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Sample records for activities phase ii

  1. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge.

  2. Zero-g experiments with a He II active phase separator for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, H. D.; Klipping, G.; Lueders, K.; Ruppert, U.; Stahnke, F.; Szuecs, Z.; Elleman, D.; Petrac, D.

    An active phase separator (APS) for temperature control of He II space cooling systems was tested in a zero-g environment during a series of parabolic flights on a NASA KC 135 aircraft. The APS provides for liquid-gas separation and features an annular gap, a downstream heat exchanger and an upstream ball closure. The apparatus was operated during acceleration and floating and in two different heat load situations. The tests confirmed that adequate mass flow rates could be maintained using a vacuum pump to simulate space vacuum and that residual liquid could be evaporated from the heat exchanger after closing a ball valve to seal off flows.

  3. The African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris): Low phase I and phase II metabolism activities.

    PubMed

    Saengtienchai, Aksorn; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Jermnark, Usuma; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Kawai, Yusuke K; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2016-12-01

    The African hedgehog, Atelerix albiventris, is a spiny mammal that has become popular as an exotic pet in many countries. To elucidate the ability of hedgehogs to metabolize xenobiotics, the animals were exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, pyrene. The in vivo exposure study indicated that pyrene was biotransformed to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, such as pyrene-1-glucuronide, pyrene-1-sulfate, and pyrenediol-sulfate, and excreted in the urine. Pyrene-1-glucuronide was the main metabolite, and limited sulfate conjugate excretion was observed. The main products excreted in feces were 1-hydroxypyrene and pyrene. Based on the results of the in vivo exposure study, in vitro enzymatic kinetic experiments were performed using various substrates and compared to rats and pigs. The enzyme efficiencies of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and warfarin 4'-, 6-, and 8-hydroxylation activity in hedgehogs were lower than those of rats. Furthermore, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity in hedgehogs also had a lower Km value than that in pigs. Interestingly, the enzyme efficiencies of sulfation activity toward 1-hydroxypyrene and β-estradiol in hedgehogs were significantly lower than those in pigs. These observations suggested that phenol and estrogen sulfotransferases may have limited roles in xenobiotic metabolism in hedgehogs.

  4. H2O2 preconditioning modulates phase II enzymes through p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Malaguti, Marco; Leoncini, Emanuela; Lorenzini, Antonello; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-06-01

    Ischemic preconditioning is a complex cardioprotective phenomenon that involves adaptive changes in cells and molecules and occurs in a biphasic pattern: an early phase after 1-2 h and a late phase after 12-24 h. While it is widely accepted that reactive oxygen species are strongly involved in triggering ischemic preconditiong, it is not clear if they play a major role in the early or late phase of preconditioning and which are the mechanisms involved. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms behind H(2)O(2)-induced cardioprotection in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We focused on antioxidant and phase II enzymes and their modulation by protein kinase signaling pathways and nuclear-factor-E(2)-related factor-1 (Nrf1) and Nrf2. H(2)O(2) preconditioning was able to counteract oxidative stress more effectively in the late than in the early phase of adaptation. In particular, H(2)O(2) preconditioning counteracted oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by decreasing caspase-3 activity, increasing Bcl2 expression and selectively increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant and phase II enzymes through Nrf1 and Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus. The downregulation of Nrf1 and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA reduced the expression level of phase II enzymes. Specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and p38 MAPK activation partially reduced the cardioprotection elicited by H(2)O(2) preconditioning and the induction and activity of phase II enzymes. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a key role for Nrf1, and not only for Nrf2, in the induction of phase II enzymes triggered by H(2)O(2) preconditioning.

  5. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  6. Effects of blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) on DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and phase II enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Dulebohn, Rachel V; Yi, Weiguang; Srivastava, Anita; Akoh, Casimir C; Krewer, Gerard; Fischer, Joan G

    2008-12-24

    Blueberry extracts have high antioxidant potential and increase phase II enzyme activities in vitro. This study tested the hypothesis that blueberries would reduce DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and increase phase II enzyme activities in vivo. Young, healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were fed control AIN-93 diets or AIN-93 diets supplemented with blueberries or blueberry extracts for 3 weeks. Diets were supplemented with 10% freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenol extract and sugars to match the 10% blueberry diet, or 1 and 0.2% blueberry flavonoids, which were primarily anthocyanins. Liver and colon mucosa glutathione-S-transferase (GST), quinone reductase, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activities in colon mucosa and liver were not significantly increased by freeze-dried whole blueberries or blueberry fractions. Liver GST activity, however, was approximately 25% higher than controls for the freeze-dried whole blueberry, blueberry polyphenol, and 1% flavonoid groups. DNA damage was significantly lower than control only in the liver of animals fed the 1% flavonoid diet. The level of urinary F(2)-isoprostanes, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was unaffected. In summary, in healthy rats, short-term supplementation with freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenols, or blueberry flavonoids did not significantly increase phase II enzyme activities. However, supplementation with 1% blueberry flavonoids did decrease oxidative DNA damage in the liver.

  7. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to

  8. Non-thermal Plasma Activates Human Keratinocytes by Stimulation of Antioxidant and Phase II Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Anke; Dietrich, Stephan; Steuer, Anna; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Masur, Kai; Wende, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma provides a novel therapeutic opportunity to control redox-based processes, e.g. wound healing, cancer, and inflammatory diseases. By spatial and time-resolved delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, it allows stimulation or inhibition of cellular processes in biological systems. Our data show that both gene and protein expression is highly affected by non-thermal plasma. Nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2) and phase II enzyme pathway components were found to act as key controllers orchestrating the cellular response in keratinocytes. Additionally, glutathione metabolism, which is a marker for NRF2-related signaling events, was affected. Among the most robustly increased genes and proteins, heme oxygenase 1, NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1, and growth factors were found. The roles of NRF2 targets, investigated by siRNA silencing, revealed that NRF2 acts as an important switch for sensing oxidative stress events. Moreover, the influence of non-thermal plasma on the NRF2 pathway prepares cells against exogenic noxae and increases their resilience against oxidative species. Via paracrine mechanisms, distant cells benefit from cell-cell communication. The finding that non-thermal plasma triggers hormesis-like processes in keratinocytes facilitates the understanding of plasma-tissue interaction and its clinical application. PMID:25589789

  9. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1999-11-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  10. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  11. Phase II enzyme-inducing and antioxidant activities of beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extracts from phenotypes of different pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Wettasinghe, Mahinda; Bolling, Bradley; Plhak, Leslie; Xiao, Hang; Parkin, Kirk

    2002-11-06

    Free-radical scavenging, reducing, and phase II enzyme-inducing activities of aqueous and 5% aqueous ethanol extracts of freeze-dried root tissue of four beet (Beta vulgaris L.) strains (red, white, orange, and high-pigment (red) phenotypes) were determined. Aqueous and ethanolic tissue extracts of the regular and high-pigment red phenotypes were most capable of inhibiting metmyoglobin/H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2-2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)-mediated bleaching of beta-carotene. These same extracts were also most efficient at reducing ABTS radical cation and inducing quinone reductase in murine hepatoma (Hepa 1c1c7) cells in vitro.

  12. Family and Community Studies (FACS) Fourth Interim Report, Phase I and Activities and Timelines for Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Renato; And Others

    Discussed in this paper is a preliminary analysis of findings from data gathered during the first phase of a research project exploring the processes whereby the nature of the mother's occupation affects her family life, especially (1) her partnership in decisions about housework, child care and education and (2) the negotiation of the allocation…

  13. Evaluation of Vocational Technical Education. Phase II. A Skeletal Model with Suggested Research and Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Educational Directions, Crawfordsville, IN.

    Phase 2 of this project presents a skeletal model for evaluating vocational education programs which can be applied to secondary, post-secondary, and adult education programs. The model addresses 13 main components of the vocational education system: descriptive information, demonstration of need, student recruitment and selection, curriculum,…

  14. Phase II antioxidant enzyme activities in brain of male and female ACI rats treated chronically with estradiol.

    PubMed

    Stakhiv, Timothy M; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Kauffman, Frederick C

    2006-08-09

    Activities of Phase II antioxidant enzymes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and phenol sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) were measured in brain of August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats exposed chronically to low doses of estradiol (E(2)). ACI rats were selected for study because this strain is highly responsive to treatment with low doses of E(2) as indexed by a high incidence of E(2)-induced mammary tumors compared to other strains. Rats were exposed chronically to 3 mg E(2) contained in cholesterol pellets implanted subcutaneously for 6 weeks. This treatment increased activities of all four enzymes in the striatum of male but not female ACI rats. Blood E(2) levels at time of sacrifice correlated closely with activities of striatal NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1, but not with striatal UGT. NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 activities in other brain regions including the cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus were less sensitive to chronic E(2) treatment. NQO1 was primarily localized in vascular elements and neurons and SULT1A1 primarily in neurons and neuropil of control and E(2)-treated rats. Collectively, these results suggest that enhanced expression of NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 may contribute to the antioxidant effects of E(2) in the striatum, an area of the brain that may be particularly prone to oxidative stress because of its high content of catecholamines.

  15. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, C.

    1984-01-01

    This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

  16. Development of in vivo biotransformation enzyme assays for ecotoxicity screening: In vivo measurement of phases I and II enzyme activities in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2016-08-01

    The development of a high-throughput tool is required for screening of environmental pollutants and assessing their impacts on aquatic animals. Freshwater planarians can be used in rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassays. Planarians are known for their remarkable regeneration ability but much less known for their metabolic and xenobiotic biotransformation abilities. In this study, the activities of different phase I and II enzymes were determined in vivo by directly measuring fluorescent enzyme substrate disappearance or fluorescent enzyme metabolite production in planarian culture media. For phase I enzyme activity, O-deethylation activities with alkoxyresorufin could not be detected in planarian culture media. By contrast, O-deethylation activities with alkoxycoumarin were detected in planarian culture media. Increases in 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities was only observed in planarians exposed to 1μM, but not 10μM, β-naphthoflavone for 24h. ECOD activity was inhibited in planarians exposed to 10 and 100μM rifampicin or carbamazepine for 24h. For phase II enzyme activity, DT-diaphorase, arylsulfatases, uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase or catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was determined in culture media containing planarians. The results of this study indicate that freshwater planarians are a promising model organism to monitor exposure to environmental pollutants or assess their impacts through the in vivo measurement of phase I and II enzyme activities.

  17. Cruciferous vegetable phytochemical sulforaphane affects phase II enzyme expression and activity in rat cardiomyocytes through modulation of Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Leoncini, Emanuela; Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Motori, Elisa; Fabbri, Daniele; Hrelia, Silvana

    2011-09-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SF), abundant in Cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce antioxidant/detoxification enzymes in many cancer cell lines, but studies focused on its cytoprotective action in nontransformed cells are just at the beginning. Since we previously demonstrated that SF elicits cardioprotection through an indirect antioxidative mechanism, the aim of this study was to analyze the signaling pathways through which SF exerts its protective effects. Using cultured rat cardiomyocytes, we investigated the ability of SF to activate Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways, which are implicated in cardiac cell survival, and to increase the phosphorylation of Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its binding to the antioxidant response element. By means of specific inhibitors, we demonstrated that the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway represents a mechanism through which SF influences both expression and activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, thioredoxin reductase, and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, analyzed by western immunoblotting and spectrophotometric assay, respectively, and modulates Nrf2 binding and phosphorylation resulting in a cytoprotective action against oxidative damage. Results of this study confirm the importance of phase II enzymes modulation as cytoprotective mechanism and support the nutritional assumption of Cruciferous vegetables as source of nutraceutical cardioprotective agents.

  18. Novel sulfoglycolipid IG20 causes neuroprotection by activating the phase II antioxidant response in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Punzón, Eva; García-Alvarado, Fernanda; Maroto, Marcos; Fernández-Mendívil, Cristina; Michalska, Patrycja; García-Álvarez, Isabel; Arranz-Tagarro, Juan Alberto; Buendia, Izaskun; López, Manuela G; León, Rafael; Gandía, Luis; Fernández-Mayoralas, Alfonso; García, Antonio G

    2017-04-01

    Compound IG20 is a newly synthesised sulphated glycolipid that promotes neuritic outgrowth and myelinisation, at the time it causes the inhibition of glial proliferation and facilitates exocytosis in chromaffin cells. Here we have shown that IG20 at 0.3-10 μM afforded neuroprotection in rat hippocampal slices stressed with veratridine, glutamate or with oxygen plus glucose deprivation followed by reoxygenation (OGD/reox). Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) elicited by glutamate or ODG/reox was prevented by IG20 that also restored the depressed tissue levels of GSH and ATP in hippocampal slices subjected to OGD/reox. Furthermore, the augmented iNOS expression produced upon OGD/reox exposure was also counteracted by IG20. Additionally, the IG20 elicited neuroprotection was prevented by the presence of inhibitors of the signalling pathways Jak2/STAT3, MEK/ERK1/2, and PI3K/Akt, consistent with the ability of the compound to increase the phosphorylation of Jak2, ERK1/2, and Akt. Thus, the activation of phase II response and the Nrf2/ARE pathway could explain the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and the ensuing neuroprotective actions of IG20.

  19. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  20. A Method for Utilizing Bivariate Efficacy Outcome Measures to Screen Regimens for Activity in 2-Stage Phase II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Larry; Litwin, Samuel; Yothers, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Background Most phase II clinical trials utilize a single primary endpoint to determine the promise of a regimen for future study. However, many disorders manifest themselves in complex ways. For example, migraine headaches can cause pain, auras, photophobia, and emesis. Investigators may believe a drug is effective at reducing migraine pain and the severity of emesis during an attack. Nevertheless, they could still be interested in proceeding with development of the drug if it is effective against only one of these symptoms. Such a study would be a candidate for a clinical trial with co-primary endpoints. Purpose The purpose of the article is to provide a method for designing a 2-stage clinical trial with dichotomous co-primary endpoints of efficacy that has the ability to detect activity on either response measure with high probability when the drug is active on one or both measures, while at the same time rejecting the drug with high probability when there is little activity on both dimensions. The design enables early closure for futility and is flexible with regard to attained accrual. Methods The design is proposed in the context of cancer clinical trials where tumor response is used to assess a drug's ability to kill tumor cells and progression-free survival (PFS) status after a certain period is used to evaluate the drug's ability to stabilize tumor growth. Both endpoints are assumed to be distributed as binomial random variables, and uninteresting probabilities of success are determined from historical controls. Given the necessity of accrual flexibility, exhaustive searching algorithms to find optimum designs do not seem feasible at this time. Instead, critical values are determined for realized sample sizes using specific procedures. Then accrual windows are found to achieve a design's desired level of significance, probability of early termination (PET), and power. Results The design is illustrated with a clinical trial that examined bevacizumab in

  1. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  2. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  3. Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Report - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1994-09-28

    This report describes the results from Phase II of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) Program, a joint effort to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high-level waste tanks. In Phase II, the program has been expanded to include inorganic constituents in addition to radionuclides. Results from Phase II that exceeded 20% relative percent difference criteria are identified.

  4. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  5. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio; Phase II, Evaluation of 1984 field and laboratory quality-assurance practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, Carolyn J. Oblinger; Chaney, Thomas H.; Myers, Donna; Norris, J. Michael; Hren, Janet

    1987-01-01

    Serious questions have been raised by Congress about the usefulness of water-quality data for addressing issues of regional and national scope and, especially, for characterizing the current quality of the Nation's streams and ground water. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey has undertaken a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to (1) determine the characteristics of current (1984) water-quality data-collection activities of Federal, regional, State, and local agencies, and academic institutions; and (2) determine how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve our ability to answer major broad-scope questions, such as:A. What are (or were) natural or near-natural water-quality conditions?B. What are existing water-quality conditions?C. How has water quality changed, and how do the changes relate to human activities?Colorado and Ohio were chosen for the pilot study largely because they represent regions with different types of waterquality concerns and programs. The study has been divided into three phases, the objectives of which are: Phase I--Inventory water-quality data-collection programs, including costs, and identify those programs that met a set of broad criteria for producing data that are potentially appropriate for water-quality assessments of regional and national scope. Phase II--Evaluate the quality assurance of field and laboratory procedures used in producing the data from programs that met the broad criteria of Phase I. Phase III--Compile the qualifying data and evaluate the adequacy of this data base for addressing selected water-quality questions of regional and national scope.Water-quality data are collected by a large number of organizations for diverse purposes ranging from meeting statutory requirements to research on water chemistry. Combining these individual data bases is an appealing and potentially cost-effective way to attempt to develop a data base adequate

  6. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  7. Busted Butte Phase II Excavation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J.W. Keifer

    2000-11-29

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an engineering excavation and ground support design for the Busted Butte phase II mine back. The analysis will apply engineering practices and previous proven design methods for pillar design and ground support in accordance with applicable Integrated Safety Management principles and functions. The scope of this analysis is limited to the Busted Butte Test Facility. The intended use of this analysis is to provide testing excavation boundaries, ground support and pillar design input to drawing(s) to support test operations implementation. This design activity has been prepared under ''Technical Work Plan For Test Facilities Design FY01 Work Activities'' (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2000b). No deviations from the TWP have been necessary for this analysis.

  8. The MU radar with active phased array system. I - Antenna and power amplifiers. II - In-house equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, S.; Sato, T.; Tsuda, T.; Kato, S.; Wakasugi, K.

    1985-12-01

    The MU (middle and upper atmosphere) radar of Japan, a 46.5 MHz pulse-modulated monostatic Doppler radar with an active phased array system, is described. The system's nominal beam width is 3.6 deg, and the peak radiation power is 1 MW with maximum average power of 50 kW. The system is composed of 475 crossed three-subelement Yagi antennas and an equivalent number of solid state power amplifiers. Each Yagi antenna is driven by a transmitter-receiver module with peak output power of 2.4 kW. This configuration enables very fast and almost continuous beam steering that has not been realized by other mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radars. The system's antenna and power amplifiers are described, as is the in-house equipment related to transmission reception, on-line data processing, and system control.

  9. Small Business Innovation Research GRC Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment for 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results associated with NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for NASA Glenn Research Center. The report also highlights the number of Phase I, Phase II, and Post-Phase II contracts awarded by mission directorate. The 2015 Phase I contract awards to companies in Ohio and their corresponding technologies are also discussed.

  10. Activity of 129 Single-Agent Drugs in 228 Phase I and II Clinical Trials in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kortuem, K. Martin; Zidich, Kaitlyn; Schuster, Steven R.; Khan, Meaghan L.; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H.; Mikhael, Joseph R.; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 400 preclinical studies report ≥ 1 compound as cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells; however, few of these agents became relevant in the clinic. Thus, the utility of such assays in predicting future clinical value is debatable. Patients and Methods We examined the application of early-phase trial experiences to predict future clinical adoption. We identified 129 drugs explored as single agents in 228 trials involving 7421 patients between 1961 and 2013. Results All drugs in common use in MM (melphalan, dexamethasone, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, bendamustine, thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, bortezomib, carfilzomib, and doxorubicin) demonstrated a best reported response rate of ≥ 22%. Older agents, including teniposide, fotemustine, paclitaxel, and interferon, also appear active by this criterion; however, if mean response rates from all reported trials for an agent are considered, then only drugs with a mean response rate of 15% partial response are in clinical use. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that thresholds of 20% for best or 15% for mean response are highly predictive of future clinical success. Below these thresholds, no drug has yet reached regulatory approval or widespread use in the clinic. Thus, this benchmark provides 1 element of the framework for guiding choice of drugs for late-stage clinical testing. PMID:24565465

  11. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  12. SLUDGE BATCH 6 PHASE II FLOWSHEET SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D.; Best, D.

    2010-03-30

    Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) runs were used to demonstrate that a fairly wide window of acid stoichiometry was available for processing SB6 Phase II flowsheet simulant (Tank 40 simulant) while still meeting the dual goals of acceptable nitrate destruction and controlled hydrogen generation. Phase II was an intermediate flowsheet study for the projected composition of Tank 40 after transfer of SB6/Tank 51 sludge to the heel of SB5. The composition was based on August 2009 projections. A window of about 50% in total acid was found between acceptable nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation.

  13. Canakinumab treatment for patients with active recurrent or chronic TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): an open-label, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Gattorno, Marco; Obici, Laura; Cattalini, Marco; Tormey, Vincent; Abrams, Ken; Davis, Nicole; Speziale, Antonio; Bhansali, Suraj G; Martini, Alberto; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of canakinumab, a high-affinity human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1β antibody, in inducing complete or almost complete responses in patients with active tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Methods Twenty patients (aged 7–78 years) with active recurrent or chronic TRAPS were treated with canakinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks for 4 months (2 mg/kg for those ≤40 kg) in this open-label, proof-of-concept, phase II study. Canakinumab was then withdrawn for up to 5 months, with reintroduction on relapse, and 4 weekly administration (subsequently increased to every 8 weeks) for 24 months. The primary efficacy variable was the proportion of patients achieving complete or almost complete response at day 15, defined as clinical remission (Physician's Global Assessment score ≤1) and full or partial serological remission. Results Nineteen patients (19/20, 95%; 95% CI 75.1% to 99.9%) achieved the primary efficacy variable. Responses to canakinumab occurred rapidly; median time to clinical remission 4 days (95% CI 3 to 8 days). All patients relapsed after canakinumab was withdrawn; median time to relapse 91.5 days (95% CI 65 to 117 days). On reintroduction of canakinumab, clinical and serological responses were similar to those seen during the first phase, and were sustained throughout treatment. Canakinumab was well tolerated and clinical responses were accompanied by rapid and sustained improvement in health-related quality of life. Weight normalised pharmacokinetics of canakinumab, although limited, appeared to be consistent with historical canakinumab data. Conclusions Canakinumab induces rapid disease control in patients with active TRAPS, and clinical benefits are sustained during long-term treatment. Trial registration number NCT01242813; Results. PMID:27269295

  14. Activity-guided isolation of constituents of Tephrosia purpurea with the potential to induce the phase II enzyme, quinone reductase.

    PubMed

    Chang, L C; Gerhäuser, C; Song, L; Farnsworth, N R; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1997-09-01

    An isoflavone, 7,4'-dihydroxy-3',5'-dimethoxyisoflavone (1), and a chalcone, (+)-tephropurpurin (2), both novel compounds, as well as six constituents of known structure, (+)-purpurin (3), pongamol (4), lanceolatin B (5), (-)-maackiain (6), (-)-3-hydroxy-4-methoxy-8,9-methylene-dioxypterocarpan (7), and (-)-medicarpin (8), were obtained as active compounds from Tephrosia purpurea, using a bioassay based on the induction of quinone reductase (QR) activity with cultured Hepa 1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells. Additionally, three inactive compounds of known structure, 3'-methoxydaidzein, desmoxyphyllin B, and 3,9-dihydroxy-8-methoxycoumestan, were isolated and identified. The structure elucidation of compounds 1 and 2 was carried out by spectral data interpretation.

  15. Phase I and II Trial of Huanglian, A Novel Botanical Against Breast Cancer that Enhances Taxol Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    than an equivalent concentration of its major component, berberine , suggesting that several components contribute to its anticancer effect. It was...specifications the huanglian extract must have 7 peaks, which are within 5 to 10% of the original composition, and the predominant berberine peak (peak...for huanglian, had the necessary 50% biological activity against the MKN-74 cells, and contained sufficient berberine (20.5% of total weight) that was

  16. Long term effect of curcumin in restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling and modulation of inflammation in prevention of cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Laxmidhar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of carcinogenesis may be a consequence of attenuation of oxidative stress via activation of antioxidant defence system, restoration and stabilization of tumour suppressor proteins along with modulation of inflammatory mediators. Previously we have delineated significant role of curcumin during its long term effect in regulation of glycolytic pathway and angiogenesis, which in turn results in prevention of cancer via modulation of stress activated genes. Present study was designed to investigate long term effect of curcumin in regulation of Nrf2 mediated phase-II antioxidant enzymes, tumour suppressor p53 and inflammation under oxidative tumour microenvironment in liver of T-cell lymphoma bearing mice. Inhibition of Nrf2 signalling observed during lymphoma progression, resulted in down regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes, p53 as well as activation of inflammatory signals. Curcumin potentiated significant increase in Nrf2 activation. It restored activity of phase-II antioxidant enzymes like GST, GR, NQO1, and tumour suppressor p53 level. In addition, curcumin modulated inflammation via upregulation of TGF-β and reciprocal regulation of iNOS and COX2. The study suggests that during long term effect, curcumin leads to prevention of cancer by inducing phase-II antioxidant enzymes via activation of Nrf2 signalling, restoration of tumour suppressor p53 and modulation of inflammatory mediators like iNOS and COX2 in liver of lymphoma bearing mice.

  17. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  18. A model for gas phase chemistry in interstellar clouds. II - Nonequilibrium effects and effects of temperature and activation energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical evolution of diffuse and dense interstellar clouds is examined via the time-dependent model outlined by Prasad and Huntress (1980). This paper presents specific results for CH, CO, CH4, O2, CH2O, CN, C2, C2H, HC3N, and NH3. Comparison with observations and predictions of other contemporary models show that cloud temperature plays a very important role through the inverse temperature dependence of radiative association reactions and through activation energies in neutral reactions and selected ion-molecule reactions. The observed fractional abundance of CN with respect to H2 and more accurate recent laboratory data on CN + O and CN + O2 reactions suggest that there is an unidentified, yet efficient, mechanism for conversion of O and O2 into polyatomic species. C2H and HC3N are synthesized early in the history of dense clouds. The value of the fractional abundance of C2H remains high, because as the cloud cools down the activation energy in the C2H + O reaction closes down this most important loss channel. A rapidly decreasing fractional abundance of O with time can also accomplish the same result. The value of the fractional abundance of HC3N remains high because it is an unreactive molecule and probably does not condense readily onto grains.

  19. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  20. Clinical activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory marginal zone B-cell lymphomas: results of a phase II study of the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Conconi, Annarita; Raderer, Markus; Franceschetti, Silvia; Devizzi, Liliana; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Magagnoli, Massimo; Arcaini, Luca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Martinelli, Giovanni; Vitolo, Umberto; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Porro, Elena; Stathis, Anastasios; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cavalli, Franco; Zucca, Emanuele

    2014-07-01

    The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group coordinated a phase II trial to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in marginal zone lymphomas (MZLs). Thirty patients with relapsed/refractory MZLs received everolimus for six cycles or until dose-limiting toxicity or progression. Median age was 71 years (range, 51-88 years). Twenty patients had extranodal, six splenic, four nodal MZL. Twenty-four patients had stage III-IV. Median number of prior therapies was two (range 1-5). Seventeen patients had early treatment discontinuation, in most cases due to toxicity. Median number of cycles was 4.5 (range, 1-16). Among the 24 assessable patients, the overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (95% confidence interval: 10-47). Grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (17% of patients, each), infections (17%), mucositis and odontogenic infections (13%) and lung toxicity (3%). The median response duration was 6.8 months (range, 1.4-11.1+). After a median follow-up of 14.5 months, five deaths were reported: four deaths were due to lymphoma, one was due to toxicity. In an intent-to-treat analysis, the projected median progression-free survival was 14 months. The moderate antitumour activity of everolimus in relapsed/refractory MZLs and the observed toxicity limit its therapeutical applicability in these indolent entities. Lower doses of the drug and, perhaps, different strategies including combination with additional agents need to be explored.

  1. DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew P; Hoffmann, Jeffrey W; Smith, Dennis N; Feeley, Thomas J; Murphy, James T

    2007-02-15

    Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal "above and beyond" the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166000/lb Hg removed.

  2. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  3. The Long Valley Well: Phase II operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August--September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6868 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  4. The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, John T.

    1992-03-24

    Phase II of the Long Valley Exploratory Well was completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991. The drilling comprised two sub-phases: (1) drilling 17-1/2 inch hole from the Phase I casing shoe at 2558 feet to a depth of 7130 feet, plugging back to 6826 feet, and setting 13-3/8 inch casing at 6825 feet, all during August-September 1991; and (2) returning in November to drill a 3.85-inch core hole deviated out of the previous wellbore at 6808 feet and extending to 7588 feet. Ultimate depth of the well is planned to be 20,000 feet, or at a bottomhole temperature of 500 C, whichever comes first. Total cost of this drilling phase was approximately $2.3 million, and funding was shared about equally between the California Energy Commission and the Department of Energy. Phase II scientific work will commence in July 1992 and will be supported by DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, DOE Geothermal Division, and other funding sources.

  5. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  6. On-line separation and preconcentration of lead(II) by solid-phase extraction using activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Shiraz, A Zendegi

    2008-02-11

    Activated carbon loaded with xylenol orange in a mini-column was used for the highly selective separation and preconcentration of Pb(II) ions. An on-line system for enrichment and the determination of Pb(II) was carried out on flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The conditions of preconcentration and quantitative recovery of Pb(II) from diluted solution, such as pH of aqueous phase, amount of the sorbent, volume of the solutions and flow variables were studied as well as effect of potential interfering ions. Under the optimum conditions, Pb(II) in an aqueous sample was concentrated about 200-fold and the detection limit was 0.4 ng mL(-1) Pb(II). The adsorption capacity of the solid phase was 0.20mg of lead per one gram of the modified activated carbon. The modified activated carbon is stable for several treatments of sample solutions without the need for using any chemical reagent. The recovery of lead(II) from river water, waste water, tap water, and in the following reference materials: SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW-07605 tea were obtained in the range of 97-104% by the proposed method.

  7. Mutagenic activation and detoxification of benzo[a]pyrene in vitro by hepatic cytochrome P450 1A1 and phase II enzymes in three meat-producing animals.

    PubMed

    Darwish, W; Ikenaka, Y; Eldaly, E; Ishizuka, M

    2010-01-01

    The mutagenic activation activity of hepatic microsomes from three meat-producing animals (cattle, deer and horses) was compared with those of rats as a reference species. In the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA98 assay, the liver microsomes of all examined animals mutagenically activated benzo[a]pyrene, an ideal promutagens, in terms of production of histidine-independent revertant colonies. The microsomes of horses had the highest ability to produce revertant colonies of the examined animals under both low and high substrate concentrations. Inhibition of this mutagenic activity using alpha-naphthoflavone, anti-rat CYP1A1, CYP3A2 and CYP2E1 antibodies suggests that this activity was mainly because of CYP1A1 in these animals as well as in rats. The addition of co-factors for two phase II enzymes, microsomal UDP glucoronosyl transferase and cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase, reduced the production of the revertant colonies in a concentration-dependent manner. Interestingly, horses had the highest reduction rate among the examined animals, suggesting that phase II enzymes play a great role in producing a state of balance between the bioactivation and detoxification of xenobiotics in these meat-producing animals. This report is the first to investigate the mutagenic activation activity of the hepatic microsomes and the role of phase II enzymes against this activity in meat-producing animals.

  8. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in thismore » issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.« less

  9. Phase Transformations and Microstructural Evolution: Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy Jean

    2015-10-30

    The activities of the Phase Transformations Committee of the Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD) of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) are oriented toward understanding the fundamental aspects of phase transformations. Emphasis is placed on the thermodynamic driving forces for phase transformations, the kinetics of nucleation and growth, interfacial structures and energies, transformation crystallography, surface reliefs, and, above all, the atomic mechanisms of phase transformations. Phase transformations and microstructural evolution are directly linked to materials processing, properties, and performance. In this issue, aspects of liquid–solid and solid-state phase transformations and microstructural evolution are highlighted. Many papers in this issue are highlighted by this paper, giving a brief summary of what they bring to the scientific community.

  10. Phase II study of the oxygen saturation curve left shifting agent BW12C in combination with the hypoxia activated drug mitomycin C in advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Propper, D J; Levitt, N C; O'Byrne, K; Braybrooke, J P; Talbot, D C; Ganesan, T S; Thompson, C H; Rajagopalan, B; Littlewood, T J; Dixon, R M; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    BW12C (5-[2-formyl-3-hydroxypenoxyl] pentanoic acid) stabilizes oxyhaemoglobin, causing a reversible left-shift of the oxygen saturation curve (OSC) and tissue hypoxia. The activity of mitomycin C (MMC) is enhanced by hypoxia. In this phase II study, 17 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) received BW12C and MMC. BW12C was given as a bolus loading dose of 45 mg kg−1over 1 h, followed by a maintenance infusion of 4 mg kg−1h−1for 5 h. MMC 6 mg m−2was administered over 15 min immediately after the BW12C bolus. The 15 evaluable patients had progressive disease after a median of 2 (range 1–4) cycles of chemotherapy. Haemoglobin electrophoresis 3 and 5 h after the BW12C bolus dose showed a fast moving band consistent with the BW12C-oxyhaemoglobin complex, accounting for approximately 50% of total haemoglobin. The predominant toxicities – nausea/vomiting and vein pain – were mild and did not exceed CTC grade 2. Liver31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of patients with hepatic metastases showed no changes consistent with tissue hypoxia. The principle of combining a hypoxically activated drug with an agent that increases tissue hypoxia is clinically feasible, producing an effect equivalent to reducing tumour oxygen delivery by at least 50%. However, BW12C in combination with MMC for 5-FU-resistant colorectal cancer is not an effective regimen. This could be related to drug resistance rather than a failure to enhance cytotoxicity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10839290

  11. Phase I/II study of the hypoxia-activated prodrug PR104 in refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Konopleva, Marina; Thall, Peter F; Yi, Cecilia Arana; Borthakur, Gautam; Coveler, Andrew; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Benito, Juliana; Konoplev, Sergej; Gu, Yongchuan; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Faderl, Stefan; Thomas, Deborah; Cortes, Jorge; Kadia, Tapan; Kornblau, Steven; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Nguyen, Hoang Q; Feliu, Jennie; Lu, Hongbo; Wei, Caimiao; Wilson, William R; Melink, Teresa J; Gutheil, John C; Andreeff, Michael; Estey, Elihu H; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-07-01

    We previously demonstrated vast expansion of hypoxic areas in the leukemic microenvironment and provided a rationale for using hypoxia-activated prodrugs. PR104 is a phosphate ester that is rapidly hydrolyzed in vivo to the corresponding alcohol PR-104A and further reduced to the amine and hydroxyl-amine nitrogen mustards that induce DNA cross-linking in hypoxic cells under low oxygen concentrations. In this phase I/II study, patients with relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n=40) after 1 or 2 prior treatments or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=10) after any number of prior treatments received PR104; dose ranged from 1.1 to 4 g/m(2). The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were myelosuppression (anemia 62%, neutropenia 50%, thrombocytopenia 46%), febrile neutropenia (40%), infection (24%), and enterocolitis (14%). Ten of 31 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (32%) and 2 of 10 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (20%) who received 3 g/m(2) or 4 g/m(2) had a response (complete response, n=1; complete response without platelet recovery, n=5; morphological leukemia-free state, n=6). The extent of hypoxia was evaluated by the hypoxia tracer pimonidazole administered prior to a bone marrow biopsy and by immunohistochemical assessments of hypoxia-inducible factor alpha and carbonic anhydrase IX. A high fraction of leukemic cells expressed these markers, and PR104 administration resulted in measurable decrease of the proportions of hypoxic cells. These findings indicate that hypoxia is a prevalent feature of the leukemic microenvironment and that targeting hypoxia with hypoxia-activated prodrugs warrants further evaluation in acute leukemia. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01037556.

  12. Status of the GERDA Phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The GERDA experiment is designed to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of 76Ge. In Phase I of the experiment a background index of 10-2 cts/(keV.kg.yr) was reached. A lower limit on the half-life of the 0νββ decay of 76Ge was set to 2.1.1025 yr (at 90% C.L.). The aim of Phase II is to reach a sensitivity of the half-life of about 1026 yr. To increase the exposure thirty new Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors have been produced. These detectors are distinct for their improved energy resolution and enhanced pulse shape discrimination of signal from background events. Further background reduction will be reached by a light instrumentation to read out argon scintillation light. In April 2015 the light instrumentation together with eight BEGe detectors has been successfully deployed in the GERDA cryostat. In a commissioning run it was shown that two of the major background components, external γ-rays from 214Bi and 208Tl decays, were suppressed up to two orders of magnitude. We are confident to reach a background index of 10-3 cts/(keV.kg.yr) which is the design goal for GERDA Phase II.

  13. Role of hepatitis B virus X repression of C/EBPbeta activity in the down-regulation of glutathione S-transferase A2 gene: implications in other phase II detoxifying enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, I J; Ki, S H; Brooks, C; Kim, S G

    2009-02-01

    1. A genome-wide in silico screening rendered the genes of phase II enzymes in the rat genome whose promoters contain the putative DNA elements interacting with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) and NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2). The hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein strongly modulates the transactivation and/or the repression of genes regulated by some bZIP transcription factors. 2. This study investigated the effects of HBx on the induction of phase II enzymes with the aim of elucidating the role of HBx interaction with C/EBPbeta or Nrf2 bZIP transcription factors in hepatocyte-derived cells. 3. Immunoblot and reporter gene analyses revealed that transfection of HBx interfered with the constitutive and inducible GSTA2 transactivation promoted by oltipraz (C/EBPbeta activator), but not that by tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ, Nrf2 activator). Moreover, HBx transfection completely inhibited GSTA2 reporter gene activity induced by C/EBPbeta, but failed to inhibit that by Nrf2. 4. Gel shift assays identified that HBx inhibited the increase in C/EBPbeta-DNA complex formation by oltipraz, but not the increase in Nrf2-DNA complex by t-BHQ. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot assays verified the direct interaction between HBx and C/EBPbeta. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed HBx inhibition of C/EBPbeta binding to its binding site in the GSTA2 gene promoter. HBx repressed the induction of other phase II enzymes including GSTP, UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, GSTM1, GSTM2, and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthase. 5. These results demonstrate that HBx inhibits the induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, which is mediated by its interaction with C/EBPbeta, but not Nrf2, substantiating the specific role of HBx in phase II detoxifying capacity.

  14. Single-agent lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma: results from a UK phase II study suggest activity and possible gender differences.

    PubMed

    Eve, Heather E; Carey, Sean; Richardson, Sarah J; Heise, Carla C; Mamidipudi, Vidya; Shi, Tao; Radford, John A; Auer, Rebecca L; Bullard, Sheila H; Rule, Simon A J

    2012-10-01

    We present data from a phase II study investigating a novel treatment strategy for relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Twenty-six patients received lenalidomide 25 mg/d (days 1-21 of a 28-d cycle) for up to 6 cycles followed by low-dose maintenance lenalidomide (15 mg) in responding patients. Eight patients achieved complete or partial response to give an overall response rate of 31% with median response duration of 22·2 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·0-53·6] and median progression-free survival (PFS) of 3·9 months (95% CI 0·0-11·1). An additional six patients (23%) achieved stable disease. Eleven patients received maintenance with median PFS of 14·6 months (95% CI 7·3-21·9). Correlative studies showed that peripheral T and Natural Killer (NK) cells increased in responding patients by 40-60% over the first 6 cycles with an initial dip in NK cells suggestive of tumour infiltration. Peripheral regulatory T cells were increased in MCL patients (P = 0·001) and expanded further following lenalidomide. Sequential plasma analysis showed increased IL12 p40 and IL7 alongside decreased MMP9, IL10, and adiponectin. Finally, a significant correlation (P = 0·02) between gender and response suggested that female MCL patients were more sensitive to lenalidomide than males. In summary, we confirm the activity, safety and immunomodulatory properties of lenalidomide in MCL and highlight its potential as a low-dose maintenance agent.

  15. Ultrasonic assisted dispersive solid-phase microextraction of Eriochrome Cyanine R from water sample on ultrasonically synthesized lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Experimental design methodology.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Sonia; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Mansoorkhani, Mohammad Javad Khoshnood; Asfaram, Arash; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar; Purkait, Mihir Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The present research focus on designing an appropriate dispersive solid-phase microextraction (UA-DSPME) for preconcentration and determination of Eriochrome Cyanine R (ECR) in aqueous solutions with aid of sonication using lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (PbO-NPs-AC). This material was fully identified with XRD and SEM. Influence of pH, amounts of sorbent, type and volume of eluent, and sonication time on response properties were investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with surface response methodology using STATISTICA. Among different solvents, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was selected as an efficient eluent, which its combination by present nanoparticles and application of ultrasound waves led to enhancement in mass transfer. The predicted maximum extraction (100%) under the optimum conditions of the process variables viz. pH 4.5, eluent 200μL, adsorbent dosage 2.5mg and 5min sonication was close to the experimental value (99.50%). at optimum conditions some experimental features like wide 5-2000ngmL(-1) ECR, low detection limit (0.43ngmL(-1), S/N=3:1) and good repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviation, <5.5%, n=12) indicate versatility in successful applicability of present method for real sample analysis. Investigation of accuracy by spiking known concentration of ECR over 200-600ngmL(-1) gave mean recoveries from 94.850% to 101.42% under optimal conditions. The procedure was also applied for the pre-concentration and subsequent determination of ECR in tap and waste waters.

  16. Athena: Assessment Phase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, David; Ayre, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The Athena mission concept has been proposed by the community in response to science themes of the Hot and Energetic Universe. Unlike other, competitive, mission selection exercises this "Large" class observatory mission has essentially been pre-selected. Nevertheless it has to be demonstrated that Athena meets the programmatic constraints of 1Bn euro cost cap, and a readiness level appropriate for formal mission adoption by the end 2019. This should be confirmed through a Phase A study conducted with two parallel industry activities. We describe the technical and programmatic content of these and latest progress in space and ground segment definition.

  17. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  18. AGOR 27/28 Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    of proposed configuration changes. The shipyard representative report, submitted separately , details specific ship checks performed against...technical standards. 4. SIO participated in Phase III mission system installation during April and May. Report of this activity will be made by separate

  19. Monorail bridge conveyor. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonski, J

    1982-04-30

    This report covers the second phase of a four-phase contract to develop and test a roof hung monorail bridge conveyor coal haulage system working behind a continuous miner. Phase II covers the fabrication and assembly of all the components in making up the Monoral Bridge Conveyor System. The original concept presented had to be analyzed before final design could proceed. The analysis revealed that 24 ft. long bridge conveyor segments were the optimum length; the suspension system must have the vertical hinge point between bridges, the impact point of the coal transfer point and the suspension point itself, coincidental. The propulsion system is such that each bridge is self propelled in order to minimize side loading on the monorail. The conveyor belt drive is simple since it only has to drive one single 24 ft. conveyor. The entire assembly of twelve conveyors has been pre-tested in our Murfreesboro, Tennessee, shop. The electric circuit proved successful to operate from a manual control or automatically, and successfully proved the cycle of sequential strating and stopping.

  20. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  1. Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, James D; McClung, David W

    2006-11-06

    This report describes the preliminary design and the effort to date of Phase II of a Low Noise Borehole Triaxial Seismometer for use in networks of seismic stations for monitoring underground nuclear explosions. The design uses the latest technology of broadband seismic instrumentation. Each parameter of the seismometer is defined in terms of the known physical limits of the parameter. These limits are defined by the commercially available components, and the physical size constraints. A theoretical design is proposed, and a preliminary prototype model of the proposed instrument has been built. This prototype used the sensor module of the KS2000. The installation equipment (hole locks, etc.) has been designed and one unit has been installed in a borehole. The final design of the sensors and electronics and leveling mechanism is in process. Noise testing is scheduled for the last quarter of 2006.

  2. Small Business Innovation Research, Post-Phase II Opportunity Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines current Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Post-Phase II opportunity contract award results for the SBIR technology program from 2007 to 2011 for NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), Science Mission Directorate (SMD), and Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD). The report provides guidelines for incorporating SBIR technology into NASA programs and projects and provides a quantitative overview of the post-Phase II award patterns that correspond with each mission directorate at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). In recent years, one of NASA's goals has been to not only transfer SBIR technologies to commercial industries, but to ensure that NASA mission directorates incorporate SBIR technologies into their program and project activities. Before incorporating technologies into MD programs, it is important to understand each mission directorate structure because each directorate has different objectives and needs. The directorate program structures follow.

  3. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  4. The SIMPLE Phase II dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Girard, T. A.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Ramos, A. R.; Marques, J. G.; Kling, A.; Puibasset, J.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Carvalho, F. P.; Prudêncio, M. I.; Marques, R.; Simple Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Phase II of SIMPLE (Superheated Instrument for Massive ParticLe Experiments) searched for astroparticle dark matter using superheated liquid C2ClF5 droplet detectors. Each droplet generally requires an energy deposition with linear energy transfer (LET) ≳150 keV/μm for a liquid-to-gas phase transition, providing an intrinsic rejection against minimum ionizing particles of order 10-10, and reducing the backgrounds to primarily α and neutron-induced recoil events. The droplet phase transition generates a millimetric-sized gas bubble that is recorded by acoustic means. We describe the SIMPLE detectors, their acoustic instrumentation, and the characterizations, signal analysis and data selection, which yield a particle-induced, "true nucleation" event detection efficiency of better than 97% at a 95% C.L. The recoil-α event discrimination, determined using detectors first irradiated with neutrons and then doped with alpha emitters, provides a recoil identification of better than 99%; it differs from those of COUPP and PICASSO primarily as a result of their different liquids with lower critical LETs. The science measurements, comprising two shielded arrays of fifteen detectors each and a total exposure of 27.77 kgd, are detailed. Removal of the 1.94 kgd Stage 1 installation period data, which had previously been mistakenly included in the data, reduces the science exposure from 20.18 to 18.24 kgd and provides new contour minima of σp=4.3×10-3 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-dependent sector of astroparticle dark matter-proton interactions and σN=3.6×10-6 pb at 35 GeV /c2 in the spin-independent sector. These results are examined with respect to the fluorine spin and halo parameters used in the previous data analysis.

  5. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  6. 78 FR 30951 - SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SBIR/STTR Phase I to Phase II Transition Benchmarks AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice for Small Business Innovation Research Program Phase I to Phase II Transition...

  7. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  8. Phase Noise Measurement in PEP II and the Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Getaneh, Mesfin

    2003-09-05

    The Goal of this project is to provide a measurement of the phase of the radio frequency (RF) relative to electron beam traveling down the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Because the Main Drive Line (MDL) supplies the RF drive and phase reference for the entire accelerator system, the phase accuracy and amount of phase noise present in the MDL are very critical to the functionality of the accelerator. Therefore, a Phase Noise Measurement System was built to measure the phase noise in the liner accelerator (Linac) and PEP II. The system was used to determine the stability of the PEP II RF reference system. In this project a low noise Phase Locked Loop system (PLL) was built to measure timing jitter about sub picoseconds level. The phase noise measured in Master Oscillator using PLL indicates that phase noise is low enough for PEP II to run.

  9. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  10. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  11. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  12. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  13. 40 CFR 72.44 - Phase II repowering extensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Compliance Plan and Compliance Options § 72.44 Phase II repowering... the requirements of paragraph (a)(1)(i) of this section may include in the unit's Phase II Acid Rain... authority shall issue the Acid Rain portion of the operating permit including: (A) The approved...

  14. Final Report on Phase II; Study of Academic Library Consortia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadra, Carlos A.; And Others

    Phase II involves a case-study analysis of 15 selected consortia to help determine the usefulness and effectiveness of academic library consortia. The two major products resulting from the project are the "Directory of Academic Library Consortia" and the "Guidelines for the Development of Academic Library Consortia." The Phase II report presents…

  15. Rationale and protocol of the MetNET-1 trial, a prospective, single center, phase II study to evaluate the activity and safety of everolimus in combination with octreotide LAR and metformin in patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pusceddu, Sara; de Braud, Filippo; Concas, Laura; Bregant, Cristina; Leuzzi, Livia; Formisano, Barbara; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway signalling and autocrine activation of the mTOR pathway, mediated through insulin-like growth factor-1, have been implicated in the proliferation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) cells. Everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, has shown antitumor benefit in pNETs alone and in combination with octreotide LAR in RADIANT-1 and RADIANT-3 studies. Although everolimus-based phase II/III trials have improved progression-free survival for pNET, its use has not impacted on prolonging overall survival. Metformin has recently shown some anti-cancer activity in both in vitro and in vivo studies by its indirect properties to decrease insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels and by its antitumour effect to promote AMPK activation and consequently inhibition to TSC1-2/mTOR complex. In light of even more retrospective evidence of metformin's anticancer activity, a prospective evaluation is required to either confirm or discard these preliminary findings. With the aim to evaluate the antiproliferative effect of metformin in combination with everolimus and octreotide LAR in pancreatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor patients, a single arm, prospective, single center phase II study was designed (MetNET-1 trial, NCT 02294006). Forty-three patients are expected to be evaluated. The study is ongoing, and recruitment is estimated to be completed in August 2016. The results will be anticipated in 2017.

  16. Bendamustine, lenalidomide and dexamethasone (BRd) has high activity as 2(nd) -line therapy for relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma - a phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Mey, Ulrich J M; Brugger, Wolfram; Schwarb, Heike; Pederiva, Stefanie; Schwarzer, Andreas; Dechow, Tobias; Jehner, Paul; Rauh, Jacqueline; Taverna, Christian J; Schmid, Mathias; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Doerfel, Steffen; Fischer, Natalie; Ruefer, Axel; Ziske, Carsten; Knauf, Wolfgang; Cathomas, Richard; von Moos, Roger; Hitz, Felicitas; Sauter, Rafael; Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Cantoni, Nathan; Bargetzi, Mario; Driessen, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    The combination of lenalidomide (Revlimid(®) , R) and dexamethasone (d) is a standard regimen for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (rrMM). With this regimen, only a small fraction of patients will achieve high quality responses [≥ very good partial response (VGPR)]. The combination of bendamustine (B), lenalidomide and dexamethasone (BRd) has shown high efficacy in patients with advanced rrMM. However, dose-limiting haematotoxicity restricted its use in extensively pre-treated patient populations. This prospective, multicentre Phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of BRd in rrMM patients with one prior line of therapy. Fifty patients were enrolled (median age 68·5 years [range 46-83]) and were treated with B 75 mg/m(2)  days 1, 2; R 25 mg days 1-21 and d (40/20 mg) days 1, 8, 15 and 22, for 6 28-day induction cycles, followed by 12 cycles with Rd alone. Pegfilgrastim was administered according to protocol-defined criteria. The study aimed to demonstrate a complete response (CR)/VGPR rate of >40% after induction therapy. Of 45 evaluable patients, 23 (51%) achieved a CR/VGPR. Grade 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia occurred in 17 (34%) and 8 (16%) of patients, respectively. BRd is a safe and efficacious regimen as a second line treatment for rrMM, leading to high quality responses in a considerable proportion of patients.

  17. First Results of the Phase II SIMPLE Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizardo, M.; Morlat, T.; Fernandes, A. C.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Ramos, A. R.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.; Sudre, C.; Poupeney, J.; Payne, R. F.; Miley, H. S.; Puibasset, J.

    2010-11-01

    We report results of a 14.1kgd measurement with 15 superheated droplet detectors of total active mass 0.208 kg, comprising the first stage of a 30kgd Phase II experiment. In combination with the results of the neutron-spin sensitive XENON10 experiment, these results yield a limit of |ap|<0.32 for MW=50GeV/c2 on the spin-dependent sector of weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interactions with a 50% reduction in the previously allowed region of the phase space, formerly defined by XENON, KIMS, and PICASSO. In the spin-independent sector, a limit of 2.3×10-5pb at MW=45GeV/c2 is obtained.

  18. Randomised Phase II Trial (NCT00637975) Evaluating Activity and Toxicity of Two Different Escalating Strategies for Pregabalin and Oxycodone Combination Therapy for Neuropathic Pain in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garassino, Marina Chiara; Piva, Sheila; La Verde, Nicla; Spagnoletti, Ilaria; Iorno, Vittorio; Carbone, Claudia; Febbraro, Antonio; Bianchi, Anna; Bramati, Annalisa; Moretti, Anna; Ganzinelli, Monica; Marabese, Mirko; Gentili, Marta; Torri, Valter; Farina, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Neuropathic pain is commonly associated with cancer. Current treatments include combination opioid and adjuvant therapies, but no guidelines are available for dose escalation strategies. This phase II study compared the efficacy and tolerability of two dose escalation strategies for oxycodone and pregabalin combination therapy. Methods Patients (N = 75) with oncological neuropathic pain, previously untreated with pregabalin, were recruited in 5 Italian institutions between 2007 and 2010. Patients were randomised to two different dose escalation strategies (arm A; N = 38) oxycodone at a fixed dose with increasing pregabalin doses; (arm B; N = 37) pregabalin at a fixed dose with increasing oxycodone doses. Patients were evaluated from daily diaries and follow-ups at 3, 7, 10, and 14 days after beginning treatment with a numerical rating scale (NRS), neuropathic pain scale (SDN), and well-being scale (ESAS). The primary endpoint was a ≥1/3 reduction in pain (NRS); secondary endpoints included the time to analgesia and adverse effects. The study had a 90% probability of detecting the best strategy for a true difference of at least 15%. Results More patients in arm A (76%) than arm B (64%) achieved ≥1/3 overall pain reduction even after controlling for baseline factors (gender, baseline pain). Group A reported fewer side effects than group B; constipation 52.8% vs. 66.7%; nausea: 27.8% vs. 44.4%; drowsiness: 44.4% vs. 55.6%; confusion: 16.7% vs. 27.8%; itching: 8.3% vs. 19.4%. Conclusions Both strategies effectively controlled neuropathic pain, but according to the adopted selection design arm A is preferable to arm B for pain control. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00637975 PMID:23577077

  19. Effect of membrane structure on the action of polyenes II: nystatin activity along the phase diagram of ergosterol- and cholesterol-containing POPC membranes.

    PubMed

    González-Damián, J; Ortega-Blake, I

    2010-09-01

    Pores formed by the polyene antibiotic nystatin were studied in solvent-free lipid membranes. The membranes were formed by the tip-dip technique using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) with different mol fractions (0-50%) of cholesterol or ergosterol. The effects of the mol fraction of sterol and of temperature variation (15-35°C) on the activity of the pores, their unitary conductances, lifetimes and time average conductances were studied. The results were used to analyze the behavior of nystatin channels along the phase diagrams previously reported for these lipid mixtures and to propose that membrane structure is the determinant factor for the known ergosterol/cholesterol selectivity.

  20. Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Sears Point Tidal Marsh Restoration Project: Phase II, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  1. Planning Targets for Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On August 1, 2011, EPA provided planning targets for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment for the Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This page provides the letters containing those planning targets.

  2. South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP South Bay Salt Pond Tidal Wetland Restoration Phase II Planning project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic re

  3. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  4. Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    electrostatic paint spray enclosures, such as the high volume, low pressure ( HVLP ) systems employed at Barstow MCLB, a minimum linear velocity of 100 fpm must be...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) D. Proffitt, R.K. Clayton, & J...ANSI Std. Z39-18 298-102 * , 85-1996 Demonstration of Spray Booth Recirculation and Partitioning - Phase II David Proffitt and Russell K. Clayton

  5. Recent application of analytical methods to phase I and phase II drugs development: a review.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Marcello; Governatori, Luciana; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Genovese, Salvatore; Mollica, Adriano; Epifano, Francesco

    2012-03-01

    Drug development is a time-consuming and costly process. It is usually divided into four phases, although it is not always possible to draw a sharp line between the various stages. In phase I and II there are many molecules investigate and it is necessary to analyze all of them in a short period of time, with lower costs, and with high-throughput assay. During phase I relevant chemical-physical parameters like the acid dissociation constant, lipophilicity, solubility and stability must be analyzed. Classic techniques such as 'shake-flask' can be used, but instrumental analytical methods such as HPLC may be helpful to improve and enhance the productivity and reproducibility of the results. During phase II the activity of a drug and factors that may have an influence on it, like metabolic profile and transformations, impurities and plasma biding proteins, must be considered. In this field, recent hyphenated analytical methods, such as LC-MS/MS, GC-MS/MS or more complex couplings, can provide more complete information. The aim of this review is to report the processes required for the validation of drug efficacy with reference to the description of 'classic' and modern techniques used.

  6. SH-2F LAMPS Instructional Systems Development: Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Hymes, Jonah P.

    This project was one of four aircrew training development projects in a continuing study of the methodology, effectiveness, and resource requirements of the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) process. This report covers the Phase II activities of a two-phase project for the development of aircrew training for SH-2F anti-submarine warfare…

  7. Design study for MOX fuel rod scanner for ATR fuel fabrication. Phase I: Design of active neutron scanner. Phase II: Design of passive neutron scanner. Phase III: Design of passive gamma-ray scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1997-09-01

    An active neutron fuel-rod scanner has been designed for the assay of fissile materials in mixed oxide fuel rods. A {sup 252}Cf source is located at the center of the scanner very near the through-hole for the fuel rods. Spontaneous fission neutrons from the californium are moderated and induce fissions within the passing fuel rod. The rod continues past a combined gamma-ray and neutron shield where delayed gamma rays above 1 MeV are detected. The authors used the Monte Carlo neutron-photon (MCNP) code to design the scanner and review optimum materials and geometries. Applications of the rod scanner include accountability of fissile material for safeguards applications, quality control of the fissile content in a fuel rod, and the verification of reactivity potential for mixed oxide fuels. A passive neutron fuel-rod scanner has been designed for the assay of the plutonium in mixed oxide fuel rods. The {sup 240}Pu-effective is measured by counting the spontaneous fission neutrons using a high-efficiency thermal-neutron detector. This passive neutron detector would be combined with a high-resolution gamma-ray system (HRGS) measurement to obtain the total plutonium from the plutonium isotopic ratios. A passive gamma-ray scanner has been designed for the measurement of the {sup 241}Am and plutonium uniformity in mixed oxide fuel rods. The passive gamma-ray emissions from {sup 241}Am (60 keV) and plutonium (150-400 keV) are used to verify the unformity of the fuel enrichment zones and to check for any pellets that are out of specification. The fuel rod is moved through the interior of an NaI(Tl) or a bismuth germanate detector to measure the passive gamma-ray emissions. A tungsten sleeve collimator is used in the through-hole to improve the pellet-to-pellet spatial resolution. The same detector is used to verify the plutonium uniformity in the pellets with a 13-mm tungsten collimator. The low-resolution passive gamma system would be used in the unattended mode.

  8. T lymphocytes and dendritic cells are activated by the deletion of peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) gene.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Yi; Noh, Young-Wook; Han, Ying-Hao; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Jin-Man; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Lim, Jong-Seok

    2006-02-15

    Peroxiredoxin II (Prx II) is a member of antioxidant enzyme family and it plays a protective role against oxidative damage. Constitutive production of endogenous reactive oxygen species was detected in spleen and bone marrow cells lacking Prx II. Here, we investigated the role of Prx II in immune responses. The total number of splenocytes (especially, the population of S-phase cells and CD3(+) T cells) was significantly higher in Prx II(-/-) mice than in wild type. Number of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in Prx II(-/-) mice was also higher than wild type. Differentiation of Prx II(-/-) mouse bone marrow cells into CD11c-positive dendritic cells was greater than that of wild type. Transplantation of Prx II(-/-) bone marrow cells into wild type mice increased PBMCs in blood and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Prx II deletion enhances concanavalin A (ConA)-induced splenocyte proliferation and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) activity of bone marrow-derived CD11c-positive dendritic cells to stimulate recipient splenocytes. Collectively, these data suggest that Prx II inhibits the immune cell responsiveness, which may be regulated by scavenging the low amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  9. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  10. A combination of gefitinib and FOLFOX-4 as first-line treatment in advanced colorectal cancer patients. A GISCAD multicentre phase II study including a biological analysis of EGFR overexpression, amplification and NF-kB activation

    PubMed Central

    Cascinu, S; Berardi, R; Salvagni, S; Beretta, G D; Catalano, V; Pucci, F; Sobrero, A; Tagliaferri, P; Labianca, R; Scartozzi, M; Crocicchio, F; Mari, E; Ardizzoni, A

    2007-01-01

    Interesting activity has been reported by combining chemotherapy with cetuximab. An alternative approach for blocking EGFR function has been the development of small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinase domain such as gefitinib. We designed a multicentre phase II study in advanced colorectal cancer combining gefitinib+FOLFOX in order to determine the activity and to relate EGFR expression and gene amplification and NF-kB activation to therapeutic results. Patients received FOLFOX-4 regimen plus gefitinib as first-line treatment. Tumour samples were analysed for EGFR protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis and for EGFR gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) and NF-kB activation. Forty-three patients were enrolled into this study; 15 patients experienced a partial response (response rate=34.9%), whereas other 12 (27.9%) had a stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 7.8 months and median overall survival (OS) was 13.9 months. We did not find any relationship with EGFR overexpression, gene amplification, while NF-kB activation was associated with a resistance to therapy. Gefitinib does not seem to increase the activity of FOLFOX in advanced colorectal cancer even in patients overexpressing EGFR or with EGFR amplification. Furthermore, while NF-kB activation seems to predict resistance to chemotherapy as demonstrated ‘in vitro' models, gefitinib does not overcome this mechanism of resistance, as reported for cetuximab. PMID:18059397

  11. Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative, Phase II Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waits, Mary Jo; Johnson, Ryan; Kornreich, Toby; Klym, Mark; Leland, Karen

    In 1996, drawing from religious, educational, social services, media, neighborhoods, nonprofits, and health-providing sectors of the community, the Phoenix Violence Prevention Initiative (PVPI) was conceived. During Phase One of the initiative, the following seven points regarding prevention and prevention design strategies were assembled: (1)…

  12. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  13. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  14. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June…

  15. Lunar Quest in Second Life, Lunar Exploration Island, Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F. M.; Day, B. H.; Mitchell, B.; Hsu, B. C.

    2010-12-01

    Linden Lab’s Second Life is a virtual 3D metaverse created by users. At any one time there may be 40,000-50,000 users on line. Users develop a persona and are seen on screen as a human figure or avatar. Avatars move through Second Life by walking, flying, or teleporting. Users form communities or groups of mutual interest such as music, computer graphics, and education. These groups communicate via e-mail, voice, and text within Second Life. Information on downloading the Second Life browser and joining can be found on the Second Life website: www.secondlife.com. This poster details Phase II in the development of Lunar Exploration Island (LEI) located in Second Life. Phase I LEI highlighted NASA’s LRO/LCROSS mission. Avatars enter LEI via teleportation arriving at a hall of flight housing interactive exhibits on the LRO/ LCROSS missions including full size models of the two spacecraft and launch vehicle. Storyboards with information about the missions interpret the exhibits while links to external websites provide further information on the mission, both spacecraft’s instrument suites, and related EPO. Other lunar related activities such as My Moon and NLSI EPO programs. A special exhibit was designed for International Observe the Moon Night activities with links to websites for further information. The sim includes several sites for meetings, a conference stage to host talks, and a screen for viewing NASATV coverage of mission and other televised events. In Phase II exhibits are updated to reflect on-going lunar exploration highlights, discoveries, and future missions. A new section of LEI has been developed to showcase NASA’s Lunar Quest program. A new exhibit hall with Lunar Quest information has been designed and is being populated with Lunar Quest information, spacecraft models (LADEE is in place) and kiosks. A two stage interactive demonstration illustrates lunar phases with static and 3-D stations. As NASA’s Lunar Quest program matures further

  16. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  17. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Freshley, M.; Hubbard, S.; Flach, G.; Freedman, V.; Agarwal, D.; Andre, B.; Bott, Y.; Chen, X.; Davis, J.; Faybishenko, B.; Gorton, I.; Murray, C.; Moulton, D.; Meyer, J.; Rockhold, M.; Shoshani, A.; Steefel, C.; Wainwright, H.; Waichler, S.

    2012-09-28

    quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  18. CYANIDE HEAP BILOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, soluble...

  19. Direct phasing in femtosecond nanocrystallography. II. Phase retrieval.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joe P J; Spence, John C H; Millane, Rick P

    2014-03-01

    X-ray free-electron laser diffraction patterns from protein nanocrystals provide information on the diffracted amplitudes between the Bragg reflections, offering the possibility of direct phase retrieval without the use of ancillary experimental diffraction data [Spence et al. (2011). Opt. Express, 19, 2866-2873]. The estimated continuous transform is highly noisy however [Chen et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. A70, 143-153]. This second of a series of two papers describes a data-selection strategy to ameliorate the effects of the high noise levels and the subsequent use of iterative phase-retrieval algorithms to reconstruct the electron density. Simulation results show that employing such a strategy increases the noise levels that can be tolerated.

  20. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  1. CYANIDE HEAP BIOLOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in the closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, solu...

  2. Phase I and II liver enzyme activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage, Florida (USA).

    PubMed

    Gunderson, M P; Oberdörster, E; Guillette, L J

    2004-10-01

    We examined CYP1A (measured using hepatic EROD and MROD activities) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) collected from three sites with varying contamination in the Kissimmee-Everglades drainage in south Florida. We hypothesized that contaminants present in areas with intermediate or higher contaminant concentrations would alter hepatic enzyme activities in juvenile alligators from those sites when compared to hepatic enzyme activity in animals from the area with the least contamination. EROD activity was found to be higher in animals from the site with lower reported levels of contamination relative to those from the site with the highest reported contamination suggesting an inhibition of CYP1A expression or activity. No differences among animals from the three sites were observed for hepatic MROD and GST activities. A significant negative relationship between EROD, MROD, and GST activities and body size was exhibited in alligators from the site with the lowest contamination. No relationship between body size and hepatic enzyme activity was found in animals from the sites with intermediate and higher contamination, suggesting that contaminants present at these sites act to alter this relationship. No correlation was observed in this study between plasma steroid concentrations (estradiol-17 beta or testosterone) and hepatic EROD, MROD, or GST activities.

  3. Adaptive Processing Experiment (APE) Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    FI LTE.R -R 9 0R L• k k.9 0Ms EPPMR PHASE AMPL,I (t) ( r)GR•S ) (Zi) ( flt3 POWfER) (DEGRFES) (Ob) tF(IpE A0TfR bFt-Iý- E. AF tLk EIJN• AFTER , ---,,1...t.In I ,4P -. 3/ ,a?-.•O*O9 -34,57 o1o)110O 0 .- . 614 . - " 13,𔃼h a w, 3b " 3 v5• S -01 ,19 -tgo (19.52 TUTAI 87 ,, ,21 .11 6,, .71 -34,,74SNET PF...38,95 a08 *t0 70,o so0 󈧽 -sob D8• -Sq,74 -37,5q 007 614 € 75,t) .7n ,76 .,tok) -.36,03 -37a01 ’nh o16 80,0 .76 o0P- u,. , () -32, 1,2• -36,79 aO b

  4. Mercury Phase II Study - Mercury Behavior in Salt Processing Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, V.; Shah, H.; Bannochie, C. J.; Wilmarth, W. R.

    2016-07-25

    Mercury (Hg) in the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste System (LWS) originated from decades of canyon processing where it was used as a catalyst for dissolving the aluminum cladding of reactor fuel. Approximately 60 metric tons of mercury is currently present throughout the LWS. Mercury has long been a consideration in the LWS, from both hazard and processing perspectives. In February 2015, a Mercury Program Team was established at the request of the Department of Energy to develop a comprehensive action plan for long-term management and removal of mercury. Evaluation was focused in two Phases. Phase I activities assessed the Liquid Waste inventory and chemical processing behavior using a system-by-system review methodology, and determined the speciation of the different mercury forms (Hg+, Hg++, elemental Hg, organomercury, and soluble versus insoluble mercury) within the LWS. Phase II activities are building on the Phase I activities, and results of the LWS flowsheet evaluations will be summarized in three reports: Mercury Behavior in the Salt Processing Flowsheet (i.e. this report); Mercury Behavior in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Flowsheet; and Mercury behavior in the Tank Farm Flowsheet (Evaporator Operations). The evaluation of the mercury behavior in the salt processing flowsheet indicates, inter alia, the following: (1) In the assembled Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 in Tank 21, the total mercury is mostly soluble with methylmercury (MHg) contributing over 50% of the total mercury. Based on the analyses of samples from 2H Evaporator feed and drop tanks (Tanks 38/43), the source of MHg in Salt Batches 7, 8 and 9 can be attributed to the 2H evaporator concentrate used in assembling the salt batches. The 2H Evaporator is used to evaporate DWPF recycle water. (2) Comparison of data between Tank 21/49, Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Tank 50 samples suggests that the total mercury as well as speciated

  5. Radiation from High Temperature Plasmas. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    introduced quite artificially. On the contrary in the case of the solution of the Schrodinger equation the discreteness apr quite naturally as the...objective of this activity is to generate a radial wave function Pn,L by solving the equation : d-2 2 - - 2V(r) + 2E] P (r)O 0, where E is the energy of the...calculation is of radial wavefunctions of a spherically-symmetrized atom, corresponding to the center of gravity energy of an electron. From these radial

  6. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters.

  7. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  8. Health Activities Project (HAP), Trial Edition II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buller, Dave; And Others

    Contained within this Health Activities Project (HAP) trial edition (set II) are a teacher information folio and numerous student activity folios which center around the idea that students in grades 5-8 can control their own health and safety. Each student folio is organized into a Synopsis, Health Background, Materials, Setting Up, and Activities…

  9. Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project. Phase II: Internal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundmark, Dana

    This report is based on the Alberta Education Energy Conservation Project - Phase II. The project was a follow-up to an earlier study, extending from June 1980 to June 1983, in which government funding and engineering manpower were used to conduct an energy management program in 52 selected pilot schools in 5 areas of the province. The report…

  10. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selection designs.

  11. A Phase II, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose-Ranging Study of Belimumab in Patients With Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel J.; Stohl, William; Furie, Richard A.; Lisse, Jeffrey R.; McKay, James D.; Merrill, Joan T.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Chatham, W. Winn; McCune, W. Joseph; Fernandez, Vivian; Chevrier, Marc R.; Zhong, John; Freimuth, William W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety, tolerability, biological activity, and efficacy of belimumab in combination with standard of care therapy (SOC) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients with SELENA-SLEDAI score≥4 (N=449) were randomly assigned to belimumab (1, 4, 10 mg/kg) or placebo in a 52-week study. Co-primary endpoints were: 1) percentage change in the SELENA-SLEDAI score at week 24; 2) time to the first SLE flare. Results Significant differences between the treatment and placebo groups were not attained for either primary endpoint and no dose response was observed. Reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score from baseline was 19.5% in the combined belimumab group versus 17.2% in the placebo group. The median time to first SLE flare was 67 days in the combined belimumab group versus 83 days in the placebo group. However, the median time to first SLE flare during weeks 24–52 was significantly longer with belimumab treatment (154 versus 108 days; P=0.0361). In the subgroup (71.5%) of serologically active patients (ANA ≥1:80 and/or anti-dsDNA ≥30 IU/mL), belimumab treatment resulted in significantly better responses at week 52 than placebo for SELENA-SLEDAI (−28.8% versus −14.2%; P=0.0435); PGA (−32.7% versus −10.7%; P=0.0011); and SF-36 PCS (+3.0 versus +1.2 points; P=0.0410). Treatment with belimumab resulted in 63–71% depletion of naive, activated, and plasmacytoid CD20+ B cells and a 29.4% reduction in anti-dsDNA titers (P ≤0.0017) by week 52. The rates of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs were similar in the belimumab and placebo groups. Conclusion Belimumab was biologically active and well tolerated. Belimumab effect on the reduction of SLE disease activity or flares was not significant. However, serologically active SLE patients responded significantly better to belimumab therapy plus SOC than SOC alone. PMID:19714604

  12. Activity levels of tamoxifen metabolites at the estrogen receptor and the impact of genetic polymorphisms of phase I and II enzymes on their concentration levels in plasma.

    PubMed

    Mürdter, T E; Schroth, W; Bacchus-Gerybadze, L; Winter, S; Heinkele, G; Simon, W; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Eichelbaum, M; Schwab, M; Brauch, H

    2011-05-01

    The therapeutic effect of tamoxifen depends on active metabolites, e.g., cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) mediated formation of endoxifen. To test for additional relationships, 236 breast cancer patients were genotyped for CYP2D6, CYP2C9, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP3A5, UGT1A4, UGT2B7, and UGT2B15; also, plasma concentrations of tamoxifen and 22 of its metabolites, including the (E)-, (Z)-, 3-, and 4'-hydroxymetabolites as well as their glucuronides, were quantified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (MS). The activity levels of the metabolites were measured using an estrogen response element reporter assay; the strongest estrogen receptor inhibition was found for (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen (inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) 3 and 7 nmol/l, respectively). CYP2D6 genotypes explained 39 and 9% of the variability of steady-state concentrations of (Z)-endoxifen and (Z)-4-hydroxytamoxifen, respectively. Among the poor metabolizers, 93% had (Z)-endoxifen levels below IC90 values, underscoring the role of CYP2D6 deficiency in compromised tamoxifen bioactivation. For other enzymes tested, carriers of reduced-function CYP2C9 (*2, *3) alleles had lower plasma concentrations of active metabolites (P < 0.004), pointing to the role of additional pathways.

  13. Salvianolic acid B protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inducing Nrf2 and phase II detoxification gene expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Musen; Zhai, Xiaohan; Wang, Guangzhi; Tian, Xiaofeng; Gao, Dongyan; Shi, Lei; Wu, Hang; Fan, Qing; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Kexin; Yao, Jihong

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is used drugs worldwide for treating pain and fever. However, APAP overdose is the principal cause of acute liver failure in Western countries. Salvianolic acid B (SalB), a major water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, has well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. We aimed to evaluate the ability of SalB to protect against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity by inducing nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression. SalB pretreatment ameliorated acute liver injury caused by APAP, as indicated by blood aspartate transaminase levels and histological findings. Moreover, SalB pretreatment increased the expression of Nrf2, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-l-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). Furthermore, the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin and the GCLC inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine reversed the protective effect of SalB. Additionally, siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 reduced the induction of HO-1 and GCLC by SalB, and SalB pretreatment activated the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways. Both inhibitors (PI3K and PKC) blocked the protective effect of SalB against APAP-induced cell death, abolishing the SalB-induced Nrf2 activation and decreasing HO-1 and GCLC expression. These results indicated that SalB induces Nrf2, HO-1 and GCLC expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC pathways, thereby protecting against APAP-induced liver injury.

  14. Maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II proof-of-concept trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Beckman, Robert A

    2014-04-01

    Phase II proof-of-concept (POC) trials play a key role in oncology drug development, determining which therapeutic hypotheses will undergo definitive phase III testing according to predefined Go-No Go (GNG) criteria. The number of possible POC hypotheses likely far exceeds available public or private resources. We propose a design strategy for maximizing return on socioeconomic investment in phase II trials that obtains the greatest knowledge with the minimum patient exposure. We compare efficiency using the benefit-cost ratio, defined to be the risk-adjusted number of truly active drugs correctly identified for phase III development divided by the risk-adjusted total sample size in phase II and III development, for different POC trial sizes, powering schemes, and associated GNG criteria. It is most cost-effective to conduct small POC trials and set the corresponding GNG bars high, so that more POC trials can be conducted under socioeconomic constraints. If δ is the minimum treatment effect size of clinical interest in phase II, the study design with the highest benefit-cost ratio has approximately 5% type I error rate and approximately 20% type II error rate (80% power) for detecting an effect size of approximately 1.5δ. A Go decision to phase III is made when the observed effect size is close to δ. With the phenomenal expansion of our knowledge in molecular biology leading to an unprecedented number of new oncology drug targets, conducting more small POC trials and setting high GNG bars maximize the return on socioeconomic investment in phase II POC trials.

  15. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  16. Steam generator tube integrity program: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, R.J.; Bickford, R.L.; Clark, R.A.; Morris, C.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1988-08-01

    The Steam Generator Tube Integrity Program (SGTIP) was a three phase program conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The first phase involved burst and collapse testing of typical steam generator tubing with machined defects. The second phase of the SGTIP continued the integrity testing work of Phase I, but tube specimens were degraded by chemical means rather than machining methods. The third phase of the program used a removed-from-service steam generator as a test bed for investigating the reliability and effectiveness of in-service nondestructive eddy-current inspection methods and as a source of service degraded tubes for validating the Phase I and Phase II data on tube integrity. This report describes the results of Phase II of the SGTIP. The object of this effort included burst and collapse testing of chemically defected pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubing to validate empirical equations of remaining tube integrity developed during Phase I. Three types of defect geometries were investigated: stress corrosion cracking (SCC), uniform thinning and elliptical wastage. In addition, a review of the publicly available leak rate data for steam generator tubes with axial and circumferential SCC and a comparison with an analytical leak rate model is presented. Lastly, nondestructive eddy-current (EC) measurements to determine accuracy of defect depth sizing using conventional and alternate standards is described. To supplement the laboratory EC data and obtain an estimate of EC capability to detect and size SCC, a mini-round robin test utilizing several firms that routinely perform in-service inspections was conducted.

  17. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  18. Study of phase I NOx control: Lessons learned for phase II NOx control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.

    1996-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is concerned with lowering the levels of acid rain in the USA. One of the contributions to acid rain is nitric oxides referred to as NO{sub x}. Title IV seeks NO{sub x} reductions from two groupings of utility steam generators. The first group, known as Phase I, was to have their reductions made by January 1, 1996. The purpose of this paper is to look back at Phase I to see what one can learn for use in Phase II compliance planning. Phase II units are scheduled to be in compliance by January 1, 2000. As such, this paper looks to answer four questions about Phase I units.

  19. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  20. Microbial Dark Matter Phase II: Stepping deeper into unknown territory

    SciTech Connect

    Jarett, Jessica; Dunfield, Peter; Peura, Sari; Wielen, Paul van der; Hedlund, Brian; Elshahed, Mostafa; Kormas, Konstantinos; Stott, Andreas Teske8, Matt; Birkeland, Nils-Kare; Zhang, Chuanlun; Rengefors, Karin; Lindemann, Stephen; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Spear, John; Hallam, Steven; Crowe, Sean; Steele, Jillian; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex; Kyrpides, Nikos; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Woyke, Tanja

    2014-10-27

    Currently available microbial genomes are of limited phylogenetic breadth due to our historical inability to cultivate most microorganisms in the laboratory. The first phase of the Microbial Dark Matter project used single-cell genomics to sequence 201 single cells from uncultivated lineages, and was able to resolve new superphyla and reveal novel metabolic features in bacteria and archaea. However, many fundamental questions about the evolution and function of microbes remain unanswered, and many candidate phyla remain uncharacterized. Phase II of the Microbial Dark Matter project will target candidate phyla with no sequenced representatives at a variety of new sites using a combination of single-cell sequencing and shotgun metagenomics approaches.

  1. PWR steam generator chemical cleaning. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Two techniques believed capable of chemically dissolving the corrosion products in the annuli between tubes and support plates were developed in laboratory work in Phase I of this project and were pilot tested in Indian Point Unit No. 1 steam generators. In Phase II, one of the techniques was shown to be inadequate on an actual sample taken from an Indian Point Unit No. 2 steam generator. The other technique was modified slightly, and it was demonstrated that the tube/support plate annulus could be chemically cleaned effectively.

  2. OSAS Surgery and Postoperative Discomfort: Phase I Surgery versus Phase II Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Giulio; Pelo, Sandro; Foresta, Enrico; Boniello, Roberto; Romandini, Mario; Cervelli, Daniele; Azzuni, Camillo; Marianetti, Tito Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aims to investigate the reasons that discourage the patients affected by OSAS to undergo orthognathic surgery and compares the postoperative discomfort of phase I (soft tissue surgery) and phase II (orthognathic surgery) procedures for treatment of OSAS. Material and Methods. A pool of 46 patients affected by OSAS was divided into two groups: “surgery patients” who accepted surgical treatments of their condition and “no surgery patients” who refused surgical procedures. The “surgery patients” group was further subdivided into two arms: patients who accepted phase I procedures (IP) and those who accepted phase II (IIP). To better understand the motivations behind the refusal of II phase procedures, we asked the patients belonging to both the IP group and “no surgery” group to indicate the main reason that influenced their decision to avoid II phase procedures. We also monitored and compared five parameters of postoperative discomfort: pain, painkiller assumption, length of hospitalization, foreign body sensation, and diet assumption following IP and IIP procedures. Results. The main reason to avoid IIP procedures was the concern of a more severe postoperative discomfort. Comparison of the postoperative discomfort following IP versus IIP procedures showed that the former scored worse in 4 out of 5 parameters analyzed. Conclusion. IIP procedures produce less postoperative discomfort. IIP procedures, namely, orthognathic surgery, should be the first choice intervention in patients affected by OSAS and dentoskeletal malformation. PMID:25695081

  3. Cleome rutidosperma and Euphorbia thymifolia Suppress Inflammatory Response via Upregulation of Phase II Enzymes and Modulation of NF-κB and JNK Activation in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Cleome rutidosperma DC. and Euphorbia thymifolia L. are herbal medicines used in traditional Indian and Chinese medicine to treat various illnesses. Reports document that they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities; nonetheless, the molecular mechanisms involved in their anti-inflammatory actions have not yet been elucidated. The anti-neuroinflammatory activities and underlying mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Cleome rutidosperma (CR) and Euphorbia thymifolia (ET) were studied using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cell line BV2. The morphology changes and production of pro-inflammatory mediators were assayed. Gene expression of inflammatory genes such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, interleukin (IL)-1β, and CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, as well as phase II enzymes such as heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) and NAD(P)H quinone dehydrogenase 1 (NQO1), were further investigated using reverse transcription quantitative-PCR (RT-Q-PCR) and Western blotting. The effects of CR and ET on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were examined using Western blotting and specific inhibitors. CR and ET suppressed BV2 activation, down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression and inhibited nitric oxide (NO) overproduction without affecting cell viability. They reduced LPS-mediated tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 production, attenuated IL-1β and CCL2 expression, but upregulated HO-1, GCLM and NQO1 expression. They also inhibited p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and modulated Jun-N terminal kinase (JNK) activation in BV2 cells. SP600125, the JNK inhibitor, significantly augmented the anti-IL-6 activity of ET. NF-κB inhibitor, Bay 11-7082, enhanced the anti-IL-6 effects of both CR and ET. Znpp, a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, attenuated the anti-NO effects of CR and ET. Our results show that CR and ET exhibit anti

  4. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  5. INSERTION DEVICE ACTIVITIES FOR NSLS-II.

    SciTech Connect

    TANABE,T.; HARDER, D.A.; HULBERT, S.; RAKOWSKI, G.; SKARITKA, J.

    2007-06-25

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) will be a medium energy storage ring of 3GeV electron beam energy with sub-nm.rad horizontal emittance and top-off capability at 500mA. Damping wigglers will be used not only to reduce the beam emittance but also used as broadband sources for users. Cryo-Permanent Magnet Undulators (CPMUs) are considered for hard X-ray linear device, and permanent magnet based elliptically polarized undulators (EPUs) for variable polarization devices for soft X-ray. 6T superconducting wiggler with minimal fan angle will be installed in the second phase as well as quasi-periodic EPU for VUV and possibly high-temperature superconducting undulator. R&D plans have been established to pursue the performance enhancement of the baseline devices and to design new types of insertion devices. A new insertion device development laboratory will also be established.

  6. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  7. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  8. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  9. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  10. Cinnamaldehyde enhances Nrf2 nuclear translocation to upregulate phase II detoxifying enzyme expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Chung, Yu-Ling; Wu, Mei-Li; Chuang, Show-Mei

    2011-05-11

    Cinnamaldehyde has been demonstrated to stimulate glutathione production and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes in HepG2 cells. The mechanism underlying this cinnamaldehyde-mediated gene expression relies on Nrf2 transcriptional activity. Therefore, the molecular signaling events in cinnamaldehyde-mediated detoxifying enzyme expression were further investigated in this study. Cinnamaldehyde activated ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK signaling pathways, but not the p38 MAP kinase pathway, subsequently leading to Nrf2 nuclear translocation and eventually increasing phase II enzyme expression. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, or JNK pathways attenuated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and phase II enzyme expression. Depletion of Nrf2 by small RNA interference (si-RNA) showed that the protein levels of phase II enzymes were no longer induced by cinnamaldehyde. A luciferase reporter assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) also demonstrated that cinnamaldehyde-activated signaling resulted in the increased transcriptional activity of Nrf2 through binding to the ARE4 enhancer sequence. Altogether, these data suggest that ERK1/2, Akt, and JNK pathways activated by cinnamaldehyde collectively control Nrf2 nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity, leading to the increase of phase II enzyme expression. Application of an appropriate chemopreventive agent such as cinnamaldehyde could potentially be an alternative strategy for cancer chemoprevention.

  11. Mammalian Toxicity of Munitions Compounds. Phase II. Effects of Multiple Doses Part II. 2,4-Dinitrotoluene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    II: Effects of Multiple Doses Part !I: 2,4-T)initrotoiuene I Progres Report No. 3 oNovember 1978 by 3I Cheng-Chun Lee U Hirty V. Ellis, III Jo.,n J...Sciences Division November 1978 vii :. •I~~~~AMMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITIONS COMPOUNDS ... ... PHASE IIz Effects of Multiple Doses m . ............... PART...161 xi MAMOMALIAN TOXICITY OF MUNITION COMPOUNDS PHASE II: Effects of Multiple Dones PART II: 2,4

  12. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  13. Yakima Fish Passage : Phase II : Fish Screen Construction.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    2003-03-01

    Accomplishments in 2001--2002 were spotty and limited due primarily to right-of-way problems at several sites and unanticipated changes in scope at some sites. Changes in BPA funding procedures have also impacted our ability to accomplish previously scheduled work. The following is a brief summary of work accomplished and scheduled at the remaining Phase II sites. (1) Selah-Moxee Fish Screen--Construction at this site was started in October 2001 and was completed in March 2002. We have settled the contractor claims and have closed out the construction contract. The O&M Agreement with the irrigation district was also completed in 2002. Work remains to complete the Designer's Operating Criteria. (2) Scott Fish Screen--Considerable effort was spent in 2001 and 2002 to try to resolve right-of-way issues at this site. However, these problems proved to be insurmountable, and this site has been dropped from the Phase n Program. The only thing remaining on Scott (as far as the Phase n program is concerned) is to prepare a brief wrap-up report to send to all interested parties to summarize what has been done and to explain the status of the diversion from a fish passage standpoint. (3) Packwood Fish Screen--Designs and specifications for the civil works were completed for this screen in 2002. The screen, screen cleaner, and other metal work have already been fabricated by WDFW Screen Shop. Award of a construction contract was scheduled for September 2002. The BP A lands staff has experienced significant delays in obtaining an easement from the state of Washington for a piece of the John Wayne Trail right-of-way currently occupied by the existing screen. As a result, the construction contract has been rescheduled for award in the fall of 2003. We are ready to proceed with construction if BP A can obtain the necessary easements by May 2003. (4) Fogarty Fish Screen--We opened bids on this site in August, 2002. There was only one responsive bidder and the bid was nearly double

  14. Chromospheric Activity in Population II Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Graham M.

    2004-01-01

    One of the mysteries of Population II giants is that they still show chromospheric emission despite their great age. The global dynamo which was active during their main-sequence lifetimes is expected to become extremely weak through magnetic rotational braking. The nature of the observed emission is not understood; although acoustic shock waves might provide the heating, acoustic waves are not predicted to drive the observed mass loss - which in turn requires the dissipation of magneto-hydrodynamic waves. This program was designed to search for the faint stellar H Ly beta emission wings and the fluorescent Fe II and H2 emission from one of the brightest, metal poor, Population II stars. These FUSE diagnostics, when combined with existing UV and optical spectra, help determine the major radiative cooling channels for the chromosphere. This observation was to complement that previously planned for the mildly metal deficient giant alpha Boo (K2 III). However, alpha Boo has yet to be observed with FUSE.

  15. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  16. Sirukumab, a human anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody: a randomised, 2-part (proof-of-concept and dose-finding), phase II study in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Weinblatt, Michael E; Sheng, Shihong; Zhuang, Yanli; Hsu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The safety and efficacy of sirukumab, an anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6) monoclonal antibody, were evaluated in a 2-part, placebo-controlled phase II study of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate therapy. Methods In Part A (proof-of-concept), 36 patients were randomised to placebo or sirukumab 100 mg every 2 weeks (q2w) through week 10, with crossover treatment during weeks 12–22. In Part B (dose finding), 151 patients were randomised to sirukumab (100 mg q2w, 100 mg q4w, 50 mg q4w, or 25 mg q4w) through week 24, or placebo through week 10 with crossover to sirukumab 100 mg q2w (weeks 12–24). The proportion of patients with an American College of Rheumatology 50 (ACR50) response and the change from baseline in the 28-joint count disease activity score using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) were determined. Safety was evaluated through week 38 in both parts. Results The primary endpoint (ACR50 at week 12 in Part B) was achieved only with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo (26.7% vs 3.3%; p=0.026). Greater improvements in mean DAS28-CRP at week 12 were observed with sirukumab 100 mg q2w versus placebo in Parts A (2.1 vs 0.6, p<0.001) and B (2.2 vs 1.1; p<0.001). The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was similar for sirukumab-treated and placebo-treated patients through week 12 in Part A (70.6% and 63.2%, respectively) and B (67.8% and 66.7%, respectively). Infections were the most common type of AE; one death occurred (Part B, sirukumab 100 mg q2w, brain aneurysm). Conclusions Sirukumab-treated patients experienced improvements in the signs/symptoms of RA. Safety results through 38 weeks were consistent with other IL-6 inhibitors. Trial registration number NCT00718718. PMID:24699939

  17. Purification, crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and phasing of an engineered single-chain PvuII restriction endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Meramveliotaki, Chrysi; Kotsifaki, Dina; Androulaki, Maria; Hountas, Athanasios; Eliopoulos, Elias; Kokkinidis, Michael

    2007-10-01

    PvuII is the first type II restriction endonuclease to be converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into an enzymatically active single-chain variant. The enzyme was crystallized and phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement. The restriction endonuclease PvuII from Proteus vulgaris has been converted from its wild-type homodimeric form into the enzymatically active single-chain variant scPvuII by tandemly joining the two subunits through the peptide linker Gly-Ser-Gly-Gly. scPvuII, which is suitable for the development of programmed restriction endonucleases for highly specific DNA cleavage, was purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.35 Å and belong to space group P4{sub 2}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.92, c = 100.28 Å and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Phasing was successfully performed by molecular replacement.

  18. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  19. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  20. 7-Methylsulfinylheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates from watercress are potent inducers of phase II enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rose, P; Faulkner, K; Williamson, G; Mithen, R

    2000-11-01

    Watercress is an exceptionally rich dietary source of beta-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). This compound inhibits phase I enzymes, which are responsible for the activation of many carcinogens in animals, and induces phase II enzymes, which are associated with enhanced excretion of carcinogens. In this study, we show that watercress extracts are potent inducers of quinone reductase (QR) in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells, a widely adopted assay for measuring phase II enzyme induction. However, contrary to expectations, this induction was not associated with PEITC (which is rapidly lost to the atmosphere upon tissue disruption due to its volatility) or a naturally occurring PEITC-glutathione conjugate, but with 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl isothiocyanates (ITCs). While it was confirmed that PEITC does induce QR (5 microM required for a two-fold induction in QR), 7-methylsulfinyheptyl and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs were more potent inducers (0.2 microM and 0.5 microM, respectively, required for a two-fold induction in QR). Thus, while watercress contains three times more phenylethyl glucosinolate than methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, ITCs derived from methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates may be more important phase II enzyme inducers than PEITC, having 10 - to 25-fold greater potency. Analysis of urine by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) following consumption of watercress demonstrated the presence of N:-acetylcysteine conjugates of 7-methylsulfinylheptyl, 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITCs and PEITC, indicating that these ITCs are taken up by the gut and metabolized in the body. Watercress may have exceptionally good anticarcinogenic potential, as it combines a potent inhibitor of phase I enzymes (PEITC) with at least three inducers of phase II enzymes (PEITC, 7-methylsulfinylheptyl ITC and 8-methylsulfinyloctyl ITC). The study also demonstrates the application of LC-MS for the detection of complex glucosinolate-derived metabolites in

  1. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  2. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications: Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jack H.; Ross, James A.; Hadden, Steve; Gonzalez, Mario; Rogers, Zach; Henderson, B. Kyle

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. During the Phase I MVIS program, funded by AFRL and DARPA, a hybrid piezoelectric/D-strut isolator was built and tested to prove its viability for retroffitable insertion into sensitive payload attachments. A second phase of the program, which is jointly funded between AFRL and Honeywell, was started in November of 2002 to build a hexapod and the supporting interface electronics and do a flight demonstration of the technology. The MVIS-II program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. This paper describes the simulations, overall test plan and product development status of the overall MVIS-II program as it approaches flight.

  3. DOD USER-NEEDS STUDY, PHASE II -- FLOW OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL INFORMATION WITHIN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. FINAL REPORT. VOLUME II, A. TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION, B. TECHNICAL APPENDICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GOODMAN, ARNOLD F.; AND OTHERS

    IN PHASE II OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE (DOD) SURVEY TO FIND OUT HOW SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS IN GOVERNMENT AND INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES ACQUIRE INFORMATION, SCIENTIFIC PERSONNEL IN THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY WERE INTERVIEWED TO DETERMINE THEIR INFORMATION NEEDS AND THE FLOW OF INFORMATION INHERENT IN SATISFYING THESE…

  4. The Development of New Measures of Cognitive Variables in Elementary School Children (Phase II). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, J. William; And Others

    This report covers Phase II of a two-phase project concerned with the development of new measures of cognitive variables in elementary school children. The four tasks undertaken in Phase II were: (1) prepare, revise and describe instruments designed to measure the cognitive variables categorized as concept formation, language development, logical…

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  6. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  7. Overview of SBIR Phase II Work on Hollow Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ultra-Lightweight materials are enabling for producing space based optical components and support structures. Heretofore, innovative designs using existing materials has been the approach to produce lighter-weight optical systems. Graphite fiber reinforced composites, because of their light weight, have been a material of frequent choice to produce space based optical components. Hollow graphite fibers would be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, would save weight in optical components. The Phase I SBIR program demonstrated it is possible to produce hollow carbon fibers that have strengths up to 4.2 GPa which are equivalent to commercial fibers, and composites made from the hollow fibers had substantially equivalent composite strengths as commercial fiber composites at a 46% weight savings. The Phase II SBIR program will optimize processing and properties of the hollow carbon fiber and scale-up processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA. Information presented here includes an overview of the strength of some preliminary hollow fibers, photographs of those fibers, and a short discussion of future plans.

  8. Easier Phase IIs: Recent Improvements to the Gemini User Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bryan; Nuñez, A.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 and 2012 Gemini Observatory undertook a significant project to improve the software tools used by investigators to propose for and prepare observations. The main goal was to make the definition of observation details (the Phase II process) easier and faster. The main initiatives included rewriting the observing proposal tool (Phase I Tool) and making several major improvements to the Observing Tool, including automatic settings for arc and flat exposures, automatic guide star selection for all instruments and wavefront sensors, and more complete initial template observations with capabilities for simultaneous editing of many observations. This poster explains these major changes as well as outlines future development plans. The Gemini Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  9. Alternate Reductant Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace Phase II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, F. C.; Stone, M. E.; Miller, D. H.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste

  10. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-27

    This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

  11. MHD seed recovery and regeneration, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by the Space and Technology Division of the TRW Space and Electronics Group for the U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center for the Econoseed process. This process involves the economical recovery and regeneration of potassium seed used in the MHD channel. The contract period of performance extended from 1987 through 1994 and was divided into two phases. The Phase II test results are the subject of this Final Report. However, the Phase I test results are presented in summary form in Section 2.3 of this Final Report. The Econoseed process involves the treatment of the potassium sulfate in spent MHD seed with an aqueous calcium formate solution in a continuously stirred reactor system to solubilize, as potassium formate, the potassium content of the seed and to precipitate and recover the sulfate as calcium sulfate. The slurry product from this reaction is centrifuged to separate the calcium sulfate and insoluble seed constituents from the potassium formate solution. The dilute solids-free potassium formate solution is then concentrated in an evaporator. The concentrated potassium formate product is a liquid which can be recycled as a spray into the MHD channel. Calcium formate is the seed regenerant used in the Econoseed process. Since calcium formate is produced in the United States in relatively small quantities, a new route to the continuous production of large quantities of calcium formate needed to support an MHD power industry was investigated. This route involves the reaction of carbon monoxide gas with lime solids in an aqueous medium.

  12. Emerging Roles of Nrf2 and Phase II Antioxidant Enzymes in Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meijuan; An, Chengrui; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Phase II metabolic enzymes are a battery of critical proteins that detoxify xenobiotics by increasing their hydrophilicity and enhancing their disposal. These enzymes have long been studied for their preventative and protective effects against mutagens and carcinogens and for their regulation via the Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH associated protein 1) / Nrf2 (Nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2) / ARE (antioxidant response elements) pathway. Recently, a series of studies have reported the altered expression of phase II genes in postmortem tissue of patients with various neurological diseases. These observations hint at a role for phase II enzymes in the evolution of such conditions. Furthermore, promising findings reveal that overexpression of phase II genes, either by genetic or chemical approaches, confers neuroprotection in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, there is a need to summarize the current literature on phase II genes in the central nervous system (CNS). This should help guide future studies on phase II genes as therapeutic targets in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduce the concept of phase I, II and III enzymes, with a special focus on phase II enzymes. We then discuss their expression regulation, their inducers and executors. Following this background, we expand our discussion to the neuroprotective effects of phase II enzymes and the potential application of Nrf2 inducers to the treatment of neurological diseases. PMID:23025925

  13. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II: Shallow Plus Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, K.; Parker, D.; Martin, E.; Chasar, D.; Amos, B.

    2016-02-03

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: a) Supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes); b) Ducted and space coupled Heat Pump Water Heater (8 homes); c) Exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes); d) Window retrofit (3 homes); e) Smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics); f) Heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes); g) Variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  14. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  15. Effect of a misspecification of response rates on type I and type II errors, in a phase II Simon design.

    PubMed

    Baey, Charlotte; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Phase-II trials are a key stage in the clinical development of a new treatment. Their main objective is to provide the required information for a go/no-go decision regarding a subsequent phase-III trial. In single arm phase-II trials, widely used in oncology, this decision relies on the comparison of efficacy outcomes observed in the trial to historical controls. The false positive rate generally accepted in phase-II trials, around 10%, contrasts with the very high attrition rate of new compounds tested in phase-III trials, estimated at about 60%. We assumed that this gap could partly be explained by the misspecification of the response rate expected with standard treatment, leading to erroneous hypotheses tested in the phase-II trial. We computed the false positive probability of a defined design under various hypotheses of expected efficacy probability. Similarly we calculated the power of the trial to detect the efficacy of a new compound for different expected efficacy rates. Calculations were done considering a binary outcome, such as the response rate, with a decision rule based on a Simon two-stage design. When analysing a single-arm phase-II trial, based on a design with a pre-specified null hypothesis, a 5% absolute error in the expected response rate leads to a false positive rate of about 30% when it is supposed to be 10%. This inflation of type-I error varies only slightly according to the hypotheses of the initial design. Single-arm phase-II trials poorly control for the false positive rate. Randomised phase-II trials should, therefore, be more often considered.

  16. Clean Air Act Title IV: Lessons learned from Phase I; getting ready for Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have required significant reductions in SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants in the US. This paper examines some of the key technical lessons learned in Phase I following retrofit of low NO{sub x} systems, FGD systems, and continuous emissions monitors. Some of the key problems encountered have been waterwall wastage as a result of low NO{sub x} burner retrofits; high LOI (carbon) ash as a result of low NO{sub x} operation; high O&M costs associated with CEMs; and the heat rate discrepancy which has arisen between CEMs and conventional heat rate calculations. As Phase II approaches, EPRI and the electric utility industry are investigating improvements in FGD systems (e.g., clear liquor scrubbing), advances in NO{sub x} control technologies, more robust CEM systems, and tools to help in the technology decision-making process.

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  19. Pressure and phase equilibria in interacting active brownian spheres.

    PubMed

    Solon, Alexandre P; Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Kardar, Mehran; Kafri, Yariv; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien

    2015-05-15

    We derive a microscopic expression for the mechanical pressure P in a system of spherical active Brownian particles at density ρ. Our exact result relates P, defined as the force per unit area on a bounding wall, to bulk correlation functions evaluated far away from the wall. It shows that (i) P(ρ) is a state function, independent of the particle-wall interaction; (ii) interactions contribute two terms to P, one encoding the slow-down that drives motility-induced phase separation, and the other a direct contribution well known for passive systems; and (iii) P is equal in coexisting phases. We discuss the consequences of these results for the motility-induced phase separation of active Brownian particles and show that the densities at coexistence do not satisfy a Maxwell construction on P.

  20. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2003-03-01

    In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

  1. The phase II ATLAS Pixel upgrade: the Inner Tracker (ITk)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, T.

    2017-01-01

    The entire tracking system of the ATLAS experiment will be replaced during the LHC Phase II shutdown (foreseen to take place around 2025) by an all-silicon detector called the ITk (Inner Tracker). The pixel detector will comprise the five innermost layers, and will be instrumented with new sensor and readout electronics technologies to improve the tracking performance and cope with the HL-LHC environment, which will be severe in terms of occupancy and radiation. Several layout options are being investigated. All of these include a barrel part and ring-shaped supports in the endcap regions. All structures will be based on low mass, highly stable and highly thermally conductive carbon-based materials cooled by evaporative carbon dioxide. Different designs of planar, 3D, and CMOS sensors are being investigated to identify the optimal technology for the different pixel layers. While the RD53 Collaboration is developing the new readout chip, the pixel off-detector readout electronics will be implemented in the framework of the general ATLAS trigger and DAQ system. A readout speed of up to 5 Gbit/s per data link (FE-chip) will be needed in the innermost layers going down to 640 Mbit/s for the outermost. This paper presents an overview of the different components of the ITk and the current status of the developments.

  2. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  3. Background rejection of n+ surface events in GERDA Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2016-05-01

    The GERDA experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta (0vββ) decay in 76Ge using an array of high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors immersed in liquid argon (LAr). Phase II of the experiment uses 30 new broad energy germanium (BEGe) detectors with superior pulse shape discrimination capabilities compared to the previously used semi-coaxial detector design. By far the largest background component for BEGe detectors in GERDA are n+-surface events from 42K β decays which are intrinsic in LAr. The β particles with up to 3.5 MeV can traverse the 0.5 to 0.9 mm thick electrode and deposit energy within the region of interest for the 0vββ decay. However, those events have particular pulse shape features allowing for a strong discrimination. The understanding and simulation of this background, showing a reduction by up to a factor 145 with pulse shape discrimination alone, is presented in this work.

  4. Phosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase II by casein kinase II: modulation of eukaryotic topoisomerase II activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, P; Glover, C V; Osheroff, N

    1985-01-01

    The phosphorylation of Drosophila melanogaster DNA topoisomerase II by purified casein kinase II was characterized in vitro. Under the conditions used, the kinase incorporated a maximum of 2-3 molecules of phosphate per homodimer of topoisomerase II. No autophosphorylation of the topoisomerase was observed. The only amino acid residue modified by casein kinase II was serine. Apparent Km and Vmax values for the phosphorylation reaction were 0.4 microM topoisomerase II and 3.3 mumol of phosphate incorporated per min per mg of kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation stimulated the DNA relaxation activity of topoisomerase II by 3-fold over that of the dephosphorylated enzyme, and the effects of modification could be reversed by treatment with alkaline phosphatase. Therefore, this study demonstrates that post-translational enzymatic modifications can be used to modulate the interaction between topoisomerase II and DNA. Images PMID:2987912

  5. Adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Naiya, Tarun Kumar; Bhattacharya, Ashim Kumar; Das, Sudip Kumar

    2009-05-01

    The ability of activated alumina as synthetic adsorbent was investigated for adsorptive removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied. The optimum solution pH for adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions was found to be 5. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second order model. The effective particle diffusion coefficient of Cd(II) and Pb(II) are of the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s. Values of mass transfer coefficient were estimated as 4.868x10(-6) cm/s and 6.85x10(-6) cm/s for Cd(II) and Pb(II) adsorption respectively. The equilibrium adsorption data for Cd(II) and Pb(II) were better fitted to Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic for Cd(II) adsorption and endothermic for Pb(II). The sorption energy calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm were 11.85 kJ/mol and 11.8 kJ/mol for the adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) respectively which indicated that both the adsorption processes were chemical in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using dilute mineral acids. Application studies carried out using industrial waste water samples containing Cd(II) and Pb(II) showed the suitability of activated alumina in waste water treatment plant operation.

  6. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  7. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  8. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  9. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  10. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  11. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  12. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  13. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  14. 40 CFR 72.74 - Federal issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.74 Federal issuance of Phase II permits. (a)(1) The Administrator will be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain... and enforcing Acid Rain permits for such sources under § 72.73(a). (2) After and to the extent...

  15. 40 CFR 72.73 - State issuance of Phase II permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Phase II Implementation § 72.73 State issuance of Phase II permits... permit program under part 70 of this chapter and that has a State Acid Rain program accepted by the Administrator under § 72.71 shall be responsible for administering and enforcing Acid Rain permits effective...

  16. TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    1999-04-15

    This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

  17. Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Artwork: Johnson Space Center U.S./International Cooperation Phase II -- This is a representation illustrating the United States' international cooperation in space. Phase II of the International Space Station is depicted with elements provided by the United States and Russia comprising the Human Tended Space Station. The scene was produced by John Frassanito and Associates. (JSC ref: S94-30086)

  18. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  19. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  20. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  1. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  2. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Collection. Each Phase II applicant will be required to provide information to the Tech-Net Database System... applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or subsidiary established for the commercial application... conducted under each Phase II award; and (iv) Updates to information in the Tech-Net database for any...

  3. Summary of WPT FOA phase II demonstration performed on July 21, 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Perry T.; Onar, Omer C.

    2015-08-01

    This summary provides details of the activities, presentations and hardware demonstrations performed at the International Transportation Innovation Center (iTiC) in Greenville, South Carolina as deliverables for the wireless power transfer (WPT) FOA #000667 phase II gateway. This report does not attempt to identify all encompassing efforts from each of the partners leading up to the demonstration, but will attempt to provide a record which briefly describes the project deliverables met and expectations from the Department of Energy (DOE) as action items agreed to during the wrap-up session on July 21, 2015.

  4. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1–Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity. PMID:19185948

  5. Dietary chemoprevention strategies for induction of phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in lung carcinogenesis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality for men and women in the United States and is a growing worldwide problem. Protection against lung cancer is associated with higher dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, according to recent large epidemiologic studies. One strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention focuses on the use of agents to modulate the metabolism and disposition of tobacco, environmental and endogenous carcinogens through upregulation of detoxifying phase II enzymes. We summarize the substantial evidence that suggests that induction of phase II enzymes, particularly the glutathione S-transferases, plays a direct role in chemoprotection against lung carcinogenesis. The engagement of the Keap1-Nrf2 complex regulating the antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway has been identified as a key molecular target of chemopreventive phase II inducers in several systems. Monitoring of phase II enzyme induction has led to identification of novel chemopreventive agents such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane, and the 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones. However, no agents have yet demonstrated clear benefit in human cell systems, or in clinical trials. Alternative strategies include: (a) using intermediate cancer biomarkers for the endpoint in human trials; (b) high-throughput small molecule discovery approaches for induced expression of human phase II genes; and (c) integrative approaches that consider pharmacogenetics, along with pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in target lung tissue. These approaches may lead to a more effective strategy of tailored chemoprevention efforts using compounds with proven human activity.

  6. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2012-09-21

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple "claimed" beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review.

  7. Mutual interactions between flavonoids and enzymatic and transporter elements responsible for flavonoid disposition via phase II metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen; Hu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids, existing mainly as glycosides in nature, have multiple “claimed” beneficial effects in humans. Flavonoids are extensively metabolized in enterocytes and hepatocytes by phase II enzymes such as UGTs and SULTs to form glucuronides and sulfates, respectively. These glucuronides and sulfates are subsequently excreted via ABC transporters (e.g., MRP2 or BCRP). Therefore, it is the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters that affects the disposition of flavonoids and leads to the low bioavailability of flavonoid aglycones. Flavonoids can also serve as chemical regulators that affect the activity or expression levels of phase II enzymes including UGTs, SULTs and GSTs, and transporters including P-gp, MRP2, BCRP, OATP and OAT. In general, flavonoids may exert the inhibitory or inductive effects on the phase II enzymes and transporters via multiple mechanisms that may involve different nuclear receptors. Since flavonoids may affect the metabolic pathways shared by many important clinical drugs, drug-flavonoid interaction is becoming an increasingly important concern. This review article focused on the disposition of flavonoids and effects of flavonoids on relevant enzymes (e.g. UGTs and SULTs) and transporters (e.g. MRP2 and BCRP) involved in the interplay between phase II enzymes and efflux transporters. The effects of flavonoids on other metabolic enzymes (e.g. GSTs) or transporters (e.g. P-gp, OATP and OAT) are also addressed but that is not the emphasis of this review. PMID:25400909

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

  9. A phase II study of axitinib in advanced neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, J R; Cives, M; Hwang, J; Weber, T; Nickerson, M; Atreya, C E; Venook, A; Kelley, R K; Valone, T; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Bergsland, E K

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are highly vascular neoplasms overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Axitinib is a potent, selective inhibitor of VEGFR-1, -2 and -3, currently approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. We performed an open-label, two-stage design, phase II trial of axitinib 5 mg twice daily in patients with progressive unresectable/metastatic low-to-intermediate grade carcinoid tumors. The primary end points were progression-free survival (PFS) and 12-month PFS rate. The secondary end points included time to treatment failure (TTF), overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), biochemical response rate and safety. A total of 30 patients were enrolled and assessable for toxicity; 22 patients were assessable for response. After a median follow-up of 29 months, we observed a median PFS of 26.7 months (95% CI, 11.4–35.1), with a 12-month PFS rate of 74.5% (±10.2). The median OS was 45.3 months (95% CI, 24.4–45.3), and the median TTF was 9.6 months (95% CI, 5.5–12). The best radiographic response was partial response (PR) in 1/30 (3%) and stable disease (SD) in 21/30 patients (70%); 8/30 patients (27%) were unevaluable due to early withdrawal due to toxicity. Hypertension was the most common toxicity that developed in 27 patients (90%). Grade 3/4 hypertension was recorded in 19 patients (63%), leading to treatment discontinuation in six patients (20%). Although axitinib appears to have an inhibitory effect on tumor growth in patients with advanced, progressive carcinoid tumors, the high rate of grade 3/4 hypertension may represent a potential impediment to its use in unselected patients. PMID:27080472

  10. Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.K.

    1987-09-01

    The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

  11. Dynamic phases of active matter systems with quenched disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Olson Reichhardt, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    Depinning and nonequilibrium transitions within sliding states in systems driven over quenched disorder arise across a wide spectrum of size scales ranging from atomic friction at the nanoscale, flux motion in type II superconductors at the mesoscale, colloidal motion in disordered media at the microscale, and plate tectonics at geological length scales. Here we show that active matter or self-propelled particles interacting with quenched disorder under an external drive represents a class of system that can also exhibit pinning-depinning phenomena, plastic flow phases, and nonequilibrium sliding transitions that are correlated with distinct morphologies and velocity-force curve signatures. When interactions with the substrate are strong, a homogeneous pinned liquid phase forms that depins plastically into a uniform disordered phase and then dynamically transitions first into a moving stripe coexisting with a pinned liquid and then into a moving phase-separated state at higher drives. We numerically map the resulting dynamical phase diagrams as a function of external drive, substrate interaction strength, and self-propulsion correlation length. These phases can be observed for active matter moving through random disorder. Our results indicate that intrinsically nonequilibrium systems can exhibit additional nonequilibrium transitions when subjected to an external drive.

  12. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  13. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In peripheral regions, angiotensin II elevates both norepinephrine release and synthesis and inhibits norepinephrine uptake at nerve endings, which may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity seen in chronic heart failure. Increased circulating angiotensin II during chronic heart failure may enhance the sympathoexcitatory chemoreflex and inhibit the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In addition, increased circulating angiotensin II can directly act on the central nervous system via the subfornical organ and the area postrema to increase sympathetic outflow. Inhibition of angiotensin II formation and its type 1 receptor has been shown to have beneficial effects in chronic heart failure patients.

  14. Preparation, characterization and biological activity of Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO 2(II) complexes of new cyclodiphosph(V)azane of sulfaguanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaby, Carmen M.

    2005-11-01

    Novel hexachlorocyclodiphosph(V)azane of sulfaguanidine, H 4L, l,3-[ N'-amidino-sulfanilamide]-2,2,2,4,4,4-hexachlorocyclodiphosph(V)azane was prepared and its coordination behaviour towards the transition metal ions Fe(III), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Cd(II) and UO 2(II) was studied. The structures of the isolated products are proposed based on elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR, mass spectra, reflectance, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The hyperfine interactions in the isolated complex compounds were studied using 14.4 keV γ-ray from radioactive 57Co (Mössbauer spectroscopy). The data show that the ligand are coordinated to the metal ions via the sulfonamide O and deprotonated NH atoms in an octahedral manner. The H 4L ligand forms complexes of the general formulae [(MX z) 2(H 2L)H 2O) n] and [(FeSO 4) 2 (H 4L) (H 2O) 4], where X = NO 3 in case of UO 2(II) and Cl in case of Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II). The molar conductance data show that the complexes are non-electrolytes. The thermal behaviour of the complexes was studied and different thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern method. Most of the prepared complexes showed high bactericidal activity and some of the complexes show more activity compared with the ligand and standards.

  15. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    SciTech Connect

    Zheligovskaya, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  16. Solid-phase extraction of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions from environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS).

    PubMed

    Duran, Celal; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan Numan; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif; Sentürk, Hasan Basri; Tüfekci, Mehmet

    2007-07-19

    A new method using a column packed with Amberlite XAD-2010 resin as a solid-phase extractant has been developed for the multi-element preconcentration of Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) ions based on their complex formation with the sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (Na-DDTC) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determinations. Metal complexes sorbed on the resin were eluted by 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 in acetone. Effects of the analytical conditions over the preconcentration yields of the metal ions, such as pH, quantity of Na-DDTC, eluent type, sample volume and flow rate, foreign ions etc. have been investigated. The limits of detection (LOD) of the analytes were found in the range 0.08-0.26 microg L(-1). The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials. The method has been applied for the determination of trace elements in some environmental samples.

  17. Metabolism of methandrostenolone in the horse: a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric investigation of phase I and phase II metabolism.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-12-05

    The phase I and phase II metabolism of the anabolic steroid methandrostenolone was investigated following oral administration to a standardbred gelding. In the phase I study, metabolites were isolated from the urine by solid-phase extraction, deconjugated by acid catalysed methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. GC-MS analysis indicated the major metabolic processes to be sequential reduction of the A-ring and hydroxylation at C6 and C16. In the phase II study, unconjugated, beta-glucuronidated and sulfated metabolites were fractionated and deconjugated using a combination of liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis, solid-phase extraction and acid catalysed methanolysis. Derivatization followed by GC-MS analysis revealed extensive conjugation to both glucuronic and sulfuric acids, with only a small proportion of metabolites occurring in unconjugated form.

  18. Thymostimulin in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Dollinger, Matthias M; Behrens, Christa M; Lesske, Joachim; Behl, Susanne; Behrmann, Curd; Fleig, Wolfgang E

    2008-01-01

    Background Thymostimulin is a thymic peptide fraction with immune-mediated cytotoxicity against hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro. In a phase II trial, we investigated safety and efficacy including selection criteria for best response in advanced or metastasised hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods 44 patients (84 % male, median age 69 years) not suitable or refractory to conventional therapy received thymostimulin 75 mg subcutaneously five times per week for a median of 8.2 months until progression or complete response. 3/44 patients were secondarily accessible to local ablation or chemoembolisation. Primary endpoint was overall survival, secondary endpoint tumor response or progression-free survival. A multivariate Cox's regression model was used to identify variables affecting survival. Results Median survival was 11.5 months (95% CI 7.9–15.0) with a 1-, 2- and 3-year survival of 50%, 23% and 9%. In the univariate analysis, a low Child-Pugh-score (p = 0.01), a low score in the Okuda- and CLIP-classification (p < 0.001) or a low AFP-level (p < 0.001) were associated with better survival, but not therapy modalities other than thymostimulin (p = 0.1) or signs of an invasive HCC phenotype such as vascular invasion (p = 0.3) and metastases (p = 0.1). The only variables independently related to survival in the Cox's regression model were Okuda stage and presence of liver cirrhosis (p < 0.01) as well as response to thymostimulin (p < 0.05). Of 39/44 patients evaluable for response, two obtained complete responses (one after concomitant radiofrequency ablation), five partial responses (objective response 18%), twenty-four stable disease (tumor control rate 79%) and eight progressed. Median progression-free survival was 6.4 months (95% CI 0.8–12). Grade 1 local reactions following injection were the only side effects. Conclusion Outcome in our study rather depended on liver function and intrahepatic tumor growth (presence of liver cirrhosis and Okuda stage) in addition

  19. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being

  20. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  1. U.S.-China Strategic Dialogue, Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-12

    Chinese Presentation 12:00-1:30p Lunch – Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 1:30p Panel II: Crisis Escalation in Theory and History Paper...Lunch Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 1:30p Panel IV: Nuclear Weapons Safety and Security: Comparing national approaches and discussing... Hibiscus Suite (Kalia Tower-2nd floor) 25 APPENDIX II: CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS 26 China Rear Admiral Yang Yi Director Institute of

  2. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  3. Orthodontists' perceptions of the impact of phase 1 treatment for Class II malocclusion on phase 2 needs.

    PubMed

    King, G J; Wheeler, T T; McGorray, S P; Aiosa, L S; Bloom, R M; Taylor, M G

    1999-11-01

    The most appropriate timing for the treatment of Class II malocclusions is controversial. Some clinicians advocate starting a first phase in the mixed dentition, followed by a phase 2 in the permanent dentition. Others see no clear advantage to that approach and recommend that the entire treatment be done in the late mixed or early permanent dentition. This study examines how orthodontists, blinded to treatment approach, perceive the impact of phase 1 treatment on phase 2 needs. The sample consisted of 242 Class II subjects, aged 10 to 15, who had completed phase 1 or observation in a randomized clinical trial (RCT). For each subject, video orthodontic records, a questionnaire, a fact sheet, and a cephalometric tracing were sent to five randomly selected reviewing orthodontists blinded to subject group and study purpose. Reviewing orthodontists were asked to assess treatment need, general approach, need for extractions, priority, difficulty, and determinants. Orthodontists agreed highly on treatment need (95%) and moderately on treatment approach (84%) and extraction need (80%). They did not perceive differences in need, approach, or extractions between treated and control groups. Treated subjects were judged as less difficult (p = 0.0001) and to have a lower treatment priority (p = 0.0001) than controls. In ranking problems that affect treatment decisions, the orthodontists ranked dental Class II (p = 0.005) and skeletal relationships (p = 0.004) more highly in control than in treated patients. These data indicate that orthodontists do not perceive phase 1 treatment for Class II as preventing the need for a second phase or as offering any particular advantage with respect to preventing the need for extractions or other skeletal treatments in that second phase. They do view early Class II treatment as an effective means of reducing the difficulty of and priority for phase 2.

  4. Phase I to II cross-induction of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes: A feedforward control mechanism for potential hormetic responses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qiang Pi Jingbo; Woods, Courtney G.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2009-06-15

    Hormetic responses to xenobiotic exposure likely occur as a result of overcompensation by the homeostatic control systems operating in biological organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying overcompensation that leads to hormesis are still unclear. A well-known homeostatic circuit in the cell is the gene induction network comprising phase I, II and III metabolizing enzymes, which are responsible for xenobiotic detoxification, and in many cases, bioactivation. By formulating a differential equation-based computational model, we investigated in this study whether hormesis can arise from the operation of this gene/enzyme network. The model consists of two feedback and one feedforward controls. With the phase I negative feedback control, xenobiotic X activates nuclear receptors to induce cytochrome P450 enzyme, which bioactivates X into a reactive metabolite X'. With the phase II negative feedback control, X' activates transcription factor Nrf2 to induce phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase, etc., which participate in a set of reactions that lead to the metabolism of X' into a less toxic conjugate X''. The feedforward control involves phase I to II cross-induction, in which the parent chemical X can also induce phase II enzymes directly through the nuclear receptor and indirectly through transcriptionally upregulating Nrf2. As a result of the active feedforward control, a steady-state hormetic relationship readily arises between the concentrations of the reactive metabolite X' and the extracellular parent chemical X to which the cell is exposed. The shape of dose-response evolves over time from initially monotonically increasing to J-shaped at the final steady state-a temporal sequence consistent with adaptation-mediated hormesis. The magnitude of the hormetic response is enhanced by increases in the feedforward gain, but attenuated by increases in the bioactivation or phase II feedback loop gains. Our study suggests a

  5. Decreased organ failure in patients with severe SIRS and septic shock treated with the platelet-activating factor antagonist TCV-309: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase II trial. TCV-309 Septic Shock Study Group.

    PubMed

    Poeze, M; Froon, A H; Ramsay, G; Buurman, W A; Greve, J W

    2000-10-01

    Sepsis and organ failure remain the main cause of death on the ICU. Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response, in which platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to play an important role. This study investigated whether treatment with the PAF-antagonist TCV-309 reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with septic shock. The study was conducted as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled multicenter study. The included patients had to fulfill the SIRS criteria with a clinical suspicion of infection, an admission APACHE II score greater than 15, and shock, defined as a mean arterial pressure <70 mmHg and/or a decrease > or =40 mmHg despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Patients received 1.0 mg/kg TCV-309 or placebo, twice daily, intravenously during 14 days. The prospectively set goals were MOF score, recovery from shock, mortality, and assessment of the safety of the medication. A total of 98 patients were included of which 97 were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall survival at day 56 of TCV-309 treated patients was similar compared to placebo treated patients (51.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.47). In contrast, the mean percentage of failed organs per patient present after 14 days in the TCV-309 treated patients was significantly lower compared to the placebo treated patients (11.9% vs. 25.1%, P = 0.04), leading to a reduced need for vasopressors, dialysis, and ventilatory support. Furthermore, the mean APACHE-II score during treatment with TCV-309 was significantly lower and the number of patients recovered from shock after day 14 was significantly higher in the TCV-309 treated patient group (2/32 vs. 9/29, P = 0.01). The number of adverse events was not significantly different between the TCV-309 and placebo treated patients. TCV-309 did not change overall mortality of septic shock, however a substantial reduction in organ dysfunction and morbidity, frequently associated with septic shock was achieved, without significant

  6. SELDI Validation Study Phase II — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    This project –A Comprehensive Program for the Validation of Prostate Cancer Early Detection with Novel Protein Identification Techniques -- is divided into three phases. The goal of Phase I was to assess the reproducibility and portability of Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption and Ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) using protein profiles generated from serum. Phase I was recently successfully completed at six institutions using a single source of pooled sera.

  7. Fire Fighter Trainer Environmental Considerations. Phase II. Appendixes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-31

    background ana is an expert in traceI I I BAH PERSONNEL LOCATIONS DURING TESTS LDQ I Scenario M. Halpern Control room G. McLennan Mobile to exterior of...stack-roof level Case Tech II Outside - LDQ I UDQ II M. Halpern Control room G. McLennan Mobile to exterior of facility where needed S. Armentrout Control...Generation of Aerosols, 1980. 1 79. Work Breakdown Structure for Advanced Fire Fighter Trainer, Work Order AT-784, Advanced TechnologyI Systems

  8. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  9. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

    2013-06-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  10. Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Mazanec, T.J.

    1997-07-01

    This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

  11. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Lutein reduced ROS levels in a PC12D neuronal cell line. • Lutein induced mRNAs of phase II antioxidative enzymes in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein increased protein levels of HO-1, SOD2, and NQO-1 in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein had no effect on intranuclear Nrf2 levels in PC12D neuronal cells. • Lutein did not activate potential upstream Nrf2 nuclear translocation pathways. - Abstract: The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  12. Public Library Information and Referral Project, Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Thomas; Krauser, Cheri

    This study is the second of a two-phase survey of public library information and referral (I&R) service. In this phase, seven public libraries offering I&R services were studied in depth to provide descriptions of their operations, organizational factors, and the reactions of their users. Organizational factors and operations were studied through…

  13. Phase II clinical trials on Investigational drugs for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward J.; Semrad, Thomas J.; Bold, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite some recent advances in treatment options, pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with poor outcomes. In a trend contrary to most malignancies, both incidence and mortality continue to rise due to pancreatic cancer. The majority of patients present with advanced disease and there are no treatment options for this stage that have demonstrated a median survival greater than 1 year. As the penultimate step prior to phase III studies involving hundreds of patients, phase II clinical trials provide an early opportunity to evaluate the efficacy of new treatments that are desperately needed for this disease. Areas Covered This review covers the results of published phase II clinical trials in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma published within the past 5 years. The treatment results are framed in the context of the current standards of care and the historic challenge of predicting phase III success from phase II trial results. Expert opinion Promising therapies remain elusive in pancreatic cancer based on recent phase II clinical trial results. Optimization and standardization of clinical trial design in the phase II setting, with consistent incorporation of biomarkers, is needed to more accurately identify promising therapies that warrant phase III evaluation. PMID:25809274

  14. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  15. Functional design criteria for project W-252, phase II liquid effluent treatment and disposal. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1995-05-01

    This document is the Functional Design Criteria for Project W-252. Project W-252 provides the scope to provide BAT/AKART (best available technology...) to 200 Liquid Effluent Phase II streams (B-Plant). This revision (Rev. 2) incorporates a major descoping of the project. The descoping was done to reflect a combination of budget cutting measures allowed by a less stringent regulatory posture toward the Phase II streams

  16. Robust growth of avirulent phase II Coxiella burnetii in bone marrow-derived murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Diane C.; Long, Carrie M.; Robertson, Shelly J.; Shannon, Jeffrey G.; Miller, Heather E.; Myers, Lara; Larson, Charles L.; Starr, Tregei; Beare, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    Published data show that murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) restrict growth of avirulent phase II, but not virulent phase I, Coxiella burnetii. Growth restriction of phase II bacteria is thought to result from potentiated recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which leads to production of inhibitory effector molecules. Past studies have used conditioned medium from L-929 murine fibroblasts as a source of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) to promote differentiation of bone marrow-derived myeloid precursors into macrophages. However, uncharacterized components of conditioned medium, such as variable amounts of type I interferons, can affect macrophage activation status and their permissiveness for infection. In the current study, we show that the C. burnetii Nine Mile phase II (NMII) strain grows robustly in primary macrophages from C57BL/6J mice when bone marrow cells are differentiated with recombinant murine M-CSF (rmM-CSF). Bacteria were readily internalized by BMDM, and replicated within degradative, LAMP1-positive vacuoles to achieve roughly 3 logs of growth over 6 days. Uninfected BMDM did not appreciably express CD38 or Egr2, markers of classically (M1) and alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, respectively, nor did infection change the lack of polarization. In accordance with an M0 phenotype, infected BMDM produced moderate amounts of TNF and nitric oxide. Similar NMII growth results were obtained using C57BL/6J myeloid progenitors immortalized with an estrogen-regulated Hoxb8 (ER-Hoxb8) oncogene. To demonstrate the utility of the ER-Hoxb8 system, myeloid progenitors from natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1) C57BL/6J knock-in mice were transduced with ER-Hoxb8, and macrophages were derived from immortalized progenitors using rmM-CSF and infected with NMII. No difference in growth was observed when compared to macrophages from wild type mice, indicating depletion of metal ions by the Nramp1

  17. High-Lift Flight Tunnel - Phase II Report. Phase 2 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofftus, David; Lund, Thomas; Rote, Donald; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High-Lift Flight Tunnel (HiLiFT) concept is a revolutionary approach to aerodynamic ground testing. This concept utilizes magnetic levitation and linear motors to propel an aerodynamic model through a tube containing a quiescent test medium. This medium (nitrogen) is cryogenic and pressurized to achieve full flight Reynolds numbers higher than any existing ground test facility world-wide for the range of 0.05 to 0.50 Mach. The results of the Phase II study provide excellent assurance that the HiLiFT concept will provide a valuable low-speed, high Reynolds number ground test facility. The design studies concluded that the HiLiFT facility is feasible to build and operate and the analytical studies revealed no insurmountable difficulties to realizing a practical high Reynolds number ground test facility. It was determined that a national HiLiFT facility, including development, would cost approximately $400M and could be operational by 2013 if fully funded. Study participants included National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center as the Program Manager and MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (MSE) of Butte, Montana as the prime contractor and study integrator. MSE#s subcontractors included the University of Texas at Arlington for aerodynamic analyses and the Argonne National Laboratory for magnetic levitation and linear motor technology support.

  18. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  19. Upgrades for the Project 8 Phase II Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettus, Walter; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Project 8 employs the Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) technique towards the ultimate goal of a high precision tritium endpoint measurement. Following the successful first demonstration of CRES, the collaboration has pursued a number of improvements to the apparatus and has recently commissioned its second phase. A new cell design and gas handling system will allow the first measurement of molecular tritium with this setup. New data acquisition systems have been implemented providing greater trigger flexibility and scalability towards future multi-antenna phases. We will highlight the hardware and instrumentation advances defining this new experimental phase of Project 8.

  20. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  1. A Phase II Study of RO4929097 Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor in Metastatic Melanoma: SWOG 0933

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sylvia M.; Moon, James; Redman, Bruce G.; Chidiac, Tarek; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Zha, Yuanyuan; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant Notch activation confers a proliferative advantage onto many human tumors, including melanoma. This phase II trial assessed the antitumor activity of RO4929097, a gamma-secretase inhibitor of Notch signaling, on the progression-free and overall survival of patients with advanced melanoma. Methods Chemotherapy-naïve patients with metastatic melanoma of cutaneous or unknown origin were treated with RO4929097 at a dose of 20 mg orally daily, 3 consecutive days per week. A two-step accrual design was used, with an interim analysis on the first 32 patients, and continuation of enrollment if ≥4/32 patients responded. Results Thirty-six patients from 23 institutions were enrolled; 32 patients were evaluable. RO4929097 was well-tolerated, and most toxicities were grade 1 or 2. The most common toxicities were nausea (53%), fatigue (41%), and anemia (22%). There was 1 confirmed partial response lasting 7 months, and 8 patients with stable disease lasting at least through week 12, with one of these continuing for 31 months. The 6-month PFS was 9% (95% CI: 2–22%), and 1-year OS was 50% (95% CI: 32–66%). Peripheral blood T cell assays showed no significant inhibition of IL-2 production, a surrogate pharmacodynamic marker of Notch inhibition, suggesting that the drug levels were insufficient to achieve Notch target inhibition. Conclusions RO4929097 showed minimal clinical activity against metastatic melanoma in this phase II trial, possibly due to inadequate exposure to therapeutic drug levels. While Notch inhibition remains a compelling target in melanoma, our results do not support further investigation of RO4929097 at this dose and schedule. PMID:25250858

  2. Signal Processor for Unattended Radar (SPUR) Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Phase I effort and revised early in Phase 11, is described below. The results described in Section 4, Validation Results, are based on the reduced...Risks* Risk Reduction Approach Analog and A/D Processing Function . Automatic Testing and Calibration of Early Conversion to Digital Domain Processor...special importance. This risk has been minimized in the optimum SPUR by converting to the digital domain as early as possible and by specifying calibration

  3. Efficacy and safety of liposomal anthracyclines in phase I/II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Alberts, David S; Muggia, Franco M; Carmichael, James; Winer, Eric P; Jahanzeb, Mohammad; Venook, Alan P; Skubitz, Keith M; Rivera, Edgardo; Sparano, Joseph A; DiBella, Nicholas J; Stewart, Simon J; Kavanagh, John J; Gabizon, Alberto A

    2004-12-01

    Preclinical studies have established the pharmacologic advantages of liposomal anthracyclines, including pharmacokinetic profiles after bolus dosing that resemble continuous infusion of conventional anthracyclines, increased drug concentrations in tumor cells compared with the surrounding tissues, and reduced toxicity relative to conventional anthracycline treatment. Based on these studies, many phase I and phase II clinical trials were conducted to assess the safety and potential activity of liposomal anthracyclines in the management of both solid and hematologic tumors. These studies provided valuable insight into the safety of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx [PLD]), nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin (Myocet [NPLD]), and liposomal daunorubicin (DaunoXome [DNX]) over a range of doses, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other cytotoxic agents. Other liposomal anthracyclines in development may be well tolerated but their activity remains to be elucidated by clinical trials. The available data also suggest that liposomal anthracyclines have activity not only against tumor types with known sensitivity to conventional anthracyclines, but also potentially for tumors that are typically anthracycline-resistant. Despite the availability of clinical data from a wide variety of tumor types and patient populations, further studies of liposomal anthracycline therapy are needed to fully establish their safety, efficacy, and dosing in the treatment of these patients.

  4. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification Stage I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-24

    level below ground: vmA Temp. Addres Fahr . * Teat delivery.: pm _________________________________or -- - r Pump’ _7 Ral= _ Owner’s...esapletLea Or abadomat Of the 11." W= OWEI is oft drlled ole: - Tota2- Ii-e ,1 . p of well: at ag wter lev below O-0 Temp. Fahr . M eat er...Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, UBTL is currently licensed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) to perform

  5. Raman signatures of inversion symmetry breaking and structural phase transition in type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kenan; Bao, Changhua; Gu, Qiangqiang; Ren, Xiao; Zhang, Haoxiong; Deng, Ke; Wu, Yang; Li, Yuan; Feng, Ji; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide MoTe2 is an important candidate for realizing the newly predicted type-II Weyl fermions, for which the breaking of the inversion symmetry is a prerequisite. Here we present direct spectroscopic evidence for the inversion symmetry breaking in the low-temperature phase of MoTe2 by systematic Raman experiments and first-principles calculations. We identify five lattice vibrational modes that are Raman-active only in the low-temperature noncentrosymmetric structure. A hysteresis is also observed in the peak intensity of inversion symmetry-activated Raman modes, confirming a temperature-induced structural phase transition with a concomitant change in the inversion symmetry. Our results provide definitive evidence for the low-temperature noncentrosymmetric Td phase from vibrational spectroscopy, and suggest MoTe2 as an ideal candidate for investigating the temperature-induced topological phase transition. PMID:27934874

  6. Raman signatures of inversion symmetry breaking and structural phase transition in type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kenan; Bao, Changhua; Gu, Qiangqiang; Ren, Xiao; Zhang, Haoxiong; Deng, Ke; Wu, Yang; Li, Yuan; Feng, Ji; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-12-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenide MoTe2 is an important candidate for realizing the newly predicted type-II Weyl fermions, for which the breaking of the inversion symmetry is a prerequisite. Here we present direct spectroscopic evidence for the inversion symmetry breaking in the low-temperature phase of MoTe2 by systematic Raman experiments and first-principles calculations. We identify five lattice vibrational modes that are Raman-active only in the low-temperature noncentrosymmetric structure. A hysteresis is also observed in the peak intensity of inversion symmetry-activated Raman modes, confirming a temperature-induced structural phase transition with a concomitant change in the inversion symmetry. Our results provide definitive evidence for the low-temperature noncentrosymmetric Td phase from vibrational spectroscopy, and suggest MoTe2 as an ideal candidate for investigating the temperature-induced topological phase transition.

  7. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and

  8. THE ORIGIN OF [O II] EMISSION IN RECENTLY QUENCHED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Lemaux, Brian C.; Lubin, Lori M.; Shapley, Alice E.; Gal, Roy R.; Squires, Gordon K.

    2011-08-20

    We have employed emission-line diagnostics derived from DEIMOS and NIRSPEC spectroscopy to determine the origin of the [O II] emission line observed in six active galactic nucleus (AGN) hosts at z {approx} 0.9. These galaxies are a subsample of AGN hosts detected in the Cl1604 supercluster that exhibit strong Balmer absorption lines in their spectra and appear to be in a post-starburst or post-quenched phase, if not for their [O II] emission. Examining the flux ratio of the [N II] to H{alpha} lines, we find that in five of the six hosts the dominant source of ionizing flux is AGN continuum emission. Furthermore, we find that four of the six galaxies have over twice the [O II] line luminosity that could be generated by star formation alone given their H{alpha} line luminosities. This strongly suggests that AGN-excited narrow-line emission is contaminating the [O II] line flux. A comparison of star formation rates calculated from extinction-corrected [O II] and H{alpha} line luminosities indicates that the former yields a five-fold overestimate of the current activity in these galaxies. Our findings reveal the [O II] line to be a poor indicator of star formation activity in a majority of these moderate-luminosity Seyferts. This result bolsters our previous findings that an increased fraction of AGN at high redshifts is hosted by galaxies in a post-starburst phase. The relatively high fraction of AGN hosts in the Cl1604 supercluster that show signs of recently truncated star formation activity may suggest that AGN feedback plays an increasingly important role in suppressing ongoing activity in large-scale structures at high redshift.

  9. Proteomic comparison of phase I and II coxiella burnetii cells reveals potential virulence biomarkers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coxiella burnetii, a category B biological warfare agent, causes several worldwide outbreaks of zoonotic disease each year. In order to identify C. burnetii virulence factors, the virulent phase I and avirulent phase II variants of the Nine Mile RSA strains, were propagated in embryonated hen eggs ...

  10. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  11. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  12. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  13. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  14. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  15. 40 CFR 76.8 - Early election for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.8 Early election for Group 1... plan and: (i) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source at which the unit is located has been... chapter to include the early election plan; or (ii) If a Phase I Acid Rain permit governing the source...

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  17. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  18. Nematogenic Aromatic Block Copolymers of Rigid and Flexible Units. II. Phase Equilibria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-06

    Phase Equilibria 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) -W_ R_ Krinhaum- 7- Shuf~in-. Prpdnn- A (’ifiarri anri r. rnnin 13a 1,TAPOF -EPORT 113b TIME COVERED 14. DATE...and Flexible Units. II. Phase Equilibria by W. R. Krigbaum, Z. Shufan, Jack Preston, A. Ciferri and G. Conio q Prepared for Publication in the

  19. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videbaek, Flemming; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The second phase of the Beam Energy Scan at RHIC will occur in 2019-2020 and will explore with precision measurements in the part of the QCD phase diagram where baryon densities are high. The program will examine energy regime of interest and turn the trends observed in phase-I into conclusions. This will be discussed in context of some of the key measurements, kurtosis of net-protons that could pinpoint the position of a critical point, measurements of directed flow of baryons vs. energy that might prove a softening of the EOS , and chiral restoration in the di-lepton channel. The measurements will be possible with an order of magnitude better statistics thanks to the electron cooling upgrade of RHIC, and the addition of the iTPC, Event Plane, and endcap TOF upgrades to STAR. Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  20. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B. J.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker-Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  1. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01

    The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

  2. Xanthohumol induces phase II enzymes via Nrf2 in human hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether xanthohumol may exert chemoprotective activity through the modulation of the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in immortalized normal THLE-2 hepatocytes and a hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line. Cells were incubated in the presence of xanthohumol and the activation of Nrf2 and expression of genes controlled by this transcription factor were evaluated. Additionally, p53 level was assessed. Xanthohumol increased the expression and led to the activation of Nrf2 in both cell lines. However, in contrast to normal cells the expression of genes controlled by this transcription factor was not affected in HepG2 cells, except for GSTA and GSTP. Xanthohumol, beside the induction of GSTs and HO-1, significantly elevated NQO1 expression in concert with p53 level in normal hepatocytes. The activation of Nrf2 pathway and subsequently phase II enzymes in concert with p53 induction in normal hepatocytes may account for the molecular mechanism of the chemopreventive activity of xanthohumol. On the other hand its cytotoxicity towards HCC cells shown in this study indicates that it may also be considered as potentially chemotherapeutic.

  3. Phase relations between total solar irradiance and the Mg II index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2016-01-01

    The Mg II index is usually used to represent the brightening contribution to total solar irradiance (TSI) by solar bright structures, such as faculae and network. In order to understand variations of TSI, phase relations of TSI and the chromospheric Mg II index is investigated on time-scales of one year and longer. The NOAA daily Mg II index at the time interval of November 17, 1978-October 24, 2007 is utilized to carry out correlation analyses respectively with the daily ACRIM and PMOD composites of TSI. The Mg II index is found to lead TSI by about one solar rotation period for time-scales of one year and longer. Correlation of TSI with the Mg II index on the time-scale of one year is sometimes significantly positive, sometimes statistically insignificant, and sometimes even significantly negative. When sunspot darkening is dominant, the correlation between TSI and Mg II is either negative or not significant. When TSI is backward shifted vs the Mg II index by about one rotation period, correlation between them becomes significantly positive in all years. Thus, it is after about one rotation period that a more prominent intensification is inferred to be contributed to TSI than that immediately, by bright constructions, which is represented by the Mg II index. We propose an explanation for the phase relationship of TSI and the Mg II index.

  4. Evaluation in Adult Literacy Research. Project ALERT. Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntiri, Daphne Williams, Ed.

    This document contains an evaluation handbook for adult literacy programs and feedback from/regarding the evaluation instruments developed during the project titled Adult Literacy and Evaluation Research Team (also known as Project ALERT), a two-phase project initiated by the Detroit Literacy Coalition (DLC) for the purpose of developing and…

  5. Window Treatment Phase I and Other Energy II Conservation Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Philip E.

    Six different energy-saving treatments for large window areas were tested by Tompkins-Cortland Community College (TCCC) to coordinate energy saving with building design. The TCCC building has an open space design with 33,000 square feet of external glass and other features causing heating problems and high energy costs. Phase I of the…

  6. Design of a Rotatable Copper Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; Lari, Luisella; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-02-15

    The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. Design issues include: (1) Collimator jaw deflection and sagitta due to heating must be small when operated in the steady state condition, (2) Collimator jaws must withstand transitory periods of high beam impaction with no permanent damage, (3) Jaws must recover from accident scenario where up to 8 full intensity beam pulses impact on the jaw surface and (4) The beam impedance contribution due to the collimators must be small to minimize coherent beam instabilities.

  7. [Coordination compounds of Pd(II) with potential antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    González Vílchez, F; García Basallote, M; Benítez Ordóñez, J; Vilaplana Serrano, R

    1982-01-01

    The first results about the anti-neoplastic activity of Pd(II) ion coordinative compounds with complexones of the ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid type are described. The assays employing Ehrlich ascites cancer of the mouse show that the presence of substitutes in the ethylenediamine skeleton originates important changes of the activity of such compounds.

  8. The optical flares of active star II Pegasi in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Shenghong; Kim, Kang Min; Lee, Byeong-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    We observed the active star II Peg using high-resolution spectrographs of 2.16m telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC and 1.8m telescope at BOAO of KASI from November to December, 2005. By means of spectral subtraction technique, the chromospheric activities of II Peg are analyzed at several activity indicators, including CaII IRT, Hα, NaI D1D2 and HeI D3 lines. The results demonstrate that the magnetic activity of II Peg is very strong, and its chromospheric activities show rotational modulations which imply there are active regions in its chromosphere. Two flare events were hunted during the observations, which were identified by HeI D3 line emission above the continuum. The first flare was happened in November 2005, the second one in December 2005, and they were located in different hemisphere of the star. This may indicate the evolution of active regions. Considering the photospheric spot activities, the possible origin of the detected flares is discussed.

  9. Workjobs II: Number Activities for Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta-Lorton, Mary

    This curriculum guide presents a program of 20 open-ended math activities to be used to supplement the math programs in kindergarten, first, or second grade classrooms. The program consists of child-oriented counters and gameboards used to explore the concept of number from counting to making up and solving addition and subtraction equations. Each…

  10. A new approach for simultaneous determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) using 2-thiophenaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone as reagent by solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Varinder; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2007-11-05

    A new method is proposed herein for the sorption, separation and simultaneous determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) using 2-thiophenaldehyde-3-thiosemicarbazone (TPTS) as a reagent by solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography-UV detection. The method is based upon the sorption of metal complexes on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber from aqueous solution followed by desorption in the desorption chamber of solid phase microextraction-high performance liquid chromatography (SPME-HPLC) interface. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography using acetonitrile:water (65:35) as an eluent on a C18 column has been used to achieve the separation. The effects of agitation, addition of salts, extraction time and desorption time are examined to obtain optimized conditions. The detection limits for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) are 9, 6, 1 and 7 ng L(-1) based on 3sigma of blank response. The precision is calculated to be less than 3.5% (R.S.D.) for all species. A 10 time enhancement in the signal is observed for SPME when compared with direct analysis. The method is successfully applied to several synthetic mixtures without interference from other common metal ions such as Mo(VI), V(V), Ag(I), Sn(IV), Cd(II), Zn(II), Pb(II), Cr(III) and Cr(VI). The proposed method is tested for the determination of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Pd(II) in alloys and water samples spiked with these metal ions.

  11. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04

    patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  12. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  13. Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert C. Piper, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Flow, Incorporated Portland, Oregon 97201...Phase 11 (24 Mar 95 - 23 Mar 97) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Parasite Lactate Dehydrogenase for Diagnosis of Plasmodium Falciparum DAMD...that infected patients become ill. Four species of Plasmodium infect humans. P. falciparum accounts for -85 % of the world’s malaria. P. falciparum is

  14. Archaeological Investigations in the Upper Tombigbee Valley, Mississippi: Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    previous year. Stripping allowed quick access to a cemented manganese | stratum which effectively sealed the Early Archaic component beneath it. A...I investigators (IV; Bense 1982: Chapter 10, * Figure 10.6), and judged to contain the sealed , intact early Archaic cultural deposits. During the...phase. Feature 4: a historic trash dumping area near what had been the southwest area of the ’old house. Mixed in with plastic, glass , nails, crockery

  15. Phase I/II Study of Temozolomide Plus Nimustine Chemotherapy for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas: Kyoto Neuro-oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Tomokazu; ARAKAWA, Yoshiki; UEBA, Tetsuya; ODA, Masashi; NISHIDA, Namiko; AKIYAMA, Yukinori; TSUKAHARA, Tetsuya; IWASAKI, Koichi; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this phase I/II study was to examine the efficacy and toxicity profile of temozolomide (TMZ) plus nimustine (ACNU). Patients who had received a standard radiotherapy with one or two previous chemo-regimens were enrolled. In phase I, the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) by TMZ (150 mg/m2/day) (Day 1–5) plus various doses of ACNU (30, 35, 40, 45 mg/m2/day) (Day 15) per 4 weeks was defined on a standard 3 + 3 design. In phase II, these therapeutic activity and safety of this regimen were evaluated. Forty-nine eligible patients were enrolled. The median age was 50 years-old. Eighty percent had a KPS of 70–100. Histologies were glioblastoma (73%), anaplastic astrocytoma (22%), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (4%). In phase I, 15 patients were treated at four cohorts by TMZ plus ACNU. MTD was TMZ (150 mg/m2) plus ACNU (40 mg/m2). In phase II, 40 patients were treated at the dose of cohort 3 (MTD). Thirty-five percent of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 toxicities, mainly hematologic. The overall response rate was 11% (4/37). Sixty-eight percent (25/37) had stable disease. Twenty-two percent (8/37) showed progression. Progression-free survival (PFS) rates at 6 and 12 months were 24% (95% CI, 12–35%) and 8% (95% CI, 4–15%). Median PFS was 13 months (95% CI, 9.2–17.2 months). Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 were 78% (95% CI, 67–89%) and 49% (95% CI, 33–57%). Median OS was 11.8 months (95% CI, 8.2–14.5 months). This phase I/II study showed a moderate toxicity in hematology and may has a promising efficacy in OS, without inferiority in PFS. PMID:27725524

  16. Phase-space structures - II. Hierarchical Structure Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, M.; Colombi, S.; Springel, V.; Alard, C.; Bouchet, F. R.

    2009-07-01

    A new multidimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in six-dimensional phase space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in three-dimensional (3D) position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognize other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 per cent of the halo mass is found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 per cent of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and show a small spread in their height distribution; low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams, as expected. However, the projected (3D) density distribution of the structures shows that some of the streams can have comparable density to the bound structures in position space. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Given the resolution limit of the Millennium Simulation, bound structures typically make only up to six orbits inside the main halo. The number of orbits scales approximately linearly with the redshift corresponding to the moment of merging of the structures with the halo. At fixed redshift, the larger the initial mass of the structure which enters the main halo, the faster it loses mass. The difference in

  17. Toward Active X-ray Telescopes II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Aldroft, Thomas L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Button, Timothy W.; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; Davis, William N.; Doel, Peter; Feldman, Charlotte H.; Freeman, Mark D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Lillie, Charles F.; Michette, Alan G.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Reid, Paul B.; Sanmartin, Daniel Rodriguez; Saha, Timo T.; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan E.; Ulmer, Melville P.; Wilke, Rudeger H. T.; Willingale, Richard; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    In the half century since the initial discovery of an astronomical (non-solar) x-ray source, the sensitivity for detection of cosmic x-ray sources has improved by ten orders of magnitude. Largely responsible for this dramatic progress has been the refinement of the (grazing-incidence) focusing x-ray telescope. The future of x-ray astronomy relies upon the development of x-ray telescopes with larger aperture areas (greater than 1 m2) and finer angular resolution (less than 1.). Combined with the special requirements of grazing-incidence optics, the mass and envelope constraints of space-borne telescopes render such advances technologically challenging.requiring precision fabrication, alignment, and assembly of large areas (greater than 100 m2) of lightweight (approximately 1 kg m2 areal density) mirrors. Achieving precise and stable alignment and figure control may entail active (in-space adjustable) x-ray optics. This paper discusses relevant programmatic and technological issues and summarizes progress toward active x-ray telescopes.

  18. SBAR Panel: NPDES Comprehensive Storm Water Phase II Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SBAR panel on proposed regulations to address currently unregulated discharges of storm water and provide regulatory relief to industrial facilities where industrial materials and activities are not exposed to storm water

  19. A Combined MG II/CA II Survey of Stellar Magnetic Activity in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicklund, B. M.; Donahue, R. A.; Dobson, A. K.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    We use nearly contemporaneus low-resolution IUE observations of Mg II h + k emission and Mount Wilson Observatory Ca II H + K S indices for 33 pairs of observations of lower main sequence stars to formulate a relationship that will permit accurate predictions of S values as a function of (B - V) color and Mg II h + k flux. The resulting relationship is useful because it will extend the set of solar neighborhood stars for which a uniform estimate of chromospheric activity is available to include stars that are not observable from Mount Wilson as well as providing additional estimates of activity levels for stars that are on the Mount Wilson HK Project observing list.

  20. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  1. Optical spectroscopic and reverse-phase HPLC analyses of Hg(II) binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, R K; Miclat, J; Kodati, V R; Abdullah, R; Hunter, T C; Mulchandani, P

    1996-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and reverse-phase HPLC were used to investigate the binding of Hg(II) to plant metal-binding peptides (phytochelatins) with the structure (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly, (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly. Glutathione-mediated transfer of Hg(II) into phytochelatins and the transfer of the metal ion from one phytochelatin to another was also studied using reverse-phase HPLC. The saturation of Hg(II)-induced bands in the UV/visible and CD spectra of (gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly suggested the formation of a single Hg(II)-binding species of this peptide with a stoichiometry of one metal ion per peptide molecule. The separation of apo-(gammaGlu-Cys)2Gly from its Hg(II) derivative on a C18 reverse-phase column also indicated the same metal-binding stoichiometry. The UV/visible spectra of both (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly and (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly at pH 7.4 showed distinct shoulders in the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer region at 280-290 mm. Two distinct Hg(II)-binding species, occurring at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.0 Hg(II) ions per peptide molecule, were observed for (gammaGlu-Cys)3Gly. These species exhibited specific spectral features in the charge-transfer region and were separable by HPLC. Similarly, two main Hg(II)-binding species of (gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly were observed by UV/visible and CD spectroscopy at metal-binding stoichiometries of around 1.25 and 2.5 respectively. Only a single peak of Hg(II)-(gammaGlu-Cys)4Gly complexes was resolved under the conditions used for HPLC. The overall Hg(II)-binding stoichiometries of phytochelatins were similar at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.4, indicating that pH did not influence the final Hg(II)-binding capacity of these peptides. The reverse-phase HPLC assays indicated a rapid transfer of Hg(II) from glutathione to phytochelatins. These assays also demonstrated a facile transfer of the metal ion from shorter- to longer-chain phytochelatins. The strength of Hg(II) binding to glutathione and phytochelatins followed the

  2. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Thamires A.; Paschoal, Vitor H.; Faria, Luiz F. O.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  3. Comparing two tetraalkylammonium ionic liquids. II. Phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thamires A; Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Costa, Fanny N; Giles, Carlos

    2016-06-14

    Phase transitions of the ionic liquids n-butyl-trimethylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1114][NTf2], and methyl-tributylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [N1444][NTf2], were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and Raman spectroscopy. XRD and Raman spectra were obtained as a function of temperature at atmospheric pressure, and also under high pressure at room temperature using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). [N1444][NTf2] experiences glass transition at low temperature, whereas [N1114][NTf2] crystallizes or not depending on the cooling rate. Both the ionic liquids exhibit glass transition under high pressure. XRD and low-frequency Raman spectra provide a consistent physical picture of structural ordering-disordering accompanying the thermal events of crystallization, glass transition, cold crystallization, pre-melting, and melting. Raman spectra in the high-frequency range of some specific cation and anion normal modes reveal conformational changes of the molecular structures along phase transitions.

  4. Cysteine racemization during the Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis of the Nav1.7-selective peptide--protoxin II.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Carlin, Kevin P; Wu, Gang; Ilyin, Victor I; Kyle, Donald J

    2012-07-01

    Protoxin II is biologically active peptide containing the inhibitory cystine knot motif. A synthetic version of the toxin was generated with standard Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. If N-methylmorpholine was used as a base during synthesis of the linear protoxin II, it was found that a significant amount of racemization (approximately 50%) was observed during the process of cysteine residue coupling. This racemization could be suppressed by substituting N-methylmorpholine with 2,4,6-collidine. The crude linear toxin was then air oxidized and purified. Electrophysiological assessment of the synthesized protoxin II confirmed its previously described interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels. Eight other naturally occurring inhibitory knot peptides were also synthesized using this same methodology. The inhibitory potencies of these synthesized toxins on Nav1.7 and Nav1.2 channels are summarized.

  5. New hits as phase II enzymes inducers from a focused library with heteroatom-heteroatom and Michael-acceptor motives.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Mauricio; de Ovalle, Stefani; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Nascimento, Fabiana; Corbelini, Patrícia; Janarelli, Fernanda; Kawano, Daniel; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2015-11-01

    The increased activity of phase-II-detoxification enzymes, such as quinone reductase (QR) and glutation S-transferase (GST), correlates with protection against chemically induced carcinogenesis. Herein we studied 11 different chemotypes, pyrazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, 1,2,5-oxadiazole, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 1,2,4-thiazole, 1,3,4-oxathiazole, thienyl hydrazone, α,β-unsaturated-oxime, α,β-unsaturated-N-oxide, coumarin and α,β-unsaturated-carbonyl, as phase-II enzymes inducers in order to identify new pharmacophores with chemopreventive activity. Fifty-four compounds were analyzed on wild-type mouse-hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 and on the aryl-hydrocarbon-nuclear-translocator (Arnt)-defective mutant BpRc1 cells. New monofunctional inducers of QR and GST were identified, the 1,2,5-oxadiazol-2-oxide (3), the 1,2,4-triazine-4-oxides (23) and (32) and the tetrahydropyrimidinones (28) and (49). It was confirmed that Nrf2 nuclear translocation is the operative molecular mechanism that allows compound (3) to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes.

  6. New hits as phase II enzymes inducers from a focused library with heteroatom–heteroatom and Michael-acceptor motives

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Mauricio; de Ovalle, Stefani; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Nascimento, Fabiana; Corbelini, Patrícia; Janarelli, Fernanda; Kawano, Daniel; Eifler-Lima, Vera Lucia; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The increased activity of phase-II-detoxification enzymes, such as quinone reductase (QR) and glutation S-transferase (GST), correlates with protection against chemically induced carcinogenesis. Herein we studied 11 different chemotypes, pyrazole, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, 1,2,5-oxadiazole, 1,2,3-thiadiazole, 1,2,4-thiazole, 1,3,4-oxathiazole, thienyl hydrazone, α,β-unsaturated-oxime, α,β-unsaturated-N-oxide, coumarin and α,β-unsaturated-carbonyl, as phase-II enzymes inducers in order to identify new pharmacophores with chemopreventive activity. Fifty-four compounds were analyzed on wild-type mouse-hepatoma Hepa-1c1c7 and on the aryl-hydrocarbon-nuclear-translocator (Arnt)-defective mutant BpRc1 cells. New monofunctional inducers of QR and GST were identified, the 1,2,5-oxadiazol-2-oxide (3), the 1,2,4-triazine-4-oxides (23) and (32) and the tetrahydropyrimidinones (28) and (49). It was confirmed that Nrf2 nuclear translocation is the operative molecular mechanism that allows compound (3) to exert protective effects via expression of downstream phase-II enzymes. PMID:28031894

  7. Auto-inhibitory regulation of angiotensin II functionality in hamster aorta during the early phases of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscila Cristina; Pernomian, Larissa; Côco, Hariane; Gomes, Mayara Santos; Franco, João José; Marchi, Kátia Colombo; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; Uyemura, Sergio Akira; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato; de Oliveira, Ana Maria

    2016-06-15

    Emerging data point the crosstalk between dyslipidemia and renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Advanced dyslipidemia is described to induce RAS activation in the vasculature. However, the interplay between early dyslipidemia and the RAS remains unexplored. Knowing that hamsters and humans have a similar lipid profile, we investigated the effects of early and advanced dyslipidemia on angiotensin II-induced contraction. Cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II (1.0pmol/l to 1.0µmol/l) were obtained in the hamster thoracic aorta. We also investigated the modulatory action of NAD(P)H oxidase on angiotensin II-induced contraction using ML171 (Nox-1 inhibitor, 0.5µmol/l) and VAS2870 (Nox-4 inhibitor, 5µmol/l). Early dyslipidemia was detected in hamsters treated with a cholesterol-rich diet for 15 days. Early dyslipidemia decreased the contraction induced by angiotensin II and the concentration of Nox-4-derived hydrogen peroxide. Advanced dyslipidemia, observed in hamsters treated with cholesterol-rich diet for 30 days, restored the contractile response induced by angiotensin II by compensatory mechanism that involves Nox-4-mediated oxidative stress. The hyporresponsiveness to angiotensin II may be an auto-inhibitory regulation of the angiotensinergic function during early dyslipidemia in an attempt to reduce the effects of the upregulation of the vascular RAS during the advanced stages of atherogenesis. The recovery of vascular angiotensin II functionality during the advanced phases of dyslipidemia is the result of the upregulation of redox-pro-inflammatory pathway that might be most likely involved in atherogenesis progression rather than in the recovery of vascular function. Taken together, our findings show the early phase of dyslipidemia may be the most favorable moment for effective atheroprotective therapeutic interventions.

  8. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Macleod, A.; Shaw, R. D.; Brothers, M. L.; Cantrall, C.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency T_{sys}/η of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  9. Hope-X high speed flight demonstration program phase II - a CNES/NAL/NASDA cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venel, S.; Faucon, P.; Yanagihara, M.; Miyazawa, Y.; Akimoto, T.; Sagisaka, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the frame of its cooperation with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), the CNES French Space Agency takes part in the High Speed Flight Demonstration (HSFD) Phase II. The HSFD program is planned as part of the National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) and NASDA joint research for the H-II Orbiting Plane Experiment (HOPE-X), an unmanned re-entry vehicle project. The program consists of two phases, and the purpose of HSFD Phase II is to estimate the HOPE-X transonic aerodynamic characteristics: a sub-scaled vehicle will be lifted to high altitude by a stratospheric balloon, from where it will be released and will accelerate into free fall to transonic region. The CNES Balloon Division is responsible for the balloon system, the launch operation, and the recovery of the vehicle after touch down. Six flights are planned between May and August 2003.

  10. Program Activity/Training Plans. STIP II (Skill Training Improvement Programs Round II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Community Coll. District, CA.

    Detailed operational guidelines, training objectives, and learning activities are provided for the Los Angeles Community College District's Skill Training Improvement Programs (STIP II), which are designed to train students for immediate employment. The first of four reports covers Los Angeles Southwest College's computer programming trainee…

  11. Project 8 Phase II: Improved beta decay electrons reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guigue, Mathieu; Project 8 Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Project 8 collaboration aims to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale using a cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy technique on the beta decays of tritium. The second phase of the project will measure a differential spectrum of tritium beta decays and extract the tritium endpoint value with an eV or sub-eV scale precision. Monoenergetic electrons emitted by gaseous 83mKr atoms can be used to determine the coefficient between the cyclotron frequency and the electron energy and to optimize the instrument configuration for the tritium measurement. We present the progress on the processing of the electron cyclotron radiation signal to reconstruct the beta decay spectrum of krypton and tritium.

  12. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg; Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian; Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David; Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan; Marble, Justin

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  13. Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-26

    AD-A124 929 PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND TRANSITION IN MIXTURES OF A In- NOMOPOLYMER AND’A BLOCK..(U) CINCINNATI UNJY ON DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND...REPORT NO. 7 v2 L Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer II. The Phase Diagram by R. J. Roe and W. C. Zin...homopolymers as in our systems. The phase equilibria at temperatures above the "pseudo-triple point" BCD can be interpreted in terms of the free energy of

  14. An investigation of long-distance propagation of gravity waves under CAWSES India Phase II Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parihar, N.; Taori, A.

    2015-05-01

    Coordinated measurements of airglow features from the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region were performed at Allahabad (25.5° N, 81.9° E) and Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), India to study the propagation of gravity waves in 13-27° N latitude range during the period June 2009 to May 2010 under CAWSES (Climate And Weather of Sun Earth System) India Phase II Programme. At Allahabad, imaging observations of OH broadband emissions and OI 557.7 nm emission were made using an all-sky imager, while at Gadanki photometric measurements of OH (6, 2) Meinel band and O2 (0, 1) Atmospheric band emissions were carried out. On many occasions, the nightly observations reveal the presence of similar waves at both locations. Typically, the period of observed similar waves lay in the 2.2-4.5 h range, had large phase speeds (~ 77-331 m s-1) and large wavelengths (~ 1194-2746 km). The images of outgoing long-wave radiation activity of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the high-resolution infrared images of KALPANA-1 satellite suggest that such waves possibly originated from some nearby convective sources. An analysis of their propagation characteristics in conjunction with SABER/TIMED temperature profiles and Horizontal Wind Model (HWM 2007) wind estimates suggest that the waves propagated over long distances (~ 1200-2000 km) in atmospheric ducts.

  15. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Maneschg, Werner; Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ∼15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  16. Optimal adaptive two-stage designs for early phase II clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guogen; Wilding, Gregory E; Hutson, Alan D; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2016-04-15

    Simon's optimal two-stage design has been widely used in early phase clinical trials for Oncology and AIDS studies with binary endpoints. With this approach, the second-stage sample size is fixed when the trial passes the first stage with sufficient activity. Adaptive designs, such as those due to Banerjee and Tsiatis (2006) and Englert and Kieser (2013), are flexible in the sense that the second-stage sample size depends on the response from the first stage, and these designs are often seen to reduce the expected sample size under the null hypothesis as compared with Simon's approach. An unappealing trait of the existing designs is that they are not associated with a second-stage sample size, which is a non-increasing function of the first-stage response rate. In this paper, an efficient intelligent process, the branch-and-bound algorithm, is used in extensively searching for the optimal adaptive design with the smallest expected sample size under the null, while the type I and II error rates are maintained and the aforementioned monotonicity characteristic is respected. The proposed optimal design is observed to have smaller expected sample sizes compared to Simon's optimal design, and the maximum total sample size of the proposed adaptive design is very close to that from Simon's method. The proposed optimal adaptive two-stage design is recommended for use in practice to improve the flexibility and efficiency of early phase therapeutic development.

  17. Phase II randomised discontinuation trial of the MET/VEGF receptor inhibitor cabozantinib in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Daud, Adil; Kluger, Harriet M; Kurzrock, Razelle; Schimmoller, Frauke; Weitzman, Aaron L; Samuel, Thomas A; Moussa, Ali H; Gordon, Michael S; Shapiro, Geoffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Background: A phase II randomised discontinuation trial assessed cabozantinib (XL184), an orally bioavailable inhibitor of tyrosine kinases including VEGF receptors, MET, and AXL, in a cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods: Patients received cabozantinib 100 mg daily during a 12-week lead-in. Patients with stable disease (SD) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) at week 12 were randomised to cabozantinib or placebo. Primary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR) at week 12 and postrandomisation progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Seventy-seven patients were enroled (62% cutaneous, 30% uveal, and 8% mucosal). At week 12, the ORR was 5% 39% of patients had SD. During the lead-in phase, reduction in target lesions from baseline was seen in 55% of evaluable patients overall and in 59% of evaluable patients with uveal melanoma. Median PFS after randomisation was 4.1 months with cabozantinib and 2.8 months with placebo (hazard ratio of 0.59; P=0.284). Median PFS from study day 1 was 3.8 months, 6-month PFS was 33%, and median overall survival was 9.4 months. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events were fatigue (14%), hypertension (10%), and abdominal pain (8%). One treatment-related death was reported from peritonitis due to diverticular perforation. Conclusions: Cabozantinib has clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma, including uveal melanoma. Further clinical investigation is warranted. PMID:28103611

  18. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneschg, Werner; Gerda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ˜15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  19. Developmental Effects of the ToxCast™ Phase I and Phase II Chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and Corresponding Responses in Zebrafish, Rats, and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Windy A.; Smith, Marjolein V.; Co, Caroll A.; Pirone, Jason R.; Rice, Julie R.; Shockley, Keith R.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modern toxicology is shifting from an observational to a mechanistic science. As part of this shift, high-throughput toxicity assays are being developed using alternative, nonmammalian species to prioritize chemicals and develop prediction models of human toxicity. Methods: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) was used to screen the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ToxCast™ Phase I and Phase II libraries, which contain 292 and 676 chemicals, respectively, for chemicals leading to decreased larval development and growth. Chemical toxicity was evaluated using three parameters: a biologically defined effect size threshold, half-maximal activity concentration (AC50), and lowest effective concentration (LEC). Results: Across both the Phase I and Phase II libraries, 62% of the chemicals were classified as active ≤ 200 μM in the C. elegans assay. Chemical activities and potencies in C. elegans were compared with those from two zebrafish embryonic development toxicity studies and developmental toxicity data for rats and rabbits. Concordance of chemical activity was higher between C. elegans and one zebrafish assay across Phase I chemicals (79%) than with a second zebrafish assay (59%). Using C. elegans or zebrafish to predict rat or rabbit developmental toxicity resulted in balanced accuracies (the average value of the sensitivity and specificity for an assay) ranging from 45% to 53%, slightly lower than the concordance between rat and rabbit (58%). Conclusions: Here, we present an assay that quantitatively and reliably describes the effects of chemical toxicants on C. elegans growth and development. We found significant overlap in the activity of chemicals in the ToxCast™ libraries between C. elegans and zebrafish developmental screens. Incorporating C. elegans toxicological assays as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo assays provides additional information for the development of models to predict a chemical

  20. LYSIS OF T4 PHAGE BY THE SPECIFIC LIPOCARBOHYDRATE OF PHASE II SHIGELLA SONNEI

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, Margeris A.; Goebel, Walther F.

    1955-01-01

    When the specific lipocarbohydrate of Phase II Sh. sonnei and T4 phage react in vitro, the virus is rapidly inactivated and the content of the viral membrane is released into the surrounding medium. The reaction between phage and lipocarbohydrate proceeds only in the presence of a lipide constituent which can be extracted from the polysaccharide, rendering the latter inactive, and which can be replaced by certain fatty acids. It has been suggested that the lipocarbohydrate is the receptor substance of the Phase II bacillus which specifically combines with and brings about disintegration of the virus when the latter infects the host cell. PMID:13271686

  1. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Tracy A; Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  2. Reversible Boolean networks. II. Phase transitions, oscillations, and local structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppersmith, S. N.; Kadanoff, Leo P.; Zhang, Zhitong

    2001-09-01

    We continue our consideration of a class of models describing the reversible dynamics of N Boolean variables, each with K inputs. We investigate in detail the behavior of the Hamming distance as well as of the distribution of orbit lengths as N and K are varied. We present numerical evidence for a phase transition in the behavior of the Hamming distance at a critical value Kc≈1.62 and also an analytic theory that yields the exact bounds 1.5< Kc<2. We also discuss the large oscillations that we observe in the Hamming distance for K< Kc as a function of time as well as in the distribution of cycle lengths as a function of cycle length for moderate K both greater than and less than Kc. We propose that local structures, or subsets of spins whose dynamics are not fully coupled to the other spins in the system, play a crucial role in generating these oscillations. The simplest of these structures are linear chains, called linkages, and rings, called circuits. We discuss the properties of the linkages in some detail, and sketch the properties of circuits. We argue that the observed oscillation phenomena can be largely understood in terms of these local structures.

  3. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  4. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  5. A Phase II Study of Sorafenib in Advanced Uterine Carcinoma / Carcinosarcoma: A Trial of the Chicago, PMH, and California Phase II Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Nimeiri, Halla S.; Oza, Amit M.; Morgan, Robert J.; Huo, Dezheng; Elit, Laurie; Knost, James A.; Wade, James L.; Agamah, Edem; Vokes, Everett E.; Fleming, Gini F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of single agent sorafenib, an oral multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced uterine carcinoma and carcinosarcoma. Methods This multi-institutional non-randomized phase II trial enrolled two cohorts: patients with uterine carcinoma (cohort A) and uterine carcinosarcoma (cohort B). Eligibility criteria included measurable disease, 0–1 prior chemotherapy regimens, and ECOG performance status ≤ 2. Sorafenib at a dose of 400 mg was administered orally twice daily. A cycle was defined as 28 days. Objective tumor response was the primary endpoint and was assessed following every two cycles. Results Fifty–six patients (40 with carcinoma, 16 with carcinosarcoma) were enrolled between March 2005 and August 2007. Two (5%) patients with uterine carcinoma had a partial response (PR) and 17 (42.5%) achieved stable disease (SD). Five had SD lasting at least 4 months. The 6-month progression free survival rate for patients with carcinoma was 29%, and the median overall survival was 11.4 months. No patients with carcinosarcoma had an objective response. Four (25%) had SD, and one had SD lasting 18 months. The 6-month progression free survival rate was 13%, and the median overall survival was 5.0 months. Grade 3/4 drug related toxicities included: hypertension (13%), hand-foot syndrome (13%), hypophosphatemia (7%), anemia (5%), rash (5%), diarrhea (5%), thrombosis (5%), fatigue (5%) and bleeding (5%). Conclusion Sorafenib had minimal activity in patients with uterine carcinoma. Predictive factors for potential benefit are needed. PMID:20117828

  6. Design of Training Systems, Phase I Final Report Appendices, Volume II of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Harold J.; And Others

    A series of five appendixes presents details related to Phase I of the three-stage project "Design of Training Systems" (DOTS). The first appendix discusses strategic assumptions and processes, while the second reviews mathematical models and data bases operational within the navel education and training command. The third appendix…

  7. Reduced DNA topoisomerase II activity in ataxia-telangiectasia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S P; Mohamed, R; Salmond, C; Lavin, M F

    1988-01-01

    Considerable evidence supports a defect at the level of chromatin structure or recognition of that structure in cells from patients with the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. Accordingly, we have investigated the activities of enzymes that alter the topology of DNA in Epstein Barr Virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from patients with this syndrome. Reduced activity of DNA topoisomerase II, determined by unknotting of P4 phage DNA, was observed in partially purified extracts from 5 ataxia-telangiectasia cell lines. The levels of enzyme activity was reduced substantially in 4 of these cell lines and to a lesser extent in the other cell line compared to controls. DNA topoisomerase I, assayed by relaxation of supercoiled DNA, was found to be present at comparable levels in both cell types. Reduced activity of topoisomerase II in ataxia-telangiectasia is compatible with the molecular, cellular and clinical changes described in this syndrome. Images PMID:2836804

  8. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  9. Intrapleural administration of interleukin 2 in pleural mesothelioma: a phase I-II study.

    PubMed Central

    Goey, S. H.; Eggermont, A. M.; Punt, C. J.; Slingerland, R.; Gratama, J. W.; Oosterom, R.; Oskam, R.; Bolhuis, R. L.; Stoter, G.

    1995-01-01

    mesothelioma. A formal phase II study is warranted. Based on the observed toxicity, the lack of dose-response relationship and the immunomodulatory effects seen at relatively low-dose IL-2, the recommended dose for a phase II study is 3 x 10(6) IU day-1 using the present treatment schedule. Images Figure 1 PMID:7577483

  10. Anti-IP-10 antibody (BMS-936557) for ulcerative colitis: a phase II randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Lloyd; Sandborn, William J; Stepanov, Yuriy; Geboes, Karel; Hardi, Robert; Yellin, Michael; Tao, Xiaolu; Xu, Li An; Salter-Cid, Luisa; Gujrathi, Sheila; Aranda, Richard; Luo, Allison Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10 or CXCL10) plays a role in inflammatory cell migration and epithelial cell survival and migration. It is expressed in higher levels in the colonic tissue and plasma of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). This phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of BMS-936557, a fully human, monoclonal antibody to IP-10, in the treatment of moderately-to-severely active UC. Design In this 8-week, phase II, double-blind, multicentre, randomised study, patients with active UC received placebo or BMS-936557 (10 mg/kg) intravenously every other week. The primary endpoint was the rate of clinical response at Day 57; clinical remission and mucosal healing rates were secondary endpoints. Post hoc analyses evaluated the drug exposure–response relationship and histological improvement. Results 109 patients were included (BMS-936557: n=55; placebo: n=54). Prespecified primary and secondary endpoints were not met; clinical response rate at Day 57 was 52.7% versus 35.2% for BMS-936557 versus placebo (p=0.083), and clinical remission and mucosal healing rates were 18.2% versus 16.7% (p=1.00) and 41.8% versus 35.2% (p=0.556), respectively. However, higher BMS-936557 steady-state trough concentration (Cminss) was associated with increased clinical response (87.5% vs 37.0% (p<0.001) for patients with Cminss 108–235 μg/ml vs placebo) and histological improvements (73.0% vs 41.0%; p=0.004). Infections occurred in 7 (12.7%) BMS-936557-treated patients and 3 (5.8%) placebo-treated patients. 2 (3.6%) BMS-936557 patients discontinued due to adverse events. Conclusions Anti-IP-10 antibody, BMS-936557, is a potentially effective therapy for moderately-to-severely active UC. Higher drug exposure correlated with increasing clinical response and histological improvement. Further dose–response studies are warranted. Clinical Trial Registration Number: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00656890. PMID:23461895

  11. Soil Strain Measurements on Misers Bluff. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-30

    tests. The first test, a 109 metric ton ANFO explosion, indicated that the tubular, telescoping strain gage with large end plates and a DC LVDT sensing...element should be adequate to measure strains on the second test which was the deto- nation of six 109 metric ton ANFO charges on the corners of a 100...to Make a Pattern for the Active Spool Gage 13 5 Spool Gage after Partial Excavation Following Test 1 14 6 109 Metric Ton ANFO Stack for Test 1 15 7

  12. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Abstracts of Phase II Awards. 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    TiXAl WITH NIOBIUM (Nb) AND ERBIUM (Er) DIPERSOIDS, WERE SUCCESSFULLY PRODUCED IN A PHASE I SBIR PROGRAM USING THE AlTi-OXY PROCESS. PHASE II WORK WILL... SILICIDES : NEW SILICON COMPATIBLE ELECTRO-OPTIC MATERIALS TOPIC: 3 OFFICE: DARPA THE GOAL OF THIS WORK IS TO OBTAIN SINGLE CRYSTAL FILMS OF SEMI...ST - STE 305 MORRISTOWN, NJ 07960 DR MURRAY S COHEN TITLE: USE OF EXPANDING MONOMER COMPOSITIONS FOR AIRCRAFT - TRANSPARENCY COATINGS • TOPIC: 45

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and anti-cancer activity of emodin-Mn(II) metal complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Tan, Jun; Wang, Bo-Chu; Zhu, Lian-Cai

    2014-12-01

    To synthesize and characterize a novel metal complex of Mn (II) with emodin, and evaluate its anti-cancer activity. The elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, TG-DSC, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR data were used to characterize the structure of the complex. The cytotoxicity of the complex against the human cancer cell lines HepG2, HeLa, MCF-7, B16, and MDA-MB-231 was tested by the MTT assay and flow cytometry. Emodin was coordinated with Mn(II) through the 9-C=O and 1-OH, and the general formula of the complex was Mn(II) (emodin)2·2H2O. In studies of the cytotoxicity, the complex exhibited significant activity, and the IC50 values of the complex against five cancer cell lines improved approximately three-fold compared with those of emodin. The complex could induce cell morphological changes, decrease the percentage of viability, and induce G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in cancer cells. The coordination of emodin with Mn(II) can improve its anticancer activity, and the complex Mn(II) (emodin)2·2H2O could be studied further as a promising anticancer drug.

  14. Active limited-angle tomographic phase microscope.

    PubMed

    Kus, Arkadiusz; Krauze, Wojciech; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an active, holographic tomography system, working with limited angle of projections, realized by optical-only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach–Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with a high numerical aperture illumination module and a spatial light modulator (SLM). Such a solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different illumination scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied here to reconstruct nonpiecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and the proposed processing path is tested for a calibrated three-dimensional micro-object as well as a biological object--C2C12 myoblast cell.

  15. Active limited-angle tomographic phase microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuś, Arkadiusz; Krauze, Wojciech; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate an active, holographic tomography system, working with limited angle of projections, realized by optical-only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with a high numerical aperture illumination module and a spatial light modulator (SLM). Such a solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different illumination scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied here to reconstruct nonpiecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and the proposed processing path is tested for a calibrated three-dimensional micro-object as well as a biological object-C2C12 myoblast cell.

  16. Advanced Direct Liquefaction Concepts for PETC Generic Units - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91040 are reported for the period July 1, 1997 to September 30, 1997. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, CONSOL, Inc., LDP Associates, and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. This work involves the introduction into the basic two stage liquefaction process several novel concepts which include dispersed lower-cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. Results are reported from experiments in which various methods were tested to activate dispersed Mo precursors. Several oxothiomolybdates precursors having S/Mo ratios from two to six were prepared. Another having a S/Mo ratio of eleven was also prepared that contained an excess of sulfur. In the catalyst screening test, none of these precursors exhibited an activity enhancement that might suggest that adding sulfur into the structure of the Mo precursors would be beneficial to the process. In another series of experiments, AHM impregnated coal slurried in the reaction mixture was pretreated withH S/H under pressure and successively heated for 30 min at 120, 250 2 2 and 360 C. THF conversions in the catalyst screening test were not affected while resid conversions o increased such that pretreated coals impregnated with 100 ppm Mo gave conversions equivalent to untreated coals impregnated with 300 ppm fresh Mo. Cobalt, nickel and potassium phosphomolybdates were prepared and tested as bimetallic precursors. The thermal stability of these compounds was evaluated in TG/MS to determine whether the presence of the added metal would stabilize the Keggin structure at reaction temperature. Coals impregnated with these salts showed the Ni and Co salts gave the same THF conversion as PMA while the Ni salt gave higher

  17. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  18. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  19. Weekly pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and paclitaxel in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma: A phase II study

    PubMed Central

    LEONARDI, VITA; PALMISANO, VALENTINA; PEPE, ALESSIO; USSET, ANTONELLA; MANUGUERRA, GIOVANNA; SAVIO, GIUSEPPINA; DE BELLA, MANUELA TAMBURO; LAUDANI, AGATA; ALÙ, MASSIMO; CUSIMANO, MARIA PIA; SCIANNA, CATERINA; GIRESI, ARMANDO; AGOSTARA, BIAGIO

    2010-01-01

    Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) has the advantage of delivering active anthracycline directly to the tumor site, while exposing the patient to a lesser degree of doxorubicin-associated toxicities. Recently, a regimen in which paclitaxel is infused weekly over 1 h produced substantial antitumor activity with little myelosuppression. We designed a phase II trial to study the efficacy and toxicity of 10 mg/m2 PLD on Days 1, 8 and 15, plus 70 mg/m2 paclitaxel weekly in patients with untreated metastatic breast cancer and a high risk of cardiotoxicity. The study included 35 patients, with 31 (88.5%) evaluable for efficacy and 35 (100%) for toxicity. A total of 28 patients (80%) had two or more sites of disease. Overall, 4 complete and 16 partial responses were noted with an overall response rate of 64.5%, with 6 cases of stable and 5 cases of progressive disease. Toxicity was found to be manageable in that the only grade 3–4 side effects recorded were palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, 8.5%; mucositis, 2.8%; leucopenia, 12.5%; anemia, 2.8% and AST/ALT, 2.8%. No cardiotoxicity was observed. In conclusion, weekly PLD plus paclitaxel appears to be a well-tolerated and effective approach for metastatic breast cancer patients with a high risk of cardiotoxicity. PMID:22966374

  20. Phase-II conjugation ability for PAH metabolism in amphibians: characteristics and inter-species differences.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines amphibian metabolic activity - particularly conjugation - by analysis of pyrene (a four ring, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FD), a mass spectrometry detector (MS) system and kinetic analysis of conjugation enzymes. Six amphibian species were exposed to pyrene (dissolved in water): African claw frog (Xenopus laevis); Tago's brown frog (Rana tagoi); Montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris); Wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa); Japanese newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster); and Clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus); plus one fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes); and a fresh water snail (Clithon retropictus), and the resultant metabolites were collected. Identification of pyrene metabolites by HPLC and ion-trap MS system indicated that medaka mainly excreted pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG), while pyrene-1-sulfate (PYOS) was the main metabolite in all amphibian species. Pyrene metabolites in amphibians were different from those in invertebrate fresh water snails. Inter-species differences were also observed in pyrene metabolism among amphibians. Metabolite analysis showed that frogs relied more strongly on sulfate conjugation than did Japanese newts and clouded salamanders. Furthermore, urodelan amphibians, newts and salamanders, excreted glucose conjugates of pyrene that were not detected in the anuran amphibians. Kinetic analysis of conjugation by hepatic microsomes and cytosols indicated that differences in excreted metabolites reflected differences in enzymatic activities. Furthermore, pyrenediol (PYDOH) glucoside sulfate was detected in the Japanese newt sample. This novel metabolite has not been reported previously to this report, in which we have identified unique characteristics of amphibians in phase II pyrene metabolism.

  1. The Potential Economic Impact of Electricity Restructuring in the State of Oklahoma: Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2001-10-30

    Because of the recent experiences of several states undergoing restructuring (e.g., higher prices, greater volatility, lower reliability), concerns have been raised in states currently considering restructuring as to whether their systems are equally vulnerable. Factors such as local generation costs, transmission constraints, market concentration, and market design can all play a role in the success or failure of the market. These factors along with the mix of generation capacity supplying the state will influence the relative prices paid by consumers. The purpose of this project is to provide a model and process to evaluate the potential price and economic impacts of restructuring the Oklahoma electric industry. The Phase I report concentrated on providing an analysis of the Oklahoma system in the near-term, using only present generation resources and customer demands. This Phase II study analyzed the Oklahoma power market in 2010, incorporating the potential of new generation resources and customer responses. Five key findings of this Phase II were made: (1) Projected expansion in generating capacity exceeds by over 3,000 MW the demands within the state plus the amount that could be exported with the current transmission system. (2) Even with reduced new plant construction, most new plants could lose money (although residential consumers would see lower rates) unless they have sufficient market power to raise their prices without losing significant market share (Figure S-1). (3) If new plants can raise prices to stay profitable, existing low-cost coal and hydro plants will have very high profits. Average prices to customers could be 5% to 25% higher than regulated rates (Figure S-1). If the coal and hydro plants are priced at cost-based rates (through long-term contracts or continued regulation) while all other plants use market-based rates then prices are lower. (4) Customer response to real-time prices can lower the peak capacity requirements by around 9

  2. A phase II study of laquinimod in Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    D'Haens, Geert; Sandborn, William J; Colombel, Jean Frederic; Rutgeerts, Paul; Brown, Kurt; Barkay, Hadas; Sakov, Anat; Haviv, Asi; Feagan, Brian G

    2015-01-01

    Objective Laquinimod is an oral therapeutic agent under investigation for the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD), Huntington's disease, lupus nephritis and multiple sclerosis. This dose escalation study evaluated the safety and efficacy of laquinimod as induction therapy in patients with active moderate–severe CD. Design Multicentre, double-blind, sequential-cohort, randomised controlled trial with laquinimod doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5 or 2 mg/day or placebo (n=45 per cohort randomised in a 2:1 ratio) for 8 weeks with 4-week follow-up. Stable concomittant therapies and prior use of anti-tumour necrosis factor agents were permitted. Comprehensive safety assessments were performed and efficacy analyses included the proportions of patients in clinical remission (CD Activity Index (CDAI) <150 and no treatment failure (TF)), and with a clinical response (70 or 100 point CDAI reduction from baseline or remission and no TF). Results 117 patients received laquinimod and 63 patients received placebo. The overall incidence of adverse events (AEs) in the laquinimod group was similar to the pooled placebo group (86.2%–96.7% vs 82.5%) and most AEs were mild to moderate in severity. Treatment with laquinimod 0.5 mg showed consistent effects on remission (48.3% (CI 31% to 66%) vs 15.9% (CI 9% to 27%)), response 100 (55.2% (CI 37% to 71%) vs 31.7% (CI 22% to 44%)) and response 70 (62.1% (CI 44% to 77%) vs 34.9% (CI 24% to 47%)) versus placebo. Laquinimod 1.0 mg showed less benefit (26.7% remission (CI 14% to 44%) and 53.3% response 70 (CI 36% to 70%)), and no effect was noted on remission/response at higher doses. Conclusions Laquinimod was safe and well tolerated, and the effects on remission and response of the 0.5 mg dose suggest a treatment benefit in patients with CD. Trial registration number NCT00737932. PMID:25281416

  3. Specific threonine-4 phosphorylation and function of RNA polymerase II CTD during M phase progression

    PubMed Central

    Hintermair, Corinna; Voß, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Imhof, Axel; Eick, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic phosphorylation of Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 heptad-repeats in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit coordinates progression of RNA polymerase (Pol) II through the transcription cycle. Here, we describe an M phase-specific form of Pol II phosphorylated at Thr4, but not at Tyr1, Ser2, Ser5, and Ser7 residues. Thr4 phosphorylated Pol II binds to centrosomes and midbody and interacts with the Thr4-specific Polo-like kinase 1. Binding of Pol II to centrosomes does not require the CTD but may involve subunits of the non-canonical R2TP-Prefoldin-like complex, which bind to and co-localize with Pol II at centrosomes. CTD Thr4 mutants, but not Ser2 and Ser5 mutants, display severe mitosis and cytokinesis defects characterized by multipolar spindles and polyploid cells. We conclude that proper M phase progression of cells requires binding of Pol II to centrosomes to facilitate regulation of mitosis and cytokinesis in a CTD Thr4-P dependent manner. PMID:27264542

  4. 78 FR 8184 - DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Department of Environmental Protection and Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission; and For the State of... DEEPWATER HORIZON Oil Spill; Final Phase II Early Restoration Plan and Environmental Review AGENCY: Interior... (OPA), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the Framework Agreement for Early...

  5. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised...

  6. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised...

  7. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised...

  8. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised...

  9. 40 CFR 76.7 - Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Revised NOX emission limitations for Group 1, Phase II boilers. 76.7 Section 76.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) ACID RAIN NITROGEN OXIDES EMISSION REDUCTION PROGRAM § 76.7 Revised...

  10. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1999-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

  11. Emotional Intelligence and Implications for Counseling Self-Efficacy: Phase II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Crystal; Martin, William E.; Wilson, Sheilah

    2008-01-01

    The authors present Phase II of a 9-month study of the relationship between emotional intelligence and counseling self-efficacy. One-hundred eighteen counselors-in-training and professional counselors completed the Counseling Self-Estimate Inventory (COSE) and Emotional Judgment Inventory (EJI). There was a significant correlation between 2 of the…

  12. 76 FR 55947 - Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Industrial Relations Promotion Project, Phase II in Vietnam AGENCY: Bureau of... funded.. DAI, through its Industrial Relations Promotion Project (IRRP), is the only organization that...: white.brenda.j@dol.gov . All inquiries should make reference to the USDOL Industrial Relations...

  13. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  14. Project Care Phase II: A Case Study in the Evaluation of Communication and Learning Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Frederick; And Others

    Phase II was a field evaluation of a communication and learning system package of films, simulation games, discussion questions, and posters designed to promote career awareness in junior high school children. It was proposed that this evaluation serves as a prototype for the assessment of the effects of learning systems on the affective and…

  15. 78 FR 5765 - Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ...] Wireline Competition Bureau Releases Connect America Phase II Cost Model Virtual Workshop Discussion Topics... Competition Bureau releases for discussion a number of virtual workshop topics related to the development and... comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing electronic comments, the...

  16. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  17. Webcam Delivery of the Camperdown Program for Adolescents Who Stutter: A Phase II Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Brenda; O'Brian, Sue; Lowe, Robyn; Onslow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This Phase II clinical trial examined stuttering adolescents' responsiveness to the Webcam-delivered Camperdown Program. Method: Sixteen adolescents were treated by Webcam with no clinic attendance. Primary outcome was percentage of syllables stuttered (%SS). Secondary outcomes were number of sessions, weeks and hours to maintenance,…

  18. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  19. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  20. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  1. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  2. 40 CFR 125.91 - What is a “Phase II Existing Facility”?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...? 125.91 Section 125.91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER... Applicable to Cooling Water Intake Structures for Phase II Existing Facilities Under Section 316(b) of the...: (1) It is a point source. (2) It uses or proposes to use cooling water intake structures with a...

  3. 7 CFR 3403.8 - Proposal format for phase II applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide information to the Tech-Net Database System (http://technet.sba.gov) per OMB No. 3245-03356. The following are examples of the data to be entered by applicants into Tech-Net: (i) Any business concern or... information in the Tech-Net database for any prior Phase II award received by the small business concern. (b)...

  4. A Cytostatic Ruthenium(II)-Platinum(II) Bis(terpyridyl) Anticancer Complex That Blocks Entry into S Phase by Up-regulating p27(KIP1).

    PubMed

    Ramu, Vadde; Gill, Martin R; Jarman, Paul J; Turton, David; Thomas, Jim A; Das, Amitava; Smythe, Carl

    2015-06-15

    Cytostatic agents that interfere with specific cellular components to prevent cancer cell growth offer an attractive alternative, or complement, to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Here, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new binuclear Ru(II) -Pt(II) complex [Ru(tpy)(tpypma)Pt(Cl)(DMSO)](3+) (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and tpypma=4-([2,2':6',2''-terpyridine]-4'-yl)-N-(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)aniline), VR54, which employs the extended terpyridine tpypma ligand to link the two metal centres. In cell-free conditions, VR54 binds DNA by non-intercalative reversible mechanisms (Kb =1.3×10(5)  M(-1) ) and does not irreversibly bind guanosine. Cellular studies reveal that VR54 suppresses proliferation of A2780 ovarian cancer cells with no cross-resistance in the A2780CIS cisplatin-resistant cell line. Through the preparation of mononuclear Ru(II) and Pt(II) structural derivatives it was determined that both metal centres are required for this anti-proliferative activity. In stark contrast to cisplatin, VR54 neither activates the DNA-damage response network nor induces significant levels of cell death. Instead, VR54 is cytostatic and inhibits cell proliferation by up-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1) and inhibiting retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation, which blocks entry into S phase and results in G1 cell cycle arrest. Thus, VR54 inhibits cancer cell growth by a gain of function at the G1 restriction point. This is the first metal-coordination compound to demonstrate such activity.

  5. Development and Validation of Methodology to Model Flow in Ventilation Systems Commonly Found in Nuclear Facilities - Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Strons, Philip; Bailey, James L.; Davis, John; Grudzinski, James; Hlotke, John

    2016-03-01

    In this report we present the results of the Phase II analysis and testing of the flow patterns encountered in the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), as well as the results from an opportunity to expand upon field test work from Phase I by the use of a Class IIIb laser. The addition to the Phase I work is covered before proceeding to the results of the Phase II work, followed by a summary of findings.

  6. Electrochemical studies of DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII Schiff base tetraazamacrocyclic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anuj; Vashistha, Vinod Kumar; Tevatia, Prashant; Singh, Randhir

    2017-04-01

    Tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of MnII, FeIII, CoII and NiII have been synthesized by template method. These tetraazamacrocycles have been analyzed with various techniques like molar conductance, IR, UV-vis, mass spectral and cyclic voltammetric studies. On the basis of all these studies, octahedral geometry has been assigned to these tetraazamacrocyclic complexes. The DNA binding properties of these macrocyclic complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammetric studies. The cyclic voltammetric data showed that ipc and ipa were effectively decreased in the presence of calf thymus DNA, which is a strong evidence for the interaction of these macrocyclic complexes with the calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant found in the order: KCoII > KNiII > KMnII which indicates that CoII macrocyclic complex has formed a strong intercalated intermediate. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV) and voltammetric binding constant were found in the order KSV(CoII) > KSV(NiII) > KSV(MnII) and K+(CoII) > K+(NiII) > K+(MnII) which shows that CoII macrocyclic complex exhibits the high interaction affinity towards ct-DNA by the intercalation binding. Biological studies of the macrocyclic complexes compared with the standard drug like Gentamycin, have shown antibacterial activities against E. coli, P. aeruginosa, B. cereus, S. aureus and antifungal activity against C. albicans.

  7. Inactivation of human pathogens during phase II composting of manure-based mushroom growth substrate.

    PubMed

    Weil, Jennifer D; Cutter, Catherine N; Beelman, Robert B; LaBorde, Luke F

    2013-08-01

    Commercial production of white button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) requires a specialized growth substrate prepared from composted agricultural by-products. Because horse and poultry manures are widely used in substrate formulations, there is a need to determine the extent to which the composting process is capable of eliminating human pathogens. In this study, partially composted substrate was inoculated with a pathogen cocktail (log 10⁶ to 10⁸ CFU/g) containing Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. Pathogen and indicator-organism reductions were followed at temperatures that typically occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning procedure. Controlled-temperature water bath studies at 48.8, 54.4, and 60°C demonstrated complete destruction of the three pathogens after 36.0, 8.0, and 0.5 h, respectively. Destruction of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 at 54.4°C occurred more slowly than E. coli, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, and Salmonella. Microbial reductions that occurred during a standard 6-day phase II pasteurization and conditioning treatment were studied in a small-scale mushroom production research facility. After phase II composting, E. coli, coliforms, and Enterobacteriaceae were below detectable levels, and inoculated pathogens were not detected by direct plating or by enrichment. The results of this study show that a phase II composting process can be an effective control measure for eliminating risks associated with the use of composted animal manures during mushroom production. Growers are encouraged to validate and verify their own composting processes through periodic microbial testing for pathogens and to conduct studies to assure uniform distribution of substrate temperatures during phase II.

  8. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  9. Variable phase sine wave generator for active phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, W. M.

    1992-09-01

    A waveform generator is provided for generating a high frequency waveform. A pulse generator provides a pulse train at a low frequency. A pulse converter converts the pulse train into an alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses. A bandpass filter passes the alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses in a frequency band centered at the high frequency to output the generated waveform at the high frequency. When the groups of pulses are a pair of pulses, a sine wave is output from the bandpass filter. A pulse delay circuit can be used to variably delay the pulse train and thereby cause a phase change in the generated waveform.

  10. Anticancer activity assessment of two novel binuclear platinum (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Shahsavani, Mohammad Bagher; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Aseman, Marzieh Dadkhah; Nabavizadeh, S Masoud; Rashidi, Mehdi; Asadi, Zahra; Erfani, Nasrollah; Ghasemi, Atiyeh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Niazi, Ali; Bahaoddini, Aminollah; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, two binuclear Pt (II) complexes, containing cis, cis-[Me2Pt (μ-NN) (μ-dppm) PtMe2] (1), and cis,cis-[Me2Pt(μ-NN)(μ dppm) Pt((CH2)4)] (2) in which NN=phthalazine and dppm=bis (diphenylphosphino) methane were evaluated for their anticancer activities and DNA/purine nucleotide binding properties. These Pt (II) complexes, with the non-classical structures, demonstrated a significant anticancer activity against Jurkat and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. The results of ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining and Caspase-III activity suggest that these complexes were capable to stimulate an apoptotic mechanism of cell death in the cancer cells. Using different biophysical techniques and docking simulation analysis, we indicated that these complexes were also capable to interact efficiently with DNA via a non-intercalative mechanism. According to our results, substitution of cyclopentane (in complex 2) with two methyl groups (in complex 1) results in significant improvement of the complex ability to interact with DNA and subsequently to induce the anticancer activity. Overall, these binuclear Pt (II) complexes are promising group of the non-classical potential anticancer agents which can be considered as molecular templates in designing of highly efficient platinum anticancer drugs.

  11. Proposal for a "phase II" multicenter trial model for preclinical new antiepilepsy therapy development.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Terence J; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bertram, Edward H; Collins, Stephen D; Kokaia, Merab; Lerche, Holger; Klitgaard, Henrik; Staley, Kevin J; Vaudano, Elisabetta; Walker, Matthew C; Simonato, Michele

    2013-08-01

    There is a pressing need to address the current major gaps in epilepsy treatment, in particular drug-resistant epilepsy, antiepileptogenic therapies, and comorbidities. A major concern in the development of new therapies is that current preclinical testing is not sufficiently predictive for clinical efficacy. Methodologic limitations of current preclinical paradigms may partly account for this discrepancy. Here we propose and discuss a strategy for implementing a "phase II" multicenter preclinical drug trial model based on clinical phase II/III studies designed to generate more rigorous preclinical data for efficacy. The goal is to improve the evidence resulting from preclinical studies for investigational new drugs that have shown strong promise in initial preclinical "phase I" studies. This should reduce the risk for expensive clinical studies in epilepsy and therefore increase the appeal for funders (industry and government) to invest in their clinical development.

  12. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01

    This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

  13. Low energy threshold analysis of the phase I and phase II data sets of the Sudbury neutrino observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, S R; Hime, A; Elliott, S R; Rielage, K

    2009-01-01

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T{sub eff} = 3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup =1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from {sup 8}B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the {sup 8}B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be {Phi}{sub NC} = 5.140{sub -0.158}{sup +0.160}(stat){sub -0.117}{sup +0.132}(syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent Ve survival probability provides a measure of the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} = 5.046{sub -0.152}{sup +0.159}(stat){sub -0.123}{sup +0.107}(syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of {theta}{sub 12} = 34.06{sub -0.84}{sup +1.16} degrees and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.20} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}. The global value of {Phi}{sub 8{sub B}} is extracted to a precision of {sub -2.95}{sup +2.38}%. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} is 2.00{sub -1.63}{sup +2.09} x 10{sup -2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  14. Low-energy-threshold analysis of the Phase I and Phase II data sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aharmim, B.; Chauhan, D.; Fleurot, F.; Hallman, E. D.; Schwendener, M. H.; Virtue, C. J.; Ahmed, S. N.; Boulay, M. G.; Cai, B.; Chen, M.; DiMarco, M.; Earle, E. D.; Evans, H. C.; Ewan, G. T.; Guillian, E.; Harvey, P. J.; Kormos, L. L.; Kos, M.; Kraus, C.; Leslie, J. R.

    2010-05-15

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T{sub eff}=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from {sup 8}B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the {sup 8}B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be PHI{sub NC}=5.140{sub -0.158}{sup +0.160}(stat){sub -0.117}{sup +0.132}(syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of 2 smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory data in which the free parameters directly describe the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent nu{sub e} survival probability provides a measure of the total {sup 8}B neutrino flux PHI{sub {sup 8}{sub B}}=5.046{sub -0.152}{sup +0.159}(stat){sub -0.123}{sup +0.107}(syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of theta{sub 12}=34.06{sub -0.84}{sup +1.16} degrees and DELTAm{sub 21}{sup 2}=7.59{sub -0.21}{sup +0.20}x10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}. The global value of PHI{sup 8}{sub B} is extracted to a precision of {sub -2.95}{sup +2.38}%. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin{sup 2}theta{sub 13} is 2.00{sub -1.63}{sup +2.09}x10{sup -2}. This implies an upper bound of sin{sup 2}theta{sub 13}<0.057 (95% C.L.).

  15. Lipoplatin monotherapy: A phase II trial of second-line treatment of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ravaioli, A; Papi, M; Pasquini, E; Marangolo, M; Rudnas, B; Fantini, M; Nicoletti, S V L; Drudi, F; Panzini, I; Tamburini, E; Gianni, L; Pasini, G

    2009-02-01

    Lipoplatin is a liposome encapsulated form of cisplatin. phase i studies on lipoplatin have demonstrated that the compound has an excellent toxicity profile. therefore we performed a phase ii trial in heavily pre-treated patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSClC), performance status 0-2 in which the primary endpoint was response rate and secondary endpoints were safety and overall survival.Nineteen patients, average age 64 years old, with stage iV NSClC, were treated with lipoplatin 100 mg/m(2) every two weeks, as second line chemotherapy.We observed 1 partial remission (5.2%) and 3 stable diseases (15.9%). Time to progression (ttp) was 16 weeks and median overall survival (OS) was 31 weeks (7.2 months). We observed G1-G2 toxicity during chemotherapy, mainly gastrointestinal with nausea and vomiting (4 patients), asthenia (3 patients), mucositis (2 patients) and anemia (4 patients).Our phase ii study does not support a more extensive use of lipoplatin in phase III studies. An increase of dosage and a better selection of patients are mandatory to understand the real therapeutic activity of lipoplatin.

  16. Phase II study of continuous infusional 5-fluorouracil with epirubicin and carboplatin (instead of cisplatin) in patients with metastatic/locally advanced breast cancer (infusional ECarboF): a very active and well-tolerated outpatient regimen.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefoi, H.; Smith, I. E.; O'Brien, M. E.; Seymour, M. T.; Powles, T. J.; Allum, W. H.; Ebbs, S.; Baum, M.

    1996-01-01

    Infusional 5-fluorouracil (F) with cisplatin (C) and epirubicin (E), so-called infusional ECF, is a highly active new schedule against locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Cisplatin, however, is a major contributor to toxicity and usually requires inpatient treatment. In an attempt to overcome this, we have investigated the effect of substituting carboplatin for cisplatin in our original infusional ECF regimen. Fifty-two patients with metastatic (n = 36) or locally advanced/inflammatory (n = 16) breast cancer were treated with 5-fluorouracil 200 mg m-2 day-1 via a Hickman line using an ambulatory pump for for 6 months, with epirubicin 50 mg m-2 intravenously (i.v.) and carboplatin AUC5 i.v. every 4 weeks, for six courses (infusional ECarboF). The overall response rate (complete plus partial) was 81% (95% CI 67%-90%), with a complete response rate of 17% (95% CI 6-33%) in patients with metastatic disease and 56% (95% CI 30-80%) in patients with locally advanced disease. Median response duration and survival for metastatic disease was 8 and 14 months respectively, and two patients with locally advanced disease have relapsed. These results are very similar to those previously achieved with infusional ECF. Severe grade 3/4 toxicity was low. Infusional ECarboF is a highly active, well-tolerated, outpatient regimen effective against advanced/metastatic breast cancer and now warrants evaluation against conventional chemotherapy in high-risk early breast cancer. PMID:8562348

  17. Hexagonal and nematic phases of chains. I - Correlation functions. II - Phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selinger, Jonathan V.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of a system of semiflexible chains, which can represent polymer liquid crystals, long-chain biomolecules, stiff wormlike micelles, or columns of discotic liquid crystals, are examined. A continuum theory is used to calculate static correlation functions in the hexagonal and nematic phases. Two correlation functions are considered: (1) the structure factor which describes fluctuations in the density; and (2) the director fluctuation spectrum, which describes fluctuations in the local optical axis. In addition, a model is developed for the phase transitions of a system of infinitely long, semiflexible chains which interact through a steric, excluded-volume repulsion. The model yields generic phase diagrams in terms of pressure or density vs. persistence length or temperature.

  18. A 2-stage phase II design with direct assignment option in stage II for initial marker validation.

    PubMed

    An, Ming-Wen; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Sargent, Daniel J

    2012-08-15

    Biomarkers are critical to targeted therapies, as they may identify patients more likely to benefit from a treatment. Several prospective designs for biomarker-directed therapy have been previously proposed, differing primarily in the study population, randomization scheme, or both. Recognizing the need for randomization, yet acknowledging the possibility of promising but inconclusive results after a stage I cohort of randomized patients, we propose a 2-stage phase II design on marker-positive patients that allows for direct assignment in a stage II cohort. In stage I, marker-positive patients are equally randomized to receive experimental treatment or control. Stage II has the option to adopt "direct assignment" whereby all patients receive experimental treatment. Through simulation, we studied the power and type I error rate of our design compared with a balanced randomized two-stage design, and conducted sensitivity analyses to study the effect of timing of stage I analysis, population shift effects, and unbalanced randomization. Our proposed design has minimal loss in power (<1.8%) and increased type I error rate (<2.1%) compared with a balanced randomized design. The maximum increase in type I error rate in the presence of a population shift was between 3.1% and 5%, and the loss in power across possible timings of stage I analysis was less than 1.2%. Our proposed design has desirable statistical properties with potential appeal in practice. The direct assignment option, if adopted, provides for an "extended confirmation phase" as an alternative to stopping the trial early for evidence of efficacy in stage I.

  19. Phased Retrofits in Existing Homes in Florida Phase II. Shallow Plus Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    K. Sutherland; Parker, D.; Martin, E.; Chasar, D.; Amos, B.

    2016-02-01

    The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013.

  20. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  1. Catalytically active lead(ii)-imidazolium coordination assemblies with diversified lead(ii) coordination geometries.

    PubMed

    Naga Babu, Chatla; Suresh, Paladugu; Srinivas, Katam; Sathyanarayana, Arruri; Sampath, Natarajan; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-05-10

    Five Pb(ii)-imidazolium carboxylate coordination assemblies with novel structural motifs were derived from the reaction between the corresponding flexible, semi flexible or rigid imidazolium carboxylic acid ligands and lead nitrate. The imidazolium linker present in these molecules likely plays a triple role such as the counter ion to balance the metal charge, the ligand being an integral part of the final product and the catalyst facilitating carbon-carbon bond formation reaction. These lead-imidazolium coordination assemblies exhibit, variable chemical and thermal stabilities, as well as catalytic activity. These newly prepared catalysts are highly active towards benzoin condensation reactions with good functional group tolerance.

  2. The Prediction of Success in Nursing Education: Phase I and Phase II, 1959-1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, John R.; And Others

    This study concerned the development and testing of an instrument designed to provide nursing schools with meaningful information about the personalities and potential problems of their students. In Phase I, the instrument--the Luther Hospital Sentence Completions (LHSC)--was constructed along with a Nursing Education Scale (NES) which provided…

  3. 76 FR 3624 - Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding Milford Wind Corridor Phase II, LLC's application...

  4. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study: Phase II, 1973-74, Final Report: Volume V.3. Historical Data Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Patricia; Elias, Patricia J.

    The Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES), Phase II, was a research project on effective teaching behavior--what teachers do that significantly affects what and how pupils learn. The purposes of Phase II were to (1) develop an assessment system for measuring teacher and pupil behaviors and other factors which could influence each of them and…

  5. Phase II study of tivozanib, an oral VEGFR inhibitor, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Chandra, Vyshak; Da, Xiao; Ou, Yangming; Emblem, Kyrre E; Muzikansky, Alona; Cai, Xuezhu; Douw, Linda; Evans, John G; Dietrich, Jorg; Chi, Andrew S; Wen, Patrick Y; Stufflebeam, Stephen; Rosen, Bruce; Duda, Dan G; Jain, Rakesh K; Batchelor, Tracy T; Gerstner, Elizabeth R

    2017-02-01

    Targeting tumor angiogenesis is a potential therapeutic strategy for glioblastoma because of its high vascularization. Tivozanib is an oral pan-VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that hits a central pathway in glioblastoma angiogenesis. We conducted a phase II study to test the effectiveness of tivozanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Ten adult patients were enrolled and treated with tivozanib 1.5 mg daily, 3 weeks on/1 week off in 28-day cycles. Brain MRI and blood biomarkers of angiogenesis were performed at baseline, within 24-72 h of treatment initiation, and monthly thereafter. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI, and vessel architecture imaging were used to assess vascular effects. Resting state MRI was used to assess brain connectivity. Best RANO criteria responses were: 1 complete response, 1 partial response, 4 stable diseases, and 4 progressive disease (PD). Two patients were taken off study for toxicity and 8 patients were taken off study for PD. Median progression-free survival was 2.3 months and median overall survival was 8.1 months. Baseline abnormal tumor vascular permeability, blood flow, tissue oxygenation and plasma sVEGFR2 significantly decreased and plasma PlGF and VEGF increased after treatment, suggesting an anti-angiogenic effect of tivozanib. However, there were no clear structural changes in vasculature as vessel caliber and enhancing tumor volume did not significantly change. Despite functional changes in tumor vasculature, tivozanib had limited anti-tumor activity, highlighting the limitations of anti-VEGF monotherapy. Future studies in glioblastoma should leverage the anti-vascular activity of agents targeting VEGF to enhance the activity of other therapies.

  6. Phase II Study of Temozolomide (TMZ) and Everolimus (RAD001) Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Allred, Jacob B.; Perez, Domingo G.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Lieser, Elizabeth A.T.; Thompson, Michael; Maples, William J.; Creagan, Edward T.; Pockaj, Barbara A.; Kaur, Judith S.; Moore, Timothy D.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is activated in malignant melanoma and in situ lesions as opposed to benign nevi. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling is implicated in sensitization of melanoma cells to alkylating agents [temozolomide (TMZ)] and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Methods We conducted a single-arm phase II multi-institution cooperative group study to assess the antitumor activity and safety profile of the combination of TMZ and the rapamycin derivative everolimus in patients with metastatic unresectable malignant melanoma. Patients received 10 mg/d of RAD001 for 5 of 7 days (ie, 50 mg/ wk) and 200 mg/m2/d of TMZ for 5 days each cycle. Results Of the first 39 eligible patients, 17 were PFS-9 successes, for a predetermined threshold of 18/39 patients for a positive trial. Overall, 21 of 48 patients were progression free at 9 weeks, for an event-free survival rate of 44% (95% confidence interval, 29%–59%). The median progression-free survival was 2.4 months and the median overall survival was 8.6 months. Four patients achieved a partial response; the median duration of response was 15.1 months. No complete remissions were observed. Treatment was in general well tolerated with only 1 patient discontinuing therapy due to toxicity (hyperlipidemia). Conclusions The combination of TMZ and RAD001 was well tolerated but failed to meet/exceed our study threshold for promising clinical activity in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23357973

  7. Gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    André, T; Reyes-Vidal, J M; Fartoux, L; Ross, P; Leslie, M; Rosmorduc, O; Clemens, M R; Louvet, C; Perez, N; Mehmud, F; Scheithauer, W

    2008-01-01

    Advanced biliary tract carcinomas (BTCs) are often diagnosed at an advanced/metastatic stage and have a poor prognosis. The combination of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) has shown promising activity in this setting. This international phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of GEMOX as first-line therapy in patients with advanced BTCs. Eligible patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic BTC received gemcitabine 1000 mg m−2 (day 1) and oxaliplatin 100 mg m−2 (day 2), every 2 weeks. Seventy patients were enroled; 72.9% had metastatic disease. Sixty-seven patients were treated. There were 10 confirmed partial responses (14.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 7.4–25.7%) in the treated population (RECIST). Twenty-four patients (35.8 %) had stable disease. The objective response rate was 20.5% in patients with non-gallbladder cancers (9/44 patients) and 4.3% in patients with gallbladder cancers (1/23). Median overall survival for the intent-to-treat population was 8.8 months (95% CI, 6.9–11.1%) and progression-free survival was 3.4 months (95% CI, 2.5–4.6%). Grade 3/4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (14.9% of patients), alanine aminotransferase elevation (13.4%), anaemia (10.4%), neutropenia (11.9%) and pain (11.9%). In this study, GEMOX demonstrated activity in non-gallbladder carcinoma, but poor activity in gallbladder carcinoma. GEMOX is well tolerated in advanced BTCs. PMID:19238628

  8. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  9. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Bourin; Luc, Sensebé; Valérie, Planat-Bénard; Jérôme, Roncalli; Alessandra, Bura-Rivière; Louis, Casteilla

    2010-01-01

    Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:21052537

  10. Phase II study of liposomal doxorubicin and gemcitabine in the salvage treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, G; Ferrandina, G; Ludovisi, M; Testa, A; Lorusso, D; Gbaguidi, N; Breda, E; Mancuso, S; Scambia, G

    2003-10-06

    In total, 70 patients were enrolled into this phase II study, to evaluate the activity of the pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) and gemcitabine (GEM) combination in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. PLD, 30 mg m(-2), was administered on day 1 by 60' i.v. infusion, followed by GEM, 1000 mg m(-2), given by 30' i.v. on days 1 and 8; cycles were repeated every 21 days. In all, 67 patients are so far evaluable for response. Seven complete responses (10.4%, 95% CI: 3.1-17.7), 16 partial responses (23.9%, 95% CI: 13.7-34.1), 26 disease stabilisations (38.8%, 95% CI: 27.1-50.5) and 18 progressions (26.9%, 95% CI: 16.3-37.5) have been registered. Within the resistant population (n=36), the response rate was 25% (95% CI: 10.9-39.1). Within the group of platinum-sensitive patients (n=31), the response rate was 45.2% (95% CI: 27.7-62.7). A total of 443 courses are evaluable for toxicity. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity was registered in 30 patients (42.8%), mainly represented by neutropenia (35.6%); palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia affected 24 patients (34.2%), but it was of grade 3 in only seven of them (10%).

  11. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as

  12. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  13. Executive Development Programs in Bangladesh. Phase II Final Report and Case Writing. A Component of the World Bank/Bangladesh Management Education and Training Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    With funding made available by the World Bank, additional (Phase II) activities were undertaken in Bangladesh to enhance business management education and training. Executive Development Programmes (EDPs) were planned and carried out according to the model previously developed and validated. Eight seminars were offered for the Institute of…

  14. Disentangling the ISM phases of the dwarf galaxy NGC 4214 using [C ii] SOFIA/GREAT observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrion, K.; Cormier, D.; Bigiel, F.; Hony, S.; Abel, N. P.; Cigan, P.; Csengeri, T.; Graf, U. U.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. C.; Wu, R.; Young, L.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The [C ii] 158 μm fine structure line is one of the dominant cooling lines in the interstellar medium (ISM) and is an important tracer of star formation. Recent velocity-resolved studies with Herschel/HIFI and SOFIA/GREAT showed that the [C ii] line can constrain the properties of the ISM phases in star-forming regions. The [C ii] line as a tracer of star formation is particularly important in low-metallicity environments where CO emission is weak because of the presence of large amounts of CO-dark gas. Aims: The nearby irregular dwarf galaxy NGC 4214 offers an excellent opportunity to study an actively star-forming ISM at low metallicity. We analyzed the spectrally resolved [C ii] line profiles in three distinct regions at different evolutionary stages of NGC 4214 with respect to ancillary H i and CO data in order to study the origin of the [C ii] line. Methods: We used SOFIA/GREAT [C ii] 158 μm observations, H i data from THINGS, and CO(2 → 1) data from HERACLES to decompose the spectrally resolved [C ii] line profiles into components associated with neutral atomic and molecular gas. We use this decomposition to infer gas masses traced by [C ii] under different ISM conditions. Results: Averaged over all regions, we associate about 46% of the [C ii] emission with the H i emission. However, we can assign only 9% of the total [C ii] emission to the cold neutral medium (CNM). We found that about 79% of the total molecular hydrogen mass is not traced by CO emission. Conclusions: On average, the fraction of CO-dark gas dominates the molecular gas mass budget. The fraction seems to depend on the evolutionary stage of the regions: it is highest in the region covering a super star cluster in NGC 4214, while it is lower in a more compact, more metal-rich region. Reduced SOFIA/GREAT data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A9

  15. An evaluation of a Simon 2-Stage phase II clinical trial design incorporating toxicity monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ray, H E; Rai, S N

    2011-05-01

    Phase II clinical trials are usually designed to measure efficacy but patient safety is also a very important aspect. Previous authors suggested a methodology that allows one to monitor the cumulative number of toxic events after each patient is treated, which is also known as continuous toxicity monitoring. In this work we describe how to combine the continuous toxicity monitoring methodology with the Simon 2-Stage design for response. Then we investigate through simulation the combined procedure's type I and type II error rates under various combinations of design parameters. We include the underlying relationship between toxicity and response in our examination of the error rates.

  16. Study of Acoustic Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Detection Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurahashi, N.

    The Study of Acoustic Ultra-high energy Neutrino Detection has started its second phase (SAUND II). Although the general location of the hydrophones has not changed, SAUND II uses a new hydrophone array that uses a fiber-optic cable to connect to shore. Changes associated with the new hydrophone array as well as a new DAQ system that incorporates multiprocessor computing and accurate GPS timestamping are reported. Initial data of lightbulb calibration conducted in March 2005, and a future plan for a more accurate calibration are also presented.

  17. Effects of triclosan on the detoxification system in the yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco): expressions of CYP and GST genes and corresponding enzyme activity in phase I, II and antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Ku, Peijia; Wu, Xiaoyan; Nie, Xiangping; Ou, Ruikang; Wang, Lan; Su, Tian; Li, Yigang

    2014-11-01

    Triclosan (TCS), a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent widely used in pharmaceuticals and personal case products (PPCPs), has been universally detected in aquatic ecosystem in recent years. Unfortunately, there is limited information about its potential impacts on responses of genes and enzymes related to fish detoxification. In the present work, we cloned CYP3A and alpha-GST of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and tested the transcriptional expression of CYP1A, CYP3A and GST as well as the alterations of their corresponding enzymes, including ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND), erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT), and also the oxidative product malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the liver of P. fulvidraco exposed to TCS. Amino acids of CYP3A and GST were deduced and phylogenetic tree was constructed respectively. High identity percent was exhibited between P. fulvidraco and other species, such as other fish, birds and mammals. Results indicated that TCS significantly elevated CYP1A and GST but decreased CYP3A expression, EROD activity and MDA content at lower concentrations of TCS at 24h. Moreover, CYP3A and GST were significantly inhibited at 72 h but induced at 168 h at lower concentrations. However, CYP3A was always induced at the highest concentration during the exposure period. Furthermore, CYP3A, GST, GST enzyme and MDA content exhibited a dose-effect relationship to some extent, but no significant responses were observed in ERND, APND and CAT except for individual treatments. Taken together, EROD was the most sensitive to TCS exposure as compared to other enzymes. Meanwhile, mRNA responses were more sensitive in yellow catfish.

  18. Phase II fabrication and construction of the Sky Harbor Airport, Solar Photovoltaic Concentrator Project. Progress from March 11, 1980-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirk, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This report documents the activities of Phase II of the Sky Harbor Airport Solar Photovoltaic Project during the period from March 11, 1980 to June 30, 1982. The work was accomplished under contract number DE-AC04-80ET20624 as part of DOE's PRDA EG-78-D-04-0035 program for the evaluation of concentrating photovoltaic application experiments. The Phase II effort included evaluation of prototype Motorola concentrator modules, a critical review of Fresnel lens concentrator designs, selection of an alternative Fresnel lens concentrator design by Martin Marietta, and construction and initial operation of the 225 kW system.

  19. Two cases of lichen striatus with prolonged active phase.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-01-01

    Lichen striatus is a localized, eczematous disorder distributed along the lines of Blaschko, primarily affecting children. In the literature, lesions have been described as having an active phase of inflamed lesions for 6 to 12 months followed by flattening and persistent pigmentary alteration. We describe two girls who had prolonged active-phase lesions for 2.5 and 3.5 years, respectively. Practitioners should be aware that lesions of lichen striatus may have a prolonged active phase.

  20. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  1. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1311 - Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... World War II veterans. 404.1311 Section 404.1311 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1311 Ninety-day active service requirement for World War II veterans. (a) The 90 days of active service required for World War II veterans do not have to...

  6. DNA Binding and Antitumor Activity of α-Diimineplatinum(II) and Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Khosravi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The two water-soluble designed platinum(II) complex, [Pt(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3 (Oct-dtc = Octyldithiocarbamate and bpy = 2,2′ -bipyridine) and palladium(II) complex, [Pd(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity measurements, IR, 1H NMR, and electronic spectra studies. Studies of antitumor activity of these complexes against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been carried out. They show Ic50 values lower than that of cisplatin. The complexes have been investigated for their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and ethidium bromide displacement and gel filtration techniques. Both of these water-soluble complexes bound cooperatively and intercalatively to the CT-DNA at very low concentrations. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. PMID:22110410

  7. Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, C.E.

    1994-11-10

    This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

  8. Novel therapies for resistant focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FONT) phase II clinical trial: study design

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The lack of adequate randomized clinical trials (RCT) has hindered identification of new therapies that are safe and effective for patients with primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), especially in patients who fail to respond to corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapies. Recent basic science advances have led to development of alternative treatments that specifically target aberrant pathways of fibrosis which are relevant to disease progression in FSGS. There is a need for a flexible Phase II study design which will test such novel antifibrotic strategies in order to identify agents suitable for phase III testing. Methods/Design The Novel Therapies for Resistant Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FONT) project is a multicenter Phase I/II RCT designed to investigate the potential efficacy of novel therapies for resistant FSGS. Adalimumab and galactose will be evaluated against conservative therapy consisting of the combination of lisinopril, losartan and atorvastatin. The sample size is defined to assure that if one of the treatments has a superior response rate compared to that of the other treatments, it will be selected with high probability for further evaluation. Comparison of primary and secondary endpoints in each study arm will enable a choice to be made of which treatments are worthy of further study in future Phase III RCT. Discussion This report highlights the key features of the FONT II RCT including the two-step outcome analysis that will expedite achievement of the study objectives. The proposed phase II study design will help to identify promising agents for further testing while excluding ineffective agents. This staged approach can help to prevent large expenditures on unworthy therapeutic agents in the management of serious but rare kidney diseases Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00814255 PMID:21310077

  9. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting.

  10. Phasing the mirror segments of the Keck telescopes II: the narrow-band phasing algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chanan, G; Ohara, C; Troy, M

    2000-09-01

    In a previous paper, we described a successful technique, the broadband algorithm, for phasing the primary mirror segments of the Keck telescopes to an accuracy of 30 nm. Here we describe a complementary narrow-band algorithm. Although it has a limited dynamic range, it is much faster than the broadband algorithm and can achieve an unprecedented phasing accuracy of approximately 6 nm. Cross checks between these two independent techniques validate both methods to a high degree of confidence. Both algorithms converge to the edge-minimizing configuration of the segmented primary mirror, which is not the same as the overall wave-front-error-minimizing configuration, but we demonstrate that this distinction disappears as the segment aberrations are reduced to zero.

  11. Targeting radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma with iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection: Clinical Phase I/II trials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhinan . E-mail: chcerc2@fmmu.edu.cn; Mi Li; Xu Jing

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: HAb18G/CD147 is a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated antigen. We developed iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection (Licartin), a novel {sup 131}I-labeled HAb18G/CD147-specific monoclonal antibody F(ab'){sub 2} fragment, and evaluated its safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy on HCC in Phase I/II trials. Methods and Materials: In a Phase I trial, 28 patients were randomly assigned to receive the injection in 9.25-, 18.5-, 27.75-, or 37-MBq/kg doses by hepatic artery infusion. In a multicenter Phase II trial, 106 patients received the injection (27.75 MBq/kg) on Day 1 of a 28-day cycle. Response rate and survival rate were the endpoints. Results: No life-threatening toxic effects were found. The safe dosage was 27.75 MBq/kg. The blood clearance fitted a biphasic model, and its half-life was 90.56-63.93 h. In the Phase II trial, the injection was found to be targeted and concentrated to tumor tissues. Of the 73 patients completing two cycles, 6 (8.22%) had a partial response, 14 (19.18%) minor response, and 43 (58.90%) stable disease. The 21-month survival rate was 44.54%. The survival rate of progression-free patients was significantly higher than that of patients with progressive disease after either one or two cycles (p < 0.0001 or p 0.0019). Conclusion: Iodine ({sup 131}I) metuximab injection is safe and active for HCC patients.

  12. Frequency translating phase conjugation circuit for active retrodirective antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-11-01

    An active retrodirective antenna array which has central phasing from a reference antenna element through a "tree" structured network of transmission lines utilizes a number of phase conjugate circuits (PCCs) at each node and a phase reference regeneration circuit (PRR) at each node except the initial node. Each node virtually coincides with an element of the array. A PCC generates the exact conjugate phase of an incident signal using a phase locked loop which combines the phases in an up converter, divides the sum by 2 and mixes the result with the phase in a down converter for phase detection. The PRR extracts the phase from the conjugate phase. Both the PCC and the PRR are not only exact but also free from mixer degeneracy.

  13. Pravastatin activates activator protein 2 alpha to argument the angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui; Liang, Wen-Jing; Shan, Mei-Rong; Wang, Xue-Qing; Zhou, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Tao; Li, Peng; Yu, Hai-Ya; Liu, Chao; Yin, Ya-Ling; Wang, Yu-Lin; Dong, Bo; Pang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Shuang-Xi

    2017-02-04

    We have previously reported that activation of AMP-activated kinase alpha 2 (AMPKα2) by nicotine or angiotensin II (AngII) instigates formation of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in Apoe-/- mice. Statins, used to treat hyperlipidemia widely, activate AMPK in vascular cells. We sought to examine the effects of pravastatin on AAA formation and uncover the molecular mechanism. The AAA model was induced by AngII and evaluated by incidence, elastin degradation, and maximal abdominal aortic diameter in Apoe-/- mice. The phosphorylated levels of AMPKα2 and activator protein 2 alpha (AP-2α) were examined in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) or in mice. We observed that pravastatin (50 mg/kg/day, 8 weeks) remarkably increased the AngII-induced AAA incidence in mice. In VSMCs, pravastatin increased the levels of pAMPK, pAP-2α, and MMP2 in both basal and AngII-stressed conditions, which were abolished by tempol and compound C. Pravastatin-upregulated MMP2 was abrogated by AMPKα2 or AP-2α siRNA. Lentivirus-mediated gene silence of AMPKα2 or AP-2α abolished pravastatin-worsened AAA formations in AngII-infused Apoe-/- mice. Clinical investigations demonstrated that both AMPKα2 and AP-2α phosphorylations were increased in AAA patients or human subjects taking pravastatin. In conclusion, pravastatin promotes AAA formation through AMPKα2-dependent AP-2α activations.

  14. Phase effects in guided mode resonances II: measuring the angular phase of a surface plasmon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, M. J.; Brown, T. G.

    2015-02-01

    We show how the phase of a resonant interaction between a focused beam and a guided mode can be directly observed in a pupil imaging experiment, in which the irradiance leaving the pupil of a standard microscope is relayed to an image sensor through a combination Wollaston prism, calcite beam splitter and polarizer. We apply the method to the observation of a surface plasmon polariton resonance excited in a corrugated silver film fabricated using electron beam lithography. We discuss how this particular imaging configuration could be adapted for applications in plasmonic optical sensing.

  15. Two-Phase Nozzle Theory and Parametric Analysis. Phase II. Parametric Analysis and Optimization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    Dekker, Inc., 1969. 4. Netzer, D . W.: Calculations of Flow Characteristics for Two-Phase Flow in Annular Converging-Diverging Nozzles. Report No. TM-62-3...Astronautica Acta, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 207-216, 1965. 6. Crowe, C. T., M. P. Sharma and D . E. Stock: The Particle-Source-In Cell (PSI-Cell) Model for...Dispersed Droplet-in-Vapor Flows Including Normal Shock Waves. ASME J. of Fluids Eng’g., pp. 355-362, 1978. 8. Elliott, D . G.: "Theoretical and

  16. Ethanol production via fungal decomposition and fermentation of biomass. Phase II (FY 1981) annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Antonopoulos, A. A.; Wene, E. G.

    1981-10-01

    This program has as its main goal the isolation and development of Fusarium strains that can efficiently and economically decompose plant polysaccharides to pentoses and hexoses and ferment them to ethanol for fuel purposes. During Phase II (FY 1981) of this program, more than 800 new Fusarium isolates were isolated and screened. All showed cellulolytic activity. The Fusarium mutant ANL 3-72181 (derived after uv exposure of ANL 22 isolate) produced 2.45 iu cellulase after 14 days. This cellulase activity was achieved in the presence of 0.7 mg/mL extracellular protein. In separate tests, the use of both proteose peptone and yeast extract with 1% cellulose increased the production of extracellular protein three times over that on cellulose alone. Initial fermentation by Fusarium strains on 1% glucose produced up to 4.2 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. All Fusarium isolates and mutants found during this period were screened for xylose fermentation. Ethanol production during early experimentation required from 120 to 144 hours to yield 4.0 to 4.5 mg/mL ethanol from 1% xylose solutions. Through continuous selection of isolates, this time was reduced to 66 hours. By recycling Fusarium cell mass, fermentations of 1% xylose yielded 4.0 to 4.3 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Consecutive fermentations of 2% xylose produced an average of 8.1 mg/mL ethanol in 48 hours. Fermentation of a 4.5% xylose + 2% glucose solution produced 21 mg/mL ethanol and 0.8 mg/mL acetic acid, while fermentation of a 7% xylose + 2% glucose solution yielded 25.5 mg/mL ethanol and 0.85 mg/mL acetic acid; these fermentations were aerated at a rate of 0.03 v/v-min.

  17. A phase II trial of ISIS 3521 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John L; Eisenberg, Steven G; Johnson, Michael D; Hanfelt, John; Dorr, F Andrew; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Oberst, Michael; Fuxman, Yair; Holmlund, Jon; Malik, Shakun

    2004-11-01

    This phase II study was designed to characterize the clinical activity of ISIS 3521 in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). Sixteen patients with pretreated or refractory CRC were treated with ISIS 3521. Eleven patients were given a dose of 2.0 mg/kg per day, and 5 patients received 3.0 mg/kg per day given over 21 days followed by a 7-day rest period. Patients continued with study until evidence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity was detected. Patients underwent baseline tumor biopsies followed by a second biopsy during the last week of the first 21-day infusion. All 16 patients underwent baseline tumor biopsies, and 12 of the 16 patients underwent on-study tumor biopsies. No evidence of tumor response was observed. One patient had stable disease after 2 cycles and remained on for 1 additional cycle only to demonstrate progression of disease at that time. No dose-limiting or other significant toxicities were observed at both dosages, which could not be explained by progression of disease. Fatigue was common in all patients treated but was not dose limiting, and there was no evidence of coagulopathy. Analysis of the tumor biopsies obtained from the 11 evaluable samples showed marked uptake of ISIS 3521 in the normal liver parenchyma. However, there was minimal uptake within the tumor cells. In addition, no evidence of any alteration in protein kinase C-a within the tumors or any downstream effects leading to apoptosis were observed. ISIS 3521 demonstrated no clinical activity or target modulation in refractory metastatic CRC.

  18. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  19. Performance of the Tile PreProcessor Demonstrator for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase II Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrió, F.; Moreno, P.; Valero, A.

    2016-03-01

    The Tile Calorimeter PreProcessor demonstrator is a high performance double AMC board based on FPGA resources and QSFP modules. This board has been designed in the framework of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Demonstrator project for the Phase II Upgrade as the first stage of the back-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator has been conceived to receive and process the data coming from the front-end electronics of the TileCal Demonstrator module, as well as to configure it. Moreover, the TilePPr demonstrator handles the communication with the Detector Control System to monitor and control the front-end electronics. The TilePPr demonstrator represents 1/8 of the final TilePPr that will be designed and installed into the detector for the ATLAS Phase II Upgrade.

  20. Enantiomeric separations of ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes using HPLC with cyclofructan chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yang; Breitbach, Zachary S; Dissanayake, Milan K; Perera, Sirantha; Aslan, Joseph M; Alatrash, Nagham; MacDonnell, Frederick M; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    The enantiomeric separation of 21 ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes was achieved with a novel class of cyclofructan-based chiral stationary phases (CSPs) in the polar organic mode. Aromatic derivatives on the chiral selectors proved to be essential for enantioselectivity. The R-napthylethyl carbamate functionalized cyclofructan 6 (LARIHC CF6-RN) column proved to be the most effective overall, while the dimethylphenyl carbamate cyclofructan 7 (LARIHC CF7-DMP) showed complementary selectivity. A combination of acid and base additives was necessary for optimal separations. The retention factor vs. acetonitrile/methanol ratio plot showed a U-shaped retention curve, indicating that different interactions take place at different polar organic solvent compositions. The separation results indicated that π-π interactions, steric effects, and hydrogen bonding contribute to the enantiomeric separation of ruthenium (II) polypyridyl complexes with cyclofructan chiral stationary phases in the polar organic mode.

  1. Phase Transition of a Structure II Cubic Clathrate Hydrate to a Tetragonal Form.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition of cubic structure II (sII) binary clathrate hydrates of methane (CH4 ) and propanol are reported from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. The deformation of host water cages at the cubic-tetragonal phase transition of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate, but not 1-propanol+CH4 hydrate, was observed below about 110 K. It is shown that the deformation of the host water cages of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate can be explained by the restriction of the motion of 2-propanol within the 5(12) 6(4) host water cages. This result provides a low-temperature structure due to a temperature-induced symmetry-lowering transition of clathrate hydrate. This is the first example of a cubic structure of the common clathrate hydrate families at a fixed composition.

  2. New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Division of Cancer Prevention’s Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program, also known as the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, is beginning a new round of studies in the effort toward systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents for people at increased risk of developing cancer. Infographic Highlight New Round of Studies Begin in Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program |

  3. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  4. Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Unit for Fission Power System, Phase II Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J. Gary; Stanley, John

    2016-01-01

    In Phase II, the manufacture and testing of two 6-kW(sub e)Stirling engines was completed. The engines were delivered in an opposed 12-kW(sub e) arrangement with a common expansion space heater head. As described in the Phase I report, the engines were designed to be sealed both hermetically and with a bolted O-ring seal. The completed Phase II convertor is in the bolted configuration to allow future disassembly. By the end of Phase II, the convertor had passed all of the final testing requirements in preparation for delivery to the NASA Glenn Research Center. The electronic controller also was fabricated and tested during Phase II. The controller sets both piston amplitudes and maintains the phasing between them. It also sets the operating frequency of the machine. Details of the controller are described in the Phase I final report. Fabrication of the direct-current to direct-current (DC-DC) output stage, which would have stepped down the main controller output voltage from 700 to 120 V(sub DC), was omitted from this phase of the project for budgetary reasons. However, the main controller was successfully built, tested with the engines, and delivered. We experienced very few development issues with this high-power controller. The project extended significantly longer than originally planned because of yearly funding delays. The team also experienced several hardware difficulties along the development path. Most of these were related to the different thermal expansions of adjacent parts constructed of different materials. This issue was made worse by the large size of the machine. Thermal expansion problems also caused difficulties in the brazing of the opposed stainless steel sodium-potassium (NaK) heater head. Despite repeated attempts Sunpower was not able to successfully braze the opposed head under this project. Near the end of the project, Glenn fabricated an opposed Inconel NaK head, which was installed prior to delivery for testing at Glenn. Engine

  5. An FPGA-based trigger for the phase II of the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Galli, L.; Grassi, M.; Morsani, F.; Nicolò, D.; Ritt, S.; Venturini, M.

    2016-07-01

    For the phase II of MEG, we are going to develop a combined trigger and DAQ system. Here we focus on the former side, which operates an on-line reconstruction of detector signals and event selection within 450 μs from event occurrence. Trigger concentrator boards (TCB) are under development to gather data from different crates, each connected to a set of detector channels, to accomplish higher-level algorithms to issue a trigger in the case of a candidate signal event. We describe the major features of the new system, in comparison with phase I, as well as its performances in terms of selection efficiency and background rejection.

  6. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Pirani, Anna; y Mélia, David Salas; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Simulation characteristics from eighteen global ocean-sea-ice coupled models are presented with a focus on the mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and other related fields in the North Atlantic. These experiments use inter-annually varying atmospheric forcing data sets for the 60-year period from 1948 to 2007 and are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The protocol for conducting such CORE-II experiments is summarized. Despite using the same atmospheric forcing, the solutions show significant differences. As most models also differ from available observations, biases in the Labrador Sea region in upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity distributions, mixed layer depths, and sea-ice cover are identified as contributors to differences in AMOC. These differences in the solutions do not suggest an obvious grouping of the models based on their ocean model lineage, their vertical coordinate representations, or surface salinity restoring strengths. Thus, the solution differences among the models are attributed primarily to use of different subgrid scale parameterizations and parameter choices as well as to differences in vertical and horizontal grid resolutions in the ocean models. Use of a wide variety of sea-ice models with diverse snow and sea-ice albedo treatments also contributes to these differences. Based on the diagnostics considered, the majority of the models appear suitable for use in studies involving the North Atlantic, but some models require dedicated development effort.

  7. MICS-Asia II: The model intercomparison study for Asia Phase II methodology and overview of findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, G. R.; Sakurai, T.; Streets, D.; Hozumi, Y.; Ueda, H.; Park, S. U.; Fung, C.; Han, Z.; Kajino, M.; Engardt, M.; Bennet, C.; Hayami, H.; Sartelet, K.; Holloway, T.; Wang, Z.; Kannari, A.; Fu, J.; Matsuda, K.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Amann, M.

    Results from the Model Intercomparison Study Asia Phase II (MICS-Asia II) are presented. Nine different regional modeling groups simulated chemistry and transport of ozone (O 3), secondary aerosol, acid deposition, and associated precursors, using common emissions and boundary conditions derived from a global model. Four-month-long periods, representing 2 years and three seasons (i.e., March, July, and December in 2001, and March in 2002), are analyzed. New observational data, obtained under the EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) monitoring program, were made available for this study, and these data provide a regional database to compare with model simulations. The analysis focused around seven subject areas: O 3 and related precursors, aerosols, acid deposition, global inflow of pollutants and precursor to Asia, model sensitivities to aerosol parameterization, analysis of emission fields, and detailed analyses of individual models, each of which is presented in a companion paper in this issue of Atmospheric Environment. This overview discusses the major findings of the study, as well as information on common emissions, meteorological conditions, and observations.

  8. 77 FR 60124 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Drug Master Files Under the Generic Drug User Fee... Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), holders of certain drug master files, namely, Type II active...

  9. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  10. Defense Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR). Abstracts of Phase II Awards 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    INCREASE THE BANDWIDTH OF THE BAND-9 ALQ-99 TOPIC: 94 OFFICE: SPAWAR THIS IS A PHASE II SBIR PROPOSAL. IT DESCRIBES A PPM HELIX TWT DEVELOPMENT FOR THE...THE PROPOSED TWT WILL EMPLOY A BRAZED COPPER HELIX DESIGN TO OVERCOME THE HEAT DISSIPA- TION LIMITATION IN PAST HELIX DERIVED CIRCUIT TUBES. IT WILL...SUBMITTED BY DEPT ASTRON CORPORATION ARMY P.O. BOX 1047 SPRINGFIELD, VA 22151 JOSEPH R. JAHODA TITLE: BROADBAND TRANSMITTING ANTENNA TOPIC: id OFFICE

  11. An Investigation of the Physical Properties of Erupting Solar Prominences, Phase II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-30

    1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVBXS/Dr. Richard Altrock 1 cy 40 Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. ... AFRL -RV-PS- AFRL -RV-PS- TR-2014-0195 TR-2014-0195 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ERUPTING SOLAR PROMINENCES, PHASE II...AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM

  12. Development and Testing of a Jet Assisted Polycrystalline Diamond Drilling Bit. Phase II Development Efforts

    SciTech Connect

    David S. Pixton

    1999-09-20

    Phase II efforts to develop a jet-assisted rotary-percussion drill bit are discussed. Key developments under this contract include: (1) a design for a more robust polycrystalline diamond drag cutter; (2) a new drilling mechanism which improves penetration and life of cutters; and (3) a means of creating a high-pressure mud jet inside of a percussion drill bit. Field tests of the new drill bit and the new robust cutter are forthcoming.

  13. Characterization of Vertical Impact Device Acceleration Pulses Using Parametric Assessment: Phase II Accelerated Free-Fall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    ACCELERATED FREE -FALL Mr. Chris Perry Mr. Chris Burneka Warfighter Interface Division Ms. Rachael Christopher ORISE Mr. Chris Albery Infoscitex...of Vertical Impact Device Acceleration Pulses Using Parametric Assessment: Phase II Accelerated Free -Fall 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-14-D-6500...bungee cord system interfaced between the VID free -fall carriage and the reaction mass to provide an initial velocity at carriage release. The approach

  14. Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process. Phase II. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RD-A154 613 RECRUITMENT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM AND ACCESSION i/7 CONTINGENCY PLANNING PROCE..(U) ECONOMIC RESEARCH LAB INC RESTON YA L GOLDBERG ET AL...11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process Phase II, Part 1 Final Report...GROUP Early Warning System, Forecasting, Manpower Planning LV &V WA&Vm 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block ny.1ber

  15. Final Report: Phase II Geothermal Exploration and Geothermal Power Plant Update for Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; Shane, M.K.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1984-07-01

    The Phase I study of the geothermal potential of Ascension Island concluded that the possibility of a geothermal resource existing under the island was excellent. This conclusion was based on the presence of young volcanic rocks (a heat source close to the surface), an ample supply of water from the sea, and high permeability of many of the rocks which make up the island. The assumption was made that the resource would be similar to geothermal systems in the Azores or Japan, and a conceptual design of a power plant to utilize the resource was prepared upon which cost estimates and an economic analysis were subsequently performed. The results of the economic analysis were very favorable, and the Air Force decided to proceed into Phase II of the project. Under Phase II, an exploration program was designed and carried out. The purpose of the program was to ascertain whether or not a geothermal resource existed beneath Ascension island and, to the extent possible, to evaluate the quality of that resource. The exploration involved a detailed aeromagnetic survey of the island, reconnaissance and detailed electrical resistivity surveys, and drilling of holes for the measurement of temperatures. These methods have confirmed the existence of geothermal activity beneath Ascension. Measured temperature gradients and bottom hole temperatures as well as chemical geothermometers indicate temperatures sufficient for the generation of electricity within reasonable drilling depths. This report documents those conclusions and the supporting data. This report also documents the results of the power plant update with new data supplied from the Phase II exploration activities on the island. The power plant scenario has been changed to reflect the fact that the resource temperature may not be as high as that originally assumed in the Phase I study, the location of the production wells will in all likelihood be farther from the existing Air Force facilities--either north of Grazing

  16. Adsorbent-adsorbate interactions in the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) on ozonized activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2002-09-01

    The present work investigated the effect of surface oxygenated groups on the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) by activated carbon. A study was undertaken to determine the adsorption isotherms and the influence of the pH on the adsorption of each metallic ion by a series of ozonized activated carbons. In the case of Cd(II), the adsorption capacity and the affinity of the adsorbent augmented with the increase in acid-oxygenated groups on the activated carbon surface. These results imply that electrostatic-type interactions predominate in this adsorption process. The adsorption observed at solution pH values below the pH(PZC) of the carbon indicates that other forces also participate in this process. Ionic exchange between -C pi-H3O+ interaction protons and Cd(II) ions would account for these findings. In the case of Hg(II), the adsorption diminished with an increase in the degree of oxidation of the activated carbon. The presence of electron-withdrawing groups on oxidized carbons decreases the electronic density of their surface, producing a reduction in the adsorbent-adsorbate dispersion interactions and in their reductive capacity, thus decreasing the adsorption of Hg(II) on the activated carbon. At pH values above 3, the pH had no influence on the adsorption of Hg(II) by the activated carbon, confirming that electrostatic interactions do not have a determinant influence on Hg(II) adsorption.

  17. Flexible designs for phase II comparative clinical trials involving two response variables.

    PubMed

    Bersimis, S; Sachlas, A; Papaioannou, T

    2015-01-30

    The aim of phase II clinical trials is to determine whether an experimental treatment is sufficiently promising and safe to justify further testing. The need for reduced sample size arises naturally in phase II clinical trials owing to both technical and ethical reasons, motivating a significant part of research in the field during recent years, while another significant part of the research effort is aimed at more complex therapeutic schemes that demand the consideration of multiple endpoints to make decisions. In this paper, our attention is restricted to phase II clinical trials in which two treatments are compared with respect to two dependent dichotomous responses proposing some flexible designs. These designs permit the researcher to terminate the clinical trial when high rates of favorable or unfavorable outcomes are observed early enough requiring in this way a small number of patients. From the mathematical point of view, the proposed designs are defined on bivariate sequences of multi-state trials, and the corresponding stopping rules are based on various distributions related to the waiting time until a certain number of events appear in these sequences. The exact distributions of interest, under a unified framework, are studied using the Markov chain embedding technique, which appears to be very useful in clinical trials for the sample size determination. Tables of expected sample size and power are presented. The numerical illustration showed a very good performance for these new designs.

  18. Simultaneous determination of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II) in surface waters by solid phase extraction and flow injection analysis with spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Castillo, E; Cortina, J L; Beltrán, J; Prat, M D; Granados, M

    2001-07-01

    A method for heavy metal monitoring using spectrophotometric detection is presented. Traces of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) at the low microg l(-1) level can be determined simultaneously after both selective removal of metal interferences and preconcentration using 'extraction chromatographic resins'. Lewatit TP807'84, which contains di(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid as active component, was used as solid adsorbent. Two minicolumns containing this resin were used: one at pH 3.2 for the removal of interferences, such as Zn(II) and Fe(III), and the other at pH 5.5 for the selective preconcentration of the target analytes. Spectrophotometric determination used FIA methodology with sulfarsazene as chromogenic reagent and partial least-squares multivariate calibration. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of surface waters from the Llobregat river and ground water samples from wells in the Guadiamar basin. Accuracy, expressed in terms of recoveries, was in the range 80-120% and relative standard deviations were below 10%.

  19. A comprehensive analysis of phase I and phase II metabolism gene polymorphisms and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in smokers.

    PubMed

    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Campa, Daniele; Lind, Helge; Ryberg, David; Skaug, Vidar; Stangeland, Lodve B; Canzian, Federico; Haugen, Aage

    2008-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide with smoking and occupational exposure to carcinogenic compounds as the major risk factors. Susceptibility to lung cancer is affected by existence of polymorphic genes controlling the levels of metabolic activation and detoxification of carcinogens. We have investigated 105 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 31 genes from the phase I and phase II metabolism genes and antioxidant defense genes for association with the risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Norwegian population-based study. Our results indicate that several SNPs in the phase I genes, CYP1B1, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP3A4, are associated with the risk of NSCLC. Moreover, significant associations with multiple SNPs in the phase II genes ALDH2, COMT, EPHX1, SOD2, NAT1, NAT2, GSTM3, GSTP1, GSTT2 and MPO were also found. We prioritized our findings by use of two different recently developed Bayesian statistical tools, employing conservative prior probabilities of association. When we corrected for multiple testing using these statistical tools, three novel associations of NSCLC risk with SNPs in the CYP1B1 (Arg48Gly), COMT (Val158Met) and GSTT2 (Met139Ile) genes were found noteworthy. However, only four of the previously reported associations with polymorphisms in the GSTP1 (Ala14Val), SOD2 (Val16Ala), EPHX1 (His139Arg) genes and the NAT1 fast acetylator phenotype remained significantly associated with lung cancer.

  20. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  1. Summary - National Dissemination and the Five Target States, Part 3, Final Report for Phase II--Dissemination, Rural Shared Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre.

    The dissemination phase (Phase II) of the Rural Shared Services Project is reported in this document. Efforts of the dissemination phase were concentrated in 5 target states: Vermont, Georgia, Wyoming, Montana, and New Mexico; national dissemination was limited to attendance at national conferences, the U. S. Office of Education PREP materials for…

  2. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  3. Synthesis of human des-tryptophan-1,norleucine-12-minigastrin-II and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Wünsch, E; Moroder, L; Göhring, W; Borin, G; Calderan, A; Bali, J P

    1986-10-06

    A human minigastrin-II analog was prepared by conventional methods in solution using N-benzyloxycarbonyltyrosine O-sulfate as starting material in the synthetic route. Upon removal of the acid-labile protecting groups and purification by preparative reversed-phase chromatography the sulfated gastrin peptide was obtained in satisfactory overall yields as homogeneous material. It was found to be about twice as active as the non-sulfated form in stimulating gastric acid secretion and to exhibit a 10-fold higher affinity to gastrin receptors of purified parietal cells.

  4. Anti-oxidant, in vitro, in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and antiproliferative activity of mefenamic acid and its metal complexes with manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II).

    PubMed

    Kovala-Demertzi, Dimitra; Hadjipavlou-Litina, Dimitra; Staninska, Malgorzata; Primikiri, Alexandra; Kotoglou, Chronis; Demertzis, Mavroudis A

    2009-06-01

    Some new complexes of mefenamic acid with potentially interesting biological activity are described. The complexes of mefenamic acid [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 1, [Co(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 2, [Ni(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], 3, [Cu(mef)(2)(H(2)O)](2), 4 and [Zn(mef)(2)], 5, were prepared by the reaction of mefenamic acid, a potent anti-inflammatory drug with metal salts. Optical and infrared spectral data of these new complexes are reported. Monomeric six-coordinated species were isolated in the solid state for Mn(II), Ni(II) and Co(II), dimeric five-coordinated for Cu(II) and monomeric four-coordinated for Zn(II). In DMF or CHCl(3) solution the coordination number is retained and the coordinated molecules of water are replaced by solvent molecules. The anti-oxidant properties of the complexes were evaluated using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, DPPH, free radical scavenging assay. The scavenging activities of the complexes were measured and compared with those of the free drug and vitamin C. We have explored their ability to inhibit soybean lipoxygenase, beta-glucuronidase and trypsin- induced proteolysis. The complex [Mn(mef)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] exhibits the highest antioxidant activity and the highest inhibitory effect against the soybean lipogygenase (LOX), properties that are not demonstrated by mefenamic acid. Their inhibitory effects on rat paw edema induced by Carrageenan was studied and compared with those of mefenamic acid. The complex [Zn(mef)(2)] exhibited a strong inhibitory effect at 0.1 mmol/Kg B.W. (81.5 +/- 1.3% inhibition), superior to the inhibition induced by mefenamic acid at the same dose (61.5 +/- 2.3% inhibition). Mefenamic acid and its metal complexes have been evaluated for antiproliferative activity in vitro against the cells of three human cancer cell lines: MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell line), T24 (bladder cancer cell line), A-549 (non-small cell lung carcinoma) and a mouse fibroblast L-929 cell line. The copper(II) complex displays against T24, MCF-7

  5. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2001-07-23

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit level. During the past quarter approval for the re-direction took place and work was initiated at both levels.

  6. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Calderon

    2002-01-22

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level.

  7. A multicentre phase II study of cisplatin and gemcitabine for malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, A K; Byrne, M J; Williamson, R; Ryan, G; Segal, A; Fielding, D; Mitchell, P; Musk, A W; Robinson, B W S

    2002-01-01

    Our previous phase II study of cisplatin and gemcitabine in malignant mesothelioma showed a 47.6% (95% CI 26.2–69.0%) response rate with symptom improvement in responding patients. Here we confirm these findings in a multicentre setting, and assess the effect of this treatment on quality of life and pulmonary function. Fifty-three patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma received cisplatin 100 mg m−2 i.v. day 1 and gemcitabine 1000 mg m−2 i.v. days 1, 8, and 15 of a 28 day cycle for a maximum of six cycles. Quality of life and pulmonary function were assessed at each cycle. The best response achieved in 52 assessable patients was: partial response, 17 (33%, 95% CI 20–46%); stable disease, 31 (60%); and progressive disease, four (8%). The median time to disease progression was 6.4 months, median survival from start of treatment 11.2 months, and median survival from diagnosis 17.3 months. Vital capacity and global quality of life remained stable in all patients and improved significantly in responding patients. Major toxicities were haematological, limiting the mean relative dose intensity of gemcitabine to 75%. This schedule of cisplatin and gemcitabine is active in malignant mesothelioma in a multicentre setting. Investigation of alternative scheduling is needed to decrease haematological toxicity and increase the relative dose intensity of gemcitabine whilst maintaining response rate and quality of life. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 491–496. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600505 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12189542

  8. Phase II Study of Everolimus and Letrozole in Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Slomovitz, Brian M.; Jiang, Yunyun; Yates, Melinda S.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Johnston, Taren; Nowakowski, Maureen; Levenback, Charles; Zhang, Qian; Ring, Kari; Munsell, Mark F.; Gershenson, David M.; Lu, Karen H.; Coleman, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently dysregulated in endometrial cancer (EC). Hormonal manipulation leads to response in some patients with EC, but resistance derived from PI3K pathway activation has been documented. Targeting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) may overcome endocrine resistance. We conducted a two-institution phase II trial of everolimus and letrozole in women with recurrent EC. Patients and Methods Patients were considered incurable, had measurable disease, and were treated with up to two prior cytotoxic regimens. Everolimus was administered orally at 10 mg daily and letrozole was administered orally at 2.5 mg daily. Each cycle consisted of 4 weeks of therapy. Patients were treated until progression, toxicity, or complete response (CR). The primary end point was the clinical benefit rate (CBR), which was defined as CR, partial response, or stable disease (≥ 16 weeks) by RECIST 1.0 criteria. Translational studies were performed to correlate biomarkers with response. Results Thirty-eight patients were enrolled (median age, 62 years; range, 24 to 82 years). Thirty-five patients were evaluable for response. The CBR was 40% (14 of 35 patients); the median number of cycles among responders was 15 (range, seven to 29 cycles). The confirmed objective response rate (RR) was 32% (11 of 35 patients; nine CRs and two partial responses; median, 15 cycles; range, eight to 29 cycles). Twenty percent of patients (seven of 35 patients) were taken off treatment after a prolonged CR and at the discretion of the treating clinician. None of the patients discontinued treatment as a result of toxicity. Serous histology was the best predictor of lack of response. Patients with endometrioid histology and CTNNB1 mutations responded well to everolimus and letrozole. Conclusion Everolimus plus letrozole results in a high CBR and RR in patients with recurrent EC. Further development of this combination in recurrent endometrioid EC is under way

  9. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  10. Efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and biomarkers of cediranib monotherapy in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: A phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Andrew X.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Supko, Jeffrey G.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Abrams, Thomas A.; McCleary, Nadine Jackson; Bhargava, Pankaj; Muzikansky, Alona; Sheehan, Susan; Regan, Eileen; Vasudev, Eamala; Knowles, Michelle; Fuchs, Charles S.; Ryan, David P.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We performed a single-arm phase II study of cediranib, a pan-VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients and Methods Patients with histologically confirmed measurable advanced HCC and adequate hematologic, hepatic, and renal functions received cediranib 30-mg orally once daily (4 weeks/cycle). The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 3 months. Other endpoints included response rates, overall survival (OS), pharmacokinetics (PK) and biomarkers for cediranib. Results Cediranib treatment resulted in an estimated 3-month-PFS rate of 77% [60%, 99%]. Median PFS was 5.3 [3.5,9.7] months, stable disease was seen in 5/17 patients (29%), and median OS was 11.7 [7.5–13.6] months. Grade 3 toxicities included hypertension (29%), hyponatremia (29%) and hyperbilirubinemia (18%). Cediranib PK were comparable to those seen in cancer patients with normal hepatic function. Plasma levels of VEGF and PlGF increased and sVEGFR1, sVEGFR2 and Ang-2 decreased after cediranib treatment. PFS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of VEGF, sVEGFR2, and bFGF and with on-treatment levels of bFGF and IGF-1, and directly associated with on-treatment levels of IFN-γ. OS was inversely correlated with baseline levels of sVEGFR1, Ang-2, TNF-α, CAIX and CD34+CD133+CD45dim circulating progenitor cells and on-treatment levels of sVEGFR2. Conclusions Despite the limitations of primary endpoint selection, cediranib at 30-mg daily showed a high incidence of toxicity and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity in advanced HCC. Hepatic dysfunction did not appear to affect the steady-state PK of cediranib. Exploratory studies suggested pro-angiogenic and inflammatory factors as potential biomarkers of anti-VEGF therapy in HCC. PMID:23362324

  11. Phase II Study of Aflibercept in Recurrent Malignant Glioma: A North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, John F.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Aldape, Kenneth; Yao, Jun; Jackson, Edward F.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lassman, Andrew B.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Chen, Alice; Prados, Michael D.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is a promising treatment approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. This single-arm phase II study evaluated the efficacy of aflibercept (VEGF Trap), a recombinantly produced fusion protein that scavenges both VEGF and placental growth factor in patients with recurrent malignant glioma. Patients and Methods Forty-two patients with glioblastoma and 16 patients with anaplastic glioma who had received concurrent radiation and temozolomide and adjuvant temozolomide were enrolled at first relapse. Aflibercept 4 mg/kg was administered intravenously on day 1 of every 2-week cycle. Results The 6-month progression-free survival rate was 7.7% for the glioblastoma cohort and 25% for patients with anaplastic glioma. Overall radiographic response rate was 24% (18% for glioblastoma and 44% for anaplastic glioma). The median progression-free survival was 24 weeks for patients with anaplastic glioma (95% CI, 5 to 31 weeks) and 12 weeks for patients with glioblastoma (95% CI, 8 to 16 weeks). A total of 14 patients (25%) were removed from the study for toxicity, on average less than 2 months from treatment initiation. The main treatment-related National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria grades 3 and 4 adverse events (38 total) included fatigue, hypertension, and lymphopenia. Two grade 4 CNS ischemias and one grade 4 systemic hemorrhage were reported. Aflibercept rapidly decreases permeability on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular analysis of baseline tumor tissue identified tumor-associated markers of response and resistance. Conclusion Aflibercept monotherapy has moderate toxicity and minimal evidence of single-agent activity in unselected patients with recurrent malignant glioma. PMID:21606416

  12. Synthesis, physico-chemical studies of manganese(II), cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes with some p-substituted acetophenone benzoylhydrazones and their antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinod P; Singh, Shweta; Katiyar, Anshu

    2009-04-01

    Complexes of the type [M(pabh)(H2O)Cl], [M(pcbh)(H2O)Cl] and [M(Hpabh)(H2O)2 (SO4)] where, M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II); Hpabh = p-amino acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone and Hpcbh = p-chloro acetophenone benzoyl hydrazone have been synthesized and characterized with the help of elemental analyses, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility measurements, electronic, ESR and IR spectra, thermal (TGA & DTA) and X-ray diffraction studies. Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) chloride complexes are square planar, whereas their sulfate complexes have spin-free octahedral geometry. ESR spectra of Cu(II) complexes with Hpabh are axial and suggest d(x(2)-y(2) as the ground state. The ligand is bidentate bonding through > C = N--and deprotonated enolate group in all the chloro complexes, whereas, >C = N and >C = O groups in all the sulfato complexes. Thermal studies (TGA & DTA) on [Cu(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] indicate a multistep decomposition pattern, which are both exothermic and endothermic in nature. X-ray powder diffraction parameters for [Co(pabh)(H2O)Cl] and [Ni(Hpabh)(H2O)2(SO4)] correspond to tetragonal and orthorhombic crystal lattices, respectively. The ligands as well as their complexes show a significant antifungal and antibacterial activity. The metal complexes are more active than the ligand.

  13. Consequences of abnormal CDK activity in S phase.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Rothe, Christiane; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beáta

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDKs) are important regulators of DNA replication. In this work we have investigated the consequences of increasing or decreasing the CDK activity in S phase. To this end we identified S-phase regulators of the fission yeast CDK, Cdc2, and used appropriate mutants to modulate Cdc2 activity. In fission yeast Mik1 has been thought to be the main regulator of Cdc2 activity in S phase. However, we find that Wee1 has a major function in S phase and thus we used wee1 mutants to investigate the consequences of increased Cdc2 activity. These wee1 mutants display increased replication stress and, particularly in the absence of the S-phase checkpoint, accumulate DNA damage. Notably, more cells incorporate EdU in a wee1(-) strain as compared to wildtype, suggesting altered regulation of DNA replication. In addition, a higher number of cells contain chromatin-bound Cdc45, an indicator of active replication forks. In addition, we found that Cdc25 is required to activate Cdc2 in S phase and used a cdc25 mutant to explore a situation where Cdc2 activity is reduced. Interestingly, a cdc25 mutant has a higher tolerance for replication stress than wild-type cells, suggesting that reduced CDK activity in S phase confers resistance to at least some forms of replication stress.

  14. Basic Chad Arabic: The Active Phase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Absi, Samir Abu; Sinaud, Andre

    This third volume in the course on Chad Arabic emphasizes the active development of speaking skills in the target language. The active participation of the student requires imitation and induction of linguistic structures to a large extent. Some 45 units present grammatical material on gender, parts of speech, and verbs. Each unit contains a…

  15. Structure and compressibility of the high-pressure molecular phase II of carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datchi, Frédéric; Mallick, Bidyut; Salamat, Ashkan; Rousse, Gwenaëlle; Ninet, Sandra; Garbarino, Gaston; Bouvier, Pierre; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    The structure and equation of state of the crystalline molecular phase II of carbon dioxide have been investigated at room temperature from 15.5 to 57.5 GPa using synchrotron x-ray diffraction methods. The CO2 samples were embedded in neon pressure medium in order to provide quasihydrostatic conditions. The x-ray diffraction patterns of phase II are best described by a tetragonal structure, with space group P42/mnm and 2 molecules per unit cell, in accordance with a previous study [Yoo et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 104103 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.104103]. There is however a large (15%) difference in the intramolecular C=O bond length between the present study, 1.14(3) Å, and the latter work (1.329-1.366 Å). The present value is similar to that of the free molecule and is in very good agreement with predictions based on density functional theory. The compressibility of CO2-II determined here also disagrees with the previous study: our value for the zero-pressure bulk modulus, B0=8.5(3) GPa [with B0'=(∂B/∂P)0=6.29], is 15.5 times smaller. These findings oppose the view that CO2-II is an intermediate state between the low-pressure molecular phases and the high-pressure nonmolecular forms, consistent with our previous results for phase IV [Datchi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 185701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.185701]. The x-ray diffraction patterns of CO2-II above 15 GPa indicate the presence of a large orthorhombic microstrain. Carrying out density functional theory calculations of the elastic tensor and stress-strain relation, we interpret this as due to the softness of the crystal against deviatoric stress in the [110] and symmetry-related directions. Unlike the other dioxides of the group-14 elements, there is however no mechanical or dynamical instability of the P42/mnm structure in CO2 up to 57.5 GPa at 295 K, and therefore no symmetry lowering to Pnnm.

  16. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume II. Detailed description of the model

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    This document is the second of a seven volume series of our Phase II Final Report. This volume deals with detailed descriptions of the structure of each program member (subroutines and functions), the interrelation between the members of a submodel, and the interrelation between the various submodels as such. The systems model for fluidized bed combustors (FBC-II) consists of a systematic combination of the following interrelated areas: fluid mechanics and bubble growth, char combustion and associated kinetics for particle burnout, sulfur capture, NO/sub x/ formation and reduction, freeboard reactions, and heat transfer. Program outline is shown in Figure 1.1. Input variables (supplied by the user are inspected to check that they lie inside the allowed range of values and are input to the various routines as needed. The necessary physical and fluid mechanical properties are calculated and utilized in estimating char combustion and sulfur capture in the bed and the freeboard. NO/sub x/ and CO emissions are estimated by taking into account all relevant chemical reactions. A material and energy balance is made over the bed. Figure 1.1 shows a block diagram of the systems program. In this diagram, the overall structure of the FBC program is illustrated in terms of the various submodels that together constitute the systems program. A more detailed outline of the systems program is shown in Figure 1.2. In this figure, all important subroutine members of the FBC program are shown, and their linkage to each other, as well as to the main program is indicated. A description of the exact sequence in which these various routines are called at time of program execution is provided in Chapter 8 under the executive routine MAIN.

  17. Zinc(II) oxide solubility and phase behavior in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemniak, S.E.; Jones, M.E.; Combs, K.E.S.

    1990-02-01

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility is used to investigate the solubility/phase behavior of zinc(II) oxide in aqueous sodium phosphate solutions at temperatures between 290 and 560 K. ZnO solubilities are observed to increase continuously with temperature and phosphate concentration. At higher phosphate concentrations, a solid phase transformation to NaZnPO{sub 4} is observed. NaZnPO{sub 4} solubilities are retrograde with temperature. The measured solubility behavior is examined via a Zn(II) ion hydrolysis/complexing model and thermodynamic functions for the hydrolysis/complexing reaction equilibria are obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. The existence of two new zinc(II) ion complexes is reported for the first time: Zn(OH){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}} and Zn(OH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sup 2{minus}}. A summary of thermochemical properties for species in the systems ZnO-H{sub 2}O and ZnO-Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-H{sub 2}O is also provided. 21 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Active Nematics Are Intrinsically Phase Separated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shradha; Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2006-09-01

    Two-dimensional nonequilibrium nematic steady states, as found in agitated granular-rod monolayers or films of orientable amoeboid cells, were predicted [Europhys. Lett. 62, 196 (2003)EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2003-00346-7] to have giant number fluctuations, with the standard deviation proportional to the mean. We show numerically that the steady state of such systems is macroscopically phase separated, yet dominated by fluctuations, as in the Das-Barma model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1602 (2000)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.85.1602]. We suggest experimental tests of our findings in granular and living-cell systems.

  19. Enhanced dewaterability of waste activated sludge by Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Dongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Zhong, Yu; Li, Xin; Deng, Yongchao; Wang, Liqun; Yi, Kaixin; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-04-01

    The effect of Fe(II)-activated peroxymonosulfate (Fe(II)-PMS) oxidation on the waste activated sludge (WAS) dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. The capillary suction time (CST), specific resistance to filterability (SRF) of sludge and water content (WC) of dewatered sludge cake were chosen as the main parameters to evaluate the sludge dewaterability. Experimental results showed that Fe(II)-PMS effectively disintegrated sludge and improved sludge dewaterability. High CST and SRF reduction (90% and 97%) was achieved at the optimal conditions of PMS (HSO5(-)) 0.9 mmol/gVSS, Fe(II) 0.81 mmol/gVSS, and pH 6.8. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy before and after Fe(II)-PMS oxidation were determined to explain the enhanced dewatering mechanism. The release of EPS-bound water induced by the destruction of EPS was the primary reason for the improvement of sludge dewaterability during Fe(II)-PMS oxidation.

  20. Cytotoxic activity, X-ray crystal structures and spectroscopic characterization of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination compounds with 2-substituted benzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guadarrama, Obdulia; López-Sandoval, Horacio; Sánchez-Bartéz, Francisco; Gracia-Mora, Isabel; Höpfl, Herbert; Barba-Behrens, Noráh

    2009-09-01

    Herein we present the synthesis, structural and spectroscopic characterization of coordination compounds of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) with 2-methylbenzimidazole (2mbz), 2-phenylbenzimidazole (2phbz), 2-chlorobenzimidazole (2cbz), 2-benzimidazolecarbamate (2cmbz) and 2-guanidinobenzimidazole (2gbz). Their cytotoxic activity was evaluated using human cancer cell lines, PC3 (prostate), MCF-7 (breast), HCT-15 (colon), HeLa (cervic-uterine), SKLU-1 (lung) and U373 (glioblastoma), showing that the zinc(II) and copper(II) compounds [Zn(2mbz)(2)Cl(2)].0.5H(2)O, [Zn(2cmbz)(2)Cl(2)].EtOH, [Cu(2cmbz)Br(2)].0.7H(2)O and [Cu(2gbz)Br(2)] had significant cytotoxic activity. The isostructural cobalt(II) complexes showed not significant activity. The cytotoxic activity is related to the presence of halides in the coordination sphere of the metal ion. Recuperation experiments with HeLa cells, showed that the cells recuperated after removing the copper(II) compounds and, on the contrary, the cells treated with the zinc(II) compounds did not. These results indicate that the mode of action of the coordination compounds is different.

  1. Phase I and Phase II Therapies for Acute Ischemic Stroke: An Update on Currently Studied Drugs in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Cesar; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Araujo, Camila; Huang, Lei; Applegate II, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a devastating cause of death and disability, consequences of which depend on the time from ischemia onset to treatment, the affected brain region, and its size. The main targets of ischemic stroke therapy aim to restore tissue perfusion in the ischemic penumbra in order to decrease the total infarct area by maintaining blood flow. Advances in research of pathological process and pathways during acute ischemia have resulted in improvement of new treatment strategies apart from restoring perfusion. Additionally, limiting the injury severity by manipulating the molecular mechanisms during ischemia has become a promising approach, especially in animal research. The purpose of this article is to review completed and ongoing phases I and II trials for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke, reviewing studies on antithrombotic, thrombolytic, neuroprotective, and antineuroinflammatory drugs that may translate into more effective treatments. PMID:28286764

  2. Phase II of the demonstration of the Koppelman series C process. Topical report, February 1995--February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.

    1998-12-31

    A pilot plant using the Koppelman Series C Process was designed, constructed, and operated near Gillette, Wyoming, as part of Phase I of this project. Construction was completed in late fall of 1993, and the shakedown was completed in early 1994. The initial series of tests performed to prove the process and to characterize the effluents was conducted during the first half of 1994. The results of those tests are described in the final report for Phase I. This report describes the activities conducted during Phase II of the project the objective of which was to move the process, which was proven during Phase I, a step closer to commercialization. Specifically, the work was planned to lower the cost of the process by developing a high-capacity processor, increasing the already high efficiency of the process by using a feed coal preheated, increasing the bulk density of the product by using mixed particle size extrudate, and preparing a preliminary scoping design for the water treatment plant for a 500,000 ton per year commercial plant.

  3. Large-N Over the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Phase I and Phase II Test Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelson, C. M.; Carmichael, J. D.; Mellors, R. J.; Abbott, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    One of the current challenges in the field of monitoring and verification is source discrimination of low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity, both natural and anthropogenic. Work is underway at the Nevada National Security Site to conduct a series of chemical explosion experiments using a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary approach. The goal of this series of experiments, called the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), is to refine the understanding of the effect of earth structures on source phenomenology and energy partitioning in the source region, the transition of seismic energy from the near field to the far field, and the development of S waves observed in the far field. To fully explore these problems, the SPE series includes tests in both hard and soft rock geologic environments. The project comprises a number of activities, which range from characterizing the shallow subsurface to acquiring new explosion data from both the near field (<100 m) and the far field (>100 m). SPE includes a series of planned explosions (with different yields and depths of burials), which are conducted in the same hole and monitored by a diverse set of sensors recording characteristics of the explosions, ground-shock, seismo-acoustic energy propagation. This presentation focuses on imaging the full 3D wavefield over hard rock and soft rock test beds using a large number of seismic sensors. This overview presents statistical analyses of optimal sensor layout required to estimate wavefield discriminants and the planned deployment for the upcoming experiments. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  4. Schisandra Chinensis Baillon regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes in hepatic damage induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Han I; Do, Gyeong-Min; Lee, Hye Min; Ok, Hyang Mok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study investigated the antioxidant activities and hepatoprotective effects of Schisandra chinensis Baillon extract (SCE) against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative hepatic damage in rats. MATERIALS/METHODS Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were pretreated with SCE (300, 600, and 1,200 mg/kg BW) or saline once daily for 14 consecutive days. On day 14, each animal, except those belonging to the normal control group, were injected with t-BHP (0.8 mmol/kg BW/i.p.), and all of the rats were sacrificed 16 h after t-BHP injection. RESULTS Although no significant differences in AST and ALT levels were observed among the TC and SCE groups, the high-dose SCE group showed a decreasing tendency compared to the TC group. However, erythrocyte SOD activity showed a significant increase in the low-dose SCE group compared with the TC group. On the other hand, no significant differences in hepatic total glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed among the TC and SCE groups. Hepatic histopathological evaluation revealed that pretreatment with SCE resulted in reduced t-BHP-induced incidence of lesions, such as neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In particular, treatment with a high dose of SCE resulted in induction of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme expression, such as glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). CONCLUSIONS Based on these results, we conclude that SCE exerts protective effects against t-BHP induced oxidative hepatic damage through the reduction of neutrophil infiltration, swelling of liver cells, and necrosis. In addition, SCE regulates the gene expression of phase II antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes independent of hepatic antioxidant enzyme activity. PMID:24944771

  5. Phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) progressing after docetaxel and abiraterone

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, J.; Loriot, Y.; Pezaro, C.; Albiges, L.; Mehra, N.; Varga, A.; Bianchini, D.; Ryan, C. J.; Petrylak, D. P.; Attard, G.; Shen, L.; Fizazi, K.; de Bono, J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Abiraterone and cabazitaxel improve survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted an open-label phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone to assess the antitumor activity and tolerability in patients with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel (phase I), and after docetaxel and abiraterone (phase II) (NCT01511536). Patients and methods The primary objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone (phase I), and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response defined as a ≥ 50% decrease confirmed ≥3 weeks later with this combination (phase II). Results Ten patients were enrolled in the phase I component; nine were evaluable. No DLTs were identified. The MTD was established as the approved doses for both drugs (cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 every 3 weeks and abiraterone 1000 mg once daily). Daily abiraterone treatment did not impact on cabazitaxel clearance. Twenty-seven patients received cabazitaxel plus abiraterone plus prednisone (5 mg twice daily) in phase II. The median number of cycles administered (cabazitaxel) was seven (range: 1–28). Grade 3–4 treatment-emergent adverse events included asthenia (in 5 patients; 14%), neutropenia (in 5 patients; 14%) and diarrhea (in 3 patients; 8%). Nine patients (24%) required dose reductions of cabazitaxel. Of 26 evaluable patients, 12 achieved a PSA response [46%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 26.6–66.6%]. Median PSA-progression-free survival was 6.9 months (95% CI: 4.1–10.3 months). Of 14 patients with measurable disease at baseline, 3 (21%) achieved a partial response per response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Conclusions The combination of cabazitaxel and abiraterone has a manageable safety profile and shows antitumor activity in patients previously treated with docetaxel and abiraterone. PMID:28039155

  6. Phase II trial of biweekly docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Atsuko; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Naoki; Matsuhashi, Nobuhisa; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer patients is still unsatisfactory. Although a docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-Fu (DCF) regimen has been reported, it is often difficult to accomplish because of severe toxicity. Therefore, we developed a new biweekly DCF (Bi-DCF) regimen and previously reported the recommended dose in a phase I dose-escalation study. We then performed a phase II study of Bi-DCF for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Patients with clinical stage II/III were eligible. Patients received 2 courses of chemotherapy: docetaxel 35 mg/m(2) with cisplatin 40 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15 and 400 mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 and 15-19 every 4 weeks. After completion of the chemotherapy, patients received esophagectomy. The primary endpoint was the completion rate of protocol treatment. Thirty-two patients were enrolled. The completion rate of protocol treatment (completion of two courses of preoperative chemotherapy and R0 surgery) was 100 %. During chemotherapy, the most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities were neutropenia (31.3 %). No treatment-related death was observed, and the incidence of operative morbidity was tolerable. The overall response rate after the chemotherapy was 90.3 %. This Bi-DCF regimen was well tolerated and highly active. This trial was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network (No. UMIN 000014625).

  7. Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-20

    Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

  8. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  9. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  10. Design of Phase II cancer trials for evaluation of cytostatic/cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Kocherginsky, Masha; Cohen, Ezra E W; Karrison, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    For experimental anticancer agents that may have both cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, assessment of response rates alone may not capture the full impact of the treatment. Oncologists are therefore interested in assessing both response and stable disease rates in early phase clinical trials of such therapies. We describe the design of a single-arm, Phase II clinical trial for the simultaneous evaluation of objective response and stable disease (lack of early tumor progression) rates using standard RECIST criteria. Demonstration of a sufficiently high rate for either of these endpoints will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis and a conclusion that the treatment warrants further study. A design is chosen that satisfies the desired type I error constraint and has sufficient statistical power at several selected points within the alternative hypothesis space using a restricted search algorithm. An early stopping rule for lack of efficacy is incorporated. The method is illustrated by the design of a Phase II clinical trial in head and neck cancer.

  11. Turnable Semiconductor Laser Spectroscopy in Hollow Optical Waveguides, Phase II SBIR

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory J. Fetzer, Ph.D.

    2001-12-24

    In this study a novel optical trace gas sensor based on a perforated hollow waveguide (PHW) was proposed. The sensor has been given the acronym ESHOW for Environmental Sensor using Hollow Optical Waveguides. Realizations of the sensor have demonstrated rapid response time (<2s), low minimum detection limits (typically around 3 x 10-5 absorbance). Operation of the PHW technology has been demonstrated in the near-infrared (NIR) and mid0infrared (MIR) regions of the spectrum. Simulation of sensor performance provided in depth understanding of the signals and signal processing required to provide high sensitivity yet retain rapid response to gas changes. A dedicated sensor electronics and software foundation were developed during the course of the Phase II effort. Commercial applications of the sensor are ambient air and continuous emissions monitoring, industrial process control and hazardous waste site monitoring. There are numerous other applications for such a sensor including medical diagnosis and treatment, breath analysis for legal purposes, water quality assessment, combustion diagnostics, and chemical process control. The successful completion of Phase II resulted in additional funding of instrument development by the Nations Institute of Heath through a Phase I SBIR grant and a strategic teaming relationship with a commercial manufacture of medical instrumentation. The purpose of the NIH grant and teaming relationship is to further develop the sensor to monitor NO in exhaled breath for the purposes of asthma diagnosis.

  12. High-intensity-discharger 400-W sodium ballast. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Felper, G.

    1981-10-01

    A research and development program directed toward design, test, and evaluation of an energy efficient High Intensity Discharge (HID) Solid-State 400 Watt Ballast lighting system was undertaken. Under Phase I of the project, the existing ballast was modified, performance characteristics were measured, efficiency was compared with a core/coil ballast including energy loss analysis. Six (6) prototype 400 W High Pressure Sodium Ballasts were built, for verification tests by an independent test facility prior to follow-on performance and life tests. This report covers Phase II of the project which was designed to make test data comparisons on results received from the independent test laboratory, determine methods to increase ballast efficiency, determine the importance of power factors, conduct bulb life tests, perform specification review, performance versus cost analysis, investigate the ballast to determine compliance with new FCC requirement, and determine a line transient specification in respect to solid state ballasting. In addition, Phase II required reliability testing, a manufacturing test plan, a marketing study for solid-state ballast, and the manufacture and delivery of fifteen (15) demonstration ballast units to LBL. These requirements are discussed.

  13. [Orthodontics in general practice 3. Angle Class II/1 malocclusion: one-phase treatment treatment preferred to two-phase treatment].

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, M A R; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2008-01-01

    With regard to the optimal treatment timing for children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion, there is an ongoing controversy on the effectiveness of a two-phase or a one-phase therapy. Two-phase treatment involves a first phase to correct the jaw relationship starting at the age of 7 to 9 years, and, when all permanent teeth are present, a second phase of treatment by fixed appliances. A one-phase treatment involves treatment of the jaw relationship and the dental malocclusion simultaneously or consecutively, starting during the early adolescence period. In recent years, several randomized controlled clinical trials have been performed on this topic. More recently, a Cochrane meta-analysis of these trials has been published. The results show that early treatment of an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion followed by a second phase of treatment does not have any advantages over treatment that is started later and finished in one phase. One-phase treatment is as effective as two-phase treatment, while the time needed for treatment is shorter and, as a consequence, total costs are lower. Dentists should take into account this information, when treating children with an Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion or referring them to an orthodontist.

  14. Antitumor activity of phenylene bridged binuclear bis(imino-quinolyl)palladium(II) and platinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Motswainyana, William M; Onani, Martin O; Madiehe, Abram M; Saibu, Morounke

    2014-04-01

    Antitumor effects of a known bis(imino-quinolyl)palladium(II) complex 1 and its newly synthesized platinum(II) analogue 2 were evaluated against human breast (MCF-7) and human colon (HT-29) cancer cell lines. The complexes gave cytotoxicity profiles that were better than the reference drug cisplatin. The highest cytotoxic activities were pronounced in complex 2 across the two examined cancer cell lines. Both compounds represent potential active drugs based on bimetallic complexes.

  15. Final Phase I-Phase II interim report : expedited site characterization, Morrill, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2005-10-20

    The city of Morrill, Kansas, is located in Brown County, in the northeastern corner of the state. The town lies about 7 mi east of Sabetha and about 10 mi northwest of Hiawatha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2000 census was approximately 277. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in the northwestern section of Morrill from 1950 until 1971. The property continued to be used for grain storage after 1971. Fourteen of the original 21 CCC/USDA circular bin structures remain today. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. Contamination with carbon tetrachloride, also known as tetrachloromethane, was initially identified in groundwater at Morrill in October 1985 in public water supply well PWS5, during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A preliminary assessment was completed by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1989 to obtain background information on the Morrill public water supply and to identify potential sources of the detected carbon tetrachloride contamination (KDHE 1989). Since 1991 the city of Morrill has obtained its water by pipeline from the municipal water supply of Sabetha. Water supplied through the Sabetha system comes from a surface reservoir. Former public wells in Morrill are no longer used for municipal supply. Wells PWS3, PWS4, and PWS5 were plugged in 1993. Wells PWS1 and PWS2 are no longer in active production, but they continue to be available for non-drinking purposes such as bulk hauling for agricultural uses, fire fighting, and road work (Hansen 2001). Because the KDHE found carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater at the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill that could, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain

  16. Urinary angiotensin II: a marker of renal tissue activity?

    PubMed

    Reams, G; Villarreal, D; Wu, Z; Bauer, J H

    1994-01-01

    The methodology for the collection, extraction, separation and measurement of urinary angiotensin II [the octapeptide, ANG(1-8)] is described. To determine the origin of urinary ANG(1-8), mean arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics and the arterial, renal venous and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were examined prior to and following the constant intra-arterial infusion of tritiated angiotensin II [3H-ANG(1-8)] in graded doses of 0.5, 2.0 and 2.5 ng/kg/min in 5 uninephrectomized, anesthetized female dogs. The infusion of 3H-ANG-(1-8) had no significant effect on mean arterial pressure, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow or urine flow rate. The mean concentration of ANG(1-8) in the urine was 3.7 fmol/ml. None or only trace amounts of 3H-ANG(1-8) were detected in the urine in spite of marked increases in renal arterial 3H-ANG(1-8) concentrations. These observations suggest that urinary ANG(1-8) was derived de novo from the intrarenal generation of angiotensin II. In addition, plasma and urinary concentrations of ANG(1-8) were assessed in patients with essential hypertension undergoing treatment with either a diuretic (n = 14) or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (n = 14). Although the concentrations of plasma ANG(1-8) responded appropriately to the respective therapies, the urinary excretion of ANG(1-8) was not different following either therapy. These data suggest that ANG(1-8) collected from the urinary bladder may not occur in adequate concentrations to accurately assess the activity of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system.

  17. Performance Evaluation of Alcohol-Gasoline Blends in 1980 Model Automobiles. Phase II. Methanol-Gasoline Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    renovation, re-inspection, and acceptance by CRC. These cars comprised three models by three automobile makers and two engine-emissions control groups for...EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL.GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES PHASE II METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS January 1984 APPROVrD FOR pUBLIC RELEASE" DISTRIBUTION...Members: PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ALCOHOL-GASOLINE BLENDS IN 1980 MODEL AUTOMOBILES : PHASE II - METHANOL-GASOLINE BLENDS (CRC Report No. 536) -I

  18. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prathima, B.; Subba Rao, Y.; Adinarayana Reddy, S.; Reddy, Y. P.; Varada Reddy, A.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and 1H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  19. Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexes of benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Synthesis, characterization and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Prathima, B; Subba Rao, Y; Adinarayana Reddy, S; Reddy, Y P; Varada Reddy, A

    2010-09-15

    Benzyloxybenzaldehyde-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligand (L) has been synthesized from benzyloxybenzaldehyde and 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazide. Complexes of this ligand with chlorides of Cu(II) and Ni(II) have been prepared. The structure of the ligand (L) is proposed based on elemental analysis, IR and (1)H NMR spectra. Its complexes with Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions are characterized from the studies of electronic as well as EPR spectra. On the basis of electronic and EPR studies, rhombically distorted octahedral structure has been proposed for Cu(II) complex while the Ni(II) complex has been found to acquire an octahedral structure. The ligand and their metal complexes have been tested in vitro for their biological effects. Their antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) have been investigated. The prepared metal complexes exhibit higher antibacterial activities than the parent ligand. The in vitro antioxidant activity of free ligand and its metal(II) complexes have also been investigated and the results however reveal that the ligand exhibits greater antioxidant activity than its complexes.

  20. In vitro studies of the loss of antibacterial activity of oxytetracycline in presence of Ca(II) or Mg(II) ions.

    PubMed

    Naz, S; Khan, K A; Zubairi, S A

    1996-07-01

    The results of a comparative study, which evaluated the in vitro effect on the antibacterial activity of oxytetracycline (OTC, CAS 79-57-2) in presence of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions suggest that susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus pumilis and Bacillus subtilis to OTC is reduced in presence of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions. As the ratio of concentration of Ca(II)/Mg(II) to OTC was increased, antibacterial activity of OTC declined. In addition to the difference observed between the antibacterial effect of pure OTC and its Ca(II)/Mg(II) complexes, it was found that decline in antibacterial activity is greater for Mg(II)-OTC complex than Ca(II)-OTC complex for the same concentration of Ca(II)/Mg(II) ions.

  1. A Phase I-II Study of Postoperative Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Crosby, Tom D.L.; Dubbelman, Ria; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 randomized study showed that postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. We hypothesized that these results could be improved further by using a more effective, intensified, and convenient chemotherapy schedule. Therefore, this Phase I-II dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and toxicity profile of postoperative radiotherapy combined with concurrent capecitabine. Patients and Methods: After recovery from surgery for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or stomach, all patients were treated with capecitabine monotherapy, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 2 weeks. After a 1-week treatment-free interval, patients received capecitabine (650-1,000 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily 5 days/week) in a dose-escalation schedule combined with radiotherapy on weekdays for 5 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the gastric bed, anastomoses, and regional lymph nodes. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated accordingly. Two patients went off study before or shortly after the start of chemoradiotherapy because of progressive disease. Therefore, 64 patients completed treatment as planned. During the chemoradiotherapy phase, 4 patients developed four items of Grade III dose-limiting toxicity (3 patients in Dose Level II and 1 patient in Dose Level IV). The predefined highest dose of capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily orally, was tolerated well and, therefore, considered safe for further clinical evaluation. Conclusions: This Phase I-II study shows that intensified chemoradiotherapy with daily capecitabine is feasible in postoperative patients with gastroesophageal junction and gastric cancer.

  2. In Vivo Exposure of Kaempferol Is Driven by Phase II Metabolic Enzymes and Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Zhu, Lijun; Zhao, Min; Shi, Jian; Li, Yuhuan; Yu, Jia; Jiang, Huangyu; Wu, Jinjun; Tong, Yunli; Liu, Yuting; Hu, Ming; Lu, Linlin; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2016-09-01

    Kaempferol is a well-known flavonoid; however, it lacks extensive pharmacokinetic studies. Phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters play an important role in the disposition of flavonoids. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters determine the in vivo exposure of kaempferol. Pharmacokinetic analysis in Sprague-Dawley rats revealed that kaempferol was mostly biotransformed to conjugates, namely, kaempferol-3-glucuronide (K-3-G), kaempferol-7-glucuronide (K-7-G), and kaempferol-7-sulfate, in plasma. K-3-G represented the major metabolite. Compared with that in wild-type mice, pharmacokinetics in knockout FVB mice demonstrated that the absence of multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) of the conjugates. The lack of MRP1 resulted in a much lower AUC of the conjugates. Intestinal perfusion in rats revealed that the glucuronide conjugates were mainly excreted in the small intestine, but 7-sulfate was mainly excreted in the colon. In Caco-2 monolayers, K-7-G efflux toward the apical (AP) side was significantly higher than K-3-G efflux. In contrast, K-3-G efflux toward the basolateral (BL) side was significantly higher than K-7-G efflux. The BL-to-AP efflux was significantly reduced in the presence of the MRP2 inhibitor LTC4. The AP-to-BL efflux was significantly decreased in the presence of the BL-side MRPs inhibitor MK571. The BCRP inhibitor Ko143 decreased the glucuronide conjugate efflux. Therefore, kaempferol is mainly exposed as K-3-G in vivo, which is driven by phase II metabolic enzymes and efflux transporters (i.e., BCRP and MRPs).

  3. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, Mohd F. Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-24

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m{sup 2}/g and 0.17 cm{sup 2}/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  4. Removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution using rice husk-based activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Mohd F.; Shuib, Anis Suhaila; Shaharun, Maizatul S.; Borhan, Azry

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the potential of rice husk-based activated carbon as an alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Rice husk-based activated carbon was prepared via treatment of rice husk with NaOH followed by the carbonization process at 400°C for 2 hours. Three samples, i.e. raw rice husk, rice husk treated with NaOH and rice husk-based activated carbon, were analyzed for their morphological characteristics using field-emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray (FESEM/EDX). These samples were also analyzed for their carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and silica contents using CHN elemental analyzer and FESEM/EDX. The porous properties of rice husk-based activated carbon were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, and its surface area and pore volume were 255 m2/g and 0.17 cm2/g, respectively. The adsorption studies for the removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single metal aqueous solution were carried out at a fixed initial concentration of metal ion (150 ppm) with variation amount of adsorbent (rice husk-based activated carbon) as a function of varied contact time at room temperature. The concentration of each metal ion was analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The results obtained from adsorption studies indicate the potential of rice husk as an economically promising precursor for the preparation of activated carbon for removal of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Pb(II) ions from single aqueous solution. Isotherm and kinetic model analyses suggested that the experimental data of adsorption studies fitted well with Langmuir, Freundlich and second-order kinetic models.

  5. Solid phase extraction of copper(II) by fixed bed procedure on cation exchange complexing resins.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, Maria; Sturini, Michela; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Biesuz, Raffaela

    2010-02-19

    The efficiency of the metal ion recovery by solid phase extraction (SPE) in complexing resins columns is predicted by a simple model based on two parameters reflecting the sorption equilibria and kinetics of the metal ion on the considered resin. The parameter related to the adsorption equilibria was evaluated by the Gibbs-Donnan model, and that related to the kinetics by assuming that the ion exchange is the adsorption rate determining step. The predicted parameters make it possible to evaluate the breakthrough volume of the considered metal ion, Cu(II), from different kinds of complexing resins, and at different conditions, such as acidity and ionic composition.

  6. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  7. Design and Development of an Arctic 20,000 Gallon Collapsible Fuel Tank. Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    Elastomeric Coated Fabric N0*,,A"rT0&T (Continue on rever’.9 aide if nec-o ry/ and identify by block numiber) ILC Dover, after successfully developing two...further testing under various global climactic conditions and evaluated for universal POL use. ILC further recommends the V84-8-1 material be...then produced two tanks of each material . Results of Phase II efforts are presented in this report. SI I 2.0 TANK CONSTRUCTION PROCEDURE DISCUSSION The

  8. A Disposable Microfluidic Device with a Screen Printed Electrode for Mimicking Phase II Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliadou, Rafaela; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Brown, Nathan J.; Welham, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Human metabolism is investigated using several in vitro methods. However, the current methodologies are often expensive, tedious and complicated. Over the last decade, the combination of electrochemistry (EC) with mass spectrometry (MS) has a simpler and a cheaper alternative to mimic the human metabolism. This paper describes the development of a disposable microfluidic device with a screen-printed electrode (SPE) for monitoring phase II GSH reactions. The proposed chip has the potential to be used as a primary screening tool, thus complementing the current in vitro methods. PMID:27598162

  9. Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research Phase II: N+4 Advanced Concept Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Marty K.; Droney, Christopher K.

    2012-01-01

    This final report documents the work of the Boeing Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) team on Task 1 of the Phase II effort. The team consisted of Boeing Research and Technology, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, General Electric, and Georgia Tech. Using a quantitative workshop process, the following technologies, appropriate to aircraft operational in the N+4 2040 timeframe, were identified: Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Hydrogen, fuel cell hybrids, battery electric hybrids, Low Energy Nuclear (LENR), boundary layer ingestion propulsion (BLI), unducted fans and advanced propellers, and combinations. Technology development plans were developed.

  10. Garlic attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rats by altering the phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Mohamed; Musthapa, M Syed; Abidi, Parveen; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rahman, Qamar

    2003-01-01

    Asbestos and its carcinogenic properties have been extensively documented. Asbestos exposure induces diverse cellular events associated with lung injury. Previously, we have shown that treatment with chrysotile shows significant alteration in phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzyme system. In this study we have examined some potential mechanisms by which garlic treatment attenuates chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in rat. Female Wistar rats received an intratracheal instillation of 5 mg chrysotile (0.5 mL saline) as well as intragastric garlic treatment (1% body weight (v/w); 6 days per week). Effect of garlic treatment was evaluated after 1, 15, 30, 90, and 180 days by assaying aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in rat lung microsome. The results showed that AHH and TBARS formation were significantly reduced at day 90 and day 180 in chrysotile treated garlic cofed rats; GSH recovered 15 days later to the near normal level and GST elevated significantly after treatment of garlic as compared to chrysotile alone treated rat lung microsome. The data obtained shows that inhibition of AHH activity and induction of GST activity could be contributing factor in chrysotile-mediated pulmonary toxicity in garlic cofed rats. However, recovery of GSH and inhibition of TBARS formation by garlic and its constituent(s) showed that garlic may give protection by altering the drug metabolizing enzyme system.

  11. The multifaceted Type II-L supernova 2014G from pre-maximum to nebular phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terreran, G.; Jerkstrand, A.; Benetti, S.; Smartt, S. J.; Ochner, P.; Tomasella, L.; Howell, D. A.; Morales-Garoffolo, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Kankare, E.; Arcavi, I.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Kangas, T.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Wiggins, P.; Yuan, F.

    2016-10-01

    We present multiband ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry, along with visual-wavelength spectroscopy, of supernova (SN) 2014G in the nearby galaxy NGC 3448 (25 Mpc). The early-phase spectra show strong emission lines of the high ionization species He II/N IV/C IV during the first 2-3 d after explosion, traces of a metal-rich circumstellar material (CSM) probably due to pre-explosion mass-loss events. These disappear by day 9 and the spectral evolution then continues matching that of normal Type II SNe. The post-maximum light curve declines at a rate typical of Type II-L class. The extensive photometric coverage tracks the drop from the photospheric stage and constrains the radioactive tail, with a steeper decline rate than that expected from the 56Co decay if γ-rays are fully trapped by the ejecta. We report the appearance of an unusual feature on the blue side of H α after 100 d, which evolves to appear as a flat spectral feature linking H α and the [O I] doublet. This may be due to interaction of the ejecta with a strongly asymmetric, and possibly bipolar CSM. Finally, we report two deep spectra at ˜190 and 340 d after explosion, the latter being arguably one of the latest spectra for a Type II-L SN. By modelling the spectral region around the [Ca II], we find a supersolar Ni/Fe production. The strength of the [O I] λλ6300,6363 doublet, compared with synthetic nebular spectra, suggests a progenitor with a zero-age main-sequence mass between 15 and 19 M⊙.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro anticancer activity of 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kareem, Abdul; Zafar, Hina; Sherwani, Asif; Mohammad, Owais; Khan, Tahir Ali

    2014-10-01

    An effective series of 18 membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes of the type [MLX2], where X = Cl or NO3 have been synthesized by template condensation reaction of oxalyl dihydrazide with dibenzoylmethane and metal salt in 2:2:1 molar ratio. The formation of macrocyclic framework, stereochemistry and their overall geometry have been characterized by various physico-chemical studies viz., elemental analysis, electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), I.R, UV-Vis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TGA/DTA studies. These studies suggest formation of octahedral macrocyclic complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Sn(II). The molar conductance values suggest nonelectrolytic nature for all the complexes. Thermogravimatric analysis shows that all the complexes are stable up to 600 °C. All these complexes have been tested against different human cancer cell lines i.e. human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep3B), human cervical carcinoma (HeLa), human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) and normal cells (PBMC). The newly synthesized 18-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes during in vitro anticancer evaluation, displayed moderate to good cytotoxicity on liver (Hep3B), cervical (HeLa) and breast (MCF7) cancer cell lines, respectively. The most effective anticancer cadmium complex (C34H28N10CdO10) was found to be active with IC50 values, 2.44 ± 1.500, 3.55 ± 1.600 and 4.82 ± 1.400 in micro-molar on liver, cervical and breast cancer cell lines, respectively.

  13. Defect-Stabilized Phases in Extensile Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel; Decamp, Stephen; Dogic, Zvonimir; Hagan, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Active nematics are liquid crystals which are driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these materials, leading to beautiful and surprising behaviors including the spontaneous generation of topological defect pairs which stream through the system and later annihilate, yielding a complex, seemingly chaotic dynamical steady-state. In this talk, I will describe the emergence of order from this chaos in the form of previously unknown broken-symmetry phases in which the topological defects themselves undergo orientational ordering. We have identified these defect-ordered phases in two realizations of an active nematic: first, a suspension of extensile bundles of microtubules and molecular motor proteins, and second, a computational model of extending hard rods. I will describe the defect-stabilized phases that manifest in these systems, our current understanding of their origins, and discuss whether such phases may be a general feature of extensile active nematics.

  14. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study of printed circuit discontinuities is necessary in order to design, for example, transitions between rectangular waveguides and printed circuits. New developments with respect to the analytical approaches to this problem are discussed. A summary of the progress in the experimental approach is presented. The accurate solution for the modes in various millimeter-wave waveguides is essential in the analysis of many integrated circuit components, such as filters and impedance transformers. Problems associated with the numerical computation of these modes in two frequently used waveguide forms, namely, the finline and microstrip, are presented. The spectral domain method of formulation, with a moment method solution, is considered. This approach can be readily extended to analyze an arbitrary configuration of dielectric and metallized regions in a shielded enclosure. Galerkin's method is used, where the testing and basic functions are the same. It is shown that the mode functions, or eigenfunctions, are more sensitive to errors than the phase constants, or eigenvalues. The approximate mode functions do not satisfy the orthogonality relationship well, resulting in difficulties when these modal solutions are used to form an approximate Green's function or are used in a mode matching analysis.

  15. Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) new complexes of 5-aminosalicylic acid: Spectroscopic, thermal characterization and biological activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Madiha H.; Mohamed, Gehad G.

    2013-04-01

    The complexing behavior of mesalazine (5-aminosalicylic acid; 5-ASA) towards the transition metal ions namely, Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been examined by elemental analyses, magnetic measurements, electronic, IR and 1H NMR. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analyses and evaluation of kinetic parameters of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equation. The free ligand and its metal complexes have been tested in vitro against Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillis subtilies and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in order to assess their antimicrobial potential. The results indicate that the metal complexes are also found to have more antimicrobial activity than the parent 5-ASA drug.

  16. Fireside corrosion testing of candidate superheater tube alloys, coatings, and claddings - phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Blough, J.L.; Stanko, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    In Phase I a variety of developmental and commercial tubing alloys and claddings were exposed to laboratory fireside corrosion testing simulating a superheater or reheater in a coal-fired boiler. Phase II (in situ testing) has exposed samples of 347, RA-8511, HR3C, 253MA, Fe{sub 3}Al + 5Cr, 310 modified, 800HT, NF 709, 690 clad, and 671 clad for over 10,000 hours to the actual operating conditions of a 250-MW coal-fired boiler. The samples were installed on an air-cooled, retractable corrosion probe, installed in the reheater cavity, and controlled to the operating metal temperatures of an existing and advanced-cycle coal-fired boiler. Samples of each alloy will be exposed for 4000, 12,000, and 16,000 hours of operation. The results will be presented for the metallurgical examination of the corrosion probe samples after 4000 hours of exposure.

  17. Domain structure in biphenyl incommensurate phase II observed by electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron, A.; Emery, J.; Spiesser, M.

    1994-11-01

    The domain structure in incommensurate phase II of single biphenyl crystal has been observed by investigations of the optically excited states of the Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (E.P.R.) deuterated naphthalene molecular probes which substitute biphenyl molecules. Our results confirm that this phase is a 1q bi-domain one. The analysis of the spectra obtained in X band (9.5 GHz) experiments, in relation with the spin Hamiltonian parameter properties permits us to show that the E.P.R. probe rotates around a direction perpendicular to its long axis while the biphenyl molecule undergoes a twist movement around this axis. They also account for a regime which is like a “ multi-soliton " regime while the modulation is a plane wave one in the pure single crystal. The two molecules of the high temperature cell do not exactly experience the saure displacement field in the incommensurate phase and consequently the two domains can be distinguished. The spin Hamiltonian parameters which characterize the E.P.R. probes have been determined in the incommensurate phase II of biphenyl. La structure en domaines de la phase II du biphényle est mise en évidence par les investigations dans les états photo-excités des molécules de naphtalène deutéré, utilisées comme sondes de Résonance Paramagnétique Electronique, se substituant de manière diluée dans le mono-cristal de biphényle. Ceci confirme que cette phase est 1q bi-domaine. L'analyse des spectres obtenus dans des expériences en bande X (9.5 GHz) en relation avec les propriétés de l'hamiltonien de spin permet de montrer que la sonde moléculaire tourne autour d'une direction perpendiculaire à son grand axe alors que la molécule de biphényle subit un mouvement de twist autour de cet axe. Les résultats montrent que ces sondes rendent compte d'un régime qui est comme un régime “ multi-solitons " alors que la modulation est plane dans le cristal pur. Les deux molécules sondes de la cellule

  18. Adsorption and desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) on Ca- alginate immobilized activated rice bran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suratman, A.; Kamalia, N. Z.; Kusumawati, W. A.

    2016-02-01

    Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran has been used for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The effect of the pH, kinetics model, adsorption isotherm and desorption on the adsorption performance was investigated. Activated rice bran was immobilized by the entrapment in alginate beads. The adsorption strength of Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran was compared to Ca-alginate and non-immobilized activated rice bran. The concentrations of adsorbed ions were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The result showed that pH of 4.0 and the contact time of 120 min are the optimum condition for adsorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II). The adsorption kinetic of Zn(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model with adsorption rate constant 4.9 x 10-2 and 3.14 g.mg-1.min-1, respectively. The both adsorption processes obeyed Langmuir isotherm with adsorption capacity of 2.03 and 2.42 mg.g-1 of adsorbent, respectively. The strength of Zn adsorption on Ca-alginate immobilized activated rice bran (86.63%) was more effective compared to Ca-alginate beads (60.96%) and activated rice bran (43.85%). The strength of Cu adsorption was 80.00%, 61.50% and 22.10%, respectively. The desorption of Zn(II) and Cu(II) showed that recovery percentage of the adsorption was 76.56% and 57.80% with the condition of using HCl 0.1 M as desorption agent for 1 hour.

  19. Spectroscopic, magnetic and thermal studies of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of 3-acetylcoumarin-isonicotinoylhydrazone and their antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunoor, Rekha S.; Patil, Basavaraj R.; Badiger, Dayananda S.; Vadavi, Ramesh S.; Gudasi, Kalagouda B.; Chandrashekhar, V. M.; Muchchandi, I. S.

    2010-11-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes with a new heterocyclic Schiff base derived by the condensation of isonicotinoylhydrazide and 3-acetylcoumarin have been synthesized. 1H, 13C and 2D HETCOR NMR analyses confirm the formation of title compound and existence of the same in two isomeric forms. The metal complexes were characterized on the basis of various spectroscopic techniques like electronic, EPR, IR, 1H and 13C NMR studies, elemental analysis, magnetic properties and thermogravimetric analysis, and also by the aid of molar conductivity measurements. It is found that the Schiff base behaves as a monobasic tridentate ligand coordinating in the imidol form with 1:1 metal to ligand stoichiometry. Trigonal bipyramidal geometry has been assigned for Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, while tetrahedral for Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes. The compounds were subjected to antimicrobial and anti-tubercular activity screening using serial broth dilution method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) is determined. Zn(II) complex has shown significant antifungal activity with an MIC of 6.25 μg/mL while Cu(II) complex is noticeable for antibacterial activity at the same concentration. Anti-TB activity of the ligand has enhanced on complexation with Co(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  20. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  1. Chromatin-dependent regulation of RNA polymerases II and III activity throughout the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Jordán-Pla, Antonio; Gupta, Ishaan; de Miguel-Jiménez, Lola; Steinmetz, Lars M; Chávez, Sebastián; Pelechano, Vicent; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2015-01-01

    The particular behaviour of eukaryotic RNA polymerases along different gene regions and amongst distinct gene functional groups is not totally understood. To cast light onto the alternative active or backtracking states of RNA polymerase II, we have quantitatively mapped active RNA polymerases at a high resolution following a new biotin-based genomic run-on (BioGRO) technique. Compared with conventional profiling with chromatin immunoprecipitation, the analysis of the BioGRO profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae shows that RNA polymerase II has unique activity profiles at both gene ends, which are highly dependent on positioned nucleosomes. This is the first demonstration of the in vivo influence of positioned nucleosomes on transcription elongation. The particular features at the 5' end and around the polyadenylation site indicate that this polymerase undergoes extensive specific-activity regulation in the initial and final transcription elongation phases. The genes encoding for ribosomal proteins show distinctive features at both ends. BioGRO also provides the first nascentome analysis for RNA polymerase III, which indicates that transcription of tRNA genes is poorly regulated at the individual copy level. The present study provides a novel perspective of the transcription cycle that incorporates inactivation/reactivation as an important aspect of RNA polymerase dynamics.

  2. Effects of Combined Phase III and Phase II Cardiac Exercise Therapy for Middle-aged Male Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hung; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Hui

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of cardiac exercise therapy (CET) on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors (CRFs) of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). [Methods] Patients who participated in an 8-week supervised, hospital-based phase II and 6-month home-based phase III CET with monthly telephone and/or home visits were defined as the exercise group (EG) (n=20), while those who did not receive phase II or phase III CET were defined as the no-exercise group (NEG) (n=10). CRFs were evaluated pre- and post-phase II and eight months after discharge. One and two-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to perform intra- and inter-group comparisons. [Results] Thirty men with AMI aged 49.3 ± 8.3 years were studied. EG increased their exercise capacity (METs) (6.8 ± 1.6 vs.10.0 ± 1.9) after phase II CET and was able to maintain it at 8-month follow-up. Both groups had significantly fewer persons who kept on smoking compared to the first examination. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased from 38.1 ± 11.0 to 43.7 ± 8.7 mg/dl at follow-up in EG while no significant difference was noted in NEG. [Conclusion] After phase III CET subjects had maintained the therapeutic effects of smoking cessation, and increasing exercise capacity obtained in phase II CET. HDL-C in EG continued to improve during phase III CET.

  3. Continuum Theory of Phase Separation Kinetics for Active Brownian Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Tiribocchi, Adriano; Allen, Rosalind J.; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies, and coexistence densities.

  4. High-pressure phases of group-II difluorides: Polymorphism and superionicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Joseph R.; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the high-pressure behavior of beryllium, magnesium, and calcium difluorides using ab initio random structure searching and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, over the pressure range 0 -70 GPa. Beryllium fluoride exhibits extensive polymorphism at low pressures, and we find two new phases for this compound—the silica moganite and CaCl2 structures—which are stable over the wide pressure range 12 -57 GPa. For magnesium fluoride, our searching results show that the orthorhombic "O-I" TiO2 structure (P b c a ,Z =8 ) is stable for this compound between 40 and 44 GPa. Our searches find no new phases at the static-lattice level for calcium difluoride between 0 and 70 GPa; however, a phase with P 6 ¯2 m symmetry is close to stability over this pressure range, and our calculations predict that this phase is stabilized at high temperature. The P 6 ¯2 m structure exhibits an unstable phonon mode at large volumes which may signal a transition to a superionic state at high temperatures. The group-II difluorides are isoelectronic to a number of other AB2-type compounds such as SiO2 and TiO2, and we discuss our results in light of these similarities.

  5. ACTIVATION OF HAGEMAN FACTOR IN SOLID AND FLUID PHASES

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, C. G.; Revak, S. D.; Wuepper, K. D.

    1973-01-01

    The activation of Hageman factor in solid and fluid phase has been analyzed. Activation of highly purified Hageman factor occurred after it interacted with and became bound to a negatively charged surface. Activation was observed in the absence of enzymes that are inhibitable with diisopropylfluorophosphate, phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride and ε-amino-n-caproic acid. The binding of [125I]Hageman factor to the negatively charged surface was markedly inhibited by plasma or purified plasma proteins. Activation of Hageman factor in solution (fluid phase) was obtained with kallikrein, plasmin, and Factor XI (plasma thromboplastin antecedent). Kallikrein was greater than 10 times more active in its ability to activate Hageman factor than plasmin and Factor XI. The data offer a plausible explanation for the finding that highly purified kallikrein promotes clotting of normal plasma. In addition, the combined results of this and previously reported data from this laboratory indicate that the reciprocal activation of Hageman factor by kallikrein in fluid phase is essential for normal rate of activation of the intrinsic-clotting, kinin-forming, and fibrinolytic systems. Activation of Hageman factor was associated with three different structural changes in the molecule: (a) Purified Hageman factor, activated on negatively charged surfaces retained its native mol wt of 80–90,000. Presumably a conformational change accompanied activation. (b) In fluid phase, activation with kallikrein and plasmin did not result in cleavage of large fragments of rabbit Hageman factor, although the activation required hydrolytic capacity of the enzymes. (c) Activation of human Hageman factor with kallikrein or plasmin was associated with cleavage of the molecule to 52,000, 40,000, and 28,000 mol wt fragments. Activation of rabbit Hageman factor with trypsin resulted in cleavage of the molecule into three fragments, each of 30,000 mol wt as noted previously. This major cleavage occurred

  6. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci.

  7. Phase II Trial of Combination Thalidomide plus Temozolomide in Patients with Metastatic Malignant Melanoma: Southwest Oncology Group S0508

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joseph I.; Moon, James; Hutchins, Laura F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Kast, W. Martin; Da Silva, Diane M.; Liu, P.Y.; Thompson, John A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In limited institution Phase II studies, thalidomide and temozolomide has yielded response rates (RR) up to 32% for advanced melanoma, leading to the use of this combination as “standard” by some. We conducted a multi-center Phase II trial to better define the clinical efficacy of thalidomide and temozolomide and the immune modulatory effects of thalidomide, when combined with temozolomide, in patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients must have had stage IV cutaneous melanoma, no active brain metastases, Zubrod PS 0–1, up to 1 prior systemic therapy excluding thalidomide, temozolomide or dacarbazine, adequate organ function, and given informed consent. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints included survival (OS), RR, toxicities, and assessment of relationships between biomarkers and clinical outcomes. Patients received thalidomide (200mg/d escalated to 400mg/d for patients <70, or 100mg/d escalated to 250mg/d for patients ≥70) plus temozolomide (75mg/m2/d × 6 weeks then 2 weeks rest). Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled; 2 refused treatment. The 6-month PFS was 15% (95% CI, 6%–23%); 1-year OS was 35% (95% CI, 24%–47%); RR was 13% (95% CI, 5%–25%), all partial. One treatment-related death occurred from myocardial infarction; 3 other Grade 4 events occurred including pulmonary embolism, neutropenia and CNS ischemia. There was no significant correlation between biomarkers and PFS or OS. Conclusion This combination of thalidomide and temozolomide does not appear to have a clinical benefit that exceeds dacarbazine alone. We would not recommend it further for phase III trials or for standard community use. PMID:19918923

  8. A modified varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong; Vandemeulebroecke, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Conventionally, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are carried out with a strict two-stage design. Recently, a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design has been developed. In this design, following the first stage, an intermediate stage can be adaptively added to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision can be made. Therefore, the number of further investigational stages is determined based upon data accumulated to the interim analysis. This design considers two plausible study endpoints, with one of them initially designated as the primary endpoint. Based on interim results, another endpoint can be switched as the primary endpoint. However, in many therapeutic areas, the primary study endpoint is well established. Therefore, we modify this design to consider one study endpoint only so that it may be more readily applicable in real clinical trial designs. Our simulations show that, the same as the original design, this modified design controls the Type I error rate, and the design parameters such as the threshold probability for the two-stage setting and the alpha allocation ratio in the two-stage setting versus the three-stage setting have a great impact on the design characteristics. However, this modified design requires a larger sample size for the initial stage, and the probability of futility becomes much higher when the threshold probability for the two-stage setting gets smaller. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. One-stage and two-stage designs for phase II clinical trials with survival endpoints.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John

    2014-09-28

    This work is motivated by trials in rapidly lethal cancers or cancers for which measuring shrinkage of tumours is infeasible. In either case, traditional phase II designs focussing on tumour response are unsuitable. Usually, tumour response is considered as a substitute for the more relevant but longer-term endpoint of death. In rapidly lethal cancers such as pancreatic cancer, there is no need to use a surrogate, as the definitive endpoint is (sadly) available so soon. In uveal cancer, there is no counterpart to tumour response, and so, mortality is the only realistic response available. Cytostatic cancer treatments do not seek to kill tumours, but to mitigate their effects. Trials of such therapy might also be based on survival times to death or progression, rather than on tumour shrinkage. Phase II oncology trials are often conducted with all study patients receiving the experimental therapy, and this approach is considered here. Simple extensions of one-stage and two-stage designs based on binary responses are presented. Outcomes based on survival past a small number of landmark times are considered: here, the case of three such times is explored in examples. This approach allows exact calculations to be made for both design and analysis purposes. Simulations presented here show that calculations based on normal approximations can lead to loss of power when sample sizes are small. Two-stage versions of the procedure are also suggested.

  10. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Z.V.; Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. DoE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve, Pierre V.

    2013-02-28

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR is to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking performance. The primary application is to demonstrate improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Example scenarios in Figure 1 include a) the target vehicle obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or b), the target engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. Figure 3 shows a number of example spectral signatures from a variety of natural and man-made materials. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II to accomplish the program goals were as follows: 1. Acquire relevant vehicle target datasets to support prototype. 2. Refine algorithms for target spectral feature exploitation. 3. Implement a prototype multi-hypothesis target tracking software package. 4. Demonstrate and quantify tracking performance using relevant data.

  12. The peculiar type II supernova 1993J in M81: Transition to the nebular phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippenko, Alexei V.; Matheson, Thomas; Barth, Aaron J.

    1994-01-01

    We present optical spectra of the bright, peculiar Type II supernova 1993J in M81 spanning the first 14 months of its existence, revealing its transition to the nebular phase. Unlike the case in normal Type II supernovae, during the first 2-10 months the H-alpha emission line gradually becomes less prominent relative to other features such as (O I) lambda lambda 6300, 6364 and (Ca II) lambda lambda 7291, 7324, as we had predicted based on early-time (tau less than or approximately equal to 2 months) spectra. The nebular spectrum resembles those of the Type Ib/Ic supernovae 1985F and 1987M, although weak H-alpha emission is easily visible even at late times in SN 1993J. At tau = 8 months a close similarity is found with the spectrum of SN 1987K, the only other Type II supernova known to have undergone such a metamorphosis. The emission lines are considerably broader than those of normal Type II supernovae at comparable phases, consistent with the progenitor having lost a majority of its hydrogen envelope prior to exploding. Consequently, there is now little doubt that Type Ib, and probably Type Ic, supernovae result from core collapse in stripped, massive stars; models of the chemical evolution of galaxies in which these subtypes are ascribed to exploding white dwarfs must be appropriately modified. Although all of the emission lines in spectra of SN 1993J fade roughly exponentially for a considerable time, the fading of H-alpha begins to slow down at tau approximately = 8 months, and in the interval tau = 10-14 months its flux is constant, or even slightly rising in the wings of the line. This behavior, together with the box-like shape and great breadth (full width at half maximum (FWHM) approximately = 17 000 km/s) of the line profile, suggests that the H-alpha emission is being produced by the high-velocity outer layer of hydrogen ejecta interacting with circumstellar gas released by the progenitor prior to its explosion. A similar phenomenon has previously been

  13. 77 FR 23228 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program-Phase II...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Public Law 106-554, the ``Small Business Reauthorization Act of 2000, H.R. 5667'' enacted on December 21... Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program--Phase II--Grant Application Package SUMMARY: This application package invites small business concerns to submit a Phase...

  14. Climatepipes: User-friendly data access, data manipulation, data analysis and visualization of community climate models Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Aashish

    2015-09-02

    In Phase I, we successfully developed a web-based tool that provides workflow and form-based interfaces for accessing, querying, and visualizing interesting datasets from one or more sources. For Phase II of the project, we have implemented mechanisms for supporting more elaborate and relevant queries.

  15. A Phase II Dose Titration Study of Thalidomide for Cancer-Associated Anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mellar; Lasheen, Wael; Walsh, Declan; Mahmoud, Fade; Bicanovsky, Leslie; Lagman, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Context Sixty-five percent of people with advanced cancer suffer from loss of appetite. Several inflammatory cytokines appear to cause appetite loss in animal models. Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug that has been associated with improved appetite in those with HIV infections, and in cancer. Objectives We completed a two-stage Phase II dose titration study of thalidomide, the primary purpose of which was to assess appetite response to thalidomide in cancer-associated anorexia. Methods Individuals older than 18 years of age with active cancer, loss of appetite by numerical rating scale (NRS), life expectancy of at least four weeks, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–3 were entered into the study. Pre-treatment screening included medical history, neurologic examination, and symptoms by NRS and categorical scale. Patients received 50 mg of thalidomide by mouth at bedtime for two weeks. Individuals who did not respond were dose escalated to 100 mg at night for two weeks. Assessment of appetite, early satiety, fatigue, insomnia, night sweats, pain, and quality of life occurred at two-week intervals. Toxicity also was assessed. The primary outcome was appetite response defined as a two-point reduction in the NRS, or one-point improvement in the categorical scale. Results Thirty-five patients entered the study; 33 completed 14 days of therapy and were analyzed for efficacy and toxicity. Sixty-four percent who completed at least two weeks of thalidomide had improved appetite. The categorical scale scores for appetite, insomnia and quality of life improved significantly. The 95% confidence intervals did not overlap. Five participants dropped out because of toxicity: two before two weeks and three later. Conclusion Thalidomide reduced multiple symptoms commonly associated with cancer-related anorexia and improved quality of life. Our findings confirmed and validated a previously published single arm trial. A recent randomized trial

  16. Phase II Study of Olaparib (AZD-2281) After Standard Systemic Therapies for Disseminated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Groshen, Susan; O’Neil, Bert H.; Messersmith, Wells; Berlin, Jordan; Chan, Emily; Leichman, Cynthia G.; Cohen, Steven J.; Cohen, Deirdre; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Gold, Philip; Boman, Bruce; Fielding, Anitra; Locker, Gershon; Cason, Ronald C.; Hamilton, Stan R.; Hochster, Howard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Effective new agents for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) with disease progression during standard therapy regimens are needed. We hypothesized that poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in patients with CRC and inefficient tumor DNA repair mechanisms, such as those with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), would result in synthetic lethality. Methods. This was an open-label phase II trial testing olaparib 400 mg p.o. b.i.d. for patients with disseminated, measurable CRC failing standard therapies with centrally confirmed tumor MSI status. The primary endpoint was the tumor response, assessed by RECIST, version 1.0. The secondary endpoints were safety/toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Results. Thirty-three patients (20 microsatellite stable [MSS], 13 MSI-H) were enrolled. The median age for all patients was 57 years and for MSS and MSI-H patients was 51 and 61 years, respectively. All patients received at least one 28-day cycle of olaparib. No patient had a complete or partial response. Nausea (48%), fatigue (36%), and vomiting (33%) were the most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events. The median PFS for all patients was 1.84 months. No statistically significant differences were found in the median PFS or OS for the MSS group compared with the MSI-H group. Conclusion. Single-agent olaparib delivered after failure of standard systemic therapy did not demonstrate activity for CRC patients, regardless of microsatellite status. Future trials, testing PARP inhibitors in patients with CRC should focus on the use of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, combined with PARP inhibitors, remembering the toxicity reported in the present study. Implications for Practice: Microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal tumors exhibit hypermethylation in tumor mismatch repair genes, or have mutations in one or more of these genes resulting from a germ-line defect (Lynch syndrome

  17. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M.; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  18. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1.

    PubMed

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M; Akob, Denise M; Neu, Thomas R; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling.

  19. Characterization of pH dependent Mn(II) oxidation strategies and formation of a bixbyite-like phase by Mesorhizobium australicum T-G1

    PubMed Central

    Bohu, Tsing; Santelli, Cara M.; Akob, Denise M.; Neu, Thomas R.; Ciobota, Valerian; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Nietzsche, Sándor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of Mn oxides in natural environments, there are only a few observations of biological Mn(II) oxidation at pH < 6. The lack of low pH Mn-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) isolates limits our understanding of how pH influences biological Mn(II) oxidation in extreme environments. Here, we report that a novel MOB isolate, Mesorhizobium australicum strain T-G1, isolated from an acidic and metalliferous uranium mining area, can oxidize Mn(II) at both acidic and neutral pH using different enzymatic pathways. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that T-G1 initiated bixbyite-like Mn oxide formation at pH 5.5 which coincided with multi-copper oxidase expression from early exponential phase to late stationary phase. In contrast, reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, appeared to be more important for T-G1 mediated Mn(II) oxidation at neutral pH. ROS was produced in parallel with the occurrence of Mn(II) oxidation at pH 7.2 from early stationary phase. Solid phase Mn oxides did not precipitate, which is consistent with the presence of a high amount of H2O2 and lower activity of catalase in the liquid culture at pH 7.2. Our results show that M. australicum T-G1, an acid tolerant MOB, can initiate Mn(II) oxidation by varying its oxidation mechanisms depending on the pH and may play an important role in low pH manganese biogeochemical cycling. PMID:26236307

  20. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  1. Effects of treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor in tumors based on 15 phase II clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Lu, Mingjie; Yao, Mengqian; Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp)90 serves as a chaperone protein that promotes the proper folding of proteins involved in a variety of signal transduction processes involved in cell growth. Hsp90 inhibitors, which inhibit the activity of critical client proteins, have emerged as the accessory therapeutic agents for multiple human cancer types. To better understand the effects of Hsp90 inhibitors in cancer treatment, the present study reviewed 15 published phase II clinical trials to investigate whether Hsp90 inhibitors will benefit patients with cancer. Information of complete response, partial response, stable disease, objective response and objective response rate was collected to evaluate clinical outcomes. Overall, Hsp90 inhibitors are effective against a variety of oncogene-addicted cancers, including those that have developed resistance to specific receptors. PMID:27602225

  2. Synthesis, characterization and biological activity of some new VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of chromone based NNO Schiff base derived from 2-aminothiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanithi, M.; Kodimunthiri, D.; Rajarajan, M.; Tharmaraj, P.

    2011-11-01

    Coordination compounds of VO(IV), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) with the Schiff base obtained through the condensation of 2-aminothiazole with 3-formyl chromone were synthesized. The compounds were characterized by 1H, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, IR, Mass, EPR, molar conductance and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The Cu(II) complex possesses tetrahedrally distorted square planar geometry whereas Co(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) show distorted tetrahedral geometry. The VO(IV) complex shows square pyramidal geometry. The cyclic voltammogram of Cu (II) complex showed a well defined redox couple Cu(II)/Cu(I) with quasireversible nature. The antimicrobial activity against the species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albigans and Aspergillus niger was screened and compared to the activity of the ligand. Emission spectrum was recorded for the ligand and the metal(II) complexes. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured and found to have one fourth of the activity of urea. The SEM image of the copper(II) complex implies that the size of the particles is 2 μm.

  3. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  4. In vitro anticancer activity evaluation of new cationic platinum(II) complexes based on imidazole moiety.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Isabella; Facchetti, Giorgio; Lucchini, Giorgio; Castiglioni, Elisa; Marchianò, Silvia; Ferri, Nicola

    2017-03-15

    The development and the synthesis of cationic platinum(II) complexes were realized and their cytotoxic activity was tested on triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line and in two cell lines poorly responsive to cisplatin (DLD-1 and MCF-7). The complex 2c resulted the most potent cytotoxic agent in MDA-MB-231 (IC50=61.9µM) and more effective than cisplatin on both DLD-1 (IC50=57.4µM) and MCF-7 (IC50=79.9µM) cell lines. 2c showed different cellular uptake and pharmacodynamic properties than cisplatin, interfering with the progression of the M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, 2c represents a lead compound of a new class of cytotoxic agents with promising antitumor activity.

  5. Active transcription and essential role of RNA polymerase II at the centromere during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, F. Lyn; Marshall, Owen J.; Saffery, Richard; Won Kim, Bo; Earle, Elizabeth; Choo, K. H. Andy; Wong, Lee H.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the centromeric regions has been reported to occur in G1 and S phase in different species. Here, we investigate whether transcription also occurs and plays a functional role at the mammalian centromere during mitosis. We show the presence of actively transcribing RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and its associated transcription factors, coupled with the production of centromere satellite transcripts at the mitotic kinetochore. Specific inhibition of RNAPII activity during mitosis leads to a decrease in centromeric α-satellite transcription and a concomitant increase in anaphase-lagging cells, with the lagging chromosomes showing reduced centromere protein C binding. These findings demonstrate an essential role of RNAPII in the transcription of α-satellite DNA, binding of centromere protein C, and the proper functioning of the mitotic kinetochore. PMID:22308327

  6. Synthesis and DNA cleavage activities of mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes which linked with uracil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ji; Li, Kun; Jiang, Ning; Chen, Shan-Yong; Lin, Hong-Hui; Huang, Yu; Ma, Li-Jian; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2006-10-01

    Mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine zinc(II), copper(II), cobalt(II) complexes, which could attach to peptide nucleic acid (PNA), were synthesized as DNA cleavage agents. The structures of these new mononuclear complexes were identified by MS and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The catalytic activities on DNA cleavage of these mononuclear complexes with different central metals were subsequently studied, which showed that copper complex was better catalyst in the DNA cleavage process than zinc and cobalt complexes. The effects of reaction time, concentration of complexes were also investigated. The results indicated that the copper(II) complexes could catalyze the cleavage of supercoiled DNA (pUC 19 plasmid DNA) (Form I) under physiological conditions to produce selectively nicked DNA (Form II, no Form III produced) with high yields. The mechanism of the cleavage process was also studied.

  7. Function of redox-active tyrosine in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ishikita, Hiroshi; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-06-01

    Water oxidation at photosystem II Mn-cluster is mediated by the redox-active tyrosine Y(Z). We calculated the redox potential (E(m)) of Y(Z) and its symmetrical counterpart Y(D), by solving the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The calculated E(m)(Y( )/Y(-)) were +926 mV/+694 mV for Y(Z)/Y(D) with the Mn-cluster in S2 state. Together with the asymmetric position of the Mn-cluster relative to Y(Z/D), differences in H-bond network between Y(Z) (Y(Z)/D1-His(190)/D1-Asn(298)) and Y(D) (Y(D)/D2-His(189)/D2-Arg(294)/CP47-Glu(364)) are crucial for E(m)(Y(Z/D)). When D1-His(190) is protonated, corresponding to a thermally activated state, the calculated E(m)(Y(Z)) was +1216 mV, which is as high as the E(m) for P(D1/D2). We observed deprotonation at CP43-Arg(357) upon S-state transition, which may suggest its involvement in the proton exit pathway. E(m)(Y(D)) was affected by formation of P(D2)(+) (but not P(D1)(+)) and sensitive to the protonation state of D2-Arg(180). This points to an electrostatic link between Y(D) and P(D2).

  8. Effects of polyaromatic hydrocarbons on photosystem II activity in pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Lankin, Anton V; Vasilyeva, Galina K; Luybimov, Valery Yu; Semenova, Galina N; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The acute effects of three typical polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene (Naph), phenanthrene (Phen) and fluoranthene (Flu) on photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) in detached leaves of 3-week-old pea plants were studied. The leaves were exposed in water with PAHs under white light for 0.5-72 h. The activity of PSII was examined by prompt and delayed chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence. The effects of PAHs depended on their concentration and exposure time. This dependency was more significant in the presence of chemical stressors (Triton X-100 or acetone) or under high intensity irradiance. Increased content of PAHs and long-term exposure (24-72 h) led to significant reduction of the maximum photochemical quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm) of PS II, changes in the polyphasic fluorescence induction (OJIP), and to decreasing amplitudes of fast and slow components of delayed Chl a fluorescence. The damage of PSII depended on water solubility of a given type of PAHs, their concentration and exposure time. During short-time exposure the compound with highest water-solubility - naphthalene - revealed the strongest effect. During long-time exposure the compounds with low water-solubility -Phen, Flu-revealed the strongest effect as the corresponding PAH accumulates in the thylakoids especially when the solution is oversaturated containing a solid phase. The reduction of PSII activity at the presence of naphthalene (30 mg L(-1)) was accompanied by transient generation of H2O2 as well as swelling of thylakoids and distortion of cell plasma membranes, which was indicated by electron microscopy images. Distortion of thylakoid membranes due to accumulation of PAHs as well as the development of oxidative stress seems to be the main pathways of PAHs influencing the photochemical activity of PS II.

  9. Serotonin and the mammalian circadian system: II. Phase-shifting rat behavioral rhythms with serotonergic agonists.

    PubMed

    Edgar, D M; Miller, J D; Prosser, R A; Dean, R R; Dement, W C

    1993-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) receive primary afferents from the median and dorsal raphe, but the role of these projections in circadian timekeeping is poorly understood. Studies of the SCN in vitro suggest that quipazine, a general serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonist, can produce circadian time-dependent phase advances and phase delays in circadian rhythms of neuronal activity. The present study addresses whether quipazine and the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT are similarly effective in vivo. Drinking and wheel-running patterns of male Wistar rats individually housed in constant darkness were monitored before and after subcutaneous administration of quipazine (5-10 mg/kg) at either circadian time (CT) 6 or CT 18, with and without running wheels available. Dose-dependent phase advances (20-180 min) were produced at CT 6. Significant phase shifts were not observed at CT 18. CT 6 quipazine-treated animals also showed a sustained and significant shortening of rhythm period (tau) following treatment (-0.28 hr; p < 0.002). tau shortening was inconsistently observed in CT 18 quipazine-treated rats. Neither quipazine-induced phase shifts nor tau effects were dependent on wheel-running activity per se. 8-OH-DPAT delivered via intracerebral ventricular treatment into the third ventricle (5 microliters at 100 microM in saline) produced slightly smaller phase advances (20-90 min) at CT 6, but did not produce phase delays at CT 18 or changes in tau. These findings support in vitro evidence that 5-HT-ergic agonists can phase-shift the circadian pacemaker.

  10. Fisetin inhibits osteoclastogenesis through prevention of RANKL-induced ROS production by Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Eiko; Shimada-Sugawara, Megumi; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Fumimoto, Reiko; Fukuma, Yutaka; Nishishita, Kazuhisa; Okamoto, Kuniaki; Tsukuba, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Osteoclasts (OCLs) are multinucleated bone-resorbing cells that are differentiated by stimulation with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We recently demonstrated that regulation of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a stress-induced cytoprotective enzyme, also functions in OCL differentiation. In this study, we investigated effects of fisetin, a natural bioactive flavonoid that has been reported to induce HO-1 expression, on the differentiation of macrophages into OCLs. Fisetin inhibited the formation of OCLs in a dose-dependent manner and suppressed the bone-resorbing activity of OCLs. Moreover, fisetin-treated OCLs showed markedly decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, and Jun N-terminal kinase, but fisetin did not inhibit p38 phosphorylation. Fisetin up-regulated mRNA expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes including HO-1 and interfered with RANKL-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Studies with RNA interference showed that suppression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcription factor for phase II antioxidant enzymes, rescued fisetin-mediated inhibition of OCL differentiation. Furthermore, fisetin significantly decreased RANKL-induced nuclear translocation of cFos and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic-1 (NFATc1), which is a transcription factor critical for osteoclastogenic gene regulation. Therefore, fisetin inhibits OCL differentiation through blocking RANKL-mediated ROS production by Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of phase II antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  12. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

  13. 78 FR 41785 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Implementation of Title I/II Program... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Implementation of Title I/II Program... Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,573. Abstract: The Implementation of Title I/II...

  14. Semi-active tuned mass dampers with phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Lap-Loi; Lai, Yong-An; Walter Yang, Chuang-Sheng; Lien, Kuan-Hua; Wu, Lai-Yun

    2013-07-01

    The present study aims at proposing an innovative phase control methodology for semi-active tuned mass dampers (SA-TMDs) that intend to minimize the off-tuned problems associated with passive tuned mass dampers (P-TMDs). The phase control algorithm is first developed, the essential of which is to apply the variable friction force to slow down the mass block at specific moments when the phase lag of the SA-TMD with respect to the structure is different from 90°, resulting in the SA-TMD back to the desired phase lag, i.e., -90° phase deviation, so that the SA-TMD has the maximum power flow to reduce the structural vibration. The feasibility of the application of the phase control in SA-TMDs is verified by performing numerical analyses of a simplified Taipei 101 structure model with a SA-TMD subjected to sinusoidal loads and design level wind loads. The numerical simulation results show that the SA-TMD implemented with phase control can enable the mass block to vibrate in a manner with a phase lag close to the -90° when the structure model is under sinusoidal excitations with frequencies different from the structural fundamental mode. The SA-TMD with phase control not only exhibits better performance than the optimal P-TMD in terms of suppressing the structural vibration, but also enhances its robustness, particularly when the SA-TMD is off-tuned to the structure.

  15. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  16. The PACOVAR-trial: A phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. Methods/design This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). Discussion The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic

  17. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  18. Phase Equilibria of Sn-Sb-Ag Ternary System (II): Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierlotka, Wojcieh; Huang, Yu-Chih; Chen, Sinn-Wen

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of the phase equilibria of the Sn-Sb-Ag ternary system is of fundamental importance in Sn-Sb-based solder applications. Thermodynamic models of the ternary Sn-Sb-Ag system and the binary Sb-Ag and Sn-Ag systems are developed using the calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) method. The calculated 250 °C isothermal section, liquidus projection, and thermodynamic properties are in good agreement with the experimental results. There are two continuous solid solutions formed between the ɛ-Ag3Sn and ɛ-Ag3Sb, and ζ-Ag17Sb3 and ζ-Ag5Sn phases, but there is no ternary compound. There are three class II ternary invariant reactions, L + Sb ↔ ɛ + β-SnSb, L + β-SnSb ↔ Sn3Sb2 + ɛ, and L + Sn3Sb2 ↔ Sn + ɛ. Their reaction temperatures are 379 °C, 313 °C, and 231 °C, respectively.

  19. Electron diffraction based analysis of phase fractions and texture in nanocrystalline thin films, part II: implementation.

    PubMed

    Lábár, János L

    2009-02-01

    This series of articles describes a method that performs (semi)quantitative phase analysis for nanocrystalline transmission electron microscope samples from selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Volume fractions of phases and their textures are obtained separately in the method. First, the two-dimensional SAED pattern is converted into an X-ray diffraction-like one-dimensional distribution. Volume fractions of the nanocrystalline components are determined by fitting the spectral components, calculated for the previously identified phases with a priori known structures. Blackman correction is also applied to take into account dynamic effects for medium grain sizes. Peak shapes and experimental parameters (camera length, etc.) are refined during the fitting iterations. Parameter space is explored with the help of the Downhill-SIMPLEX algorithm. Part I presented the principles, while Part II now elaborates current implementation, and Part III will demonstrate its usage by examples. The method is implemented in a computer program that runs under the Windows operating system on IBM PC compatible machines.

  20. Orbit Design for Phase I and II of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Steve P.

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) is a NASA mission intended to make fundamental advancements in our understanding of the Earth's Magnetosphere. There are three processes that MMS is intended to study including magnetic recon- nection, charged particle acceleration, and turbulence. There are four phases of the MMS mission and each phase is designed to study a particular region of the Earth's magnetosphere. The mission is composed of a formation of four spacecraft that are nominally in a regular tetrahedron formation. In this work, we present optimal orbit designs for Phase I and II. This entails designing optimal reference orbits so that the spacecraft dwell-time in the region of interest is a maximum. This is non-trivial because the Earth's magnetosphere is dynamic and its shape and position are not constant in inertial space. Optimal orbit design for MMS also entails designing the formation so that the relative motion of the four spacecraft yields the greatest science return. We develop performance metrics that are related to the science return, and use Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) to determine optimal relative motion solutions. We also ensure that practical constraints such as maximum eclipse time and minimum inter-spacecraft separation distances are not violated.