Results from several research cruises offshore Hispaniola have identified and characterized zones of active deformation that were not observed onshore, such as the Muertos out-of-sequence thrust or the Beata Ridge crest fault zone. The Muertos out-of-sequence thrust could be related to the M≈8 event occurred the 18th of October in 1751 that shook central and south-eastern Hispaniola. In other seismic fault zones, such as the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and the Septentrional fault zones, knowledge of their offshore continuity is limited. Future research cruises will target the offshore continuity of these strike-slip seismic fault zones in the vicinity of Southern Peninsula of Haiti, in the Jamaica Passage and in the Gonave Bay. As part of the NORCARIBE project, a research cruise will be taking place in the spring of 2012 aboard the Spanish R/V Hespérides. Multichannel, high-resolution and wide-angle seismic profiles will be acquired together with swath bathymetry, magnetic and gravity data. The scientific and social interest in studying this region has greatly

  17. Pre-stack full waveform inversion of ultra-high-frequency marine seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provenzano, Giuseppe; Vardy, Mark E.; Henstock, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    The full waveform inversion (FWI) of seismic reflection data aims to reconstruct a detailed physical properties model of the subsurface, fitting both the amplitude and traveltime of the reflections generated at physical discontinuities in the propagation medium. Unlike reservoir-scale seismic exploration, where seismic inversion is a widely adopted remote characterisation tool, ultra high frequency (UHF, 0.2-4.0 kHz) multi-channel marine reflection seismology is still most often limited to a qualitative interpretation of the reflections' architecture. Here we propose an elastic full waveform inversion methodology, custom-tailored for pre-stack UHF marine data in vertically heterogeneous media to obtain a decimetric-scale distribution of P-impedance, density and Poisson's ratio within the shallow sub-seabed sediments. We address the deterministic multi-parameter inversion in a sequential fashion. The complex trace instantaneous phase is first inverted for the P-wave velocity to make-up for the lack of low-frequency in the data and reduce the non-linearity of the problem. This is followed by a short-offset P-impedance optimisation and a further step of full offset range Poisson's ratio inversion. Provided that the seismogram contains wide reflection angles (>40 degrees), we show that it is possible to invert for density and decompose a-posteriori the relative contribution of P-wave velocity and density to the P-impedance. A broad range of synthetic tests is used to prove the potential of the methodology and highlights sensitivity issues specific to UHF seismic. An example application to real data is also presented. In the real case, trace normalisation is applied to minimise the systematic error deriving from an inaccurate source wavelet estimation. The inverted model for the top 15 meters of the sub-seabed agrees with the local lithological information and core-log data. Thus we can obtain a detailed remote characterisation of the shallow sediments using a multi

  18. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future.

  19. Monitoring of low-energy seismic activity in Elbrus volcanic area with the use of underground seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, V.; Sobisevitch, A.

    2012-04-01

    Results of experiment with underground seismic array for studying low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area are presented. Linear seismic array of 2.5 km aperture is created in the tunnel of Baksan neutrino observatory. Horizontal tunnel of 4.3 km length is drilled in the mount Andyrchi at a distance of 20 km from Elbrus volcano. Array includes 6 three-component seismic sensors with 24-byte recorders installed with 500 m interval one from another along the tunnel. Underground seismic array is the new instrument of geophysical observatory organized for studies of geophysical processes in the Elbrus volcanic area. The observatory equipped with modern geophysical instruments including broadband tri-axial seismometers, quartz tilt-meters, magnetic variometers, geo-acoustic sensors, hi-precision distributed thermal sensors and gravimeters. The initial analysis of seismic signals recorded by seismic array allows us to detect low-energy seismic activity in the Elbrus volcanic area beginning from the distance of 3-5 km (the faults in a vicinity of mount Andyrchi) up to 15-25 km (area of Elbrus volcano). The regional micro-earthquakes with magnitude 1-2 at the distances 50-100 km was also recorded. 2.5 km aperture of the underground linear seismic array make it possible to determine with high accuracy hypocenters of local seismic events associated with geodynamic of volcanic magmatic structures and to realize seismo-emission tomography of the active zones of Elbrus volcano.

  20. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Utah, during 1967

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Barton K.; Dunrud, C. Richard; Hernandez, Jerome

    1969-01-01

    A seismic monitoring network near Sunnyside, Utah, consisting of a triangular array of seismometer stations that encompasses most of the mine workings in the district, recorded over 50,000 local earth tremors during 1967. About 540 of the tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be accurately located. Most of these were located within 2-3 miles of mine workings and were also near known or suspected faults. The district-wide seismic activity generally consisted of two different patterns--a periodic increase in the daily number of tremors at weekly intervals, and also a less regular and longer term increase and decrease of seismic activity that occurred over a period of weeks or even months. The shorter and more regular pattern can be correlated with the mine work week and seems to result from mining. The longer term activity, however, does not correlate with known mining causes sad therefore seems to be .caused by natural stresses.

  1. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP): Active Rift Processes in the Brawley Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, L.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Rymer, M. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Harding, A. J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lazaro-Mancilla, O.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP), funded by NSF and USGS, acquired seismic data in and across the Salton Trough in southern California and northern Mexico in March 2011. The project addresses both rifting processes at the northern end of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. Seven lines of onshore refraction and low-fold reflection data were acquired in the Coachella, Imperial, and Mexicali Valleys, two lines and a grid of airgun and OBS data were acquired in the Salton Sea, and onshore-offshore data were recorded. Almost 2800 land seismometers and 50 OBS's were used in almost 5000 deployments at almost 4300 sites, in spacing as dense as 100 m. These instruments received seismic signals from 126 explosive shots up to 1400 kg and over 2300 airgun shots. In the central Salton Trough, North American lithosphere appears to have been rifted completely apart. Based primarily on a 1979 seismic refraction project, the 20-22 km thick crust is apparently composed entirely of new crust added by magmatism from below and sedimentation from above. Active rifting of this new crust is manifested by shallow (<10km depth) seismicity in the oblique Brawley Seismic Zone (BSZ), small Salton Buttes volcanoes aligned perpendicular to the transform faults, very high heat flow (~140 mW/m2), and geothermal energy production. This presentation is focused on an onshore-offshore line of densely sampled refraction and low-fold reflection data that crosses the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Buttes in the direction of plate motion. At the time of abstract submission, data analysis was very preliminary, consisting of first-arrival tomography of the onshore half of the line for upper crustal seismic velocity. Crystalline basement (>5 km/s), comprised of late-Pliocene to Quaternary sediment metamorphosed by the high heat flow, occurs at ~2 km depth beneath the Salton Buttes and geothermal field and ~4 km

  2. Broad-band calibration of marine seismic sources used by R/V Polarstern for academic research in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, Monika; Boebel, Olaf; El Naggar, Saad; Jokat, Wilfried; Werner, Berthold

    2008-08-01

    Air guns and air-gun arrays of different volumes are used for scientific seismic surveys with R/V Polarstern in polar regions. To assess the potential risk of these research activities on marine mammal populations, knowledge of the sound pressure field of the seismic sources is essential. Therefore, a broad-band (0-80 kHz) calibration study was conducted at the Heggernes Acoustic Range, Norway. A GI (2.4 l), a G (8.5 l) and a Bolt gun (32.8 l) were deployed as single sources, 3 GI (7.4 l), 3 G (25.6 l) and 8 VLF™ Prakla-Seismos air guns (24.0 l) as arrays. Each configuration was fired along a line of 3-4 km length running between two hydrophone chains with receivers in 35, 100, 198 and 263 m depth. Peak-to-peak, zero-to-peak, rms and sound exposure levels (SEL) were analysed as functions of range. They show the typical dipole-like directivity of marine seismic sources with amplitude cancellation close to the sea surface, higher amplitudes in greater depths, and sound pressure levels which continuously decrease with range. Levels recorded during the approach are lower than during the departure indicating a shadowing effect of Polarsterns's hull. Backcalculated zero-to-peak source levels range from 224-240 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m. Spectral source levels are highest below 100 Hz and amount to 182-194 dB re 1 μPa Hz-1. They drop off continuously with range and frequency. At 1 kHz they are ~30 dB, at 80 kHz ~60 dB lower than the peak level. Above 1 kHz amplitude spectra are dominated by Polarstern's self-noise. From the rms and sound exposure levels of the deepest hydrophone radii for different thresholds are derived. For a 180 dB rms-level threshold radii maximally vary between 200 and 600 m, for a 186 dB SEL threshold between 50 and 300 m.

  3. CHARACTERIZING MARINE GAS-HYDRATE RESERVOIRS AND DETERMINING MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MARINE GAS-HYDRATE STRATA WITH 4-COMPONENT OCEAN-BOTTOM-CABLE SEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    B.A. Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; P. Murray; L.J. Wood assisted by K. Rogers

    2002-01-01

    The technical approach taken in this gas-hydrate research is unique because it is based on applying large-scale, 3-D, multi-component seismic surveys to improve the understanding of marine gas-hydrate systems. Other gas-hydrate research uses only single-component seismic technology. In those rare instances when multi-component seismic data have been acquired for gas-hydrate research, the data acquisition has involved only a few receiver stations and a few source stations, sometimes only three or four of each. In contrast, the four-component, 3-D, ocean-bottom-cable (4C3D OBC) data used in this study were acquired at thousands of receiver stations spaced 50 m apart over an area of approximately 1,000 km{sup 2} using wavefields generated at thousands of source stations spaced 75 m apart over this same survey area. The reason for focusing research attention on marine multi-component seismic data is that 4C3D OBC will provide a converted-SV image of gas-hydrate systems in addition to an improved P-wave image. Because P and SV reflectivities differ at some stratal surfaces, P and SV data provide two independent, and different, images of subsurface geology. The existence of these two independent seismic images and the availability of facies-sensitive SV seismic attributes, which can be combined with conventional facies-sensitive, P-wave seismic attributes, means that marine gas-hydrate systems should be better evaluated using multi-component seismic data than using conventional single-component seismic data. Conventional seismic attributes, such as instantaneous reflection amplitude and reflection coherency, have been extracted from the P and SV data volumes created from the 4C3D OBC data used in this research. Comparisons of these attributes and comparisons of P and SV time slices and vertical slices show that SV data provide a more reliable image of stratigraphy and structure associated with gas-invaded strata than do P-wave data. This finding confirms that multi

  4. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  5. Mapping faults and intrusions onshore Disko Island by use of Vibroseismic data, shallow marine seismic data and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Nørmark, Egon; Gulbrandsen, Pelle; Sabra, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The west Greenland margin is characterized by sedimentary basins containing high density of intrusions (dikes and sills) originating from the Cenozoic breakup and separation of Greenland and North American. The magmatic rocks have lately attracted interest due to observations of hydrocarbons associated to the intrusions but here due to the ore potential associated to the same intrusions. In 2000 a marine seismic campaign by GEUS in the coastal areas of West Greenland showed that it is possible to identify magmatic intrusions in the sedimentary succession as well as map normal faults, and that the intrusions are heterogeneous distributed and probably related to the normal faults. The presence of normal faults is known from the regional onshore geological mapping campaigns performed by GEUS. However, the marine seismic data indicate a much more complicated structural pattern than presented in the onshore maps, which is a well-known phenomenon (Marcussen et al., 2002). In 2012 and 2013 seismic data were acquired onshore on the northern coast of Disko as part of a research project funded by Avannaa Resources . The objective was initially to test whether it is possible to acquire data of a quality enabling the observation and mapping of intrusions in the subsurface. Later it was followed by a more extensive survey where it was attempted to map the depth to and geometry of the intrusions. The relatively dense seismic grid onshore -compared to the marine seismic data offshore west Greenland- enable the identification and more important the mapping of several intrusions. They show some of the same characteristics as intrusions observed at e.q. the Norwegian margin of the North Atlantic (Hansen et al., 2004). The preliminary results which integrate both marine and onshore seismic data revise the structural understanding of the area and indicate a close relation between the intrusions and the rift related normal faults. The results are consistent with remote sensing methods

  6. Correlation between Induced Seismic Events and Hydraulic Fracturing activities in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R.; Aminzadeh, F.; Tiwari, A.

    2014-12-01

    Induced seismicity observed in Oklahoma and Ohio have raised environmental concern to an alarming level and thus any plausible correlation between subsurface injection and production activities have become an significant area of study. As per US Seismic Hazard map, California lies in highly sensitive zone, which makes understanding of stimulation induced seismic events critically important. The copious number of seismic events due to presence of numerous faults in California benefits understanding seismicity of the region but makes it difficult to distinguish induced seismic events from naturally occurring seismic events. Since regional models are considered more effective in understanding the seismicity of the region, this study aims in understanding impact of hydraulic fracturing activities in various oilfields in California. The focus of the study is to identify sensitive zones in California which might have observed seismic activities induced due to hydraulic fracturing. This has been done using the criteria of spatial and temporal co-relation between fracturing activities and seismic events for oilfields with significant number of fracturing activities. The seismic and well data used for this study is acquired from public sources and have been integrated in an efficient manner using the GIS tool and iterative querying. The two step methodology implemented for this work involves segregating the induced seismic events from natural events based on the depth of the event and seismic history of the region and then spatially and temporally studying it with regards to hydraulic fracturing in vicinity of the seismic event.

  7. Seismicity and active tectonics at Coloumbo Reef (Aegean Sea, Greece): Monitoring an active volcano at Santorini Volcanic Center using a temporary seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriadis, I.; Karagianni, E.; Panagiotopoulos, D.; Papazachos, C.; Hatzidimitriou, P.; Bohnhoff, M.; Rische, M.; Meier, T.

    2009-02-01

    The volcanic center of Santorini Island is the most active volcano of the southern Aegean volcanic arc. Α dense seismic array consisting of fourteen portable broadband seismological stations has been deployed in order to monitor and study the seismo-volcanic activity at the broader area of the Santorini volcanic center between March 2003 and September 2003. Additional recordings from a neighbouring larger scale temporary network (CYCNET) were also used for the relocation of more than 240 earthquakes recorded by both arrays. A double-difference relocation technique was used, in order to obtain optimal focal parameters for the best-constrained earthquakes. The results indicate that the seismic activity of the Santorini volcanic center is strongly associated with the tectonic regime of the broader Southern Aegean Sea area as well as with the volcanic processes. The main cluster of the epicenters is located at the Coloumbo Reef, a submarine volcano of the volcanic system of Santorini Islands. A smaller cluster of events is located near the Anydros Islet, aligned in a NE-SW direction, running almost along the main tectonic feature of the area under study, the Santorini-Amorgos Fault Zone. In contrast, the main Santorini Island caldera is characterized by the almost complete absence of seismicity. This contrast is in very good agreement with recent volcanological and marine studies, with the Coloumbo volcanic center showing an intense high-temperature hydrothermal activity, in comparison to the corresponding low-level activity of the Santorini caldera. The high-resolution hypocentral relocations present a clear view of the volcanic submarine structure at the Coloumbo Reef, showing that the main seismic activity is located within a very narrow vertical column, mainly at depths between 6 and 9 km. The focal mechanisms of the best-located events show that the cluster at the Coloumbo Reef is associated with the "Kameni-Coloumbo Fracture Zone", which corresponds to the

  8. Trypanocidal Activity of Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy J.; Grkovic, Tanja; Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a diverse, unique collection of compounds with immense therapeutic potential. This has resulted in these molecules being evaluated for a number of different disease indications including the neglected protozoan diseases, human African trypanosomiasis and Chagas disease, for which very few drugs are currently available. This article will review the marine natural products for which activity against the kinetoplastid parasites; Trypanosoma brucei brucei, T.b. rhodesiense and T. cruzi has been reported. As it is important to know the selectivity of a compound when evaluating its trypanocidal activity, this article will only cover molecules which have simultaneously been tested for cytotoxicity against a mammalian cell line. Compounds have been grouped according to their chemical structure and representative examples from each class were selected for detailed discussion. PMID:24152565

  9. Waveform Inversion of Marine Seismic Reflection Data from the Queen Charlotte Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takam Takougang, E.; Calvert, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    In order to obtain higher resolution seismic velocity data above approximately 1.5 km depth, two-dimensional waveform inversion was applied to seismic reflection data from the Queen Charlotte sedimentary basin off the west coast of Canada. The inversion, which employs the method of Pratt (1999), was performed using a multi- scale approach in the frequency domain based on the acoustic wave equation. The seismic data are from a survey of 8 lines that was collected in 1988 by the Geological survey of Canada. Data preconditioning, inversion strategies and results from line 88-06 which crosses Tertiary formations in Hecate Strait between Graham Island and Dolphin Island are presented. A starting velocity model, which gives an RMS travel time misfit of 18 ms, is derived from travel-time tomography, and is sufficient to avoid cycle skipping at a starting waveform inversion frequency of 8 Hz. Due to the limited maximum offset of 3700 m the maximum depth of penetration doesn't exceed 1500 m. The relatively high minimum frequency (8 Hz) constitutes a challenge for a successful inversion, as higher frequencies are subject to greater instability. A strategy is presented to mitigate this issue with the inversion implemented in two stages. The first stage consists of enriching at the initial frequency the starting model with intermediate to low wavenumbers, using a filter in the wavenumber domain to ensure continuity in the spectral coverage, and preconditioning the residual by inverting first for the most linear component of the data. The second stage consists of inverting from the initial frequency (8 Hz) up to 15 Hz, using 10 iterations per frequency and following a layer stripping approach to give the same kinematics to all portions of the model. Amplitude scaling and spiking deconvolution constitute the main preconditioning of the data; their effects are also shown. Model appraisal is carried out by comparing synthetic shot gathers obtained by forward modeling with the

  10. Current (1985-1988) seismic activity in Belgium: Comparison with historical and instrumental seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camelbeeck, T.

    1990-12-01

    Reliable information concerning the historical and instrumental seismicity in Belgium is discussed in comparison with the more recent data of microseismicity. The Brabant Massif and the north of France are characterized by an important historical seismicity. Since the Middle Ages, four earthquakes caused considerable concern in that region. The actual seismic activity is not well known due to the lack of seismological stations. It is thus impossible to base the tectonic pattern on seismological data. The seismic activity in Hainaut was analyzed with the data of the seismic sequence near Dour in 1987 and the reexamination of the bigger earthquakes having occurred since 1965. The seismogenic layer is limited to the 8 first km of the crust. The occurrence under the form of swarms or sequences is an evidence of strong fracturation. The fault-plane solution of the Dour earthquake in 1987 indicates an almost north-south extension at this place of the Mons Basin. The focal mechanisms of 5 earthquakes in the center region shows a north-west south-east oriented maximal horizontal compressive stress. This information is in agreement with the dextral strike-slip of the 'shear zone of north-Artois' made conspicuous by geology. Important information about the seismotectonics in the eastern part of Belgium is given by the study of the actual microseismicity with a dense network of seismological stations. The fault-plane solution of the Malmedy (12 May 1985, M (sub L) = 2.5) earthquake indicates a south-west north-east extension along a fault of rhenish orientation. This is a favorable argument to the hypothesis of the prolongation across the Ardennes of the quaternary faults of the lower Rhine embayment. The analysis of the Bilzen (16 Jul. 1985, M(sub L) = 3.0), Gulpen (17 Oct. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.5), and Sprimont (27 Dec. 1988, M(sub L) = 3.6) earthquakes supplies new information on the complex tectonics of the Liege region.

  11. Airgun inter-pulse noise field during a seismic survey in an Arctic ultra shallow marine environment.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shane; Vignola, Joseph; Judge, John; Turo, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration using seismic airguns generates intense underwater pulses that could cause marine mammal hearing impairment and/or behavioral disturbances. However, few studies have investigated the resulting multipath propagation and reverberation from airgun pulses. This research uses continuous acoustic recordings collected in the Arctic during a low-level open-water shallow marine seismic survey, to measure noise levels between airgun pulses. Two methods were used to quantify noise levels during these inter-pulse intervals. The first, based on calculating the root-mean-square sound pressure level in various sub-intervals, is referred to as the increment computation method, and the second, which employs the Hilbert transform to calculate instantaneous acoustic amplitudes, is referred to as the Hilbert transform method. Analyses using both methods yield similar results, showing that the inter-pulse sound field exceeds ambient noise levels by as much as 9 dB during relatively quiet conditions. Inter-pulse noise levels are also related to the source distance, probably due to the higher reverberant conditions of the very shallow water environment. These methods can be used to quantify acoustic environment impacts from anthropogenic transient noises (e.g., seismic pulses, impact pile driving, and sonar pings) and to address potential acoustic masking affecting marine mammals.

  12. Tracking Stress and Hydrothermal Activity Along Oceanic Spreading Centers Using Tomographic Images of Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, R. A.; Conder, J. A.; Canales, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Marine controlled-source seismic tomography experiments now utilize 50+ ocean-bottom seismographs and source grids consisting of many tens of seismic lines with <500 m shot spacing. These dense experiments focus on the upper 10 km of the lithosphere over areas approaching 9000 sq-km. Because of the dense sampling and large azimuthal coverage of ray paths (200,000+ travel time measurements possible), it is now feasible to solve for 3-D images of P-wave azimuthal anisotropy with resolving lengths approaching 1km. Recent examples include the L-SCAN and MARINER experiments, performed at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36N), respectively. In each case, background anisotropy of ~4% is found in the upper 3-4 km of lithosphere and is consistent with pervasive stress-aligned cracks and microcracks. The fast axes are generally oriented parallel to the trend of the spreading center, as expected for cracks that form in association with seafloor spreading. Three-dimensional images of anisotropy magnitude and orientation reveal variations interpreted as arising from changes in the ambient stress field. Near the ends of ridge segments, where the ridge axis jumps from one spreading center to the next, anisotropy is high with orientations that are out of alignment relative to the background trend. This agrees with numerical models and seafloor morphology that suggest tensile stress concentration and brittle crack formation in these areas. Anisotropy also increases in areas along the ridges where the underlying magma supply and hydrothermal output are greater. This is opposite the trend expected if simple tectonic stress models govern anisotropy. Increased hydrothermal activity, due to increased magma supply, can explain higher anisotropy via increased pore pressure and hydrofracturing. These studies provide the first evidence that images of seismic anisotropy can be used to map variations in hydrologic activity along the crests of oceanic spreading centers.

  13. Structure and seismic activity of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evain, M.; Galve, A.; Charvis, P.; Laigle, M.; Ruiz Fernandez, M.; Kopp, H.; Hirn, A.; Flueh, E. R.; Thales Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Several active and passive seismic experiments conducted in 2007 in the framework of the European program "Thales Was Right" and of the French ANR program "Subsismanti" provided a unique set of geophysical data highlighting the deep structure of the central part of the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, offshore Dominica and Martinique, and its seismic activity during a period of 8 months. The region is characterized by a relatively low rate of seismicity that is often attributed to the slow (2 cm/yr) subduction of the old, 90 My, Atlantic lithosphere beneath the Caribbean Plate. Based on tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic data, the forearc can clearly be divided into an inner forearc, characterised by a high vertical velocity gradient in the igneous crust, and an outer forearc with lower crustal velocity gradient. The thick, high velocity, inner forearc is possibly the extension at depth of the Mesozoic Caribbean crust outcropping in La Désirade Island. The outer forearc, up to 70 km wide in the northern part of the study area, is getting narrower to the south and disappears offshore Martinique. Based on its seismic velocity structure with velocities higher than 6 km/s the backstop consists, at least partly, of magmatic rocks. The outer forearc is also highly deformed and faulted within the subducting trend of the Tiburon Ridge. With respect to the inner forearc velocity structure the outer forearc basement could either correspond to an accreted oceanic terrane or made of highly fractured rocks. The inner forearc is a dense, poorly deformable crustal block, tilted southward as a whole. It acts as a rigid buttress increasing the strain within both the overriding and subducting plates. This appears clearly in the current local seismicity affecting the subducting and the overriding plates that is located beneath the inner forearc. We detected earthquakes beneath the Caribbean forearc and in the Atlantic oceanic plate as well. The main seismic activity is

  14. 76 FR 13130 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Polar Bear Captures AGENCY: National Marine..., incidental to a capture-recapture program of polar bears in the U.S. Chukchi Sea. DATES: Effective March 14... taking, by harassment, of marine mammals incidental to a capture-recapture program of polar bears in...

  15. 76 FR 330 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Polar Bear Captures AGENCY: National Marine...) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to a capture- recapture program of polar bears in...-recapture program of polar bears in the U.S. Chukchi Sea. NMFS reviewed the USFWS' application...

  16. Direct Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Joint Inversion ofMarine Seismic AVA&CSEM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G. Michael; Cassassuce, Florence; Gasperikova, Erika; Newman,Gregory A.; Rubin, Yoram; Zhangshuan, Hou; Vasco, Don

    2005-01-12

    A new joint inversion algorithm to directly estimate reservoir parameters is described. This algorithm combines seismic amplitude versus angle (AVA) and marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data. The rock-properties model needed to link the geophysical parameters to the reservoir parameters is described. Errors in the rock-properties model parameters, measured in percent, introduce errors of comparable size in the joint inversion reservoir parameter estimates. Tests of the concept on synthetic one-dimensional models demonstrate improved fluid saturation and porosity estimates for joint AVA-CSEM data inversion (compared to AVA or CSEM inversion alone). Comparing inversions of AVA, CSEM, and joint AVA-CSEM data over the North Sea Troll field, at a location with well control, shows that the joint inversion produces estimated gas saturation, oil saturation and porosity that is closest (as measured by the RMS difference, L1 norm of the difference, and net over the interval) to the logged values whereas CSEM inversion provides the closest estimates of water saturation.

  17. [Bio-active substances derived from marine microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanyong; Hu, Jiangchun; Xue, Delin; Ma, Chengxin; Wang, Shujin

    2002-07-01

    Marine microorganisms, which are taxonomically diverse and genetically special, have powerful potential in producing novel bio-active substances. This article summarized research progress in this respect. The results showed that marine bacteria which are main marine microorganism flora can produce rich kinds of bio-active substances and that even though marine actinomycetes and marine fungi are not as many as marine bacteria in species and quantity, they should be paid no less attention about their bio-active substances. Besides, present research are limited to those marine microorganisms which are easily cultured. One of the future research trends will be focused on bio-active substances derived from non-culturable marine microorganisms.

  18. Geometry and deformation history of the New Madrid seismic zone fault system, Central U.S. from high-resolution marine seismic reflection data, and implications for intraplate deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Magnani, M.; McIntosh, K. D.; Waldron, B. A.; Saustrup, S.; Fave, X. J.

    2010-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) is the most seismically active area in the continental United States east of the Rocky Mountains, and by far the most studied intraplate seismic zone in the world. The occurrence of large magnitude historical and prehistorical earthquakes, as well as the high level of instrumental seismicity suggest that the North American plate is actively deforming in this region. This observation appears to clash with geodetic evidence that shows minimal motion across the faults illuminated by the present seismicity, suggesting that either the present GPS vectors recorded at the surface are not typical of the long term deformation rate of the NMSZ faults, or that the NMSZ fault system is presently unloaded and not deforming. To better constrain the long-term deformation history of the NMSZ fault system, in the summer of 2010 we acquired ~300 km of high-resolution seismic marine reflection data along the Mississippi River from Cape Girardeau, MO to Caruthersville, MO. The profile crosses a large portion of the Mississippi Embayment, including three of the four main NMSZ active faults, and images the gently south-dipping unconsolidated sediments of the Mississippi Embayment from the Quaternary alluvium of the Mississippi River down to the top of Paleozoic sequences, at a depth of ~650 m. Among the most remarkable structures imaged by the profile is the Reelfoot fault, interpreted as the NW-SE striking restraining bend connecting two NE-SW trending dextral strike-slip faults. The Reelfoot thrust intersects the profile at three locations along the river meander known as the Kentucky Bend. The multiple crossings allow mapping of the along-strike variations of the fault plane’s dip and structure. In particular the data show that a reverse offset of 42 m at the top of the Cretaceous is accommodated by a single fault at the crossing north of town of Tiptonville, TN, west of the location where the Reelfoot thrust ruptured during the 7 February 1812 M7

  19. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    A search for space and time regularities in volcanic and seismic events for the purpose of forecast method development seems to be of current concern, both scientifically and practically. The seismic and volcanic processes take place in the Earth's field of gravity which in turn is closely related to gravitational fields of the Moon, the Sun, and the planets of the Solar System. It is mostly gravity and tidal forces that exercise control over the Earth's configuration and relief. Dynamic gravitational interaction between the Earth and other celestial bodies makes itself evident in tidal phenomena and other effects in the geospheres (including the Earth's crust). Dynamics of the tidal and attractive forces is responsible for periodical changes in gravity force, both in value and direction [Darwin, 1965], in the rate of rotation and orbital speed; that implies related changes in the endogenic activity of the Earth. The Earth's rotation in the alternating gravitational field accounts to a considerable extent for regular pattern of crustal deformations and dislocations; it is among principal factors that control the Earth's form and structure, distribution of oceans and continents and, probably, continental drift [Peive, 1969; Khain, 1973; Kosygin, 1983]. The energy of gravitational interaction is transmitted through the tidal energy to planetary spheres and feeds various processes there, including volcanic and seismic ones. To determine degree, character and special features of tidal force contribution to the volcanic and seismic processes is of primary importance for understanding of genetic and dynamic aspects of volcanism and seismicity. Both volcanic and seismic processes are involved in evolution of celestial bodies; they are operative on the planets of the Earth group and many satellites [Essays…, 1981; Lukashov, 1996]. From this standpoint, studies of those processes are essential with a view to development of scenarios of the Earth's evolution as a celestial

  20. New insights on shallow and deep crustal geological structures of BABEL line 7 marine reflection seismic data revealed from reprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrokhi, H.; Malehmir, A.; Sopher, D.

    2012-04-01

    The BABEL project (Baltic And Bothnian Echoes from the Lithosphere) was a collaboration among British, Danish, Finnish, German and Swedish geoscientists to collect deep-crustal reflection and wide-angle refraction profiles in Baltic Shield and Gulf of Bothnia. The acquisition of 2,268km of deep marine reflection seismic data was carried out in 1989. The BABEL line 7 runs in E-W direction in the Bothnian Sea, north of the Åland islands and east of the city of Gävle. Several authors presented the seismic results but with a main focus of imaging and interpreting deep crustal geological structures and the nature and the depth of Moho discontinuity along line 7. Based on this seismic data, several publications about velocity distributions within the crust, the depth and texture of Moho discontinuity and seismic reflectivity patterns in the crust were presented. Some evidence from the reflection seismic data was also presented to suggest Early Proterozoic plate tectonics in the Baltic Shield. Previous seismic images of the BABEL line 7 reflection data show a dramatic change in the reflectivity pattern from weakly reflective lower crust in the west to a more reflective lower crust in the east, which was attributed to a change from a rigid crust to a plastic crust from the west to the east. The BABEL line 7 reflection data were acquired with a total profile length of 174km, a set of 48 airguns towed at 7.5m depth, and 3000m long streamer with 60 channels spaced with 50m intervals and towed at 15m depth. Seismic data were recorded for 25s using 4ms sampling interval and 75m shot interval. Seismic data is characterized by strong source-generated noise at shallow travel times and strong but randomly distributed spurious spikes at later arrival times. In this study, we have recovered and reprocessed the seismic data along BABEL line 7. Using modern processing and imaging techniques, which were not available at the time, and with a focus on the shallow parts of the seismic

  1. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  2. Seismic image of a CO2 reservoir beneath a seismically active volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Pitt, A.M.; Foulger, G.R.

    1998-01-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a seismically active volcano 200 000 to 50 000 years old, situated on the southwestern rim of Long Valley caldera, California. Since 1989 it has shown evidence of unrest in the form of earthquake swarms (Hill et al. 1990), volcanic 'long-period' earthquakes (Pitt and Hill 1994), increased output of magmatic 3He (Sorey et al. 1993) and the emission of about 500 tonnes day-1 of CO2 (Farrar et al. 1995; Hill 1996; M. Sorey, personal communication, 1997) which has killed trees and poses a threat to human safety. Local-earthquake tomography shows that in mid-1989 areas of subsequent tree-kill were underlain by extensive regions where the ratio of the compressional and shear elastic-wave speeds Vp/VS was about 9% lower than in the surrounding rocks. Theory (Mavko and Mukerji 1995), experiment (Ito, DeVilbiss and Nur 1979) and experience at other geothermal/volcanic areas (Julian et al. 1996) and at petroleum reservoirs (Harris et al. 1996) indicate that Vp/VS is sensitive to pore-fluid compressibility, through its effect on Vp. The observed Vp/VS anomaly is probably caused directly by CO2, and seismic Vp/VS tomography is thus a promising tool for monitoring gas concentration and movement in volcanoes, which may in turn be related to volcanic activity.

  3. 78 FR 33369 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to take marine mammals, by Level B harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine geophysical (i.e., seismic) survey in the deep water of the Gulf of Mexico, April to May...

  4. 78 FR 11821 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ...NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine geophysical (seismic) survey in the Gulf of Mexico, April to May, 2013. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to......

  5. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  6. Active Tectonics and Seismic Potential of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Wesson, Robert L.; Ekström, Göran

    This multidisciplinary monograph provides the first modern integrative summary focused on the most spectacular active tectonic systems in North America. Encompassing seismology, tectonics, geology, and geodesy, it includes papers that summarize the state of knowledge, including background material for those unfamiliar with the region; address global hypotheses using data from Alaska; and test important global hypotheses using data from this region. It is organized around four major themes: • subduction and great earthquakes at the Aleutian Arc, • the transition from strike slip to accretion and subduction of the Yakutat microplate, • the Denali fault and related structures and their role in accommodating permanent deformation of the overriding plate, and • regional integration and large-scale models and the use of data from Alaska to address important global questions and hypotheses. The book's publication near the beginning of the National Science Foundation's EarthScope project makes it especially timely because Alaska is perhaps the least understood area within the EarthScope footprint, and interest in the region can be expected to rise with time as more EarthScope data become available.

  7. Archiving and Exchange of a Computerized Marine Seismic Database: The ROSE (Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment) Data Archive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    The participating institutions provided their data to the facility where the data were catalogued and distributed. This report describes in detail ...distributed. This report describes in detail the processes and computer programs used to catalog, store and distribute the ROSE seismic data. The...of the Data Base 1 II. The Rose Storage and Exchange Format 2 A. The Tape Header File 2 B. File Header Record and Data Structure 6 C. Shot

  8. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity in Fthiotida, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Contadakis, Michael E.; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyrous

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of our previous studies concerning the tidal triggering effect on the seismicity in Greece, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality, associated with earthquake occurrence. Then, we investigate whether the recent increase in the seismic activity at Fthiotida in Greek mainland indicates faulting maturity and the possible production a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this investigation

  9. A comparison of active seismic source data to seismic excitations from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Arthur; Kennedy, Ben; Keys, Harry; Lokmer, Ivan; Proctor, Jon; Lyons, John; Jolly, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption jets, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~7x105 m3) that propagated ~2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption chronology must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity starting at 11:52:18 UTC that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the timing of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the eruptive sequence. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9x106 joules producing seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four 3-component stations. From these, we obtained a distribution of amplitudes across the network for each drop position which varied systematically from the eruption vent and avalanche scar to the debris avalanche toe. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross-correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we found evidence for the debris avalanche a few minutes prior to the eruption in both the broad spectrum and narrow frequency (5-10 Hz) analysis. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~8x1011 joules, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The inferred seismic energy release for the

  10. Searching for Seismically Active Faults in the Gulf of Cadiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custodio, S.; Antunes, V.; Arroucau, P.

    2015-12-01

    The repeated occurrence of large magnitude earthquakes in southwest Iberia in historical and instrumental times suggests the presence of active fault segments in the region. However, due to an apparently diffuse seismicity pattern defining a broad region of distributed deformation west of Gibraltar Strait, the question of the location, dimension and geometry of such structures is still open to debate. We recently developed a new algorithm for earthquake location in 3D complex media with laterally varying interface depths, which allowed us to relocate 2363 events having occurred from 2007 to 2013, using P- and S-wave catalog arrival times obtained from the Portuguese Meteorological Institute (IPMA, Instituto Portugues do Mar e da Atmosfera), for a study area lying between 8.5˚W and 5˚W in longitude and 36˚ and 37.5˚ in latitude. The most remarkable change in the seismicity pattern after relocation is an apparent concentration of events, in the North of the Gulf of Cadiz, along a low angle northward-dipping plane rooted at the base of the crust, which could indicate the presence of a major fault. If confirmed, this would be the first structure clearly illuminated by seismicity in a region that has unleashed large magnitude earthquakes. Here, we present results from the joint analysis of focal mechanism solutions and waveform similarity between neighboring events from waveform cross-correlation in order to assess whether those earthquakes occur on the same fault plane.

  11. Near-surface, marine seismic-reflection data defines potential hydrogeologic confinement bypass in a tertiary carbonate aquifer, southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Walker, Cameron; Westcott, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 210 km of near-surface, high-frequency, marine seismic-reflection data were acquired on the southeastern part of the Florida Platform between 2007 and 2011. Many high-resolution, seismic-reflection profiles, interpretable to a depth of about 730 m, were collected on the shallow-marine shelf of southeastern Florida in water as shallow as 1 m. Landward of the present-day shelf-margin slope, these data image middle Eocene to Pleistocene strata and Paleocene to Pleistocene strata on the Miami Terrace. This high-resolution data set provides an opportunity to evaluate geologic structures that cut across confining units of the Paleocene to Oligocene-age carbonate rocks that form the Floridan aquifer system.Seismic profiles image two structural systems, tectonic faults and karst collapse structures, which breach confining beds in the Floridan aquifer system. Both structural systems may serve as pathways for vertical groundwater flow across relatively low-permeability carbonate strata that separate zones of regionally extensive high-permeability rocks in the Floridan aquifer system. The tectonic faults occur as normal and reverse faults, and collapse-related faults have normal throw. The most common fault occurrence delineated on the reflection profiles is associated with karst collapse structures. These high-frequency seismic data are providing high quality structural analogs to unprecedented depths on the southeastern Florida Platform. The analogs can be used for assessment of confinement of other carbonate aquifers and the sealing potential of deeper carbonate rocks associated with reservoirs around the world.

  12. Active seismic sources as a proxy for seismic surface processes: An example from the 2012 Tongariro volcanic eruptions, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, A. D.; Lokmer, I.; Kennedy, B.; Keys, H. J. R.; Proctor, J.; Lyons, J. J.; Jolly, G. E.

    2014-10-01

    The 6 August 2012 eruption from Tongariro volcano's Te Maari vent comprised a complex sequence of events including at least 4 eruption pulses, a large chasm collapse, and a debris avalanche (volume of ~ 7 × 105 m3) that propagated ~ 2 km beyond the eruptive vent. The eruption was poorly observed, being obscured by night time darkness, and the eruption timing must be unravelled instead from a complex seismic record that includes discrete volcanic earthquakes, a sequence of low to moderate level spasmodic tremor and an intense burst of seismic and infrasound activity that marked the eruption onset. We have discriminated the evolution of the complex surface activity by comparing active seismic source data to the seismic sequence in a new cross correlation source location approach. We dropped 11 high impact masses from helicopter to generate a range of active seismic sources in the vicinity of the eruption vent, chasm, and debris avalanche areas. We obtained 8 successful drops having an impact energy ranging from 3 to 9 × 106 Nm producing observable seismic signals to a distance of 5 to 10 km and having good signal to noise characteristics in the 3-12 Hz range. For the 8 drops, we picked first-P arrival times and calculated amplitude spectra for a uniform set of four stations. We then compared these proxy source excitations to the natural eruption and pre-eruption data using a moving window cross correlation approach. From the correlation processing, we obtain a best matched source position in the near vent region for the eruption period and significant down channel excitations during both the pre and post eruption periods. The total seismic energy release calculated from the new method is ~ 8 × 1011 Nm, similar to an independently estimated calculation based on the radiated seismic energy. The new energy estimate may be more robust than those calculated from standard seismic radiation equations, which may include uncertainties about the path and site effects. The

  13. Active Faults, Modern Seismicity And Block Structure Of Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatinsky, Y.; Rundquist, D.

    2004-12-01

    The analysis of on active faults and seismicity shows that the only a northern part of Eurasia should be regarded as an indivisible lithosphere unit. We defined it as the North Eurasian plate (Gatinsky, Rundquist, 2004) unlike the Eurasian plate s.l., which can be used only for paleotectonic reconstructions. The North Eurasian plate is bordered by zones of seismic activity traced along the Gakkel ridge, the Chersky and Stanovoi ranges, the Baikal rift, Altai--Sayany region, northern Tien Shan, Pamir, Hindu Kush and Kopet Dagh, Great Caucasus, northern Anatolia, Rhodopes, Carpathians, eastern and central Alps. Relationships between this plate and Europe west of the Rhine grabens remain ambiguous. The satellite measurements for them seem to be similar (Nocquet, Calais, 2003), but structural and seismic evidences allow suggesting their incipient division. Wide zones between this plate and neighboring ones can be distinguished outside north Eurasia. These zones consist of numerous blocks of various sizes. Block boundaries are mainly characterized by the high seismicity and development of active wrench faults, thrusts or modern rifts. Some of such zones were named earlier as "diffuse plate boundaries" (Stein et al., 2002; Bird et al, 2003). We suggest to name them as "transit zones" because they are situated between large lithosphere plates and as if transfer the stress field of one of them to other. Blocks within the transit zones reveal local divergences in GPS vectors of their displacements in the ITRF system and especially with respect to fixed Eurasia. At the same time data of satellite measurements emphasize the unity of the North Eurasian plate, which moves eastward in absolute coordinates with some clockwise rotation. The stress distribution in inner parts of the continent is being affected by the interaction with different plates and blocks. It can be more effectively illustrated by a «triangle» of the maximal seismic activity of Eurasia in the central Asia

  14. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Dovi; Posner, Ellen Kromkowski; McDermid, Karla J.; Tabandera, Nicole K.; Wright, Patrick R.; Wright, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power) assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer. PMID:22412808

  15. JNCC guidelines for minimising the risk of injury and disturbance to marine mammals from seismic surveys: We can do better.

    PubMed

    Wright, Andrew J; Cosentino, A Mel

    2015-11-15

    The U.K.'s Joint Nature Conservation Committee 1998 guidelines for minimising acoustic impacts from seismic surveys on marine mammals were the first of their kind. Covering both planning and operations, they included various measures for reducing the potential for damaging hearing - an appropriate focus at the time. Since introduction, the guidelines have been criticised for, among other things: the arbitrarily-sized safety zones; the lack of shut-down provisions; the use of mitigation measures that introduce more noise into the environment (e.g., soft-starts); inadequate observer training; and the lack of standardised data collection protocols. Despite the concerns, the guidelines have remained largely unchanged. Moreover, increasing scientific recognition of the scope and magnitude of non-injurious impacts of sound on marine life has become much more widespread since the last revisions in 2010. Accordingly, here we present feasible and realistic recommendations for such improvements, in light of the current state of knowledge.

  16. Characterizing the accumulation and distribution of gas hydrate in marine sediments using numerical models and seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimblett, Jillian Nicole

    Despite the increasing availability of geophysical, geochemical, geotechnical, and biological data that characterize in situ properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the fundamental physical processes associated with gas hydrate formation, accumulation, distribution and dissociation in porous marine sediments remain poorly understood. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal accumulation of gas hydrate in marine sediments through (1) a numerical model that explores the impact of hydraulic parameters on permeability evolution during hydrate formation; and (2) tomographic analysis of multichannel seismic data that constrain the local concentration of gas hydrate. The results constrain the hydraulic parameters pertinent to the hydrodynamics of gas hydrate reservoirs and provide insight about the physical and elastic properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments relevant for estimating hydrate concentration in porous assemblages.

  17. Bromophenols from marine algae with potential anti-diabetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiukun; Liu, Ming

    2012-12-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols with a variety of biological activities, including antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress in researches on the biomaterials from marine algae, emphasizing the relationship between the structure and the potential anti-diabetic applications. Bromophenols from marine algae display their hyperglycemic effects by inhibiting the activities of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, α-glucosidase, as well as other mechanisms.

  18. Marine soundscape shaped by fishing activity

    PubMed Central

    Lossent, Julie; Grall, Jacques; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Marine communities face anthropogenic pressures that degrade ecosystems. Because underwater soundscapes carry information about habitat quality, we explored whether destructive impacts of fishing could be evaluated via the soundscape. Maerl beds are recognized as biodiversity hotspots and they experience major worldwide degradation owing to fishing. We collected field acoustic recordings in maerl beds exposed to different fishing practices. We found that unfished maerl beds were threefold louder and exhibited sound frequencies more diversified than those recorded in fished maerl beds. Analyses of associated fauna samples indicated that snapping shrimps provided a major contribution to the maerl bed soundscape. Moreover, sea urchins and squat lobsters most likely contributed to differences between the soundscapes of unfished and fished maerl beds. Our results supported the idea that the soundscape can provide valuable information on maerl bed ecosystem health related to fishing activity. PMID:28280559

  19. Active damping performance of the KAGRA seismic attenuation system prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yoshinori; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Aso, Yoichi; Barton, Mark; Erasmo Peña Arellano, Fabián; Shoda, Ayaka; Akutsu, Tomotada; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Hirata, Naoatsu; Hayama, Kazuhiro; Okutomi, Koki; Miyamoto, Takahiro; Ishizuka, Hideki; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    The Large-scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave Telescope (formerly LCGT now KAGRA) is presently under construction in Japan. This May we assembled a prototype of the seismic attenuation system (SAS) for the beam splitter and the signal recycling mirrors of KAGRA, which we call Type-B SAS, and evaluated its performance at NAOJ (Mitaka, Toyko). We investigated its frequency response, active damping performance, vibration isolation performance and long-term stability both in and out of vacuum. From the frequency response test and the active damping performance test, we confirmed that the SAS worked as we designed and that all mechanical resonances which could disturb lock acquisition and observation are damped within 1 minute, which is required for KAGRA, by the active controls.

  20. Geoazur's contribution in instrumentation to monitor seismic activity of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, B.; Hello, Y.; Anglade, A.; Desprez, O.; Ogé, A.; Charvis, P.; Deschamps, A.; Galve, A.; Nolet, G.; Sukhovich, A.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic activity in the earth is mainly located near the tectonic plate boundaries, in the deep ocean (expansion centers) or near their margins (subduction zones). Travel times and waveforms of recorded seismograms can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional wave speed distribution in the earth with seismic tomography or to image specific boundaries in the deep earth. Because of the lack of permanent sea-bottom seismometers these observation are conducted over short period of time using portable ocean bottom seismometers. Geaozur has a long experience and strong skills in designing and deploying Ocean Bottom Seismometers all over the world. We have developed two types of ocean bottom instruments. The "Hippocampe" for long deployment and "Lady bug" for aftershock monitoring or for fast overlaps during wide angle experiments. Early warning systems for tsunamis and earthquakes have been developed in recent years but these need real time data transmission and direct control of the instrument. We have developed a permanent real time Broad Band instrument installed in the Mediterranean Sea and connected to the Antares Neutrinos telescope. This instrument offers all the advantages of a very heavy and costly installation, such as the ability to do real-time seismology on the seafloor. Such real-time seafloor monitoring is especially important for seismic hazard. Major earthquakes cause human and economic losses directly related to the strong motion of the ground or by induced phenomena such as tsunamis and landslides. Fiber optical cables provide a high-capacity lightweight alternative to traditional copper cables. Three-component sensors analyze permanently the noise signal and detect the events to record. Major events can force the network to transmit data with almost zero lag time. The optical link also allows us to retrieve events at a later date. However, OBSs alone can never provide the density and long term, homogeneous data coverage needed for local and global

  1. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-07-01

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads.

  2. Marine peptides and their anti-infective activities.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-16

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present.

  3. Marine Peptides and Their Anti-Infective Activities

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Kyoung; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2015-01-01

    Marine bioresources are a valuable source of bioactive compounds with industrial and nutraceutical potential. Numerous clinical trials evaluating novel chemotherapeutic agents derived from marine sources have revealed novel mechanisms of action. Recently, marine-derived bioactive peptides have attracted attention owing to their numerous beneficial effects. Moreover, several studies have reported that marine peptides exhibit various anti-infective activities, such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antimalarial, antiprotozoal, anti-tuberculosis, and antiviral activities. In the last several decades, studies of marine plants, animals, and microbes have revealed tremendous number of structurally diverse and bioactive secondary metabolites. However, the treatments available for many infectious diseases caused by bacteria, fungi, and viruses are limited. Thus, the identification of novel antimicrobial peptides should be continued, and all possible strategies should be explored. In this review, we will present the structures and anti-infective activity of peptides isolated from marine sources (sponges, algae, bacteria, fungi and fish) from 2006 to the present. PMID:25603351

  4. Detailed Analysis of the Interoccurrence Time Statistics in Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Aizawa, Yoji

    2017-02-01

    The interoccurrence time statistics of seismiciry is studied theoretically as well as numerically by taking into account the conditional probability and the correlations among many earthquakes in different magnitude levels. It is known so far that the interoccurrence time statistics is well approximated by the Weibull distribution, but the more detailed information about the interoccurrence times can be obtained from the analysis of the conditional probability. Firstly, we propose the Embedding Equation Theory (EET), where the conditional probability is described by two kinds of correlation coefficients; one is the magnitude correlation and the other is the inter-event time correlation. Furthermore, the scaling law of each correlation coefficient is clearly determined from the numerical data-analysis carrying out with the Preliminary Determination of Epicenter (PDE) Catalog and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Catalog. Secondly, the EET is examined to derive the magnitude dependence of the interoccurrence time statistics and the multi-fractal relation is successfully formulated. Theoretically we cannot prove the universality of the multi-fractal relation in seismic activity; nevertheless, the theoretical results well reproduce all numerical data in our analysis, where several common features or the invariant aspects are clearly observed. Especially in the case of stationary ensembles the multi-fractal relation seems to obey an invariant curve, furthermore in the case of non-stationary (moving time) ensembles for the aftershock regime the multi-fractal relation seems to satisfy a certain invariant curve at any moving times. It is emphasized that the multi-fractal relation plays an important role to unify the statistical laws of seismicity: actually the Gutenberg-Richter law and the Weibull distribution are unified in the multi-fractal relation, and some universality conjectures regarding the seismicity are briefly discussed.

  5. 78 FR 18965 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an Exploration Drilling Program in the Chukchi Sea... harassment, incidental to conducting offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in... small numbers of marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting offshore exploration...

  6. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  7. Boundary separating the seismically active reelfoot rift from the sparsely seismic Rough Creek graben, Kentucky and Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reelfoot rift is the most active of six Iapetan rifts and grabens in central and eastern North America. In contrast, the Rough Creek graben is one of the least active, being seismically indistinguishable from the central craton of North America. Yet the rift and graben adjoin. Hazard assessment in the rift and graben would be aided by identification of a boundary between them. Changes in the strikes of single large faults, the location of a Cambrian transfer zone, and the geographic extent of alkaline igneous rocks provide three independent estimates of the location of a structural boundary between the rift and the graben. The boundary trends north-northwest through the northeastern part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex of Kentucky and Illinois, and has no obvious surface expression. The boundary involves the largest faults, which are the most likely to penetrate to hypocentral depths, and the boundary coincides with the geographic change from abundant seismicity in the rift to sparse seismicity in the graben. Because the structural boundary was defined by geologic variables that are expected to be causally associated with seismicity, it may continue to bound the Reelfoot rift seismicity in the future.

  8. Modelling sound propagation in the Southern Ocean to estimate the acoustic impact of seismic research surveys on marine mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, Monika; Bohlen, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Modelling sound propagation in the ocean is an essential tool to assess the potential risk of air-gun shots on marine mammals. Based on a 2.5-D finite-difference code a full waveform modelling approach is presented, which determines both sound exposure levels of single shots and cumulative sound exposure levels of multiple shots fired along a seismic line. Band-limited point source approximations of compact air-gun clusters deployed by R/V Polarstern in polar regions are used as sound sources. Marine mammals are simulated as static receivers. Applications to deep and shallow water models including constant and depth-dependent sound velocity profiles of the Southern Ocean show dipole-like directivities in case of single shots and tubular cumulative sound exposure level fields beneath the seismic line in case of multiple shots. Compared to a semi-infinite model an incorporation of seafloor reflections enhances the seismically induced noise levels close to the sea surface. Refraction due to sound velocity gradients and sound channelling in near-surface ducts are evident, but affect only low to moderate levels. Hence, exposure zone radii derived for different hearing thresholds are almost independent of the sound velocity structure. With decreasing thresholds radii increase according to a spherical 20 log10 r law in case of single shots and according to a cylindrical 10 log10 r law in case of multiple shots. A doubling of the shot interval diminishes the cumulative sound exposure levels by -3 dB and halves the radii. The ocean bottom properties only slightly affect the radii in shallow waters, if the normal incidence reflection coefficient exceeds 0.2.

  9. Marine Seismic System(MSS) Deployment. Phase IV. Investigation of Techniques and Deployment Scenarios for Installation of Tri-Axial Seismometer in a Borehole in the Deep Ocean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-31

    Demonstrate the baseline BIP drill string deployment techniques in deep water o Measure seismic signal and noise within a deep sea borehole o Record 5 days... deep ocean. UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION PREPARED BY: ROBERT L. WALLERSTEDT PROJECT ENGINEER GLOBAL MARINE DEVELOPMENT INC 2302 MARTIN...borehole in the deep ocean. UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION PREPARED BY: ROBERT L. WALLERSTEDT PROJECT ENGINEER GLOBAL MARINE DEVELOPMENT INC

  10. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  11. Marine seismic refraction data indicate Mesozoic syn-rift volcanism and seafloor-spreading in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Christeson, Gail; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin that formed by continental rifting and seafloor-spreading between North America and the Yucatan Block during the Jurassic to early Cretaceous. The lack of good, deeply-penetrating geophysical data in the Gulf of Mexico has precluded prior reconstructions of the timing and location of the transition from rifting to seafloor-spreading, as well as the degree to which magmatism influenced these geological processes. To illuminate the deep structure of this enigmatic region, we acquired four marine seismic refraction profiles in the northern Gulf of Mexico from the shelf to deep water as part of the Fall 2010 Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening (GUMBO) project. Here, we present the data and resulting seismic velocity structures of two GUMBO profiles in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. GUMBO Line 1 extends ~330 km offshore south Texas from Matagorda Island across Alaminos Canyon to the central Gulf. GUMBO Line 2 extends ~400 km from the shelf offshore western Louisiana across the Sigsbee Escarpment. On both lines, ocean-bottom seismometers at 10-km spacing recorded 150m-spaced airgun shots over offsets up to 80 km. We use travel times from these long-offset reflections and refractions to image seismic velocities in the sediments, crystalline crust, and upper mantle using a tomographic inversion. On average, seismic velocities increase with depth from 2 km/s near the seafloor to 5 km/s near the interpreted base of salt. On both profiles we observe a large amount of lateral heterogeneity in the sediments due to salt tectonics. The deeper seismic velocity structure along GUMBO Line 1 also exhibits substantial lateral heterogeneity (4.5 km/s to 7 km/s) that may be consistent with crystallization of thin, ultraslow-spreading oceanic crust alternating with emplacement of exhumed mantle lithosphere. If the basement here is indeed oceanic, the prominent magnetic anomaly along the Texas coastline may represent the expression of synrift volcanism

  12. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    SciTech Connect

    Karyono; Mazzini, Adriano; Sugiharto, Anton; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono,; Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli,; Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat

    2015-04-24

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green’s functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  13. The Lusi seismic experiment: An initial study to understand the effect of seismic activity to Lusi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Masturyono, Rudiyanto, Ariska; Pranata, Bayu; Muzli, Widodo, Handi Sulistyo; Sudrajat, Ajat; Sugiharto, Anton

    2015-04-01

    The spectacular Lumpur Sidoarjo (Lusi) eruption started in northeast Java on the 29 of May 2006 following a M6.3 earthquake striking the island [1,2]. Initially, several gas and mud eruption sites appeared along the reactivated strike-slip Watukosek fault system [3] and within weeks several villages were submerged by boiling mud. The most prominent eruption site was named Lusi. The Lusi seismic experiment is a project aims to begin a detailed study of seismicity around the Lusi area. In this initial phase we deploy 30 seismometers strategically distributed in the area around Lusi and along the Watukosek fault zone that stretches between Lusi and the Arjuno Welirang (AW) complex. The purpose of the initial monitoring is to conduct a preliminary seismic campaign aiming to identify the occurrence and the location of local seismic events in east Java particularly beneath Lusi.This network will locate small event that may not be captured by the existing BMKG network. It will be crucial to design the second phase of the seismic experiment that will consist of a local earthquake tomography of the Lusi-AW region and spatial and temporal variations of vp/vs ratios. The goal of this study is to understand how the seismicity occurring along the Sunda subduction zone affects to the behavior of the Lusi eruption. Our study will also provide a large dataset for a qualitative analysis of earthquake triggering studies, earthquake-volcano and earthquake-earthquake interactions. In this study, we will extract Green's functions from ambient seismic noise data in order to image the shallow subsurface structure beneath LUSI area. The waveform cross-correlation technique will be apply to all of recordings of ambient seismic noise at 30 seismographic stations around the LUSI area. We use the dispersive behaviour of the retrieved Rayleigh waves to infer velocity structures in the shallow subsurface.

  14. Energetic analysis of the white light emission associated to seismically active flares in solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam

    2014-06-01

    Solar flares are explosive phenomena, thought to be driven by magnetic free energy accumulated in the solar corona. Some flares release seismic transients, "sunquakes", into the Sun's interior. Different mechanisms are being considered to explain how sunquakes are generated. We are conducting an analysis of white-light emission associated with those seismically active solar flares that have been reported by different authors within the current solar cycle. Seismic diagnostics are based upon standard time-distance techniques, including seismic holography, applied to Dopplergrams obtained by SDO/HMI and GONG. The relation between white-light emissions and seismic activity may provide important information on impulsive chromospheric heating during flares, a prospective contributor to seismic transient emission, at least in some instances. We develop a method to get an estimation of Energy associated whit white-light emission and compare those results whit values of energy needed to generate a sunquake according with holographic helioseismology techniques.

  15. Deepwater seismic acquisition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.

    1996-09-01

    Although truly new technology is not required for successful acquisition of seismic data in deep Gulf of Mexico waters, it is helpful to review some basic aspects of these seismic surveys. Additionally, such surveys are likely to see early use of some emerging new technology which can improve data quality. Because such items as depth imaging, borehole seismic, 4-D and marine 3-component recording were mentioned in the May 1996 issue of World Oil, they are not discussed again here. However, these technologies will also play some role in the deepwater seismic activities. What is covered in this paper are some new considerations for: (1) longer data records needed in deeper water, (2) some pros and cons of very long steamer use, and (3) two new commercial systems for quantifying data quality.

  16. Marine Activity Dynamics (M.A.D.). Unit S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Education Information Center.

    This curriculum guide describes an activity-oriented marine study program, designed for use with middle school children (grade 5). The content focuses primarily upon the life sciences, with some emphasis on chemistry and geology. Following the development of a rationale for the inclusion of marine sciences in the school curriculum, a middle…

  17. The character and amplitude of 'discontinuous' bottom-simulating reflections in marine seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Jess I. T.; Cook, Ann E.; Sawyer, Derek E.; Küçük, H. Mert; Goldberg, David S.

    2017-02-01

    Bottom-simulating reflections (BSRs) identified in seismic data are well documented; and are commonly interpreted to indicate the presence of gas hydrates along continental margins, as well as to estimate regional volumes of gas hydrate. A BSR is defined as a reflection that sub-parallels the seafloor but is opposite in polarity and cross-cuts dipping sedimentary strata. BSRs form as a result of a strong negative acoustic impedance contrast. BSRs, however, are a diverse seismic phenomena that manifest in strikingly contrasting ways in different geological settings, and in different seismic data types. We investigate the characteristics of BSRs, using conventional and high resolution, 2D and 3D seismic data sets in three locations: the Terrebonne and Orca Basins in the Gulf of Mexico, and Blake Ridge on the US Atlantic Margin. The acquisition geometry and frequency content of the seismic data significantly impact the resultant character of BSRs, as observed with depth and amplitude maps of the BSRs. Furthermore, our amplitude maps reinforce the concept that the BSR represents a zone, over which the transition from hydrate to free gas occurs, as opposed to the conventional model of the BSR occurring at a single interface. Our results show that a BSR can be mapped in three dimensions but it is not spatially continuous, at least not at the basin scale. Rather, a BSR manifests itself as a discontinuous, or patchy, reflection and only at local scales is it continuous. We suggest the discontinuous nature of BSRs is the result of variable saturation and distribution of free gas and hydrate, acquisition geometry and frequency content of the recorded seismic data. The commonly accepted definition of a BSR should be broadened with careful consideration of these factors, to represent the uppermost extent of enhanced amplitude at the shallowest occurrence of free gas trapped by overlying hydrate-bearing sediments.

  18. Apollo 14 and 16 Active Seismic Experiments, and Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Seismic refraction experiments were conducted on the moon by Apollo astronauts during missions 14, 16, and 17. Seismic velocities of 104, 108, 92, 114 and 100 m/sec were inferred for the lunar regolith at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 landing sites, respectively. These data indicate that fragmentation and comminution caused by meteoroid impacts has produced a layer of remarkably uniform seismic properties moonwide. Brecciation and high porosity are the probable causes of the very low velocities observed in the lunar regolith. Apollo 17 seismic data revealed that the seismic velocity increases very rapidly with depth to 4.7 km/sec at a depth of 1.4 km. Such a large velocity change is suggestive of compositional and textural changes and is compatible with a model of fractured basaltic flows overlying anorthositic breccias. 'Thermal' moonquakes were also detected at the Apollo 17 site, becoming increasingly frequent after sunrise and reaching a maximum at sunset. The source of these quakes could possibly be landsliding.

  19. Seismic Activity Seen Through Evolution of the Hurst Exponent Model in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño Ortiz, J.; Carreño Aguilera, R.; Balankin, A. S.; Patiño Ortiz, M.; Tovar Rodriguez, J. C.; Acevedo Mosqueda, M. A.; Martinez Cruz, M. A.; Yu, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics seismic activity occurred in the Cocos Plate - Mexico is analyzed through the evolution of Hurst exponent and 3D fractal dimension, under the mathematical fractal structure based on seismic activity time series, taking into account the magnitude (M) as the main parameter to be estimated. The seismic activity time series and, annual intervals are considered first for finding the Hurst exponent of each year since 1988 (the year in which the database is consistent) until 2012, and then the following years are accumulated describing the cumulative Hurst exponent. The seismic activity description is based on Cocos Plate data information; during a period conform from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 2012. Analyses were performed following methods, mainly considering that the Hurst exponent analysis provides the ability to find the seismicity behavior time-space, described by parameters obtained under the fractal dimension and complex systems.

  20. ActiveSeismoPick3D - automatic first arrival determination for large active seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffrath, Marcel; Küperkoch, Ludger; Wehling-Benatelli, Sebastian; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We developed a tool for automatic determination of first arrivals in active seismic data based on an approach, that utilises higher order statistics (HOS) and the Akaike information criterion (AIC), commonly used in seismology, but not in active seismics. Automatic picking is highly desirable in active seismics as the number of data provided by large seismic arrays rapidly exceeds of what an analyst can evaluate in a reasonable amount of time. To bring the functionality of automatic phase picking into the context of active data, the software package ActiveSeismoPick3D was developed in Python. It uses a modified algorithm for the determination of first arrivals which searches for the HOS maximum in unfiltered data. Additionally, it offers tools for manual quality control and postprocessing, e.g. various visualisation and repicking functionalities. For flexibility, the tool also includes methods for the preparation of geometry information of large seismic arrays and improved interfaces to the Fast Marching Tomography Package (FMTOMO), which can be used for the prediction of travel times and inversion for subsurface properties. Output files are generated in the VTK format, allowing the 3D visualization of e.g. the inversion results. As a test case, a data set consisting of 9216 traces from 64 shots was gathered, recorded at 144 receivers deployed in a regular 2D array of a size of 100 x 100 m. ActiveSeismoPick3D automatically checks the determined first arrivals by a dynamic signal to noise ratio threshold. From the data a 3D model of the subsurface was generated using the export functionality of the package and FMTOMO.

  1. Seismarmara 2001: A Marine Seismic Survey and Offshore-onshore Artificial Source and Natural Earthquakes In The Seismogenic Region of The Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, A.; Singh, S.; Charvis, P.; Géli, L.; Laigle, M.; Lépine, J.-C.; de Voogd, B.; Saatcilar, R.; Taymaz, T.; Ozalaybey, S.; Shimamura, H.; Selvi, O.; Karabulut, H.; Murai, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Yamada, A.; Vigner, A.; Bazin, S.; Tan, O.; Yolsal, S.; Aktar, M.; Galvé, A.; Sapin, M.; Marthelot, J.-M.; Imren, C.; Ergin, M.; Tapirdamaz, C.; Koçaoglu, A.; Tarancioglu, A.; Diaz, J.; Verhille, J.; Auffret, Y.; Cetin, S.; Oçakoglu, N.; Karakoç, F.; Klien, E.; Ricolleau, A.; Selvigen, V.; Demirbag, E.; Hakyemez, Y.; Sarikawak, K.

    SEISMARMARA is a Turkish-French survey carried out in July-October 2001 as a multi-method approach of seismic structure and activity of the Sea of Marmara. This is the segment of the North Anatolian Fault system that continues the one that produced the two destructive earthquakes in 1999 to the East, and is prone to future major earth- quakes as it has experienced in the past. Aims of the programme are to shed light on the regional tectonics and recent evolution at crustal scale, image faults by their structure and seismic activity, and provide a model and reference to improve loca- tion of earthquakes and focal mechanism studies. The programme bases on marine multichannel reflection seismics (MCS), ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) and land stations recording of wide-angle reflection-refraction from the same source, as well as recording of local earthquakes for tomography and stress/strain distribution. The French N/O Le Nadir acquired 4000 km of MCS profiles in the northern Sea of Mar- mara, using a 4.5 km long digital streamer with 360-channels and sources of 8100 cu. in., or 2900 cu. in., provided by a 12-airgun array in single-bubble mode. Navigation safety was provided by a vessel of the Turkish Coast Guards (Sahil Güvenlik), Leg 1 comprises 4 E-W lines and 30 cross-lines in the whole Marmara Trough, leg 2 has 1 been devoted to a very dense grid of lines in the Cinarcik basin and its margins, record- ing over 80 dip-lines at 0.6-0.9 km spacing At sea-bottom 38 OBS, with 3-component sensors and continuous recording over 1 to 2-month in order to also record natural earthquakes were deployed and collected by the Turkish ship MTA Sismik-1. On land the permanent array has been complemented by as many temporary stations, in par- ticular over 30 continuous recording 3-component 2 Hz stations. Refraction seismics from offshore to onshore was further implemented by short-duration deployments of vertical component lightweight instruments with short recording capacity. A

  2. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  3. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): U.S. Geological Survey Program to Provide new Access to Proprietary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, J. R.; Hart, P. E.

    2004-12-01

    Marine seismic reflection profile data originally acquired for purposes of offshore oil and gas exploration and development within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone represent a national scientific resource of inestimable value. Although the commercial value of these data has diminished due to technological advances and offshore development moratoria, the value to current and future scientific endeavors continues to be very high. Recently, commercial owners (including WesternGeco and ChevronTexaco) of large data holdings offshore the eastern, western, and Alaskan coasts of the United States have offered to transfer over 200,000 line kilometers of two-dimensional data (vintage 1970 to 1985) to the public domain. Recognizing the value of these data, the U.S. Geological Survey in co-operation with the Institute for Crustal Studies at UCSB, the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, and the American Geological Institute) is promoting efforts to safeguard on behalf of the research community and the nation any data that may otherwise be lost, and to ensure free and open access to that data. To achieve these goals, the USGS has developed a National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS). Work is underway to organize and reformat digital data currently stored on obsolete media, primarily nine-track tapes. The NAMSS web site below has further information on the project, including trackline maps of surveys that will soon be publicly available. The ultimate objective is the establishment of a data repository accessible through an on-line database, with graphical and text-based search and retrieval interface.

  4. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  5. Lithoprobe east: marine deep seismic reflection results across the Appalachians and the rifted continental margin northeast of Newfoundland

    SciTech Connect

    Keen, C.E.; Stockmal, G.S.; O'Brien, S.J.; Quinlan, G.

    1985-01-01

    Marine deep seismic reflection data have been collected across the Appalachian Orogen and the rifted continental margin northeast of Newfoundland. Results across the Appalachian Orogen show the extent of the ancient Grenvillian passive margin beneath the terranes to the east, the nature of terrane boundaries at depth, and the relationships between surface geological features and the seismically defined crustal geometry. The results across the rifted margin define a decollement zone below the faulted continental basement. These basement fault blocks do not exhibit a listric geometry. The continental crust thins beneath the sedimentary basins occupying the rifted margin, although there does not appear to be a simple relationship between crustal thickness and basin subsidence. The ocean-continent transition is marked by a landward dip of the oceanic crust which disappears below the thinned continental crust near the transition. The ocean-continent boundary is not a vertical boundary between crustal types, rather there appears to be continuity of oceanic-type crust below the continent, perhaps forming a high velocity lower crustal layer across the continental margin.

  6. Seismic structure and seismicity at the southern Mariana Trough with hydrothermal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Mizuno, M.; Takada, H.; Yamada, T.; Isse, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Southern Mariana Trough back-arc spreading system shows asymmetry spreading, and has high relief at spreading axes, which infers abundant melt supply. Furthermore, five hydrothermal vents that extrude different water contents, exist within 5 km near the spreading axis. To investigate upper mantle structure, crustal structure and hypocenter distribution provide important constraint on following four main points to understand the back-arc spreading system; 1) imaging melt delivery to the spreading axis and off axis seamount including volcanic arc, 2) production and character of the crust, 3) relationship between melt supply and crustal formation, and 4) pathway and heat source for hydrothermal circulation with related to its formation. We conducted a seismic reflection/refraction survey and seismicity observation at the hydrothermal area in the Southern Mariana Trough from August to November in 2010. We used 9 ocean bottom seismometers, an air gun (GI gun) and a single channel streamer cable. We took 7 parallel lines and 7 perpendicular lines to the spreading center. Line length was 15 km each, and line interval was 2.5 km. From the survey and observation, we obtained very low seismicity at the hydrothermal area in the 3 month's observation. The reflection survey shows that some reflectors exist under the hydrothermal area. In this presentation, we will also show seismic velocity structures from the refraction survey.

  7. Dynamics of radon activity due to earthquakes (by the example of Altai seismically active region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptikaeva, O. I.; Shitov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of monitoring radon emanations in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk due to seismic activity and their influence on human health are considered. It is shown that the level of activity of subsoil radon in the vicinity of the fault zone in the territory of Gorno-Altaisk exceeds such a level recorded in Moscow by 3-4 times. There is ambiguity in the behavior of radon as a precursor of a seismic event. Some radon anomalies are synchronous with moments of earthquakes and others correspond to quiet periods. The radon activity is more closely associated with the earthquakes localized in the aftershock zone of the Chuya earthquake. This is assumed to be caused by the network of fluid-conducting channels within the active fault between this region and the observation station.

  8. Multi-axial active isolation for seismic protection of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ming

    Structural control technology has been widely accepted as an effective means for the protection of structures against seismic hazards. Passive base isolation is one of the common structural control techniques used to enhance the performance of structures subjected to severe earthquake excitations. Isolation bearings employed at the base of a structure naturally increase its flexibility, but concurrently result in large base displacements. The combination of base isolation with active control, i.e., active base isolation, creates the possibility of achieving a balanced level of control performance, reducing both floor accelerations as well as base displacements. Many theoretical papers have been written by researchers regarding active base isolation, and a few experiments have been performed to verify these theories; however, challenges in appropriately scaling the structural system and modeling the complex nature of control-structure interaction have limited the applicability of these results. Moreover, most experiments only focus on the implementation of active base isolation under unidirectional excitations. Earthquakes are intrinsically multi-dimensional, resulting in out-of-plane responses, including torsional responses. Therefore, an active isolation system for buildings using multi-axial active control devices against multi-directional excitations must be considered. The focus of this dissertation is the development and experimental verification of active isolation strategies for multi-story buildings subjected to bi-directional earthquake loadings. First, a model building is designed to match the characteristics of a representative full-scale structure. The selected isolation bearings feature low friction and high vertical stiffness, providing stable behavior. In the context of the multi-dimensional response control, three, custom-manufactured actuators are employed to mitigate both in-plane and out-of-plane responses. To obtain a high-fidelity model of the

  9. High Resolution Multichannel Seismic Images of Marine Permafrost - First Results from TRANSDRIFT X Cruise to the Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenk, T.; Spiess, V.; Zühlsdorff, L.; Voigt, T.; Belan, A.; Gusev, Y.; Rekant, P.; Hoelemann, J.; Kassens, H.

    2004-12-01

    Large areas of the shallow shelf seas in the Siberian Arctic were exposed in glacial times and thereby subject to climatic conditions supporting the development and growth of permafrost. However, it is unclear, how the cyclic occurrence of transgressions and regressions have effected the presence and distribution of permafrost in the currently drowned shelf areas. As part of the Laptev Sea System' Project carried out in close partnership between German and Russian Research institutions, the TRANSDRIFT X cruise with R/V Smirnitsky was undertaken inSeptember 2004 to survey off-shore permafrost in the eastern Laptev Sea with a combination of acoustic and seismic systems, namely side scan sonar, chirp sonar and the new shallow marine multichannel seismic system FlaMMe of the University of Bremen. It was of particular interest to detect the top of the permafrost zone to analyze the stability of permafrost after the Holocene transgression to use the collected data for a drilling campaign planned for summer 2005. The MCS system consists of a 48-channel single hydrophone streamer of 50 m length with 5 cable levellers and additional 9 depth sensors built into the streamer to allow a superior geometry control and towing at very shallow depth of appx. 1 m. A SODERA Mini GI Gun and a SODERA S-15 Watergun were used to generate high frequency signals beyond the conventional seismic frequencies, which ranges between 100 and 500 and between 200 and 1600 Hz, respectively. Examples will be shown from areas near the coast, where the former thermokarst surface was nearly undestroyed by the transgression, as well as a region northeast of the Lena delta, where an unconformity indicated the transgressive reworking of the terrestrial landscape. Further targets are thermokarst structures like pingos or thermokarst lakes with associated taliks, the distribution of marine Holocene sediments and the permafrost degradation with respect to the location of the paleoriver valleys. Combined

  10. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): Status Report on U.S. Geological Survey Program Providing Access to Proprietary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    During the last four decades, hundreds of thousands of line kilometers of 2D marine seismic reflection data have been collected by the hydrocarbon exploration industry within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone. The commercial value of much of these data has decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and new technology such as 3D acquisition. However, these data still have tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes. The U.S. Geological Survey has recently made agreements with two commercial owners of large data holdings to transfer to the public domain over 250,000 line kilometers of marine data from off the eastern, western, and Alaskan coasts of the United States. In order to provide access to the data, the USGS has developed the National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) program. For a small fraction of the money that would be required to collect new data, work is underway to organize and recover digital data currently stored on tens of thousands of 9-track tapes. Even where new data collection efforts could be funded, current environmental restrictions on marine seismic exploration could preclude operations. The NAMSS web site at http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/NAMSS/ has trackline maps of surveys that are now or will soon be available for downloading in SEG-Y format. As more owners and users become aware of this new data resource, it is hoped that additional partners in will join this data rescue effort.

  11. Resolution analysis of marine seismic full waveform data by Bayesian inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Sekar, A.; Hoversten, G. M.; Albertin, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Bayesian posterior density function (PDF) of earth models that fit full waveform seismic data convey information on the uncertainty with which the elastic model parameters are resolved. In this work, we apply the trans-dimensional reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo method (RJ-MCMC) for the 1D inversion of noisy synthetic full-waveform seismic data in the frequency-wavenumber domain. While seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful method for characterizing subsurface elastic parameters, the uncertainty in the inverted models has remained poorly known, if at all and is highly initial model dependent. The Bayesian method we use is trans-dimensional in that the number of model layers is not fixed, and flexible such that the layer boundaries are free to move around. The resulting parameterization does not require regularization to stabilize the inversion. Depth resolution is traded off with the number of layers, providing an estimate of uncertainty in elastic parameters (compressional and shear velocities Vp and Vs as well as density) with depth. We find that in the absence of additional constraints, Bayesian inversion can result in a wide range of posterior PDFs on Vp, Vs and density. These PDFs range from being clustered around the true model, to those that contain little resolution of any particular features other than those in the near surface, depending on the particular data and target geometry. We present results for a suite of different frequencies and offset ranges, examining the differences in the posterior model densities thus derived. Though these results are for a 1D earth, they are applicable to areas with simple, layered geology and provide valuable insight into the resolving capabilities of FWI, as well as highlight the challenges in solving a highly non-linear problem. The RJ-MCMC method also presents a tantalizing possibility for extension to 2D and 3D Bayesian inversion of full waveform seismic data in the future, as it objectively

  12. Active fungi amidst a marine subsurface RNA paleome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, W.; Biddle, J.; Edgcomb, V.

    2012-12-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Since extracellular DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA signatures by amplicon pyrosequencing, metazoan, plant, and diatom rRNA signatures were recovered from marine sediments up to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. This finding confirms the concept of a paleome, extending it to include rRNA. Within the same dataset, unique profiles of fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces exhibiting statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Sequences from metazoans, plants and diatoms showed different correlation patterns, consistent with a depth-controlled paleome. The fungal correlations with geochemistry allow the inference that some fungi are active and adapted for survival in the marine subsurface. A metatranscriptomic analysis of fungal derived mRNA confirms that fungi are metabolically active and utilize a range of organic and inorganic substrates in the marine subsurface.

  13. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter during the recent seismic activity of Fthiotida, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael; Aarabelos, Dimitrios; Vergos, Georgios; Spatalas, Spyridon

    2014-05-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ) . The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identifiation of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check on posterior if the variation of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, Greece. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in Terrestrial and Stellar Environment, eds.D. Arabelos, M

  14. 78 FR 56659 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...NMFS has received a request from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for authorization to take marine mammals incidental to construction activities as part of a pier maintenance project. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting public comment on its proposal to issue an incidental harassment authorization (IHA) to the Navy to take, by harassment only, two species of marine......

  15. Issues Related to Seismic Activity Induced by the Injection of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Sminchak, Joel; Gupta, Neeraj; Byrer, Charles; Bergman, Perry

    2001-05-31

    Case studies, theory, regulation, and special considerations regarding the disposal of carbon dioxide (CO2) into deep saline aquifers were investigated to assess the potential for induced seismic activity. Formations capable of accepting large volumes of CO2 make deep well injection of CO2 an attractive option. While seismic implications must be considered for injection facilities, induced seismic activity may be prevented through proper siting, installation, operation, and monitoring. Instances of induced seismic activity have been documented at hazardous waste disposal wells, oil fields, and other sites. Induced seismic activity usually occurs along previously faulted rocks and may be investigated by analyzing the stress conditions at depth. Seismic events are unlikely to occur due to injection in porous rocks unless very high injection pressures cause hydraulic fracturing. Injection wells in the United States are regulated through the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. UIC guidance requires an injection facility to perform extensive characterization, testing, and monitoring. Special considerations related to the properties of CO2 may have seismic ramifications to a deep well injection facility. Supercritical CO2 liquid is less dense than water and may cause density-driven stress conditions at depth or interact with formation water and rocks, causing a reduction in permeability and pressure buildup leading to seismic activity. Structural compatibility, historical seismic activity, cases of seismic activity triggered by deep well injection, and formation capacity were considered in evaluating the regional seismic suitability in the United States. Regions in the central, midwestern, and southeastern United States appear best suited for deep well injection. In Ohio, substantial deep well injection at a waste disposal facility has not caused seismic events in a seismically active area. Current

  16. Prestack reverse time migration for 3D marine reflection seismic data

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Seonghyung; Kim, Taeyoun

    2015-03-10

    Prestack reverse time migration (RTM) is a method for imaging the subsurface using the inner product of wavefield extrapolation in shot domain and in receiver domain. It is well known that RTM is better for preserving amplitudes and phases than other prestack migrations. Since 3D seismic data is huge data volume and it needs heavy computing works, it requires parallel computing in order to have a meaningful depth image of the 3D subsurface. We implemented a parallelized version of 3D RTM for prestack depth migration. The results of numerical example for 3D SEG/EAGE salt model showed good agreement with the original geological model. We applied RTM to offshore 3D seismic reflection data. The study area is 12 × 25 km with 120 survey lines. Shot and receiver spacing is 25 m and 12.5 m. The line spacing is 100 m. Shot gathers were preprocessed to enhance signal to noise ratio and velocity model was calculated from conventional stack velocity. Both of them were used to obtain 3D image using RTM. The results show reasonable subsurface image.

  17. Improving the Detectability of the Catalan Seismic Network for Local Seismic Activity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Jose Antonio; Frontera, Tànit; Batlló, Josep; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Catalonia is mainly performed by the regional seismic network operated by the Cartographic and Geologic Institute of Catalonia (ICGC). After successive deployments and upgrades, the current network consists of 16 permanent stations equipped with 3 component broadband seismometers (STS2, STS2.5, CMG3ESP and CMG3T), 24 bits digitizers (Nanometrics Trident) and VSAT telemetry. Data are continuously sent in real-time via Hispasat 1D satellite to the ICGC datacenter in Barcelona. Additionally, data from other 10 stations of neighboring areas (Spain, France and Andorra) are continuously received since 2011 via Internet or VSAT, contributing both to detect and to locate events affecting the region. More than 300 local events with Ml ≥ 0.7 have been yearly detected and located in the region. Nevertheless, small magnitude earthquakes, especially those located in the south and south-west of Catalonia may still go undetected by the automatic detection system (DAS), based on Earthworm (USGS). Thus, in order to improve the detection and characterization of these missed events, one or two new stations should be installed. Before making the decision about where to install these new stations, the performance of each existing station is evaluated taking into account the fraction of detected events using the station records, compared to the total number of events in the catalogue, occurred during the station operation time from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014. These evaluations allow us to build an Event Detection Probability Map (EDPM), a required tool to simulate EDPMs resulting from different network topology scenarios depending on where these new stations are sited, and becoming essential for the decision-making process to increase and optimize the event detection probability of the seismic network.

  18. Seismic Activity at Vailulu'u, Samoa's Youngest Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konter, J.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.

    2002-12-01

    Submarine volcanic systems, as a product of the Earth's mantle, play an essential role in the Earth's heat budget and in the interaction between the solid Earth and the hydrosphere and biosphere. Their eruptive and intrusive activity exerts an important control on these hydrothermal systems. In March 2000, we deployed an array of five ocean bottom hydrophones (OBH) on the summit region (625-995 m water depth) of Vailulu'u Volcano (14°12.9'S;169°03.5'W); this volcano represents the active end of the Samoan hotspot chain and is one of only a few well-studied intra-plate submarine volcanoes. We monitored seismic activity for up to 12 months at low sample rate (25 Hz), and for shorter times at a higher sample rate (125 Hz). We have begun to catalogue and locate a variety of acoustic events from this network. Ambient ocean noise was filtered out by a 4th-order Butterworth bandpass filter (2.3 - 10 Hz). We distinguish small local earthquakes from teleseismic activity, mostly identified by T- (acoustic) waves, by comparison with a nearby GSN station (AFI). Most of the detected events are T-phases from teleseismic earthquakes, characterized by their emergent coda and high frequency content (up to 30 Hz); the latter distinguishes them from low frequency emergent signals associated with the volcano (e.g. tremor). A second type of event is characterized by impulsive arrivals, with coda lasting a few seconds. The differences in arrival times between stations on the volcano are too small for these events to be T-waves; they are very likely to be local events, since the GSN station in Western Samoa (AFI) shows no arrivals close in time to these events. Preliminary locations show that these small events occur approximately once per day and are located within the volcano (the 95% confidence ellipse is similar to the size of the volcano, due to the small size of the OBH network). Several events are located relatively close to each other (within a km radius) just NW of the crater.

  19. Comparative morphological analysis of the diurnal rhythms in geomagnetic and seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desherevskii, A. V.; Sidorin, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    To verify the hypothesis of the possible influence of geomagnetic variations on seismicity, the structures of the diurnal rhythms of seismicity in Garm research area, Tajikistan, and geomagnetic activity are investigated in detail using the regional index of geomagnetic activity at the Tashkent Astronomical Observatory. We compare (1) the average shape of the diurnal variations and its seasonal changes; (2) temporal changes in special coefficients of the amplitude variations and the diurnal variation stability. It is revealed that the dynamics of the mentioned parameters differ considerably between the geomagnetic and seismic activities. We conclude that the results obtained on the basis of the used data and processing techniques do not confirm the hypothesis of possible influence of weak geomagnetic variations on background seismicity in the Garm region, Tajikistan.

  20. Delineation of Active Basement Faults in the Eastern Tennessee and Charlevoix Intraplate Seismic Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, C. A.; Langston, C. A.; Cooley, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recognition of distinct, seismogenic basement faults within the eastern Tennessee seismic zone (ETSZ) and the Charlevoix seismic zone (CSZ) is now possible using local earthquake tomography and datasets containing a sufficiently large number of earthquakes. Unlike the New Madrid seismic zone where seismicity clearly defines active fault segments, earthquake activity in the ETSZ and CSZ appears diffuse. New arrival time inversions for hypocenter relocations and 3-D velocity variations using datasets in excess of 1000 earthquakes suggest the presence of distinct basement faults in both seismic zones. In the ETSZ, relocated hypocenters align in near-vertical segments trending NE-SW, parallel to the long dimension of the seismic zone. Earthquakes in the most seismogenic portion of the ETSZ delineate another set of near-vertical faults trending roughly E-ESE. These apparent trends and steep dips are compatible with ETSZ focal mechanism solutions. The solutions are remarkably consistent and indicate strike-slip motion along the entire length of the seismic zone. Relocated hypocenter clusters in the CSZ define planes that trend and dip in directions that are compatible with known Iapitan rift faults. Seismicity defining the planes becomes disrupted where the rift faults encounter a major zone of deformation produced by a Devonian meteor impact. We will perform a joint statistical analysis of hypocenter alignments and focal mechanism nodal plane orientations in the ETSZ and the CSZ to determine the spatial orientations of dominant seismogenic basement faults. Quantifying the locations and dimensions of active basement faults will be important for seismic hazard assessment and for models addressing the driving mechanisms for these intraplate zones.

  1. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  2. 76 FR 4093 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Exploration Drilling Programs in the Chukchi and.... (Shell) incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the... IHAs were not issued, and Shell did not conduct the proposed exploration drilling programs in...

  3. 78 FR 24731 - Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to an Exploration Drilling Program in the Chukchi Sea... drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, during the 2014 open-water... exploration drilling in the Chukchi Sea during the 2014 open- ] water season. NMFS published a Notice...

  4. 77 FR 51773 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... retinal injury. Biosonics Up to three Bird-Guard broadcasting units (bird distress calls) could be used to... distress and predator calls could be used. The bird calls are naturally occurring sounds and are not... Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Bird Mitigation Research in the Farallon...

  5. 77 FR 50990 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... approaches if pinnipeds are hauled out directly in the study plots or while biologists walk from one location... vicinity of the permanent abalone study plots. Disturbance may result in reactions ranging from an animal... associated with the proposed activity is the quadrat locations being marked with marine epoxy. The...

  6. 77 FR 56613 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ..., and an acoustic Doppler current profiler continuously throughout the survey except while on station for marine coring activities. Acoustic stimuli (i.e., increased underwater sound) generated during... for a more detailed description of the authorized action, including vessel and acoustic...

  7. Trace Gases - A Warning Signs of Impending Major Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baijnath, J.; Freund, F.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological models can predict future earthquakes only with wide uncertainty windows, typically on the order of decades to centuries. To improve short-term earthquake forecasts, it is essential to understand the non-seismic processes that take place in Earth's crust during the build-up of tectonic stresses. Days prior to the January 2001 M 7.6 Gujurat earthquake in India, there was a significant increase in the regional CO concentration, reaching 240 ppbv over a 100 squared kilometers, as derived from data of the MOPITT sensor onboard the NASA Terra satellite. A possible explanation for these observations is that when stresses in Earth's crust are building, positive hole charge carriers are activated, which are highly mobile and spread from deep below the earth to the surface. Positive holes act as highly oxidizing oxygen radicals, oxidizing water to hydrogen peroxide. It is hypothesized that, as positive hole charge carriers arrive from below and traverse the soil, they are expected to oxidize soil organics, converting aliphatics to ketones, formaldehyde, CO and CO2. This is tested by using a closed chamber with a slab of gabbro rock. Ultrasound generated by a pair of 50 W, 40 kHz piezoelectric transducers, applied to one end of the gabbro slab was used to activate the positive holes. This created a high concentration of positive holes at the end of the rock that the electrical conductivity through the rock increased more than 1000-fold, while the increase in conductivity through the other end of the gabbro slab was on the order of 100-fold. On the other end of the slab, rock dust and various soils were placed. A stainless steel mesh was also placed over the soil and dust to allow a current to flow through the granular material. When the far end of the slab was subjected to the ultrasound, currents as large as 250 nA were recorded flowing through the length of the gabbro slab and through the dust/soil pile. Dry dust/soil and dust samples impregnated with

  8. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  9. Estimating the Depth of Stratigraphic Units from Marine Seismic Profiles Using Nonstationary Geostatistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chihi, Hayet; Galli, Alain; Ravenne, Christian; Tesson, Michel; Marsily, Ghislain de

    2000-03-15

    The object of this study is to build a three-dimensional (3D) geometric model of the stratigraphic units of the margin of the Rhone River on the basis of geophysical investigations by a network of seismic profiles at sea. The geometry of these units is described by depth charts of each surface identified by seismic profiling, which is done by geostatistics. The modeling starts by a statistical analysis by which we determine the parameters that enable us to calculate the variograms of the identified surfaces. After having determined the statistical parameters, we calculate the variograms of the variable Depth. By analyzing the behavior of the variogram we then can deduce whether the situation is stationary and if the variable has an anisotropic behavior. We tried the following two nonstationary methods to obtain our estimates: (a) The method of universal kriging if the underlying variogram was directly accessible. (b) The method of increments if the underlying variogram was not directly accessible. After having modeled the variograms of the increments and of the variable itself, we calculated the surfaces by kriging the variable Depth on a small-mesh estimation grid. The two methods then are compared and their respective advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as their fields of application. These methods are capable of being used widely in earth sciences for automatic mapping of geometric surfaces or for variables such as a piezometric surface or a concentration, which are not 'stationary,' that is, essentially, possess a gradient or a tendency to develop systematically in space.

  10. Seismic displacement of gently-sloping coastal and marine sediment under multidirectional earthquake loading

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Gentle sediment-laden slopes are typical of the onshore coastal zone and offshore continental shelf and slope. Coastal sediment are commonly young weakly consolidated materials that are well stratified, have low strength, and can mobilize shear displacements at low levels of stress. Seismically-driven plastic displacements of these sediment pose a hazard to coastal cities, buried onshore utilities, and offshore infrastructure like harbor protection and outfalls. One-dimensional rigid downslope-directed Newmark sliding block analyses have been used to predict earthquake deformations generally on steeper slopes that are modeled as frictional materials. This study probes the effect of multidirectional earthquake motions on inertial displacements of gently sloping ground of the coastal and offshore condition where soft-compliant soil is expected. Toward that objective, this investigation seeks to understand the effect on Newmark-type displacements of [1] multidirectional earthquake shaking and [2] soil compliance. In order to model multidirectional effects, the earthquake motions are rotated into the local slope strike- and dip-components. On gently sloping ground, including the strike component of motion always results in a larger and more accurate shear stress vector. Strike motions are found to contribute to downslope deformations on any declivity. Compliant response of the soil mass also influences the plastic displacements. The magnitude of seismic displacements can be estimated with a simplified model using only the estimated soil yield-acceleration (ky) and the peak ground velocity (Vmax) of the earthquake motions. Compliance effects can be effectively mapped using the concept of Plastic Displacement Response Spectra (PDRS).

  11. Sensing network for electromagnetic fields generated by seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum I.; Bambakidis, Gust; Ternovskiy, Igor V.

    2014-06-01

    The sensors network is becoming prolific and play now increasingly more important role in acquiring and processing information. Cyber-Physical Systems are focusing on investigation of integrated systems that includes sensing, networking, and computations. The physics of the seismic measurement and electromagnetic field measurement requires special consideration how to design electromagnetic field measurement networks for both research and detection earthquakes and explosions along with the seismic measurement networks. In addition, the electromagnetic sensor network itself could be designed and deployed, as a research tool with great deal of flexibility, the placement of the measuring nodes must be design based on systematic analysis of the seismic-electromagnetic interaction. In this article, we review the observations of the co-seismic electromagnetic field generated by earthquakes and man-made sources such as vibrations and explosions. The theoretical investigation allows the distribution of sensor nodes to be optimized and could be used to support existing geological networks. The placement of sensor nodes have to be determined based on physics of electromagnetic field distribution above the ground level. The results of theoretical investigations of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena are considered in Section I. First, we compare the relative contribution of various types of mechano-electromagnetic mechanisms and then analyze in detail the calculation of electromagnetic fields generated by piezomagnetic and electrokinetic effects.

  12. Ion density and temperature variations at altitude of 500 km during moderate seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Khurana, M. S.; Bahal, B. M.; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ionospheric ions (O+ and H+) and temperature (Ti) as precursory parameters to seismic activity have been analysed from year 1995 till 1998, using SROSS-C2 (average altitude range of ∼500 km) satellite measurements for moderate magnitude earthquakes. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) and National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) website. 13 seismic events of moderate magnitude (M = 4-5.5) from 1995 to 1998, using SROSS-C2 satellite measurements have been analysed. During seismic affected period, considerable decrease in the density of heavier ion - O+ and increase in the ion temperature (Ti) is observed during all the selected events. Lighter ion - H+ doesn't show any significant change. Electric field and electromagnetic emissions generated due to seismogenic activity could be the plausible initializing agents responsible for change in ion concentration and temperature values during these events.

  13. New inferences from spectral seismic energy measurement of a link between regional seismicity and volcanic activity at Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, R.; Falsaperla, S.; Marrero, J. M.; Messina, A.

    2009-04-01

    The existence of a relationship between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity has been the subject of several studies in the last years. Generally, activity in basaltic volcanoes such as Villarica (Chile) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) shows very little changes after the occurrence of regional earthquakes. In a few cases volcanic activity has changed before the occurrence of regional earthquakes, such as observed at Teide, Tenerife, in 2004 and 2005 (Tárraga et al., 2006). In this paper we explore the possible link between regional seismicity and changes in volcanic activity at Mt. Etna in 2006 and 2007. On 24 November, 2006 at 4:37:40 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 4.7 stroke the eastern coast of Sicily. The epicenter was localized 50 km SE of the south coast of the island, and at about 160 km from the summit craters of Mt. Etna. The SSEM (Spectral Seismic Energy Measurement) of the seismic signal at stations at 1 km and 6 km from the craters highlights that four hours before this earthquake the energy associated with volcanic tremor increased, reached a maximum, and finally became steady when the earthquake occurred. Conversely, neither before nor after the earthquake, the SSEM of stations located between 80 km and 120 km from the epicentre and outside the volcano edifice showed changes. On 5 September, 2007 at 21:24:13 GMT an earthquake of magnitude 3.2 and 7.9 km depth stroke the Lipari Island, at the north of Sicily. About 38 hours before the earthquake occurrence, there was an episode of lava fountain lasting 20 hours at Etna volcano. The SSEM of the seismic signal recorded during the lava fountain at a station located at 6 km from the craters highlights changes heralding this earthquake ten hours before its occurrence using the FFM method (e.g., Voight, 1988; Ortiz et al., 2003). A change in volcanic activity - with the onset of ash emission and Strombolian explosions - was observed a couple of hours before the occurrence of the regional

  14. 75 FR 60173 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Seismic Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... discharge of 1,150 in\\3\\. Table 2 of the IHA application presents different sound pressure level (SPL) radii...) and can operate in temperatures as low as -45.6 C (-50 degrees F). The Healy is a USCG icebreaker... required during operations. Sound level radii for the proposed three airgun array were measured in...

  15. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  16. Volcanic activity observed from continuous seismic records in the region of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, N.; Droznin, D.; Droznina, S.; Senyukov, S.; Chebrov, V.; Gordeev, E.; Frank, W.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze continuous seismic records from 18 permanent stations operated in vicinity of the Klyuchevskoy group of volcanos (Kamchatka, Russia) during the period between 2009 and 2014. We explore the stability of the inter-station cross-correlation to detect different periods of sustained emission from seismic energy. The main idea of this approach is that cross-correlation waveforms computed from a wavefield emitted by a seismic source from a fixed position remain stable during the period when this source is acting. The detected periods of seismic emission correspond to different episodes of activity of volcanoes: Klyuchevskoy, Tolbachik, Shiveluch, and Kizimen. For Klyuchevskoy and Tolbachik whose recent eruptions are mostly effusive, the detected seismic signals correspond to typical volcanic tremor, likely caused by degassing processes. For Shiveluch and Kizimen producing more silicic lavas, the observed seismic emission often consists of many repetitive long period (LP) seismic events that might be related to the extrusion of viscous magmas. We develop an approach for automatic detection of these individual LP events in order to characterize variations of their size and recurrence in time.

  17. Seismic evidence for Neogene and active shortening offshore of Lebanon (Shalimar cruise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, H.; Singh, S. C.; Tapponnier, P.; Elias, A.; Briais, A.; Sursock, A.; Jomaa, R.; King, G. C. P.; DaëRon, M.; Jacques, E.; Barrier, L.

    2009-07-01

    Lebanon, located on a 160-km-long transpressional bend of the left-lateral Levant (Dead Sea) fault system (LFS), has been the site of infrequent but large earthquakes, including one submarine, tsunamigenic event. The main objective of the Shalimar marine survey was to characterize and map active deformation offshore of Lebanon using a range of geophysical techniques, particularly seismic reflection profiling. The cruise results clearly establish the presence of young submarine thrust faults and folds and clarify the structure of this part of the Levant margin. A submarine fold belt, bounded by thrusts and lateral ramps and extending up to 30 km from the shoreline, is interpreted as the foreland thrust system of the actively growing Mount Lebanon range. There is no large fault extending into the Levant basin toward Cyprus, which indicates that thrusting only absorbs local transpression resulting from the Lebanese restraining bend. Both the Miocene and Plio-Quaternary sedimentary sequences are affected by shortening, with landward dipping blind thrusts and associated growth strata. The presence of the Messinian evaporites creates complex deformation patterns, including normal faults due both to folding accommodation and to gravity spreading, all well imaged in the seismic reflection profiles. Because the evaporite layer acts as a décollement level, shortening extends farther out seaward through a series of thrust imbricates or duplexes. The strongest shortening, observed between Beirut and Batroun, decreases toward the south between Saida and Tyre. North of Tripoli, the passive margin is not affected by Neogene deformation and is well preserved. We propose that since the Miocene, the northward propagating LFS interacted with margin structures inherited from the Mesozoic rifting phase and was deviated along the more rigid oceanic crust flooring the Levant basin, a process which led to the formation of the Lebanese restraining bend of the LFS and consequently to the

  18. Seismic Evidence for Neogene and Active Shortening Offshore Lebanon (SHALIMAR Cruise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, H.; Singh, S. C.; Tapponnier, P.; Elias, A.; Briais, A.; Sursock, A.; Jomaa, R.; King, G. C.; Daeron, M.; Jacques, E.; Barrier, L.

    2004-12-01

    Lebanon is located on a 160 km long transpressional bend of the left-lateral Levant (Dead Sea) Fault. The main objective of the SHALIMAR (2003) marine survey was to characterize and map active deformation offshore Lebanon using a range of geophysical techniques, particularly seismic reflection profiling. The cruise results clearly establish the presence of submarine thrust faults - likely the source of one of the most devastating submarine historical earthquakes that happened along the Levantine shores - and clarify the structure of this part of the Levant margin. A submarine fold-belt, bounded by thrusts and lateral ramps and extending in places to at least 30 km from the shoreline, is interpreted as the foreland thrust system of the actively growing Mount Lebanon range. There is no large fault extending into the Levant Basin towards Cyprus, which indicates that thrusting only absorbs local transpression resulting from the Lebanese restraining bend. Both the Miocene and Plio-Quaternary sedimentary sequences are affected by shortening, with landward-dipping blind thrusts and associated growth strata. The presence of the Messinian evaporites creates complex deformation patterns, including normal faults due both to folding accommodation and gravity spreading, all well imaged in the seismic reflection profiles. Because the evaporite layer acts as a decollement level, deformation extends farther out seawards through a series of thrust imbricates or duplexes. Shortening is strongest between Beyrut and Batroun and decreases towards the south between Saida and Tyre. North of Tripoli, the passive margin is not affected by Neogene deformation, and is well preserved. We propose that, since the Miocene, the northward propagating Levant Fault interacted with margin structures inherited from the Mesozoic rifting phase, and was deviated away from the more rigid oceanic crust flooring the Levant basin, a process which led to the formation of the Lebanese restraining bend, and

  19. Seismic Evidence for Neogene and Active Shortening Offshore Lebanon (SHALIMAR Cruise)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, H.; Singh, S. C.; Tapponnier, P.; Elias, A.; Briais, A.; Sursock, A.; Jomaa, R.; King, G. C.; Daeron, M.; Jacques, E.; Barrier, L.

    2007-12-01

    Lebanon is located on a 160 km long transpressional bend of the left-lateral Levant (Dead Sea) Fault. The main objective of the SHALIMAR (2003) marine survey was to characterize and map active deformation offshore Lebanon using a range of geophysical techniques, particularly seismic reflection profiling. The cruise results clearly establish the presence of submarine thrust faults - likely the source of one of the most devastating submarine historical earthquakes that happened along the Levantine shores - and clarify the structure of this part of the Levant margin. A submarine fold-belt, bounded by thrusts and lateral ramps and extending in places to at least 30 km from the shoreline, is interpreted as the foreland thrust system of the actively growing Mount Lebanon range. There is no large fault extending into the Levant Basin towards Cyprus, which indicates that thrusting only absorbs local transpression resulting from the Lebanese restraining bend. Both the Miocene and Plio-Quaternary sedimentary sequences are affected by shortening, with landward-dipping blind thrusts and associated growth strata. The presence of the Messinian evaporites creates complex deformation patterns, including normal faults due both to folding accommodation and gravity spreading, all well imaged in the seismic reflection profiles. Because the evaporite layer acts as a decollement level, deformation extends farther out seawards through a series of thrust imbricates or duplexes. Shortening is strongest between Beyrut and Batroun and decreases towards the south between Saida and Tyre. North of Tripoli, the passive margin is not affected by Neogene deformation, and is well preserved. We propose that, since the Miocene, the northward propagating Levant Fault interacted with margin structures inherited from the Mesozoic rifting phase, and was deviated away from the more rigid oceanic crust flooring the Levant basin, a process which led to the formation of the Lebanese restraining bend, and

  20. 76 FR 14924 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Specified Activities; Russian River Estuary Management Activities AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... incidental to Russian River estuary management activities. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA... Channel Adaptive Management Plan. NMFS' Environmental Assessment (2010) and associated Finding of...

  1. A preliminary census of engineering activities located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Marco; Briffa, Emanuela; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavò, Flavio; Gambino, Salvatore; Maiolino, Vincenza; Maugeri, Roberto; Palano, Mimmo; Privitera, Eugenio; Scaltrito, Antonio; Spampinato, Salvatore; Ursino, Andrea; Velardita, Rosanna

    2015-04-01

    The seismic events caused by human engineering activities are commonly termed as "triggered" and "induced". This class of earthquakes, though characterized by low-to-moderate magnitude, have significant social and economical implications since they occur close to the engineering activity responsible for triggering/inducing them and can be felt by the inhabitants living nearby, and may even produce damage. One of the first well-documented examples of induced seismicity was observed in 1932 in Algeria, when a shallow magnitude 3.0 earthquake occurred close to the Oued Fodda Dam. By the continuous global improvement of seismic monitoring networks, numerous other examples of human-induced earthquakes have been identified. Induced earthquakes occur at shallow depths and are related to a number of human activities, such as fluid injection under high pressure (e.g. waste-water disposal in deep wells, hydrofracturing activities in enhanced geothermal systems and oil recovery, shale-gas fracking, natural and CO2 gas storage), hydrocarbon exploitation, groundwater extraction, deep underground mining, large water impoundments and underground nuclear tests. In Italy, induced/triggered seismicity is suspected to have contributed to the disaster of the Vajont dam in 1963. Despite this suspected case and the presence in the Italian territory of a large amount of engineering activities "capable" of inducing seismicity, no extensive researches on this topic have been conducted to date. Hence, in order to improve knowledge and correctly assess the potential hazard at a specific location in the future, here we started a preliminary study on the entire range of engineering activities currently located in Sicily (Southern Italy) which may "potentially" induce seismicity. To this end, we performed: • a preliminary census of all engineering activities located in the study area by collecting all the useful information coming from available on-line catalogues; • a detailed compilation

  2. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  3. Biological Activity of Recently Discovered Halogenated Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents the biological activity—antibacterial, antifungal, anti-parasitic, antiviral, antitumor, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and enzymatic activity—of halogenated marine natural products discovered in the past five years. Newly discovered examples that do not report biological activity are not included. PMID:26133553

  4. Extending Terrestrial Climate Information Into the Marine Realm: Palynological Information as a key to Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigelt, E.; Uenzelmann-Neben, G.; Dupont, L. M.

    2006-12-01

    The sedimentary sequences of the continental margin off southwest Africa have been shaped by different forces: So, the interaction of climate, oceanic currents and sea level fluctuations left a significant imprint in the sedimentary structures along the continental margin. Additionally, tectonic movements affected the sedimentary sequences. Our aim is to unravel the development and modifications of the depositional system in the Northern Cape Basin, and to deduce from local processes to global paleoclimatological and paleoceanographic changes. We present a seismostratigraphic model for the Neogene sedimentary layers in the Northern Cape Basin based on a combination of reflection seismic lines with drill site records of the ODP Leg 175 Site 1082, and assisted by palynological data. A striking observation is an unconformity dated at 2.2 Ma. The reflectors above onlap onto this interface, whereas the internal reflectors of the unit below show toplap termination. The outbuilding of the slope in the lower unit indicates a low relative sea level. In contrast the sigmoid reflection configuration in the unit above the unconformity is an indication for a gentle rise of relative sea level which indeed corresponds to a rise in eustatic sealevel. Since we can identify this Late Pliocene unconformity 250 km along the margin of the Northern Cape Basin we infer a large regional change in deposition regime. It coincides with a marked change of pollen assemblages. The accumulation rate of pollen suddenly drops from 50-60 pol/a/ccm in older layers to 8 pol/a/ccm in average after 2.2 Ma. The marked reduction of pollen input into the ocean is interpreted as the result of a loss of a perennial river discharge. It indicates a change of hinterland climate from humid to drier conditions, which in turn is associated with a shift of the Polar Front Zone of the Southern Ocean in the late Pliocene.

  5. Study of seismic activity during the ascending and descending phases of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukma, Indriani; Abidin, Zamri Zainal

    2016-12-01

    The study of the solar cycle and geomagnetic index associated with the seismic activity from the year 1901 to the end of 2015 has been done for an area that covers the majority of China and its bordering countries. Data of sunspot number, solar wind speed, daily storm time index and earthquake number are collected from NOAA, NASA, WDC, OMNI and USGS databases and websites. The earthquakes are classified into small (M < 5) and large (M ≥ 5) magnitudes (in Richter scale). We investigated the variation of earthquake activities with the geomagnetic storm index due to the solar wind. We focused on their variation in the ascending and descending phases of solar cycle. From our study, we conclude that there is a correlation between the phases' geomagnetic index and solar wind speed. We have also suggested that there is a certain degree of correlation between solar activity and seismicity in these phases. For every solar cycle, we find that there is a trend for earthquakes to occur in greater numbers during the descending phase. This can be explained by the increment in the solar wind speed and geomagnetic storm index during this phase.

  6. Extracts of marine algae show inhibitory activity against osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells that play a crucial role in bone resorption. The imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation results in osteoporosis. Therefore, substances that can suppress osteoclast formation are potential candidate materials for drug development or functional foods. There have been reports that extracts or purified compounds from marine micro- and macroalgae can suppress osteoclast differentiation. Symbioimine, isolated from the cultured dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., had suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation in osteoclast-like cells. Norzoanthamine, isolated from the colonial zoanthid Zoanthas sp., has been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice. With regard to marine extracts, the fucoxanthin-rich component from brown algae has been shown to have suppressive effects against osteoclast differentiation. An extract of Sargassum fusiforme has recently been shown to have antiosteoporosis activity. This extract suppressed both osteoclast differentiation and accelerated osteoblast formation in separate in vitro experiments. It also showed antiosteoporosis activity in ovariectomized mice by regulating the balance between bone resorption and bone formation. These marine algae and their extracts may be sources of marine medicinal foods for the prevention of osteoporosis.

  7. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules.

  8. The Seismicity activity toward east of Bogotá D. C., Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicangana, G.; Vargas, C. A.; Gomez-Capera, A.; Pedraza, P.; Mora-Paez, H.; Salcedo, E.; Caneva, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the eastern flank of Eastern Cordillera very close to Bogotá D.C metropolitan area at least in last 450 years five magnitude 5.0 or higher earthquakes has occur. These were confirmed by both historical and instrumental seismicity information. Among these earthquakes, the first one in Colombian historical times was occur at March 16th, 1644 and was sense toward south of Santa Fé de Bogotá. Then on October 18th, 1743 occurred with a current probabilistic magnitude greater than 6.5 an earthquake that transcended in this region due to the economic slump and loss of lives that it caused. Recently the Quetame Earthquake with M = 5.9 occur on May 24th, 2008, that destroyed the Quetame town. This last earthquake was registered locally by Colombian Seismological Network (RSNC). In this study we realized an analysis over this seismicity activity both by historical chronicles with macroseismic estimation data, the seismicity record obtained mainly by the Colombian National Seismological Network (RSNC) data for the 1993-2012 lapse, for searching the seismogenics sources that produced this seismicity activity. So, with these results we show the tectonic panorama of this region indicating of this manner the faults that possibility can be potentially seismic actives. For this we have considered mainly geomorphologic features associated to the faults activity additionally corroborated with GPS velocities data of GEORED project of Colombian Geological Survey.

  9. Swell effect correction for the high-resolution marine seismic data acquired using an airgun and an 8-channel streamer cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Young; Koo, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Wonsik; Kim, Byoung-yeop; Cheong, Snons; Kim, Young-Jun

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution marine seismic surveys are used for the imaging of the detailed subsurface geological structure in engineering and marine geological survey. When the sea state gets worse, the quality of the seismic data become worse due to the sea swell. We corrected the swell effect to enhance the quality of seismic data. To remove the swell effect, we picked the sea bottom location automatically, averaged the picked sea bottom times of the adjacent traces and corrected the differences between the calculated and averaged sea bottom location. To make high quality seismic section, we used high-resolution marine 8-channel airgun seismic data acquired off Yeosu, Korea. The energy source was a 30 in3 airgun and the receiver was a 40 m long 8 channel streamer cable with a group interval of 5 m. The offset distance between the source and the first channel was 20 m. The shot interval was 2 seconds corresponding to ~5 m in distance, assuming ship's speed 5 knots. The data were digitally recorded with a sample interval of 0.1 ms and a record length of 1 s. The processing sequence includes basic processing procedures such as gain recovery, deconvolution, frequency filtering, CMP sorting, NMO correction, swell effect correction and stacking. To select sea bottom location for the swell effect correction, we pick maximum amplitude within the expected range including sea bottom location and find the first location at which the amplitude is larger than the threshold that is 40% of the maximum amplitude. We averaged these two-way travel times of sea bottom and corrected the differences. The range of the swell effect correction was -0.5 ~ 0.4 ms. After correction the continuity of reflectors were improved and high quality of the seismic data was produced. This study is a part of a Basic Research Project of the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), a National Research Laboratory (NRL) project supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), and

  10. Discrimination and Assessment of Induced Seismicity in Active Tectonic Zones: A Case Study from Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Lindsey, N.; Foxall, W.; Robertson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes induced by human activity have become a matter of heightened public concern during recent years. Of particular concern is seismicity associated with wastewater injection, which has included events having magnitudes greater than 5. The causes of the induced events are primarily changes in pore-pressure, fluid volume and perhaps temperature due to injection. Recent research in the US has focused on mid-continental regions having low rates of naturally-occurring seismicity, where induced events can be identified by relatively straightforward spatial and temporal correlation of seismicity with high-volume injection activities. Recent examples include events correlated with injection of wastewater in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas and Ohio, and long-term brine injection in the Paradox Valley in Colorado. Even in some of the cases where there appears at first sight to be a clear spatial correlation between seismicity and injection, it has been difficult to establish causality definitively. Here, we discuss methods to identify induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. We concentrate our study on Southern California, where large numbers of wastewater injection wells are located in oil-producing basins that experience moderate to high rates of naturally-occurring seismicity. Using the catalog of high-precision CISN relocations produced by Hauksson et al. (BSSA, 2012), we aim to discriminate induced from natural events based on spatio-temporal patterns of seismicity occurrence characteristics and their relationships to injection activities, known active faults and other faults favorably oriented for slip under the tectonic stress field. Since the vast majority of induced earthquakes are very small, it is crucial to include all events above the detection threshold of the CISN in each area studied. In addition to exploring the correlation of seismicity to injection activities in time and space, we analyze variations in frequency-magnitude distributions, which can

  11. Predicting earthquakes by analyzing accelerating precursory seismic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    During 11 sequences of earthquakes that in retrospect can be classed as foreshocks, the accelerating rate at which seismic moment is released follows, at least in part, a simple equation. This equation (1) is {Mathematical expression},where {Mathematical expression} is the cumulative sum until time, t, of the square roots of seismic moments of individual foreshocks computed from reported magnitudes;C and n are constants; and tfis a limiting time at which the rate of seismic moment accumulation becomes infinite. The possible time of a major foreshock or main shock, tf,is found by the best fit of equation (1), or its integral, to step-like plots of {Mathematical expression} versus time using successive estimates of tfin linearized regressions until the maximum coefficient of determination, r2,is obtained. Analyzed examples include sequences preceding earthquakes at Cremasta, Greece, 2/5/66; Haicheng, China 2/4/75; Oaxaca, Mexico, 11/29/78; Petatlan, Mexico, 3/14/79; and Central Chile, 3/3/85. In 29 estimates of main-shock time, made as the sequences developed, the errors in 20 were less than one-half and in 9 less than one tenth the time remaining between the time of the last data used and the main shock. Some precursory sequences, or parts of them, yield no solution. Two sequences appear to include in their first parts the aftershocks of a previous event; plots using the integral of equation (1) show that the sequences are easily separable into aftershock and foreshock segments. Synthetic seismic sequences of shocks at equal time intervals were constructed to follow equation (1), using four values of n. In each series the resulting distributions of magnitudes closely follow the linear Gutenberg-Richter relation log N=a-bM, and the product n times b for each series is the same constant. In various forms and for decades, equation (1) has been used successfully to predict failure times of stressed metals and ceramics, landslides in soil and rock slopes, and volcanic

  12. Ocean Planet. Interdisciplinary Marine Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Barbara

    The Ocean Planet is a traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution designed to share with the public what recent research has revealed about the oceans and to encourage ocean conservation. This booklet of lessons and activities adapts several themes from the exhibition for use in middle and high school classrooms. Lesson plans include:…

  13. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  14. Application of continuous seismic-reflection techniques to delineate paleochannels beneath the Neuse River at US Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardinell, Alex P.

    1999-01-01

    A continuous seismic-reflection profiling survey was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey on the Neuse River near the Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station during July 7-24, 1998. Approximately 52 miles of profiling data were collected during the survey from areas northwest of the Air Station to Flanner Beach and southeast to Cherry Point. Positioning of the seismic lines was done by using an integrated navigational system. Data from the survey were used to define and delineate paleochannel alignments under the Neuse River near the Air Station. These data also were correlated with existing surface and borehole geophysical data, including vertical seismic-profiling velocity data collected in 1995. Sediments believed to be Quaternary in age were identified at varying depths on the seismic sections as undifferentiated reflectors and lack the lateral continuity of underlying reflectors believed to represent older sediments of Tertiary age. The sediments of possible Quaternary age thicken to the southeast. Paleochannels of Quaternary age and varying depths were identified beneath the Neuse River estuary. These paleochannels range in width from 870 feet to about 6,900 feet. Two zones of buried paleochannels were identified in the continuous seismic-reflection profiling data. The eastern paleochannel zone includes two large superimposed channel features identified during this study and in re-interpreted 1995 land seismic-reflection data. The second paleochannel zone, located west of the first paleochannel zone, contains several small paleochannels near the central and south shore of the Neuse River estuary between Slocum Creek and Flanner Beach. This second zone of channel features may be continuous with those mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1995 using land seismic-reflection data on the southern end of the Air Station. Most of the channels were mapped at the Quaternary-Tertiary sediment boundary. These channels appear to have been cut into the older sediments

  15. Marine Mammal Active Sonar Test 2004 (MAST 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Vandiver, Amy; Edelson, Geoffrey S.; Frankel, Adam S.; Clark, Christopher W.

    2004-05-01

    The Marine Mammal Active Sonar Test was conducted in January 2004 off the central California coast during the gray whale migration. The purpose of the test was to collect data to significantly advance active sonar detection, classification, and tracking of marine mammals out to ranges of 1 mile. The R/V NEW HORIZON was moored in the migration path. Two different sonar systems operating between 210 and 220 dB were deployed off the vessel, the IMAPS phased array sonar system that operates from 20-30 kHz and the MAST mechanical system that uses rotating parabolic transducers operating from 30 to 40 kHz. Marine mammal observers were deployed on the bluffs overlooking the experiment and aboard the NEW HORIZON. The observers tracked the whales using electronic theodelites, providing ground truth for the sonar systems. They also looked for any severe reactions from the animals, and called for a shutdown if any marine mammals were observed within 100 m of the sonar. Here, we discuss the experiment and the results to date, including any reaction of the whales to the sonar system. We will also touch on the legal battle to conduct the experiment, and lessons learned.

  16. Recent Seismic and Geodetic Activity at Multiple Volcanoes in the Ecuadorean Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, S.; Ruiz, M. C.; McCausland, W. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Mothes, P. A.; Bell, A. F.; Hidalgo, S.; Barrington, C.; Yepez, M.; Aguaiza, S.; Plain, M.

    2015-12-01

    The state of volcanic activity often fluctuates between periods of repose and unrest. The transition time between a period of repose and unrest, or vice versa for an open system, can occur within a matter of hours or days. Because of this short time scale, real-time seismic and geodetic (e.g. tiltmeter, GPS) monitoring networks are crucial for characterizing the state of activity of a volcano. In the Ecuadorean Andes, 5 volcanoes demonstrate long-term (Tungurahua, Reventador, and Guagua Pichincha) or recently reactivated (Cotopaxi, Chiles-Cerro Negro) seismic and geodetic activity. The Instituto Geofisico regularly characterizes volcano seismicity into long period, very long period, volcano-tectonic, and tremor events. Significant recent changes at these volcanoes include: rigorous reactivation of glacier-capped Cotopaxi, drumbeat seismicity absent a dome extrusion at Tungurahua, and regularly reoccurring (~7 day recurrence interval), shallow seismic swarms at Guagua Pichincha. These volcanoes locate along both the Western and Eastern Cordillera of the Ecuadorean Andes and, where data are available, manifest important variations in chemical composition, daily gas flux, and surficial deformation. We summarize the long-term geophysical parameters measured at each volcano and place recent changes in each parameter in a larger magmatic and hydrothermal context. All of the studied volcanoes present significant societal hazards to local and regional communities.

  17. Tectonic interactions between India and Arabia since the Jurassic reconstructed from marine geophysics, ophiolite geology, and seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaina, Carmen; Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Spakman, Wim

    2015-05-01

    Gondwana breakup since the Jurassic and the northward motion of India toward Eurasia were associated with formation of ocean basins and ophiolite obduction between and onto the Indian and Arabian margins. Here we reconcile marine geophysical data from preserved oceanic basins with the age and location of ophiolites in NW India and SE Arabia and seismic tomography of the mantle below the NW Indian Ocean. The North Somali and proto-Owen basins formed due to 160-133 Ma N-S extension between India and Somalia. Subsequent convergence destroyed part of this crust, simultaneous with the uplift of the Masirah ophiolites. Most of the preserved crust in the Owen Basin may have formed between 84 and 74 Ma, whereas the Mascarene and the Amirante basins accommodated motion between India and Madagascar/East Africa between 85 and circa 60 Ma and 75 and circa 66 Ma, respectively. Between circa 84 and 45 Ma, oblique Arabia-India convergence culminated in ophiolite obduction onto SE Arabia and NW India and formed the Carlsberg slab in the lower mantle below the NW Indian Ocean. The NNE-SSW oriented slab may explain the anomalous bathymetry in the NW Indian Ocean and may be considered a paleolongitudinal constraint for absolute plate motion. NW India-Asia collision occurred at circa 20 Ma deforming the Sulaiman ranges or at 30 Ma if the Hindu Kush slab north of the Afghan block reflects intra-Asian subduction. Our study highlights that the NW India ophiolites have no relationship with India-Asia motion or collision but result from relative India-Africa/Arabia motions instead.

  18. Antifouling activities of marine bacteria associated with sponge ( Sigmadocia sp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S.; Soniamby, A. R.; Sunjaiy Shankar, C. V.; Mary Josephine Punitha, S.

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the antifouling activity of bacteria associated with marine sponges. A total of eight bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of sponge Sigmadocia sp., of them, SS02, SS05 and SS06 showed inhibitory activity against biofilm-forming bacteria. The extracts of these 3 strains considerably affected the extracellular polymeric substance producing ability and adhesion of biofilm-forming bacterial strains. In addition to disc diffusion assay, microalgal settlement assay was carried out with the extracts mixed with polyurethane wood polish and coated onto stainless steel coupons. The extract of strain SS05 showed strong microalgal settlement inhibitory activity. Strain SS05 was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its 16S rRNA gene. Metabolites of the bacterial strains associated with marine invertebrates promise to be developed into environment-friendly antifouling agents.

  19. Antioxidant Activity of Marine Algal Polyphenolic Compounds: A Mechanistic Approach.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I P Shanura; Kim, Misook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenolic compounds isolated from marine algae exhibit a broad spectrum of beneficial biological properties, including antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic activities, along with several other bioactivities centered on their antioxidant properties. Consequently, polyphenolic compounds are increasingly being investigated for their potential use in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. The antioxidant activities of these compounds have been explored widely through experimental studies. Nonetheless, a theoretical understanding of the structural and electronic properties could broaden research perspectives, leading to the identification and synthesis of efficient structural analogs with prophylactic uses. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding antioxidant polyphenolic compounds in marine algae with an attempt to describe the structure-activity relationship.

  20. Recent seismic activity of the Kivu Province, Western Rift Valley of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zana, N.; Kamba, M.; Katsongo, S.; Janssen, Th.

    1989-11-01

    The Kivu Province is located at the junction between the well-defined Ruzizi Valley to the south and the Lake Amin Trough to the north. In this zone, the Rift Valley is characterized by the highest uplift and by complex dislocations of the crust, accompanied by the most intensive volcanism of the East African Rift System. In this paper, we show the recent state of the seismic activity of this zone in connection with the seismic activity generated by the volcanoes Nyiragongo and Nyamuragira. The pattern of cumulative energy release by these volcanoes shows a steplike increase that is believed to be a precursor of volcanic eruptions.

  1. The European-wide Geo-Seas data space for marine geological and geophysical data and its novel approach in Metadata, Data models and Semantics emerging from the case of Seismic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diviacco, Paolo; Busato, Alessandro; Glaves, Helen M.; Schaap, Dick M. A.

    2013-04-01

    The Geo-Seas EU FP7 project aims at providing means to deliver and access integrated sets of primary marine geological and geophysical data. These are among the most important elements in the process of scientific and applied marine research, economic activities, and sustainable environmental management, at regional, European and global scales. Such data space requires an European-wide services infrastructure, standardised practices by the data repositories, and middleware so that end users can identify, locate and access the data they might be interested in. Being Geo-Seas a sibling of the SeaDataNet project, it adopts technologies developed within the latter, extending them and introducing new paradigms. Within this perspective a specific attention was reserved to Seismic data, due to its value in commercial use and scientific community positioning, on one hand, and to the difficulties in handling its file size on the other. To tackle these issues a novel approach was devised, that uses web based data-owner-side visualization facilities installed at each data provider premise. This overcomes the limitations of the common practices in data dissemination, where eventually the data is downloaded and used "off-line" at the end-user workstation. This solution is based on a seismic data visualization software that is strictly integrated with the GeoSeas (and SeaDataNet) project middleware and that therefore allows to perform consistent user authentications and requests handling across all domains and partners. Considering the large and ever increasing number of datasets made available within the project, and that deep examination of seismic data via the viewer could take time, it was devised to introduce a more efficient way to select useful hits within the Geo-Seas data space extending the already existent ISO19115-based SeaDataNet discovery mechanism (CDI). This has been achieved through the introduction of a "browsing" level linked to the CDI where further

  2. Geochemical monitoring of thermal waters in Slovenia: relationships to seismic activity.

    PubMed

    Zmazek, B; Italiano, F; Zivcić, M; Vaupotic, J; Kobal, I; Martinelli, G

    2002-12-01

    Thermally anomalous fluids released in seismic areas in Slovenia were the subjects of geochemical monitoring. Thermal waters were surveyed from the seismically active area of Posocje (Bled and Zatolmin; NW Slovenia) and from Rogaska Slatina in eastern Slovenia. Continuous monitoring of geochemical parameters (radon concentration, electrical conductivity, and water temperature) was performed with discrete gas sampling for their (3)He/(4)He ratio. The observed values were correlated with meteorological parameters (rainfall, barometric pressure and air temperature) and with seismic activity. Only a few earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of the measuring sites during the monitoring period. Nevertheless, changes in radon concentration, water temperature, electrical conductivity and helium isotopic ratio were detected at the three thermal springs in the periods preceding the earthquakes. A close correlation was also observed of both water temperature and electrical conductivity with the Earth tide, making the observations in the selected sites a promising tool for addressing the widely debated question of earthquake prediction.

  3. Seismic activity related to the degassing of the Gorely volcano (Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenkov, S. S.; Shapiro, N.; Koulakov, I.; Abkadyirov, I.; Frank, W.; Jakovlev, A.

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed continuous seismic records from a temporary network of 21 broadband seismograph that we installed in Gorely volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) between August 2013 and August 2014. During the studied period, the activity of Gorely was characterized by a sustained gas emission. We developed a source scanning algorithm based on summation of seismogram envelopes to automatically detect seismic events characterized by emerging signals without clear arrivals of P or S waves. With the help of this method, we detected and located numerous events originated from the vicinity of the main crater and caused by the volcano degassing. We then studied variations in spatio-temporal distribution of this seismic emission to characterize the evolution of the volcanic activity.

  4. Seismic activity response as observed in mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata), Cuero y Salado Wildlife Refuge, Honduras.

    PubMed

    Snarr, Kymberley Anne

    2005-10-01

    This report documents the response of wild mantled howlers (Alouatta palliata) to coseismic activity (seismic activity at the time of an earthquake). During field work on the north coast of Honduras, data were collected on a habituated troop of mantled howlers as they responded to coseismic activity. The seismic event occurred on 13 February 2001 at 0822 hours local time with a magnitude of Richter scale 6.6, focus depth of approximately 15 km at a distance of 341 km from the epicentre to the field site, Cuero y Salado. At the field site, based upon Jeffreys and Bullen (1988), body waves, noted as P and S waves, arrived at 60 and 87 s, respectively, with surface waves arriving approximately 103 s post-origin time of the seismic event. While there are three reports on non-human primate response to coseismic activity in the literature, they report on captive non-human primates. This is the first documented response on a non-captive troop. In addition, this report compares the intensity measure encountered by a wild troop of howlers and one captive group of orangutans as set out by the Modified Mercalli Intensity scale. The Modified Mercalli measure of intensity is one of two standard measures of seismic activity and rates what a person sees and feels at their location (Wood and Neumann 1931; Richter 1958). Thus, arboreal nonhuman primates are found to respond to coseismic activity ranging from Level IV to Level VI as based upon the modified Mercalli intensity scale.

  5. Anthropogenically-Induced Superficial Seismic Activity Modulated By Slow-Slip Events in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, W.; Shapiro, N.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Campillo, M.

    2014-12-01

    We use the data of the MASE seismic experiment operated during 2.5 years in Guerrero, Mexico to create a large catalog of seismic multiplets. This catalog is dominated by families of Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFE) occurring in vicinity of the main subduction interface. In addition to more than one thousand LFE families, we detected nine repeating seismic event families that are located in the upper crust and are anthropogenically induced (AI) by mining blasts. Analysis of the recurrence of these AI events in time shows that their activity significantly increases during the strong Slow-Slip Event (SSE) in 2006. Modeled static stress perturbations induced by the SSE at the surface are ~5 kPa that is on the same order of magnitude as dynamic stress perturbations observed to trigger other low stress drop phenomena, such as tectonic tremor. We propose therefore that strong SSEs in Guerrero impose an extensional regime throughout the continental crust, modifying the stress field near the surface and increasing AI activity. This modulation of the recurrence of the crustal seismic events by the SSE-induced stress might be related to another recent observation: the SSE-induced reduction of seismic velocities linked to nonlinear elastic effects caused by opening of cracks (Rivet et al., 2011, 2014).

  6. Variations of terrestrial geomagnetic activity correlated to M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2013-04-01

    From the surface of the Sun, as a result of a solar flare, are expelled a coronal mass (CME or Coronal Mass Ejection) that can be observed from the Earth through a coronagraph in white light. This ejected material can be compared to an electrically charged cloud (plasma) mainly composed of electrons, protons and other small quantities of heavier elements such as helium, oxygen and iron that run radially from the Sun along the lines of the solar magnetic field and pushing into interplanetary space. Sometimes the CME able to reach the Earth causing major disruptions of its magnetosphere: mashed in the region illuminated by the Sun and expanding in the region not illuminated. This interaction creates extensive disruption of the Earth's geomagnetic field that can be detected by a radio receiver tuned to the ELF band (Extreme Low Frequency 0-30 Hz). The Radio Emissions Project (scientific research project founded in February 2009 by Gabriele Cataldi and Daniele Cataldi), analyzing the change in the Earth's geomagnetic field through an induction magnetometer tuned between 0.001 and 5 Hz (bandwidth in which possible to observe the geomagnetic pulsations) was able to detect the existence of a close relationship between this geomagnetic perturbations and the global seismic activity M6+. During the arrival of the CME on Earth, in the Earth's geomagnetic field are generated sudden and intensive emissions that have a bandwidth including between 0 and 15 Hz, an average duration of 2-8 hours, that preceding of 0-12 hours M6+ earthquakes. Between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012, all M6+ earthquakes recorded on a global scale were preceded by this type of signals which, due to their characteristics, have been called "Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors" (S.G.P.). The main feature of Seismic Geomagnetic Precursors is represented by the close relationship that they have with the solar activity. In fact, because the S.G.P. are geomagnetic emissions, their temporal modulation depends

  7. Noise-based body-wave seismic tomography in an active underground mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, G.; Brenguier, F.; Campillo, M.; Lynch, R.; Roux, P.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ambient noise tomography has become increasingly popular to image the earth's upper crust. The seismic noise recorded in the earth's crust is dominated by surface waves emanating from the interaction of the ocean with the solid earth. These surface waves are low frequency in nature ( < 1 Hz) and not usable for imaging smaller structures associated with mining or oil and gas applications. The seismic noise recorded at higher frequencies are typically from anthropogenic sources, which are short lived, spatially unstable and not well suited for constructing seismic Green's functions between sensors with conventional cross-correlation methods. To examine the use of ambient noise tomography for smaller scale applications, continuous data were recorded for 5 months in an active underground mine in Sweden located more than 1km below surface with 18 high frequency seismic sensors. A wide variety of broadband (10 - 3000 Hz) seismic noise sources are present in an active underground mine ranging from drilling, scraping, trucks, ore crushers and ventilation fans. Some of these sources generate favorable seismic noise, while others are peaked in frequency and not usable. In this presentation, I will show that the noise generated by mining activity can be useful if periods of seismic noise are carefully selected. Although noise sources are not temporally stable and not evenly distributed around the sensor array, good estimates of the seismic Green's functions between sensors can be retrieved for a broad frequency range (20 - 400 Hz) when a selective stacking scheme is used. For frequencies below 100 Hz, the reconstructed Green's functions show clear body-wave arrivals for almost all of the 153 sensor pairs. The arrival times of these body-waves are picked and used to image the local velocity structure. The resulting 3-dimensional image shows a high velocity structure that overlaps with a known ore-body. The material properties of the ore-body differ from

  8. The application of active-source seismic imaging techniques to transtensional problems the Walker Lane and Salton Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kell, Anna Marie

    The plate margin in the western United States is an active tectonic region that contains the integrated deformation between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly focused plate motion between the North American and Pacific plates within the northern Gulf of California gives way north of the Salton Trough to more diffuse deformation. In particular a large fraction of the slip along the southernmost San Andreas fault ultimately bleeds eastward, including about 20% of the total plate motion budget that finds its way through the transtensional Walker Lane Deformation Belt just east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Fault-bounded ranges combined with intervening low-lying basins characterize this region; the down-dropped features are often filled with water, which present opportunities for seismic imaging at unprecedented scales. Here I present active-source seismic imaging from the Salton Sea and Walker Lane Deformation Belt, including both marine applications in lakes and shallow seas, and more conventional land-based techniques along the Carson range front. The complex fault network beneath the Salton Trough in eastern California is the on-land continuation of the Gulf of California rift system, where North American-Pacific plate motion is accommodated by a series of long transform faults, separated by small pull-apart, transtensional basins; the right-lateral San Andreas fault bounds this system to the north where it carries, on average, about 50% of total plate motion. The Salton Sea resides within the most youthful and northerly "spreading center" in this several thousand-kilometer-long rift system. The Sea provides an ideal environment for the use of high-data-density marine seismic techniques. Two active-source seismic campaigns in 2010 and 2011 show progression of the development of the Salton pull-apart sub-basin and the northerly propagation of the Imperial-San Andreas system through time at varying resolutions. High fidelity seismic imagery

  9. Seismic hydraulic fracture migration originated by successive deep magma pulses: The 2011-2013 seismic series associated to the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Moreno, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; De Angelis, S.; García-Yeguas, A.; Prudencio, J.; Morales, J.; Tuvè, T.; García, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011-2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the preeruptive and syneruptive seismicity using a realistic 3-D velocity model. Our results suggest that eruptive activity and the accompanying seismicity were caused by repeated injections of magma from the mantle into the lower crust. These magma pulses occurred within a small and well-defined volume resulting in the emplacement of fresh magma along the crust-mantle boundary underneath El Hierro. We analyzed the distribution of earthquake hypocenters in time and space in order to assess seismic diffusivity in the lower crust. Our results suggest that very high earthquake rates underneath El Hierro represent the response of a stable lower crust to stress perturbations with pulsatory character, linked to the injection of magma from the mantle. Magma input from depth caused large stress perturbations to propagate into the lower crust generating energetic seismic swarms. The absence of any preferential alignment in the spatial pattern of seismicity reinforces our hypothesis that stress perturbation and related seismicity, had diffusive character. We conclude that the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity was neither tracking the path of magma migration nor it defines the boundaries of magma storage volumes such as a midcrustal sill. Our conceptual model considers pulsatory magma injection from the upper mantle and its propagation along the Moho. We suggest, within this framework, that the spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake hypocenters reflect hydraulic fracturing processes associated with stress propagation due to magma movement.

  10. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Pitt, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ∼2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10−3 to 7.9 × 10−3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10−4 to 3.4 × 10−3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day−1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ∼25–1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  11. Tomographic Image of a Seismically Active Volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Chouet, B. A.; Pitt, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP /VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (˜50 km3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is primarily due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate-spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α ˜8 x 10-4 (crack-like pores) and gas volume fraction φ ˜4 x 10-4. The pore density parameter κ = 3φ / (4πα) = na3 = 0.12, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to range up to ˜1.6 x 1010 kg if the pores exclusively contain CO2, although he presence of an aqueous phase may lower this estimate by up to one order of magnitude. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 5 x 105 kg day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜8 to ˜90 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  12. Tomographic image of a seismically active volcano: Mammoth Mountain, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip; Chouet, Bernard; Pitt, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution tomographic P wave, S wave, and VP/VS velocity structure models are derived for Mammoth Mountain, California, using phase data from the Northern California Seismic Network and a temporary deployment of broadband seismometers. An anomalous volume (5.1 × 109 to 5.9 × 1010m3) of low P and low S wave velocities is imaged beneath Mammoth Mountain, extending from near the surface to a depth of ˜2 km below sea level. We infer that the reduction in seismic wave velocities is due to the presence of CO2 distributed in oblate spheroid pores with mean aspect ratio α = 1.6 × 10-3 to 7.9 × 10-3 (crack-like pores) and mean gas volume fraction ϕ = 8.1 × 10-4 to 3.4 × 10-3. The pore density parameter κ = 3ϕ/(4πα) = na3=0.11, where n is the number of pores per cubic meter and a is the mean pore equatorial radius. The total mass of CO2 is estimated to be 4.6 × 109 to 1.9 × 1011 kg. The local geological structure indicates that the CO2 contained in the pores is delivered to the surface through fractures controlled by faults and remnant foliation of the bedrock beneath Mammoth Mountain. The total volume of CO2 contained in the reservoir suggests that given an emission rate of 500 tons day-1, the reservoir could supply the emission of CO2 for ˜25-1040 years before depletion. Continued supply of CO2 from an underlying magmatic system would significantly prolong the existence of the reservoir.

  13. Multiple Seismic Array Observations for Tracing Deep Tremor Activity in Western Shikoku, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shiomi, K.; Obara, K.

    2011-12-01

    Deep non-volcanic tremors become very active during episodic slow-slip events in western Japan and Cascadia. The episodic tremor and slow-slip events in western Shikoku, Japan, occur at a typical interval of 6 months. Recently, it has been reported that tremor migration activity is complex and shows different migrating directions depending on time scales (Ghosh et al., 2010). Such characteristics of tremor are important to understand the mechanism of tremor and the relationship between tremor and SSEs. However it is difficult to determine the location of tremors with high accuracy because tremors show faint signals and make the identification of P/S-wave arrivals difficult. Seismic array analysis is useful to evaluate tremor activity, especially to estimate the arrival direction of seismic energy (e.g. Ueno et al., 2010, Ghosh et al., 2010), as it can distinguish multiple tremor sources occurring simultaneously. Here, we have conducted seismic array observation and analyzed seismic data during tremor activity by applying the MUSIC method to trace tremor location and its migration in western Shikoku. We have installed five seismic arrays in western Shikoku since January 2011. One of the arrays contains 30 stations with 3-component seismometers with a natural frequency of 2 Hz (Type-L array). The array aperture size is 2 km and the mean interval between stations is approximately 200 m. Each of the other arrays (Type-S array) contains 9 seismic stations with the same type of seismometers of the Type-L array, and is deployed surrounding the Type-L array. The small array aperture size is 800 m and its mean station interval is approximately 150 m. All array stations have recorded continuous waveform data at a sampling of 200Hz. In May 2011, an episodic tremor and a short-term slip event occurred for the first time during the observation period. We could retrieve the array seismic data during the whole tremor episode. The analysis of data from the type-L array confirms

  14. Seismic Response Control Of Structures Using Semi-Active and Passive Variable Stiffness Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed M. A.

    Controllable devices such as Magneto-Rheological Fluid Dampers, Electro-Rheological Dampers, and controllable friction devices have been studied extensively with limited implementation in real structures. Such devices have shown great potential in reducing seismic demands, either as smart base isolation systems, or as smart devices for multistory structures. Although variable stiffness devices can be used for seismic control of structures, the vast majority of research effort has been given to the control of damping. The primary focus of this dissertation is to evaluate the seismic control of structures using semi-active and passive variable stiffness characteristics. Smart base isolation systems employing variable stiffness devices have been studied, and two semi-active control strategies are proposed. The control algorithms were designed to reduce the superstructure and base accelerations of seismically isolated structures subject to near-fault and far-field ground motions. Computational simulations of the proposed control algorithms on the benchmark structure have shown that excessive base displacements associated with the near-fault ground motions may be better mitigated with the use of variable stiffness devices. However, the device properties must be controllable to produce a wide range of stiffness changes for an effective control of the base displacements. The potential of controllable stiffness devices in limiting the base displacement due to near-fault excitation without compromising the performance of conventionally isolated structures, is illustrated. The application of passive variable stiffness devices for seismic response mitigation of multistory structures is also investigated. A stiffening bracing system (SBS) is proposed to replace the conventional bracing systems of braced frames. An optimization process for the SBS parameters has been developed. The main objective of the design process is to maintain a uniform inter-story drift angle over the

  15. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  16. An Idea for an Active Seismic Experiment on Mars in 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lognonne, Ph.; Banerdt, B.; Giardini, D.; Costard, F.

    2001-01-01

    The detection of liquid water is of prime interest and should have deep implications in the understanding of the Martian hydrological cycle and also in exobiology. In the frame of the 2007 joint CNES-NASA mission to Mars, a set of 4 NETLANDERS developed by an European consortium is expected to be launched in June 2007. We propose to use a second spacecraft going or landing to Mars to release near one of the Netlander a series of artificial metallic meteorites, in order to perform an active seismic experiment providing a seismic profile of the crust and subsurface.

  17. Common features and peculiarities of the seismic activity at Phlegraean Fields, Long Valley, and Vesuvius

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marzocchi, W.; Vilardo, G.; Hill, D.P.; Ricciardi, G.P.; Ricco, C.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed and compared the seismic activity that has occurred in the last two to three decades in three distinct volcanic areas: Phlegraean Fields, Italy; Vesuvius, Italy; and Long Valley, California. Our main goal is to identify and discuss common features and peculiarities in the temporal evolution of earthquake sequences that may reflect similarities and differences in the generating processes between these volcanic systems. In particular, we tried to characterize the time series of the number of events and of the seismic energy release in terms of stochastic, deterministic, and chaotic components. The time sequences from each area consist of thousands of earthquakes that allow a detailed quantitative analysis and comparison. The results obtained showed no evidence for either deterministic or chaotic components in the earthquake sequences in Long Valley caldera, which appears to be dominated by stochastic behavior. In contrast, earthquake sequences at Phlegrean Fields and Mount Vesuvius show a deterministic signal mainly consisting of a 24-hour periodicity. Our analysis suggests that the modulation in seismicity is in some way related to thermal diurnal processes, rather than luni-solar tidal effects. Independently from the process that generates these periodicities on the seismicity., it is suggested that the lack (or presence) of diurnal cycles is seismic swarms of volcanic areas could be closely linked to the presence (or lack) of magma motion.

  18. Seismic and satellite observations of calving activity at major glacier fronts in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danesi, Stefania; Salimbeni, Simone; Urbini, Stefano; Pondrelli, Silvia; Margheriti, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between oceans and large outlet glaciers in polar regions contributes to the budget of the global water cycle. We have observed the dynamic of sizeable outlet glaciers in Greenland by the analysis of seismic data collected by the regional seismic network Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network (GLISN) trying also to find out correspondence in the glacier tongue evolution derived by the observation of satellite images. By studying the long-period seismic signals at stations located at the mouth of large fjords (e.g. ILULI, NUUG, KULLO), we identify major calving events through the detection of the ground flexure in response to seiche waves generated by iceberg detachments. 
For the time spanning the period between 2010-2014, we fill out calving-event catalogues which can be useful for the estimation of spatial and temporal variations in volume of ice loss at major active fronts in Greenland.

  19. Seismic evidence for active underplating below the megathrust earthquake zone in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hisanori; Takeda, Tetsuya; Obara, Kazushige; Kasahara, Keiji

    2010-07-09

    Determining the structure of subduction zones is important for understanding mechanisms for the generation of interplate phenomena such as megathrust earthquakes. The peeling off of the uppermost part of a subducting slab and accretion to the bottom of an overlying plate (underplating) at deep regions has been inferred from exhumed metamorphic rocks and deep seismic imaging, but direct seismic evidence of this process is lacking. By comparing seismic reflection profiles with microearthquake distributions in central Japan, we show that repeating microearthquakes occur along the bottom interface of the layer peeling off from the subducting Philippine Sea plate. This region coincides with the location of slow-slip events that may serve as signals for monitoring active underplating.

  20. High-resolution seismic-reflection and marine-magnetic data from offshore central California--San Gregorio to Point Sur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Watt, Janet T.; Scheirer, Daniel S.; Allwardt, Parker; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution seismic-reflection data on four surveys (S-N1-09-MB, S-15-10-NC, S-06-11-MB, and S-04-12-MB) and marine-magnetic data on one survey (S-06-11-MB) between 2009 and 2012, offshore of central California between San Gregorio and Point Sur. This work was supported in part by the California Seafloor Mapping Program. The survey areas span about 120 km of California's coast (including Monterey Bay). Most data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey R/V Parke Snavely. Cumulatively, approximately 1,410 km of single-channel seismic-reflection data were acquired, mainly using a SIG 2mille minisparker. About 44 km of data were collected simultaneously using an EdgeTech Chirp 512. Subbottom acoustic penetration spanned tens to several hundreds of meters, variable by location. Marine magnetic data were collected on approximately 460 km of track lines (mainly in southern Monterey Bay) using a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. This report includes maps and navigation files of the surveyed transects, linked to Google Earth™ software, as well as digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y and JPEG formats. The images of bedrock, sediment deposits, and tectonic structure provide geologic information that is essential to hazard assessment, regional sediment management, and coastal and marine spatial planning at Federal, State and local levels, as well as to future research on the geomorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and climatic record of central California.

  1. Crustal root beneath the Rif Cordillera as imaged from both active seismic data and teleseismic receiver functions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Jordi; Gil, Alba; Gallart, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon; Harnafi, Mimoun; Levander, Alan

    2015-04-01

    The Rif cordillera forms, together with the Betic ranges, one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth. This continental boundary zone is dominated now by the slow convergence between Nubia and Eurasia, but with clear evidences of extensional tectonics. One of the missing elements to constrain the complex geodynamics of the Gibraltar Arc System is the knowledge of the crustal architecture beneath northern Morocco. In the last decade a major effort has been done in this sense, from active and passive seismics. We compile here the recent results available from the Rif domains. Two 330 km long wide angle DSS profiles were recorded end of 2011 across the Rif in NS and EW transects within the Rifsis project, complemented by onshore recordings of the Gassis-WestMed marine profiles. At the same period, BB seismic arrays were deployed in the area within Topo-Iberia and Picasso projects, allowing receiver function analyses of crustal depths. The ray-tracing modeling of the Rifsis profiles reveal a large Moho step and an area of crustal thickening both in EW and NS directions, grossly coincident with the Bouguer gravity anomalies. The deployment logistics allowed that all the stations recorded all the shots, thus providing useful offline data. We will use here all available in-line and offline data to provide a map of the crustal thickness in northern Morocco. We combined two approaches: i) a hyperbolic time reduction applied to the seismic data, resulting in low-fold stacks in which the reflections from the Moho should appear as subhorizontal lines; ii) the arrival times of the observed PmP phases allow, assuming a mean crustal velocity, to assign a midpoint crustal thickness to each lecture. Although some uncertainties may be inherent to those approaches, a large crustal root, reaching more than 50 km, is well documented in the central part of the Rif Cordillera, close to the zone where the Alboran slab may still be attached to the lithosphere. We also compared these results

  2. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  3. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  4. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine... SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Fourteenth Coast Guard District § 3.70-20 Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone....

  5. Characterising Seismicity at Alutu, an Actively Deforming Volcano in the Main Ethiopian Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, M.; Nowacki, A.; Kendall, J. M.; Wookey, J. M.; Biggs, J.; Bastow, I. D.; Ayele, A.; Bedada, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) provides a unique example of the tectonic and volcanic processes occuring during the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading. Situated 100 km south of Addis Ababa along the eastern rift margin, Alutu is a silicic stratovolcano that geodetic measurements (InSAR and GPS) have shown is actively deforming. Though the volcano has received relatively little scientific attention it is also a site of economic significance as a geothermal power plant resides within the caldera. As part of ARGOS (Alutu Research Geophysical ObservationS), a multi-disciplinary project aiming to investigate the magmatic and hydrothermal processes occuring at Alutu, a seismic network of 12 broadband seismometers was deployed in January 2012. Other components of ARGOS include InSAR, GPS, geologic mapping and magnetotellurics. From the seismic dataset, P- and S-wave arrivals across the array were manually picked and used to locate events using a non-linear earthquake location algorithm (NonLinLoc) and a predefined 1D velocity model. Perturbations were later applied to this velocity model to investigate the sensitivity of the locations and evaluate the true uncertainties of the solutions. Over 1000 events were successfully located during 2012, where picks were possible at 4 or more stations. Seismicity clusters at both shallow depths (z<2 km) beneath the caldera and at deeper depths of 5-15 km. There is a significant increase in seismicity during the rainy months, suggesting the shallow events may be related to the hydrothermal system. We interpret the deeper events as being magmatic in origin. Events are also located along the eastern border faults that bound the outer edges of the MER and highlights that seismicity arises concurrently via tectonic processes. An adapted version of Richter's original local magnitude scale (ML) to account for attenuation within the MER (Keir et al., 2006) was then used to compute magnitudes for the best located events

  6. Ice motion and seismic activity on a steep temporate glacier tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalban Canassy, Pierre; Faillettaz, Jerome; Funk, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Ice motion and seismic activity on a steep temporate glacier (Triftgletscher, Bernese Alps, Switzerland) Pierre Dalban Canassy*, Jerome Faillettaz* and Martin Funk* * Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW), ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland (dalban@vaw.baug.ethz.ch) In the last 15 years Triftgletscher (Bernese Alps, Switzerland) has substantially retreated (several hundreds of meters) from the riegel and a proglacial lake containing 6.106 m3 water has been formed in the glacier forefield. Because of the glacier retreat, especially the thinning of the lower flat tongue, the stability of the steep section behind it is affected. The consequence is that the likelihood of large ice avalanches starting from the steep section will increase. The recent intensive glacier thinning in the lower tongue area of 6-10 m.a-1 has even worsened the situation because the runout path of the ice avalanches has become steeper. Ice avalanches with several millions of m3 triggering impulse waves by plunguing into the lake can be the consequence. The aim of our study is to improve the understanding of the mechanisms leading to such instabilities and to develop a predictive method based on both seismic and photogrammetric surveys. The seismic recording is performed with help of 3 geophones installed on the rock on both sides of the serac fall allowing a continuous record. We are able to highlight seismic events by applying an automatic detection procedure, to locate their sources and also to evaluate the released energy of each detected icequake. The most part of these events are due to crack openings and falls of ice chunks, but we could also isolate specific events corresponding to stick-slip motions. The latter seem to play a significant role in the destabilization of the ice mass and represent valuable precursors to break-off episodes. The 2D picture analysis is achieved by analysing photographs taken every day at the same time by an automatic camera installed in

  7. Seismic activity triggered by water wells in the Paraná Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AssumpçãO, Marcelo; Yamabe, Tereza H.; Barbosa, José Roberto; Hamza, Valiya; Lopes, Afonso E. V.; Balancin, Lucas; Bianchi, Marcelo B.

    2010-07-01

    Triggered seismicity is commonly associated with deep water reservoirs or injection wells where water is injected at high pressure into the reservoir rock. However, earth tremors related solely to the opening of groundwater wells are extremely rare. Here we present a clear case of seismicity induced by pore-pressure changes following the drilling of water wells that exploit a confined aquifer in the intracratonic Paraná Basin of southeastern Brazil. Since 2004, shallow seismic activity, with magnitudes up to 2.9 and intensities V MM, has been observed near deep wells (120-200 m) that were drilled in early 2003 near the town of Bebedouro. The wells were drilled for irrigation purposes, cross a sandstone layer about 60-80 m thick and extract water from a confined aquifer in fractured zones between basalt flow layers. Seismic activity, mainly event swarms, has occurred yearly since 2004, mostly during the rainy season when the wells are not pumped. During the dry season when the wells are pumped almost continuously, the activity is very low. A seismographic network, installed in March 2005, has located more than 2000 microearthquakes. The events are less than 1 km deep (mostly within the 0.5 km thick basalt layer) and cover an area roughly 1.5 km × 5 km across. The seismicity generally starts in a small area and expands to larger distances with an equivalent hydraulic diffusivity ranging from 0.06 to 0.6 m2/s. Geophysical and geothermal logging of several wells in the area showed that water from the shallow sandstone aquifer enters the well at the top and usually forms waterfalls. The waterfalls flow down the sides of the wells and feed the confined, fractured aquifer in the basalt layer at the bottom. Two seismic areas are observed: the main area surrounds several wells that are pumped continuously during the dry season, and a second area near another well (about 10 km from the first area) that is not used for irrigation and not pumped regularly. The main area

  8. Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.; Moldovan, Iren; Voiculescu, Mirela; Balasis, George; Lichtenberger, Janos; Heilig, Balazs; Kovacs, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We present a project devoted to the scientific exploitation of SWARM multi-point measurements of the magnetic and electric field, of the electron temperature and density in the ionosphere. These data provide unique opportunities to study in-situ and remotely the electromagnetic and plasma variability due to ionospheric forcing from above and below. The project "Electric, Magnetic and Ionospheric Survey of Seismically Active Regions with SWARM (EMISSARS)" focus on coordinated studies between SWARM and ground based observatories to survey electromagnetic and ionospheric variability at medium latitudes and look for possible correlations with the seismic activity in central Europe. The project is coordinated by the Institute for Space Sciences (INFLPR-ISS) and the National Institute for Earth Physics (INFP) in Bucharest, Romania. In addition to SWARM data the project benefits from support of dedicated ground based measurements provided by the MEMFIS network coordinated by INFP, the MM100 network of magnetic observatories coordinated by the Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary (MFGI) in Budapest. Seismic data are provided by INFP and the European Mediterranean Seismological Center. The mission of the project is to monitor from space and from ground the ionospheric and electromagnetic variability during time intervals prior, during and after seismic activity in (i) the seismic active regions of the central Europe and (ii) in regions unaffected by the seismic activity. The latter will provide reference measurements, free from possible seismogenic signals. The scientific objectives of the project are: (1) Observation of electric, magnetic and ionospheric (electron temperature, density) variability in the ionosphere above or in the close vicinity of seismic active regions, in conjunction with ground based observations from dedicated networks; (2) Investigation of the coupling between the litosphere - atmosphere - ionosphere, during Earthquakes; (3) Quantitative

  9. Human activities change marine ecosystems by altering predation risk.

    PubMed

    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Dill, Lawrence M; Ridlon, April D; Heithaus, Michael R; Warner, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    In ocean ecosystems, many of the changes in predation risk - both increases and decreases - are human-induced. These changes are occurring at scales ranging from global to local and across variable temporal scales. Indirect, risk-based effects of human activity are known to be important in structuring some terrestrial ecosystems, but these impacts have largely been neglected in oceans. Here, we synthesize existing literature and data to explore multiple lines of evidence that collectively suggest diverse human activities are changing marine ecosystems, including carbon storage capacity, in myriad ways by altering predation risk. We provide novel, compelling evidence that at least one key human activity, overfishing, can lead to distinct, cascading risk effects in natural ecosystems whose magnitude exceeds that of presumed lethal effects and may account for previously unexplained findings. We further discuss the conservation implications of human-caused indirect risk effects. Finally, we provide a predictive framework for when human alterations of risk in oceans should lead to cascading effects and outline a prospectus for future research. Given the speed and extent with which human activities are altering marine risk landscapes, it is crucial that conservation and management policy considers the indirect effects of these activities in order to increase the likelihood of success and avoid unfortunate surprises.

  10. Study of Seismic Activity Using Geophysical and Radio Physical Equipment for Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvavadze, N.; Tsereteli, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most dangerous and destructive natural hazards are earthquakes, which is confirmed by recent earthquakes such as Nepal 2015, Japan and Turkey 2011. Because of this, study of seismic activity is important. Studying any process, it is necessary to use different methods of observation, which allows us to increase accuracy of obtained data. Seismic activity is a complex problem and its study needs different types of observation methods. Two main problems of seismic activity study are: reliable instrumental observations and earthquake short-term predictions. In case of seismic risks it is necessary to have reliable accelerometer data. One of the most promising field in earthquake short-term prediction is very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic wave propagation in ionosphere observation. To study Seismic activity of Caucasus region, was created observation complex using Accelerometer, Velocimeter and VLF electromagnetic waves received from communication stations (located in different area of the world) reflected from low ionosphere. System is created and operates at Tbilisi State University Ionosphere Observatory, near Tbilisi in Tabakhmela 42.41'70 N, 44.80'92 E, Georgia. Data obtained is sent to a local server located at M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics, TSU, for storage and processing. Diagram for complex is presented. Also data analysis methods were created and preliminary processing was done. In this paper we present some of the results: Earthquake data from ionosphere observations as well as local earthquakes recorded with accelerometer and velocimeter. Complex is first in 6 that will be placed around Georgia this year. We plan on widening network every year.

  11. Temporal variation of mass-wasting activity in Mount St. Helens crater, Washington, U. S. A. indicated by seismic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, H.H. )

    1991-11-01

    In the crater of Mount St. Helens, formed during the eruption of 18 May 1980, thousands of rockfalls may occur in a single day, and some rock and dirty-snow avalanches have traveled more than 1 km from their source. Because most seismic activity in the crater is produced by mass wasting, the former can be used to monitor the latter. The number and amplitude of seismic events per unit time provide a generalized measure of mass-wasting activity. In this study 1-min averages of seismic amplitudes were used as an index of rockfall activity during summer and early fall. Plots of this index show the diurnal cycle of rockfall activity and establish that the peak in activity occurs in mid to late afternoon. A correlation coefficient of 0.61 was found between daily maximum temperature and average seismic amplitude, although this value increases to 0.72 if a composite temperature variable that includes the maximum temperature of 1 to 3 preceding days as well as the present day is used. Correlation with precipitation is much weaker.

  12. 76 FR 49737 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... (MBES) and a sub-bottom profiler (SBP) continuously throughout the survey. Acoustic stimuli (i.e..., depending on logistics and weather. The seismic survey will collect seismic reflection and refraction... overlying sediments. Acoustic velocities (required to convert measured travel times to true depth) will...

  13. 76 FR 26255 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...) and a sub-bottom profiler (SBP) continuously throughout the survey. Acoustic stimuli (i.e., increased... logistics and weather. The proposed seismic survey will collect seismic reflection and refraction data to... streamers will receive the returning acoustic signals and transfer the data to the on-board...

  14. 76 FR 33246 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... throughout the survey. Acoustic stimuli (i.e., increased underwater sound) generated during the operation of... logistics and weather. The proposed seismic survey will collect seismic reflection and refraction profiles... sediments. Acoustic velocities (required to convert measured travel times to true depth) will be...

  15. Testing the recent Santorini seismic activity for possible tidal triggering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Dimitrios N.; Vergos, George

    2013-04-01

    Applying the Hi(stogram)Cum(ulation) method, which was introduced recently by Cadicheanu, van Ruymbecke and Zhu (2007), we analyze the series of the earthquakes occurred in the last 50 years in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ). The result of the analysis for all the areas indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations and the same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence and we check if the recent increase in the seismic activity at the Santorini island complex indicate that the faults Kameni and Columbo (to which the seismicity is clustered) (Chouliaras et al. 2013) are mature for a stronger earthquake. In this paper we present the results of this test. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M andZhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the seismic area of Mygdonia basin, North Greece, in

  16. Seismic structure off the Kii Peninsula, Japan, deduced from passive- and active-source seismographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kaiho, Yuka; Obana, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Ayako; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-01

    We conduct seismic tomography to model subsurface seismicity between 2010 and 2012 and structural heterogeneity off the Kii Peninsula, southwestern Japan, and to investigate their relationships with segmentation of the Nankai and Tonankai seismogenic zones of the Nankai Trough. In order to constrain both the shallow and deep structure of the offshore seismogenic segments, we use both active- and passive-source data recorded by both ocean-bottom seismometers and land seismic stations. The relocated microearthquakes indicate a lack of seismic activity in the Tonankai seismogenic segment off Kumano, whereas there was active intraslab seismicity in the Kii Channel area of the Nankai seismogenic segment. Based on comparisons among the distribution of seismicity, age, and spreading rate of the subducting Philippine Sea plate, and the slip-deficit distribution, we conclude that seismicity in the subducting slab under the Kii Channel region nucleated from structures in the Philippine Sea slab that pre-date subduction and that fluids released by dehydration are related to decreased interplate coupling of these intraslab earthquakes. Our velocity model clearly shows the areal extent of two key structures reported in previous 2-D active-source surveys: a high-velocity zone beneath Cape Shionomisaki and a subducted seamount off Cape Muroto, both of which are roughly circular and of 15-20 km radius. The epicenters of the 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes are near the edge of the high-velocity body beneath Cape Shionomisaki, suggesting that this anomalous structure is related to the nucleation of these two earthquakes. We identify several other high- and low-velocity zones immediately above the plate boundary in the Tonankai and Nankai seismogenic segments. In comparison with the slip-deficit model, some of the low-velocity zones appear to correspond to an area of strong coupling. Our observations suggest that, unlike the Japan Trench subduction zone, in our study area

  17. Active faulting in low- to moderate-seismicity regions: the SAFE project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebrier, M.; Safe Consortium

    2003-04-01

    SAFE (Slow Active Faults in Europe) is an EC-FP5 funded multidisciplinary effort which proposes an integrated European approach in identifying and characterizing active faults as input for evaluating seismic hazard in low- to moderate-seismicity regions. Seismically active western European regions are generally characterized by low hazard but high risk, due to the concentration of human and material properties with high vulnerability. Detecting, and then analysing, tectonic deformations that may lead to destructive earthquakes in such areas has to take into account three major limitations: - the typical climate of western Europe (heavy vegetation cover and/or erosion) ; - the subdued geomorphic signature of slowly deforming faults ; - the heavy modification of landscape by human activity. The main objective of SAFE, i.e., improving the assessment of seismic hazard through understanding of the mechanics and recurrence of active faults in slowly deforming regions, is achieved through four major steps : (1) extending geologic and geomorphic investigations of fault activity beyond the Holocene to take into account various time-windows; (2) developing an expert system that combines diverse lines of geologic, seismologic, geomorphic, and geophysical evidence to diagnose the existence and seismogenic potential of slow active faults; (3) delineating and characterising high seismic risk areas of western Europe, either from historical or geological/geomorphic evidence; (4) demonstrating and discussing the impact of the project results on risk assessment through a seismic scenario in the Basel-Mulhouse pilot area. To take properly into account known differences in source behavior, these goals are pursued both in extensional (Lower and Upper Rhine Graben, Catalan Coast) and compressional tectonic settings (southern Upper Rhine Graben, Po Plain, and Provence). Two arid compressional regions (SE Spain and Moroccan High Atlas) have also been selected to address the limitations

  18. Analysis of Seismic Activity of the last 15 Years Nearby Puerto Rico and Caribbean Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Torres-Ortíz, D. M.; Fernández-Heredia, A. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    An earthquake catalog of the seismicity occurred during the last 15 years in the Caribbean region, nearby the vicinity of Puerto Rico Island (PRI) was compiled in order to capture the big picture of the regional seismic activity ratio and in particular at the epicentral regions of several historical and instrumentally recorded (during 2008-20015) large to moderate magnitude earthquakes occurred nearby PRI in onshore and offshore, which include the M6.4 earthquake of 01/13/2014, the largest earthquake recorded instrumentally nearby PRI. From the point of view of joint temporal-spatial distribution of epicenters, episodic temporal-spatial seismic activity is clearly seen as temporal-spatial concentrations during certain time intervals in different regions. These localized concentrations of epicenters that occur during certain time intervals in well localized/concentrated regions may suggest "seismic gaps" that shows no regular time interval, neither spatial pattern. In the epicentral region of the M6.4 01/13/2014 earthquake and the historical Mona Passage M7.5 earthquake of 10/11/1918, episodic concentrations in time and space of small magnitude earthquakes epicenters is evident, however do not show temporal pattern. Preliminary results of statistical analysis of an ongoing research in terms of the parameter b (Gutenberg-Richter relationship), and the Omori's law with the aim to relate the tectonic framework of the region (or sub-regions) such as structural heterogeneity stress are here presented/discussed.

  19. Seismic Spatial Autocorrelation as a Technique to Track Changes in the Permafrost Active Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present preliminary results from an effort to continuously track freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer using a small-aperture seismic array. The 7-element array of three-component posthole seismometers is installed on permafrost at Poker Flat Research Range, near Fairbanks, Alaska. The array is configured in two three-station circles with 75 and 25 meter radii that share a common center station. This configuration is designed to resolve omnidirectional, high-frequency seismic microtremor (i.e. ambient noise). Microtremor is continuously monitored and the data are processed using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. The resulting SPAC coefficients are then inverted for shear-wave velocity structure versus depth. Thawed active-layer soils have a much slower seismic velocity than frozen soils, allowing us to track the depth and intensity of thawing. Persistent monitoring on a permanent array would allow for a way to investigate year-to-year changes without costly site visits. Results from the seismic array will compared to, and correlated with, other measurement techniques, such as physical probing and remote sensing methods. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  1. Evaluation of seismic hazard of the Gökova bay in terms of seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkoç, Ebru Aktepe; Uluǧ, Atilla

    2016-04-01

    While discovering the seismicity of our country, knowing the array of earthquake occurrence which reflects the characteristic tectonic features of each region makes vital contributions to the earthquakes that have occurred and to the pursuit of the processes which might occur in the future. When considering the region's seismic activity, the presence of active faults that create earthquake within the bay is obvious. Many active fault parts in the Gulf of Gökova region continues their seismic activity with the opening effect that is generally prevailing in Western Anatolia. The region has generally been continuing its seismic activity under the control of normal faults. Considering the marine studies that are made and marine continuity of the faults which are on land in addition to the seismological and tectonic studies, the determination of seismic hazard in the Gulf of Gökova and its surroundings is also important in terms of introducing the earthquake scenarios with minimized errors.

  2. Wide-angle Marine Seismic Refraction Imaging of Vertical Faults: Pre-Stack Turning Wave Migrations of Synthetic Data and Implications for Survey Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, N. C.; Lizarralde, D.; McGuire, J.; Hole, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    We consider methodologies, including survey design and processing algorithms, which are best suited to imaging vertical reflectors in oceanic crust using marine seismic techniques. The ability to image the reflectivity structure of transform faults as a function of depth, for example, may provide new insights into what controls seismicity along these plate boundaries. Turning-wave migration has been used with success to image vertical faults on land. With synthetic datasets we find that this approach has unique difficulties in the deep ocean. The fault-reflected crustal refraction phase (Pg-r) typically used in pre-stack migrations is difficult to isolate in marine seismic data. An "imagable" Pg-r is only observed in a time window between the first arrivals and arrivals from the sediments and the thick, slow water layer at offsets beyond ~25 km. Ocean- bottom seismometers (OBSs), as opposed to a long surface streamer, must be used to acquire data suitable for crustal-scale vertical imaging. The critical distance for Moho reflections (PmP) in oceanic crust is also ~25 km, thus Pg-r and PmP-r are observed with very little separation, and the fault-reflected mantle refraction (Pn-r) arrives prior to Pg-r as the observation window opens with increased OBS-to-fault distance. This situation presents difficulties for "first-arrival" based Kirchoff migration approaches and suggests that wave- equation approaches, which in theory can image all three phases simultaneously, may be more suitable for vertical imaging in oceanic crust. We will present a comparison of these approaches as applied to a synthetic dataset generated from realistic, stochastic velocity models. We will assess their suitability, the migration artifacts unique to the deep ocean, and the ideal instrument layout for such an experiment.

  3. Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) Regulatory Networks in Marine Organisms: From Physiological Observations towards Marine Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Orlikova, Barbora; Diederich, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Part of our ocean’s richness comes from its extensive history of supporting life, resulting in a highly diverse ecological system. To date, over 250,000 species of marine organisms have been identified, but it is speculated that the actual number of marine species exceeds one million, including several hundreds of millions of species of marine microorganisms. Past studies suggest that approximately 70% of all deep-sea microorganisms, gorgonians, and sea sponges produce secondary metabolites with anti-cancer activities. Recently, novel FDA-approved drugs derived from marine sponges have been shown to reduce metastatic breast cancer, malignant lymphoma, and Hodgkin’s disease. Despite the fact that many marine natural products have been shown to possess a good inhibition potential against most of the cancer-related cell signaling pathways, only a few marine natural products have been shown to target JAK/STAT signaling. In the present paper, we describe the JAK/STAT signaling pathways found in marine organisms, before elaborating on the recent advances in the field of STAT inhibition by marine natural products and the potential application in anti-cancer drug discovery. PMID:26262624

  4. Seismicity characteristics of a potentially active Quaternary volcano: The Tatun Volcano Group, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos I.; Lin, Cheng-Horng; Liang, Wen-Tzong

    2007-02-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group (TVG) is located at the northern tip of Taiwan, near the capital Taipei and close to two nuclear power plants. Because of lack of any activity in historical times it has been classified as an extinct volcano, even though more recent studies suggest that TVG might have been active during the last 20 ka. In May 2003 a seismic monitoring project at the TVG area was initiated by deploying eight three-component seismic stations some of them equipped with both short-period and broadband sensors. During the 18 months observation period local seismicity mainly consisted of high frequency earthquakes either occurring as isolated events, or as a continuous sequence in the form of spasmodic bursts. Mixed and low frequency events were also present during the same period, even though they occurred only rarely. Arrival times from events with clear P-/S-wave phases were inverted in order to obtain a minimum 1D velocity model with station corrections. Probabilistic nonlinear earthquake locations were calculated for all these events using the newly derived velocity model. Most high frequency seismicity appeared to be concentrated near the areas of hydrothermal activity, forming tight clusters at depths shallower than 4 km. Relative locations, calculated using the double-difference method and utilising catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltimes, showed insignificant differences when compared to the nonlinear probabilistic locations. In general, seismicity in the TVG area seems to be primarily driven by circulation of hydrothermal fluids as indicated by the occurrence of spasmodic bursts, mixed/low frequency events and a b-value (1.17 ± 0.1) higher than in any other part of Taiwan. These observations, that are similar to those reported in other dormant Quaternary volcanoes, indicate that a magma chamber may still exist beneath TVG and that a future eruption or period of unrest should not be considered unlikely.

  5. Grazing-activated chemical defence in a unicellular marine alga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Steinke, Michael; Kirst, Gunter O.

    1997-06-01

    Marine plankton use a variety of defences against predators, some of which affect trophic structure and biogeochemistry. We have previously shown that, during grazing by the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina on the alga Emiliania huxleyi, dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) from the prey is converted to dimethyl sulphide (DMS) when lysis of ingested prey cells initiates mixing of algal DMSP and the enzyme DMSP lyase. Such a mechanism is similar to macrophyte defence reactions,. Here we show that this reaction deters protozoan herbivores, presumably through the production of highly concentrated acrylate, which has antimicrobial activity. Protozoan predators differ in their ability to ingest and survive on prey with high-activity DMSP lyase, but all grazers preferentially select strains with low enzyme activity when offered prey mixtures. This defence system involves investment in a chemical precursor, DMSP, which is not self-toxic and has other useful metabolic functions. We believe this is the first report of grazing-activated chemical defence in unicellular microorganisms.

  6. Joint analysis of infrasound and seismic signals by cross wavelet transform: detection of Mt. Etna explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.; Patanè, D.

    2013-06-01

    The prompt detection of explosive volcanic activity is crucial since this kind of activity can release copious amounts of volcanic ash and gases into the atmosphere, causing severe dangers to aviation. In this work, we show how the joint analysis of seismic and infrasonic data by wavelet transform coherence (WTC) can be useful to detect explosive activity, significantly enhancing its recognition that is normally done by video cameras and thermal sensors. Indeed, the efficiency of these sensors can be reduced (or inhibited) in the case of poor visibility due to clouds or gas plumes. In particular, we calculated the root mean square (RMS) of seismic and infrasonic signals recorded at Mt. Etna during 2011. This interval was characterised by several episodes of lava fountains, accompanied by lava effusion, and minor strombolian activities. WTC analysis showed significantly high values of coherence between seismic and infrasonic RMS during explosive activity, with infrasonic and seismic series in phase with each other, hence proving to be sensitive to both weak and strong explosive activity. The WTC capability of automatically detecting explosive activity was compared with the potential of detection methods based on fixed thresholds of seismic and infrasonic RMS. Finally, we also calculated the cross correlation function between seismic and infrasonic signals, which showed that the wave types causing such seismo-acoustic relationship are mainly incident seismic and infrasonic waves, likely with a common source.

  7. Seismic detection of an active subglacial magmatic complex in Marie Byrd Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lough, Amanda C.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Grace Barcheck, C.; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Aster, Richard C.; Blankenship, Donald D.; Huerta, Audrey D.; Nyblade, Andrew; Young, Duncan A.; Wilson, Terry J.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous volcanoes exist in Marie Byrd Land, a highland region of West Antarctica. High heat flow through the crust in this region may influence the stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Volcanic activity progressed from north to south in the Executive Committee mountain range between the Miocene and Holocene epochs, but there has been no evidence for recent magmatic activity. Here we use a recently deployed seismic network to show that in 2010 and 2011, two swarms of seismic activity occurred at 25-40km depth beneath subglacial topographic and magnetic highs, located 55km south of the youngest subaerial volcano in the Executive Committee Range. We interpret the swarm events as deep long-period earthquakes based on their unusual frequency content. Such earthquakes occur beneath active volcanoes, are caused by deep magmatic activity and, in some cases, precede eruptions. We also use radar profiles to identify a prominent ash layer in the ice overlying the seismic swarm. Located at 1,400m depth, the ash layer is about 8,000years old and was probably sourced from the nearby Mount Waesche volcano. Together, these observations provide strong evidence for ongoing magmatic activity and demonstrate that volcanism continues to migrate southwards along the Executive Committee Range. Eruptions at this site are unlikely to penetrate the 1.2 to 2-km-thick overlying ice, but would generate large volumes of melt water that could significantly affect ice stream flow.

  8. 75 FR 49709 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Shell Offshore Inc. (Shell) to take, by harassment, small numbers of 8 species of marine mammals incidental to a marine survey program, which includes site clearance and shallow hazards, ice gouge, and strudel scour surveys,......

  9. Seismic activity in the Sunnyside mining district, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah, during 1968

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunrud, C. Richard; Maberry, John O.; Hernandez, Jerome H.

    1970-01-01

    More than 20,000 local earth tremors were recorded by the seismic monitoring network in the Sunnyside mining district during 1968. This is about 40 percent of the number of tremors recorded by the network in 1967. In 1968 a total of 281 tremors were of sufficient magnitude to be located accurately--about 50 percent of the number of tremors in 1967 that were located accurately. As in previous years, nearly all the earth tremors originated near, or within a few thousand feet of, the mine workings. This distribution indicates that mine-induced stress changes caused most of the seismic activity. However, over periods of weeks and months there were significant changes in the distribution of seismic activity caused by tremors that were not directly related to mining but probably were caused by adjustment of natural stresses 6r by a complex combination of both natural and mine-induced stress changes. In 1968 the distribution of tremor hypocenters varied considerably with time, relative to active mining areas and to faults present in the mine workings. During the first 6 months, most tremors originated along or near faults that trend close to or through the active mine workings. However, in the last 6 months, the tremor hypocenters tended to concentrate in the rock mass closer to, or around, the active mining areas. This shift in concentration of seismic activity with time has been noted throughout the district many times since recording began in 1963, and is apparently caused by spontaneous releases of stored strain energy resulting from mine-induced stress changes. These spontaneous releases of strain energy, together with rock creep, apparently are the mechanism of adjustment within the rock mass toward equilibrium conditions, which are continually disrupted by mining. Although potentially hazardous bumps were rare in the Sunnyside mining district during 1968, smaller bumps and rock falls were more common in a given active mining area whenever hypocenters of larger

  10. Microbial activity in the marine deep biosphere: progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Beth N.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Colwell, Frederick S.; Glazer, Brian T.; Reese, Brandi Kiel; Kirkpatrick, John B.; Lapham, Laura L.; Mills, Heath J.; Sylvan, Jason B.; Wankel, Scott D.; Wheat, C. Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The vast marine deep biosphere consists of microbial habitats within sediment, pore waters, upper basaltic crust and the fluids that circulate throughout it. A wide range of temperature, pressure, pH, and electron donor and acceptor conditions exists—all of which can combine to affect carbon and nutrient cycling and result in gradients on spatial scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. Diverse and mostly uncharacterized microorganisms live in these habitats, and potentially play a role in mediating global scale biogeochemical processes. Quantifying the rates at which microbial activity in the subsurface occurs is a challenging endeavor, yet developing an understanding of these rates is essential to determine the impact of subsurface life on Earth's global biogeochemical cycles, and for understanding how microorganisms in these “extreme” environments survive (or even thrive). Here, we synthesize recent advances and discoveries pertaining to microbial activity in the marine deep subsurface, and we highlight topics about which there is still little understanding and suggest potential paths forward to address them. This publication is the result of a workshop held in August 2012 by the NSF-funded Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) “theme team” on microbial activity (www.darkenergybiosphere.org). PMID:23874326

  11. Newly identified active faults in the Pollino seismic gap, southern Italy, and their seismotectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Cirillo, Daniele; de Nardis, Rita; Cardinali, Mauro; Lavecchia, Giusy; Orecchio, Barbara; Presti, Debora; Totaro, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The following is a geological study of a Quaternary and active normal fault-system, which crops out in the Pollino area, a seismogenic sector of the Southern Apennines, Italy. From 2010 to 2014, this area was affected by long lasting seismic activity characterized by three major events which occurred in May 2012 (Mw 4.3), in October 2012 (Mw 5.2) and in June 2014 (Mw 4.0). The integration of structural-geological data with morpho-structural and remote sensing analyses, led to define the geometry, the kinematics, the cross-cutting relationships and the slip rates of the inferred active fault segments within and near the epicentral area. We reconstructed an asymmetric extensional pattern characterized by low-angle, E and NNE-dipping faults, and by antithetic, high-angle, SW- to WSW-dipping faults. The geometry of the faults at depth was constrained using high-resolution hypocenter distributions. The overall system fits well with the deformation field obtained from focal mechanisms and geodetic data. Comparing the fault pattern with the time-space evolution of the Pollino seismic activity, we identified the seismogenic sources in two, near-parallel, WSW-dipping faults, whose seismogenic potential were assessed. The peculiar perpendicular-to-fault-strike evolution of the seismic activity, is discussed in the frame of the reconstructed seismotectonic model.

  12. Seismicity and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano, Guatemala: February 1975 -January 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuan, A.T.E.; McNutt, S.R.; Harlow, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    We examine seismic and eruptive activity at Fuego Volcano (14??29???N, 90?? 53???W), a 3800-m-high stratovolcano located in the active volcanic arc of Guatemala. Eruptions at Fuego are typically short-lived vulcanian eruptions producing ash falls and ash flows of high-alumina basalt. From February 1975 to December 1976, five weak ash eruptions occurred, accompanied by small earthquake swarms. Between 0 and 140 (average ??? 10) A-type or high-frequency seismic events per day with M > 0.5 were recorded during this period. Estimated thermal energies for each eruption are greater by a factor of 106 than cumulative seismic energies, a larger ratio than that reported for other volcanoes. Over 4000 A-type events were recorded January 3-7, 1977 (cumulative seismic energy ??? 109 joules), yet no eruption occurred. Five 2-hour-long pulses of intense seismicity separated by 6-hour intervals of quiescence accounted for the majority of events. Maximum likelihood estimates of b-values range from 0.7 ?? 0.2 to 2.1 ?? 0.4 with systematically lower values corresponding to the five intense pulses. The low values suggest higher stress conditions. During the 1977 swarm, a tiltmeter located 6 km southeast of Fuego recorded a 14 ?? 3 microradian tilt event (down to SW). This value is too large to represent a simple change in the elastic strain field due to the earthquake swarm. We speculate that the earthquake swarm and tilt are indicative of subsurface magma movement. ?? 1984.

  13. PRESS40: a project for involving students in active seismic risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaba, Carla; Contessi, Elisa; Rosa Girardi, Maria

    2016-04-01

    To memorialize the anniversary of the 1976 Friuli earthquake, the Istituto Statale di Istruzione Superiore "Magrini Marchetti" in Gemona del Friuli (NE Italy), with the collaboration of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS), has promoted the PRESS40 Project (Prevenzione Sismica nella Scuola a 40 anni dal terremoto del Friuli, that in English sounds like "Seismic Prevention at School 40 years later the Friuli earthquake"). The project has developed in the 2015-2016 school year, starting from the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake, and it aims to disseminate historical memory, seismic culture and awareness of seismic safety in the young generations, too often unconscious of past experiences, as recent seismic hazard perception tests have demonstrated. The basic idea of the PRESS40 Project is to involve the students in experimental activities to be active part of the seismic mitigation process. The Project is divided into two main parts, the first one in which students learn-receive knowledge from researchers, and the second one in which they teach-bring knowledge to younger students. In the first part of the project, 75 students of the "Magrini Marchetti" school acquired new geophysical data, covering the 23 municipalities from which they come from. These municipalities represent a wide area affected by the 1976 Friuli earthquake. In each locality a significant site was examined, represented by a school area. At least, 127 measurements of ambient noise have been acquired. Data processing and interpretation of all the results are still going on, under the supervision of OGS researchers.The second part of the project is planned for the early spring, when the students will present the results of geophysical survey to the younger ones of the monitored schools and to the citizens in occasion of events to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Friuli earthquake.

  14. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  15. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  16. Locadiff with ambient seismic noise : theoretical background and application to monitoring volcanoes and active faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Eric; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Rossetto, Vincent; Margerin, Ludovic; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Campillo, Michel

    2015-04-01

    This contribution will cover recent theoretical, numerical, and field data processing developments aiming at modeling how coda waves are perturbed (in phase and amplitude) by mechanical changes in the crust. Using continuous ambient seismic noise, we cross-correlate data every day and compare the coda of the correlograms. We can relative velocity changes and waveform decorrelation along the year, that are related to mechanical changes in the shallow crust, associated to the seismic or volcanic activity, but also to environmental effects such as hydrology. Bibliography : Anne Obermann, Thomas Planes, Eric Larose and Michel Campillo, Imaging pre- and co-eruptive structural changes of a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. Geophys. Res. 118 6285-6294 (2013). A. Obermann, B. Froment, M. Campillo, E. Larose, T. Planès, B. Valette, J. H. Chen, and Q. Y. Liu, Seismic noise correlations to image structural and mechanical changes associated with the Mw7.9 2008-Wenchuan earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 1-14,(2014). Thomas Planès, Eric Larose, Ludovic Margerin, Vincent Rossetto, Christoph Sens-Schoenfelder, Decorrelation and phase-shift of coda waves induced by local changes : Multiple scattering approach and numerical validation, Waves in Random and Complex Media 24, 99-125, (2014)

  17. Global earthquake catalogs and long-range correlation of seismic activity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In view of the long-term seismic activity in the world, homogeneity of a global catalog is indispensable. Lately, Engdahl and Villaseñor (2002) compiled a global earthquake catalog of magnitude (M)7.0 or larger during the last century (1900-1999). This catalog is based on the various existing catalogs such as Abe catalog (Abe, 1981, 1984; Abe and Noguchi, 1983a, b) for the world seismicity (1894-1980), its modified catalogs by Perez and Scholz (1984) and by Pacheco and Sykes (1992), and also the Harvard University catalog since 1975. However, the original surface wave magnitudes of Abe catalog were systematically changed by Perez and Scholz (1984) and Pacheco and Sykes (1992). They suspected inhomogeneity of the Abe catalog and claimed that the two seeming changes in the occurrence rate around 1922 and 1948 resulted from magnitude shifts for some instrumental-related reasons. They used a statistical test assuming that such a series of large earthquakes in the world should behave as the stationary Poisson process (uniform occurrences). It is obvious that their claim strongly depends on their a priori assumption of an independent or short-range dependence of earthquake occurrence. We question this assumption from the viewpoint of long-range dependence of seismicity. We make some statistical analyses of the spectrum, dispersion-time diagrams and R/S for estimating and testing of the long-range correlations. We also attempt to show the possibility that the apparent rate change in the global seismicity can be simulated by a certain long-range correlated process. Further, if we divide the globe into the two regions of high and low latitudes, for example, we have different shapes of the cumulative curves to each other, and the above mentioned apparent change-points disappear from the both regions. This suggests that the Abe catalog shows the genuine seismic activity rather than the artifact of the suspected magnitude shifts that should appear in any wide enough regions

  18. 78 FR 30273 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to construction activities as part of a barge mooring project. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to the Navy to take, by Level B Harassment only, four species......

  19. First seismic shear wave velocity profile of the lunar crust as extracted from the Apollo 17 active seismic data by wavefield gradient analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollberger, David; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Nakamura, Yosio; Khan, Amir

    2016-04-01

    We present a new seismic velocity model of the shallow lunar crust, including, for the first time, shear wave velocity information. So far, the shear wave velocity structure of the lunar near-surface was effectively unconstrained due to the complexity of lunar seismograms. Intense scattering and low attenuation in the lunar crust lead to characteristic long-duration reverberations on the seismograms. The reverberations obscure later arriving shear waves and mode conversions, rendering them impossible to identify and analyze. Additionally, only vertical component data were recorded during the Apollo active seismic experiments, which further compromises the identification of shear waves. We applied a novel processing and analysis technique to the data of the Apollo 17 lunar seismic profiling experiment (LSPE), which involved recording seismic energy generated by several explosive packages on a small areal array of four vertical component geophones. Our approach is based on the analysis of the spatial gradients of the seismic wavefield and yields key parameters such as apparent phase velocity and rotational ground motion as a function of time (depth), which cannot be obtained through conventional seismic data analysis. These new observables significantly enhance the data for interpretation of the recorded seismic wavefield and allow, for example, for the identification of S wave arrivals based on their lower apparent phase velocities and distinct higher amount of generated rotational motion relative to compressional (P-) waves. Using our methodology, we successfully identified pure-mode and mode-converted refracted shear wave arrivals in the complex LSPE data and derived a P- and S-wave velocity model of the shallow lunar crust at the Apollo 17 landing site. The extracted elastic-parameter model supports the current understanding of the lunar near-surface structure, suggesting a thin layer of low-velocity lunar regolith overlying a heavily fractured crust of basaltic

  20. Studies of the Correlation Between Ionospheric Anomalies and Seismic Activities in the Indian Subcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2010-10-20

    The VLF (Very Low Frequency) signals are long thought to give away important information about the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. It is recently established that the ionosphere may be perturbed due to seismic activities. The effects of this perturbation can be detected through the VLF wave amplitude. There are several methods to find this correlations and these methods can be used for the prediction of these seismic events. In this paper, first we present a brief history of the use of VLF propagation method for the study of seismo-ionospheric correlations. Then we present different methods proposed by us to find out the seismo-ionospheric correlations. At the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata we have been monitoring the VTX station at Vijayanarayanam from 2002. In the initial stage, we received 17 kHz signal and latter we received 18.2 kHz signal. In this paper, first we present the results for the 17 kHz signal during Sumatra earthquake in 2004 obtained from the terminator time analysis method. Then we present much detailed and statistical analysis using some new methods and present the results for 18.2 kHz signal. In order to establish the correlation between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what are the reference signals throughout the year. We present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators for the 18.2 kHz signal as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005 to 2008 when the solar activity was very low. In this case, the signal would primarily be affected by the Sun due to normal sunrise and sunset effects. Any deviation from this standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial (such as solar activities and other high energy phenomena). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of sixteen months and show that the correlations with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation

  1. Fault activation after vigorous eruption: the December 8, 2015 seismic swarm at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, Salvatore; Bonforte, Alessandro; Guglielmino, Francesco; Maiolino, Vincenza; Puglisi, Giuseppe; Ursino, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    From December 2, 2015, volcanic activity suddenly occurred on Mt. Etna with very violent fire fountaining at central crater, known also as "Voragine". This activity continued with other intense episodes at the same crater during the three following days and involving also, in turn, all the other three summit craters. This sudden eruption produced a rapid deflation of the volcano and was followed, from December 8, by a seismic swarm, with almost eighty earthquakes during this day, located on the uppermost segment of the Pernicana-Provenzana fault system (PFS). This seismicity was characterized by shallow foci (from few hundred meters until 1.5 km below the sea level) and mainshock with 3.6 magnitude. In order to investigate and measure the dynamics controlling and accompanying the PFS activation, a dataset composed of C-Band Sentinel-1A data has been used for SAR Interferometry (InSAR) analysis. Some interferograms have been generated from ascending and descending orbits in order to analyze both short- and long-term deformation. The availability of GPS data allowed comparing and integrating them with InSAR for ground truth and modeling aims. The surface kinematics and modeling obtained by DInSAR and GPS data and integration have been compared to the distribution of the seismicity and related focal mechanisms in order to define the fault geometry and motion. Moreover, essential constraints have been achieved about the PFS dynamic and its relationship with the intense volcanic activity occurred.

  2. Radar imaging of winter seismic survey activity in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Benjamin M.; Rykhus, Russ; Lu, Zhiming; Arp, C.D.; Selkowitz, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    During the spring of 2006, Radarsat-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery was acquired on a continual basis for the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA), in the northeast portion of the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPR-A) in order to monitor lake ice melting processes. During data processing, it was discovered that the Radarsat-1 imagery detected features associated with winter seismic survey activity. Focused analysis of the image time series revealed various aspects of the exploration process such as the grid profile associated with the seismic line surveys as well as trails and campsites associated with the mobile survey crews. Due to the high temporal resolution of the dataset it was possible to track the progress of activities over a one month period. Spaceborne SAR imagery can provide information on the location of winter seismic activity and could be used as a monitoring tool for land and resource managers as increased petroleum-based activity occurs in the TLSA and NPR-A.

  3. A Large-N Mixed Sensor Active + Passive Seismic Array near Sweetwater, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklage, M.; Hollis, D.; Gridley, J. M.; Woodward, R.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    A collaborative high-density seismic survey using broadband and short period seismic sensors was conducted March 7 - April 30, 2014 near Sweetwater, TX. The objective of the survey was to use a combination of controlled source shot slices and passive seismic recordings recorded by multiple types of sensors with different bandwidths and sensitivities to image the subsurface. The broadband component of the survey consisted of 25 continuously recording seismic stations comprised of 20 Trillium Compact Posthole sensors from Nanometrics and 5 Polar Trillium 120PHQs from the IRIS/PASSCAL Instrument Center (PIC). The broadband stations also utilized 25 Centaur digitizers from Nanometrics as well as 25 polar quick deploy enclosures from the PIC. The broadband array was designed to maximize horizontal traveling seismic energy for surface wave analysis over the primary target area with sufficient offset for imaging objectives at depth. The short period component of the survey consisted of 2639 receiver locations using Zland nodes from NodalSeismic. The nodes are further divided into 3 sub-arrays: 1) outlier array 2) active source array 3) backbone array. The outlier array consisted of 25 continuously recording nodes distributed around the edge of the survey at a distance of ~5 km from the survey boundary, and provided valuable constraints to passive data analysis techniques at the edge of the survey boundary. The active source patch consisted of densely spaced nodes that were designed to record signals from a Vibroseis source truck for active source reflection processing and imaging. The backbone array consisted of 292 nodes that covered the entirety of the survey area to maximize the value of the passive data analysis. By utilizing continuous recording and smartly designed arrays for measuring local and regional earthquakes we can incorporate velocity information derived from passive data analysis into the active source processing workflow to produce a superior subsurface

  4. Ionospheric plasma deterioration in the area of enhanced seismic activity as compared to antipodal sites far from seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaeva, Tamara; Arikan, Feza; Poustovalova, Ljubov; Stanislawska, Iwona

    2016-07-01

    The early magnetogram records from two nearly antipodal sites at Greenwich and Melbourne corresponding to the activity level at the invariant magnetic latitude of 50 deg give a long series of geomagnetic aa indices since 1868. The aa index derived from magnetic perturbation values at only two observatories (as distinct from the planetary ap index) experiences larger extreme values if either input site is well situated to the overhead ionospheric and/or field aligned current systems producing the magnetic storm effects. Analysis of the earthquakes catalogues since 1914 has shown the area of the peak global earthquake occurrence in the Pacific Ocean southwards from the magnetic equator, and, in particular, at Australia. In the present study the ionospheric critical frequency, foF2, is analyzed from the ionosonde measurements at the nearby observatories, Canberra and Slough (Chilton), and Moscow (control site) since 1944 to 2015. The daily-hourly-annual percentage occurrence of positive ionospheric W index (pW+) and negative index (pW-) is determined. It is found that the ionospheric plasma depletion pW- of the instant foF2 as compared to the monthly median is well correlated to the aa index at all three sites but the positive storm signatures show drastic difference at Canberra (no correlation of pW+ with aa index) as compared to two other sites where the high correlation is found of the ionospheric plasma density enhancement with the geomagnetic activity. A possible suppression of the enhanced ionospheric variability over the region of intense seismicity is discussed in the paper. This study is supported by TUBITAK EEEAG 115E915.

  5. Active-source seismic imaging below Lake Malawi (Nyasa) from the SEGMeNT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Accardo, N. J.; McCartney, T.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Kamihanda, G.; Trinhammer, P.; Wood, D. A.; Khalfan, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Mruma, A. H.; Salima, J.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rift systems. The northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa) rift in the East African Rift System is an early stage rift exhibiting pronounced tectonic segmentation, which is defined in the upper crust by ~100-km-long border faults. Very little volcanism is associated with rifting; the only surface expression of magmatism occurs in an accommodation zone between segments to the north of the lake in the Rungwe Volcanic Province. The SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) project is a multidisciplinary, multinational study that is acquiring a suite of geophysical, geological and geochemical data to characterize deformation and magmatism in the crust and mantle lithosphere along 2-3 segments of this rift. As a part of the SEGMeNT project, we acquired seismic reflection and refraction data in Lake Malawi (Nyasa) in March-April 2015. Over 2000 km of seismic reflection data were acquired with a 500 to 2580 cu in air gun array from GEUS/Aarhus and a 500- to 1500-m-long seismic streamer from Syracuse University over a grid of lines across and along the northern and central basins. Air gun shots from MCS profiles and 1000 km of additional shooting with large shot intervals were also recorded on 27 short-period and 6 broadband lake bottom seismometers from Scripps Oceanographic Institute as a part of the Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrument Pool (OBSIP) as well as the 55-station onshore seismic array. The OBS were deployed along one long strike line and two dip lines. We will present preliminary data and results from seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the lake and their implications for crustal deformation within and between rift segments. Seismic reflection data image structures up to ~5-6 km below the lake bottom, including syntectonic sediments, intrabasinal faults and other complex horsts. Some intrabasinal faults in both the northern and

  6. First assessment of effects of air-gun seismic shooting on marine resources in the central Adriatic sea

    SciTech Connect

    La Bella, G.; Cannata, S.; Froglia, C.

    1996-11-01

    A series of investigations were carried out to test the effects of air-gun seismic shooting on main fishery resources of the Adriatic Sea during summer 1995. The energy source used for the trial was formed by one air-gun array made up by two sub-arrays consisting in 8 air-guns each developing a total volume of c.a. 2500 i{sup 3} at 2000 psi with an amplitude of 60 bar/m. The interval between two was of 25 s. The intensity was of 210 dB re 1 mPa-m/Hz. Acoustical and spectral analysis were performed simultaneously in the surveyed areas to correlate fishery and behavior observations with sound pattern of the energization. Main results were: (1) Analysis of trawl catch data evidenced no significant changes before and after the air-gun seismic profiling. (2) Echosurvey relative estimate of pelagic biomass, performed simultaneously to trawling operations, failed to evidence any significant change in the pelagic biomass subsequent to the seismic shooting. (3) Small differences were observed in the trammel net catch composition, but one single set of pre-post fishing operations could be done in the study period. (4) Similar density estimate were obtained from dredge surveys performed by an hydraulic dredger before and after air-gun seismic profiling over a clam bed in 14 in depth. (5) Video recording of captive fish, kept into cages moored on the sea bottom at 12 in depth, evidenced a Behavioral response to the approach of the sound source; but no lethal event was recorded on captive sea-bass immediately after the seismic shooting. (6) Biochemical and histological analysis were performed to verify if it is to be related to the captive condition or is somewhat consequent to the air-gun energization. These results confirm that no relevant effects are induced on fishery resources by seismic air-gun shooting.

  7. New features revealed by multi-method seismic imaging of the seismic structure and activity of the Lesser Antilles and Hellenic subduction zones, and their comparison with Tohoku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, A.; Laigle, M.; Sachpazi, M.; Charvis, P.; Flueh, E. R.; Becel, A.; Diaz, J.; Gesret, A.; Galvé, A.; Sapin, M.; Charalampakis, M.; Lebrun, J.; Evain, M.; Ruiz, M.; Kopp, H.; Hello, Y.; Gallart, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Nicolich, R.; Raffaele, R.

    2012-12-01

    The densely populated two subduction zones on the European Union territory, in the western Hellenic and the Lesser Antilles regions have been currently considered as having a low seismic coupling, that is aseismic from the point of view of megathrust earthquakes which have been commonly unexpected there. The occurrence of the 2004 megathrust event in Sumatra, also unexpected, prompted support to our research projects submitted before. The unexpected occurrence of the Tohoku 2011 event since, provides terms of comparison for our results. We applied to both subduction zones specific approaches to the seismic structure and activity by a cluster of active and passive offshore-onshore seismic experiments with Research Vessels, OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometers) and land seismometer arrays and funding from several countries, coordinated within the "Thales was right" proposal to the European Union action (see also Laigle et al. in session T02, and Sachpazi et al. in the present session). Each of the two studies allows comparing different seismic methods, in their resolution-penetration, and building on their joint use: i) MCS multichannel reflection seismics, ii) OBS and offshore-onshore refraction seismics and shot tomography, iii) Teleseismic converted waves imaging of deep and steep interfaces (e.g. RF, receiver-function), iv) local earthquakes high-resolution location by OBS and land arrays, v) search for non-volcanic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes. A number of features revealed in spite of the much lower level of current seismic activity share a similarity with those originally interpreted in the frame of a largely aseismic subduction zone in Tohoku, for which the occurrence of the 2011 event imposed another view. Such features are: i) the extent of the crust on crust subduction thrust, proxy to the downdip extent of the seismogenic, could be identified and mapped much landward than commonly considered, ii) furthermore, the Tohoku rupture showed the seismogenic

  8. The Seismic Broad Band Western Mediterranean (wm) Network and the Obs Fomar Pool: Current state and Obs activities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos, Antonio; Davila, Jose Martin; Buforn, Elisa; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Harnafi, Mimoun; Mattesini, Mauricio; Caldeira, Bento; Hanka, Winfried; El Moudnib, Lahcen; Strollo, Angelo; Roca, Antoni; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Dahm, Torsten; Cabieces, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Western Mediterranean (WM) seismic network started in 1996 as an initiative of the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), with the collaboration of the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) of Potsdam. A first broad band seismic station (SFUC) was installed close to Cádiz (South Spain). Since then, additional stations have been installed in the Ibero-Moghrebian region. In 2005, the "WM" code was assigned by the FDSN and new partners were jointed: Evora University (UEVO, Portugal), the Scientifique Institute of Rabat (ISRABAT, Morocco), and GFZ. Now days, the WM network is composed by 15 BB stations, all of them with Streckaisen STS-2 or STS-2.5 sensors, Quanterra or Earthdata digitizers and SeiscomP. Most them have co-installed a permanent geodetic GPS stations, and some them also have an accelerometer. There are 10 stations deployed in Spanish territory (5 in the Iberian peninsula, 1 in Balearic islands and 4 in North Africa Spanish places) with VSAT or Internet communications, 2 in Portugal (one of them without real time), and 3 in Morocco (2 VSAT and 1 ADSL). Additionally, 2 more stations (one in South Spain and one in Morocco) will be installed along this year. Additionally ROA has deployed a permanent real time VBB (CMG-3T: 360s) station at the Alboran Island. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), ROA and UCM have acquired six broad band "LOBSTERN" OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), conforming the OBS FOMAR pool. Three of them with CMG-40T sensor and the other with Trillium 120. These OBS were deployed along the Gibraltar strait since January to November 2014 to study the microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. In September 2015 FOMAR network has been deployed in SW of the San Vicente Cape for 8 months as a part of

  9. Tsujal Marine Survey: Crustal Characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block Boundary and its Implications for Seismic and Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, R.; Danobeitia, J.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Cameselle, A. L.; Estrada, F.; Prada, M.; Bandy, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    During the spring of 2014, a team of Spanish and Mexican scientists explored the western margin of Mexico in the frame of the TSUJAL project. The two main objectives were to characterize the nature and structure of the lithosphere and to identify potential sources triggering earthquakes and tsunamis at the contact between Rivera plate-Jalisco block with the North American Plate. With these purposes a set of marine geophysical data were acquired aboard the RRS James Cook. This work is focus in the southern part of the TSUJAL survey, where we obtain seismic images from the oceanic domain up to the continental shelf. Thus, more than 800 km of MCS data, divided in 7 profiles, have been acquired with a 6km long streamer and using an air-gun sources ranging from 5800 c.i. to 3540 c.i. Furthermore, a wide-angle seismic profile of 190 km length was recorded in 16 OBS deployed perpendicular to the coast of Manzanillo. Gravity and magnetic, multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data were recorded simultaneously with seismic data in the offshore area. Preliminary stacked MCS seismic sections reveal the crustal structure in the different domains of the Mexican margin. The contact between the Rivera and NA Plates is observed as a strong reflection at 6 s two way travel time (TWTT), in a parallel offshore profile (TS01), south of Manzanillo. This contact is also identified in a perpendicular profile, TS02, along a section of more than 100 km in length crossing the Rivera transform zone, and the plate boundary between Cocos and Rivera Plates. Northwards, offshore Pto. Vallarta, the MCS data reveals high amplitude reflections at around 7-8.5 s TWTT, roughly 2.5-3.5 s TWTT below the seafloor, that conspicuously define the subduction plane (TS06b). These strong reflections which we interpret as the Moho discontinuity define the starting bending of subduction of Rivera Plate. Another clear pattern observed within the first second of the MCS data shows evidences of a bottom

  10. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-01

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry.

  11. Evidence of Velocity Variations During the Recent Mt. Etna Eruptive Activity Detected by Temporal Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, G.; Zhang, H.; Cocina, O.; Patanè, D.; Thurber, C. H.

    2005-12-01

    After nearly 10 years without any major flank eruption, volcanic activity resumed at Mt. Etna on July 17, 2001, giving rise to the first of the two most striking flank eruptions on this volcano in recent times. Fifteen months after the end (August 09, 2001) of this eruptive episode, a new eruption started abruptly on October 26, 2002 with only a few hours of premonitory seismicity accompanying the opening of eruptive fissures along a bi-radial direction. Since the end of this last eruption (January 2003), a period of weak volcanic activity occurred. On September 7, 2004 a new eruption occurred along a WNW-ESE to NW-SE oriented fracture system at the base of the South East summit crater. Compared to the previous two flank eruptions, the 2004 eruption did not have any measurable short-period seismicity and deformation variations. Since 2001, Mt. Etna is well covered by the INGV-CT permanent network and some temporary networks. This provides a unique opportunity to investigate seismic velocity variations before, during and after the three most recent eruptions. Characterizing spatial and temporal variations in seismic velocity in detail will yield a better understanding of the complex plumbing system beneath Mt. Etna and the triggering mechanisms for each eruption. The conventional way to detect temporal velocity changes is to separately invert velocity models for each data set and then examine their differences. This may, however, cause some artifacts in the velocity changes due to different data quality and distribution. Here we present a true temporal seismic tomography algorithm by constraining velocity models for different periods through a temporal smoothing operator. This technique considers the fact that the main features of the velocity models for different periods are similar. The temporal seismic tomography algorithm is based on the double-difference tomography code tomoDD that uses both absolute and differential arrival times to simultaneously determine

  12. Seismic properties of fluid bearing formations in magmatic geothermal systems: can we directly detect geothermal activity with seismic methods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grab, Melchior; Scott, Samuel; Quintal, Beatriz; Caspari, Eva; Maurer, Hansruedi; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Seismic methods are amongst the most common techniques to explore the earth's subsurface. Seismic properties such as velocities, impedance contrasts and attenuation enable the characterization of the rocks in a geothermal system. The most important goal of geothermal exploration, however, is to describe the enthalpy state of the pore fluids, which act as the main transport medium for the geothermal heat, and to detect permeable structures such as fracture networks, which control the movement of these pore fluids in the subsurface. Since the quantities measured with seismic methods are only indirectly related with the fluid state and the rock permeability, the interpretation of seismic datasets is difficult and usually delivers ambiguous results. To help overcome this problem, we use a numerical modeling tool that quantifies the seismic properties of fractured rock formations that are typically found in magmatic geothermal systems. We incorporate the physics of the pore fluids, ranging from the liquid to the boiling and ultimately vapor state. Furthermore, we consider the hydromechanics of permeable structures at different scales from small cooling joints to large caldera faults as are known to be present in volcanic systems. Our modeling techniques simulate oscillatory compressibility and shear tests and yield the P- and S-wave velocities and attenuation factors of fluid saturated fractured rock volumes. To apply this modeling technique to realistic scenarios, numerous input parameters need to be indentified. The properties of the rock matrix and individual fractures were derived from extensive literature research including a large number of laboratory-based studies. The geometries of fracture networks were provided by structural geologists from their published studies of outcrops. Finally, the physical properties of the pore fluid, ranging from those at ambient pressures and temperatures up to the supercritical conditions, were taken from the fluid physics

  13. Tectonic expression of an active slab tear from high-resolution seismic and bathymetric data offshore Sicily (Ionian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutscher, Marc-André; Dominguez, Stephane; Lepinay, Bernard Mercier; Pinheiro, Luis; Gallais, Flora; Babonneau, Nathalie; Cattaneo, Antonio; Le Faou, Yann; Barreca, Giovanni; Micallef, Aaron; Rovere, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    Subduction of a narrow slab of oceanic lithosphere beneath a tightly curved orogenic arc requires the presence of at least one lithospheric scale tear fault. While the Calabrian subduction beneath southern Italy is considered to be the type example of this geodynamic setting, the geometry, kinematics and surface expression of the associated lateral, slab tear fault offshore eastern Sicily remain controversial. Results from a new marine geophysical survey conducted in the Ionian Sea, using high-resolution bathymetry and seismic profiling reveal active faulting at the seafloor within a 140 km long, two-branched fault system near Alfeo Seamount. The previously unidentified 60 km long NW trending North Alfeo Fault system shows primarily strike-slip kinematics as indicated by the morphology and steep-dipping transpressional and transtensional faults. Available earthquake focal mechanisms indicate dextral strike-slip motion along this fault segment. The 80 km long SSE trending South Alfeo fault system is expressed by one or two steeply dipping normal faults, bounding the western side of a 500+ m thick, 5 km wide, elongate, syntectonic Plio-Quaternary sedimentary basin. Both branches of the fault system are mechanically capable of generating magnitude 6-7 earthquakes like those that struck eastern Sicily in 1169, 1542, and 1693.

  14. Diurnal variation in the effect of the weekend in global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhin, Yu. Ya.; Chertoprud, V. E.; Ivanov-Kholodnyi, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the earthquake probability diurnal variation on specific features in the weekend effect in global seismic activity is revealed. The dependence of the global earthquake number on the local time and its possible relation to a quiet solar diurnal variation ( Sq) in the geomagnetic field have been considered in detail. It has been indicated that a stable diurnal effect, which has a maximum near midnight and a minimum near local noon, exists in the global seismicity of the Earth. The diurnal variation amplitude changes insignificantly during days of week and substantially decreases (by a factor of almost 3) on Saturday and Sunday. The weekend effect is not revealed during "local nights." Since the daily effect of a quiet solar diurnal variation ( Sq) should not depend on days of week, we arrive at the conclusion that the diurnal variation in global seismicity evidently contains the anthropogenic activity product. The Sunday effect in the earthquake number decreases over the course of time and is most probably real but weak and not stationary since weekly variations occur against a background (or under the action) of stronger variations, i.e., an increase in the earthquake number and diurnal variations.

  15. Amplitude versus offset analysis to marine seismic data acquired in Nankai Trough, offshore Japan where methane hydrate exists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hato, M.; Inamori, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Shimizu, S.

    2003-04-01

    Occurrence of methane hydrates in the Nankai Trough, located off the south-eastern coast of Japan, was confirmed by the exploratory test well drilling conducted by Japan’s Ministry of International Trade and Industry in 1999. Confirmation of methane hydrate has given so big impact to the Japan's future energy strategy and scientific and technological interest was derived from the information of the coring and logging results at the well. Following the above results, Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC) launched the national project, named as MH21, for establishing the technology of methane hydrate exploration and related technologies such as production and development. As one of the research project for evaluating the total amount of the methane hydrate, Amplitude versus Offset (AVO) was applied to the seismic data acquired in the Nankai Trough area. The main purpose of the AVO application is to evaluate the validity of delineation of methane hydrate-bearing zones. Since methane hydrate is thought to accompany with free-gas in general just below the methane hydrate-bearing zones, the AVO has a possibility of describing the presence of free-gas. The free-gas is thought to be located just below the base of methane hydrate stability zone which is characterized by the Bottom Simulating Reflectors (BSRs) on the seismic section. In this sense, AVO technology, which was developed as gas delineation tools, can be utilized for methane hydrate exploration. The result of AVO analysis clearly shows gas-related anomaly below the BSRs. Appearance of the AVO anomaly has so wide variety. Some of the anomalies might not correspond to the free-gas existence, however, some of them may show free-gas. We are now going to develop methodology to clearly discriminate free-gas from non-gas zone by integrating various types of seismic methods such as seismic inversion and seismic attribute analysis.

  16. Probabilistic seismic hazard study based on active fault and finite element geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastelic, Vanja; Carafa, Michele M. C.; Visini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    We present a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) that is exclusively based on active faults and geodynamic finite element input models whereas seismic catalogues were used only in a posterior comparison. We applied the developed model in the External Dinarides, a slow deforming thrust-and-fold belt at the contact between Adria and Eurasia.. is the Our method consists of establishing s two earthquake rupture forecast models: (i) a geological active fault input (GEO) model and, (ii) a finite element (FEM) model. The GEO model is based on active fault database that provides information on fault location and its geometric and kinematic parameters together with estimations on its slip rate. By default in this model all deformation is set to be released along the active faults. The FEM model is based on a numerical geodynamic model developed for the region of study. In this model the deformation is, besides along the active faults, released also in the volumetric continuum elements. From both models we calculated their corresponding activity rates, its earthquake rates and their final expected peak ground accelerations. We investigated both the source model and the earthquake model uncertainties by varying the main active fault and earthquake rate calculation parameters through constructing corresponding branches of the seismic hazard logic tree. Hazard maps and UHS curves have been produced for horizontal ground motion on bedrock conditions VS 30 ≥ 800 m/s), thereby not considering local site amplification effects. The hazard was computed over a 0.2° spaced grid considering 648 branches of the logic tree and the mean value of 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years hazard level, while the 5th and 95th percentiles were also computed to investigate the model limits. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to control which of the input parameters influence the final hazard results in which measure. The results of such comparison evidence the deformation model and

  17. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    for second-order Sturm - Liouville boundary-value problems, such a count of eigenvalues may be established in terms of the number of zero crossings of...will be operational during the next six months. Section 11 describes a series of activities in the development and imple- mentation of the seismic...element of seismic research. with emphasis on those areas directly related to tho operations of the SDC. Substantial progress has been made in the

  18. 76 FR 68974 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...NMFS received an application from Shell Offshore Inc. (Shell) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to Shell to take, by......

  19. 78 FR 12541 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...NMFS received an application from ConocoPhillips Company (COP) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its proposal to issue an IHA to COP to take, by......

  20. 76 FR 43639 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Liquefied Natural Gas Port Facility in Massachusetts Bay AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to operating a liquefied natural gas (LNG) port facility... diameter natural gas pipeline which interconnects the Port to an offshore natural gas pipeline known as...

  1. 76 FR 9250 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... marine mammal and sound research (funded by the Navy or otherwise) Any verified information which reveals... the shelf break, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration was formulated... mammals to levels of sound likely to result in injury or death of marine mammals; (3) several...

  2. 76 FR 46729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Statoil USA E&P Inc. (Statoil) to take, by harassment, small numbers of 13 species of marine mammals incidental to shallow hazards and geotechnical surveys in the Chukchi Sea, Alaska, during the 2011 Arctic open-water...

  3. 77 FR 27321 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Shell Gulf of Mexico Inc. (Shell) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Chukchi Sea,...

  4. 77 FR 27283 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) regulations, notification is hereby given that NMFS has issued an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to Shell Offshore Inc. (Shell) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to offshore exploration drilling on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases in the Beaufort Sea,...

  5. Assessing low-activity faults for the seismic safety of dams

    SciTech Connect

    Page, W.D.; Savage, W.U.; McLaren, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Dams have been a familiar construct in the northern Sierra Nevada range in California (north of the San Joaquin River) since the forty-niners and farmers diverted water to their gold mines and farms in the mid 19th century. Today, more than 370 dams dot the region from the Central Valley to the eastern escarpment. Fifty-five more dam streams on the eastern slope. The dams are of all types: 240 earth fill; 56 concrete gravity; 45 rock and earth fills; 35 rock fill; 14 concrete arch; 9 hydraulic fill; and 29 various other types. We use the northern Sierra Nevada to illustrate the assessment of low-activity faults for the seismic safety of dams. The approach, techniques, and methods of evaluation are applicable to other regions characterized by low seismicity and low-activity faults having long recurrence intervals. Even though several moderate earthquakes had shaken the Sierra Nevada since 1849 (for example, the 1875 magnitude 5.8 Honey Lake and the 1909 magnitudes 5 and 5.5 Downieville earthquakes), seismic analyses for dams in the area generally were not performed prior to the middle of this century. Following the 1971 magnitude 6.7 San Fernando earthquake, when the hydraulic-fill Lower Van Norman Dam in southern California narrowly escaped catastrophic failure, the California Division of Safety of Dams and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission required seismic safety to be addressed with increasing rigor. In 1975, the magnitude 5.7 Oroville earthquake on the Cleveland Hill fault near Oroville Dam in the Sierra Nevada foothills, showed convincingly that earthquakes and surface faulting could occur within the range. Following this event, faults along the ancient Foothills fault system have been extensively investigated at dam sites.

  6. 77 FR 27189 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... reflection and refraction profiles to monitor the post-seismic response of the outer acretionary prism, the...-energy seismic methodology to monitor the post-seismic response of the outer accretionary prism, the...

  7. Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Muhammad Abdul Mojid; Shin, Hee Jae; Islam, Mohammad Tofazzal

    2013-01-01

    Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed. PMID:23941823

  8. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  9. Earth's magnetic field anomalies that precede the M6+ global seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Gabriele; Cataldi, Daniele; Straser, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    In this work has been analyzed the Earth's magnetic field variations and the M6+ global seismic activity to verify if M6+ earthquakes are preceded by a change of the Earth's magnetic field. The data of Earth's magnetic field used to conduct the study of correlation are provided by the induction magnetometer of Radio Emissions Project's station (Lat: 41°41'4.27"N, Long: 12°38'33,60"E, Albano Laziale, Rome, Italy), equipped with a ELF receiver prototype (with a vertically aligned coil antenna) capable to detect the variations of the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field on Z magnetic component. The M6+ global seismic activity data are provided in real-time by USGS, INGV and CSEM. The sample of data used to conduct the study refers to the period between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2012. The Earth's magnetic field variations data set has been marked with the times (time markers) of M6+ earthquakes occurred on a global scale and has been verified the existence of disturbances of the Earth's geomagnetic field in the time interval that preceded the M6+ global seismic activity. The correlation study showed that all M6+ earthquakes recorded on 2012 were preceded by an increase of the Earth's magnetic field, detected in the Z magnetic component. The authors measured the time lag elapsed between the maximum increment of the Earth's magnetic field recorded before an earthquake M6+ and the date and time at which this occurred, and has been verified that the minimum time lag recorded between the Earth's magnetic field increase and the earthquake M6+ has been 1 minute (9 October 2012, Balleny Islands, M6,4); while, the maximum time lag recorded has been 3600 minutes (26 June 2012, China, M6,3). The average time lag has been 629.47 minutes. In addition, the average time lag is deflected in relation to the magnitude increase. Key words: Seismic Geomagnetic Precursor (SGP), Interplanetary Seismic Precursor (ISP), Earth's magnetic field variations, earthquakes, prevision.

  10. Solar-terrestrial effect controls seismic activity to a large extent (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, G.

    2010-12-01

    Several observational results and corresponding publications in the 20 century indicate that earthquakes in many regions happen systematically in dependence on the time of day and on the season as well. In the recent decade, studies on this topic have also been intensively performed at the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), Vienna. Any natural effect on Earth which systematically appears at certain hours of the day or at a special season can solely be caused by a solar or lunar influence. And actually, statistic results on seismic activity reveal a correlation with the solar cycles. Examples of this seismic performance are shown. To gain more clarity about these effects, the three-hour magnetic index Kp, which characterizes the magnetic field disturbances, mainly caused by the solar particle radiation, the solar wind, was correlated with the seismic energy released by earthquakes over decades. Kp is determined from magnetic records of 13 observatories worldwide and continuously published by ISGI, France. It is demonstrated that a highly significant correlation between the geomagnetic index Kp and the annual seismic energy release in regions at latitudes between 35 and 60° N exists. Three regions of continental size were investigated, using the USGS (PDE) earthquake catalogue data. In the period 1974-2009 the Kp cycle periods range between 9 and 12 years, somewhat different to the sunspot number cycles of 11 years. Seismicity follows the Kp cycles with high coincidence. A detailed analysis of this correlation for N-America reveals, that the sum of released energy by earthquakes per year changes by a factor up to 100 with Kp. It is shown that during years of high Kp there happen e.g. 1 event M7, 4 events M6 and 30 events M5 per year, instead of only 10 events M5 in years with lowest Kp. Almost the same relation appears in other regions of continental size, with the same significance. The seismicity in S-America clearly follows the Kp cycles

  11. Motif Discovery on Seismic Amplitude Time Series: The Case Study of Mt Etna 2011 Eruptive Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Aliotta, Marco; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Spampinato, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Algorithms searching for similar patterns are widely used in seismology both when the waveforms of the events of interest are known and when there is no a priori-knowledge. Such methods usually make use of the cross-correlation coefficient as a measure of similarity; if there is no a-priori knowledge, they behave as brute-force searching algorithms. The disadvantage of these methods, preventing or limiting their application to very large datasets, is computational complexity. The Mueen-Keogh (MK) algorithm overcomes this limitation by means of two optimization techniques—the early abandoning concept and space indexing. Here, we apply the MK algorithm to amplitude time series retrieved from seismic signals recorded during episodic eruptive activity of Mt Etna in 2011. By adequately tuning the input to the MK algorithm we found eight motif groups characterized by distinct seismic amplitude trends, each related to a different phenomenon. In particular, we observed that earthquakes are accompanied by sharp increases and decreases in seismic amplitude whereas lava fountains are accompanied by slower changes. These results demonstrate that the MK algorithm, because of its particular features, may have wide applicability in seismology.

  12. Temporal Variations of Magnetic Field Associated with Seismic Activity at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, J. M.; Serna, J. P.; Guzman, J.

    2011-12-01

    A study of magnetic variations was carried out at Cerro Machin Volcano, Colombia for the period 2009 -2010, with two permanent magnetometers located at South and North of the central dome, separated about 2.5 km each other. After corrections, we found that there is no clear correlation between volcanic seismicity and temporal changes of magnetic field for each magnetometer station, if they are analyzed individually. On the contrary, when we calculated the residual Magnetic field (RMF), for each magnetometer, and then we made the subtraction between them, and plot it vs time, we found a clear correlation of changes in local magnetic field with the occurrence of volcanic seismicity (ML >1.6). We found a change in the RMF between 1584 nT and 1608 nT, each time that a volcano-tectonic earthquake occurred. The máximum lapse time between the previous change in RMF and the further occurrence of the earthquake is 24 days, with an average of 11 days. This pattern occurred more than 9 times during the studied period. Based on the results, we believed that the simple methodology proposed here, is a good tool for monitoring changes in seismicity associated with activity at Cerro Machín volcano. We suggest that the temporal changes of RMF at Cerro Machín Volcano, are associated with piezo-magnetic effects, due to changes in strain-stress inside the volcano, produced by the interaction between local faulting and magma movement.

  13. Dense seismic networks as a tool to characterize active faulting in regions of slow deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Arroucau, Pierre; Carrilho, Fernando; Cesca, Simone; Dias, Nuno; Matos, Catarina; Vales, Dina

    2016-04-01

    The theory of plate tectonics states that the relative motion between lithospheric plates is accommodated at plate boundaries, where earthquakes occur on long faults. However, earthquakes with a wide range of magnitudes also occur both off plate boundaries, in intra-plate settings, and along discontinuous, diffuse plate boundaries. These settings are characterized by low rates of lithospheric deformation. A fundamental limitation in the study of slowly deforming regions is the lack of high-quality observations. In these regions, earthquake catalogs have traditionally displayed diffuse seismicity patterns. The location, geometry and activity rate of faults - all basic parameters for understanding fault dynamics - are usually poorly known. The dense seismic networks deployed in the last years around the world have opened new windows in observational seismology. Although high-magnitude earthquakes are rare in regions of slow deformation, low-magnitude earthquakes are well observable on the time-scale of these deployments. In this presentation, we will show how data from dense seismic deployments can be used to characterize faulting in regions of slow deformation. In particular, we will present the case study of western Iberia, a region undergoing low-rate deformation and which has generated some of the largest earthquakes in Europe, both intraplate (mainland) and interplate (offshore). The methods that we employ include automated earthquake detection methods to lower the completeness magnitude of catalogs, earthquake relocations, focal mechanisms patterns, waveform similarity and clustering analysis.

  14. Outgoing longwave radiation anomalies analysis associated with different types of seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pan; Shen, Xuhui

    2017-03-01

    The paper has developed and proposed a statistical analysis method based on the Robust Satellite data analysis technique to detect seismic anomalies within the NOAA OLR dataset based on spatial/temporal continuity analysis. The proposed methods has been applied to statistical analyze about 3376 earthquake cases from September 01, 2007 to May 23, 2015. For statistical purposes, all these events have been divided into different types on the basis of the seismic parameters, including Southern or Northern Hemisphere earthquakes, earthquakes at different magnitude levels, earthquakes at different depth levels. The results show that the intensity of the anomalies increased with the magnitude increasing; anomalies are more easily observed during shallow earthquakes than the deep ones; more obvious anomalies could be detected for the earthquakes occurring in the Northern Hemisphere and the anomalies significant increases near the epicenter one day before and on the day of the earthquake. A similar anomaly shows that there are anomalies near the epicenters before earthquakes and the anomalies have some relation with the earthquake preparation on all seismic activity. All these statistical results can help create a better understanding of the preparation process of the earthquakes.

  15. Control of seismic and operational vibrations of rotating machines using semi-active mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Soong, T. T.

    2004-06-01

    A dual isolation problem for rotating machines consists of isolation of housing structures from the machine vibrations and protection of machines during an earthquake to maintain their functionality. Desirable characteristics of machine mounts for the above two purposes can differ significantly due to difference in nature of the excitation and performance criteria in the two situations. In this paper, relevant response quantities are identified that may be used to quantify performance and simplified models of rotating machines are presented using which these relevant response quantities may be calculated. Using random vibration approach with a stationary excitation, it is shown that significant improvement in seismic performance is achievable by proper mount design. Results of shaking table experiments performed with a realistic setup using a centrifugal pump are presented. It is concluded that a solution to this dual isolation problem lies in a semi-active mount capable switching its properties from ‘operation-optimum’ to ‘seismic-optimum’ at the onset of a seismic event.

  16. High-resolution seismic monitoring of geomorphic activity in a catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtin, A.; Hovius, N.; Turowski, J.; McArdell, B.; Vergne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous survey of the surface activity in a river catchment is essential for the understanding of the landscape dynamics. In steep mountain catchments, a detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of geomorphic processes is generally impossible. The classic techniques (imagery and in situ channel approaches) are not adapted to the extreme conditions that occur during strong rainstorms. There is a real need to develop a method and to define the procedures that will allow the study of surface processes without any environmental dependency. Nowadays, more and more studies explore the use of the seismic instruments to survey the catchment activity. Seismometers can be deployed in sheltered area, which allow us to record in continuous the ground vibrations induced by surface processes, like the sediment transport and mass movements. To continue the exploration of this potential, we deployed a dense array of 10 seismometers in the Illgraben, a 10-km2 catchment in the Swiss Alps, during the summer 2011. This catchment is highly prone to hillslope and debris flow activity, so almost every summer convective storms trigger geomorphic events. The network was designed to monitor the spatial and temporal features of every type of surface activity. Thus during rainstorms, the stations located along the main stream well record the channel activity like the passage of sediment flows, while the instruments installed around the catchment reveal the occurrences of many rockfalls. These latter events show a spectral seismic signature at high frequencies (> 1 Hz), whereas the channel activity is dominant between 10 and 30 Hz. For the largest debris flow of the summer, we are able to identify the location of its initiation from the hillslope. Then, we can map the secondary events, which were triggered by the propagation of the debris flow. With these preliminary results, we demonstrate that the use of a dense seismic array is relevant to map in real time the landscape dynamics at the

  17. Quantitative description of induced seismic activity before and after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake by nonstationary ETAS models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Ogata, Yosihiko

    2013-12-01

    The epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model is extended for application to nonstationary seismic activity, including transient swarm activity or seismicity anomalies, in a seismogenic region. The time-dependent rates of both background seismicity and aftershock productivity in the ETAS model are optimally estimated from hypocenter data. These rates can provide quantitative evidence for abrupt or gradual changes in shear stress and/or fault strength due to aseismic transient causes such as triggering by remote earthquakes, slow slips, or fluid intrusions within the region. This extended model is applied to data sets from several seismic events including swarms that were induced by the M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake of 2011.

  18. Physical modeling of the formation and evolution of seismically active fault zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponomarev, A.V.; Zavyalov, A.D.; Smirnov, V.B.; Lockner, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) in rocks is studied as a model of natural seismicity. A special technique for rock loading has been used to help study the processes that control the development of AE during brittle deformation. This technique allows us to extend to hours fault growth which would normally occur very rapidly. In this way, the period of most intense interaction of acoustic events can be studied in detail. Characteristics of the acoustic regime (AR) include the Gutenberg-Richter b-value, spatial distribution of hypocenters with characteristic fractal (correlation) dimension d, Hurst exponent H, and crack concentration parameter Pc. The fractal structure of AR changes with the onset of the drop in differential stress during sample deformation. The change results from the active interaction of microcracks. This transition of the spatial distribution of AE hypocenters is accompanied by a corresponding change in the temporal correlation of events and in the distribution of event amplitudes as signified by a decrease of b-value. The characteristic structure that develops in the low-energy background AE is similar to the sequence of the strongest microfracture events. When the AR fractal structure develops, the variations of d and b are synchronous and d = 3b. This relation which occurs once the fractal structure is formed only holds for average values of d and b. Time variations of d and b are anticorrelated. The degree of temporal correlation of AR has time variations that are similar to d and b variations. The observed variations in laboratory AE experiments are compared with natural seismicity parameters. The close correspondence between laboratory-scale observations and naturally occurring seismicity suggests a possible new approach for understanding the evolution of complex seismicity patterns in nature. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Saguenay Fjord, Quebec, Canada: Integrating marine geotechnical and geophysical data for spatial seismic slope stability and hazard assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Urgeles, R.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.J.; Martin, F.

    2002-01-01

    In 1996 a major flood occurred in the Saguenay region, Quebec, Canada, delivering several km3 of sediment to the Saguenay Fjord. Such sediments covered large areas of the, until then, largely contaminated fjord bottom, thus providing a natural capping layer. Recent swath bathymetry data have also shown that sediment landslides are widely present in the upper section of the Saguenay Fjord, and therefore, should a new event occur, it would probably expose the old contaminated sediments. Landslides in the Upper Saguenay Fjord are most probably due to earthquakes given its proximity to the Charlevoix seismic region and to that of the 1988 Saguenay earthquake. In consequence, this study tries to characterize the permanent ground deformations induced by different earthquake scenarios from which shallow sediment landslides could be triggered. The study follows a Newmark analysis in which, firstly, the seismic slope performance is assessed, secondly, the seismic hazard analyzed, and finally an evaluation of the seismic landslide hazard is made. The study is based on slope gradients obtained from EM1000 multibeam bathymetry data as well as water content and undrained shear strength measurements made in box and gravity cores. Ground motions integrating local site conditions were simulated using synthetic time histories. The study assumes the region of the 1988 Saguenay earthquake as the most likely source area for earthquakes capable of inducing large ground motions in the Upper Saguenay region. Accordingly, we have analyzed several shaking intensities to deduce that generalized sediment displacements will begin to occur when moment magnitudes exceed 6. Major displacements, failure, and subsequent landslides could occur only from earthquake moment magnitudes exceeding 6.75. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 58473 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... is 389 km\\2\\. Table 1--Distances to Sound Thresholds for the Nearshore Surveys Water depth at... 0.36 0.44 45 0.10 0.10 0.51 Table 2--Distance to Sound Thresholds for the Channel Surveys Water... explosives as the sound source. Seismic surveys on land use ``shot holes'' that are drilled every 50 m...

  1. 77 FR 49921 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    .... Sounds generated by the icebreaker and seismic vessel moving through these relatively light ice conditions are expected to be far below the high sound levels often attributed to icebreaking. These high sound levels (>200 dB re 1 Pa ) have been recorded from icebreakers during backing and...

  2. 78 FR 51147 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... km of pre-plot lines plus approximately 115 km for 1-km run-in and 5-km run- out between seismic... include 3,631 km of pre-plot lines plus about 60 km of 1-km run-in and 5-km run-out between pre-plot...

  3. 76 FR 77782 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... resulted in schedule challenges that forced the survey into an inclement weather period and after further... echosounder (MBES) and a sub-bottom profiler (SBP) continuously throughout the survey. Acoustic stimuli (i.e... these dates is possible, depending on logistics and weather. The proposed seismic survey will...

  4. 77 FR 25829 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... secured to the ocean bottom cable. Surface markers and acoustic pingers will be attached to the cable at... (OBRL), GPS and acoustic pingers will be used. For OBRL, the source vessel fires a precisely positioned... seismic data acquisition is approximately 50 days, depending on weather and other...

  5. 76 FR 33705 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... echosounder (MBES) and a sub-bottom profiler (SBP) continuously throughout the survey. Acoustic stimuli (i.e... deviation from these dates is possible, depending on logistics and weather. The seismic survey will collect... the thickness of the overlying sediments. Acoustic velocities (required to convert measured...

  6. 77 FR 58255 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Marine Geophysical Survey off the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... received are a part of the public record and will generally be posted to http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr...://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/permits/incidental.htm#applications . The National Science Foundation (NSF... seismic studies are outlined in a Science Plan submitted to the National Science Foundation (NSF) by...

  7. Comparative velocity structure of active Hawaiian volcanoes from 3-D onshore-offshore seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.; Peters, L.; Benesh, N.

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the combined subaerial and submarine portions of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii, based on first-arrival seismic tomography of marine airgun shots recorded by the onland seismic network. Our model shows that high-velocity materials (6.5-7.0??km/s) lie beneath Kilauea's summit, Koae fault zone, and the upper Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) and upper and middle East Rift Zone (ERZ), indicative of magma cumulates within the volcanic edifice. A separate high-velocity body of 6.5-6.9??km/s within Kilauea's lower ERZ and upper Puna Ridge suggests a distinct body of magma cumulates, possibly connected to the summit magma cumulates at depth. The two cumulate bodies within Kilauea's ERZ may have undergone separate ductile flow seaward, influencing the submarine morphology of Kilauea's south flank. Low velocities (5.0-6.3??km/s) seaward of Kilauea's Hilina fault zone, and along Mauna Loa's seaward facing Kao'iki fault zone, are attributed to thick piles of volcaniclastic sediments deposited on the submarine flanks. Loihi seamount shows high-velocity anomalies beneath the summit and along the rift zones, similar to the interpreted magma cumulates below Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, and a low-velocity anomaly beneath the oceanic crust, probably indicative of melt within the upper mantle. Around Kilauea's submarine flank, a high-velocity anomaly beneath the outer bench suggests the presence of an ancient seamount that may obstruct outward spreading of the flank. Mauna Loa's southeast flank is also marked by a large, anomalously high-velocity feature (7.0-7.4??km/s), interpreted to define an inactive, buried volcanic rift zone, which might provide a new explanation for the westward migration of Mauna Loa's current SWRZ and the growth of Kilauea's SWRZ. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Influence of Seismic Amplification and Distanced Surcharge on the Active Thrust on Earth-Reinforced Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Biondi, Giovani; Grassi, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes a closed form pseudo-static solution for the estimation of the active earth-pressure coefficient for an earth-reinforced wall assuming a non-uniform profile of the seismic coefficients along the wall height and a distanced uniformly-distributed surcharge on the backfill surface. The static and seismic hydraulic conditions of the backfill are also accounted for. A parametric analysis is carried out and the obtained results are discussed.

  9. Broadband seismic monitoring of active volcanoes using deterministic and stochastic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Nakano, M.; Maeda, T.; Yepes, H.; Palacios, P.; Ruiz, M. C.; Arrais, S.; Vaca, M.; Molina, I.; Yamashina, T.

    2009-12-01

    We systematically used two approaches to analyze broadband seismic signals observed at active volcanoes: one is waveform inversion of very-long-period (VLP) signals in the frequency domain assuming possible source mechanisms; the other is a source location method of long-period (LP) and tremor using their amplitudes. The deterministic approach of the waveform inversion is useful to constrain the source mechanism and location, but is basically only applicable to VLP signals with periods longer than a few seconds. The source location method uses seismic amplitudes corrected for site amplifications and assumes isotropic radiation of S waves. This assumption of isotropic radiation is apparently inconsistent with the hypothesis of crack geometry at the LP source. Using the source location method, we estimated the best-fit source location of a VLP/LP event at Cotopaxi using a frequency band of 7-12 Hz and Q = 60. This location was close to the best-fit source location determined by waveform inversion of the VLP/LP event using a VLP band of 5-12.5 s. The waveform inversion indicated that a crack mechanism better explained the VLP signals than an isotropic mechanism. These results indicated that isotropic radiation is not inherent to the source and only appears at high frequencies. We also obtained a best-fit location of an explosion event at Tungurahua when using a frequency band of 5-10 Hz and Q = 60. This frequency band and Q value also yielded reasonable locations for the sources of tremor signals associated with lahars and pyroclastic flows at Tungurahua. The isotropic radiation assumption may be valid in a high frequency range in which the path effect caused by the scattering of seismic waves results in an isotropic radiation pattern of S waves. The source location method may be categorized as a stochastic approach based on the nature of scattering waves. We further applied the waveform inversion to VLP signals observed at only two stations during a volcanic crisis

  10. Present activity and seismogenic potential of a low-angle normal fault system (Città di Castello, Italy): Constraints from surface geology, seismic reflection data and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozzetti, Francesco; Boncio, Paolo; Lavecchia, Giusy; Pace, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    We present new constraints on an active low-angle normal fault system in the Città di Castello-Sansepolcro basin (CSB) of the northern Apennines of Italy. New field data from the geological survey of the Carta Geologica d' Italia (CARG project) define the surface geometry of the normal fault system and lead to an interpretation of the CROP 03 deep-crust seismic reflection profile (Castiglion Fiorentino-Urbania segment), with particular attention paid to the geometry of the Plio-Quaternary extensional structures. Surface and sub-surface geological data are integrated with instrumental and historical seismicity in order to define the seismotectonics of the area. Low-angle east-dipping reflectors are the seismic expression of the well-known Altotiberina Fault (AF), a regional extensional detachment on which both east- and west-dipping high-angle faults, bounding the CSB, sole out. The AF breakaway zone is located ˜ 10 km west of the CSB. Within the extensional allochthon, synthetic east-dipping planes prevail. Displacement along the AF is ˜ 4.5 km, which agrees with the cumulative offset due to its synthetic splays. The evolution of the CSB has mainly been controlled by the east-dipping fault system, at least since Early Pleistocene time; this system is still active and responsible for the seismicity of the area. A low level of seismic activity was recorded instrumentally within the CSB, but several damaging earthquakes have occurred in historical times. The instrumental seismicity and the intensity data points of the largest historical earthquakes (5 events with maximum MCS intensity of IX to IX-X) allow us to propose two main seismogenic structures: the Monte Santa Maria Tiberina (Mmax = 5.9) and Città di Castello (Mmax up to 6.5) normal faults. Both are synthetic splays of the AF detachment, dipping to the NE at moderate (45-50°) to low (25-30°) angles and cutting the upper crust up to the surface. This study suggests that low-angle normal faults (at least

  11. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  12. High-resolution 3D seismic reflection imaging across active faults and its impact on seismic hazard estimation in the Tokyo metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Susumu; Kawasaki, Shinji; Kato, Naoko

    2016-10-01

    We collected and interpreted high-resolution 3D seismic reflection data across a hypothesized fault scarp, along the largest active fault that could generate hazardous earthquakes in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The processed and interpreted 3D seismic cube, linked with nearby borehole stratigraphy, suggests that a monocline that deforms lower Pleistocene units is unconformably overlain by middle Pleistocene conglomerates. Judging from structural patterns and vertical separation on the lower-middle Pleistocene units and the ground surface, the hypothesized scarp was interpreted as a terrace riser rather than as a manifestation of late Pleistocene structural growth resulting from repeated fault activity. Devastating earthquake scenarios had been predicted along the fault in question based on its proximity to the metropolitan area, however our new results lead to a significant decrease in estimated fault length and consequently in the estimated magnitude of future earthquakes associated with reactivation. This suggests a greatly reduced seismic hazard in the Tokyo metropolitan area from earthquakes generated by active intraplate crustal faults.

  13. New High-Resolution Marine Single-Channel Seismic Data From the Emperor Seamounts: Initial Observations From ODP Leg 197

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, B. C.; Scholl, D. W.

    2001-12-01

    In July-August of 2001, ODP Leg 197 drilled Detroit, Nintoku, and Koko Seamounts of the Emperor seamount chain to obtain cores of basaltic lava flows. These basalt cores will provide radiometric age and paleomagnetic data to accurately and precisely constrain the paleolatitude of the Hawaiian hotspot. In addition, recovered cores will determine temporal changes in the geochemistry of Hawaiian hotspot volcanic products. Prior to drilling, the JOIDES Resolution, performed high-resolution single-channel seismic surveys in the vicinity of preliminary site locations to help confirm suitability for drilling, and to collect digital seismic data. Generally, at least two seismic lines (about 10 km in length) cross directly over each drill site. The acoustic source consisted of a single SSI 80 cubic-inch water gun with a peak output frequency of approximately 50 Hz. Compared to most SCS data, low ship speeds (4.5-7 knots) and higher than typical firing rates (4 or 6 seconds) helped maximize horizontal resolution, resulting in shot-point spacings between 9 and 21.5 m. A 60-phone, 100-m-long Teledyne oil-filled streamer recorded the water gun shots at near-zero offset. At the end of the leg, a calibrated hydrophone, suspended about 30 m below the water gun, recorded the gun's source signature for 11-30 consecutive shots at each of 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 m below the sea surface. Near-ideal weather conditions during each site survey produced data with high signal-to-noise ratios. The presence of volcaniclastic and/or soil interbeds, as well as highly vesicular lava flow units, significantly affected the seismic reflection character of the volcanic basement. Strong, laterally-coherent internal reflections in the volcanic basement indicate the presence of these layers, which exhibit low velocities and low bulk densities. Generally, laterally-coherent reflections cease where the number and thickness of the low-velocity interbeds diminish. Where the seamount sediment cap is underlain by

  14. Soft computing analysis of the possible correlation between temporal and energy release patterns in seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantaras, Anthony; Katsifarakis, Emmanouil; Artzouxaltzis, Xristos; Makris, John; Vallianatos, Filippos; Varley, Martin

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a preliminary investigation of the possible correlation of temporal and energy release patterns of seismic activity involving the preparation processes of consecutive sizeable seismic events [1,2]. The background idea is that during periods of low-level seismic activity, stress processes in the crust accumulate energy at the seismogenic area whilst larger seismic events act as a decongesting mechanism releasing considerable energy [3,4]. A dynamic algorithm is being developed aiming to identify and cluster pre- and post- seismic events to the main earthquake following on research carried out by Zubkov [5] and Dobrovolsky [6,7]. This clustering technique along with energy release equations dependent on Richter's scale [8,9] allow for an estimate to be drawn regarding the amount of the energy being released by the seismic sequence. The above approach is being implemented as a monitoring tool to investigate the behaviour of the underlying energy management system by introducing this information to various neural [10,11] and soft computing models [1,12,13,14]. The incorporation of intelligent systems aims towards the detection and simulation of the possible relationship between energy release patterns and time-intervals among consecutive sizeable earthquakes [1,15]. Anticipated successful training of the imported intelligent systems may result in a real-time, on-line processing methodology [1,16] capable to dynamically approximate the time-interval between the latest and the next forthcoming sizeable seismic event by monitoring the energy release process in a specific seismogenic area. Indexing terms: pattern recognition, long-term earthquake precursors, neural networks, soft computing, earthquake occurrence intervals References [1] Konstantaras A., Vallianatos F., Varley M.R. and Makris J. P.: ‘Soft computing modelling of seismicity in the southern Hellenic arc', IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 5 (3), pp. 323-327, 2008 [2] Eneva M. and

  15. 78 FR 52148 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    .... Effects to marine mammals from the specified activity are expected to result from underwater sound... southward parallel to the coast. Sea surface temperatures range from around 16 C in winter to 28 C in summer... to the St. Johns River by a 500-ft-wide entrance channel, will largely contain sound produced...

  16. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  17. Geology of the area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Secor, D.T. Jr.; Smith, W.A.; Snoke, A.W.; Peck, L.S.; Pitcher, D.M.; Prowell, D.C.; Simpson, D.H.

    1982-08-10

    This study provides geological background information necessary for an evaluation of the earthquake hazard in an area of induced seismic activity at Monticello Reservoir, South Carolina. This region contains a thick stratified sequence of Proterozoic Z and Cambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. In the early to middle Paleozoic, this sequence was recrystallized and deformed under metamorphic conditions that ranged from greenschist to amphibolite facies and experienced at least two episodes of folding. The region has been intruded by late kinematic to postkinematic granitoid plutons of Silurian and Carboniferous ages and by numerous northwest trending diabase diks of Late Traissic and Early Jurassic age. The region south of Monticello Reservoir in the Carolina slate belt experienced two episodes of faulting in the late Paleozoic and/or early to middle Mesozoic. The older group of faults trends approximately east, has only small displacements, and is characterized by extensive silicifiction of the fault zones. The younger group of faults trends approximately north has experienced dip slip displacements up to 1700 m and is characterized by carbonate mineralization in the fault zones. Both sets of faults are cut by an undeformed diabase dike of Late Triassic or Early Jurassic age. The induced seismic activity around Monticello Reservoir is occurring in a heterogeneous quartz monzonite pluton of Carboniferous age. The pluton contains large enclaves of country rock and is cut by numerous, diversely oriented small faults and joint. These local inhomogeneities in the pluton together with an irregular stress field are interpreted to control the diffuse seismic activity around the reservoir. In view of the apparent absence of lengthy faults it is unlikely that a large-magnitude earthquake will occur in response to the stress and pore pressure changes related to the impoundment of Monticello Reservoir.

  18. Quaternary deformation along the Meeman-Shelby Fault near Memphis, Tennessee, imaged by high-resolution marine and land seismic reflection profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanjun; Magnani, Maria Beatrice; McIntosh, Kirk; Waldron, Brian; Guo, Lei

    2013-06-01

    series of high-resolution seismic reflection surveys was carried out in 2008, 2010, and 2011, providing a total of five new seismic profiles constraining the location and character of the Meeman-Shelby Fault (MSF), about 9 km west of Memphis, Tennessee, in the Central U.S. The MSF is the best documented fault closest to Memphis yet discovered and shows a recurrent fault history. The fault, as imaged by the reflection profiles, is ~45 km long, strikes N25°E, and dips west-northwest ~83°, exhibiting an up-to-the-west sense of motion with a possible right-lateral strike-slip component. The data show that on average, the MSF offsets the Paleozoic unit ~77 m and folds the top of the Cretaceous unit and the Paleocene-Eocene Wilcox Group ~44 and ~25 m, respectively. One seismic profile acquired along the Mississippi River images the bottom of the Quaternary alluvium warped up ~28 m, indicating recent activity of the MSF. Calculated vertical slip rates of the MSF during the deposition of the Upper Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene, and Quaternary sediments are 0.0022, 0.0010, 0.0004, and 0.2154 mm/yr, respectively, suggesting an increase in fault activity during the Quaternary. Consistent with the present stress field and the deformation of the New Madrid seismic zone fault system, we interpret the MSF as a P shear fault in the context of a left-stepping, right-lateral constraining strike-slip fault system under a nearly east-west oriented compressional stress field. Source scaling estimates indicate that the MSF is capable of generating a M6.9 earthquake if rupturing in one event.

  19. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  20. The 2013 earthquake swarm in Helike, Greece: seismic activity at the root of old normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanidis, V.; Deschamps, A.; Papadimitriou, P.; Matrullo, E.; Karakonstantis, A.; Bozionelos, G.; Kaviris, G.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Voulgaris, N.; Bernard, P.; Sokos, E.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-09-01

    The Corinth Rift in Central Greece has been studied extensively during the past decades, as it is one of the most seismically active regions in Europe. It is characterized by normal faulting and extension rates between 6 and 15 mm yr-1 in an approximately N10E° direction. On 2013 May 21, an earthquake swarm was initiated with a series of small events 4 km southeast of Aigion city. In the next days, the seismic activity became more intense, with outbursts of several stronger events of magnitude between 3.3 and 3.7. The seismicity migrated towards the east during June, followed by a sudden activation of the western part of the swarm on July 15th. More than 1500 events have been detected and manually analysed during the period between 2013 May 21 and August 31, using over 15 local stations in epicentral distances up to 30 km and a local velocity model determined by an error minimization method. Waveform similarity-based analysis was performed, revealing several distinct multiplets within the earthquake swarm. High-resolution relocation was applied using the double-difference algorithm HypoDD, incorporating both catalogue and cross-correlation differential traveltime data, which managed to separate the initial seismic cloud into several smaller, densely concentrated spatial clusters of strongly correlated events. Focal mechanism solutions for over 170 events were determined using P-wave first motion polarities, while regional waveform modelling was applied for the calculation of moment tensors for the 18 largest events of the sequence. Selected events belonging to common spatial groups were considered for the calculation of composite mechanisms to characterize different parts of the swarm. The solutions are mainly in agreement with the regional NNE-SSW extension, representing typical normal faulting on 30-50° north-dipping planes, while a few exhibit slip in an NNE-SSW direction, on a roughly subhorizontal plane. Moment magnitudes were calculated by spectral analysis

  1. 78 FR 1941 - Marine Mammals; Incidental Take During Specified Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339, 24 hours a day... potential to injure a marine mammal or marine mammal stock in the wild'' [the MMPA calls this Level A..., breeding, feeding, or sheltering'' [the MMPA calls this Level B harassment] (16 U.S.C. 1362). The...

  2. Fault mirrors of seismically active faults: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Song, S.; Suppe, J.

    2013-12-01

    Many faults are decorated with naturally polished and glossy surfaces named fault mirrors (FMs) formed during slips. The characterization of FMs is of paramount importance to investigate physico-chemical processes controlling dynamic fault mechanics during earthquakes. Here we present detailed microstructural and mineralogical observations of the FMs from borehole cores of seismically active faults. The borehole cores were recovered from 600 to 800 m depth located in the hanging wall of the Hsiaotungshi fault in Taiwan which ruptured during 1935 Mw7.1 Hsinchu-Taichung earthquake. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of FMs show that two distinct textural domains, fault gouge and coated materials (nanograins, melt patchs, and graphite), were cut by a well-defined boundary. Melt patches and graphite, determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), and SEM-EDS analysis, were found to be distributed heterogeneously on the slip surfaces. On the basis of the current kinematic cross section of the Hsiaotungshi fault, all the FMs were exhumed less than 5 km, where ambient temperatures are less than 150°C. It seems that the amorphous materials on the FMs were generated by seismic slips. The sintering nanograins coating the slip surfaces was also suggested to be produced at high slip rates from both natural observation and recent rock deformation experiments. In addition, graphite could be produced by seismic slips and lubricate the fault based on the rock deformation experiments. Our observation suggests that the FMs were composed of several indicators of coseismic events (melt patches, sintering nanograins, and graphite) corresponding to small thermal perturbation generated by seismic slips. Although the contribution of these coseismic indicators on frictional behavior remains largely unknown, it suggests that multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms such as flash heating, powder lubrication and graphitization may be involved during

  3. Swell Activity in the Southern Pacific From Seismic and Infrasonic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, D.; Barruol, G.; Fontaine, F.; Hyvernaud, O.; Maurer, V.; Maamaatuaiahutapu, K.

    2004-12-01

    A temporary network of 10 broad band seismic stations has been deployed in French Polynesia for the Polynesian Lithosphere and Upper Mantle Experiment (PLUME). The stations are installed either on volcanic islands or on atolls of the various archipelagos of French Polynesia to complement the geographic coverage provided by the permanent stations. At all sites, the proximity of the ocean generates a high microseismic noise level. The power spectral density of the seismic data show clear peaks in the 0.05 to 0.09 Hz frequency range (11 to 20 s period), corresponding to typical swell frequencies. In this single frequency peak, the swell-related seismic signal is elliptically polarized and is contained within the horizontal plane. We measure hourly its amplitude and azimuth and demonstrate that in this frequency range, the amplitude of the microseismic "noise" shows very similar variations from station to station and is strongly correlated with the swell amplitude predicted by the NOAA, wind-derived, "WaveWatch" models. Deducing the swell direction from the ground particle motion has to be done with care since the island ground motion can be strongly controlled by local swell refraction processes. We find cases, however, such as in Tahiti or on roughly circular atolls, for which the azimuth of the incoming swell may be well deduced from the seismic data. This therefore demonstrates that the swell-related seismic signal observed in French Polynesia in the single frequency peak can reliably be used as a proxy for swell amplitude and azimuth. The presence of an infrasonic array installed in Tahiti also provides the opportunity to use microbarometric signal to characterize the swell activity. For a period of low wind (which is a strong noise generator) and high swell, we evidenced a clear correlation between the microseismic and infrasonic noise amplitude, together with the predicted and the locally observed swell amplitudes, suggesting that such infrasonic data can be

  4. Field Report on the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, E.; Levander, A.; Schmandt, B.; Palomeras, I.; Harder, S. H.; Creager, K. C.; Vidale, J. E.; Malone, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    In the second half of July we completed the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, one component of the Imaging Magma Under Saint Helens project. A team of ~75 volunteers deployed 3500 seismographs to ~5920 locations on and around Mount St. Helens over the course of 3 weeks. This instrument deployment was accompanied by 23 shots distributed around the volcano. Instrumentation consisted of ~2550 Reftek 125A (Texan) seismographs with 4.5 Hz geophones, and 920 Nodal Seismic recorders with 10 Hz geophones. The shots were also recorded by the permanent stations of the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network and 70 iMUSH broadband seismographs. Fifteen of the shots, 424 kg each, formed two rings around Mount Saint Helens at 15 km and 30 km radius from the summit. Eight of the shots, 828 kg each, were fired at distances of 50 to 80 km from MSH on NW-SE and NE-SW azimuths. The deployment geometry consisted of two lines oriented NW/SE and NE/SW, and three arrays. The offset of the lines ranged from 150 km to 190 km with an average spacing of 200 m. The first array was centered on the volcano with a radius of 30 km, and required both driving and hiking to deploy. Arrays two and three were set out with, and centered on, the NW/SE line. These arrays had a distance range from MSH of 30-75 km and an azimuth range of about 100 degrees. In addition to this large-scale deployment, we set out 7 beamforming arrays approximately collocated with iMUSH broadband seismographs, and above clusters of seismicity in the region. The aperture of these arrays was about 1 km with an instrument spacing of 100 m. The final deployment ended only days before the AGU abstract deadline, so we have not yet examined all of the data. However, the preliminary indications are that signal to noise is excellent: The shots, several of which registered on PNSN as ML>2.1, carried across the entire array, and were recorded as far away as Seattle and Corvallis on permanent stations. The array also recorded a

  5. Waveform Inversion of OBS Data and Illumination/Resolution Analyses on Marine Seismic Data Acquisitions by the Adjoint Wavefield Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Li, K.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a wave-equation based adjoint wavefield method for seismic illumination/resolution analyses and full waveform inversion. A two-way wave-equation is used to calculate directional and diffracted energy fluxes for waves propagating between sources and receivers to the subsurface target. The first-order staggered-grid pressure-velocity formulation, which lacks the characteristic of being self-adjoint is further validated and corrected to render the modeling operator before its practical application. Despite most published papers on synthetic kernel research, realistic applications to two field experiments are demonstrated and emphasize its practical needs. The Fréchet sensitivity kernels are used to quantify the target illumination conditions. For realistic illumination measurements and resolution analyses, two completely different survey geometries and nontrivial pre-conditioning strategies based on seismic data type are demonstrated and compared. From illumination studies, particle velocity responses are more sensitive to lateral velocity variations than pressure records. For waveform inversion, the more accurately estimated velocity model obtained the deeper the depth of investigation would be reached. To achieve better resolution and illumination, closely spaced OBS receiver interval is preferred. Based on the results, waveform inversion is applied for a gas hydrate site in Taiwan for shallow structure and BSR detection. Full waveform approach potentially provides better depth resolution than ray approach. The quantitative analyses, a by-product of full waveform inversion, are useful for quantifying seismic processing and depth migration strategies.llumination/resolution analysis for a 3D MCS/OBS survey in 2008. Analysis of OBS data shows that pressure (top), horizontal (middle) and vertical (bottom) velocity records produce different resolving power for gas hydrate exploration. ull waveform inversion of 8 OBS data along Yuan-An Ridge in SW Taiwan

  6. Increased radon-222 in soil gas because of cumulative seismicity at active faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Katsuaki; Yoshinaga, Tohru; Ueyama, Takayoshi; Asaue, Hisafumi

    2014-12-01

    This study demonstrates how the radon-222 (222Rn) concentration of soil gas at an active fault is sensitive to cumulative recent seismicity by examining seven active faults in western Japan. The 222Rn concentration was found to correlate well with the total earthquake energy within a 100-km radius of each fault. This phenomenon can probably be ascribed to the increase of pore pressure around the source depth of 222Rn in shallow soil caused by frequently induced strain. This increase in pore pressure can enhance the ascent velocity of 222Rn carrier gas as governed by Darcy's law. Anomalous 222Rn concentrations are likely to originate from high gas velocities, rather than increased accumulations of parent nuclides. The high velocities also can yield unusual young gas under the radioactive nonequilibrium condition of short elapsed time since 222Rn generation. The results suggest that ongoing seismicity in the vicinity of an active fault can cause accumulation of strain in shallow fault soils. Therefore, the 222Rn concentration is a possible gauge for the degree of strain accumulation.

  7. Planning the improvement of a seismic network for monitoring active volcanic areas: the experience on Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, A.; Scarfì, L.; Scaltrito, A.; Di Prima, S.; Rapisarda, S.

    2013-10-01

    Seismology and geodesy are generally seen as the most reliable diagnostic tools for monitoring highly active or erupting volcanoes, like Mt. Etna. From the early 1980's, seismic activity was monitored at Mt. Etna by a permanent seismic network, progressively improved in the following years. This network has been considerably enhanced since 2005 by 24-bit digital stations equipped with broad-band (40 s) sensors. Today, thanks to a configuration of 33 broad-band and 12 short-period stations, we have a good coverage of the volcanic area as well as a high quality of the collected data. In the framework of the VULCAMED project a workgroup of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia has taken on the task of developing the seismic monitoring system, through the installation of other seismic stations. The choice of optimal sites must be clearly made through a careful analysis of the geometry of the existing seismic network. In this paper, we applied the Seismic Network Evaluation through Simulation in order to evaluate the performance of the Etna Seismic Network before and after the addition of the stations in the candidate sites. The main advantage of the adopted method is that we can evaluate the improvement of the network before the actual installation of the stations. Our analysis has permitted to identify some critical issues of the current permanent seismic network related to the lack of stations in the southern sector of the volcano, which is nevertheless affected by a number of seismogenic structures. We have showed that the addition of stations at the candidate sites would greatly extend the coverage of the network to the south by significantly reducing the errors in the hypocenter parameters estimation.

  8. Multi-level continuous active source seismic monitoring (ML-CASSM): Application to shallow hydrofracture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Butler-Veytia, B.; Peterson, J.; Gasperikova, E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Induced subsurface processes occur over a wide variety of time scales ranging from seconds (e.g. fracture initiation) to days (e.g. unsteady multiphase flow) and weeks (e.g. induced mineral precipitation). Active source seismic monitoring has the potential to dynamically characterize such alterations and allow estimation of spatially localized rates. However, even optimal timelapse seismic surveys have limited temporal resolution due to both the time required to acquire a survey and the cost of continuous field deployment of instruments and personnel. Traditional timelapse surveys are also limited by experimental repeatability due to a variety of factors including geometry replication and near-surface conditions. Recent research has demonstrated the value of semi-permanently deployed seismic systems with fixed sources and receivers for use in monitoring a variety of processes including near-surface stress changes (Silver et.al. 2007), subsurface movement of supercritical CO2 (Daley et.al. 2007), and preseismic velocity changes in fault regions (Niu et. al. 2008). This strategy, referred to as continuous active source seismic monitoring (CASSM), allows both precise quantification of traveltime changes on the order of 1.1 x 10-7 s and temporal sampling on the order of minutes. However, as previously deployed, CASSM often sacrifices spatial resolution for temporal resolution with previous experiments including only a single source level. We present results from the first deployment of CASSM with a large number of source levels under automated control. Our system is capable of autonomously acquiring full tomographic datasets (10 sources, 72 receivers) in 3 minutes without human intervention, thus allowing active source seismic imaging (rather than monitoring) of processes with short durations. Because no sources or receivers are moved in the acquisition process, signal repeatability is excellent and subtle waveform changes can be interpreted with increased confidence

  9. Geomorphic evidence of active faults growth in the Norcia seismic area (central Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Materazzi, Marco; Aringoli, Domenico; Farabollini, Piero; Giacopetti, Marco; Pambianchi, Gilberto; Tondi, Emanuele; Troiani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Fault-growth by segment linkage is one of the fundamental processes controlling the evolution, in both time and the space, of fault systems. In fact, step-like trajectories shown by length-displacement diagrams for individual fault arrays suggest that the development of evolved structures result by the linkage of single fault segments. The type of interaction between faults and the rate at which faults reactivate not only control the long term tectonic evolution of an area, but also influence the seismic hazard, as earthquake recurrence intervals tend to decrease as fault slip rate increase. The use of Geomorphological investigations represents an important tool to constrain the latest history of active faults. In this case, attention has to be given to recognize morphostructural, historical, environmental features at the surface, since they record the long-term seismic behavior due to the fault growth processes (Tondi and Cello, 2003). The aim of this work is to investigate the long term morphotectonic evolution of a well know seismic area in the central Apennines: the Norcia intramontane basin (Aringoli et al., 2005). The activity of the Norcia seismic area is characterized by moderate events and by strong earthquakes with maximum intensities of X-XI degrees MCS and equivalent magnitudes around 6.5±7.0 (CPTI, 2004). Based on the morphostructural features as well as on the historical seismicity of the area, we may divide the Norcia seismic area into three minor basins roughly NW-SE oriented: the Preci sub-basin in the north; the S. Scolastica and the Castel S. Maria sub-basins in the south. The wider basin (S. Scolastica) is separated from the other two by ridges transversally oriented with respect the basins themselves; they are the geomorphological response to the tectonic deformation which characterizes the whole area. Other geomorphological evidences of tectonic activity are represented by deformation of old summit erosional surfaces, hydrographic network

  10. Structure of the active rift zone and margins of the northern Imperial Valley from Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, A.; Han, L.; Delph, J. R.; White-Gaynor, A. L.; Petit, R.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    First-arrival refraction data were used to create a seismic velocity model of the upper crust across the actively rifting northern Imperial Valley and its margins. The densely sampled seismic refraction data were acquired by the Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) , which is investigating rift processes in the northern-most rift segment of the Gulf of California extensional province and earthquake hazards at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault system. A 95-km long seismic line was acquired across the northern Imperial Valley, through the Salton Sea geothermal field, parallel to the five Salton Butte volcanoes and perpendicular to the Brawley Seismic Zone and major strike-slip faults. Nineteen explosive shots were recorded with 100 m seismometer spacing across the valley and with 300-500 m spacing into the adjacent ranges. First-arrival travel times were picked from shot gathers along this line and a seismic velocity model was produced using tomographic inversion. Sedimentary basement and seismic basement in the valley are interpreted to be sediment metamorphosed by the very high heat flow. The velocity model shows that this basement to the west of the Brawley Seismic Zone is at ~4-km depth. The basement shallows to ~2-km depth in the active geothermal field and Salton Buttes volcanic field which locally coincide with the Brawley Seismic Zone. At the eastern edge of the geothermal field, the basement drops off again to ~3.5-km depth. The eastern edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the along-strike extension of the Sand Hills Fault, an inactive strike-slip fault. The seismic velocities to the east of the fault correspond to metamorphic rock of the Chocolate Mountains, different from the metamorphosed basement in the valley. The western edge of the valley appears to be fault bounded by the active Superstition Hills Fault. To the west of the valley, >4-km deep valley basement extends to the active Superstition Hills Fault. Basement then shallows

  11. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone. 3.70-20 Section 3.70-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE...

  12. 33 CFR 3.70-20 - Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities Far East Marine Inspection Zone. 3.70-20 Section 3.70-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE...

  13. 78 FR 72655 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Bremerton Ferry Terminal Wingwall...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... Specified Activities; Bremerton Ferry Terminal Wingwall Replacement Project AGENCY: National Marine... terminal in Washington State. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting... replacement of wingwalls at the Bremerton ferry terminal in Washington State. On June 12, 2013, NMFS issued...

  14. 77 FR 12010 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Navy Research, Development, Test and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ...NMFS has received an application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) activities at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD). Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting comments on its......

  15. Variation in harbour porpoise activity in response to seismic survey noise

    PubMed Central

    Pirotta, Enrico; Brookes, Kate L.; Graham, Isla M.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Animals exposed to anthropogenic disturbance make trade-offs between perceived risk and the cost of leaving disturbed areas. Impact assessments tend to focus on overt behavioural responses leading to displacement, but trade-offs may also impact individual energy budgets through reduced foraging performance. Previous studies found no evidence for broad-scale displacement of harbour porpoises exposed to impulse noise from a 10 day two-dimensional seismic survey. Here, we used an array of passive acoustic loggers coupled with calibrated noise measurements to test whether the seismic survey influenced the activity patterns of porpoises remaining in the area. We showed that the probability of recording a buzz declined by 15% in the ensonified area and was positively related to distance from the source vessel. We also estimated received levels at the hydrophones and characterized the noise response curve. Our results demonstrate how environmental impact assessments can be developed to assess more subtle effects of noise disturbance on activity patterns and foraging efficiency. PMID:24850891

  16. Seismic protection of frame structures via semi-active control: modeling and implementation issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattulli, Vincenzo; Lepidi, Marco; Potenza, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Theoretical and practical issues concerning the multi-faceted task of mitigating the latero-torsional seismic response of a prototypal frame structure with asymmetric mass distribution are approached. Chevron braces with embedded magnetorheological dampers acting on the interstory drift are used to ensure additional energy dissipation. The semi-active control strategy employed to govern the modification of the damper characteristics via feedback is based on the selection of optimal forces according to a H2/LQG criterion, with respect to which the actual forces are regulated by a clipped-optimal logic. A dynamic observer is used to estimate the state through a non-collocated placement of the acceleration sensors. Several aspects to be addressed throughout the complex process including the design, modelization, and implementation phases of semi-active protection systems are discussed. Finally, experimental results obtained to mitigate the motion induced by ground excitation in a large-scale laboratory prototype, simulating the seismic response of a two-story building, are summarized.

  17. Active faults and induced seismicity in the Val d'Agri area (Southern Apennines, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valoroso, L.; Improta, L.; Chiaraluce, L.; Di Stefano, R.; Ferranti, L.; Govoni, A.; Chiarabba, C.

    2009-07-01

    The NW-SE trending Val d'Agri extensional basin is one of the regions in Italy with the highest seismogenic potential. Field data do not univocally define which of the fault systems bordering the basin on the two opposite sides is accommodating the active deformation. In this study, we detect and locate, by using an automatic picking procedure, almost 2000 low-magnitude earthquakes (-0.2 < ML < 2.7) recorded by a dense network during a 13-months-long seismic experiment. Events are mostly located along the southwestern flank of the basin. To the south, intense swarm-type microseismicity defines a major cluster ~5km wide from 1 to 5km depth. To the west, a clear alignment of events, characterized by normal faulting kinematics, defines a NE-dipping normal fault between 1 and 6km depth. The upward continuation of this structure, ~5km long, matches a mapped active normal fault recognized by field and palaeoseismological surveys. A temporal correlation found between the intense swarm-type microseismicity and the water level changes in the nearby artificial Pertusillo lake suggests that this seismicity is reservoir-induced.

  18. Upper plate responses to active spreading ridge/transform subduction: The tectonics, basin evolution, and seismicity of the Taita area, Chile Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, S.; Prior, D. ); Styles, P.; Murdie, R. ); Agar, S.; Turner, P. )

    1993-02-01

    Integrated field geophysical, structural and stratigraphic studies are attempting to elucidate the mechanisms and consequences of the Late Miocene-present day subduction of the Chile Ridge triple junction system. Preliminary data indicate a shallow plane of seismicity at about 15 km to 20 km depth below the Taitao peninsula. The depths correspond to the predicted depth range of subducted upper ocean crust. The calculated Bouguer anomaly map cannot be explained by the upper plate geology, suggesting that gravity is influenced by heterogeneities in the subducting oceanic plate. Seismic data imply that a subducted transform system underlying the inner Taitao Peninsula is still an active structure. A series of Middle-Late Tertiary sedimentary basins lie inboard of the triple junction. Within the Cosmelli basin, abrupt marine to continental facies transitions give clear evidence of base level changes. The amount of basinward shift of facies across sequence boundaries gets progressively greater up stratigraphy, indicating progressively greater base level changes. The lower part of the basin fill is folded and then thrusted eastward as a series of imbricates, while the overlying, greater thickness of fluvial sediments are only gently tilted westwards. We provisionally interpret this geometry to indicate that the early basin fill was deforming due to contractional tectonics while the later basin fill was being deposited. This complex basin history may reflect initiation and development of triple junction subduction.

  19. 75 FR 5045 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... of detecting differences in temperature from thermal energy (heat) radiated from living bodies or... combination with remotely sensed habitat parameters (i.e., sea surface temperature and chlorophyll), these... DPI to marine mammals is considered highly unlikely. Therefore, the risk of injury or mortality is...

  20. 75 FR 41440 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... vessels will cease any movement in the area if a marine mammal other than a right whale is sighted within... cease any movement in the construction area if a right whale is sighted within or approaching to a... movement. (D) The material barges and tugs used for repair work shall transit from the operations dock...

  1. 76 FR 43267 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... by causing disruption of natural behavioral patterns, including, but not limited to, migration... optical and electronic sensors are also employed for target clearance. If any marine mammals are detected... sensors (IR), and visual means. An alternative area would be selected if any cetaceans or vessels...

  2. 78 FR 80385 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... areas (see Figure 2 in Apache's application). Vessels will lay and retrieve nodal sensors on the sea... the intertidal and marine environment. For the land operator, a single-component sensor land node will... submersible multi-component system made up of three velocity sensors and a hydrophone (see Figure 5...

  3. 78 FR 77433 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Structure Monitoring, Intertidal Biodiversity Surveys, Marine Protected Area Baseline Monitoring, Intertidal... application (see ADDRESSES). Biodiversity Surveys, which are part of a long-term monitoring project and are... measurements. Table 2 in PISCO's application (see ADDRESSES) lists established biodiversity sites in Oregon...

  4. 77 FR 64320 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... monitoring projects include Community Structure Monitoring, Intertidal Biodiversity Surveys, Marine Protected... Table 1 in PISCO's application (see ADDRESSES). Biodiversity Surveys, which are part of a long-term... biodiversity sites in Oregon and California. In September 2007, the state of California began establishing...

  5. 77 FR 72327 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Biodiversity Surveys, Marine Protected Area Baseline Monitoring, Intertidal Recruitment Monitoring, and Ocean... each site are presented in Table 1 in PISCO's application (see ADDRESSES). Biodiversity Surveys, which... ADDRESSES) lists established biodiversity sites in Oregon and California. In September 2007, the state...

  6. 76 FR 62778 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in the Massachusetts Bay for a period of 1 year. DATES: This... Natural Gas Port Facility in Massachusetts Bay AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National...) long, 24-inch (61-centimeter) outside diameter natural gas pipeline which interconnects the Port to...

  7. 78 FR 47495 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... and weather conditions will influence when and where the open- water marine surveys will be conducted... sub-seafloor) using acoustic methods. The ice gouge surveys will be conducted using the conventional survey method where the acoustic instrumentation will be towed behind the survey vessel. These...

  8. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGES

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; ...

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  9. Perspectives on the use of Active Structural Control Systems for Seismic Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, G.; Iervolino, I.

    2007-12-01

    In thinking about feasibility of earthquake early warning systems (EEWS), the actual question to ask is if they have a potential as tools for real-time seismic risk mitigation, which implies seismology to converge alongside earthquake engineering to real-time loss reduction. In fact, although the evacuation of buildings requires warning time not available in many urbanized areas threatened by seismic hazard, if they may still be used for the real- time protection of critical facilities using automatic systems is the focus of a great deal of research. To this aim, possible interaction between EEWS and semi-active structural control is to be investigated. As a matter of fact, real-time seismology, via the rapid estimation of earthquake's features based on measurements made on the first seconds of the P-waves, allows to predict peak ground motion features of earthquake engineering interest, as the response spectrum at a site, before the quake strikes. This opens new prospects for the adoption of feed-forward control algorithms able to adapt the dynamic features of the structure to better withstand the ensuing ground motion. Nonetheless, feasibility analysis of such EEWS requires the assessment of the risk reduction and cost efficiency due to the security action. An important point, in respect to classical risk assessment, is related to the uncertainties in the estimation of the event and ground motion features, as well as their evolution in time and space. In fact, the performance target of this kind of systems is no longer only related to the maximization of the warning time. The key issue is the calibration, in a full probabilistic approach, of the alarm thresholds and of the decisional rules in order to maximize the loss reduction following the decision, which should account for costs due to false alarms. In this paper these issues, in respect of structural control for seismic early warning in the performance-based earthquake engineering framework, are discussed.

  10. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  11. Syn-rift volcanism and seafloor-spreading in the northern Gulf of Mexico: results from the GUMBO marine seismic refraction project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, D. R.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Kneller, E. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    Continental rifting and seafloor-spreading between North America and the Yucatán Block during the Jurassic to early Cretaceous formed the small ocean basin known today as the Gulf of Mexico. The lack of deeply-penetrating geophysical data in the Gulf of Mexico limited early reconstructions of the timing and location of the rift-to-drift transition, particularly with respect to the influence of magmatism on the breakup of continental crust and the onset of seafloor-spreading. To better understand the deep structure of this economically important basin, we acquired four marine seismic refraction profiles in the northern Gulf of Mexico from the shelf to deep water as part of the 2010 Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening project (GUMBO). We use travel times from long-offset reflections and refractions to image compressional seismic velocities in the sediments, crystalline crust, and upper mantle using an iterative tomographic inversion. GUMBO Line 3 extends from offshore Alabama through the De Soto Canyon towards the central Gulf of Mexico. We interpret velocities >5.0 km/s in the sediment layer landward of the Florida Escarpment as a Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform. Crystalline crust with velocities between 5.5-7.5 km/s thins significantly from 23 km to 7 km across a narrow necking zone. A deep, localized region of anomalously high seismic velocities (>7.5 km/s) at the base of crystalline crust exceeds those of continental lower crust in the eastern US. We interpret this section of GUMBO 3 to represent mafic under-plating and/or infiltration of asthenospheric melts, common at volcanic rifted margins. The seaward end of GUMBO 3 has seismic velocities consistent with mafic ocean crust produced by normal seafloor-spreading (6.0-7.5 km/s); this observation is supported by a consistent crustal thickness of ~7 km and minimal lateral heterogeneities in velocity structure. GUMBO Line 2 extends from offshore Louisiana southward across the Sigsbee Escarpment. We find a massive

  12. Biological activities and potential health benefits of bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Vo, Thanh-Sang; Ngo, Dai-Nghiep; Wijesekara, Isuru; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2012-11-01

    Marine organisms have been recognized as rich sources of bioactive compounds with valuable nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potentials. Recently, marine bioactive peptides have gained much attention because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Notably, these peptides exhibit various biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anti-proliferative, anticoagulant, calcium-binding, anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activities. This review mainly presents biological activities of peptides from marine organisms and emphasizing their potential applications in foods as well as pharmaceutical areas.

  13. Investigating active faulting in the south-central Chilean forearc by local seismicity and moment tensor inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Bohm, M.; Echtler, H.; Melnick, D.; Bruhn, C.; Bataille, K.

    2004-12-01

    The seismological ISSA experiment is giving a detailed insight into the seismicity distribution of southern Chile, where major earthquakes (M>8) have repeatedly ruptured the surface, involving vertical offsets of several meters. During a nearly 5-month observation period in 1999 and 2000 a temporary seismic network recorded approximately 350 local earthquakes. Two localized areas, North and South of the Arauco peninsula, showed a very high seismic activity in and above the interplate seismic zone of the Nazca-South America convergent margin. We used a double-difference relocation technique to obtain detailed images of the seismicity distribution in these areas. We also determined fault plane solutions to interpret the observed alignment of earthquakes hypocenters. Due to the low signal to noise ratio reliable first motion reading were difficult to achieve, which only very few clear readings. To overcome this problem we used moment tensor inversions to estimate reliable source mechanisms. However, for small magnitude earthquakes (<5) the biggest obstacle is the alignment of synthetic and observed waveforms. Inverting only for the amplitude spectrum, and therefore dropping the information in the phase spectrum can mostly circumvent the alignment problem. The two clusters investigated show high waveform correlation coefficients for most of the earthquakes indicating that possibly changes in fluid pressure can be responsible for triggering the events. After relocation most of the hypocenters in each of the two clusters align on a eastward dipping fault. Source mechanisms obtained indicate thrust faulting, where one of the possible fault planes aligns with the steep eastward dipping fault based on the seismicity distribution. These faults are reaching down to the top of the seismogenic zone and may serve as pathways for ascending fluids released in the subduction process. Active crustal-scale faulting below and active uplift of the coast account for active tectonic

  14. The offshore Yangsan fault activity in the Quaternary, SE Korea: Analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Moon, Seonghoon; Jou, Hyeong-Tae; Lee, Gwang Hoon; Yoo, Dong Geun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kwang Hee

    2016-12-01

    The NNE-trending dextral Yangsan fault is a > 190-km-long structure in the Korean Peninsula traced to the southeastern coast. The scarcity of Quaternary deposits onland precludes any detailed investigation of the Quaternary activity and structure of the Yangsan fault using seismic reflection profiling. We acquired offshore high-resolution seismic profiles to investigate the extension of the Yangsan fault and constrain its Quaternary activity using stratigraphic markers. The seismic profiles reveal a NNE-trending fault system consisting of a main fault and an array of subsidiary faults that displaced Quaternary sequences. Stratigraphic analysis of seismic profiles indicates that the offshore faults were activated repeatedly in the Quaternary. The up-to-the-east sense of throw on the main fault and plan-view pattern of the fault system are explained by dextral strike-slip faulting. The main fault, when projected toward the Korean Peninsula along its strike, aligns well with the Yangsan fault. We suggest that the offshore fault system is a continuation of the Yangsan fault and has spatial correlation with weak but ongoing seismicity.

  15. Precursory Activity Before Larger Events in Greece Revealed by Aggregated Seismicity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamaki, Angeliki K.; Roberts, Roland G.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the seismicity rate behaviour in and around Greece during 2009, seeking significant changes in rate preceding larger events. For individual larger events it is difficult to clearly distinguish precursory rate changes from other, possibly unrelated, variations in seismicity. However, when we aggregate seismicity data occurring within a radius of 10 km and in a 50-day window prior to earthquakes with, e.g. magnitude ≥3.5, the resulting aggregated time series show a clearly increasing trend starting 2-3 weeks prior to the "mainshock" time. We apply statistical tests to investigate if the observed behaviour may be simply consistent with random (poissonian) variations, or, as some earlier studies suggest, with clustering in the sense that high activity rates at some time may imply increased rates later, and thus (randomly) greater probability of larger coming events than for periods of lower seismicity. In this case, rate increases have little useful predictive power. Using data from the entire catalogue, the aggregated rate changes before larger events are clearly and strongly statistically significant and cannot be explained by such clustering. To test this we choose events at random from the catalogue as potential "mainshocks". The events preceding the randomly chosen earthquakes show less pronounced rate increases compared to the observed rate changes prior to larger events. Similar behaviour is observed in data sub-sets. However, statistical confidence decreases for geographical subsets containing few "mainshocks" as it does when data are weighted such that "mainshocks" with many preceding events are strongly downweighted relative to those with fewer. The analyses suggest that genuine changes in aggregated rate do occur prior to larger events and that this behaviour is not due to a small number of mainshocks with many preceding events dominating the analysis. It does not automatically follow that it will be possible to routinely observe precursory

  16. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  17. Systematic detection of seismic activity before recent large earthquakes in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Z.; Wang, B.; Ruan, X.; Meng, X.; Hongwei, T.; Long, F.; Su, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sometimes large shallow earthquakes are preceded by increased local seismic activity, known as "foreshocks". However, the exact relationship between foreshocks and mainshock nucleation is still in debate. Several studies have found accelerating or migrating foreshock activity right before recent large earthquakes along major plate boundary faults, indicating that foreshocks are likely driven by slow-slip events. However, it is still not
clear whether similar features could be observed for earthquakes that occur away from plate-boundary regions.
Here we conduct a systematic detection of possible foreshock activity around the times of 6 recent large earthquakes in China.
The candidate events include the 2008 Ms7.3 Yutian, Ms8.0 Wenchuan, the 2010 Ms7.0 Yushu,
the 2013 Ms7.0 Lushan, the 2014 Ms7.3 Yutian, and the 2014 Ms6.5 Zhaotong earthquakes. Among them, the 2010 Yushu and 2014 Yutian mainshocks had clear evidence of M4-5 immediate foreshocks listed in regional earthquake catalogs, while the rest
did not. In each case, we use waveforms of local earthquakes listed in the catalog as templates and scan through continuous waveforms recorded by both permanent and temporary seismic stations around the epicentral region of each mainshock. Our waveform matching method can detect at least a few times more events than listed in the catalog. Our initial results show a wide range of behaviors. For the 2010 Yushu and 2014 Yutian cases, the M4-5 foreshocks were followed by many smaller-size events that could be considered as their aftershocks. For the Wenchuan case, we did not observe any obvious foreshock in the immediate vicinity of the epicenter. However, we found one swarm sequence that shows systematic migration a few months before the Wenchuan mainshock. Our next step is to relocate these newly detected events to search for spatio-temporal evolutions before each mainshock, as well
as performing Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) modeling to examine

  18. The analysis of interseismic GPS observation and its implication to seismic activity in Taiwan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. C.; Yu, S. B.; Shin, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is an active tectonic area with about 80 mm/yr plate convergence rate. To understand the crustal deformation and seismic potential in Taiwan area. We derived 2009-2014 interseismic GPS velocity field and strain rate, implicate to seismic activity of 2005-2014. Data collected by 281 sites of Taiwan Continuous GPS (cGPS) Array and processed with GAMIT/GLOBK software. Stacking of power spectral densities from cGPS data in Taiwan, we found the errors type can be described as a combination of white noise and flicker noise. The common errors are removed by stacking 50 cGPS sites with data period larger than 5 years. By removing the common errors, the precision of GPS data has been further improved to 2.3 mm, 1.9 mm, and 6.9 mm in the E, N, U components, respectively. After strictly data quality control, time series analysis and noise analysis, we derive an interseismic ITRF2008 velocity field from 2009 to 2014 in the Taiwan area. The general pattern is quite similar with previous studies, but the station density is much larger and spatial coverage better. Based on this interseismic velocity field, we estimate the crustal strain rate in Taiwan area. Approximately half of plate convergence strain rate is accommodated on the fold and thrust belt of western Taiwan and another half is taken up in the Longitudinal Valley and the Coastal Range in eastern Taiwan. The maximum dilatation rates is about -0.75~-0.9 μstrain/yr in WNW-ESE direction. The velocities in western Taiwan generally show a fan-shaped pattern, consistent with the direction of maximum compression tectonic stress. Extension in the E-W direction is observed at the Central Range area, the focal mechanism results also indicate the earthquake type here most are normal faults. In northern Taiwan, the velocity vectors reveal clockwise rotation, indicating the on-going extensional deformation related to the back-arc extension of the Okinawa Trough. In southern Taiwan, the horizontal velocity increases from

  19. Crosswell CASSM(Continuous Active-Source Seismic Monitoring): Recent Developments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, T. M.; Niu, F.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Solbau, R.; Silver, P. G.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous active-source monitoring using borehole sources and sensors in a crosswell configuration has proven to be a useful tool for monitoring subsurface processes (Silver, et al, 2007; Daley, et al, 2007; Niu, et al, 2008). This recent work has focused on two applications: monitoring stress changes related to seismicity and monitoring changes in fluid distribution related to geologic storage of CO2. Field tests have demonstrated precision in travel time measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-7 s, and in velocity perturbation measurement of up to 1.1 x 10-5 (Niu, et al 2008). In this talk I will summarize our preceding work and discuss current developments. Current efforts address both hardware and design challenges to improving the methodology. Hardware issues include deployment of multiple piezoelectric sources in shallow and deep boreholes, source and sensor deployment on tubing inside casing, and deployment with other monitoring instrumentation. Design issues are focused on use of multiple sources and/or sensors to obtain optimal spatial resolution for monitoring processes in the interwell region. This design issue can be investigated with optimal experiment design theory. New field experiments for monitoring seismicity (at SAFOD) and CO2 injection (at a US Dept of Energy pilot) are in the design/deployment stage. Current status of these projects will be discussed. References: Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Niu, F., Majer, E.L., 2007, Active source monitoring of crosswell seismic travel time for stress induced changes, Bulletin of Seismological Society of America, v97, n1B, p281-293. Daley, T.M., R.D. Solbau, J.B. Ajo-Franklin, S.M. Benson, 2007, Continuous active-source monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer, Geophysics, v72, n5, pA57-A61, DOI:10.1190/1.2754716. Niu, F., Silver, P.G., Daley, T.M., Cheng, X., Majer, E.L., 2008, Preseismic velocity changes observed from active source monitoring at the Parkfield SAFOD drill site, Nature, 454, 204-208, DOI:10

  20. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  1. Tectonic history and thrust-fold deformation style of seismically active structures near Coalinga

    SciTech Connect

    Namson, J.S. ); Davis, T.L.; Lagoe, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    The stratigraphy of the Coalinga region can be divided into tectostratigraphic facies whose boundaries delineate two major tectonic events - one in the mid-Cenozoic (38-17 Ma) and one in the late Cenozoic (less than 3 Ma). The succession of these tectostratigraphic facies, and an integration of geology, subsurface well data, a seismic-reflection profile, and earthquake seismicity on a retrodeformable cross section, yield a model for the tectonic evolution of the Coalinga region. This model suggests that the structural style of both deformational events is characteristic of fold and thrust belts. The model also indicates that the causative fault of the May 2 earthquake is a ramped thrust. The results of this study, in combination with regional geologic relations, suggest that the Coalinga region is part of an active fold and thrust belt which borders the west and south sides of the San Joaquin Valley. The potential for future earthquakes due to movement of other blind thrust faults within this belt should be evaluated.

  2. Dating previously balanced rocks in seismically active parts of California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.W.; Brune, J.N.; Liu, T.; Zreda, M.; Yount, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Precariously balanced boulders that could be knocked down by strong earthquake ground motion are found in some seismically active areas of southern California and Nevada. In this study we used two independent surface-exposure dating techniques - rock-varnish microlamination and cosmogenic 36Cl dating methodologies - to estimate minimum- and maximum-limiting ages, respectively, of the precarious boulders and by inference the elapsed time since the sites were shaken down. The results of the exposure dating indicate that all of the precarious rocks are >10.5 ka and that some may be significantly older. At Victorville and Jacumba, California, these results show that the precarious rocks have not been knocked down for at least 10.5 k.y., a conclusion in apparent conflict with some commonly used probabilistic seismic hazard maps. At Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the ages of the precarious rocks are >10.5 to >27.0 ka, providing an independent measure of the minimum time elapsed since faulting occurred on the Solitario Canyon fault.

  3. Marine Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Bernard L.

    The five papers in this publication on marine careers were selected so that science teachers, guidance councilors, and students could benefit from the experience and knowledge of individuals active in marine science. The areas considered are indicated by the titles: Professional Careers in Marine Science with the Federal Government, Marine Science…

  4. Biological activities and health effects of terpenoids from marine fungi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Li, Yong-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed by the consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical products due to their various health beneficial effects. Hence, it can be suggested that bioactive functional ingredients from marine bioresources and their by-products are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. Marine-derived fungi produce a vast array of secondary metabolites including terpenes, steroids, polyketides, peptides, alkaloids, and polysaccharides. These secondary metabolites serve many biopharmaceutical purposes. This chapter discusses about marine fungi-derived terpenoids and presents an overview of their beneficial health effects.

  5. On dependence of seismic activity on 11 year variations in solar activity and/or cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhantayev, Zhumabek; Khachikyan, Galina; Breusov, Nikolay

    2014-05-01

    It is found in the last decades that seismic activity of the Earth has a tendency to increase with decreasing solar activity (increasing cosmic rays). A good example of this effect may be the growing number of catastrophic earthquakes in the recent rather long solar minimum. Such results support idea on existence a solar-lithosphere relationship which, no doubts, is a part of total pattern of solar-terrestrial relationships. The physical mechanism of solar-terrestrial relationships is not developed yet. It is believed at present that one of the main contenders for such mechanism may be the global electric circuit (GEC) - vertical current loops, piercing and electrodynamically coupling all geospheres. It is also believed, that the upper boundary of the GEC is located at the magnetopause, where magnetic field of the solar wind reconnects with the geomagnetic field, that results in penetrating solar wind energy into the earth's environment. The effectiveness of the GEC operation depends on intensity of cosmic rays (CR), which ionize the air in the middle atmosphere and provide its conductivity. In connection with the foregoing, it can be expected: i) quantitatively, an increasing seismic activity from solar maximum to solar minimum may be in the same range as increasing CR flux; and ii) in those regions of the globe, where the crust is shipped by the magnetic field lines with number L= ~ 2.0, which are populated by anomalous cosmic rays (ACR), the relationship of seismic activity with variations in solar activity will be manifested most clearly, since there is a pronounced dependence of ACR on solar activity variations. Checking an assumption (i) with data of the global seismological catalog of the NEIC, USGS for 1973-2010, it was found that yearly number of earthquake with magnitude M≥4.5 varies into the 11 year solar cycle in a quantitative range of about 7-8% increasing to solar minimum, that qualitatively and quantitatively as well is in agreement with the

  6. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoirparameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jinsong; Dickens, Thomas

    2007-04-09

    This study investigates the effects of uncertainty inrockphysics models on estimates of reservoir parameters from jointinversion of seismic AVA and CSEMdata. The reservoir parameters arerelated to electrical resistivity using Archie's law, and to seismicvelocity and density using the Xu-White model. To account for errors inthe rock-physics models, we use two methods to handle uncertainty: (1)the model outputs are random functions with modes or means given by themodel predictions, and (2) the parameters of the models are themselvesrandom variables. Using a stochastic framework and Markov Chain MonteCarlo methods, we obtain estimates of reservoir parameters as well as ofthe uncertainty in the estimates. Synthetic case studies show thatuncertainties in both rock-physics models and their associated parameterscan have significant effects on estimates of reservoir parameters. Ourmethod provides a means of quantifying how the uncertainty in theestimated reservoir parameters increases with increasing uncertainty inthe rock-physics model and in the model parameters. We find that in theexample we present, the estimation of water saturation is relatively lessaffected than is the estimation of clay content and porosity.

  7. Seismic Source Mechanism of Gas-Piston Activity at Kilauea Inferred from Inversion of Broadband Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B. A.; Dawson, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Among the broad range of magmatic processes observed in the Overlook pit crater in Kilauea Caldera are recurring episodes of gas-piston activity. This activity is accompanied by repetitive seismic signals recorded by a broadband network deployed in the summit caldera. We use the seismic data to model the source mechanism of representative gas-piston events in a sequence that occurred on 20-25 August 2011 during a gentle inflation of the Kilauea summit. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range of 1 - 10,000 s. Most of the seismic wave field produced by gas-pistoning originates in a source region ~1 km below the eastern perimeter of Halema'uma'u pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks featuring an east-striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north-striking crack (inclined sheet) dipping 65° to the east. Each gas-piston event is characterized by a rapid inflation lasting a few minutes trailed by a slower deflation ramp extending up to 15 minutes, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes accompanying the growth and collapse of a layer of foam at the top of the magma column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed pressure and volume variations can be modeled with the following attributes: foam thickness (10 - 50 m), foam cell diameter (0.04 - 0.10 m), and gas-injection velocity (0.01 - 0.06 m s-1). Based on the change in the period of very-long-period oscillations accompanying the onset of the gas-piston signal and tilt evidence, the height of

  8. Reflection seismic investigation of the geodynamically active West -Bohemia/Vogtland region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, N.; Buske, S.; Shapiro, S. A.; Wigger, P.

    2013-12-01

    The West Bohemia-Vogtland region in central Europe attracts much scientific interest due to recurrent earthquake swarms and continuous exhalation of CO2 dominated fluid from the subsurface. Seismological and geochemical studies reveal (1) significant upper mantle derived content of the emitted fluid, (2) an updoming of the MOHO below that area (3) possible existence of a magmatic fluid reservoir in the upper mantle and (4) fluid activity as a possible trigger for the swarm earthquakes. In this study the subsurface structure beneath the region is investigated by reprocessing the deep reflection seismic profile 9HR, which runs almost directly across the swarm area. The migrated image confirms the upwelling of the MOHO known from receiver function studies. Directly below one of the major gas escape centres, channel like fault structures are observed which seem to have their roots at the MOHO. They may represent deep reaching degassing channels that allow direct transport of mantle-derived fluid. The middle and lower crust appears highly fractured below the swarm area. This may result in mantle fluid ascending through the crust and then getting blocked in the crust. Such blockage could result in building up of an over-pressured fluid zone at the bottom of near surface rocks. After a critical state is reached, the over-pressured fluid may have sufficient energy to force its way above into near surface rocks and to trigger seismicity. Since the swarm seismicity is found to be restricted along a plane only, such intrusion might have taken place along a semi-permeable zone that extends from the fractured lower crust into the near surface rocks. A comparison of the spatio-temporal evolution of the recent swarms in the years 2000 and 2008 with the subsurface reflectivity shows that in both cases the swarm activity initiates at the upper edge of a highly diffuse reflectivity zone, moves upward, bends at a bright spot above and finally stops after travelling a few kilometers

  9. Reflection seismic investigation of the geodynamically active West-Bohemia/Vogtland region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullick, Nirjhar; Buske, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The West Bohemia-Vogtland region in central Europe attracts much scientific interest due to recurrent earthquake swarms and continuous exhalation of CO2 dominated fluid from the subsurface. Seismological and geochemical studies reveal 1) significant upper mantle derived content of the emitted fluid, 2) an updoming of the MOHO below that area 3) possible existence of a magmatic fluid reservoir in the upper mantle and 4) fluid activity as a possible trigger for the swarm earthquakes. In this study the subsurface structure beneath the region is investigated by reprocessing the deep reflection seismic profile 9HR, which runs almost directly across the swarm area. The migrated image confirms the upwelling of the MOHO known from receiver function studies. Directly below one of the major gas escape centres, channel like fault structures are observed which seem to have their roots at the MOHO. They may represent deep reaching degassing channels that allow direct transport of mantle-derived fluid. The middle and lower crust appears highly fractured below the swarm area. This may result in mantle fluid ascending through the crust and then getting blocked in the crust. Such blockage could result in building up of an over-pressured fluid zone at the bottom of near surface rocks. After a critical state is reached, the over-pressured fluid may have sufficient energy to force its way above into near surface rocks and to trigger seismicity. Since the swarm seismicity is found to be restricted along a plane only, such intrusion might have taken place along a semi-permeable zone that extends from the fractured lower crust into the near surface rocks. A comparison of the spatio-temporal evolution of the recent swarms in the years 2000 and 2008 with the subsurface reflectivity shows that in both cases the swarm activity initiates at the upper edge of a highly diffuse reflectivity zone, moves upward, bends at a bright spot above and finally stops after travelling a few kilometers along

  10. Marine organic aerosol and oceanic biological activity: what we know and what we need (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.

    2009-12-01

    Observations carried out in the North Atlantic as well as in other marine locations evidenced a seasonal dependence of sub micron particle chemical composition on biological oceanic activity and a potentially important marine aerosol organic component from primary and/or secondary formation processes associated to marine vegetation and its seasonal cycle. Primary organics generated by bubble bursting in high biological activity periods are almost entirely water insoluble (WIOM up to 96 ± 2 % )and are constituted by aggregation of lipopolysaccharides exuded by phytoplankton with dominant surface tension character. In many marine environments the secondary organic fraction is dominated by MSA and by several oxygenated species (mainly carboxylic acids). New measurements also show the potential importance of secondary organic N species (biogenic amine salts ). However a large fraction of the secondary organic fraction (SOA) is still not characterized and the precursors are not identified. For modeling marine organics, besides reducing the uncertainty in the knowledge of the chemical composition and new precursors, it is of crucial importance to link marine aerosol organic composition to satellite products that could be better proxy for marine biological activity and of its decomposition products than chlorophyll-a.

  11. Variations in stable- isotope ratios of ground waters in seismically active regions of California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Chi-Yu, King

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of D and 18O concentrations of ground waters in seismically active regions are potentially useful in earthquake prediction and in elucidating mechanisms operative during earthquakes. Principles of this method are discussed and some preliminary data regarding a magnitude 5.7 earthquake at the Oroville Dam in 1975 and a series of events near San Juan Bautista in 1980 are presented to support the utility of such measurements. After earthquakes, the D content of nearby ground waters increased by several permil while the 18O content remained constant. This increase implies that H2O may have either decomposed or reacted to form molecular H2 at depth. It is emphasized that many areas must be investigated for these effects in order to find a sufficient number of 'sensitive' water wells and springs to permit a truly effective program of earthquake research. -Authors

  12. Theoretical model of DC electric field formation in the ionosphere stimulated by seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. M.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Yaschenko, A. K.

    2005-09-01

    Seismic activity is accompanied by emanation of soil gases into the atmosphere. These gases transfer positive and negative charged aerosols. Atmospheric convection of charged aerosols forms external electric current, which works as a source of perturbation in the atmosphere ionosphere electric circuit. It is shown that DC electric field generated in the ionosphere by this current reaches up to 10 mV/m, while the long-term vertical electric field disturbances near the Earth's surface do not exceed 100 V/m. Such a limitation of the near-ground field is caused by the formation of potential barrier for charged particles at the Earth's surface in a process of their transport from soil to atmosphere. This paper presents the method for calculation of the electric field in the atmosphere and the ionosphere generated by given distribution of external electric current in the atmosphere.

  13. 78 FR 35363 - Marine Mammals; Incidental Take During Specified Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972, as amended (MMPA), and its implementing regulations, we, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service or we), are finalizing regulations that authorize the nonlethal, incidental, unintentional take of small numbers of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and polar bears (Ursus maritimus) during oil and gas Industry......

  14. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. John; Denny, F. Brett; Follmer, Leon R.; Masters, John M.

    1999-05-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  15. Quaternary grabens in southernmost Illinois: Deformation near an active intraplate seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, W.J.; Denny, F.B.; Follmer, L.R.; Masters, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Narrow grabens displace Quaternary sediments near the northern edge of the Mississippi Embayment in extreme southern Illinois, east-central United States. Grabens are part of the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex (FAFC), which has been recurrently active throughout Phanerozoic time. The FAFC strikes directly toward the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ), scene of some of the largest intra-plate earthquakes in history. The NMSZ and FAFC share origin in a failed Cambrian rift (Reelfoot Rift). Every major fault zone of the FAFC in Illinois exhibits Quaternary displacement. The structures appear to be strike-slip pull-apart grabens, but the magnitude and direction of horizontal slip and their relationship to the current stress field are unknown. Upper Tertiary strata are vertically displaced more than 100 m, Illinoian and older Pleistocene strata 10 to 30 m, and Wisconsinan deposits 1 m or less. No Holocene deformation has been observed. Average vertical slip rates are estimated at 0.01 to 0.03 mm/year, and recurrence intervals for earthquakes of magnitude 6 to 7 are on the order of 10,000s of years for any given fault. Previous authors remarked that the small amount of surface deformation in the New Madrid area implies that the NMSZ is a young feature. Our findings show that tectonic activity has shifted around throughout the Quaternary in the central Mississippi Valley. In addition to the NMSZ and southern Illinois, the Wabash Valley (Illinois-Indiana), Benton Hills (Missouri), Crowley's Ridge (Arkansas-Missouri), and possibly other sites have experienced Quaternary tectonism. The NMSZ may be only the latest manifestation of seismicity in an intensely fractured intra-plate region.

  16. Determination of temporal changes in seismic velocity caused by volcanic activity in and around Hakone volcano, central Japan, using ambient seismic noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukutake, Yohei; Ueno, Tomotake; Miyaoka, Kazuki

    2016-12-01

    Autocorrelation functions (ACFs) for ambient seismic noise are considered to be useful tools for estimating temporal changes in the subsurface structure. Velocity changes at Hakone volcano in central Japan, where remarkable swarm activity has often been observed, were investigated in this study. Significant velocity changes were detected during two seismic activities in 2011 and 2013. The 2011 activity began immediately after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, suggesting remote triggering by the dynamic stress changes resulting from the earthquake. During the 2013 activity, which exhibited swarm-like features, crustal deformations were detected by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations and tiltmeters, suggesting a pressure increment of a Mogi point source at a depth of 7 km and two shallow open cracks. Waveforms that were bandpass-filtered between 1 and 3 Hz were used to calculate ACFs using a one-bit correlation technique. Fluctuations in the velocity structure were obtained using the stretching method. A gradual decrease in the velocity structure was observed prior to the 2013 activity at the KOM station near the central cone of the caldera, which started after the onset of crustal expansion observed by the GNSS stations. Additionally, a sudden significant velocity decrease was observed at the OWD station near a fumarolic area just after the onset of the 2013 activity and the tilt changes. The changes in the stress and strain caused by the deformation sources were likely the main contributors to these decreases in velocity. The precursory velocity reduction at the KOM station likely resulted from the inflation of the deep Mogi source, whereas the sudden velocity decrease at the OWD station may reflect changes in the strain caused by the shallow open-crack source. Rapid velocity decreases were also detected at many stations in and around the volcano after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The velocity changes may reflect the redistribution of hydrothermal

  17. Approaching a more Complete Picture of Rockfall Activity: Seismic and LiDAR Detection, Loaction and Volume Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Turowski, Jens; Ehlers, Todd; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Rockfall activity in steep alpine landscapes is often difficult to survey due to its infrequent nature. Classic approaches are limited by temporal and spatial resolution. In contrast, seismic monitoring provides access to catchment-wide analysis of activity patterns in rockfall-dominated environments. The deglaciated U-shaped Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, is a perfect example of such landscapes. It was instrumented with up to six broadband seismometers and repeatedly surveyed by terrestrial LiDAR to provide independent validation data. During August-October 2014 and April-June 2015 more than 23 (LiDAR) to hundred (seismic) events were detected. Their volumes range from < 0.01 to 5.80 cubic metres as detected by LiDAR. The evolution of individual events (i.e., precursor activity, detachment, falling phase, impact, talus cone activity) can be quantified in terms of location and duration. For events that consist of single detachments rather than a series of releases, volume scaling relationships are possible. Seismic monitoring approaches are well-suited for studying not only the rockfall process but also for understanding the geomorphic framework and boundary conditions that control such processes in a comprehensive way. Taken together, the combined LiDAR and seismic monitoring approach provides high fidelity spatial and temporal resolution of individual events.

  18. The Crowded Sea: Incorporating Multiple Marine Activities in Conservation Plans Can Significantly Alter Spatial Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Tessa; Possingham, Hugh P.; Edelist, Dori; Brokovich, Eran; Kark, Salit

    2014-01-01

    Successful implementation of marine conservation plans is largely inhibited by inadequate consideration of the broader social and economic context within which conservation operates. Marine waters and their biodiversity are shared by a host of stakeholders, such as commercial fishers, recreational users and offshore developers. Hence, to improve implementation success of conservation plans, we must incorporate other marine activities while explicitly examining trade-offs that may be required. In this study, we test how the inclusion of multiple marine activities can shape conservation plans. We used the entire Mediterranean territorial waters of Israel as a case study to compare four planning scenarios with increasing levels of complexity, where additional zones, threats and activities were added (e.g., commercial fisheries, hydrocarbon exploration interests, aquaculture, and shipping lanes). We applied the marine zoning decision support tool Marxan to each planning scenario and tested a) the ability of each scenario to reach biodiversity targets, b) the change in opportunity cost and c) the alteration of spatial conservation priorities. We found that by including increasing numbers of marine activities and zones in the planning process, greater compromises are required to reach conservation objectives. Complex plans with more activities incurred greater opportunity cost and did not reach biodiversity targets as easily as simplified plans with less marine activities. We discovered that including hydrocarbon data in the planning process significantly alters spatial priorities. For the territorial waters of Israel we found that in order to protect at least 10% of the range of 166 marine biodiversity features there would be a loss of ∼15% of annual commercial fishery revenue and ∼5% of prospective hydrocarbon revenue. This case study follows an illustrated framework for adopting a transparent systematic process to balance biodiversity goals and economic

  19. On causes of the low seismic activity in the Earth's polar latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Boris; Sasorova, Elena; Domanski, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    The irregularity of distribution of seismic activity in the world was observed at the beginning of the era of instrumental seismology (B. Gutenberg, C. Richter, K. Kasahara). At the same time, the global nature of the symmetry of this effect has been established only in this millennium, with the participation of authors (Levin B.W., Sasorova E.V., 2010). Analysis of the global earthquake catalogs showed that almost all seismic events over the last century occurred within a limited latitudinal band contained between the 65 N and 65 S. The seismic activity in the polar regions of the planet was manifested very weakly. The reasons for such features were found by following the analysis of the characteristics associated with the theory of the figure of the Earth. In the works of the French mathematician A. Veronne (1912) was the first to introduce the concept of "critical" latitudes (φ1 = ±35°15' 22″) wherein the radius of the ellipsoid of revolution is equal to the radius of the sphere of the same volume. Variation of the radius vector of the ellipsoid at this latitude is equal to zero. There is the boundary between the compressed areas of the polar zones and equatorial region, where the rocks of the Earth are dominated by tensile forces. Analysis of the specific characteristics of the gravity force distribution on the surface of the ellipsoid has shown that there is a distribution of the same character with a singular point at latitude φ2 = ±61° 52' 12″. In case of variations in the angular velocity of the planet's rotation the variation of gravity force at the latitude φ2 is negligible, compared with variations of gravity force on the equator and pole, which exceed the previous value by 3-4 orders. Attempted analysis of the model of the ellipsoid of revolution in the theory of axisymmetric elastic shells has allowed to establish that in the elastic shell of the planet must occur meridional and ring forces. The theory shows that when the flatness (or polar

  20. Towards a more Complete Survey of Rockfall Activity: Seismic and LiDAR Detection, Location and Volume Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, M., VI; Mohadjer, S.; Burtin, A.; Turowski, J. M.; Ehlers, T. A.; Hovius, N.

    2015-12-01

    Rockfall activity in steep alpine landscapes is often difficult to survey due to its infrequent nature. Classical approaches are limited by temporal and spatial resolution. In contrast, seismic monitoring provides access to catchment-wide analysis of activity patterns in rockfall-dominated environments. The deglaciated U-shaped Lauterbrunnen Valley in the Bernese Oberland, Switzerland, is a perfect example of such landscapes. It was instrumented with up to six broadband seismometers (capable of detecting volumes down to individual clasts) and repeatedly surveyed by terrestrial LiDAR (few weeks lapse time) to provide independent validation of the seismic data. During August-October 2014 and April-June 2015 more than 23 (LiDAR) to hundred (seismic) rockfall and icefall events were detected. Their volumes range from 0.1 to 5.80 m3 as detected by LiDAR. At the beginning of April 2015, increased activity was detected with more than 40 ice- or rockfalls in less than two hours. The evolution of these individual events (i.e., precursor activity, detachment, falling phase, impact, talus cone activity) is quantified in terms of location (within less than 200 m uncertainty) and duration. For events that consist of single detachments rather than a series of releases, volume scaling relationships are presented. Rockfall activity is linked to meteorological patterns at different temporal cycles. Seismic monitoring approaches are well-suited for studying not only the rockfall process but also for understanding the geomorphic framework and boundary conditions that control such processes in a comprehensive way. Taken together, the combined LiDAR and seismic monitoring approach provides high fidelity spatial and temporal resolution of individual events.

  1. Late Holocene marine terraces along the northeastern Japan Sea: Evidence of coseismic uplift associated with large earthquakes beneath an active fold and thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, T.; Nakanishi, T.; Shishikura, M.; Echigo, T.; Kamataki, T.; Furusawa, A.; Takada, K.; Suda, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present structural models tightly constrained by tectonic geomorphology, surface geologic mapping, shallow borehole transects, high resolution P wave seismic reflection profiles and well logs to define the kinematic evolution and coseismic growth of the Northern Hokkaido fold and thrust belt (NHFTB). The NHFTB is an active compressive structure that consumes a half of the relative North America - Eurasia plate convergence in northern Japan, and consists of a 150-km-long array of active, west verging reverse faults. Reprocessed industrial seismic reflection data tied with well logs and synthetic seismograms indicate that the NHFTB forms a classical critical wedge composed of upper Cretaceous to Tertiary, forearc basin to shallow marine and terrestrial sedimentary strata above an east dipping basal decollement within or at the base of Cretaceous forearc basin deposits. This thin skinned fold and thrust belt is underlain by an active blind thrust that is expressed as middle Pleistocene to Holocene folded and/or uplifted shallow marine sediments. Drilling investigations across the easterly folded terraces above an east dipping thrust ramp at the leading edge of the NHFTB indicate that shallow marine (i.e., foreshore) deposits are folded and subdued beneath the piggyback basin above the backlimb of the frontal fold. Tephrochronology of volcanic ash found in conformably overlying dune deposits suggests that the shallow marine unit deposited during marine isotope stage 5e, and thus provides minimum uplift rates of 1.0 mm/yr across the forelimb and 0.4 mm/yr across the backlimb of the active fold, respectively. In contrast to folded Pleistocene marine terrace deposits, geomorphic signature of coseismic growth of the NHFTB is expressed by late Holocene marine terraces that are interpreted as produced during large blind-thrust earthquakes. A 1 m-grid digital terrain model obtained by LIDAR illuminates that late Holocene paleo-shorelines elevated up to 4.6, 8.7, and 10.8 m

  2. Three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Bandai volcano in northeastern Japan inferred from active seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Teruo; Tanaka, Satoru; Ueki, Sadato; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Haruhisa; Nishimura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Jun; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Nishi, Kiyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Sosuke; Miyamachi, Hiroki; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka

    2004-12-01

    The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of the Bandai volcano has been revealed by tomographic inversion using approximately 2200 travel-time data collected during an active seismic survey comprising 298 temporary seismic stations and eight artificial shots. The key result of this study is the delineation of a high-velocity anomaly (Vp>4.6 km/s at sea-level) immediately below the summit peak. This feature extends to depths of 1-2 km below sea-level. The near-surface horizontal position of the high-velocity anomaly coincides well with that of a positive Bouguer gravity anomaly. Geological data demonstrate that sector collapses have occurred in all directions from the summit and that the summit crater has been repeatedly refilled with magmatic material. These observations suggest that the high-velocity region revealed in this study is a manifestation of an almost-solidified magmatic plumbing system. We have also noted that a near-surface low-velocity region (Vp<3.0 km/s at sea-level) on the southern foot of the volcano corresponds to the position of volcanic sediments including ash and debris avalanche material. In addition, we have made use of the tomographic results to recompute the hypocenters of earthquake occurring during seismic swarms beneath the summit in 1988 and 2000. Relocating the earthquakes using the three-dimensional velocity model clearly indicates that they predominantly occurred on two steeply dipping planes. Low-frequency earthquakes observed during the swarms in 2000 occurred in the seismic gap between the two clusters. The hypocentral regions of the seismic swarms and the low-frequency earthquakes are close to the higher-velocity zone beneath the volcano's summit. These observations suggest that the recent seismic activity beneath the summit is likely associated with thermal energy being released within the solidifying magmatic plumbing system.

  3. Multi-Parameter Observation and Detection of Pre-Earthquake Signals in Seismically Active Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, D.; Pulinets, S.; Parrot, M.; Liu, J. Y.; Hattori, K.; Kafatos, M.; Taylor, P.

    2012-01-01

    The recent large earthquakes (M9.0 Tohoku, 03/2011; M7.0 Haiti, 01/2010; M6.7 L Aquila, 04/2008; and M7.9 Wenchuan 05/2008) have renewed interest in pre-anomalous seismic signals associated with them. Recent workshops (DEMETER 2006, 2011 and VESTO 2009 ) have shown that there were precursory atmospheric /ionospheric signals observed in space prior to these events. Our initial results indicate that no single pre-earthquake observation (seismic, magnetic field, electric field, thermal infrared [TIR], or GPS/TEC) can provide a consistent and successful global scale early warning. This is most likely due to complexity and chaotic nature of earthquakes and the limitation in existing ground (temporal/spatial) and global satellite observations. In this study we analyze preseismic temporal and spatial variations (gas/radon counting rate, atmospheric temperature and humidity change, long-wave radiation transitions and ionospheric electron density/plasma variations) which we propose occur before the onset of major earthquakes:. We propose an Integrated Space -- Terrestrial Framework (ISTF), as a different approach for revealing pre-earthquake phenomena in seismically active areas. ISTF is a sensor web of a coordinated observation infrastructure employing multiple sensors that are distributed on one or more platforms; data from satellite sensors (Terra, Aqua, POES, DEMETER and others) and ground observations, e.g., Global Positioning System, Total Electron Content (GPS/TEC). As a theoretical guide we use the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling (LAIC) model to explain the generation of multiple earthquake precursors. Using our methodology, we evaluated retrospectively the signals preceding the most devastated earthquakes during 2005-2011. We observed a correlation between both atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies preceding most of these earthquakes. The second phase of our validation include systematic retrospective analysis for more than 100 major earthquakes (M>5

  4. Temporal Changes of Seismic Velocity of Shallow Structure Associated With the 2000 Miyakejima Volcano Activity as Inferred From Ambient Seismic Noise Correlation Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggono, T.; Nishimura, T.; Sato, H.; Ueda, H.; Ukawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Miyakejima Island, which is located about 170 km to the south of Tokyo, Japan, is an active volcano of basaltic magma. In 2000 volcanic activity started with magma ascent and migration northwestwardly on June 26 - 27. Then, the volcano formed a caldera on the summit in July, and large amount of volcanic gas emission continued from late August until now. We analyze the ambient seismic noise recorded at three NIED seismic stations (MKK, MKT, and MKS) in the island in order to study the volcano structure behavior associated with such significant volcanic activities. We apply cross correlation analyses to the continuous records of vertical component of short period seismometers (1 s). The data are sampled at a frequency of 100 Hz with an A/D resolution of 16-bit. We calculate cross correlation functions (CCFs) for time window of 60 s for each station pair. We stack the CCFs for each month and bandpass filter the stacked data at frequency band 0.4 - 0.8 Hz. The stacked CCFs, which may represent the Green function between two stations, at station pairs MKK - MKS (the distance is 1.8 km) and MKT - MKS (the distance is 3.9 km) show wave packets with large amplitudes at both sides (positive and negative time delays). The wave packets propagate at group velocities of about 0.8 - 1.0 km/s. The stacked CCFs for MKK - MKT (the distance is 3.1 km) is one sided (negative time delay). Such asymmetric might be due to the inhomogeneous distribution of propagation direction of ambient seismic noise, so we do not use the data for the following analyses. Comparing the CCFs obtained for periods from July 1999 to June 2000 with that of October 2002, we observe small phase difference of the main wave packet. Our results show that for station pair MKK - MKS, whose path crosses the northern part of the island, velocity increased about 1.6 % after the 2000 volcanic activity. For MKT - MKS, whose path closely crosses the newly formed caldera, we estimate the velocity decrease of about 1

  5. Active and passive seismic methods for characterization and monitoring of unstable rock masses: field surveys, laboratory tests and modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombero, Chiara; Baillet, Laurent; Comina, Cesare; Jongmans, Denis; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate characterization and monitoring of potentially unstable rock masses may provide a better knowledge of the active processes and help to forecast the evolution to failure. Among the available geophysical methods, active seismic surveys are often suitable to infer the internal structure and the fracturing conditions of the unstable body. For monitoring purposes, although remote-sensing techniques and in-situ geotechnical measurements are successfully tested on landslides, they may not be suitable to early forecast sudden rapid rockslides. Passive seismic monitoring can help for this purpose. Detection, classification and localization of microseismic events within the prone-to-fall rock mass can provide information about the incipient failure of internal rock bridges. Acceleration to failure can be detected from an increasing microseismic event rate. The latter can be compared with meteorological data to understand the external factors controlling stability. On the other hand, seismic noise recorded on prone-to-fall rock slopes shows that the temporal variations in spectral content and correlation of ambient vibrations can be related to both reversible and irreversible changes within the rock mass. We present the results of the active and passive seismic data acquired at the potentially unstable granitic cliff of Madonna del Sasso (NW Italy). Down-hole tests, surface refraction and cross-hole tomography were carried out for the characterization of the fracturing state of the site. Field surveys were implemented with laboratory determination of physico-mechanical properties on rock samples and measurements of the ultrasonic pulse velocity. This multi-scale approach led to a lithological interpretation of the seismic velocity field obtained at the site and to a systematic correlation of the measured velocities with physical properties (density and porosity) and macroscopic features of the granitic cliff (fracturing, weathering and anisotropy). Continuous

  6. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, A.; Audin, L.; Nocquet, J. M.; Lagreulet, S.; Segovia, M.; Font, Y.; Lamarque, G.; Yepes, H.; Mothes, P.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrín, P.; Quidelleur, X.

    2014-02-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) extends over 60 km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the N-S segmented, en echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active, and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited N-S direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected at depth to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS data set indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4 mm/yr, which decreases northward along the fold system as it connects to the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely populated Quito region highlights the need for additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  7. Active tectonics in Quito, Ecuador, assessed by geomorphological studies, GPS data, and crustal seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Alvarado, Alexandra; Nocquet, Jean-Mathieu; Lagreulet, Sarah; Segovia, Monica; Font, Yvonne; Yepes, Hugo; Mothes, Patricia; Rolandone, Frédérique; Jarrin, Pierre; Quidelleur, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The Quito Fault System (QFS) is an intraplate reverse fault zone, that extend over 60km along the Interandean Depression in northern Ecuador. Multidisciplinary studies coherently support an interpretation in which two major contemporaneous fault systems affect Quaternary volcanoclastic deposits. Hanging paleovalleys and disruption of drainage networks attest to ongoing crustal deformation and uplift in this region, further confirmed by 15 years of GPS measurements and seismicity. The resulting new kinematic model emphasizes the role of the NS segmented, en-echelon eastward migrating Quito Fault System (QFS). Northeast of this major tectonic feature, the strike-slip Guayllabamba Fault System (GFS) aids the eastward transfer of the regional strain toward Colombia. These two tectonic fault systems are active and the local focal mechanisms are consistent with the direction of relative GPS velocities and the regional stress tensor. Among active features, inherited NS direction sutures appear to play a role in confining the active deformation in the Interandean Depression. The most frontal of the Quito faults formed at the tip of a blind thrust, dipping 40°W, is most probably connected, at depth, to inactive suture to the west. A new GPS dataset indicates active shortening rates for Quito blind thrust of up to 4mm/yr, wich decreases northwards along the fold system as it connects to the strike slip Guayllabamba Fault System. The proximity of these structures to the densely-populated Quito region underlines the need of additional tectonic studies in these regions of Ecuador to generate further hazard assessments.

  8. Seismic activity during the 1968 test pumping at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal disposal well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, Donald B.; Dietrich, J.A.

    1969-01-01

    During the 1968 pumping tests at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal disposal welt, the U.S. Geological Survey was responsible for monitoring earthquakes occurring in the area of the arsenal and making chemical analysis of the fluids removed, three criteria were established to suspend the pumping if anomalous earthquake activity occurred during the pumping test. These criteria were based on the frequency, magnitude, and location of the local earthquakes. The pumping program consisted of four tests which occurred between September 3 and October 26, 1968. During periods of pumping, earthquake activity remained within acceptable limits and no suspensions of the pumping were required. After each of the two major pumping periods an increase in the frequency of small earthquakes occurred. During the first of these two periods of high seismic activity the Geological Survey recommended a delay in the start of the next phase of the pumping until the activity subsided. Most of the earthquakes during 1968 occurred northwest of the arsenal; however, in the 2? month period after the start of the test, a larger percent of the earthquakes occurred on the arsenal than in the previous 8-month period. The temperature in the cooled zone at the bottom of the well was 12?F warmer 2 weeks after pumping stopped than it was in January 1968. Preliminary chemical analyses indicate that very little mixing between waste fluids and connate water bas occurred.

  9. Investigating possible influence of solar activity on some reported seismic-induced ionospheric precursors via VLF wave propagation in Earth-ionosphere waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Ray, Suman

    2016-07-01

    The diurnal propagation characteristic of VLF radio signal have been widely used to study pre-seismic ionospheric anomalies, some of which are often reported to be associated with the event. On the other hand, Solar particle events and geomagnetic activity also drive changes in the magnetosphere, which modify ionospheric parameters through the Earth's magnetic field. There are also effects originating from planetary and tidal waves, thermospheric tides and stratospheric warming. Distinguishing or separating seismically induced ionospheric fluctuations from those of other origin remain vital and challenging. In this work, we investigated the influence of solar and geomagnetic origin on some reported 'seismic ionospheric precursors' before a few major earthquakes. We also investigated anomalies in VLF day-length signal during period of low solar and geomagnetic activity (in relation to seismic activity), to understand the occurrence of VLF anomaly that are unrelated to seismicity and solar activity.

  10. Ground penetrating radar and active seismic investigation of stratigraphically verified pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gase, A.; Bradford, J. H.; Brand, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    We conducted ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and active seismic surveys in July and August, 2015 parallel to outcrops of the pyroclastic density current deposits of the May 18th, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington. The primary objective of this study is to compare geophysical properties that influence electromagnetic and elastic wave velocities with stratigraphic parameters in the un-saturated zone. The deposits of interest are composed of pumice, volcanic ash, and lava blocks comprising a wide range of intrinsic porosities and grain sizes from sand to boulders. Single-offset GPR surveys for reflection data were performed with a Sensors and Software pulseEKKO Pro 100 GPR using 50 MHz, 100 MHz, and 200 MHz antennae. GPR data processing includes time-zero correction, dewow filter, migration, elevation correction. Multi-offset acquisition with 100 MHz antennae and offsets ranging from 1 m to 16 m are used for reflection tomography to create 2 D electromagnetic wave velocity models. Seismic surveys are performed with 72 geophones spaced at two meters using a sledge hammer source with shot points at each receiver point. We couple p- wave refraction tomography with Rayleigh wave inversion to compute Vp/Vs ratios. The two geophysical datasets are then compared with stratigraphic information to illustrate the influence of lithological parameters (e.g. stratification, grain-size distribution, porosity, and sorting) on geophysical properties of unsaturated pyroclastic deposits. Future work will include joint petrophysical inversion of the multiple datasets to estimate porosity and water content in the unsaturated zone.

  11. 78 FR 19652 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Specified Activities; Office of Naval Research Acoustic Technology Experiments in the Western North Pacific... Acoustic Technology Experiments (ATE) in the western North Pacific Ocean. The Navy's activities are... underwater active acoustic sources are likely to result in the take of marine mammals. Take, by Level...

  12. 77 FR 87 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; U.S. Marine Corps Training Exercises...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... significant potential to injure a marine mammal or marine mammal stock in the wild [Level A Harassment]; or (ii) Any act that disturbs or is likely to disturb a marine mammal or marine mammal stock in the wild... training, including bombing, strafing, special (laser systems) weapons; surface fires using...

  13. Monitoring and Characterizing the Geysering and Seismic Activity at the Lusi Mud Eruption Site, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyono, Karyono; Obermann, Anne; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Syafri, Ildrem; Abdurrokhim, Abdurrokhim; Masturyono, Masturyono; Hadi, Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi eruption began on May 29, 2006 in the northeast of Java Island, Indonesia, and to date is still active. Lusi is a newborn sedimentary-hosted hydrothermal system characterized by continuous expulsion of liquefied mud and breccias and geysering activity. Lusi is located upon the Watukosek fault system, a left lateral wrench system connecting the volcanic arc and the bakarc basin. This fault system is still periodically reactivated as shown by field data. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we conducted several types of monitoring. Based on camera observations, we characterized the Lusi erupting activity by four main behaviors occurring cyclically: (1) Regular activity, which consists in the constant emission of water and mud breccias (i.e. viscous mud containing clay, silt, sand and clasts) associated with the constant expulsion of gas (mainly aqueous vapor with minor amounts of CO2 and CH4) (2) Geysering phase with intense bubbling, consisting in reduced vapor emission and more powerful bursting events that do not seem to have a regular pattern. (3) Geysering phase with intense vapor and degassing discharge and a typically dense plume that propagates up to 100 m height. (4) Quiescent phase marking the end of the geysering activity (and the observed cycle) with no gas emissions or bursts observed. To investigate the possible seismic activity beneath Lusi and the mechanisms controlling the Lusi pulsating behaviour, we deployed a network of 5 seismic stations and a HD camera around the Lusi crater. We characterize the observed types of seismic activity as tremor and volcano-tectonic events. Lusi tremor events occur in 5-10 Hz frequency band, while volcano tectonic events are abundant in the high frequencies range from 5 Hz until 25 Hz. We coupled the seismic monitoring with the images collected with the HD camera to study the correlation between the seismic tremor and the different phases of the geysering activity. Key words: Lusi

  14. EUMETSAT activities in preparation of the Sentinel-3 Marine Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonekamp, H.; O'Carroll, A.; Kwiatkowska, E.; Montagner, F.; Wilson, H.; Fournier Sicre, V.; Santacesaria, V.; Loddo, C.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the EUMETSAT preparations towards the operational phase of the sentinel-3A mission scheduled for launch in 2013. EUMETSAT is expanding its operational services for applications related to the marine environment and climate monitoring. In its phase E, EUMETSAT will be the Sentinel-3 satellite and Sentinel-3 Marine Centre operator. EUMETSAT has joined up with ESA for the definition of the cal val plans and systems, and to define the set-ups ensuring that the core mission performances and operational products will be state of the art. Specific aspects are the validation and monitoring against in-situ data, and different modes of operations. To support the science discussion in this session with a general familiarisation with the planned operational data streams, the presentation will provide an overview of the set-up of product monitoring and services originating from the EUMETSAT premises. Major recent developments of other marine missions involving EUMETSAT partnerships will also be debriefed.

  15. Evaluation and developmental studies of possible active seismic experiments during the post-Apollo period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic velocity studies pertinent to the lunar crust and mantle are briefly summarized. The compressional and shear wave velocities in loose aggregates are discussed along with the effects of temperature on seismic velocity in compacted powders. Abstracts of papers concerning the lunar structure are included.

  16. 2D Time-lapse Seismic Tomography Using An Active Time Constraint (ATC) Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a 2D seismic time-lapse inversion approach to image the evolution of seismic velocities over time and space. The forward modeling is based on solving the eikonal equation using a second-order fast marching method. The wave-paths are represented by Fresnel volumes rathe...

  17. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation. PMID:26712768

  18. The Structure-Activity Relationship between Marine Algae Polysaccharides and Anti-Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Wenjing; Liang, Hongze; Zhang, Quanbin

    2015-12-25

    In this study, 33 different polysaccharides were prepared to investigate the structure-activity relationships between the polysaccharides, mainly from marine algae, and anti-complement activity in the classical pathway. Factors considered included extraction methods, fractionations, molecular weight, molar ratio of galactose to fucose, sulfate, uronic acid (UA) content, linkage, branching, and the type of monosaccharide. It was shown that the larger the molecular weights, the better the activities. The molar ratio of galactose (Gal) to fucose (Fuc) was a positive factor at a concentration lower than 10 µg/mL, while it had no effect at a concentration more than 10 µg/mL. In addition, sulfate was necessary; however, the sulfate content, the sulfate pattern, linkage and branching had no effect at a concentration of more than 10 µg/mL. Moreover, the type of monosaccharide had no effect. Laminaran and UA fractions had no activity; however, they could reduce the activity by decreasing the effective concentration of the active composition when they were mixed with the active compositions. The effect of the extraction methods could not be determined. Finally, it was observed that sulfated galactofucan showed good anti-complement activity after separation.

  19. 75 FR 45527 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Military Training Activities and Research, Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...NMFS, upon application from the U.S. Navy (Navy) on behalf of the Department of Defense (including the Navy, the U.S. Air Force (USAF), and the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC)), is issuing regulations to govern the unintentional taking of marine mammals incidental to activities conducted in the Mariana Islands Range Complex (MIRC) study area for the period of July 2010 through July 2015. The Navy's......

  20. A Precursory Phase to a Sudden Enhanced Activity at Yasur volcano (Vanuatu) : Insights from Simultaneous Infrasonic and Seismic Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, S.; Zielinski, C.; Battaglia, J.; Metaxian, J. P.; Bani, P.; LE Pichon, A.; Lardy, M.; Millier, P.; Frogneux, M.; Gallois, F.; Herry, P.; Todman, S.; Garaebiti, E.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent activity at Yasur (Vanuatu), characterised by a close series of Strombolian explosions, is analysed using simultaneous infrasonic and seismic recordings (6-25 Nov 2008) close to the vents. The RMS amplitudes per hour, the number of explosions and the peak-to-peak amplitudes of each signal show that the initial quiet phase (11 days) is followed by a precursory phase (7 days) prior to an enhanced activity (17 hours). Three periods exist during the strong activity: (1) a rapid increase leading to the paroxysm (3 hours), (2) a first (5 hours) and (3) a second decrease (9 hours), each having an excellent correlation between seismic and infrasonic RMS amplitudes per hour (correlation coefficient > 0.96) when using the band associated to explosions (1-5 Hz and 1.8-4 Hz for seismic and infrsonic recordings, respectively). The ratio between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes, assumed to be a proxy for the magma level, increases strongly during the week before the paroxysm. This is explained by the arrival of an additional gas flux at the top of the reservoir. The foam accumulated there, whose partial coalescence and spreading towards the conduit are responsible for the permanent Strombolian activity, thickens. This enhances both the viscous massive foam coalescence and the foam spreading. This leads to an increase in the gas flux in the conduit, ultimately responsible for the formation of a shallow foam at the surface. This foam acts as a viscous cap overlying the magma column, thereby increasing the radiated infrasonic pressure and the strength of the explosions. The first decrease in the relationship between infrasonic and seismic RMS amplitudes is associated with the stopping of the additionnal gas flux in the magma reservoir and the rapid decrease of the top of the magma column due to the previous intense degassing. The second decrease corresponds to the time neccessary to restore the convective motions in the conduit at their normal velocities.

  1. Larvicidal Activity against Aedes aegypti and Molluscicidal Activity against Biomphalaria glabrata of Brazilian Marine Algae.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elíca Amara Cecília; de Carvalho, Cenira M; Ribeiro Junior, Karlos Antonio Lisboa; Lisboa Ribeiro, Thyago Fernando; de Barros, Lurdiana Dayse; de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; Prado Moura, Flávia de Barros; Goulart Sant'ana, Antônio Euzebio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the biological activities of five benthic marine algae collected from Northeastern Region of Brazil. The tested activities included larvicidal activity against Aedes aegypti, molluscicidal activity against Biomphalaria glabrata, and toxicity against Artemia salina. Extracts of Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta), Padina gymnospora, Sargassum vulgare (Phaeophyta), Hypnea musciformis, and Digenea simplex (Rhodophyta) were prepared using different solvents of increasing polarity, including dichloromethane, methanol, ethanol, and water. Of the extracts screened, the dichloromethane extracts of H. musciformis and P. gymnospora exhibited the highest activities and were subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation in hexane and chloroform. The chloroform fractions of the P. gymnospora and H. musciformis extracts showed molluscicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (11.1460  μ g·mL(-1) and 25.8689  μ g·mL(-1), resp.), and the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora showed larvicidal activity at values below 40  μ g·mL(-1) (29.018  μ g·mL(-1) and 17.230  μ g·mL(-1), resp.). The crude extracts were not toxic to A. salina, whereas the chloroform and hexane fractions of P. gymnospora (788.277  μ g·mL(-1) and 706.990  μ g·mL(-1)) showed moderate toxicity, indicating that the toxic compounds present in these algae are nonpolar.

  2. Ionosperic anomaly due to seismic activities - Part 1: Calibration of the VLF signal of VTX 18.2 KHz station from Kolkata and deviation during seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2009-08-01

    VLF signals are long thought to give away important information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In order to establish co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what the reference signals are, throughout the year. The best opportunity to do this is during the period of solar minimum where the number of flares and sunspots are negligible and the data would be primarily affected by the sun and variation would be due to normal sunset and sunrise effects. In this paper, we present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005-2008 when the solar activity was very low. The terminators are for the 18.2 KHz VTX signal of the Indian Navy as observed from Indian Centre for Space Physics receiving station located in Kolkata. A total of 624 days of data have been used to obtain the mean plot. Any deviation of observations from this so-called the standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial events (such as solar activities). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of 16 months and show that the correlation with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation takes place up to a couple of days prior to the seismic event. Simultaneous observations of such deviations from more than one station could improve the predictability of earthquakes.

  3. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  4. Biological activities and potential health benefits of fucoxanthin derived from marine brown algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Pangestuti, Ratih

    2011-01-01

    The importance of marine algae as sources of functional ingredients has been well recognized due to their valuable health beneficial effects. Therefore, isolation and investigation of novel bioactive ingredients with biological activities from marine algae have attracted great attention. Among functional ingredients identified from marine algae, fucoxanthin has received particular interest. Fucoxanthin has been attributed with extraordinary potential for protecting the organism against a wide range of diseases and has considerable potential and promising applications in human health. Fucoxanthin has been reported to exhibit various beneficial biological activities such as antioxidant, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiobesity, and neuroprotective activities. In this chapter, the currently available scientific literatures regarding the most significant activities of fucoxanthin are summarized.

  5. Combined use of repeated active shots and ambient noise to detect temporal changes in seismic velocity: application to Sakurajima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takashi; Nakahara, Hisashi; Nishimura, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    Coda-wave interferometry is a technique to detect small seismic velocity changes using phase changes in similar waveforms from repeating natural or artificial sources. Seismic interferometry is another technique for detecting seismic velocity changes from cross-correlation functions of ambient seismic noise. We simultaneously use these two techniques to clarify seismic velocity changes at Sakurajima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Japan, examining the two methods. We apply coda-wave interferometry to the records of repeated active seismic experiments conducted once a year from 2011 to 2014, and seismic interferometry to the ambient seismic noise data. We directly compare seismic velocity changes from these two techniques. In coda-wave interferometry analyses, we detect significant seismic velocity increases between 2011 and 2013, and seismic velocity decreases between 2013 and 2014 at the northern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The absolute values are at a maximum 0.47 ± 0.06% for 2-4 Hz, 0.24 ± 0.03% for 4-8 Hz, and 0.15 ± 0.03% for 8-16 Hz, respectively. In seismic interferometry analyses, vertical-vertical cross-correlations in 1-2, 2-4, and 4-8 Hz bands indicate seismic velocity increases and decreases during 3 years of 2012-2014 with the maximum amplitudes of velocity change of ±0.3% for 1-2 Hz, ±0.4% for 2-4 Hz, and ±0.2% for 4-8 Hz, respectively. Relative velocity changes indicate the almost annual change. These periodical changes are well matched with volcano deformation detected by GNSS receivers deployed around the volcano. We compare the results from coda-wave interferometry with those from seismic interferometry on the shot days and find that most of them are consistent. This study illustrates that the combined use of coda-wave interferometry and seismic interferometry is useful to obtain accurate and continuous measurements of seismic velocity changes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Monitoring and descriptive analysis of radon in relation to seismic activity of Northern Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jilani, Zeeshan; Mehmood, Tahir; Alam, Aftab; Awais, Muhammad; Iqbal, Talat

    2017-03-16

    Earthquakes are one of the major causes of natural disasters and its forecasting is challenging task. Some precursory phenomenon exists in theory in relation to earthquakes occurrence. The emission of radioactive gas named 'radon' before the earthquakes is a potential earthquake precursory candidate. The study aims to monitor and to analyze the radon in relation to seismic activity in Northern Pakistan. For this purpose RTM-2200 has been used to monitor the changes in radon concentration from August 01, 2014 to January 31, 2015 in Northern Pakistan. Significant temporal variations has been observed in radon concentration. The bivariate analysis of radon with other variables manifests its positive relationship with air pressure and relative humidity and negative relationship with temperature. 2σ upper control limit on monthly basis are computed for detection of anomalous trends in the data. Overall increasing trend is detected in radon concentration. Five earthquakes from August 01, 2014 to January 31, 2015 have been selected from earthquake catalogue, depending upon their magnitude and distance from monitoring station and out of which radon concentration can be associated with only two earthquakes correlated with tectonic effect of radon concentration. Both of events have same magnitude 5.5 and occurred on September 13 and October 14, 2014 respectively. Very large variations have been observed in radon for the last two months of the study period, which may be occurred due to some other geological and environmental changes, but are not related to the earthquake activity.

  7. Rifting process of the Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana arc-backarc system inferred from active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Yamashita, M.; No, T.; Takizawa, K.; Kaiho, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana (IBM) arc-backarc system has continued the crustal growth through crustal thickening by magmatic activities and crustal thinning by backarc opening. Tatsumi et al (2008) proposed petrological crustal growth model started from basaltic magmas rising from the slab, and showed the consistency with the seismic velocity model. Although crustal growth by the crustal thickening are modeled, crustal structural change by the backarc opening are not still unknown yet. The Shikoku Basin and Parece Vela Basin were formed by the backarc opening during approximately 15-30 Ma. Since 6 Ma, the Mariana Trough has opened and the stage already moved to spreading process from rifting process. In the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, the Sumisu rift is in the initial rifting stage. Therefore, understanding of the crustal change by the backarc opening from rifting to spreading is indispensable to know the crustal growth of whole Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana island arc. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic studies using a multichannel reflection survey system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) around the IBM arc since 2003 (Takahashi et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2007; Takahashi et al., 2008; Kodaira et al., 2008). We already obtained eight P-wave velocity models across the IBM arc and these structures record the crustal structural change during the backarc opening process from the rifting stage to the spreading stage. As the results, we identified characteristics of the crustal structural change accompanied with backarc opening as follows. (1) Beneath the initial rifting stage without normal faults, for example, in the northern tip of the Mariana Trough, crustal thickening are identified. (2) Beneath the initial rifting stage with normal faults, for example, in the Sumisu Rift, the crustal thickness is almost similar to that beneath the volcanic front. Although an existence of the crust-mantle transition layer with

  8. Insights into induced earthquakes and aftershock activity with in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations in an active underground mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenguier, F.; Olivier, G.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.; Shapiro, N.; Lynch, R.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of the crust shortly after large earthquakes has been the subject of numerous studies, but many co- and post-seismic processes remain poorly understood. Damage and healing of the bulk rock mass, post-seismic deformation and the mechanisms of earthquake triggering are still not well understood. These processes are important to properly model and understand the behaviour of faults and earthquake cycles.In this presentation, we will show how in-situ measurements of seismic velocity variations have given new insights into these co- and post-seismic processes. An experiment was performed where a blast was detonated in a tunnel in an underground mine, while seismic velocity variations were accurately (0.005 %) measured with ambient seismic noise correlations. Additionally, aftershock activity was examined and the influence of the removal of a piece of solid rock was estimated with elastic static stress modelling. The majority of the aftershocks were delayed with respect to the passing of the dynamic waves from the blast, while the locations of the aftershocks appeared clustered and not homogeneously spread around the blast location. A significant velocity drop is visible during the time of the blast, which is interpreted as co-seismic damage and plastic deformation. These non-elastic effects are healed by the confining stresses over a period of 5 days until the seismic velocity converges to a new baseline level. The instantaneous weakening and gradual healing observed from the velocity variations are qualitatively similar to results reported in laboratory studies. The change in the baseline level of the seismic velocity before and after the blast indicate a change in the static stress that is comparable to the results of elastic static stress modelling. The differences between the elastic model predictions and the seismic velocity variations could be due to zones of fractured rock, indicated by the spatial clustering of the aftershocks, that are not

  9. Analysis of marine sediment and lobster hepatopancreas reference materials by instrumental photon activation

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Davidson, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    By use of instrumental photon activation analysis, twelve trace (As, Ba, Cr, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Sr, U, Zn, and Zr) and eight minor (C, Na, Mg, Co, K, Ca, Tl, and Fe) elements were determined in a certified marine sediment standard reference material as well as eight trace (Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, and Pb) and four minor (Na, Mg, Cl, and Ca) elements in a certified marine tissue (lobster hepatopancreas) standard reference material. The precision and accuracy of the present results when compared to the accepted values clearly demonstrate the reliability of this nondestructive technique and its applicability to marine environmental or marine geochemical studies. 24 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  11. Impact-induced seismic activity on asteroid 433 Eros: a surface modification process.

    PubMed

    Richardson, James E; Melosh, H Jay; Greenberg, Richard

    2004-11-26

    High-resolution images of the surface of asteroid 433 Eros revealed evidence of downslope movement of a loose regolith layer, as well as the degradation and erasure of small impact craters (less than approximately 100 meters in diameter). One hypothesis to explain these observations is seismic reverberation after impact events. We used a combination of seismic and geomorphic modeling to analyze the response of regolith-covered topography, particularly craters, to impact-induced seismic shaking. Applying these results to a stochastic cratering model for the surface of Eros produced good agreement with the observed size-frequency distribution of craters, including the paucity of small craters.

  12. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Joseph J.; Trone, Daniel W.; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A.; Austin, Krista G.; Lieberman, Harris R.

    2016-01-01

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher. PMID:27735834

  13. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel.

    PubMed

    Knapik, Joseph J; Trone, Daniel W; McGraw, Susan; Steelman, Ryan A; Austin, Krista G; Lieberman, Harris R

    2016-10-09

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women). The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users) were coffee (65%), colas (54%), teas (40%), and energy drinks (28%). Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week) included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day) was higher.

  14. Antiviral activity of natural products extracted from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Uzair, Bushra; Mahmood, Zahra; Tabassum, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    Many epidemics have broken out over the centuries. Hundreds and thousands of humans have died over a disease. Available treatments for infectious diseases have always been limited. Some infections are more deadly than the others, especially viral pathogens. These pathogens have continuously resisted all kinds of medical treatment, due to a need for new treatments to be developed. Drugs are present in nature and are also synthesized in vitro and they help in combating diseases and restoring health. Synthesizing drugs is a hard and time consuming task, which requires a lot of man power and financial aid. However, the natural compounds are just lying around on the earth, may it be land or water. Over a thousand novel compounds isolated from marine organisms are used as antiviral agents. Others are being pharmacologically tested. Today, over forty antiviral compounds are present in the pharmacological market. Some of these compounds are undergoing clinical and preclinical stages. Marine compounds are paving the way for a new trend in modern medicine.

  15. 50 CFR 18.27 - Regulations governing small takes of marine mammals incidental to specified activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specified activity (other than commercial fishing) within a specified geographical region. (b) Scope of... specified geographical region and potentially involves the taking of small numbers of marine mammals. The specified activity and specified geographical region should be identified so that the anticipated effects...

  16. Marine-derived Penicillium in Korea: diversity, enzyme activity, and antifungal properties.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Fong, Jonathan J; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Sohn, Jae Hak; Lim, Young Woon

    2014-08-01

    The diversity of marine-derived Penicillium from Korea was investigated using morphological and multigene phylogenetic approaches, analyzing sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region, β-tubulin gene, and RNA polymerase subunit II gene. In addition, the biological activity of all isolated strains was evaluated. We tested for the extracellular enzyme activity of alginase, endoglucanase, and β-glucosidase, and antifungal activity against two plant pathogens (Colletotrichum acutatum and Fusarium oxysporum). A total of 184 strains of 36 Penicillium species were isolated, with 27 species being identified. The most common species were Penicillium polonicum (19.6 %), P. rubens (11.4 %), P. chrysogenum (11.4 %), and P. crustosum (10.9 %). The diversity of Penicillium strains isolated from soil (foreshore soil and sand) and marine macroorganisms was higher than the diversity of strains isolated from seawater. While many of the isolated strains showed alginase and β-glucosidase activity, no endoglucanase activity was found. More than half the strains (50.5 %) showed antifungal activity against at least one of the plant pathogens tested. Compared with other strains in this study, P. citrinum (strain SFC20140101-M662) showed high antifungal activity against both plant pathogens. The results reported here expand our knowledge of marine-derived Penicillium diversity. The relatively high proportion of strains that showed antifungal and enzyme activity demonstrates that marine-derived Penicillium have great potential to be used in the production of natural bioactive products for pharmaceutical and/or industrial use.

  17. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early

  18. Increasing background seismicity and dynamic triggering behaviors with nearby mining activities around Fangshan Pluton in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijun; Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang; Chen, Qi-Fu; Liu, Ning

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic triggering in western Fangshan Pluton, Beijing, China, has been repeatedly identified, but previous studies are limited by sparse seismic station coverage. Here we systematically analyze continuous waveforms recorded by both permanent stations and a temporary seismic network 40 days before and after the 11 March 2011 Mw 9.1 Tohoku-Oki and the 14 April 2012 Mw 8.6 Indian Ocean earthquakes. We first build a template database using a short-term average to long-term average method. Next, we apply the matched filter technique that cross correlates the template waveforms with continuous data to detect additional seismic events. Overall, we detect 1956 and 950 seismic events around the Tohoku-Oki and Indian Ocean main shocks, respectively. Most detected events are shallow (<5 km) and clustered at Beiling Syncline in western Fangshan Pluton, which is adjacent to a running coalmine. Seven and 10 events are detected during the large-amplitude surface waves of the two main shocks, respectively, but no similar burst is detected following their major foreshock and aftershocks. Multiple statistical tests indicate that the short-term bursts after the two main shocks are dynamically triggered. We suggest that mining-related activities may perturb the subsurface stress conditions and hence make the region more susceptible for dynamic triggering than other places.

  19. Modelling Active Faults in Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) with OpenQuake: Definition, Design and Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherill, Graeme; Garcia, Julio; Poggi, Valerio; Chen, Yen-Shin; Pagani, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The Global Earthquake Model (GEM) has, since its inception in 2009, made many contributions to the practice of seismic hazard modeling in different regions of the globe. The OpenQuake-engine (hereafter referred to simply as OpenQuake), GEM's open-source software for calculation of earthquake hazard and risk, has found application in many countries, spanning a diversity of tectonic environments. GEM itself has produced a database of national and regional seismic hazard models, harmonizing into OpenQuake's own definition the varied seismogenic sources found therein. The characterization of active faults in probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) is at the centre of this process, motivating many of the developments in OpenQuake and presenting hazard modellers with the challenge of reconciling seismological, geological and geodetic information for the different regions of the world. Faced with these challenges, and from the experience gained in the process of harmonizing existing models of seismic hazard, four critical issues are addressed. The challenge GEM has faced in the development of software is how to define a representation of an active fault (both in terms of geometry and earthquake behaviour) that is sufficiently flexible to adapt to different tectonic conditions and levels of data completeness. By exploring the different fault typologies supported by OpenQuake we illustrate how seismic hazard calculations can, and do, take into account complexities such as geometrical irregularity of faults in the prediction of ground motion, highlighting some of the potential pitfalls and inconsistencies that can arise. This exploration leads to the second main challenge in active fault modeling, what elements of the fault source model impact most upon the hazard at a site, and when does this matter? Through a series of sensitivity studies we show how different configurations of fault geometry, and the corresponding characterisation of near-fault phenomena (including

  20. 77 FR 27720 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... produced from active acoustic sources (primarily airguns) used in the surveys. There is also an onshore... day, if weather conditions allow. NMFS outlined the purpose of the program in a previous notice for... detailed description of the activity, including vessel and acoustic source specifications, the...

  1. Well log interpretation and seismic character of the cenozoic sequence in the northern Alboran Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, M. J.; Comas, M. C.

    1992-06-01

    Seismic stratigraphic and main lithological features of the sedimentary cover overlying the basement of the Alboran Sea were established via the analysis of commercial multichannel seismic surveys, geophysical well logs, and well data. Six seismic stratigraphics units (VI to I), bounded by unconformities, form the marine sediments that range in age from early Miocene to Quaternary. They are dated by extrapolation of commercial drilling results from the northern Alboran Sea. Volcanic activity is recorded within sedimentary sequences of units V to II. Undercompaction features are detected in the two basal units.

  2. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Louie, John; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  3. Active tectonics in Eastern Lunana (NW Bhutan): Implications for the seismic and glacial hazard potential of the Bhutan Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. C.; Wiesmayr, G.; Brauner, M.; HäUsler, H.; Wangda, D.

    2006-06-01

    Paleoseismological investigations, brittle fault analysis, and paleostrain calculations combined with the interpretation of satellite imagery and flood wave modeling were used to investigate the seismic and associated glacial hazard potential in Eastern Lunana, a remote area in NW Bhutan. Seismically induced liquefaction features, cracked pebbles, and a surface rupture of about 6.8 km length constrain the occurrence of M ≥ 6 earthquakes within this high-altitude periglacial environment, which are the strongest earthquakes ever been reported for the Kingdom of Bhutan. Seismicity occurs along conjugate sets of faults trending NE-SW to NNW-SSE by strike-slip and normal faulting mechanism indicating E-W extension and N-S shortening. The strain field for these conjugate sets of active faults is consistent with widespread observations of young E-W expansion throughout southern Tibet and the north Himalaya. We expect, however, that N-S trending active strike-slip faults may even reach much farther to the south, at least into southern Bhutan. Numerous glacial lakes exist in the investigation area, and today more than 100 × 106 m3 of water are stored in moraine-dammed and supraglacial lakes which are crosscut by active faults. Strong earthquakes may trigger glacial lake outburst floods, and the impact of such flash floods may be worst 80 km downstream where the valley is broad and densely populated. Consequently, tectonic models of active deformation have to be closely linked with glacial hazard evaluation and require rethinking and modification.

  4. Limestones as a paleobathymeter for reconstructing past seismic activities: Muroto-misaki, Shikoku, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iryu, Y.; Maemoku, H.; Yamada, T.; Maeda, Y.

    2009-03-01

    Muroto-misaki (Cape Muroto) is located at the southern tip of the eastern half of Shikoku, southwestern Japan and is ~ 100 km north of the Nankai Trough where the Philippine Sea Plate is being subducted beneath the Eurasian Plate. Therefore, the Muroto-misaki area has been seismically uplifted. Sedimentologic analyses were conducted on Holocene limestones that occur along the coast from Muroto-misaki to Meoto-iwa, located ~ 13 km north of the cape. The limestones are limited to less than 9.2 m in elevation. The limestones are up to 4.4 m in mean diameter, up to 0.5 m in thickness, and consist mainly of fossilized sessile organisms, including annelids, corals, bryozoans, encrusting foraminifers, barnacles, nongeniculate coralline algae, and, to a lesser extent, molluscs and peyssonneliacean algae. Acicular and equant cements are minor components. Acicular cements are found in semi-closed spaces between coralline algal crusts and their substrates. The modal composition of limestones was determined by a point-counting technique. Based on the biotic composition, the Holocene limestones can be classified into six types (Types I to VI). A comparison of the vertical distribution of these rock types with that of modern sessile organisms indicates that the top of Type I limestone, which is characterized by the occurrence of hermatypic corals, corresponds approximately to the mean low water springs when the limestones formed. A difference in the highest occurrence of Type I limestone between two sites may represent the variation in the total amount of uplift over the last 1000 to 1500 years, which resulted in an apparent northward decline of paleo-mean low water springs at a rate of ~ 10 cm/km. Therefore, the Holocene limestones are a good paleobathymeter to reconstruct past seismic activities in this area. This study shows that warm temperate carbonate deposits are as excellent recorders of geologic events, such as the timing and scale of repeated coseismic uplifts and

  5. Seismic activity before and after the eruption of Kuchinoerabujima in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, K.

    2015-12-01

    Shindake, on Kuchinoerabujima, in the Ryukyu Islands, south of Kyusyu, Japan, erupted at 09:59 JST on 29 May 2015. This eruption is considered to have been a phreato-magmatic eruption, according to the Coordinating Committee for Prediction of Volcanic Eruption in Japan. As characteristic seismic activities before and after the eruption, an A-type event (Mw 2.3) occurred in the northwestern part of Shindake on 23 May, and numerous volcanic events occurred in and around Shindake just after the eruption. The frequency-magnitude distribution (b-value) of earthquakes is commonly high in volcanic areas. It is also known that high b-values in volcanic areas are primarily responsible for material heterogeneity, low shear strength, and high thermal gradients. These facts suggest that the b-value distribution can be used as a tool to locate active magma chambers. It is thus important to determine the distribution of hypocenters precisely and to investigate the b-value distribution on Kuchinoerabujima. We used a data set of the Japan Meteorological Agency and the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, and a half-space with Vp = 2.5 km/s as a velocity structure. For the determination of hypocenters, we used the hypomh (Hirata and Matsu'ura 1987) and hypoDD (Waldhauser and Ellsworth 2000) algorithms. This revealed that many estimated hypocenters were distributed in and around the vent at a depth of ~5 km under Shindake before and after the eruption. A volume of high b (>1.2) was locally observed in the eastern part at depths of 1.0-2.5 km below Shindake before the eruption and another was widely observed at depths of 2.0-4.0 km after the eruption. By comparing these findings with other observation results, we may be able to obtain a clear image of the active magma chamber.

  6. 77 FR 19242 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...NMFS has received an application from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (L-DEO), a part of Columbia University, for an Incidental Harassment Authorization (IHA) to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to conducting a low-energy marine geophysical survey in the central Pacific Ocean, May through June, 2012. Pursuant to the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), NMFS is requesting......

  7. In vitro screening of antifungal activity of marine sponge extracts against five phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    El Amraoui, Belkassem; El Wahidi, Majida; Fassouane, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our research is the screening of extracts of marine sponges for their antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi. The in vitro screening of hydroalcoholic and organic extracts of ten marine sponges from Atlantic coast of Morocco against five phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. melonis, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris, Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium digitatum) showed that only two sponges (Haliclona viscosa and Cynachirella tarentina) are active against all phytopathogenic fungi studied.

  8. In vitro anti-HMPV activity of meroditerpenoids from marine alga Stypopodium zonale (Dictyotales).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gabriella; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Sigiliano, Lorena; Machado, Fernanda; Kaiser, Carlos; Romeiro, Nelilma; Gestinari, Lísia; Santos, Norma; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we evaluated the antiviral activity against HMPV replication of crude extract of the marine algae Stypopodium zonale and of two meroditerpenoids obtained from it, atomaric acid and epitaondiol, and a methyl ester derivative of atomaric acid. Their selectivity indexes were 20.78, >56.81, 49.26 and 12.82, respectively. Compared to ribavirin, the substances showed a relatively low cytotoxicity on LLC-MK2 cells, with a significant antiviral activity, inhibiting at least 90% of viral replication in vitro, which demonstrates the potential of these marine natural products to combat infections caused by HMPV in vitro.

  9. Soil radon measurements as potential tracer of seismic and volcanic activity at Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Marco; Giammanco, Salvatore; Galli, Gianfranco; Ferrera, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    obtained by the radon probe installed along the NE flank of Etna (~1800 m asl), nearby a seismogenic fault that is the westernmost segment of the Pernicana fault system. The probe is located also close to the North-East Rift, an important volcano-tectonic structure of Etna which is site of frequent lateral volcanic eruptions. The collected data (radon, temperature and atmospheric pressure) were statistically analyzed and compared with the main meteorological parameters. In two periods (28/Feb/2010-06/May/2010 and 01/Jan/2011- 18/Feb/2011) we observed major anomalies in the signal of radon. An earthquake swarm has affected the western portion of the Pernicana fault system on 2-3 April 2010. Moreover, the period under investigation was characterized by tree eruptive paroxysms occurred on 11-12 January, 18 February and 10 April 2011, respectively. The maximum release of seismic energy falls almost halfway through the first radon anomaly (28/Feb/2010-06/Maj/2010), after about 33 days from its inception. Regarding the second radon anomaly (01/Jan/2011-18/Feb/2011), two of the three paroxysmal eruptions (11-12 January and 18 February 2011) fall within that timeframe. In this case the radon anomaly begins ~10 days before the 11-12 January paroxysm. The results show the possibility of using the anomalous variations of radon as potential tracers of seismic and volcanic activity.

  10. The Sasquatch Hydrothermal Field: Linkages Between Seismic Activity, Hydrothermal Flow, and Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D. A.; Kelley, D. S.; Delaney, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    chimney debris and thick deposits of oxidized hydrothermal sediment extends 200 m south. Large extinct chimneys (5-10 m high, 2-4 m in diameter) along the sulfide ridge indicate that Sasquatch was once far more active, though the current spatial extent and size of active chimneys are significantly smaller than the other four Endeavour vent fields. We suggest that seismic activity in 1999-2000 is responsible for renewed hydrothermal activity at Sasquatch, and that the field may have been further impacted by an earthquake swarm in 2005. Upon its discovery in 2000, diffuse flow was widespread at the field and along the adjacent ridge. Subsequent visits in 2002 and 2004 observed far less bacterial mat, suggesting a decrease in the amount of diffuse flow. In February-March 2005, a swarm of >3,700 earthquakes occurred ~35 km NNW of the field (http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/acoustics/seismicity/nepac/endeav0205.html) and may have contributed to the initiation and growth of several new "beehive" vent structures observed in September 2005 and 2006. References Johnson, H.P., M. Hutnak, R.P. Dziak, C.G. Fox, I. Urcuyo, J.P. Cowen, J. Nabelek, and C. Fisher (2000), Earthquake-induced changes in a hydrothermal system on the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge, Nature 407, 174-177. Lilley, M. D., D. A. Butterfield, J. E. Lupton, and E. J. Olson (2003), Magmatic events can produce rapid changes in hydrothermal chemistry, Nature 422, 878-881. Proskurwoski, G., M. D. Lilley and T. A. Brown (2004), Isotopic evidence of magmatism and seawater bicarbonate removal at the Endeavour hydrothermal system, Ear. Planet. Sci. Let. 225, 1-2, 53-61.

  11. Mass transport deposits as witness of Holocene seismic activity on the Ligurian margin, Western Mediterranean (ASTARTE project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samalens, Kevin; Cattaneo, Antonio; Migeon, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The Ligurian Margin (Western Mediterranean) is at the transition between the Southern Alpes and the Liguro-Provençal margin and it is one of the most seismic areas of France. Several historic earthquakes have been indexed; the strongest, on February 23rd, 1887, occurred offshore Menton and Imperia and also caused a tsunami wave. Its equivalent magnitude has been estimated between 6 and 6.5. In addition, a moderate recurrent seismicity shakes the margin. The aim of this study is to understand the link between seismic activity and slope destabilization, and to identify the sedimentary deposits resulting from mass transport or turbidity currents. During Malisar (Geoazur laboratory), Prisme 2 and Prisme 3 (Ifremer) cruises, bathymetry, seafloor imagery (SAR), geophysics data (CHIRP SYSIF and high resolution seismics), and sediment cores have been acquired on the continental slope, focussing on canyons and submarine landslides, and in the basin. These data record numerous mass transport deposits (slump, debrites) in the different physiographic areas of the margin. To search for evidences of past Ligurian margin seismicity during the Holocene, we focused on the northeast part of the margin, the Finale area. We identified and sampled acoustically transparent Mass Transport Deposits up to 20-m thick in the bottom of three coaleshing canyons: Noli, Pora and Centa canyons from W to E in the area offshore Finale Ligure. We also recovered an MTD in the collecting deeper canyon system. MTDs in cores appear as sediment with different degrees of deformation (tilted blocks, slump, debrites) and are topped by hemipelagites. The radiocarbon age of the top of MTDs can be considered synchronous and centered around 4900 yr BP. Mass wasting occurring over more than 50 km of the Ligurian margin could indicate that an earthquake stroke the Finale area sector at that time.

  12. Seismic imaging of the metamorphism of young sediment into new crystalline crust in the actively rifting Imperial Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Liang; Hole, John A.; Stock, Joann M.; Fuis, Gary S.; Williams, Colin F.; Delph, Jonathan R.; Davenport, Kathy K.; Livers, Amanda J.

    2016-11-01

    Plate-boundary rifting between transform faults is opening the Imperial Valley of southern California and the rift is rapidly filling with sediment from the Colorado River. Three 65-90 km long seismic refraction profiles across and along the valley, acquired as part of the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project, were analyzed to constrain upper crustal structure and the transition from sediment to underlying crystalline rock. Both first arrival travel-time tomography and frequency-domain full-waveform inversion were applied to provide P-wave velocity models down to ˜7 km depth. The valley margins are fault-bounded, beyond which thinner sediment has been deposited on preexisting crystalline rocks. Within the central basin, seismic velocity increases continuously from ˜1.8 km/s sediment at the surface to >6 km/s crystalline rock with no sharp discontinuity. Borehole data show young sediment is progressively metamorphosed into crystalline rock. The seismic velocity gradient with depth decreases approximately at the 4 km/s contour, which coincides with changes in the porosity and density gradient in borehole core samples. This change occurs at ˜3 km depth in most of the valley, but at only ˜1.5 km depth in the Salton Sea geothermal field. We interpret progressive metamorphism caused by high heat flow to be creating new crystalline crust throughout the valley at a rate comparable to the ≥2 km/Myr sedimentation rate. The newly formed crystalline crust extends to at least 7-8 km depth, and it is shallower and faster where heat flow is higher. Most of the active seismicity occurs within this new crust.

  13. Oligocene to Recent tectonic history of the Central Solomon intra-arc basin as determined from marine seismic reflection data and compilation of onland geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Shane; Mann, Paul; Coffin, M. F.; Shipley, Thomas H.

    2004-10-01

    Systematic analysis of a grid of 3450 km of multichannel seismic reflection lines from the Solomon Islands constrains the late Tertiary sedimentary and tectonic history of the Solomon Island arc and its convergent interaction with the Cretaceous Ontong Java oceanic plateau (OJP). The OJP, the largest oceanic plateau on Earth, subducted beneath the northern edge of the Solomon arc in the late Neogene, but the timing and consequences of this obliquely convergent event and its role in the subduction polarity reversal process remain poorly constrained. The Central Solomon intra-arc basin (CSB), which developed in Oligocene to Recent time above the Solomon arc, provides a valuable record of the tectonic environment prior to and accompanying the OJP convergent event and the subsequent arc polarity reversal. Recognition of regionally extensive stratigraphic sequences—whose ages can be inferred from marine sedimentary sections exposed onland in the Solomon Islands—indicate four distinct tectonic phases affecting the Solomon Island arc. Phase 1: Late Oligocene-Late Miocene rifting of the northeast-facing Solomon Island arc produced basal, normal-fault-controlled, asymmetrical sequences of the CSB; the proto-North Solomon trench was probably much closer to the CSB and is inferred to coincide with the trace of the present-day Kia-Kaipito-Korigole (KKK) fault zone; this protracted period of intra-arc extension shows no evidence for interruption by an early Miocene period of convergent "soft docking" of the Ontong Java Plateau as proposed by previous workers. Phase 2: Late Miocene-Pliocene oblique convergence of the Ontong Java Plateau at the proto-North Solomon trench (KKK fault zone) and folding of the CSB and formation of the Malaita accretionary prism (MAP); the highly oblique and diachronous convergence between the Ontong Java plateau and the Solomon arc terminates intra-arc extension first in the southeast (Russell subbasin of the CSB) during the Late Miocene and

  14. Crustal rifting and magmatic underplating in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) intra-oceanic arc detected by active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic experiments using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc region since 2002 to understand growth process of continental crust. The source was an airgun array with a total capacity of 12,000 cubic inches and the OBSs as the receiver were deployed with an interval of 5 km for all seismic refraction experiments. As the results, we obtained crustal structures across the whole IBM arc with an interval of 50 km and detected the structural characteristics showing the crustal growth process. The IBM arc is one of typical oceanic island arc, which crustal growth started from subduction of an oceanic crust beneath the other oceanic crust. The arc crust has developed through repeatedly magmatic accretion from subduction slab and backarc opening. The volcanism has activated in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Quaternary (e.g., Taylor, 1992), however, these detailed locations of past volcanic arc has been remained as one of unknown issues. In addition, a role of crustal rifting for the crustal growth has also been still unknown issue yet. Our seismic structures show three rows of past volcanic arc crusts except current arc. A rear arc and a forearc side have one and two, respectively. The first one, which was already reported by Kodaira et al. (2008), distributes in northern side from 27 N of the rear arc region. The second one, which develops in the forearc region next to the recent volcanic front, distributes in whole of the Izu-Ogasawara arc having crustal variation along arc direction. Ones of them sometimes have thicker crust than that beneath current volcanic front and no clear topographic high. Last one in the forearc connects to the Ogasawara Ridge. However, thickest crust is not always located beneath these volcanic arcs. The initial rifting region like the northern end of the Mariana Trough and the Sumisu

  15. Marine Invertebrate Xenobiotic-Activated Nuclear Receptors: Their Application as Sensor Elements in High-Throughput Bioassays for Marine Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Ingrid; Fidler, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    Developing high-throughput assays to screen marine extracts for bioactive compounds presents both conceptual and technical challenges. One major challenge is to develop assays that have well-grounded ecological and evolutionary rationales. In this review we propose that a specific group of ligand-activated transcription factors are particularly well-suited to act as sensors in such bioassays. More specifically, xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (XANRs) regulate transcription of genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification. XANR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) may adaptively evolve to bind those bioactive, and potentially toxic, compounds to which organisms are normally exposed to through their specific diets. A brief overview of the function and taxonomic distribution of both vertebrate and invertebrate XANRs is first provided. Proof-of-concept experiments are then described which confirm that a filter-feeding marine invertebrate XANR LBD is activated by marine bioactive compounds. We speculate that increasing access to marine invertebrate genome sequence data, in combination with the expression of functional recombinant marine invertebrate XANR LBDs, will facilitate the generation of high-throughput bioassays/biosensors of widely differing specificities, but all based on activation of XANR LBDs. Such assays may find application in screening marine extracts for bioactive compounds that could act as drug lead compounds. PMID:25421319

  16. Marine invertebrate xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors: their application as sensor elements in high-throughput bioassays for marine bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Richter, Ingrid; Fidler, Andrew E

    2014-11-24

    Developing high-throughput assays to screen marine extracts for bioactive compounds presents both conceptual and technical challenges. One major challenge is to develop assays that have well-grounded ecological and evolutionary rationales. In this review we propose that a specific group of ligand-activated transcription factors are particularly well-suited to act as sensors in such bioassays. More specifically, xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (XANRs) regulate transcription of genes involved in xenobiotic detoxification. XANR ligand-binding domains (LBDs) may adaptively evolve to bind those bioactive, and potentially toxic, compounds to which organisms are normally exposed to through their specific diets. A brief overview of the function and taxonomic distribution of both vertebrate and invertebrate XANRs is first provided. Proof-of-concept experiments are then described which confirm that a filter-feeding marine invertebrate XANR LBD is activated by marine bioactive compounds. We speculate that increasing access to marine invertebrate genome sequence data, in combination with the expression of functional recombinant marine invertebrate XANR LBDs, will facilitate the generation of high-throughput bioassays/biosensors of widely differing specificities, but all based on activation of XANR LBDs. Such assays may find application in screening marine extracts for bioactive compounds that could act as drug lead compounds.

  17. Bayesian spatial modeling of cetacean sightings during a seismic acquisition survey.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Raul; Pena, Ursula; Esteban, Ruth; Koemans, Robin

    2016-08-15

    A visual monitoring of marine mammals was carried out during a seismic acquisition survey performed in waters south of Portugal with the aim of assessing the likelihood of encountering Mysticeti species in this region as well as to determine the impact of the seismic activity upon encounter. Sightings and effort data were assembled with a range of environmental variables at different lags, and a Bayesian site-occupancy modeling approach was used to develop prediction maps and evaluate how species-specific habitat conditions evolved throughout the presence or not of seismic activity. No statistical evidence of a decrease in the sighting rates of Mysticeti by comparison to source activity was found. Indeed, it was found how Mysticeti distribution during the survey period was driven solely by environmental variables. Although further research is needed, possible explanations may include anthropogenic noise habituation and zone of seismic activity coincident with a naturally low density area.

  18. 78 FR 12720 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... beluga whales, to sound levels that may result in injury. For example, protected species observers will... to confirm that the majority of beluga whales have moved out of the proposed survey area before initiating those activities. Response: Beluga whales remain in Cook Inlet year-round, but...

  19. 75 FR 32379 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... m) behind the vessel. Each array is composed of three strings for a total of 26 active G-guns (4 60... and 12 single airguns). The proposed 3,000 in\\3\\ array is also composed of three strings with a...

  20. 75 FR 25729 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... continuous sound sources. Sound measurements from the Discoverer have not previously been conducted in the Arctic or elsewhere; however, sounds from a similar drillship, the Northern Explorer II, were measured at... level for modeling the combined drilling activities. The underwater received sound pressure level...

  1. An objective method for the assessment of fluid injection-induced seismicity and application to tectonically active regions in central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, T. H. W.; Hauksson, E.; Aminzadeh, F.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    Changes in seismicity rates, whether of tectonic or of induced origin, can readily be identified in regions where background rates are low but are difficult to detect in seismically active regions. We present a novel method to identify likely induced seismicity in tectonically active regions based on short-range spatiotemporal correlations between changes in fluid injection and seismicity rates. The method searches through the entire parameter space of injection rate thresholds and determines the statistical significance of correlated changes in injection and seismicity rates. Applying our method to Kern County, central California, we find that most earthquakes within the region are tectonic; however, fluid injection contributes to seismicity in four different cases. Three of these are connected to earthquake sequences with events above M4. Each of these sequences followed an abrupt increase in monthly injection rates of at least 15,000 m3. The probability that the seismicity sequences and the abrupt changes in injection rates in Kern County coincide by chance is only 4%. The identified earthquake sequences display low Gutenberg-Richter b values of ˜0.6-0.7 and at times systematic migration patterns characteristic for a diffusive process. Our results show that injection-induced pressure perturbations can influence seismic activity at distances of 10 km or more. Triggering of earthquakes at these large distances may be facilitated by complex local geology and faults in tectonically active regions. Our study provides the first comprehensive, statistically robust assessment of likely injection-induced seismicity within a large, tectonically active region.

  2. Very Long Period Seismicity Accompanying Increasing Shallower Activity at Cotopaxi Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, G.; Molina Polania, C. I.; Ruiz, M. C.; Kumagai, H.; Hernandez, S.; Plain, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Yepez, M.; Barrington, C.; Hidalgo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Cotopaxi is an andesitic stratovolcano, located in the highland region of Ecuador, which renewed its activity in April 2015, showing an increased number of volcano-tectonic (VT), long-period (LP), very long period events (VLP), and tremors. The VLP events were recorded in several episodes between 2002 and 2014, and have been interpreted as volumetric changes due to the release of gas and subsequent pressure drop and recovery in the magma intrusion. The two peaks of VLP seismicity in June 2002 and April 2015 preceded an increase of surficial activity (fumarolic increase) and the deformation data during those episodes suggested a small intrusion of magma beneath the volcano.Using polarization analysis, we found that most of these events were located at 2-3 km depth beneath the volcano summit, while the deformation data suggests the intrusion is deeper (5-10 km deep). Using tiltmeter data, Mogi point source modelling on successive periods of inflation and deflation show a significant shallowing of sources since the end of May 2015, matching the recent very large spike in SO2 emissions (~3000 t/d). From mid-February until the gas emission spikes in May 2015, Mogi source modelling has indicated inflation/deflation events at 11 to 10 km depth, having shallowed to a depth of between 8 and 7 km after the SO2 emission increase. Shallow source volumes suggested by deformation indicate values of 4 - 31x106 m3, with the most recent, most shallow inflation currently at 8x106 m3.

  3. Shallow Lunar Seismic Activity and the Current Stress State of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, T. R.; Weber, R. C.; Collins, G. C.; Johnson, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    A vast, global network of more than 3200 lobate thrust fault scarps has been revealed in high resolution Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images. The fault scarps very young, less than 50 Ma, based on their small scale and crisp appearance, crosscutting relations with small-diameter impact craters, and rates of infilling of associated small, shallow graben and may be actively forming today. The population of young thrust fault scarps provides a window into the recent stress state of the Moon and offers insight into the origin of global lunar stresses. The distribution of orientations of the fault scarps is non-random, inconsistent with isotropic stresses from late-stage global contraction as the sole source of stress Modeling shows that tidal stresses contribute significantly to the current stress state of the lunar crust. Tidal stresses (orbital recession and diurnal tides) superimposed on stresses from global contraction result in non-isotropic compressional stress and thrust faults consistent with lobate scarp orientations. Stresses due to orbital recession do not change with orbital position, thus it is with the addition of diurnal stresses that peak stresses are reached. At apogee, diurnal and recession stresses are most compressive near the tidal axis, while at perigee they are most compressive 90 degrees away from the tidal axis. Coseismic slip events on currently active thrust faults are expected to be triggered when peak stresses are reached. Analysis of the timing of the 28 the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo seismic network shows that 19 indeed occur when the Moon is closer to apogee, while only 9 shallow events occur when the Moon is closer to perigee. Here we show the results of relocating the shallow moonquake using an algorithm designed for sparse networks to better constrain their epicentral locations in order to compare them with stress models. The model for the current stress state of the Moon is refined by investigating the

  4. Shallow Lunar Seismic Activity and the Current Stress State of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Weber, Renee C.; Collins, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    A vast, global network of more than 3200 lobate thrust fault scarps has been revealed in high resolution Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) images. The fault scarps are very young, less than 50 Ma, based on their small scale and crisp appearance, crosscutting relations with small-diameter impact craters, and rates of infilling of associated small, shallow graben and may be actively forming today. The population of young thrust fault scarps provides a window into the recent stress state of the Moon and offers insight into the origin of global lunar stresses. The distribution of orientations of the fault scarps is non-random, inconsistent with isotropic stresses from late-stage global contraction as the sole source of stress. Modeling shows that tidal stresses contribute significantly to the current stress state of the lunar crust. Tidal stresses (orbital recession and diurnal tides) superimposed on stresses from global contraction result in non-isotropic compressional stress and may produce thrust faults consistent with lobate scarp orientations. At any particular point on the lunar surface, peak compressive stress will be reached at a certain time in the diurnal cycle. Coseismic slip events on currently active thrust faults are expected to be triggered when peak stresses are reached. Analysis of the timing of the 28 the shallow moonquakes recorded by the Apollo seismic network shows that 19 indeed occur when the Moon is closer to apogee, while only 9 shallow events occur when the Moon is closer to perigee. Here we report efforts to refine the model for the current stress state of the Moon by investigating the contribution of polar wander. Progress on relocating the epicentral locations of the shallow moonquakes using an algorithm designed for sparse networks is also reported.

  5. Cytotoxicity and antimicrobial activity of marine macro algae (Dictyotaceae and Ulvaceae) from the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Mashjoor, Sakineh; Yousefzadi, Morteza; Esmaeili, Mohamad Ali; Rafiee, Roya

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical industry now accept the worlds ocean which contains a vast array of organisms with unique biological properties, as a major frontier for medical investigation. Bioactive compounds with different modes of action, such as, antiproliferative, antioxidant, antimicrotubule, have been isolated from marine sources, specifically macro and micro algae, and cyanobacteria. The aim of this work was to investigate antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities of the extracts of marine macro algae Ulva flexuosa, Padina antillarum and Padina boergeseni from the northern coasts of the Persian Gulf, Qeshm Island, Iran, against three cell lines including MCF7, HeLa and Vero, as well as their inhibitory effects against a wide array (i.e. n = 11) of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. Antimicrobial activity of the marine macro algal extracts was assessed using a disc diffusion method; an MTT cytotoxicity assay was employed to test the effects of the extracts on each cancer cell line. The algal extracts showed considerable antimicrobial activity against the majority of the tested bacteria and fungi. Both ethyl acetate and methanol extracts at the highest concentration (100 µg/ml) caused cell death, with the IC50 values calculated for each cell type and each algal extracts. Results are exhibited a higher decrease in the viability of the cells treated at the highest concentration of marine macro algal ethyl acetate extracts compared to the methanol extracts (78.9 % death in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Despite, the ethyl acetate extracts with lower dose- response of cells, exhibited better cytotoxic activity than methanol extracts (IC50: 55.26 μg/ml in Vero cells by ethyl acetate extracts from U. flexuosa). Based on the findings, it is concluded that the marine macro algal extracts from the Persian Gulf possess antibacterial and cytotoxic potential, which could be considered for future applications in medicine and identifying novel drugs from the

  6. Excision and transposition activity of Tc1/mariner superfamily transposons in sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, Yasunori; Yaguchi, Junko; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Yajima, Mamiko

    2010-03-01

    Tc1/mariner superfamily transposons are used as transformation vectors in various model organisms. The utility of this transposon family is evidenced by the fact that Tc1/mariner transposons have loose host specificity. However, the activity of these transposons has been observed in only a few organisms, and a recent study in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis suggests that not all Tc1/ mariner transposons show loose host specificity. To understand host specificity, we used sea urchins, since they have a long history as materials of embryology and developmental biology. Transposon techniques have not been reported in this organism, despite the likelihood that these techniques would open up many experimental possibilities. Here we tested the activity of three Tc1/ mariner transposons (Minos, Sleeping Beauty, and Frog Prince) in the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. Minos has both excision and transposition activity in H. pulcherrimus embryos, whereas no excision activity was detected for Sleeping Beauty or Frog Prince. This study suggests that Minos is active in a broad range of non-host organisms and can be used as a transformation tool in sea urchin embryos.

  7. Deep Sequencing of Subseafloor Eukaryotic rRNA Reveals Active Fungi across Marine Subsurface Provinces

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F.; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface. PMID:23418556

  8. Deep sequencing of subseafloor eukaryotic rRNA reveals active Fungi across marine subsurface provinces.

    PubMed

    Orsi, William; Biddle, Jennifer F; Edgcomb, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The deep marine subsurface is a vast habitat for microbial life where cells may live on geologic timescales. Because DNA in sediments may be preserved on long timescales, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is suggested to be a proxy for the active fraction of a microbial community in the subsurface. During an investigation of eukaryotic 18S rRNA by amplicon pyrosequencing, unique profiles of Fungi were found across a range of marine subsurface provinces including ridge flanks, continental margins, and abyssal plains. Subseafloor fungal populations exhibit statistically significant correlations with total organic carbon (TOC), nitrate, sulfide, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). These correlations are supported by terminal restriction length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses of fungal rRNA. Geochemical correlations with fungal pyrosequencing and TRFLP data from this geographically broad sample set suggests environmental selection of active Fungi in the marine subsurface. Within the same dataset, ancient rRNA signatures were recovered from plants and diatoms in marine sediments ranging from 0.03 to 2.7 million years old, suggesting that rRNA from some eukaryotic taxa may be much more stable than previously considered in the marine subsurface.

  9. Marine Invertebrate Metabolites with Anticancer Activities: Solutions to the “Supply Problem”

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Nelson G. M.; Dasari, Ramesh; Chandra, Sunena; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrates provide a rich source of metabolites with anticancer activities and several marine-derived agents have been approved for the treatment of cancer. However, the limited supply of promising anticancer metabolites from their natural sources is a major hurdle to their preclinical and clinical development. Thus, the lack of a sustainable large-scale supply has been an important challenge facing chemists and biologists involved in marine-based drug discovery. In the current review we describe the main strategies aimed to overcome the supply problem. These include: marine invertebrate aquaculture, invertebrate and symbiont cell culture, culture-independent strategies, total chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis, and a number of hybrid strategies. We provide examples illustrating the application of these strategies for the supply of marine invertebrate-derived anticancer agents. Finally, we encourage the scientific community to develop scalable methods to obtain selected metabolites, which in the authors’ opinion should be pursued due to their most promising anticancer activities. PMID:27213412

  10. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  11. Active Seismicity and Tectonics in Central Asia from Seismological Data Recorded in the Pamir and Tien Shan Mountain Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Christian; Schurr, Bernd; Schneider, Felix M.; Yuan, Xiaohui; Mechie, James; Minaev, Vladislav; Abdybachaev, Ulan A.; Gadoev, Mustafo; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon

    2010-05-01

    Active tectonics in the Pamir mountains in central Asia, the westernmost part of the India-Eurasia collision zone, are controlled by ongoing convergence (about 20 mm/yr), causing substantial crustal shortening and compressional deformation. This leads to high seismicity rates throughout the region. Whereas seismic activity along the rim of the Pamir plateau is mostly compressional and concentrated along the Main Pamir Thrust, the distribution and focal mechanisms of earthquakes in its interior are more diffuse, with extensional events occurring along North-South trending rift zones (Kara Kul, Wachan). Seismicity in the south-western Pamir and in the Hindu Kush features frequent intermediate-depth earthquakes, reaching hypocentral depths of 300 km, which is rare for regions not obviously related to active subduction of oceanic lithosphere. These mantle earthquakes, which are not observed beneath the Himalayas and Tibet further east, form a rather well-defined Wadati-Benioff zone that was readily interpreted as subducted lithosphere present below the current collisional orogen. Earlier seismological studies showed the presence of a northward-dipping lithospheric slab under the Hindu Kush and a southward-dipping one beneath the Pamirs, with a small seismic gap in-between. Different hypotheses concerning the nature of these slabs (oceanic or continental lithosphere) and tectonic geometry in general (two slabs subducting in opposite directions or a single, hugely contorted slab) have been proposed in literature. Political instability in the region in the last two decades hampered on-site studies and field work, leaving many key issues poorly understood. In the framework of the multidisciplinary project TIPAGE (Tien Shan Pamir Geodynamic Programme), for the first time, new field campaigns collecting high quality data have been made possible. Local seismicity in the Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges (Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan) is currently being recorded by a temporary

  12. Seismic Activity Related to the 2002-2003 Mt. Etna Volcano Eruption (Italy): Fault Plane Solutions and Stress Tensor Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, G.; Cammarata, L.; Cocina, O.; Maiolino, V.; Musumeci, C.; Privitera, E.

    2003-04-01

    Late on the night of October 26, 2002, a bi-lateral eruption started on both the eastern and the southeastern flanks of Mt. Etna. The opening of the eruptive fracture system on the NE sector and the reactivation of the 2001 fracture system, on the S sector, were accompanied by a strong seismic swarm recorded between October 26 and 28 and by sharp increase of volcanic tremor amplitude. After this initial phase, on October 29 another seismogenetic zone became active in the SE sector of the volcano. At present (January 2003) the eruption is still in evolution. During the whole period a total of 862 earthquakes (Md≫1) was recorded by the local permanent seismic network run by INGV - Sezione di Catania. The maximum magnitude observed was Md=4.4. We focus our attention on 55 earthquakes with magnitude Md≫ 3.0. The dataset consists of accurate digital pickings of P- and S-phases including first-motion polarities. Firstly earthquakes were located using a 1D velocity model (Hirn et alii, 1991), then events were relocated by using two different 3D velocity models (Aloisi et alii, 2002; Patane et alii, 2002). Results indicate that most of earthquakes are located to the east of the Summit Craters and to northeast of them. Fault plane solutions (FPS) obtained show prevalent strike-slip rupture mechanisms. The suitable FPSs were considered for the application of Gephart and Forsyth`s algorithm in order to evaluate seismic stress field characteristics. Taking into account the preliminary results we propose a kinematic model of the eastern flank eastward movement in response of the intrusion processes in the central part of the volcano. References Aloisi M., Cocina O., Neri G., Orecchio B., Pr