Science.gov

Sample records for activities pile driving

  1. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  2. 77 FR 32943 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia River, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia River, WA AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS..., incidental to pile driving during construction of the Terminal 5 Bulk Potash Handling Facility. DATES... (Eumatopius jubatus) ] incidental to pile driving activities conducted during the construction of the...

  3. Avoidance of wind farms by harbour seals is limited to pile driving activities.

    PubMed

    Russell, Debbie J F; Hastie, Gordon D; Thompson, David; Janik, Vincent M; Hammond, Philip S; Scott-Hayward, Lindesay A S; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Jones, Esther L; McConnell, Bernie J

    2016-12-01

    As part of global efforts to reduce dependence on carbon-based energy sources there has been a rapid increase in the installation of renewable energy devices. The installation and operation of these devices can result in conflicts with wildlife. In the marine environment, mammals may avoid wind farms that are under construction or operating. Such avoidance may lead to more time spent travelling or displacement from key habitats. A paucity of data on at-sea movements of marine mammals around wind farms limits our understanding of the nature of their potential impacts.Here, we present the results of a telemetry study on harbour seals Phoca vitulina in The Wash, south-east England, an area where wind farms are being constructed using impact pile driving. We investigated whether seals avoid wind farms during operation, construction in its entirety, or during piling activity. The study was carried out using historical telemetry data collected prior to any wind farm development and telemetry data collected in 2012 during the construction of one wind farm and the operation of another.Within an operational wind farm, there was a close-to-significant increase in seal usage compared to prior to wind farm development. However, the wind farm was at the edge of a large area of increased usage, so the presence of the wind farm was unlikely to be the cause.There was no significant displacement during construction as a whole. However, during piling, seal usage (abundance) was significantly reduced up to 25 km from the piling activity; within 25 km of the centre of the wind farm, there was a 19 to 83% (95% confidence intervals) decrease in usage compared to during breaks in piling, equating to a mean estimated displacement of 440 individuals. This amounts to significant displacement starting from predicted received levels of between 166 and 178 dB re 1 μPa(p-p). Displacement was limited to piling activity; within 2 h of cessation of pile driving, seals were distributed as per

  4. 77 FR 43259 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving for Honolulu Seawater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... volcanic rock. The majority of monk seals live in six main breeding subpopulations in the Northwestern... monitoring such a large area in order to prevent Level B harassment is not feasible. HSWAC may still conduct... monitor this area and stop pile driving in order to prevent Level B harassment of humpback whales...

  5. Underwater Sound Propagation from Marine Pile Driving.

    PubMed

    Reyff, James A

    2016-01-01

    Pile driving occurs in a variety of nearshore environments that typically have very shallow-water depths. The propagation of pile-driving sound in water is complex, where sound is directly radiated from the pile as well as through the ground substrate. Piles driven in the ground near water bodies can produce considerable underwater sound energy. This paper presents examples of sound propagation through shallow-water environments. Some of these examples illustrate the substantial variation in sound amplitude over time that can be critical to understand when computing an acoustic-based safety zone for aquatic species.

  6. 77 FR 69797 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in Port Townsend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... vicinity of the ferry terminal. Because direct pull and clamshell pile removal, and use of barges do not... we require WSF to monitor before, during, and after all ramp-ups of vibratory and impact pile driving.... Response: We disagree that WSF needs to monitor for marine mammals before, during, and after all...

  7. 77 FR 39471 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in Port Townsend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... uniformity) in the water column and from surface and bottom roughness and water depth (bathymetry). During..., including the size, type, and depth of the animal; the depth, intensity, and duration of the pile driving sound; the depth of the water column; the substrate of the habitat; the standoff distance between...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pile driving equipment. 1926.603 Section 1926.603 Labor... Operations § 1926.603 Pile driving equipment. (a) General requirements. (1) Boilers and piping systems which are a part of, or used with, pile driving equipment shall meet the applicable requirements of...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pile driving equipment. 1926.603 Section 1926.603 Labor... Operations § 1926.603 Pile driving equipment. (a) General requirements. (1) Boilers and piping systems which are a part of, or used with, pile driving equipment shall meet the applicable requirements of...

  10. Development of a geotechnical and pile driving database, Adriatic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Carpaneto, R.; Paoletti, L.; Guaita, P.; Pratico, A.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents a geotechnical and pile driving data base relevant to offshore installations in the Adriatic Sea. The paper discusses sources of information, structure, content, and engineering applications of the data base. Data available from Agip`s platform installations in the Adriatic was reviewed, and 20 representative platforms were chosen. Two relational data bases were created, for geotechnical and installation data respectively. The data bases provide a comprehensive and organized source of information about past experience in the area. Such experience is now quickly available for geotechnical engineering activities. As a main application of the data bases, information was processed to make data sets for training Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) to predict pile driveability. It is envisioned that the data bases will also be used in ongoing installation program design.

  11. 73. VIEW SHOWING THE DRIVING OF FALSEWORK PILES FOR TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    73. VIEW SHOWING THE DRIVING OF FALSEWORK PILES FOR TOWER BRIDGE, ca February 9, 1935. (Note that the deck has been removed from M Street Bridge, allowing placement of piles directly beneath. Steamer Delta King is moored at River Lines Terminal.) - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  12. 48. Photocopied August 1978. DRIVING PILES FOR THE POWER HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photocopied August 1978. DRIVING PILES FOR THE POWER HOUSE FOUNDATION, WEST END, AROUND SEPTEMBER 1, 1900. THE COFFER DAM HOLDING BACK THE ST. MARY'S IS AT THE LEFT. PILES SAWED TO LEVEL ARE ON THE LOWER RIGHT-HAND SIDE OF THE PHOTO. UNCUT PILES ARE AT THE CENTER. A SECOND PILE DRIVER WORKING FROM THE EAST END CAN BE SEEN IN THE BACKGROUND, ALONG WITH THE PUMPING PLANT AND THE STONE CRUSHING MACHINE. (71) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  13. 48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF RIVER, November 7, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  14. Analysis of Wave Fields induced by Offshore Pile Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnau, M.; Heitmann, K.; Lippert, T.; Lippert, S.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-12-01

    Impact pile driving is the common technique to install foundations for offshore wind turbines. With each hammer strike the steel pile - often exceeding 6 m in diameter and 80 m in length - radiates energy into the surrounding water and soil, until reaching its targeted penetration depth. Several European authorities introduced limitations regarding hydroacoustic emissions during the construction process to protect marine wildlife. Satisfying these regulations made the development and application of sound mitigation systems (e.g. bubble curtains or insulation screens) inevitable, which are commonly installed within the water column surrounding the pile or even the complete construction site. Last years' advances have led to a point, where the seismic energy tunneling the sound mitigation systems through the soil and radiating back towards the water column gains importance, as it confines the maximum achievable sound mitigation. From an engineering point of view, the challenge of deciding on an effective noise mitigation layout arises, which especially requires a good understanding of the soil-dependent wave field. From a geophysical point of view, the pile acts like a very unique line source, generating a characteristic wave field dominated by inclined wave fronts, diving as well as head waves. Monitoring the seismic arrivals while the pile penetration steadily increases enables to perform quasi-vertical seismic profiling. This work is based on datasets that have been collected within the frame of three comprehensive offshore measurement campaigns during pile driving and demonstrates the potential of seismic arrivals induced by pile driving for further soil characterization.

  15. 76 FR 51947 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving in the Columbia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... devices, such as a bubble curtain, would be used during any impact hammering. In addition to pile... the sensitivity of the receptor (Richardson et al., 1995). Marine mammal reactions to sound may depend.... Jacobs and Terhune (2002) observed wild harbor seal reactions to high-frequency acoustic...

  16. Effects of Pile Driving on the Residency and Movement of Tagged Reef Fish

    PubMed Central

    Iafrate, Joseph D.; Watwood, Stephanie L.; Reyier, Eric A.; Scheidt, Douglas M.; Dossot, Georges A.; Crocker, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    The potential effects of pile driving on fish populations and commercial fisheries have received significant attention given the prevalence of pile driving occurring in coastal habitats throughout the world. Behavioral impacts of sound generated from these activities on fish typically have a greater area of influence than physical injury, and may therefore adversely affect a greater portion of the local population. This study used acoustic telemetry to assess the movement, residency, and survival of 15 sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus) and 10 grey snapper (Lutjanus griseus) in Port Canaveral, Florida, USA, in response to 35 days of pile driving at a wharf complex. No obvious signs of mortality or injury to tagged fish were evident from the data. Received sound pressure levels from pile strikes on the interior of the wharf, where reef fish primarily occur, were on average 152–157 dB re 1 μPa (peak). No significant decrease in sheepshead daytime residency was observed during pile driving within the central portion of the wharf and area of highest sound exposure, and no major indicators of displacement from the exposure wharf with the onset of pile driving were observed. There was evidence of potential displacement from the exposure wharf that coincided with the start of pile driving observed for 2 out of 4 grey snapper, along with a decrease in daytime residency for a subset of this species with high site fidelity prior to the event. Results indicate that snapper may be more likely to depart an area of pile driving disturbance more readily than sheepshead, but were less at risk for behavioral impact given the lower site fidelity of this species. PMID:27880786

  17. Effects of Impulsive Pile-Driving Exposure on Fishes.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Carlson, Thomas J; Halvorsen, Michele B; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Six species of fishes were tested under aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions to answer several key questions regarding the effects of exposure to impulsive pile driving. The issues addressed included which sound levels lead to the onset of barotrauma injuries, how these levels differ between fishes with different types of swim bladders, the recovery from barotrauma injuries, and the potential effects exposure might have on the auditory system. The results demonstrate that the current interim criteria for pile-driving sound exposures are 20 dB or more below the actual sound levels that result in the onset of physiological effects on fishes.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pile driving equipment. 1926.603 Section 1926.603 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and...

  19. Noise Mitigation During Pile Driving Efficiently Reduces Disturbance of Marine Mammals.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Georg; Rose, Armin; Diederichs, Ansgar; Bellmann, Michael; Pehlke, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic monitoring of harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena L., 1758) indicated a strongly reduced disturbance by noise emitted by pile driving for offshore wind turbine foundations insulated by a big bubble curtain (BBC). This newly developed noise mitigation system was tested during construction of the offshore wind farm Borkum West II (North Sea). Because porpoise activity strongly corresponded to the sound level, operation of the new system under its most suitable configuration reduced the porpoise disturbance area by ~90%. Hence, for the first time, a positive effect of a noise mitigation system during offshore pile driving on an affected marine mammal species could be demonstrated.

  20. 31. Photocopied August 1978. DRIVING PILES ON SLOPE, NORTH SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopied August 1978. DRIVING PILES ON SLOPE, NORTH SIDE, EARTH SECTION, JANUARY 17, 1901, IN PREPARATION FOR THE INSTALLATION OF THE TIMBER LINING. THE 12 x 12'S FORMING THE BERN OR BULKHEAD ATOP THE LINING IS ALREADY IN PLACE. CLAY WAS TO BE SLOPED BEHIND THE BERN AND PAVED WITH STONE. (117) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  1. Residency of Reef Fish During Pile Driving Within a Shallow Pierside Environment.

    PubMed

    Iafrate, Joseph D; Watwood, Stephanie L; Reyier, Eric A; Gilchrest, Matthew; Crocker, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    The potential effects of pile driving on fish populations and commercial fisheries have received significant attention given the prevalence of construction occurring in coastal habitats throughout the world. In this study, we used acoustic telemetry to assess the movement and survival of free-ranging reef fish in Port Canaveral, FL, in response to 35 days of pile driving at an existing wharf complex. The site fidelity and behavior of 15 sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus) and 10 gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus) were determined before, during, and after pile driving. No obvious signs of mortality or injury to tagged fish were evident from the data. There was a significant decline in the residency index for mangrove snapper at the construction wharf after pile driving compared with the baseline, although this may be influenced by natural movements of this species in the study area rather than a direct response to pile driving.

  2. Acoustic stress responses in juvenile sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax induced by offshore pile driving.

    PubMed

    Debusschere, Elisabeth; Hostens, Kris; Adriaens, Dominique; Ampe, Bart; Botteldooren, Dick; De Boeck, Gudrun; De Muynck, Amelie; Sinha, Amit Kumar; Vandendriessche, Sofie; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Underwater sound generated by pile driving during construction of offshore wind farms is a major concern in many countries. This paper reports on the acoustic stress responses in young European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (68 and 115 days old), based on four in situ experiments as close as 45 m from a pile driving activity. As a primary stress response, whole-body cortisol seemed to be too sensitive to 'handling' bias. On the other hand, measured secondary stress responses to pile driving showed significant reductions in oxygen consumption rate and low whole-body lactate concentrations. Furthermore, repeated exposure to impulsive sound significantly affected both primary and secondary stress responses. Under laboratory conditions, no tertiary stress responses (no changes in specific growth rate or Fulton's condition factor) were noted in young sea bass 30 days after the treatment. Still, the demonstrated acute stress responses and potentially repeated exposure to impulsive sound in the field will inevitably lead to less fit fish in the wild.

  3. Hearing thresholds of two harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) for playbacks of multiple pile driving strike sounds.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; Gransier, Robin; Jennings, Nancy

    2013-09-01

    Pile driving, which creates high amplitude sounds with potentially negative impacts on the marine environment, is used to attach wind turbines to the sea bed. To quantify the distance at which pile driving sounds can be detected by harbor seals, unmasked hearing thresholds were obtained for series of five pile driving sounds recorded at 100 and 800 m from a pile driving location. The played back spectra resembled the spectra of sounds recorded under certain conditions 10-50 km from an offshore pile driving site. The lower the received level, the later within the series of sounds the harbor seals responded. The mean 50% detection threshold sound exposure levels for any sound in the series were: 40 (seal 01, 100 m), 39 (seal 01, 800 m), 43 (seal 02, 100 m), and 43 (seal 02, 800 m) dB re 1 μPa(2)s (add 9 dB for sound pressure level, dB re 1 μPa). The mean 50% detection thresholds based on detection of only the first sound of the series were ca. 5 dB higher. Detection at sea depends on the actual propagation conditions and on the degree of masking of the sounds by ambient noise, but the present study suggests that pile driving sounds are audible to harbor seals up to hundreds of kilometers from pile driving sites.

  4. Methods for Predicting Potential Impacts of Pile-Driving Noise on Endangered Sturgeon During Bridge Construction.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Justin; Jacobs, Fred; Conway, Robert; Popper, Arthur N; Moese, Mark; Rollino, John; Racca, Roberto; Martin, Bruce; MacGillivray, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The potential impacts of pile-driving noise on Hudson River sturgeon during construction of the New NY Bridge were predicted. Abundance data for shortnose and Atlantic sturgeon derived from fisheries sampling were combined with data about the spatial extent of pile-driving noise. This approach was used to calculate the number of sturgeon that could occur within sound level isopleths exceeding peak and cumulative noise criteria used by the National Marine Fisheries Service to determine the incidental take of sturgeon. The number of sturgeon subject to the potential onset of physiological effects during pile driving was predicted to be 35-41 fish for each species.

  5. In Situ Mortality Experiments with Juvenile Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) in Relation to Impulsive Sound Levels Caused by Pile Driving of Windmill Foundations

    PubMed Central

    Debusschere, Elisabeth; De Coensel, Bert; Bajek, Aline; Botteldooren, Dick; Hostens, Kris; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Vandendriessche, Sofie; Van Ginderdeuren, Karl; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Impact assessments of offshore wind farm installations and operations on the marine fauna are performed in many countries. Yet, only limited quantitative data on the physiological impact of impulsive sounds on (juvenile) fishes during pile driving of offshore wind farm foundations are available. Our current knowledge on fish injury and mortality due to pile driving is mainly based on laboratory experiments, in which high-intensity pile driving sounds are generated inside acoustic chambers. To validate these lab results, an in situ field experiment was carried out on board of a pile driving vessel. Juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) of 68 and 115 days post hatching were exposed to pile-driving sounds as close as 45 m from the actual pile driving activity. Fish were exposed to strikes with a sound exposure level between 181 and 188 dB re 1 µPa2.s. The number of strikes ranged from 1739 to 3067, resulting in a cumulative sound exposure level between 215 and 222 dB re 1 µPa2.s. Control treatments consisted of fish not exposed to pile driving sounds. No differences in immediate mortality were found between exposed and control fish groups. Also no differences were noted in the delayed mortality up to 14 days after exposure between both groups. Our in situ experiments largely confirm the mortality results of the lab experiments found in other studies. PMID:25275508

  6. In situ mortality experiments with juvenile sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) in relation to impulsive sound levels caused by pile driving of windmill foundations.

    PubMed

    Debusschere, Elisabeth; De Coensel, Bert; Bajek, Aline; Botteldooren, Dick; Hostens, Kris; Vanaverbeke, Jan; Vandendriessche, Sofie; Van Ginderdeuren, Karl; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Impact assessments of offshore wind farm installations and operations on the marine fauna are performed in many countries. Yet, only limited quantitative data on the physiological impact of impulsive sounds on (juvenile) fishes during pile driving of offshore wind farm foundations are available. Our current knowledge on fish injury and mortality due to pile driving is mainly based on laboratory experiments, in which high-intensity pile driving sounds are generated inside acoustic chambers. To validate these lab results, an in situ field experiment was carried out on board of a pile driving vessel. Juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) of 68 and 115 days post hatching were exposed to pile-driving sounds as close as 45 m from the actual pile driving activity. Fish were exposed to strikes with a sound exposure level between 181 and 188 dB re 1 µPa².s. The number of strikes ranged from 1739 to 3067, resulting in a cumulative sound exposure level between 215 and 222 dB re 1 µPa².s. Control treatments consisted of fish not exposed to pile driving sounds. No differences in immediate mortality were found between exposed and control fish groups. Also no differences were noted in the delayed mortality up to 14 days after exposure between both groups. Our in situ experiments largely confirm the mortality results of the lab experiments found in other studies.

  7. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine... signalmen. (2) All employees shall be kept clear when piling is being hoisted into the leads. (3) When...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.603 - Pile driving equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Motor Vehicles, Mechanized Equipment, and Marine... signalmen. (2) All employees shall be kept clear when piling is being hoisted into the leads. (3) When...

  9. Pile-Driving Pressure and Particle Velocity at the Seabed: Quantifying Effects on Crustaceans and Groundfish.

    PubMed

    Miller, James H; Potty, Gopu R; Kim, Hui-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the effects of pile driving on crustaceans, groundfish, and other animals near the seafloor. Three different waves were investigated, including the compressional wave, shear wave, and interface wave. A finite element (FE) technique was employed in and around the pile, whereas a parabolic equation (PE) code was used to predict propagation at long ranges from the pile. Pressure, particle displacement, and particle velocity are presented as a function of range at the seafloor for a shallow-water environment near Rhode Island. We discuss the potential effects on animals near the seafloor.

  10. Avoidance of Pile-Driving Noise by Hudson River Sturgeon During Construction of the New NY Bridge at Tappan Zee.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Justin; Jacobs, Fred; Popper, Arthur N

    2016-01-01

    Sturgeon movements were monitored during a pile-driving operation. Fewer sturgeon were detected during pile driving and remained for a shorter time than during silent control periods. Moreover, the short time spent by sturgeon near pile driving suggests that they were unlikely to have reached the criterion of 187 dB re 1 μPa(2)·s cumulative sound exposure level. These results suggest that sturgeon are likely to avoid impact pile driving and not remain long enough to experience physiological effects, thus providing empirical evidence that the 206 dB re 1 μPa peak sound pressure level is the appropriate criterion for assessing the impacts of pile-driving noise on sturgeon.

  11. Effect Of Trenches On Attenuation Of Ground Vibration During Pile Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madheswaran*, C. K.; Natarajan, K.; Sundaravadivelu, R.; Boominathan, A.

    The ground vibration generated from pile driving, could cause disturbances to adjacent structures and also disrupt the operation of nearby sensitive equipment. Raleigh waves that propagate in a zone close to the ground surface carries most of the vibration energy affecting near by structures. Trenches open or filled (wave barriers) are often used in engineering practice to reduce the ground vibrations caused by propagating surface (Rayleigh) waves of relatively small wavelengths. The measurement of ground vibrations during prototype pile driving at a site in Chennai was carried out. The analysis was carried using a finite element code, PLAXIS, to study the ground vibration with and without trenches during driving of steel casing with bottom shoe. This paper presents the Peak Particle Acceleration (PPA) of ground measured from prototype pile driving were compared with analytical results. This paper present the results of Finite Element (FE) analysis of concrete trench for effectiveness of screening of vertically polarized Rayleigh waves. Finite element analysis was also carried out to study the effect of parameters such as trench dimension, location of trench from the piling and strength of concrete trenches on ground vibration.

  12. Pile Driving at the New Bridge at Tappan Zee: Potential Environmental Impacts.

    PubMed

    Popper, Arthur N; Moese, Mark; Rollino, John; Krebs, Justin; Racca, Roberto; Martin, Bruce; Zeddies, David; MacGillivray, Alexander; Jacobs, Fred

    2016-01-01

    A new bridge will be constructed to replace the aging Tappan Zee Bridge over the Hudson River in New York. Construction will potentially result in hydroacoustic impacts to the local fish fauna. As a consequence, a substantial environmental impact analysis had to be conducted to obtain construction permits. This paper describes the process of environmental analysis and some of the results of the studies that led up to the final permitting. The process included modeling of pile-driving acoustics, analysis of river ambient noise, analysis of test piling, and observations on fish behavior during these tests.

  13. Recovery of Barotrauma Injuries in Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha from Exposure to Pile Driving Sound

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Brandon M.; Popper, Arthur N.; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, were exposed to simulated high intensity pile driving signals to evaluate their ability to recover from barotrauma injuries. Fish were exposed to one of two cumulative sound exposure levels for 960 pile strikes (217 or 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum; single strike sound exposure levels of 187 or 180 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss respectively). This was followed by an immediate assessment of injuries, or assessment 2, 5, or 10 days post-exposure. There were no observed mortalities from the pile driving sound exposure. Fish exposed to 217 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum displayed evidence of healing from injuries as post-exposure time increased. Fish exposed to 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum sustained minimal injuries that were not significantly different from control fish at days 0, 2, and 10. The exposure to 210 dB re 1 µPa2·s SELcum replicated the findings in a previous study that defined this level as the threshold for onset of injury. Furthermore, these data support the hypothesis that one or two Mild injuries resulting from pile driving exposure are unlikely to affect the survival of the exposed animals, at least in a laboratory environment. PMID:22745794

  14. 77 FR 14736 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Placement for Fishermen's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ...-month period (May-August) to allow for permitting and weather delays. Pile driving would only occur in weather that provides adequate visibility for marine mammal monitoring activities. Region of Proposed... passive acoustic monitoring. Records show that bottlenose dolphins and a single unidentified pinniped...

  15. Threshold for Onset of Injury in Chinook Salmon from Exposure to Impulsive Pile Driving Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Casper, Brandon M.; Woodley, Christa M.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2012-01-01

    The risk of effects to fishes and other aquatic life from impulsive sound produced by activities such as pile driving and seismic exploration is increasing throughout the world, particularly with the increased exploitation of oceans for energy production. At the same time, there are few data that provide insight into the effects of these sounds on fishes. The goal of this study was to provide quantitative data to define the levels of impulsive sound that could result in the onset of barotrauma to fish. A High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid filled wave Tube was developed that enabled laboratory simulation of high-energy impulsive sound that were characteristic of aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions. The sounds used were based upon the impulsive sounds generated by an impact hammer striking a steel shell pile. Neutrally buoyant juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were exposed to impulsive sounds and subsequently evaluated for barotrauma injuries. Observed injuries ranged from mild hematomas at the lowest sound exposure levels to organ hemorrhage at the highest sound exposure levels. Frequency of observed injuries were used to compute a biological response weighted index (RWI) to evaluate the physiological impact of injuries at the different exposure levels. As single strike and cumulative sound exposure levels (SELss, SELcum respectively) increased, RWI values increased. Based on the results, tissue damage associated with adverse physiological costs occurred when the RWI was greater than 2. In terms of sound exposure levels a RWI of 2 was achieved for 1920 strikes by 177 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss yielding a SELcum of 210 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s, and for 960 strikes by 180 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss yielding a SELcum of 210 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s. These metrics define thresholds for onset of injury in juvenile Chinook salmon. PMID:22745695

  16. Common Sole Larvae Survive High Levels of Pile-Driving Sound in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Loes J.; de Jong, Christ A. F.; Bierman, Stijn M.; van Beek, Pieter J. G.; van Keeken, Olvin A.; Wessels, Peter W.; van Damme, Cindy J. G.; Winter, Hendrik V.; de Haan, Dick; Dekeling, René P. A.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the rapid extension of offshore wind farms, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge on possible adverse effects of underwater sound generated by pile-driving. Mortality and injuries have been observed in fish exposed to loud impulse sounds, but knowledge on the sound levels at which (sub-)lethal effects occur is limited for juvenile and adult fish, and virtually non-existent for fish eggs and larvae. A device was developed in which fish larvae can be exposed to underwater sound. It consists of a rigid-walled cylindrical chamber driven by an electro-dynamical sound projector. Samples of up to 100 larvae can be exposed simultaneously to a homogeneously distributed sound pressure and particle velocity field. Recorded pile-driving sounds could be reproduced accurately in the frequency range between 50 and 1000 Hz, at zero to peak pressure levels up to 210 dB re 1µPa2 (zero to peak pressures up to 32 kPa) and single pulse sound exposure levels up to 186 dB re 1µPa2s. The device was used to examine lethal effects of sound exposure in common sole (Solea solea) larvae. Different developmental stages were exposed to various levels and durations of pile-driving sound. The highest cumulative sound exposure level applied was 206 dB re 1µPa2s, which corresponds to 100 strikes at a distance of 100 m from a typical North Sea pile-driving site. The results showed no statistically significant differences in mortality between exposure and control groups at sound exposure levels which were well above the US interim criteria for non-auditory tissue damage in fish. Although our findings cannot be extrapolated to fish larvae in general, as interspecific differences in vulnerability to sound exposure may occur, they do indicate that previous assumptions and criteria may need to be revised. PMID:22431996

  17. A semi-analytical model for the prediction of underwater noise from offshore pile driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    Underwater noise from offshore pile driving gained considerable attention in recent years mainly due to the large scale construction of offshore wind farms. The most common foundation type of a wind turbine is a monopile, upon which the wind tower rests. The pile is driven into place with the help of hydraulic hammers. During the hammering of the pile, high levels of noise are generated which are known to produce deleterious effects on both mammals and fish. In this work, a linear semi-analytical model is developed for predicting the levels of underwater noise for a wide range of system parameters. The model incorporates all major parts of the system. The hydraulic hammer is substituted by an external force, the pile is described as a thin circular cylindrical shell, the water is modelled as a compressible fluid and the water-saturated seabed is defined by distributed springs and dashpots in all directions. The solution of the coupled vibroacoustic problem is based on the representation of the response of the complete system on the modal basis of the in vacuo shell structure. The influence that the inter-modal coupling, the choice of the soil parameters and the acoustic impedance of the seabed have on the generated noise levels is studied in the frequency domain. Strong and weak points of the present model are discussed on the basis of a comparison with a set of available experimental data. The obtained results show the capability of the model to predict the underwater noise levels both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. Effects of exposure to pile-driving sounds on the lake sturgeon, Nile tilapia and hogchoker

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Casper, Brandon M.; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2012-01-01

    Pile-driving and other impulsive sound sources have the potential to injure or kill fishes. One mechanism that produces injuries is the rapid motion of the walls of the swim bladder as it repeatedly contacts nearby tissues. To further understand the involvement of the swim bladder in tissue damage, a specially designed wave tube was used to expose three species to pile-driving sounds. Species included lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)—with an open (physostomous) swim bladder, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)—with a closed (physoclistous) swim bladder and the hogchoker (Trinectes maculatus)—a flatfish without a swim bladder. There were no visible injuries in any of the exposed hogchokers, whereas a variety of injuries were observed in the lake sturgeon and Nile tilapia. At the loudest cumulative and single-strike sound exposure levels (SELcum and SELss respectively), the Nile tilapia had the highest total injuries and the most severe injuries per fish. As exposure levels decreased, the number and severity of injuries were more similar between the two species. These results suggest that the presence and type of swim bladder correlated with injury at higher sound levels, while the extent of injury at lower sound levels was similar for both kinds of swim bladders. PMID:23055066

  19. Effects of pile-driving on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) at the first offshore wind farm in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dähne, Michael; Gilles, Anita; Lucke, Klaus; Peschko, Verena; Adler, Sven; Krügel, Kathrin; Sundermeyer, Janne; Siebert, Ursula

    2013-06-01

    The first offshore wind farm ‘alpha ventus’ in the German North Sea was constructed north east of Borkum Reef Ground approximately 45 km north off the German coast in 2008 and 2009 using percussive piling for the foundations of 12 wind turbines. Visual monitoring of harbour porpoises was conducted prior to as well as during construction and operation by means of 15 aerial line transect distance sampling surveys, from 2008 to 2010. Static acoustic monitoring (SAM) with echolocation click loggers at 12 positions was performed additionally from 2008 to 2011. SAM devices were deployed between 1 and 50 km from the centre of the wind farm. During aerial surveys, 18 600 km of transect lines were covered in two survey areas (10 934 and 11 824 km2) and 1392 harbour porpoise sightings were recorded. Lowest densities were documented during the construction period in 2009. The spatial distribution pattern recorded on two aerial surveys three weeks before and exactly during pile-driving points towards a strong avoidance response within 20 km distance of the noise source. Generalized additive modelling of SAM data showed a negative impact of pile-driving on relative porpoise detection rates at eight positions at distances less than 10.8 km. Increased detection rates were found at two positions at 25 and 50 km distance suggesting that porpoises were displaced towards these positions. A pile-driving related behavioural reaction could thus be detected using SAM at a much larger distance than a pure avoidance radius would suggest. The first waiting time (interval between porpoise detections of at least 10 min), after piling started, increased with longer piling durations. A gradient in avoidance, a gradual fading of the avoidance reaction with increasing distance from the piling site, is hence most probably a product of an incomplete displacement during shorter piling events.

  20. Recovery of Barotrauma Injuries Resulting from Exposure to Pile Driving Sound in Two Sizes of Hybrid Striped Bass

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT) was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis). The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g) had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g). However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders. PMID:24040089

  1. Recovery of barotrauma injuries resulting from exposure to pile driving sound in two sizes of hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Casper, Brandon M; Halvorsen, Michele B; Matthews, Frazer; Carlson, Thomas J; Popper, Arthur N

    2013-01-01

    The effects of loud sounds on fishes, such as those produced during impulsive pile driving, are an increasing concern in the management of aquatic ecosystems. However, very little is known about such effects. Accordingly, a High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid Filled wave Tube (HICI-FT) was used to investigate the effects of sounds produced by impulsive pile driving on two size groups of hybrid striped bass (white bass Moronechrysops x striped bass Moronesaxatilis). The larger striped bass (mean size 17.2 g) had more severe injuries, as well as more total injuries, than the smaller fish (mean size 1.3 g). However, fish in each size group recovered from most injuries within 10 days of exposure. A comparison with different species from previously published studies show that current results support the observation that fishes with physoclistous swim bladders are more susceptible to injury from impulsive pile driving than are fishes with physostomous swim bladders.

  2. Big Pile or Small Pile?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branca, Mario; Quidacciolu, Rossana G.; Soletta, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    The construction of a voltaic pile (battery) is a simple laboratory activity that commemorates the invention of this important device and is of great help in teaching physics. The voltaic pile is often seen as a scientific toy, with the "pile" being constructed from fruit. These toys use some strips of copper and zinc inserted in a piece…

  3. Pile driving models for the evaluation of soil penetration resistance measurements from planetary subsurface probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kömle, Norbert I.; Poganski, Joshua; Kargl, Günter; Grygorczuk, Jerzy

    2015-05-01

    Several planetary lander missions conducted in the past and planned for the near future have instruments on board, which are dedicated to the determination of various material properties, among them mechanical properties of the surface like material strength and penetration resistance. In this paper two instruments are considered in more detail: (i) the MUPUS penetrator, a device aboard the Lander Philae of ESA's Rosetta mission, and (ii) the Mole HP3, which is part of the payload of NASA's next Discovery mission InSight, due for landing on Mars in 2016. Both devices are driven by hammering mechanisms designed to work under low or micro-gravity conditions and blaze themselves a trail into the subsurface of their respective target bodies. Naturally the speed with which this process takes place and if penetration is possible at all depends on the mechanical properties of the soil. However, a quantitative evaluation of soil mechanical parameters from measured depth-versus-time data is not a straightforward task. In this paper we apply an old technique, originally developed for modelling the driving of a pile into the ground, to describe the performance of penetrators and Moles developed for planetary applications. The numerical pile driving model of Smith (1962) is scaled and adapted for this purpose and used to predict the penetration behaviour of these instruments in dependence of their internal construction and the properties of the soil they are driven in. The model computes the permanent set of the surrounding soil in response to one hammer blow cycle as well as the oscillations and waves excited inside the devices and in the surrounding soil. Both the penetration resistance of the tip and the resistance caused by friction of the penetrator along the cylindrical side wall are calculated. By comparing the modelling results with previous laboratory measurements it is demonstrated that the models produce realistic results and can be used both as tools for proper

  4. Noise reduction by the application of an air-bubble curtain in offshore pile driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Underwater noise pollution is a by-product of marine industrial operations. In particular, the noise generated when a foundation pile is driven into the soil with an impact hammer is considered to be harmful for the aquatic species. In an attempt to reduce the ecological footprint, several noise mitigation techniques have been investigated. Among the various solutions proposed, the air-bubble curtain is often applied due to its efficacy in noise reduction. In this paper, a model is proposed for the investigation of the sound reduction during marine piling when an air-bubble curtain is placed around the pile. The model consists of the pile, the surrounding water and soil media, and the air-bubble curtain which is positioned at a certain distance from the pile surface. The solution approach is semi-analytical and is based on the dynamic sub-structuring technique and the modal decomposition method. Two main results of the paper can be distinguished. First, a new model is proposed that can be used for predictions of the noise levels in a computationally efficient manner. Second, an analysis is presented of the principal mechanisms that are responsible for the noise reduction due to the application of the air-bubble curtain in marine piling. The understanding of these mechanisms turns to be crucial for the exploitation of the maximum efficiency of the system. It is shown that the principal mechanism of noise reduction depends strongly on the frequency content of the radiated sound and the characteristics of the bubbly medium. For piles of large diameter which radiate most of the acoustic energy at relatively low frequencies, the noise reduction is mainly attributed to the mismatch of the acoustic impedances between the seawater and the bubbly layer. On the contrary, for smaller piles and when the radiated acoustic energy is concentrated at frequencies close to, or higher than, the resonance frequency of the air bubbles, the sound absorption within the bubbly layer

  5. ACTIV: Sandwich Detector Activity from In-Pile Slowing-Down Spectra Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    ACTIV calculates the activities of a sandwich detector, to be used for in-pile measurements in slowing-down spectra below a few keV. The effect of scattering with energy degradation in the filter and in the detectors has been included to a first approximation.

  6. 75 FR 67951 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... effects on the auditory system; however, NMFS does not consider onset TTS to be the lowest level at which... acclimate to human activity. The DNR will also not remove piles within 30 yards (27 m) of haulouts, avoiding... from equipment (auditory injury is not possible due to low source levels and intermittent...

  7. 76 FR 67419 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Piling and Structure Removal in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... crane. The vibratory hammer is a large steel device lowered on top of the pile, which then grips and... removal activities to gather the data needed to determine the effectiveness of this technique as a... the efficacy of the soft start technique has not been empirically verified and, as such, NMFS...

  8. Extended Pile Driving Model to Predict the Penetration of the Insight/HP3 Mole into the Martian Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poganski, Joshua; Kömle, Norbert I.; Kargl, Günter; Schweiger, Helmut F.; Grott, Matthias; Spohn, Tilman; Krömer, Olaf; Krause, Christian; Wippermann, Torben; Tsakyridis, Georgios; Fittock, Mark; Lichtenheldt, Roy; Vrettos, Christos; Anrade, Jose E.

    2016-11-01

    The NASA InSight mission will provide an opportunity for soil investigations using the penetration data of the heat flow probe built by the German Aerospace Center DLR. The Heat flow and Physical Properties Probe (HP3) will penetrate 3 to 5 meter into the Martian subsurface to investigate the planetary heat flow. The measurement of the penetration rate during the insertion of the HP3 will be used to determine the physical properties of the soil at the landing site. For this purpose, numerical simulations of the penetration process were performed to get a better understanding of the soil properties influencing the penetration performance of HP3. A pile driving model has been developed considering all masses of the hammering mechanism of HP3. By cumulative application of individual stroke cycles it is now able to describe the penetration of the Mole into the Martian soil as a function of time, assuming that the soil parameters of the material through which it penetrates are known. We are using calibrated materials similar to those expected to be encountered by the InSight/HP3 Mole when it will be operated on the surface of Mars after the landing of the InSight spacecraft. We consider various possible scenarios, among them a more or less homogeneous material down to a depth of 3-5 m as well as a layered ground, consisting of layers with different soil parameters. Finally we describe some experimental tests performed with the latest prototype of the InSight Mole at DLR Bremen and compare the measured penetration performance in sand with our modeling results. Furthermore, results from a 3D DEM simulation are presented to get a better understanding of the soil response.

  9. Big Pile or Small Pile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branca, Mario; Quidacciolu, Rossana G.; Soletta, Isabella

    2013-10-01

    The construction of a voltaic pile (battery) is a simple laboratory activity that commemorates the invention of this important device and is of great help in teaching physics. The voltaic pile is often seen as a scientific toy, with the "pile" being constructed from fruit. These toys use some strips of copper and zinc inserted in a piece of fruit to produce a low-intensity electrical current to power a digital device. In a voltaic pile of this type, the zinc acts as an anode while the copper acts as a cathode. The reduction reaction [i.e.,2H+(aq)+2e⇋H2(g)] occurs on the copper (the cathode). The two electrons that are needed for the reduction are taken from the metal (copper), which remains positively charged, while the anode is the zinc, which is oxidized through the reaction Zn∘(m)⇋Zn+2(aq )+2e, and the two electrons remain on the metal, which is negatively charged. If the two pieces of metal are connected by an external conductor, electrons flow from the zinc to the copper. The electromotive force of this system is about 0.76 V, which is the reduction potential of zinc, as can be found in the table of standard reduction potentials.

  10. Development and Testing of a Device Capable of Placing Model Piles by Driving and Pushing in the Centrifuge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    of the pile in the soil as long as the model capacity was measured at the appropriate test gravity level. Ryan ?83 ) and ’i ,’an I)85,-enz ion tne...modulus of the pile material and tip dimensions are known. Measurement of the tip pressure by a load cell dictates all seoarat on of :ne tip from the...iamer ,is .... cr ao :. :r the above reasons 3s .,el] as 4n -,-e determina ion f the oenetration of the oile after impact. Using ,the stecoer motor in its

  11. Development and Testing of a Device Capable of Placing Model Piles by Driving and Pushing in the Centrifuge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    during loading aids in determination of the load shedding characteristics of the pile-soil system and the mechinism by which the soil mobilizes its...mounted above in a protective canister. The system chosen (Figure 4-11) consists of a stepper motor geared • through a ball bearing screw assembly (ball...number of steps versus the vertical displacement of the rack gear and magnet load cell. Vertical displace- ment of the ball screw for each step equals the

  12. Framework for assessing impacts of pile-driving noise from offshore wind farm construction on a harbour seal population

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Paul M.; Hastie, Gordon D.; Nedwell, Jeremy; Barham, Richard; Brookes, Kate L.; Cordes, Line S.; Bailey, Helen; McLean, Nancy

    2013-11-15

    Offshore wind farm developments may impact protected marine mammal populations, requiring appropriate assessment under the EU Habitats Directive. We describe a framework developed to assess population level impacts of disturbance from piling noise on a protected harbour seal population in the vicinity of proposed wind farm developments in NE Scotland. Spatial patterns of seal distribution and received noise levels are integrated with available data on the potential impacts of noise to predict how many individuals are displaced or experience auditory injury. Expert judgement is used to link these impacts to changes in vital rates and applied to population models that compare population changes under baseline and construction scenarios over a 25 year period. We use published data and hypothetical piling scenarios to illustrate how the assessment framework has been used to support environmental assessments, explore the sensitivity of the framework to key assumptions, and discuss its potential application to other populations of marine mammals. -- Highlights: • We develop a framework to support Appropriate Assessment for harbour seal populations. • We assessed potential impacts of wind farm construction noise. • Data on distribution of seals and noise were used to predict effects on individuals. • Expert judgement linked these impacts to vital rates to model population change. • We explore the sensitivity of the framework to key assumptions and uncertainties.

  13. 77 FR 2701 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Placement for ORPC Maine's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... driven to the top of bedrock and would protrude 3-5 m (10-15 ft) above the seafloor. A total of 11 piles.... The monitoring pile would protrude about six m (20 ft) above the seafloor. The two-m diameter pile... spreading loss of 15 log R, OPRC estimates that the 180-dB (Level A) isopleth for the impact hammer could...

  14. 77 FR 15045 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Placement for ORPC Maine's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... to the top of bedrock and will protrude 3-5 m (10- 15 ft) above the seafloor. A total of 11 piles (10... (30 in) in diameter. The monitoring pile will protrude about six m (20 ft) above the seafloor. ORPC... expected to be 175 dB and 190 dB, respectively. Assuming a practical spreading loss of 15 log R,...

  15. Piling underwater noise impact on migrating salmon fish during Lithuanian LNG terminal construction (Curonian Lagoon, Eastern Baltic Sea Coast).

    PubMed

    Bagočius, Donatas

    2015-03-15

    Development of human activities in the Klaipėda strait generates a wide spectrum of underwater noise. In the fall of 2013, at the liquid natural gas terminal construction site in the shallow Curonian Lagoon area, an assessment of possible negative impacts on migrating salmon fish caused by pile driving noise was made. It is well known that impact hammer pile driving generates pulses with extremely high underwater noise levels. The obtained results proved that the pile hammering into the lagoon bottom generated pulses with a sound exposure level of 218 dB re 1 μPa(2) s @1m thus posing a risk to the migrating fish.

  16. 46. Photocopied August 1978. PILE DRIVERS #1 and #2, HOUSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photocopied August 1978. PILE DRIVERS #1 and #2, HOUSED FOR WINTER WORK, AT COMPLETION OF PILE DRIVING FOR COFFER DAM OF POWER HOUSE, APRIL 1, 1899. SOME OF THE TRIPLE -LAP SHEET PILES USED IN THE DAM ARE SHOWN IN THE FOREGROUND. (29) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  17. 76 FR 47155 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile-Driving and Renovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Trinidad Bay shoreline. In-air (i.e., sub-aerial) and underwater sound effects would be the most laterally... sound attenuates at a rate of -4.5 dB re 1 Pa (rms) for each doubling of distance, underwater sound from... value because 120 dB (rms) is the lowest threshold currently used to detect underwater sound effects...

  18. 76 FR 28733 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile-Driving and Renovation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... (i.e., sub-aerial) and underwater sound effects would be the most laterally extensive effects of the proposed action and thus demarcate the limits of the action area. Assuming that underwater sound attenuates at a rate of -4.5 dB re 1 Pa (rms) for each doubling of distance, underwater sound from...

  19. 77 FR 59904 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Pile Driving for Honolulu Seawater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... area proposed for pipeline installation. The seafloor slopes with varying degrees and consists mostly... Sound. Assuming a practical spreading loss of 15 log R, HSWAC estimated distances from the sound source... construction and while the intake and discharge pipes will take up a limited amount of space on the...

  20. 30 CFR 817.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 817.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 817.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  1. 30 CFR 817.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 817.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 817.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  2. 30 CFR 816.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 816.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 816.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  3. 30 CFR 816.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 816.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 816.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  4. 30 CFR 816.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 816.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 816.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  5. 30 CFR 816.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 816.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 816.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  6. 30 CFR 817.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 817.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 817.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  7. 30 CFR 817.83 - Coal mine waste: Refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. 817.83 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.83 Coal mine waste: Refuse piles. Refuse piles shall meet the requirements of § 817.81, the...) Drainage control. (1) If the disposal area contains springs, natural or manmade water courses, or...

  8. 45. Photocopied August 1978. PILE DRIVER, NOVEMBER 2, 1898. THIS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Photocopied August 1978. PILE DRIVER, NOVEMBER 2, 1898. THIS MACHINE WAS USED TO DRIVE PILES FOR THE POWER HOUSE COFFER DAM. AT THIS POINT IT IS JUST BEGINNING WORK. (12) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  9. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  10. Subthreshold activation of the superior colliculus drives saccade motor learning.

    PubMed

    Soetedjo, Robijanto; Fuchs, Albert F; Kojima, Yoshiko

    2009-12-02

    How the brain learns and maintains accurate precision movements is currently unknown. At times throughout life, rapid gaze shifts (saccades) become inaccurate, but the brain makes gradual adjustments so they again stop on target. Previously, we showed that complex spikes (CSs) in Purkinje cells of the oculomotor cerebellum report the direction and amplitude by which saccades are in error. Anatomical studies indicate that this error signal could originate in the superior colliculus (SC). Here, we deliver subthreshold electrical stimulation of the SC after the saccade lands to signal an apparent error. The size of saccades in the same direction as the simulated error gradually increase; those in the opposite direction decrease. The electrically adapted saccades endure after stimulation is discontinued, exhibit an adaptation field, can undergo changes in direction, and depend on error timing. These electrically induced adaptations were virtually identical with those produced by the visually induced adaptations that we report here for comparable visual errors in the same monkeys. Therefore, our experiments reveal that an additional role for the SC in the generation of saccades is to provide a vector error signal that drives dysmetric saccades to adapt. Moreover, the characteristics of the electrically induced adaptation reflect those of error-related CS activity in the oculomotor cerebellum, suggesting that CS activity serves as the learning signal. We speculate that CS activity may serve as the error signal that drives other kinds of motor learning as well.

  11. Design and Analysis of an Active Helical Drive Downhole Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Yujia; LIU, Qingyou; CHEN, Yonghua; REN, Tao

    2017-03-01

    During oil-gas well drilling and completion, downhole tools and apparatus should be conveyed to the destination to complete a series of downhole works. Downhole tractors have been used to convey tools in complex wellbores, however a very large tractive force is needed to carry more downhole tools to accomplish works with high efficiency. A novel serial active helical drive downhole tractor which has significantly improved performance compared with previous work is proposed. All previously reported helical drive downhole tractors need stators to balance the torque generated by the rotator. By contrast, the proposed serial downhole tractor does not need a stator; several rotator-driven units should only be connected to one another to achieve a tractive force multifold higher than that was previously reported. As a result, the length of a single unit is shortened, and the motion flexibility of the downhole tractor is increased. The major performance indicators, namely, gear ratio, velocity, and tractive force, are analyzed. Experimental results show that the maximum tractive force of a single-unit prototype with a length of 900 mm is 165.3 kg or 1620 N. The analysis and experimental results show that the proposed design has considerable potential for downhole works.

  12. Momentum Driving: Which Physical Processes Dominate Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Choi, Ena; Ciotti, Luca; Novak, Gregory S.; Proga, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    The deposition of mechanical feedback from a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in an active galactic nucleus into the surrounding galaxy occurs via broad-line winds which must carry mass and radial momentum as well as energy. The effect can be summarized by the dimensionless parameter η ={\\dot{M}_outf}/{\\dot{M}_acc}= {2 ɛ_wc^2}/{v_w^2} where epsilonw (≡ \\dot{E}_w/(\\dot{M}_accc^2)) is the efficiency with which accreted matter is turned into wind energy in the disk surrounding the central SMBH. The outflowing mass and momentum are proportional to η, and many prior treatments have essentially assumed that η = 0. We perform one- and two-dimensional simulations and find that the growth of the central SMBH is very sensitive to the inclusion of the mass and momentum driving but is insensitive to the assumed mechanical efficiency. For example in representative calculations, the omission of momentum and mass feedback leads to a hundred-fold increase in the mass of the SMBH to over 1010 M sun. When allowance is made for momentum driving, the final SMBH mass is much lower and the wind efficiencies that lead to the most observationally acceptable results are relatively low with epsilonw <~ 10-4.

  13. Mechanosignaling through YAP and TAZ drives fibroblast activation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Lagares, David; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Stopfer, Lauren; Marinković, Aleksandar; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Probst, Clemens K.; Hiemer, Samantha E.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Horowitz, Jeffrey C.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Varelas, Xaralabos; Tager, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological fibrosis is driven by a feedback loop in which the fibrotic extracellular matrix is both a cause and consequence of fibroblast activation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Here we identify yes-associated protein (YAP) (homolog of drosophila Yki) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) (also known as Wwtr1), transcriptional effectors of the Hippo pathway, as key matrix stiffness-regulated coordinators of fibroblast activation and matrix synthesis. YAP and TAZ are prominently expressed in fibrotic but not healthy lung tissue, with particularly pronounced nuclear expression of TAZ in spindle-shaped fibroblastic cells. In culture, both YAP and TAZ accumulate in the nuclei of fibroblasts grown on pathologically stiff matrices but not physiologically compliant matrices. Knockdown of YAP and TAZ together in vitro attenuates key fibroblast functions, including matrix synthesis, contraction, and proliferation, and does so exclusively on pathologically stiff matrices. Profibrotic effects of YAP and TAZ operate, in part, through their transcriptional target plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, which is regulated by matrix stiffness independent of transforming growth factor-β signaling. Immortalized fibroblasts conditionally expressing active YAP or TAZ mutant proteins overcome soft matrix limitations on growth and promote fibrosis when adoptively transferred to the murine lung, demonstrating the ability of fibroblast YAP/TAZ activation to drive a profibrotic response in vivo. Together, these results identify YAP and TAZ as mechanoactivated coordinators of the matrix-driven feedback loop that amplifies and sustains fibrosis. PMID:25502501

  14. Hyperosmotic activation of CNS sympathetic drive: implications for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Toney, Glenn M; Stocker, Sean D

    2010-01-01

    Evidence now indicates that exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) significantly contributes to salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. Although CNS mechanisms that support the elevation of SNA in various cardiovascular disease models have been intensively studied, many mechanistic details remain unknown. In recent years, studies have shown that SNA can rise as a result of both acute and chronic increases of body fluid osmolality. These findings have raised the possibility that salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases could result, at least in part, from direct osmosensory activation of CNS sympathetic drive. In this brief review we emphasize recent findings from several laboratories, including our own, which demonstrate that neurons of the forebrain organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) play a pivotal role in triggering hyperosmotic activation of SNA by recruiting neurons in specific regions of the hypothalamus, brainstem and spinal cord. Although OVLT neurons are intrinsically osmosensitive and shrink when exposed to extracellular hypertonicity, it is not yet clear if these processes are functionally linked. Whereas acute hypertonic activation of OVLT neurons critically depends on TRPV1 channels, studies in TRPV1−/− mice suggest that acute and long-term osmoregulatory responses remain largely intact. Therefore, acute and chronic osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons may be mediated by distinct mechanisms. We speculate that organic osmolytes such as taurine and possibly novel processes such as extracellular acidification could contribute to long-term osmosensory transduction by OVLT neurons and might therefore participate in the elevation of SNA in salt-sensitive cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20603334

  15. A Pile of Legos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePino, Andrew, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the relationships a high school built with neighborhood industry, a national laboratory, a national museum, and a large university while trying to build a scale model of the original atomic pile. Provides suggestions for teachers. (MVL)

  16. Basic Pile Group Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    geotechnical engineer to obtain the values of the soil modulus and the coefficient of horizontal subgrade reaction. The methods provided in this Appendix must...describes a computerized method for pile group design and analysis as practiced in the Corps of Engineers and proposes criteria for sys- tematizing... Engineers , and to propose criteria for systematizing this method in a computer program. This paper describes a computerized method of pile group analysis

  17. Brain activity during driving with distraction: an immersive fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Tom A.; Kan, Karen; Hung, Yuwen; Tam, Fred; Naglie, Gary; Graham, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive measurements of brain activity have an important role to play in understanding driving ability. The current study aimed to identify the neural underpinnings of human driving behavior by visualizing the areas of the brain involved in driving under different levels of demand, such as driving while distracted or making left turns at busy intersections. Materials and Methods: To capture brain activity during driving, we placed a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and pedals in a 3.0 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) system. To identify the brain areas involved while performing different real-world driving maneuvers, participants completed tasks ranging from simple (right turns) to more complex (left turns at busy intersections). To assess the effects of driving while distracted, participants were asked to perform an auditory task while driving analogous to speaking on a hands-free device and driving. Results: A widely distributed brain network was identified, especially when making left turns at busy intersections compared to more simple driving tasks. During distracted driving, brain activation shifted dramatically from the posterior, visual and spatial areas to the prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the distracted brain sacrificed areas in the posterior brain important for visual attention and alertness to recruit enough brain resources to perform a secondary, cognitive task. The present findings offer important new insights into the scientific understanding of the neuro-cognitive mechanisms of driving behavior and lay down an important foundation for future clinical research. PMID:23450757

  18. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  19. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  20. Periosteal BMP2 activity drives bone graft healing.

    PubMed

    Chappuis, Vivianne; Gamer, Laura; Cox, Karen; Lowery, Jonathan W; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Rosen, Vicki

    2012-10-01

    Bone graft incorporation depends on the orchestrated activation of numerous growth factors and cytokines in both the host and the graft. Prominent in this signaling cascade is BMP2. Although BMP2 is dispensable for bone formation, it is required for the initiation of bone repair; thus understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying bone regeneration driven by BMP2 is essential for improving bone graft therapies. In the present study, we assessed the role of Bmp2 in bone graft incorporation using mice in which Bmp2 has been removed from the limb prior to skeletal formation (Bmp2(cKO)). When autograft transplantations were performed in Bmp2cKO mice, callus formation and bone healing were absent. Transplantation of either a vital wild type (WT) bone graft into a Bmp2(cKO) host or a vital Bmp2(cKO) graft into a WT host also resulted in the inhibition of bone graft incorporation. Histological analyses of these transplants show that in the absence of BMP2, periosteal progenitors remain quiescent and healing is not initiated. When we analyzed the expression of Sox9, a marker of chondrogenesis, on the graft surface, we found it significantly reduced when BMP2 was absent in either the graft itself or the host, suggesting that local BMP2 levels drive periosteal cell condensation and subsequent callus cell differentiation. The lack of integrated healing in the absence of BMP2 was not due to the inability of periosteal cells to respond to BMP2. Healing was achieved when grafts were pre-soaked in rhBMP2 protein, indicating that periosteal progenitors remain responsive in the absence of BMP2. In contrast to the requirement for BMP2 in periosteal progenitor activation in vital bone grafts, we found that bone matrix-derived BMP2 does not significantly enhance bone graft incorporation. Taken together, our data show that BMP2 signaling is not essential for the maintenance of periosteal progenitors, but is required for the activation of these progenitors and their subsequent

  1. Neighborhood environment and physical activity among older adults: do the relationships differ by driving status?

    PubMed

    Ding, Ding; Sallis, James F; Norman, Gregory J; Frank, Lawrence D; Saelens, Brian E; Kerr, Jacqueline; Conway, Terry L; Cain, Kelli; Hovell, Melbourne F; Hofstetter, C Richard; King, Abby C

    2014-07-01

    Some attributes of neighborhood environments are associated with physical activity among older adults. This study examined whether the associations were moderated by driving status. Older adults from neighborhoods differing in walkability and income completed written surveys and wore accelerometers (N = 880, mean age = 75 years, 56% women). Neighborhood environments were measured by geographic information systems and validated questionnaires. Driving status was defined on the basis of a driver's license, car ownership, and feeling comfortable to drive. Outcome variables included accelerometer-based physical activity and self-reported transport and leisure walking. Multilevel generalized linear regression was used. There was no significant Neighborhood Attribute × Driving Status interaction with objective physical activity or reported transport walking. For leisure walking, almost all environmental attributes were positive and significant among driving older adults but not among nondriving older adults (five significant interactions at p < .05). The findings suggest that driving status is likely to moderate the association between neighborhood environments and older adults' leisure walking.

  2. Driving an Active Vibration Balancer to Minimize Vibrations at the Fundamental and Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holliday, Ezekiel S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Vibrations of a principal machine are reduced at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies by driving the drive motor of an active balancer with balancing signals at the fundamental and selected harmonics. Vibrations are sensed to provide a signal representing the mechanical vibrations. A balancing signal generator for the fundamental and for each selected harmonic processes the sensed vibration signal with adaptive filter algorithms of adaptive filters for each frequency to generate a balancing signal for each frequency. Reference inputs for each frequency are applied to the adaptive filter algorithms of each balancing signal generator at the frequency assigned to the generator. The harmonic balancing signals for all of the frequencies are summed and applied to drive the drive motor. The harmonic balancing signals drive the drive motor with a drive voltage component in opposition to the vibration at each frequency.

  3. Test Exponential Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermi, Enrico

    The Patent contains an extremely detailed description of an atomic pile employing natural uranium as fissile material and graphite as moderator. It starts with the discussion of the theory of the intervening phenomena, in particular the evaluation of the reproduction or multiplication factor, K, that is the ratio of the number of fast neutrons produced in one generation by the fissions to the original number of fast neutrons, in a system of infinite size. The possibility of having a self-maintaining chain reaction in a system of finite size depends both on the facts that K is greater than unity and the overall size of the system is sufficiently large to minimize the percentage of neutrons escaping from the system. After the description of a possible realization of such a pile (with many detailed drawings), the various kinds of neutron losses in a pile are depicted. Particularly relevant is the reported "invention" of the exponential experiment: since theoretical calculations can determine whether or not a chain reaction will occur in a give system, but can be invalidated by uncertainties in the parameters of the problem, an experimental test of the pile is proposed, aimed at ascertaining if the pile under construction would be divergent (i.e. with a neutron multiplication factor K greater than 1) by making measurements on a smaller pile. The idea is to measure, by a detector containing an indium foil, the exponential decrease of the neutron density along the length of a column of uranium-graphite lattice, where a neutron source is placed near its base. Such an exponential decrease is greater or less than that expected due to leakage, according to whether the K factor is less or greater than 1, so that this experiment is able to test the criticality of the pile, its accuracy increasing with the size of the column. In order to perform this measure a mathematical description of the effect of neutron production, diffusion, and absorption on the neutron density in the

  4. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs. PMID:22385499

  5. A five-wheel wheelchair with an active-caster drive system.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Yu; Tanaka, Aki; Wada, Masayoshi

    2013-06-01

    A novel wheelchair system with an active-caster drive mechanism is presented in this paper. A manual (hand propelled) wheelchair with an external single-wheel drive system forms a five-wheel configuration. The active-caster mechanism is applied to a drive system to motorize a manual wheelchair. Two electric motors which drive a wheel axis and a steering axis of a drive wheel independently are equipped on the active-caster. A coordinated control of the two motors enables the velocity vector on the steering shaft to direct in an arbitrary direction with an arbitrary magnitude. The generated velocity vector allows a wheelchair to go straight and/or rotate completely in a same way as a standard electric wheelchair. Namely 2DOF of the wheelchair can be controlled independently by a single drive wheel without any constraint, such as the orientation of the drive wheel which is well known as a non-holonomic constraint. In addition to the 2DOF mobility, the proposed system enables wheelchair users to change drive modes, a rear drive and a front drive. The drive wheel on the back side of the wheelchair is vertically actuated by a linear motor to change the height of the drive wheel that can vary load distribution and the number of wheels contacting to the ground. The five-wheel-contact makes the wheelchair to move as the normal mode in which the center of rotation is located at the midpoint of the main wheels. Depressing the drive wheel results in lost contacts of the main wheels from the ground in which the center of rotation is jumped at the midpoint of the front wheels, namely it performs as a front drive wheelchair. In this paper, kinematic models of the wheelchair and that with an active-caster drive system are analyzed and a control method by using a 2DOF joystick is derived. Based on the kinematic model, a prototype mechanism of the active-caster is designed and mounted on a manual wheelchair to realize the five-wheel wheelchair. In the experiments, the independent 2

  6. Piled-Slab Searches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    tinuously as one moves away from the origin (Figure 1). Because such a search is both strategically optimal and locally random, we will refer to it as SOLR ...approximating the inverted cup with a solid composed of n piled slabs. The resulting detection proba- bility will, of course, be smaller than the SOLR ...total effort density in the annulus between Ri−1 and Ri (Figure 2). The total Figure 1. The inverted SOLR cup has the greatest search effort density at

  7. NSSDC activities with 12-inch optical disk drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Barbara E.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1986-01-01

    The development status of optical-disk data transfer and storage technology at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is surveyed. The aim of the R&D program is to facilitate the exchange of large volumes of data. Current efforts focus on a 12-inch 1-Gbyte write-once/read-many disk and a disk drive which interfaces with VAX/VMS computer systems. The history of disk development at NSSDC is traced; the results of integration and performance tests are summarized; the operating principles of the 12-inch system are explained and illustrated with diagrams; and the need for greater standardization is indicated.

  8. Improving detection of avalanches on a conical bead pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajpeyi, Avi; Lehman, Susan; Dahmen, Karin; Leblanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan

    A conical bead pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used as a simple system to investigate the variations in the avalanche size probability distribution function. Steel beads are dropped onto the pile from different heights and at different strengths of applied magnetic field. Avalanches are recorded by the change in mass as beads fall off the pile. Experimentally we observe an increasing deviation from power law behavior as the field and thus cohesion between the beads increases. We compare our experimental results for the probability distribution function to the results of an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches [Dahmen, Nat Phys 7, 554 (2011)]. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with the existing system. To more fully characterize the avalanching behavior of the pile over time, a high-speed camera has been added to the system to record the largest avalanches and allow more detailed analysis. The conical pile geometry presents a challenge for observation and particle tracking over the full pile. Our implementation scheme and preliminary results from the video analysis are presented. Research supported by NSF CBET 1336116 and 1336634.

  9. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  10. Drive for thinness, affect regulation and physical activity in eating disorders: a daily life study.

    PubMed

    Vansteelandt, Kristof; Rijmen, Frank; Pieters, Guido; Probst, Michel; Vanderlinden, Johan

    2007-08-01

    Using Ecological Momentary Assessment, the within patient associations between drive for thinness, emotional states, momentary urge to be physically active and physical activity were studied in 32 inpatients with an eating disorder. Participants received an electronic device and had to indicate at nine random times a day during 1 week their momentary drive for thinness, positive and negative emotional states and their urge to be physically active and physical activity. Multilevel analyses indicated that patients with higher mean levels for urge to be physically active were characterized by lower body mass index (BMI) and chronically negative affect whereas patients with higher mean levels for physical activity were characterized by lower BMI and higher dispositions for drive for thinness. In addition, within patient relations between drive for thinness and urge to be physically active were moderated by BMI and chronically negative affect whereas within patient relations between drive for thinness and physical activity were moderated by BMI. Finally, also positive emotional states were significantly associated with physical activity within patients. By using a daily process design, characteristics of physical activity were revealed that have not been identified with assessment methods that have a lower time resolution.

  11. SOX9 drives WNT pathway activation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fen; Ye, Huihui; He, Housheng Hansen; Gerrin, Sean J.; Chen, Sen; Tanenbaum, Benjamin A.; Sowalsky, Adam G.; He, Lingfeng; Wang, Hongyun; Balk, Steven P.; Yuan, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX9 is critical for prostate development, and dysregulation of SOX9 is implicated in prostate cancer (PCa). However, the SOX9-dependent genes and pathways involved in both normal and neoplastic prostate epithelium are largely unknown. Here, we performed SOX9 ChIP sequencing analysis and transcriptome profiling of PCa cells and determined that SOX9 positively regulates multiple WNT pathway genes, including those encoding WNT receptors (frizzled [FZD] and lipoprotein receptor-related protein [LRP] family members) and the downstream β-catenin effector TCF4. Analyses of PCa xenografts and clinical samples both revealed an association between the expression of SOX9 and WNT pathway components in PCa. Finally, treatment of SOX9-expressing PCa cells with a WNT synthesis inhibitor (LGK974) reduced WNT pathway signaling in vitro and tumor growth in murine xenograft models. Together, our data indicate that SOX9 expression drives PCa by reactivating the WNT/β−catenin signaling that mediates ductal morphogenesis in fetal prostate and define a subgroup of patients who would benefit from WNT-targeted therapy. PMID:27043282

  12. Age differences in the takeover of vehicle control and engagement in non-driving-related activities in simulated driving with conditional automation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Hallie; Feng, Jing

    2016-09-26

    High-level vehicle automation has been proposed as a valuable means to enhance the mobility of older drivers, as older drivers experience age-related declines in many cognitive functions that are vital for safe driving. Recent research attempted to examine age differences in how engagement in non-driving-related activities impact driving performance, by instructing drivers to engage in mandatory pre-designed activities. While the mandatory engagement method allows a precise control of the timing and mental workload of the non-driving-related activities, it is different from how a driver would naturally engage in these activities. This study allowed younger (age 18-35, mean age=19.9years) and older drivers (age 62-81, mean age=70.4years) to freely decide when and how to engage in voluntarily chosen non-driving-related activities during simulated driving with conditional automation. We coded video recordings of participants' engagement in non-driving-related activities. We examined the effect of age, level of activity-engagement and takeover notification interval on vehicle control performance during the takeover, by comparing between the high and low engagement groups in younger and older drivers, across two takeover notification interval conditions. We found that both younger and older drivers engaged in various non-driving-related activities during the automated driving portion, with distinct preferences on the type of activity for each age group (i.e., while younger drivers mostly used an electronic device, older drivers tended to converse). There were also significant differences between the two age groups and between the two notification intervals on various driving performance measures. Older drivers benefited more than younger drivers from the longer interval in terms of response time to notifications. Voluntary engagement in non-driving-related activities did not impair takeover performance in general, although there was a trend of older drivers who were

  13. Mapping of noise impact provoked by the execution of foundation piles at high rise building sites.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Adolpho Guido; Gusmão, Alexandre Duarte; Rabbani, Emilia Rahnemay Kohman; Fucale, Stela Paulino

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to map, in a limited area inside and outside of the worksite, the environmental impact generated by sound pollution coming from the driving of foundation piles for high rise buildings, as well as to observe and check if the noise levels produced by the emitting source are tolerable in the urban environment. The methodology of the work includes a survey of technical references about the subject; measurement of noises surrounding the worksite during the foundation phase for four distinct buildings, with different types of piles: prefabricated piles, continuous helical displacement piles , traditional compaction piles and Terra Probe compaction piles. A grid of points was built due to the time of driving and after that the measurements of environmental noises were performed emitted by the execution of each type of pile using a sound level meter. The interpretation of the measurements and their impacts on the neighborhood of the building were performed using the computational tool Suffer for creating noise level contours. The X and Y axes of the grid represent the distances in meters of the area studied and the Z axis represents the noise measured in dB. The contours developed represent the mapping of the noise at the worksites and their surroundings. The mapping of the urban impact of noise, the measurement of its dimensions, and the examination of its propagation around the building are important subsides to adequate individual and collective protection procedures. Seventy one points were measured at four building sites with different types of piles, and the results showed that at only three points was the noise within the limits of the Municipal Law of Recife of 70 dB, which proves the relevance of the research. Finally, the comparative analysis between the four types of piles shows that the continuous helical displacement pile emits the lowest noise level among the four pile types studied.

  14. Optogenetic Activation of Septal Glutamatergic Neurons Drive Hippocampal Theta Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Williams, Sylvain

    2016-03-09

    The medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) has an essential role for theta rhythm generation in the hippocampus and is critical for learning and memory. The MS-DBB contains cholinergic, GABAergic, and recently described glutamatergic neurons, but their specific contribution to theta generation is poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons in theta rhythm using optogenetic activation and electrophysiological recordings performed in in vitro preparations and in freely behaving mice. The experiments in slices suggest that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons provide prominent excitatory inputs to a majority of local GABAergic and a minority of septal cholinergic neurons. In contrast, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic fiber terminals in hippocampal slices elicited weak postsynaptic responses in hippocampal neurons. In the in vitro septo-hippocampal preparation, activation of MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons did increase the rhythmicity of hippocampal theta oscillations, whereas stimulation of septo-hippocampal glutamatergic fibers in the fornix did not have an effect. In freely behaving mice, activation of these neurons in the MS-DBB strongly synchronized hippocampal theta rhythms over a wide range of frequencies, whereas activation of their projections to the hippocampus through fornix stimulations had no effect on theta rhythms, suggesting that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons played a role in theta generation through local modulation of septal neurons. Together, these results provide the first evidence that MS-DBB glutamatergic neurons modulate local septal circuits, which in turn contribute to theta rhythms in the hippocampus.

  15. Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-01-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions (e.g., Shibata et al. 1992, Shimojo et al. 1996, Cirtain et al. 2007. Savcheva et al. 2007). Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism (e.g. Yokoyama & Shibata 1995). We present observations of an on-disk active region (NOAA AR 11513) that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale 20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode. A full report of this study appears in Sterling et al. (2016).

  16. Activation domains drive nucleosome eviction by SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, José L; Chandy, Mark; Carrozza, Michael J; Workman, Jerry L

    2007-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play a critical role in chromatin dynamics. A large number of in vitro studies have pointed towards nucleosome sliding as the principal remodeling outcome of SWI/SNF action, whereas few have described histone octamer transfer as the principal outcome. In contrast, recent in vivo studies have linked the activity of SWI/SNF to histone eviction in trans from gene promoters. In this study, we have found that the chimeric transcription factor Gal4-VP16 can enhance SWI/SNF histone octamer transfer activity, resulting in targeted histone eviction from a nucleosome probe. This effect is dependent on the presence of the activation domain. We observed that under conditions mimicking the in vivo relative abundance of SWI/SNF with respect to the total number of nucleosomes in a cell nucleus, the accessibility of the transcription factor binding site is the first determinant in the sequence of events leading to nucleosome remodeling. We propose a model mechanism for this transcription factor-mediated enhancement of SWI/SNF octamer transfer activity. PMID:17235287

  17. Notch activation drives adipocyte dedifferentiation and tumorigenic transformation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Karki, Anju; Castro, Beatriz; Wirbisky, Sara E.; Bidwell, Christopher A.; Freeman, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Liposarcomas (LPSs) are the most common soft-tissue cancer. Because of the lack of animal models, the cellular origin and molecular regulation of LPS remain unclear. Here, we report that mice with adipocyte-specific activation of Notch signaling (Ad/N1ICD) develop LPS with complete penetrance. Lineage tracing confirms the adipocyte origin of Ad/N1ICD LPS. The Ad/N1ICD LPS resembles human dedifferentiated LPS in histological appearance, anatomical localization, and gene expression signature. Before transformation, Ad/N1ICD adipocytes undergo dedifferentiation that leads to lipodystrophy and metabolic dysfunction. Although concomitant Pten deletion normalizes the glucose metabolism of Ad/N1ICD mice, it dramatically accelerates the LPS prognosis and malignancy. Transcriptomes and lipidomics analyses indicate that Notch activation suppresses lipid metabolism pathways that supply ligands to Pparγ, the master regulator of adipocyte homeostasis. Accordingly, synthetic Pparγ ligand supplementation induces redifferentiation of Ad/N1ICD adipocytes and tumor cells, and prevents LPS development in Ad/N1ICD mice. Importantly, the Notch target HES1 is abundantly expressed in human LPS, and Notch inhibition suppresses the growth of human dedifferentiated LPS xenografts. Collectively, ectopic Notch activation is sufficient to induce dedifferentiation and tumorigenic transformation of mature adipocytes in mouse. PMID:27573812

  18. Regional Quality Assurance Activity in Higher Education in Southeast Asia: Its Characteristics and Driving Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umemiya, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the characteristics and driving forces of regional quality assurance activity in Southeast Asia, which has been actively promoted in recent years by the ASEAN University Network, an organisation for higher education under the auspices of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). There are now more collaborative…

  19. A longitudinal study of driving instructor guidance from an activity-oriented perspective.

    PubMed

    Boccara, V; Vidal-Gomel, C; Rogalski, J; Delhomme, P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a better understanding of the scaffolding activity of instructors during driving lessons in a French urban traffic context. It focuses on three common and risky tasks: turning right, turning left and overtaking. Data were based on fine-grained longitudinal analyses of the records of five driving lessons involving four student-instructor dyads. The instructor scaffolding activity was analyzed throughout training - an original approach in the sphere of driving. The results show that the instructors implemented the learning process using an integrative approach based on 'cutting' and 'decoupling' the driving task rather than the step-by-step method recommended in the curriculum. They transferred the responsibility of the driving components to the students in a similar order: 1) technical maneuvers, 2) situation identification and 3) goals focusing on other road-users. As expected, student autonomy and efficiency in driving increased as the training progressed. However, at the end of training, uncertainties remained with regard to the execution of basic sub-goals in complex situation; moreover, the instructors were still in charge of the navigational task. The results were discussed and suggestions were made to improve instructor training with a view to increasing their efficiency in teaching students.

  20. 40 CFR 264.554 - Staging piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... existing permit (for example, RAP), closure plan, or order be modified to allow me to use a staging pile? (1) To modify a permit, other than a RAP, to incorporate a staging pile or staging pile operating... under § 270.42 of this chapter. (2) To modify a RAP to incorporate a staging pile or staging...

  1. 40 CFR 264.554 - Staging piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... existing permit (for example, RAP), closure plan, or order be modified to allow me to use a staging pile? (1) To modify a permit, other than a RAP, to incorporate a staging pile or staging pile operating... under § 270.42 of this chapter. (2) To modify a RAP to incorporate a staging pile or staging...

  2. 40 CFR 264.554 - Staging piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... existing permit (for example, RAP), closure plan, or order be modified to allow me to use a staging pile? (1) To modify a permit, other than a RAP, to incorporate a staging pile or staging pile operating... under § 270.42 of this chapter. (2) To modify a RAP to incorporate a staging pile or staging...

  3. Test Pile Reactivity Loss Due to Trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Plumlee, K.E.

    2001-03-09

    The presence of trichloroethylene in the test pile caused a continual decrease in pile reactivity. A system which removed, purified, and returned 12,000 cfh helium to the pile has held contamination to a negligible level and has permitted normal pile operation.

  4. Molecular motors robustly drive active gels to a critically connected state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, José; Sheinman, Michael; Sharma, Abhinav; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2013-09-01

    Living systems naturally exhibit internal driving: active, molecular processes drive non-equilibrium phenomena such as metabolism or migration. Active gels constitute a fascinating class of internally driven matter, in which molecular motors exert localized stresses inside polymer networks. There is evidence that network crosslinking is required to allow motors to induce macroscopic contraction. Yet a quantitative understanding of how network connectivity enables contraction is lacking. Here we show experimentally that myosin motors contract crosslinked actin polymer networks to clusters with a scale-free size distribution. This critical behaviour occurs over an unexpectedly broad range of crosslink concentrations. To understand this robustness, we developed a quantitative model of contractile networks that takes into account network restructuring: motors reduce connectivity by forcing crosslinks to unbind. Paradoxically, to coordinate global contractions, motor activity should be low. Otherwise, motors drive initially well-connected networks to a critical state where ruptures form across the entire network.

  5. Localized recruitment of a chromatin-remodeling activity by an activator in vivo drives transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Laura L.; Weirich, Christine S.; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    To understand the role of chromatin-remodeling activities in transcription, it is necessary to understand how they interact with transcriptional activators in vivo to regulate the different steps of transcription. Human heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) stimulates both transcriptional initiation and elongation. We replaced mouse HSF1 in fibroblasts with wild-type and mutant human HSF1 constructs and characterized regulation of an endogenous mouse hsp70 gene. A mutation that diminished transcriptional initiation led to twofold reductions in hsp70 mRNA induction and recruitment of a SWI/SNF remodeling complex. In contrast, a mutation that diminished transcriptional elongation abolished induction of full-length mRNA, SWI/SNF recruitment, and chromatin remodeling, but minimally impaired initiation from the hsp70 promoter. Another remodeling factor, SNF2h, is constitutively present at the promoter irrespective of the genotype of HSF1. These data suggest that localized recruitment of SWI/SNF drives a specialized remodeling reaction necessary for the production of full-length hsp70 mRNA. PMID:12782657

  6. Pile Structure Program, Projected Start Date : January 1, 2010 (Implementation).

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Chris; Corbett, Catherine; Ebberts, Blaine

    2009-07-27

    The 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion includes Reasonable and Prudent Alternative 38-Piling and Piling Dike Removal Program. This RPA directs the Action Agencies to work with the Estuary Partnership to develop and implement a piling and pile dike removal program. The program has since evolved to include modifying pile structures to enhance their habitat value and complexity by adding large woody debris. The geographic extent of the Pile Structure Program (PSP) includes all tidally-influenced portions of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam; however, it will focus on the mainstem. The overarching goal of the PSP is to enhance and restore ecosystem structure and function for the recovery of federally listed salmonids through the active management of pile structures. To attain this goal, the program team developed the following objectives: (1) Develop a plan to remove or modify pile structures that have lower value to navigation channel maintenance, and in which removal or modification will present low-risk to adjacent land use, is cost-effective, and would result in increased ecosystem function. (2) Determine program benefits for juvenile salmonids and the ecosystem through a series of intensively monitored pilot projects. (3) Incorporate best available science and pilot project results into an adaptive management framework that will guide future management by prioritizing projects with the highest benefits. The PSP's hypotheses, which form the basis of the pilot project experiments, are organized into five categories: Sediment and Habitat-forming Processes, Habitat Conditions and Food Web, Piscivorous Fish, Piscivorous Birds, and Toxic Contaminant Reduction. These hypotheses are based on the effects listed in the Estuary Module (NOAA Fisheries in press) and others that emerged during literature reviews, discussions with scientists, and field visits. Using pilot project findings, future implementation will be adaptively managed to

  7. Application of a load-bearing passive and active vibration isolation system in hydraulic drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Oliver; Haase, Thomas; Pohl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Hydraulic drives are widely used in many engineering applications due to their high power to weight ratio. The high power output of the hydraulic drives produces high static and dynamic reaction forces and moments which must be carried by the mounts and the surrounding structure. A drawback of hydraulic drives based on rotating pistons consists in multi-tonal disturbances which propagate through the mounts and the load bearing structure and produce structure borne sound at the surrounding structures and cavities. One possible approach to overcome this drawback is to use an optimised mounting, which combines vibration isolation in the main disturbance direction with the capability to carry the reaction forces and moments. This paper presents an experimental study, which addresses the vibration isolation performance of an optimised mounting. A dummy hydraulic drive is attached to a generic surrounding structure with optimised mounting and excited by multiple shakers. In order to improve the performance of the passive vibration isolation system, piezoelectric transducers are applied on the mounting and integrated into a feed-forward control loop. It is shown that the optimised mounting of the hydraulic drive decreases the vibration transmission to the surrounding structure by 8 dB. The presented study also reveals that the use of the active control system leads to a further decrease of vibration transmission of up to 14 dB and also allows an improvement of the vibration isolation in an additional degree of freedom and higher harmonic frequencies.

  8. 1975 Inspection of Experimental Marine Piling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The cooperative-treated piles at Coco Solo, Canal Zone, and the cooperative-CEL-, and CEL/Industry-treated piles at Pearl Harbor were inspected by a...diver in March and April 1975. After 12 years at Coco Solo, only the dual-treated piles are performing satisfactorily. At Pearl Harbor, the remaining

  9. 1976 Inspection of Experimental Marine Piling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    The cooperative-treated piles Coco Solo, Canal Zone, and the cooperative-, CEL-, and CEL/Industry-treated piles at Pearl Harbor were inspected by a...diver in March and April 1976. After 13 years at Coco Solo, only the Douglas fir piles treated with ammoniacal copper arsenite followed by cresote

  10. 1972 Inspection of Experimental Marine Piling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The 54 Cooperative piles at Coco Solo, Canal Zone, and the 267 Cooperative and NCEL experimental piles at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii were inspected during...the periods February 22 to 25 and March 17 to 24, 1972, respectively. After 9 years of exposure at Coco Solo, 11 of the 12 piles treated with 70/30

  11. 1970 Inspection of Experimental Marine Piling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The 54 Cooperative piles at Coco Solo, Canal Zone and the 273 Cooperative and NCEL experimental piles at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii were inspected during...the weeks of 9 and 23 March 1970, respectively. After 7 years of exposure at Coco Solo, 9 of the 12 piles treated with creosote-coal tar showed borer

  12. Brick-pile To Rubble-pile Impact Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korycansky, Donald; Asphaug, E.

    2010-10-01

    One of the chief lines of evidence that asteroids are "rubble piles", (loose aggregates of rock and/or ice held together by gravity and friction) is the under-density that many of them exhibit compared to the density of solid rock as inferred from surface compositions. Under-densities up to 50% or greater have been found for some objects (Britt and Consolmagno 2002). However, little is known of the internal structure of these bodies. Under-density may be due to "microporosity", i.e. porosity at the level of grains, or "macroporosity" in which void space is provided by the mis-match of large structural blocks that comprise the bulk of the object. We present work that models sub-catastrophic impacts into "brick piles", i.e. close-fitting aggregates with little or no void space. Calculations follow the partial or complete dispersal of an asteroid and its reassembly. After reassembly, the post-impact volume of the object is compared to the pre-impact object to derive a void fraction. Model calculations were carried out with programs based on the Open Dynamics Engine library that has been used by us for a number of studies (Korycansky and Asphaug 2009, Korycansky 2010a,b LPSC). Initial brick-pile objects were constructed by means of quasi-random Voronoi decompositions of an initial volume that is the hull of the pre-impact object. We will present results on the amount and distribution of void space of post-impact rubble piles and compare to the observed distribution of inferred void space, and characterize our results in terms of body and impact parameters, such as numbers and size distribution of pre-impact brick piles and impact velocities and geometry. This work has been supported by NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics program grant NNX07AQ04G.

  13. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted. PMID:25685412

  14. Active Matrix Driving Organic Light-Emitting Diode Panel Using Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Satoru; Chuman, Takashi; Miyaguchi, Satoshi; Satoh, Hideo; Tanabe, Takahisa; Okuda, Yoshiyuki; Tsuchida, Masami

    2005-06-01

    We developed an active matrix driving organic light-emitting diode (OLED) panel on a glass substrate using two organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) per pixel, a switching OTFT and a driving OTFT. The OTFTs are bottom contact structures with the high-dielectric constant gate insulator tantalum oxide (Ta2O5, relative dielectric constant of 23) produced by anodization in ammonium adipate solution and with pentacene as the active layer. The W/L (where W and L are the OTFTs channel width and length, respectively) was 400 μm/10 μm for the switching OTFTs and 680 μm/10 μm for the driving OTFTs. The characteristics of the OTFTs were improved by treating the Ta2O5 surface with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), so that the field-effect mobility was 2.0× 10-1 cm2 V-1 s-1 and the current on/off ratio was 105. A green phosphorescent dopant, tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3], was used for the OLED layer. The panel had 8× 8 pixels and the aperture ratio was 27%. We confirmed a 16-gray-scale representation and a luminance of 400 cd/m2.

  15. Active and Passive Fatigue in Simulated Driving: Discriminating Styles of Workload Regulation and Their Safety Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Saxby, Dyani J.; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S.; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Neubauer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of driver fatigue, it is a difficult construct to study empirically. Different forms of task-induced fatigue may differ in their effects on driver performance and safety. Desmond and Hancock (2001) defined active and passive fatigue states that reflect different styles of workload regulation. In 2 driving simulator studies we investigated the multidimensional subjective states and safety outcomes associated with active and passive fatigue. Wind gusts were used to induce active fatigue, and full vehicle automation to induce passive fatigue. Drive duration was independently manipulated to track the development of fatigue states over time. Participants were undergraduate students. Study 1 (N = 108) focused on subjective response and associated cognitive stress processes, while Study 2 (N = 168) tested fatigue effects on vehicle control and alertness. In both studies the 2 fatigue manipulations produced different patterns of subjective response reflecting different styles of workload regulation, appraisal, and coping. Active fatigue was associated with distress, overload, and heightened coping efforts, whereas passive fatigue corresponded to large-magnitude declines in task engagement, cognitive underload, and reduced challenge appraisal. Study 2 showed that only passive fatigue reduced alertness, operationalized as speed of braking and steering responses to an emergency event. Passive fatigue also increased crash probability, but did not affect a measure of vehicle control. Findings support theories that see fatigue as an outcome of strategies for managing workload. The distinction between active and passive fatigue is important for assessment of fatigue and for evaluating automated driving systems which may induce dangerous levels of passive fatigue. PMID:24041288

  16. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  17. Are some meteoroids rubble piles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jiri

    2015-08-01

    It is generally accepted that some asteroids are rubble piles, i.e. strengthless aggregates of boulders of various sizes held together only by mutual gravity. This is particularly true for asteroids in the size range from ~ 200 m to 10 km, whose rotations are in almost all cases slower that the surface disruption barrier, at which the centrifugal force would exceed the gravitational force. On the other hand, smaller asteroids often rotate rapidly.Recently, Sánchez and Scheeres (2014, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 49, 788) proposed that rubble piles may have some cohesive strength provided by van der Waals forces between small grains. They estimate the strength to be about 25 Pa. Such a low strength would be sufficient to hold some rapidly rotating small asteroids together against centrifugal force, even if they were rubble piles. In particular, Sánchez and Scheeres (2014) argued that asteroid 2008 TC3 was a rubble pile. That asteroid entered the Earth’s atmosphere and produced meteorites Almahata Sitta.Asteroids and meteoroids entering the atmosphere are subject to dynamic pressure p = ρv2, where ρ is atmospheric density and v is velocity. It can be expected that they break-up when the dynamic pressure exceeds their strength. Fragmentation of meteoroids is indeed common. For asteroidal bodies it usually occurs at pressures 0.1 - 10 MPa (Popova et al. 2011, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 46, 1525). For example, the main break-up of 2008 TC3 occurred at 0.9 MPa. These pressures are lower than the strength of solid meteoric rocks but dramatically exceed the expected strength for rubble piles. They best correspond to fractured stones. Nevertheless, the first break-up of rubble piles can be expected at heights above 100 km, earlier than the intensive evaporation starts and the fireball begins to be visible. Is it possible that some meteoroids were broken-up already at the beginning of observation? I will discuss this question generally and also for several specific cases of

  18. Static and dynamic pile testing of reinforced concrete piles with structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kohlhoff, Harald; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Baeßler, Matthias; Niederleithinger, Ernst; Georgi, Steven; Herten, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Static and dynamic pile tests are carried out to determine the load bearing capacity and the quality of reinforced concrete piles. As part of a round robin test to evaluate dynamic load tests, structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors were used to receive more detailed information about the strains along the pile length compared to conventional measurements at the pile head. This paper shows the instrumentation of the pile with extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers sensors and fibre Bragg gratings sensors together with the results of the conducted static load test as well as the dynamic load tests and pile integrity tests.

  19. Lower Cortisol Activity is Associated with First-Time Driving while Impaired

    PubMed Central

    Couture, Sophie; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Gianoulakis, Christina; Tremblay, Jacques; Ng Ying Kin, NMK; Brochu, Serge; Pruessner, Jens; Dedovic, Katarina; Brown, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Driving while impaired (DWI) is a grave and persistent high-risk behavior. Previous work demonstrated that DWI recidivists had attenuated cortisol reactivity compared to non-DWI drivers. This suggests that cortisol is a neurobiological marker of high-risk driving. The present study tested the hypothesis that this initial finding would extend to first-time DWI (fDWI) offenders compared to non-DWI drivers. Male fDWI offenders (n = 139) and non-DWI drivers (n = 31) were exposed to a stress task, and their salivary cortisol activity (total output and reactivity) was measured. Participants also completed questionnaires on sensation seeking, impulsivity, substance use, and engagement in risky and criminal behaviors. As hypothesized, fDWI offenders, compared to non-DWI drivers, had lower cortisol reactivity; fDWI offenders also showed lower total output. In addition, cortisol activity was the most important predictor of group membership, after accounting for alcohol misuse patterns and consequences and other personality and problem behavior characteristics. The findings indicate that attenuated cortisol activity is an independent factor associated with DWI offending risk at an earlier stage in the DWI trajectory than previously detected. PMID:25922575

  20. PileSort Module Usage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-25

    green turquoise blue yellow orange burnt orange brown bittersweet green blue melon aquamarine thistle mulberry lavender black apricot...violet red white yellow green yellow orange aquamarine blue gray burnt orange cadet blue copper forest green goldenrod chestnut...34 /> </node> - <node id=" aquamarine "> <property id="containing_pile" value="blues" /> <property id="meta_information" value="" /> <property

  1. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Richard J.

    2007-07-01

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  2. Prestressed Concrete Fender Piles: Final Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    CONFIGURATION ....................... 4-1 4.1 Design Criteria ............................... 4-1 4.2 Residual Crack Width........................... 4-3...criteria were established based on the previous test pile programs [1.3]. The pile design procedure was further refined in this phase to limit residual ...with a residual crack width less than 0.012 in. after 100 cycles of working level load applications. Design aids were developed for a range of pile

  3. Pile Model Tests Using Strain Gauge Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Adam; Kusio, Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Ordinary pile bearing capacity tests are usually carried out to determine the relationship between load and displacement of pile head. The measurement system required in such tests consists of force transducer and three or four displacement gauges. The whole system is installed at the pile head above the ground level. This approach, however, does not give us complete information about the pile-soil interaction. We can only determine the total bearing capacity of the pile, without the knowledge of its distribution into the shaft and base resistances. Much more information can be obtained by carrying out a test of instrumented pile equipped with a system for measuring the distribution of axial force along its core. In the case of pile model tests the use of such measurement is difficult due to small scale of the model. To find a suitable solution for axial force measurement, which could be applied to small scale model piles, we had to take into account the following requirements: - a linear and stable relationship between measured and physical values, - the force measurement accuracy of about 0.1 kN, - the range of measured forces up to 30 kN, - resistance of measuring gauges against aggressive counteraction of concrete mortar and against moisture, - insensitivity to pile bending, - economical factor. These requirements can be fulfilled by strain gauge sensors if an appropriate methodology is used for test preparation (Hoffmann [1]). In this paper, we focus on some aspects of the application of strain gauge sensors for model pile tests. The efficiency of the method is proved on the examples of static load tests carried out on SDP model piles acting as single piles and in a group.

  4. Pile Spacing Optimization of Short Piled Raft Foundation System for Obtaining Minimum Settlement on Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro, S. M.; Bakar, I.; Sulaeman, A.

    2016-07-01

    Short Piled Raft is a modified piled raft foundation system, which represents combination between raft foundation and pile foundation, but the length of pile is relatively shorter. The basic concept of the Short Piled Raft foundation system considers the passive soil pressure creating a stiff condition of slab-pile system. This means that the thin concrete slab floats on the supporting soil, while the piles serve as stiffeners concrete slab and also to reduce settlement of the foundation. Slab to pile ratio of such system has been mentioned by several researchers, however the optimum pile spacing of stability performance for obtaining minimum settlement on peat haven't been clearly discussed. In this study, finite element method to simulate the stability performance related to settlement of Short Piled Raft foundation system was used. Short Piled Raft foundation system with concrete slab of 7.0 m x 7.0 m square was assumed to be built on peat with the thickness of 3.5 m. The material properties of pile and raft were constant. The outer diameter of galvanized steel pipe as pile was 0.30 m; raft thickness was considered to be constant of 0.15 m and the length of pile was 3.0 m, while the pile spacing varied from 0.50 to 3.00 m. Point load varied from 0 to 100 kN with increment of 20 kN was also considered as a static load, acted on the centre of the concrete slab. Optimization was done by comparing each numerical result of simulations, thus conclusion can easily be drawn. The optimum pile spacing was 1.00 m which produced minimum settlement of 30.11 mm under the load of 100 kN.

  5. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  6. Small Activity Differences Drive Phase Separation in Active-Passive Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smrek, Jan; Kremer, Kurt

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical studies found that mixtures of active and passive colloidal particles phase separate but only at very high activity ratio. The high value poses serious obstacles for experimental exploration of this phenomenon. Here we show using simulations that when the active and passive particles are polymers, the critical activity ratio decreases with the polymer length. This not only facilitates the experiments but also has implications on the DNA organization in living cell nuclei. Entropy production can be used as an accurate indicator of this nonequilibrium phase transition.

  7. Secreted CLIC3 drives cancer progression through its glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase activity

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan R.; Ruengeler, Elena; Casazza, Andrea; Neilson, Lisa J.; Pulleine, Ellie; Santi, Alice; Ismail, Shehab; Lilla, Sergio; Dhayade, Sandeep; MacPherson, Iain R.; McNeish, Iain; Ennis, Darren; Ali, Hala; Kugeratski, Fernanda G.; Al Khamici, Heba; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van den Berghe, Peter V.E.; Cloix, Catherine; McDonald, Laura; Millan, David; Hoyle, Aoisha; Kuchnio, Anna; Carmeliet, Peter; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Blyth, Karen; Yin, Huabing; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Norman, Jim C.; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The secretome of cancer and stromal cells generates a microenvironment that contributes to tumour cell invasion and angiogenesis. Here we compare the secretome of human mammary normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). We discover that the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3) is an abundant component of the CAF secretome. Secreted CLIC3 promotes invasive behaviour of endothelial cells to drive angiogenesis and increases invasiveness of cancer cells both in vivo and in 3D cell culture models, and this requires active transglutaminase-2 (TGM2). CLIC3 acts as a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase that reduces TGM2 and regulates TGM2 binding to its cofactors. Finally, CLIC3 is also secreted by cancer cells, is abundant in the stromal and tumour compartments of aggressive ovarian cancers and its levels correlate with poor clinical outcome. This work reveals a previously undescribed invasive mechanism whereby the secretion of a glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase drives angiogenesis and cancer progression by promoting TGM2-dependent invasion. PMID:28198360

  8. Active prompting to decrease cell phone use and increase seat belt use while driving.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Michael; Helms, Bridgett; Simpson, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    Automobile crashes are the leading cause of death for those aged 3 to 33, with 43,005 (118 per day) Americans killed in 2002 alone. Seat belt use reduces the risk of serious injury in an accident, and refraining from using a cell phone while driving reduces the risk of an accident. Cell phone use while driving increases accident rates, and leads to 2,600 U.S. fatalities each year. An active prompting procedure was employed to increase seat belt use and decrease cell phone use among drivers exiting a university parking lot. A multiple baseline with reversal design was used to evaluate the presentation of two signs: "Please Hang Up, I Care" and "Please Buckle Up, I Care." The proportion of drivers who complied with the seat belt prompt was high and in line with previous research. The proportion of drivers who hung up their cell phones in response to the prompt was about equal to that of the seat belt prompt. A procedure that reduces cell phone use among automobile drivers is a significant contribution to the behavioral safety literature.

  9. SATB1 OVEREXPRESSION DRIVES TUMOR-PROMOTING ACTIVITIES IN CANCER-ASSOCIATED DENDRITIC CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Tesone, Amelia J.; Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Brencicova, Eva; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Stephen, Tom L.; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Payne, Kyle K.; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Wickramasinghe, Jayamanna; Tchou, Julia; Borowsky, Mark E.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (Satb1) governs genome-wide transcriptional programs. Using a conditional knockout mouse, we find that Satb1 is required for normal differentiation of conventional dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, Satb1 governs the differentiation of inflammatory DCs by regulating MHC-II expression through Notch1 signaling. Mechanistically, Satb1 binds to the Notch1 promoter, activating Notch expression and driving RBPJ occupancy of the H2-Ab1 promoter, which activates MHC-II transcription. However, tumor-driven, unremitting expression of Satb1 in activated Zbtb46+ inflammatory DCs that infiltrate ovarian tumors results in an immunosuppressive phenotype characterized by increased secretion of tumor-promoting Galectin-1 and IL-6. In vivo silencing of Satb1 in tumor-associated DCs reverses their tumorigenic activity and boosts protective immunity. Therefore, dynamic fluctuations in Satb1 expression govern the generation and immunostimulatory activity of steady-state and inflammatory DCs, but continuous Satb1 overexpression in differentiated DCs converts them into tolerogenic/pro-inflammatory cells that contribute to malignant progression. PMID:26876172

  10. Physiological investigation of automobile driver's activation index using simulated monotonous driving.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, T; Yamakoshi, K; Tanaka, S; Nogawa, M; Kusakabe, M; Kusumi, M; Tanida, K

    2004-01-01

    Monotonous automobile operation in our daily life may cause the lowering of what might be termed an activation state of the human body, resulting in an increased risk of an accident. We therefore propose to create a more suitable environment in-car so as to allow active operation of the vehicle, hopefully thus avoiding potentially dangerous situations during driving. In order to develop such an activation method as a final goal, we have firstly focused on the acquisition of physiological variables, including cardiovascular parameters, during presentation to the driver of a monotonous screen image, simulating autonomous travel of constant-speed on a motorway. Subsequently, we investigated the derivation of a driver's activation index. During the screen image presentation, a momentary electrical stimulation of about 1 second duration was involuntarily applied to a subject's shoulder to obtain a physiological response. We have successfully monitored various physiological variables during the image presentation, and results suggest that a peculiar pattern in the beat-by-beat change of blood pressure in response to the involuntary stimulus may be an appropriate, and feasible, index relevant to activation state.

  11. BAS-drive trait modulates dorsomedial striatum activity during reward response-outcome associations.

    PubMed

    Costumero, Víctor; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Fuentes, Paola; Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Ávila, César

    2016-09-01

    According to the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory, behavioral studies have found that individuals with stronger reward sensitivity easily detect cues of reward and establish faster associations between instrumental responses and reward. Neuroimaging studies have shown that processing anticipatory cues of reward is accompanied by stronger ventral striatum activity in individuals with stronger reward sensitivity. Even though establishing response-outcome contingencies has been consistently associated with dorsal striatum, individual differences in this process are poorly understood. Here, we aimed to study the relation between reward sensitivity and brain activity while processing response-reward contingencies. Forty-five participants completed the BIS/BAS questionnaire and performed a gambling task paradigm in which they received monetary rewards or punishments. Overall, our task replicated previous results that have related processing high reward outcomes with activation of striatum and medial frontal areas, whereas processing high punishment outcomes was associated with stronger activity in insula and middle cingulate. As expected, the individual differences in the activity of dorsomedial striatum correlated positively with BAS-Drive. Our results agree with previous studies that have related the dorsomedial striatum with instrumental performance, and suggest that the individual differences in this area may form part of the neural substrate responsible for modulating instrumental conditioning by reward sensitivity.

  12. 78 FR 29705 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    .... Pile driving and removal activities would occur only within an approved in-water work window from July... occur between July 16, 2013, and July 15, 2014. All in-water construction activities within the Hood... (183 m) offshore at water depths of 60-100 ft (18-30 m), and would consist of the main wharf, a...

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Rubble Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Rubble piles are a common feature of solar system bodies. They are composed of monolithic elements of ice or rock bound by gravity. Voids occupy a significant fraction of the volume of a rubble pile. They can exist up to pressure P≈ {ε }Yμ , where {ε }Y is the monolithic material's yield strain and μ its rigidity. At low P, contacts between neighboring elements are confined to a small fraction of their surface areas. As a result, the effective thermal conductivity of a rubble pile, {k}{con}≈ k{(P/({ε }Yμ ))}1/2, can be orders of magnitude smaller than the thermal conductivity of its monolithic elements, k. In a fluid-free environment, only radiation can transfer energy across voids. It contributes an additional component, {k}{rad}=16{\\ell }σ {T}3/3, to the total effective conductivity, {k}{eff}={k}{con}+{k}{rad}. Here ℓ, the inverse of the opacity per unit volume, is of the order of the size of the elements, and voids. An important distinction between {k}{con} and {k}{rad} is that the former is independent of the size of the elements, whereas the latter is proportional to it. Our expression for {k}{eff} provides a good fit to the depth dependence of thermal conductivity in the top 140 cm of the lunar regolith. It also offers a good starting point for detailed modeling of thermal inertias for asteroids and satellites. Measurement of the response of surface temperature to variable insolation is a valuable diagnostic of a regolith. There is an opportunity for careful experiments under controlled laboratory conditions to test models of thermal conductivity such as the one we outline.

  14. Adult activity and temperature preference drives region-wide damselfly (Zygoptera) distributions under a warming climate

    PubMed Central

    Corser, Jeffrey D.; White, Erin L.; Schlesinger, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We analysed a recently completed statewide odonate Atlas using multivariate linear models. Within a phylogenetically explicit framework, we developed a suite of data-derived traits to assess the mechanistic distributional drivers of 59 species of damselflies in New York State (NYS). We found that length of the flight season (adult breeding activity period) mediated by thermal preference drives regional distributions at broad (105 km2) scales. Species that had longer adult flight periods, in conjunction with longer growing seasons, had significantly wider distributions. These intrinsic traits shape species' responses to changing climates and the mechanisms behind such range shifts are fitness-based metapopulation processes that adjust phenology to the prevailing habitat and climate regime through a photoperiod filter. PMID:25878048

  15. Obesity-associated NLRC4 inflammasome activation drives breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Ryan; Phan, Liem; Borcherding, Nicholas; Liu, Yinghong; Yuan, Fang; Janowski, Ann M.; Xie, Qing; Markan, Kathleen R.; Li, Wei; Potthoff, Matthew J.; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Ellies, Lesley G.; Knudson, C. Michael; Lee, Mong-Hong; Yeung, Sai-Ching J.; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.; Zhang, Weizhou

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of developing breast cancer and is also associated with worse clinical prognosis. The mechanistic link between obesity and breast cancer progression remains unclear, and there has been no development of specific treatments to improve the outcome of obese cancer patients. Here we show that obesity-associated NLRC4 inflammasome activation/ interleukin (IL)-1 signalling promotes breast cancer progression. The tumour microenvironment in the context of obesity induces an increase in tumour-infiltrating myeloid cells with an activated NLRC4 inflammasome that in turn activates IL-1β, which drives disease progression through adipocyte-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) expression and angiogenesis. Further studies show that treatment of mice with metformin inhibits obesity-associated tumour progression associated with a marked decrease in angiogenesis. This report provides a causal mechanism by which obesity promotes breast cancer progression and lays out a foundation to block NLRC4 inflammasome activation or IL-1β signalling transduction that may be useful for the treatment of obese cancer patients. PMID:27708283

  16. Vanin-1 pantetheinase drives smooth muscle cell activation in post-arterial injury neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dammanahalli, K Jagadeesha; Stevens, Stephanie; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The pantetheinase vanin-1 generates cysteamine, which inhibits reduced glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Vanin-1 promotes inflammation and tissue injury partly by inducing oxidative stress, and partly by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) expression. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to neointimal hyperplasia in response to injury, by multiple mechanisms including modulation of oxidative stress and PPARγ. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that vanin-1 drives SMC activation and neointimal hyperplasia. We studied reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and functional responses to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the pro-oxidant diamide in cultured mouse aortic SMCs, and also assessed neointima formation after carotid artery ligation in vanin-1 deficiency. Vnn1(-/-) SMCs demonstrated decreased oxidative stress, proliferation, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) activity in response to PDGF and/or diamide, with the effects on proliferation linked, in these studies, to both increased GSH levels and PPARγ expression. Vnn1(-/-) mice displayed markedly decreased neointima formation in response to carotid artery ligation, including decreased intima:media ratio and cross-sectional area of the neointima. We conclude that vanin-1, via dual modulation of GSH and PPARγ, critically regulates the activation of cultured SMCs and development of neointimal hyperplasia in response to carotid artery ligation. Vanin-1 is a novel potential therapeutic target for neointimal hyperplasia following revascularization.

  17. 40 CFR 264.554 - Staging piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... than two years, except when the Director grants an operating term extension under paragraph (i) of this section (entitled “May I receive an operating extension for a staging pile?”). You must measure the two... date when you first placed remediation waste into the staging pile for the life of the permit,...

  18. Remote OP-FTIR sensing of magmatic gases driving Yasur trachyandesitic explosive activity, Vanuatu island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Burton, M.; Sawyer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Yasur volcano, located in the southern part of the Vanuatu island arc (Tanna island), is a small trachyandesitic cone that has grown in the resurgent (17 cm y-1) Siwi caldera. Since about 1,400 years Yasur has displayed almost continuous Strombolian-Vulcanian explosive activity and is one of the most actively erupting volcanoes worldwide. Using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy from the crater rim (260-300 m slanting distance) and molten lava as the radiation source, we measured during several days the high frequency compositional variations of magmatic gases driving this explosive activity. Our results expand previous observations from a first FTIR measurement in 2005 [1] and complement in-situ gas measurements made in 2007 [2] within our same research framework (French ANR 'VOLGASPEC' project). FTIR absorption spectra allowed simultaneous retrieval of the molar path amounts of volcanic H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl and CO, corrected for air background in case of H2O, CO2 and CO. We observe a rather steady composition of the crater gas release between the explosions (~one every 1-3 mn) and sharp compositional variations (increases of SO2/HCl, CO2/SO2 and CO/CO2 ratios, decrease of H2O/SO2) associated with the explosions, which demonstrate the ascent and bursting of deeper-derived, CO2-SO2-CO-enriched gas slugs. Such abrupt compositional changes of magmatic gases driving explosive activity at Yasur do resemble those recorded at Stromboli volcano [3]. However, in contrast to Stromboli, Yasur explosions generate dense ash clouds whose fast expansion significantly affects the measured column gas amounts at the onset of each event (an effect considered in our data elaboration). When referred to the pressure-related behaviour of dissolved volatiles in the trachyandesitic magma feeding Yasur (melt inclusions [2]), our results provide new constraints on the source depth(s) of the explosions and the magma degassing processes controlling the volcanic activity

  19. Optogenetic excitation of preBötzinger complex neurons potently drives inspiratory activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alsahafi, Zaki; Dickson, Clayton T; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the sites and mechanisms underlying respiratory rhythmogenesis is of fundamental interest in the field of respiratory neurophysiology. Previous studies demonstrated the necessary and sufficient role of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) in generating inspiratory rhythms in vitro and in vivo. However, the influence of timed activation of the preBötC network in vivo is as yet unknown given the experimental approaches previously used. By unilaterally infecting preBötC neurons using an adeno-associated virus expressing channelrhodopsin we photo-activated the network in order to assess how excitation delivered in a spatially and temporally precise manner to the inspiratory oscillator influences ongoing breathing rhythms and related muscular activity in urethane-anaesthetized rats. We hypothesized that if an excitatory drive is necessary for rhythmogenesis and burst initiation, photo-activation of preBötC not only will increase respiratory rate, but also entrain it over a wide range of frequencies with fast onset, and have little effect on ongoing respiratory rhythm if a stimulus is delivered during inspiration. Stimulation of preBötC neurons consistently increased respiratory rate and entrained respiration up to fourfold baseline conditions. Furthermore, brief pulses of photostimulation delivered at random phases between inspiratory events robustly and consistently induced phase-independent (Type 0) respiratory reset and recruited inspiratory muscle activity at very short delays (∼100 ms). A 200 ms refractory period following inspiration was also identified. These data provide strong evidence for a fine control of inspiratory activity in the preBötC and provide further evidence that the preBötC network constitutes the fundamental oscillator of inspiratory rhythms. PMID:26010654

  20. A comparison of cerebral activity in the prefrontal region between young adults and the elderly while driving.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hajime; Nashihara, Hiroshi; Morozumi, Kiyotaka; Ota, Hiroo; Hatakeyama, Eiko

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the difference of cerebral activity in the prefrontal region between young adults and elderly subjects during driving. The procedure of the experiment was explained to the subjects and informed consent was obtained. Fourteen young male adults (21.6+/-0.76 yrs), seven elderly males (69.9+/-4.91 yrs), and seven elderly females (66.6+/-6.02 yrs) volunteered as subjects for the experiments. Non-invasive measurement of regional cerebral activity was estimated by measuring the deoxygenated hemoglobin, oxygenated hemoglobin, and total hemoglobin of both sides of the prefrontal region using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and time-resolved spectroscopy (TRS). The distance to the vehicle in front, speed, and braking were recorded and the behavior of the drivers was obtained using a CCD camera and video recorder. Temperature and relative humidity in the experimental car were 23-25 degrees Centigrade and 30-40%RH respectively. Background noise in the car was 50-65 dB (A). The less experienced young adults display a greater increase in prefrontal cerebral activity than do the experienced young adults during driving. Prefrontal cerebral activity in elderly subjects is lower than that in young adults at rest and shows little variation compared with young adults during driving. Less experienced young adults and elderly males display similar behavior patterns in driving, such as not observing the door mirror carefully when changing lane. The less experienced young adults are considered to be less adapted to driving. It is possible to evaluate adaptability for driving by means of measuring cerebral hemodynamic changes while driving.

  1. EEG-based decoding of error-related brain activity in a real-world driving task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Chavarriaga, R.; Khaliliardali, Z.; Gheorghe, L.; Iturrate, I.; Millán, J. d. R.

    2015-12-01

    Objectives. Recent studies have started to explore the implementation of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) as part of driving assistant systems. The current study presents an EEG-based BCI that decodes error-related brain activity. Such information can be used, e.g., to predict driver’s intended turning direction before reaching road intersections. Approach. We executed experiments in a car simulator (N = 22) and a real car (N = 8). While subject was driving, a directional cue was shown before reaching an intersection, and we classified the presence or not of an error-related potentials from EEG to infer whether the cued direction coincided with the subject’s intention. In this protocol, the directional cue can correspond to an estimation of the driving direction provided by a driving assistance system. We analyzed ERPs elicited during normal driving and evaluated the classification performance in both offline and online tests. Results. An average classification accuracy of 0.698 ± 0.065 was obtained in offline experiments in the car simulator, while tests in the real car yielded a performance of 0.682 ± 0.059. The results were significantly higher than chance level for all cases. Online experiments led to equivalent performances in both simulated and real car driving experiments. These results support the feasibility of decoding these signals to help estimating whether the driver’s intention coincides with the advice provided by the driving assistant in a real car. Significance. The study demonstrates a BCI system in real-world driving, extending the work from previous simulated studies. As far as we know, this is the first online study in real car decoding driver’s error-related brain activity. Given the encouraging results, the paradigm could be further improved by using more sophisticated machine learning approaches and possibly be combined with applications in intelligent vehicles.

  2. Lesbian blood drives as community-building activism in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Beth

    2015-01-01

    As gay men began voluntarily withdrawing from blood donation in the early 1980s, lesbians in community with gay men in several U.S. cities organized drives to replenish the blood supply. These drives were sometimes the continuation of previously established drives by gay-lesbian organizations or faith communities, sometimes new initiatives in response to HIV/AIDS. However, after the initial publicity, mention of lesbian blood drives in print is both scarce and brief. Focusing on drives organized from 1983 to 1992 by a group known as San Diego Blood Sisters, this article is an initial step in documenting lesbian blood drives to inform and enrich conversations about histories of responses to HIV/AIDS, theoretical discussions of how community connections in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer spectrum are enacted and understood, and emerging research on intersections of gender and sexuality as they are expressed through blood donorship.

  3. 76 FR 38361 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... exposed to sound pressure levels associated with vibratory and impulsive pile driving, and were analyzed... piles, and measure in-water sound propagation parameters (e.g., transmission loss) during pile installation and removal. Geotechnical and sound propagation data collected during pile installation...

  4. Inductance and Active Phase Vector Based Torque Control for Switched Reluctance Motor Drives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpathi, Ramani Raman

    The Switched Reluctance Motor (SRM) drive technology has developed significantly over the last few years. The simplicity in both motor design and power converter requirement along with the availability of high frequency, high power semiconductor switches have made SRMs compete with conventional adjustable speed drive technologies. The subject of winding current control in switched reluctance machines has always been associated with the shaft position information. The use of inductance for direct commutation control is the central subject of this dissertation. In contrast to the conventional methods based on position commutation, new methods of control based on inductance commutation are presented. The object of a commutation algorithm is to switch the currents in the phase coils, in order to provide continuous energy conversion with maximum torque output for a given unit of input current. Since torque production in a SRM is based on the concept of variable reluctance, it makes more sense to observe the instantaneous phase inductance or reluctance instead of estimating the rotor position. The inductance sensors observe the machine parameters and provide sufficient information on the electrical characteristics of the coils. This control strategy avoids the inductance to position transformation blocks conventionally used in SRM control systems. In a typical SRM, the phase coils have a nonlinear behavior of inductance due to effects of current saturation. Also the parameters of one phase coil differ from those of the other due to manufacturing tolerances or due to bearing wear. In such cases, the algorithms written during the stage of manufacturing may not be valid after parameter changes. Optimizing torque production in the event of phase asymmetry and saturation is developed in this research. Indirect sensors connected to the active phase coil of the SRM are based on sensing the flux level in the active coil. New commutation algorithms based on flux sensing concepts

  5. Active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators for high-precision hard disk drive servo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwong Wah; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2006-03-01

    Positioning precision is crucial to today's increasingly high-speed, high-capacity, high data density, and miniaturized hard disk drives (HDDs). The demand for higher bandwidth servo systems that can quickly and precisely position the read/write head on a high track density becomes more pressing. Recently, the idea of applying dual-stage actuators to track servo systems has been studied. The push-pull piezoelectric actuated devices have been developed as micro actuators for fine and fast positioning, while the voice coil motor functions as a large but coarse seeking. However, the current dual-stage actuator design uses piezoelectric patches only without passive damping. In this paper, we propose a dual-stage servo system using enhanced active-passive hybrid piezoelectric actuators. The proposed actuators will improve the existing dual-stage actuators for higher precision and shock resistance, due to the incorporation of passive damping in the design. We aim to develop this hybrid servo system not only to increase speed of track seeking but also to improve precision of track following servos in HDDs. New piezoelectrically actuated suspensions with passive damping have been designed and fabricated. In order to evaluate positioning and track following performances for the dual-stage track servo systems, experimental efforts are carried out to implement the synthesized active-passive suspension structure with enhanced piezoelectric actuators using a composite nonlinear feedback controller.

  6. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    PubMed

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows).

  7. Environmental assessment of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Butala, J.H.; Webb, D.A.; Jop, K.M.; Putt, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive ecological risk assessment was conducted to evaluate the environmental impact of creosote-treated pilings in the marine environment at Moss Landing Harbor, Moss Landing, California. Four areas of investigation comprising the risk assessment were (1) evaluation of environmental conditions around existing creosote-treated pilings (2) investigating effects related to restoration of pilings (3) assessing creosote migration into surrounding environment, one year after pile-driving and (4) confirmation of creosote toxicity in laboratory studies. Biological and chemical evaluation of the impact of creosote-treated pilings was conducted on surface sheen, water column and sediment samples collected at Moss Landing Harbor. Water samples (surface sheen, water column and sediment pore water) were evaluated using short-term chronic exposures with Mysidopsis bahia, while bulk sediment samples were evaluated with 10-day sediment toxicity tests with Ampelisca abdita. Samples of surface, column water and sediment were analyzed for the constituents of creosote by GC mass spectrometry. In addition, a sample of neat material used to preserve treated pilings represented a reference for the polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Verification of organism response and analyses of field collected samples was performed by conducting 10-day A. abdita sediment and 7-day M. bahia elutriate exposures with creosote applied to clean sediment collected at Moss Landing, Evaluations were also performed to determine the effects of photoinduced toxicity on test organisms exposed to PAHs. The biological and analytical results of the field and laboratory exposures are being used to evaluate and determine risk of creosote-treated pilings on the marine environment.

  8. High frequency drive mechanism for an active controls systems aircraft control surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism was successfully utilized on a wind tunnel model tested in the transonic blow down tunnel. The mechanism is also applicable to a flying aircraft. Several interrelated mechanical subsystems were utilized, including a low inertia antibacklash drive mechanism for high frequency oscillation and a compact antibacklash drive mechanism for conversion of rotary motion to linear motion.

  9. Active Prompting to Decrease Cell Phone Use and Increase Seat Belt Use while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Michael; Helms, Bridgett; Simpson, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    Automobile crashes are the leading cause of death for those aged 3 to 33, with 43,005 (118 per day) Americans killed in 2002 alone. Seat belt use reduces the risk of serious injury in an accident, and refraining from using a cell phone while driving reduces the risk of an accident. Cell phone use while driving increases accident rates, and leads…

  10. Characterizing differential post-stroke corticomotor drive to the dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles during resting and volitional muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jacqueline Ann; Zarzycki, Ryan; Morton, Susanne M; Kesar, Trisha M; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A

    2017-01-11

    Imbalance of corticomotor excitability between the paretic and nonparetic limbs has been associated with the extent of upper extremity motor recovery post-stroke, is greatly influenced by specific testing conditions such as the presence or absence of volitional muscle activation, and may vary across muscle groups. However, despite its clinical importance, post-stroke corticomotor drive to lower extremity muscles has not been thoroughly investigated. Additionally, while conventional gait rehabilitation strategies for stroke survivors focus on paretic limb foot drop and dorsiflexion impairments, most contemporary literature has indicated that paretic limb propulsion and plantarflexion impairments are the most significant limiters to post-stroke walking function. The purpose of this study was to compare corticomotor excitability of the dorsi- and plantarflexor muscles during resting and active conditions in individuals with good and poor post-stroke walking recovery and in neurologically-intact controls. We found that plantarflexor muscles showed reduced corticomotor symmetry between paretic and nonparetic limbs compared to dorsiflexor muscles in individuals with poor post-stroke walking recovery during active muscle contraction but not during rest. Reduced plantarflexor corticomotor symmetry during active muscle contraction was a result of reduced corticomotor drive to the paretic muscles and enhanced corticomotor drive to the nonparetic muscles when compared to the neurologically-intact controls. These results demonstrate that atypical corticomotor drive exists in both the paretic and nonparetic lower limbs and implicate greater severity of corticomotor impairments to plantarflexor versus dorsiflexor muscles during muscle activation in stroke survivors with poor walking recovery.

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1439 - Dedicated pile drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated pile drivers. 1926.1439 Section 1926.1439 Labor... Dedicated pile drivers. (a) The provisions of subpart CC apply to dedicated pile drivers, except as...) Section 1926.1416(e)(4) (Load weighing and similar devices) applies only to dedicated pile...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1439 - Dedicated pile drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated pile drivers. 1926.1439 Section 1926.1439 Labor... Dedicated pile drivers. (a) The provisions of subpart CC apply to dedicated pile drivers, except as...) Section 1926.1416(e)(4) (Load weighing and similar devices) applies only to dedicated pile...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1439 - Dedicated pile drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated pile drivers. 1926.1439 Section 1926.1439 Labor... Dedicated pile drivers. (a) The provisions of subpart CC apply to dedicated pile drivers, except as...) Section 1926.1416(e)(4) (Load weighing and similar devices) applies only to dedicated pile...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1439 - Dedicated pile drivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dedicated pile drivers. 1926.1439 Section 1926.1439 Labor... Dedicated pile drivers. (a) The provisions of subpart CC apply to dedicated pile drivers, except as...) Section 1926.1416(e)(4) (Load weighing and similar devices) applies only to dedicated pile...

  15. Immobilized transition metals stimulate contact activation and drive factor XII-mediated coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, N.J.; Waters, E.K.; Morrissey, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Upon contact with an appropriate surface, factor XII (FXII) undergoes autoactivation or cleavage by kallikrein. Zn2+ is known to facilitate binding of FXII and the cofactor, high molecular weight kininogen (HK), to anionic surfaces. Objectives To investigate whether transition metals immobilized on liposome surfaces can initiate coagulation via the contact pathway. Methods & Results Liposomes containing a metal ion-chelating lipid (DOGS-NTA) were prepared by membrane extrusion (20% DOGS-NTA, 40% phosphatidylcholine, 10% phosphatidylserine, and 30% phosphatidylethanolamine). Ni2+ immobilized on such liposomes accelerated clotting in normal, but not FXI- or FXII-deficient plasma. Results were comparable to a commercial aPTT reagent. Charging such liposomes with other transition metals revealed differences in their procoagulant capacity, with Ni2+> Cu2+> Co2+ and Zn2+. Plasma could be depleted of FXI, FXII and HK by adsorption with Ni2+-containing beads, resulting in delayed clot times. Consistent with this, FXI, FXII and HK bound to immobilized Ni2+ or Cu2+ with high affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance. In the presence of Ni2+-bearing liposomes, Km and kcat values derived for autoactivation of FXII and prekallikrein, as well as for activation of FXII by kallikrein or prekallikrein by FXIIa, were similar to literature values in the presence of dextran sulfate. Conclusions Immobilized Ni2+ and Cu2+ bind FXII, FXI and HK with high affinity and stimulate activation of the contact pathway, driving FXII-mediated coagulation. Activation of the contact system by immobilized transition metals may have implications during pathogenic infection or in individuals exposed to high levels of pollution. PMID:22905925

  16. β-Arrestin-1 Drives Endothelin-1–Mediated Podocyte Activation and Sustains Renal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Buelli, Simona; Rosanò, Laura; Gagliardini, Elena; Corna, Daniela; Longaretti, Lorena; Pezzotta, Anna; Perico, Luca; Conti, Sara; Rizzo, Paola; Novelli, Rubina; Morigi, Marina; Zoja, Carlamaria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Bagnato, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Activation of endothelin-A receptor (ETAR) by endothelin-1 (ET-1) drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in ovarian tumor cells through β-arrestin signaling. Here, we investigated whether this pathogenetic pathway could affect podocyte phenotype in proliferative glomerular disorders. In cultured mouse podocytes, ET-1 caused loss of the podocyte differentiation marker synaptopodin and acquisition of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin. ET-1 promoted podocyte migration via ETAR activation and increased β-arrestin-1 expression. Activated ETAR recruited β-arrestin-1 to form a trimeric complex with Src leading to epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation and β-catenin phosphorylation, which promoted gene transcription of Snail. Increased Snail expression fostered ET-1–induced migration as confirmed by Snail knockdown experiments. Silencing of β-arrestin-1 prevented podocyte phenotypic changes and motility and inhibited ETAR-driven signaling. In vitro findings were confirmed in doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-induced nephropathy. Mice receiving Adriamycin developed renal injury with loss of podocytes and hyperplastic lesion formation; β-arrestin-1 expression increased in visceral podocytes and in podocytes entrapped in pseudo-crescents. Administration of the selective ETAR antagonist sitaxsentan prevented podocyte loss, formation of the hyperplastic lesions, and normalized expression of glomerular β-arrestin-1 and Snail. Increased β-arrestin-1 levels in podocytes retrieved from crescents of patients with proliferative glomerulopathies confirmed the translational relevance of these findings and suggest the therapeutic potential of ETAR antagonism for a group of diseases still needing a specific treatment. PMID:24371298

  17. STS-103 crew practices driving personnel carrier, part of TCDT activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) (far right) practices driving a small armored personnel carrier that is part of emergency egress training during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front is Capt. George Hoggard, trainer with the KSC Fire Department. At far left is Mission Specialist Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency. The tracked vehicle could be used by the crew in the event of an emergency at the pad during which the crew must make a quick exit from the area. The TCDT also provides simulated countdown exercises and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay. STS-103 is a 'call-up' mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The other STS-103 crew members are Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), (Ph.D.), and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST.

  18. Sympathetic network drive during water deprivation does not increase respiratory or cardiac rhythmic sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Holbein, Walter W; Toney, Glenn M

    2013-06-15

    Effects of water deprivation on rhythmic bursting of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were investigated in anesthetized, bilaterally vagotomized, euhydrated (control) and 48-h water-deprived (WD) rats (n = 8/group). Control and WD rats had similar baseline values of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, and central respiratory drive. Although integrated splanchnic SNA (sSNA) was greater in WD rats than controls (P < 0.01), analysis of respiratory rhythmic bursting of sSNA revealed that inspiratory rhythmic burst amplitude was actually smaller (P < 0.005) in WD rats (+68 ± 6%) than controls (+208 ± 20%), and amplitudes of the early expiratory (postinspiratory) trough and late expiratory burst of sSNA were not different between groups. Further analysis revealed that water deprivation had no effect on either the amplitude or periodicity of the cardiac rhythmic oscillation of sSNA. Collectively, these data indicate that the increase of sSNA produced by water deprivation is not attributable to either increased respiratory or cardiac rhythmic burst discharge. Thus the sympathetic network response to acute water deprivation appears to differ from that of chronic sympathoexcitation in neurogenic forms of arterial hypertension, where increased respiratory rhythmic bursting of SNA and baroreflex adaptations have been reported.

  19. Can Active Navigation Be as Good as Driving? A Comparison of Spatial Memory in Drivers and Backseat Drivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Stulpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C.

    2012-01-01

    When driving a vehicle, either the driver or a passenger (henceforth: backseat driver) may be responsible for navigation. Research on active navigation, primarily addressed in virtual environments, suggests that controlling navigation is more central for spatial learning than controlling movement. To test this assumption in a real-world scenario,…

  20. 116. Photocopied August 1978. NEW INTERLOCKING STEEL SHEET PILING AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. Photocopied August 1978. NEW INTERLOCKING STEEL SHEET PILING AT PENSTOCK 52 IN THE FALL OF 1926. THE PILES FOR SUPPORTING THE HORIZONTAL ELEMENTS OF THE NEW FOREBAY APRON ARE IN PLACE BETWEEN THE NEW SHEET PILING AND THE FOREBAY WALL. VISIBLE BEYOND THE NEW SHEET PILING IS THE TIMBER SHEET PILING DRIVEN IN 1903 BY VON SCHON TO PREVENT WASHOUTS. (1006) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  1. High Temperature Thermocouples For In-pile Applications

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; S. C. Wilkins

    2005-10-01

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project has been initiated to explore the use of specialized thermocouples that are composed of materials that are able to withstand higher temperature, in-pile test conditions. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate the performance of these specialized thermocouples are reported in this paper. Candidate materials were evaluated for their ability to withstand irradiation, to resit material interactions and to remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, candidate thermocouples were evaluated based on their resolution over the temperature ranges of interest. Results from these evaluations are reported, and additional on-going development activities are summarized.

  2. 75 FR 42691 - Small Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Exploratorium Relocation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... piles would be installed with an ICE 14122 (or similar) vibratory hammer; however, it may be necessary... likely an overestimate of sound levels produced by pile driving using a bubble curtain or wood cap....

  3. Crowd-Sourcing Management Activity Data to Drive GHG Emission Inventories in the Land Use Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paustian, K.; Herrick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the land use sector constitute the largest source category for many countries in Africa. Enhancing C sequestration and reducing GHG emissions on managed lands in Africa has to potential to attract C financing to support adoption of more sustainable land management practices that, in addition to GHG mitigation, can provide co-benefits of more productive and climate-resilient agroecosystems. However, robust systems to measure and monitor C sequestration/GHG reductions are currently a significant barrier to attracting more C financing to land use-related mitigation efforts.Anthropogenic GHG emissions are driven by a variety of environmental factors, including climate and soil attributes, as well as human-activities in the form of land use and management practices. GHG emission inventories typically use empirical or process-based models of emission rates that are driven by environmental and management variables. While a lack of field-based flux and C stock measurements are a limiting factor for GHG estimation, we argue that an even greater limitation may be availabiity of data on the management activities that influence flux rates, particularly in developing countries in Africa. In most developed countries there is a well-developed infrastructure of agricultural statistics and practice surveys that can be used to drive model-based GHG emission estimations. However, this infrastructure is largely lacking in developing countries in Africa. While some activity data (e.g. land cover change) can be derived from remote sensing, many key data (e.g., N fertilizer practices, residue management, manuring) require input from the farmers themselves. The explosive growth in cellular technology, even in many of the poorest parts of Africa, suggests the potential for a new crowd-sourcing approach and direct engagement with farmers to 'leap-frog' the land resource information model of developed countries. Among the many benefits of this approach

  4. Direct activation of Shroom3 transcription by Pitx proteins drives epithelial morphogenesis in the developing gut

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Mei-I; Nascone-Yoder, Nanette M.; Grover, Stephanie A.; Drysdale, Thomas A.; Wallingford, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Individual cell shape changes are essential for epithelial morphogenesis. A transcriptional network for epithelial cell shape change is emerging in Drosophila, but this area remains largely unexplored in vertebrates. The distinction is important as so far, key downstream effectors of cell shape change in Drosophila appear not to be conserved. Rather, Shroom3 has emerged as a central effector of epithelial morphogenesis in vertebrates, driving both actin- and microtubule-based cell shape changes. To date, the morphogenetic role of Shroom3 has been explored only in the neural epithelium, so the broad expression of this gene raises two important questions: what are the requirements for Shroom3 in non-neural tissues and what factors control Shroom3 transcription? Here, we show in Xenopus that Shroom3 is essential for cell shape changes and morphogenesis in the developing vertebrate gut and that Shroom3 transcription in the gut requires the Pitx1 transcription factor. Moreover, we show that Pitx proteins directly activate Shroom3 transcription, and we identify Pitx-responsive regulatory elements in the genomic DNA upstream of Shroom3. Finally, we show that ectopic expression of Pitx proteins is sufficient to induce Shroom3-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization and epithelial cell shape change. These data demonstrate new breadth to the requirements for Shroom3 in morphogenesis, and they also provide a cell-biological basis for the role of Pitx transcription factors in morphogenesis. More generally, these results provide a foundation for deciphering the transcriptional network that underlies epithelial cell shape change in developing vertebrates. PMID:20332151

  5. Radiocarbon from Pile Graphite; Chemical Methods for Its Concentrations

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Arnold, J. R.; Libby, W. F.

    1946-10-10

    Samples of pile graphite, irradiated in a test-hole at Hanford for 15 months, have been assayed for radioactive C{sup 14} yielding 0.38 ± 0.04 microcuries per gram. At this level of activity, the pile graphite contains very valuable amounts of C{sup14}. The relation between the above assay and the probable average assay of pile graphite is discussed, and it is concluded that the latter is almost certainly above 0.3 microcuries/gram. Controlled oxidation of this graphite, either with oxygen at ~750ºC, or with chromic acid "cleaning solution" at room temperature, yields early fractions which are highly enriched in C{sup 14}. Concentrations of 5-fold with oxygen, and 50-fold with CrO{sub 3}, have been observed. The relation between the observed enrichment and the Wigner effect is discussed, and a mechanism accounting for the observations put forward. According to this, about 25% of the stable carbon atoms in the lattice have been displaced by Wigner effect, a large fraction of which have healed by migrating to crystal edges. All the C{sup 14} atoms have been displaced, and the same fraction of these migrate to the edges. The enrichment then results from surface oxidation, in the oxygen case. Predictions are made on the basis of this hypothesis. A technique of counting radioactive CO{sub 2} in the gas phase is described.

  6. Chestnut Ridge Borrow Area Waste Pile work plan

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. )

    1991-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through its contractor Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., has constructed a storage facility, the Chestnut Ridge Borrow Area Waste Pile (CRBAWP), for mercury-contaminated soil excavated from the Oak Ridge Civic Center properties and the Oak Ridge Sewer Line Beltway. Excavation of the soil from the Civic Center began in September 1984 and was completed in early 1985. Similar soils from other areas of the city were added to the pile until 1987. Approximately 3000 yd{sup 3} are stored at the present time. An Interim Status RCRA permit was initially sought for this facility. Samples from the waste pile passed the Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test (EP Tox). The Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (now the Tennessee Department of Conservation-TDC) denied the permit based on their conclusion that the waste was not a RCRA-regulated waste. On September 25, 1990 the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) superseded the EP Tox test. TCLP tests are not proposed to satisfy a request by TDC and to make a final determination of the nature of the soils in order to close the CRBAWP as a solid waste disposal facility under Tennessee State rule 1200-1-7-.04. The objectives of this work are to summarize existing site information and detail actions necessary to sample and characterize soils from the waste pile as hazardous or nonhazardous per the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Within the scope of this plan, a site investigation will be discussed; a field sampling plan will be described in terms of sampling locations, procedures, and quality assurance; and ancillary activities such as waste management, data management, and health and safety will be outlines. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Lateral load tests on large pipe piles in coral

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, W.R.; Hong, I.S.

    1984-05-01

    Results are presented for lateral load tests on 36-, 48-, 80-, and 132-in. diameter pipe piles in 26- to 67-ft water depths at a port site in Saudi Arabia. Primary soil types at the site are crushed coral and sand, with layers of intact weak coral. Pile loads were measured with load cells, deflections were measured with potentiometers, and pile slopes were measured with a slope indicator. Pile top deflections and pile deflected shapes are reported at several load levels. Maximum test loads ranged from 72 to 559 kips, and maximum pile top deflections were from 3.6 to 55 inches. Comparison of test results to expectations of behavior based on state-of-the-practice analytical methods shows that the character of pile deflected shapes were predicted well, but that deflections were generally over-predicted in the analyses. Comparison of test pile and reaction pile deflected shapes shows secondary but significant differences.

  8. Grieving while Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Paul C.

    2004-01-01

    Secondary analysis of data from 84 people in 2 interview studies shows that some bereaved people grieve actively while driving. The grief can be intense, even years after a death. Grief while driving may erupt spontaneously or be set off by a wide range of reminders. Some bereaved people seem to save their grieving for times when they drive,…

  9. Can active navigation be as good as driving? A comparison of spatial memory in drivers and backseat drivers.

    PubMed

    von Stülpnagel, Rul; Steffens, Melanie C

    2012-06-01

    When driving a vehicle, either the driver or a passenger (henceforth: backseat driver) may be responsible for navigation. Research on active navigation, primarily addressed in virtual environments, suggests that controlling navigation is more central for spatial learning than controlling movement. To test this assumption in a real-world scenario, we manipulated movement control through seating participants in the front or the back position of a tandem bike, and navigation control by presenting differently detailed maps to participants unfamiliar (Experiment 1) or familiar (Experiment 2) with an environment. Landmark knowledge was tested with recognition tasks. For participants unfamiliar with the environment (Experiment 1), passive navigation enabled better landmark recognition than active navigation, but there was no effect of movement control. For participants more familiar with the environment (Experiment 2), there was no effect of navigation control, but drivers showed better landmark recognition than backseat drivers. These findings are discussed in relation to action memory research. Measures of route and survey knowledge demonstrated that good performance resulted from active navigation (Experiment 1-2). Moreover, with regard to these measures, driving compensated for passive navigation if the environment was familiar (Experiment 2). An additional experiment in a lab setting (Experiment 3) validated the manipulation of navigation control and the used tasks and demonstrated the importance of real environment exposure. As our findings suggest, driving may be more relevant for remembering landmarks, but actively controlling navigation (even as a backseat driver) is more relevant for remembering a route than maneuvering a vehicle.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Passenger Traffic Fleets in Asian Cities: Technology, Driving Activities, and Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM Oanh, N. T.; Huynh, H. V.; Saikawa, E.

    2015-12-01

    The road transport sector is the major emission source of toxic air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHGs) in large Asian cities. This paper comparatively analyzed on-road passenger traffic fleets (cars, buses, taxis, motorcycles), using local data collected in cities of Bangkok (BKK), Kathmandu, Hanoi, Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), and Yangon. Surveys were done in 2010-2014 to obtain information on vehicle technology, driving activities (speed, distance, number, and types of starts), traffic density, and fuel characteristics. Large shares of pre-Euro vehicles were still observed, especially for public buses. The most advanced technology was Euro4, which was observed in small shares (<5%) of the personal car fleets in BKK, HCMC, and Yangon. Euro3 was generally the most advanced technology found in other fleets in these cities. Motorcycles (MC) was the most dominant fleet in all cities, except in Yangon, where they were not allowed. Low vehicle speeds, mainly below 25 km/h, were observed for all vehicle types, indicating traffic jams. Natural gas and LPG had considerable shares in BKK and Yangon while for other cities diesel and gasoline were still the two major fuels used in transportation. Running emission factors (EF) of buses and taxis in Kathmandu were considerably higher than other cities due to its hilly topography, low speeds, high mileage, and less advanced vehicle technologies. The number of passenger vehicles per 1000 people were 400-500 in HCMC and Hanoi (mainly by MC) and in BKK (also by cars), moderate in Kathmandu (200) and the lowest in Yangon (40) because of the MC ban. Annual emissions of the passenger fleets were calculated for each city using the International Vehicle Emission (IVE) for 14 species. BC and OC emissions were estimated using their fractions of PM10 emission. Annual emission per capita of toxic air pollutants and GHGs was analyzed. For example, the emission in kg/year/person for CO, VOC, NOx and PM10 in these cities was 24-150 for CO, 0

  11. A Transformerless Hybrid Active Filter Capable of Complying with Harmonic Guidelines for Medium-Voltage Motor Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Ryota; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents a transformerless hybrid active filter that is integrated into medium-voltage adjustable-speed motor drives for fans, pumps, and compressors without regenerative braking. The authors have designed and constructed a three-phase experimental system rated at 400V and 15kW, which is a downscaled model from a feasible 6.6-kV 1-MW motor drive system. This system consists of the hybrid filter connecting a passive filter tuned to the 7th harmonic filter in series with an active filter that is based on a three-level diode-clamped PWM converter, as well as an adjustable-speed motor drive in which a diode rectifier is used as the front end. The hybrid filter is installed on the ac side of the diode rectifier with no line-frequency transformer. The downscaled system has been exclusively tested so as to confirm the overall compensating performance of the hybrid filter and the filtering performance of a switching-ripple filter for mitigating switching-ripple voltages produced by the active filter. Experimental results verify that the hybrid filter achieves harmonic compensation of the source current in all the operating regions from no-load to the rated-load conditions, and that the switching-ripple filter reduces the switching-ripple voltages as expected.

  12. Respiration drives network activity and modulates synaptic and circuit processing of lateral inhibition in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew E.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Willhite, David C.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2012-01-01

    Respiration produces rhythmic activity in the entire olfactory system, driving neurons in the olfactory epithelium, bulb (OB) and cortex. The rhythmic nature of this activity is believed to be a critical component of sensory processing. OB projection neurons, mitral and tufted cells, exhibit both spiking and subthreshold membrane potential oscillations rhythmically coupled to respiration. Yet, the network and synaptic mechanisms that produce respiration-coupled activity, and the effects of respiration on lateral inhibition, a major component of sensory processing in OB circuits, are not known. Is respiration-coupled activity in mitral and tufted cells produced by sensory synaptic inputs from nasal airflow alone, cortico-bulbar feedback, or intrinsic membrane properties of the projection neurons? Does respiration facilitate or modulate the activity of inhibitory lateral circuits in the OB? Here, in vivo intracellular recordings from identified mitral and tufted cells in anesthetized rats demonstrate that nasal airflow provides excitatory synaptic inputs to both cell types and drives respiration-coupled spiking. Lateral inhibition, inhibitory post-synaptic potentials evoked by intrabulbar microstimulation, was modulated by respiration. In individual mitral and tufted cells inhibition was larger at specific respiratory phases. However, lateral inhibition was not uniformly larger during a particular respiratory phase in either cell type. Removing nasal airflow abolished respiration-coupled spiking in both cell types and nearly eliminated spiking in mitral, but not tufted cells. In the absence of nasal airflow, lateral inhibition was weaker in mitral cells and less modulated in tufted cells. Thus, respiration drives distinct network activities that functionally modulate sensory processing in the OB. PMID:22219272

  13. 6. CANNERY PILINGS Foundation of a portion of the cannery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CANNERY PILINGS Foundation of a portion of the cannery over water. Crumbling cement footings and decomposing pilings make portions of this area unsafe. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  14. A role for cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons in coupling homeostatic sleep drive to EEG slow wave activity.

    PubMed

    Morairty, Stephen R; Dittrich, Lars; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Valladao, Daniel; Heiss, Jaime E; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2013-12-10

    Although the neural circuitry underlying homeostatic sleep regulation is little understood, cortical neurons immunoreactive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1) have been proposed to be involved in this physiological process. By systematically manipulating the durations of sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery sleep, we show that activation of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons is directly related to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, NREM bout duration, and EEG δ power during NREM sleep, an index of preexisting homeostatic sleep drive. Conversely, nNOS knockout mice show reduced NREM sleep time, shorter NREM bouts, and decreased power in the low δ range during NREM sleep, despite constitutively elevated sleep drive. Cortical NK1 neurons are still activated in response to sleep deprivation in these mice but, in the absence of nNOS, they are unable to up-regulate NREM δ power appropriately. These findings support the hypothesis that cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons translate homeostatic sleep drive into up-regulation of NREM δ power through an NO-dependent mechanism.

  15. Chemical or genetic Pin1 inhibition exerts potent anticancer activity against hepatocellular carcinoma by blocking multiple cancer-driving pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Arina Li; Zheng, Min; Li, Mei-Qing; Chen, Champ Peng; Xu, Huijuan; Chu, Qing-Song; Yang, Dayun; Lu, Wenxian; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Liu, Hekun; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most prevalent and malignant cancers with high inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity. A central common signaling mechanism in cancer is proline-directed phosphorylation, which is further regulated by the unique proline isomerase Pin1. Pin1 is prevalently overexpressed in human cancers including ~70% of HCC, and promotes tumorigenesis by activating multiple cancer-driving pathways. However, it was challenging to evaluate the significance of targeting Pin1 in cancer treatment until the recent identification of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) as a Pin1 inhibitor. Here we systematically investigate functions of Pin1 and its inhibitor ATRA in the development and treatment of HCC. Pin1 knockdown potently inhibited HCC cell proliferation and tumor growth in mice. ATRA-induced Pin1 degradation inhibited the growth of HCC cells, although at a higher IC50 as compared with breast cancer cells, likely due to more active ATRA metabolism in liver cells. Indeed, inhibition of ATRA metabolism enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to ATRA. Moreover, slow-releasing ATRA potently and dose-dependently inhibited HCC growth in mice. Finally, chemical or genetic Pin1 ablation blocked multiple cancer-driving pathways simultaneously in HCC cells. Thus, targeting Pin1 offers a promising therapeutic approach to simultaneously stop multiple cancer-driving pathways in HCC. PMID:28262728

  16. An analytical model for the underwater sound pressure waveforms radiated when an offshore pile is driven.

    PubMed

    Hall, Marshall V

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the pile vibration and consequent sound pressure and particle velocity radiated underwater when an offshore cylindrical pile is struck by a drop hammer. The model, which is based on the coupled equations of motion for axial and radial vibration of a thin cylindrical shell, yields frequency-dependent phase velocity and attenuation of these vibrations. The amplitude of the pulse of axial and radial displacement that travels down a pile following an axial impact is described in terms of the hammer properties. Solutions are obtained for the radiated sound pressure and particle velocity, using Junger and Feit's Transform Formulation of the Pressure Field of Cylindrical Radiators [(Acoustical Society of America, New York, 1993), p. 216]. The model is applied to published data on radiated noise from offshore driving of a steel pile. The modeled pressure waveforms at 12-m horizontal range and at 9 hydrophone depths correlate significantly with the measured waveforms. The modeled pressures of the initial positive peaks (appropriately low-pass filtered) agree with data to within 1 dB. The initial negative peaks however exceed the data by up to 7 dB, and as hydrophone depth increases, the model negative peaks have a maximum at 7 m, whereas the data have a maximum at 9 m.

  17. Use of a magnetic field to modify and detect avalanche behavior on a conical bead pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Nathan; Lehman, Susan

    2015-03-01

    A conical bead pile subject to slow driving and an external magnetic field is used to test the effects of drop height and cohesion on avalanche statistics. Magnetically susceptible beads were dropped onto a pile from different heights and into different strengths of magnetic field. Avalanches were recorded by the change in mass as beads fall off the pile. For beads dropped from a low drop height with no cohesion, the avalanche size distribution follows a power law. As cohesion increases, we observe an increase in the probability of very large avalanches and decreases in the mid-size avalanches. The resulting bump in the avalanche distribution moves to larger avalanche size as the cohesion in the system is increased, matching the prediction by an analytic theory from a mean-field model of slip avalanches. The model also makes predictions for avalanche duration, which is not measurable with our current system. Since the steel beads are magnetized while in the applied magnetic field, their motion during an avalanche creates a change in magnetic flux. To detect this motion, we have placed a large-diameter pick-up coil around the pile. Results of the testing and calibration of this coil to measure avalanche duration are presented.

  18. Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-11

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT Title: Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases (ONR Grant No. N00014-97-1-0887) Period: June...Literature Review The literature study on suction piles has been completed and the final report has been submitted to the Naval Facilities Engineering...Analytical Performance Study of Suction Piles The suction pile performance study using linear elastic soil material properties has been completed. Results

  19. 30 CFR 77.215 - Refuse piles; construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Refuse piles; construction requirements. 77.215... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.215 Refuse piles; construction requirements. (a) Refuse deposited on a pile shall be spread in layers and compacted in such a manner so as to minimize the flow of...

  20. 30 CFR 77.215 - Refuse piles; construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Refuse piles; construction requirements. 77.215... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.215 Refuse piles; construction requirements. (a) Refuse deposited on a pile shall be spread in layers and compacted in such a manner so as to minimize the flow of...

  1. 30 CFR 77.215 - Refuse piles; construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Refuse piles; construction requirements. 77.215... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.215 Refuse piles; construction requirements. (a) Refuse deposited on a pile shall be spread in layers and compacted in such a manner so as to minimize the flow of...

  2. 30 CFR 77.215 - Refuse piles; construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Refuse piles; construction requirements. 77.215... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.215 Refuse piles; construction requirements. (a) Refuse deposited on a pile shall be spread in layers and compacted in such a manner so as to minimize the flow of...

  3. 30 CFR 77.215 - Refuse piles; construction requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Refuse piles; construction requirements. 77.215... COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.215 Refuse piles; construction requirements. (a) Refuse deposited on a pile shall be spread in layers and compacted in such a manner so as to minimize the flow of...

  4. 30 CFR 77.214 - Refuse piles; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... located in areas which are a safe distance from all underground mine airshafts, preparation plants... covered with clay or other inert material as the piles are constructed. (c) A fireproof barrier of clay or inert material shall be constructed between old and new refuse piles. (d) Roadways to refuse piles...

  5. Timber Piling Barrier and Chemical Preservation Annual Costs Comparison.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    another wrap did not adequately cover an attached bolt and thus borer damage continued at that point only. The aluminum alloy nails used to attach the...been virtually eliminated because of the much lower cost of PVC wrapping. The most common metal used was a 90:10 cupro-nickel alloy in sheets 2 mils...thick. The sheets were fastened to the piling with monel or cupro-nickel nails. The copper does offer some antifouling activity from the slow release

  6. Driving simulation in the clinic: testing visual exploratory behavior in daily life activities in patients with visual field defects.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Johanna; Kraft, Antje; Ohl, Sven; De Beukelaer, Sophie; Audebert, Heinrich J; Brandt, Stephan A

    2012-09-18

    Patients suffering from homonymous hemianopia after infarction of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) report different degrees of constraint in daily life, despite similar visual deficits. We assume this could be due to variable development of compensatory strategies such as altered visual scanning behavior. Scanning compensatory therapy (SCT) is studied as part of the visual training after infarction next to vision restoration therapy. SCT consists of learning to make larger eye movements into the blind field enlarging the visual field of search, which has been proven to be the most useful strategy(1), not only in natural search tasks but also in mastering daily life activities(2). Nevertheless, in clinical routine it is difficult to identify individual levels and training effects of compensatory behavior, since it requires measurement of eye movements in a head unrestrained condition. Studies demonstrated that unrestrained head movements alter the visual exploratory behavior compared to a head-restrained laboratory condition(3). Martin et al.(4) and Hayhoe et al.(5) showed that behavior demonstrated in a laboratory setting cannot be assigned easily to a natural condition. Hence, our goal was to develop a study set-up which uncovers different compensatory oculomotor strategies quickly in a realistic testing situation: Patients are tested in the clinical environment in a driving simulator. SILAB software (Wuerzburg Institute for Traffic Sciences GmbH (WIVW)) was used to program driving scenarios of varying complexity and recording the driver's performance. The software was combined with a head mounted infrared video pupil tracker, recording head- and eye-movements (EyeSeeCam, University of Munich Hospital, Clinical Neurosciences). The positioning of the patient in the driving simulator and the positioning, adjustment and calibration of the camera is demonstrated. Typical performances of a patient with and without compensatory strategy and a healthy control are

  7. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  8. Promoting Active Transport in Older Adolescents Before They Obtain Their Driving Licence: A Matched Control Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Dorien; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle; Van Dyck, Delfien; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Geus, Bas; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Clarys, Peter; Deforche, Benedicte

    2016-01-01

    Background Active transport has great potential to increase physical activity in older adolescents (17–18 years). Therefore, a theory- and evidence-based intervention was developed aiming to promote active transport among older adolescents. The intervention aimed to influence psychosocial factors of active transport since this is the first step in order to achieve a change in behaviour. The present study aimed to examine the effect of the intervention on the following psychosocial factors: intention to use active transport after obtaining a driving licence, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, subjective norm, self-efficacy, habit and awareness towards active transport. Methods A matched control three-arm study was conducted and consisted of a pre-test post-test design with intervention and control schools in Flanders (northern part of Belgium). A lesson promoting active transport was implemented as the last lesson in the course ‘Driving Licence at School’ in intervention schools (intervention group 1). Individuals in intervention group 2 received this active transport lesson and, in addition, they were asked to become a member of a Facebook group on active transport. Individuals in the control group only attended the regular course ‘Driving Licence at School’. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing socio-demographics and psychosocial variables at baseline, post (after one week) and follow-up (after eight weeks). To assess intervention effects, multilevel linear mixed models analyses were performed. Results A sample of 441 older adolescents (56.8% female; 17.4 (0.7) years) was analysed. For awareness regarding the existence of car sharing schemes, a significant increase in awareness from baseline to post measurement was found within intervention group 1 (p = 0.001) and intervention group 2 (p = 0.030) compared to the control group in which no change was found. In addition, a significant increase in awareness from baseline to follow

  9. Atypical cortical drive during activation of the paretic and nonparetic tibialis anterior is related to gait deficits in chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacqueline A.; Needle, Alan R.; Pohlig, Ryan T.; Binder-Macleod, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The role of cortical drive in stroke recovery for the lower extremity remains ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cortical drive and gait speed in a group of stroke survivors. Methods Eighteen individuals with stroke were dichotomized into fast or slow walking groups. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to collect motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the tibialis anterior of each lower extremity during rest, paretic muscle contractions, and nonparetic muscle contractions. An asymmetry-index (AI) was calculated using motor thresholds and compared between groups. The average MEP of the paretic leg during TMS at maximal intensity (MEP100) for each condition was compared within and between groups. Results A significant positive correlation was found between AI and walking speed. Slow-walkers had greater MEP100s during the nonparetic contraction than during the paretic contraction or rest conditions. In contrast, fast-walkers had greatest MEP100s during the paretic contraction. Conclusions Alterations in the balance of corticomotor excitability occur in the lower extremity of individuals with poor motor recovery post-stroke. This atypical cortical drive is dependent on activation of the unaffected hemisphere and contraction of the nonparetic leg. Significance Understanding mechanisms underlying function can help to identify specific patient deficits that impair function. PMID:26142877

  10. Isotopically enriched ammonium shows high nitrogen transformation in the pile top zone of dairy manure compost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Koki; Toyoda, Sakae; Yano, Midori; Hattori, Shohei; Fukasawa, Makoto; Nakajima, Keiichi; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) of NH4+ in dairy manure compost piles with and without bulking agent (10 % w/w) were compared to understand the effects of the use of bulking agent on nitrogen conversion during manure composting. The δ15N-NH4+ values in each of three pile zones (top, side and core) were also compared. At the end of the process, piles with bulking agent showed significantly higher δ15N values (17.7 ± 1.3 ‰) than piles without bulking agent (11.8 ± 0.9 ‰), reflecting the significantly higher nitrogen conversion and NH3 loss in the former. The samples from the top zone, especially in the piles with bulking agent, showed very high NH4+ concentrations with significantly high 15N (δ15N: 12.7-29.8 ‰) values, indicating that extremely high nitrogen conversion, nitrification-denitrification activity of the microbes and NH3 volatilization occurred in this zone.

  11. Measurement of Frost Heave Forces on H-Piles and Pipe Piles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    inherent problem with the reaction beam experiments both showed the fluctuations in heave and force-balance methods is that they may under- 3 estimate the...shear stresses developed on the pile in the soil be- frost penetration. low the 0*C isotherm. Therefore, the reaction beam and force-balance methods ...actually measure a net uplift force, which is the total uplift load less METHODS AND MATERIALS the total restraining load acting on the pile. Johnson and

  12. Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, Harold; Nyer, Warren

    2012-01-01

    On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day.

  13. 40 CFR 264.554 - Staging piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... operations as long as they are intended to prepare the wastes for subsequent management or treatment. (2) (b... Technological Requirements (MTR)? No. Placing hazardous remediation wastes into a staging pile does not constitute land disposal of hazardous wastes or create a unit that is subject to the minimum...

  14. Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1

    ScienceCinema

    Agnew, Harold; Nyer, Warren

    2016-07-12

    On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day.

  15. Minimizing coal terminal marine structure costs. A case history: Plaquemines Parish terminal. [Dock and piles design to absorb and distribute impact and longitudinal forces

    SciTech Connect

    Pardon, D.V.; Faeth, M.T.; Curth, O.

    1981-01-01

    At International Marine Terminals' Plaquemines Parish Terminal, design optimization was accomplished by optimizing the dock pile bent spacing and designing the superstructure to distribute berthing impact forces and bollard pulls over a large number of pile bents. Also, by resisting all longitudinal forces acting on the dock at a single location near the center of the structure, the number of longitudinal batter piles was minimized and the need for costly expansion joints was eliminated. Computer techniques were utilized to analyze and optimize the design of the new dock. Pile driving procedures were evaluated utilizing a wave equation technique. Tripod dolphins with a resilient fender system were provided. The resilent fender system, a combination of rubber shear type and wing type fenders, adds only a small percentage to the total cost of the dolphins but greatly increases their energy absorption capability.

  16. ERK1/2 Activation in Preexisting Oligodendrocytes of Adult Mice Drives New Myelin Synthesis and Enhanced CNS Function

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Marisa A.; Urbanek, Kelly; Torres, Lester; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Rubio, Maria E.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that mechanisms controlling CNS plasticity extend beyond the synapse and that alterations in myelin can modify conduction velocity, leading to changes in neural circuitry. Although it is widely accepted that newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs) produce myelin in the adult CNS, the contribution of preexisting OLs to functional myelin remodeling is not known. Here, we show that sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in preexisting OLs of adult mice is sufficient to drive increased myelin thickness, faster conduction speeds, and enhanced hippocampal-dependent emotional learning. Although preexisting OLs do not normally contribute to remyelination, we show that sustained activation of ERK1/2 renders them able to do so. These data suggest that strategies designed to push mature OLs to reinitiate myelination may be beneficial both for enhancing remyelination in demyelinating diseases and for increasing neural plasticity in the adult CNS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Myelin is a crucial regulator of CNS plasticity, function, and repair. Although it is generally accepted that new myelin production in the adult CNS is initiated by newly generated oligodendrocytes (OLs), great interest remains in additionally driving mature preexisting OLs to make myelin. The ability to induce myelination by the larger population of preexisting OLs carries the potential for enhanced remyelination in demyelinating diseases and increased neural plasticity in the adult CNS. Here, we show that sustained activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathway is sufficient to drive mature OLs in the adult mouse CNS to reinitiate myelination, leading to new myelin wraps and functional changes. PMID:27581459

  17. Electrochemical reduction of carbon fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile Mechanistic analysis employing Marcus Hush quadratic activation-driving force relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, A.; Sangaranarayanan, M. V.

    2007-10-01

    The reduction of carbon-fluorine bond in 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile as the solvent, is analyzed using convolution potential sweep voltammetry and the dependence of the transfer coefficient on potential is investigated within the framework of Marcus-Hush quadratic activation-driving force theory. The validity of stepwise mechanism is inferred from solvent reorganization energy estimates as well as bond length calculations using B3LYP/6-31g(d) method. A novel method of estimating the standard reduction potential of the 4-fluorobenzonitrile in acetonitrile is proposed.

  18. The association of physical activity, cognitive processes and automobile driving ability in older adults: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sally M; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Insel, Kathleen C

    2016-01-01

    As the number of older adults in the United States grows, the number of automobile drivers over the age of 65 will also increase. Several cognitive processes necessary for automobile driving are vulnerable to age-related decline. These include declines in executive function, working memory, attention, and speed of information processing. The benefits of physical activity on physical, psychological and particular cognitive processes are well-documented; however few studies have explored the relationship between physical activity and driving ability in older adults or examined if cognitive processes mediate (or moderate) the effect of physical activity on driving ability. The purpose of this paper is to review the existing literature regarding physical activity, cognition and automobile driving. Recommendations for further research and utility of the findings to nursing and the health care team are provided.

  19. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  20. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  1. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil—pile interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele; Mylonakis, George

    2008-07-01

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000@. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  2. Constitutively active Lck kinase in T cells drives antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Nika, Konstantina; Soldani, Cristiana; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Paster, Wolfgang; Gray, Adrian; Etzensperger, Ruth; Fugger, Lars; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Dushek, Omer; Höfer, Thomas; Viola, Antonella; Acuto, Oreste

    2010-06-25

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and coreceptor ligation is thought to initiate signal transduction by inducing activation of the kinase Lck. Here we showed that catalytically active Lck was present in unstimulated naive T cells and thymocytes and was readily detectable in these cells in lymphoid organs. In naive T cells up to approximately 40% of total Lck was constitutively activated, part of which was also phosphorylated on the C-terminal inhibitory site. Formation of activated Lck was independent of TCR and coreceptors but required Lck catalytic activity and its maintenance relied on monitoring by the HSP90-CDC37 chaperone complex to avoid degradation. The amount of activated Lck did not change after TCR and coreceptor engagement; however it determined the extent of TCR-zeta phosphorylation. Our findings suggest a dynamic regulation of Lck activity that can be promptly utilized to initiate T cell activation and have implications for signaling by other immune receptors.

  3. From Compass to Hard Drive--Integrated Activities for Studying Magnets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a range of practical activities that allows students to investigate the properties and applications of magnets. The activities can be used in isolation or used together to build a rounded understanding of the subject area. The activities include simple demonstrations using common or inexpensive equipment, hands-on experiments for small…

  4. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Melanie A; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2015-07-07

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up.

  5. Picking up Clues from the Discard Pile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander excavates trenches, it also builds piles with most of the material scooped from the holes. The piles, like this one called 'Caterpillar,' provide researchers some information about the soil.

    On Aug. 24, 2008, during the late afternoon of the 88th Martian day after landing, Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager took separate exposures through red, green and blue filters that have been combined into this approximately true-color image.

    This conical pile of soil is about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The sources of material that the robotic arm has dropped onto the Caterpillar pile have included the 'Dodo' and ''Upper Cupboard' trenches and, more recently, the deeper 'Stone Soup' trench.

    Observations of the pile provide information, such as the slope of the cone and the textures of the soil, that helps scientists understand properties of material excavated from the trenches.

    For the Stone Soup trench in particular, which is about 18 centimeters (7 inches) deep, the bottom of the trench is in shadow and more difficult to observe than other trenches that Phoenix has dug. The Phoenix team obtained spectral clues about the composition of material from the bottom of Stone Soup by photographing Caterpillar through 15 different filters of the Surface Stereo Imager when the pile was covered in freshly excavated material from the trench.

    The spectral observation did not produce any sign of water-ice, just typical soil for the site. However, the bigger clumps do show a platy texture that could be consistent with elevated concentration of salts in the soil from deep in Stone Soup. The team chose that location as the source for a soil sample to be analyzed in the lander's wet chemistry laboratory, which can identify soluble salts in the soil.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif

  6. c/EBPbeta is a major regulatory element driving transcriptional activation of the CXCL12 promoter.

    PubMed

    Calonge, E; Alonso-Lobo, J M; Escandón, C; González, N; Bermejo, M; Santiago, B; Mestre, L; Pablos, J L; Caruz, A; Alcamí, J

    2010-02-26

    CXCL12 is considered a constitutively expressed chemokine with homeostatic functions. However, induction of CXCL12 expression and its potential role in several pathologic conditions have been reported, suggesting that CXCL12 gene expression can be induced by different stimuli. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of CXCL12 gene expression, we aim to define the molecular factors that operate at the transcriptional level. Basal, constitutive expression of CXCL12 was dependent on basic helix-loop-helix factors. Transcriptional up-regulation of the CXCL12 gene was induced by cellular confluence or inflammatory stimuli such as interleukin-1 and interleukin-6, in a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (c/EBPbeta)-dependent manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed c/EBPbeta binding to a specific response element located at -1171 of the promoter region of CXCL12. Our data show that c/EBPbeta is a major regulatory element driving transcription of the CXCL12 gene in response to cytokines and cell confluence.

  7. Effects of Non-Driving Cognitive Activity on Driver's Eye Movement and Their Individual Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Makoto; Inagaki, Toshiyuki

    This paper investigates effects on driver's eye movement when the driver is distracted by a secondary cognitive task that demands a high mental workload. By observing drivers behavior in a fixed-base driving simulator, we analyze how the time lengths of eye fixations change when a driver is imposed to perform a cognitive secondary task. The results show that two types (Type 1: the number of short fixations increases, Type 2: the number of short fixations decreases) are found. Interestingly, our data show that both types can be seen even in one driver depending on traffic conditions. It is also shown that likelihood of occurring Type 1 or Type 2 effects depends on driver. The data suggest that it is possible to predict which effect is likely to occur for a driver if we analyze his or her eye movement under normal conditions. With these findings, this study developed and improved a driver-adaptable algorithm for detecting the state of being under high mental workload. The results suggest that the time length of an eye fixation can be useful index at least several drivers.

  8. BH3-Triggered Structural Reorganization Drives the Activation of Pro-apoptotic BAX

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Reyna, Denis E.; Davis, Marguerite L.; Bird, Gregory H.; Walensky, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary BAX is a pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member that lies dormant in the cytosol until converted into a killer protein in response to cellular stress. Having recently identified the elusive trigger site for direct BAX activation, we now delineate by NMR and biochemical methods the essential allosteric conformational changes that transform ligand-triggered BAX into a fully activated monomer capable of propagating its own activation. Upon BAX engagement by a triggering BH3 helix, the unstructured loop between α-helices 1 and 2 is displaced, the carboxy terminal helix 9 is mobilized for membrane translocation, and the exposed BAX BH3 domain propagates the death signal through an auto-activating interaction with the trigger site of inactive BAX monomers. Our structure-activity analysis of this seminal apoptotic process reveals new pharmacologic opportunities to modulate cell death by interceding at key steps of the BAX activation pathway. PMID:21070973

  9. RAS/MAPK Activation Drives Resistance to Smo Inhibition, Metastasis, and Tumor Evolution in Shh Pathway-Dependent Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X; Whitson, Ramon J; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E; Chan, Jennifer A; Kelleher, Joseph F; Segal, Rosalind A

    2015-09-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy, and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS-MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway dependency, drives tumor growth, and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together, these findings reveal a critical role of the RAS-MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors.

  10. RAS/MAPK activation drives resistance to Smo inhibition, metastasis and tumor evolution in Shh pathway-dependent tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuesong; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Ornell, Kimberly J.; Zhou, Pengcheng; Dabral, Sukriti K.; Pak, Ekaterina; Li, Wei; Atwood, Scott X.; Whitson, Ramon J.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Li, Jiang; Oro, Anthony E.; Chan, Jennifer A.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant Shh signaling promotes tumor growth in diverse cancers. The importance of Shh signaling is particularly evident in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), where inhibitors targeting the Shh pathway component Smoothened (Smo) show great therapeutic promise. However, the emergence of drug resistance limits long-term efficacy and the mechanisms of resistance remain poorly understood. Using new medulloblastoma models, we identify two distinct paradigms of resistance to Smo inhibition. Sufu mutations lead to maintenance of the Shh pathway in the presence of Smo inhibitors. Alternatively activation of the RAS/MAPK pathway circumvents Shh pathway-dependency, drives tumor growth and enhances metastatic behavior. Strikingly, in BCC patients treated with Smo inhibitor, squamous cell cancers with RAS/MAPK activation emerged from the antecedent BCC tumors. Together these findings reveal a critical role of RAS/MAPK pathway in drug resistance and tumor evolution of Shh pathway-dependent tumors. PMID:26130651

  11. Activity-dependent depression of monosynaptic fast IPSCs in hippocampus: contributions from reductions in chloride driving force and conductance.

    PubMed

    Ling, D S; Benardo, L S

    1995-01-23

    Whole-cell recordings techniques were used to record pharmacologically isolated fast inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from rat hippocampal slices. Repetitive extracellular stimulation up to 10 Hz progressively reduced steady-state fast IPSC amplitude. At low stimulation frequencies (up to 1 Hz), this attenuation was characterized by a positive shift of IPSC reversal potential with no change in IPSC conductance. Above 1 Hz stimulation, fast IPSC depression was associated with changes in both reversal potential and IPSC conductance. Use-dependent depression at low frequencies was prevented when cells were chloride-loaded using cesium chloride based intracellular solutions. These findings suggest that activity-dependent depression of fast IPSCs at low stimulus frequencies results entirely from a reduction in chloride driving force, stemming from intracellular chloride accumulation. Activity-dependent changes in fast IPSC conductance occur only at stimulation rates above 1 Hz.

  12. Temperature Oscillations Drive Cycles in the Activity of MMP-2,9 Secreted by a Human Trabecular Meshwork Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Stanley Ka-lok; Banerjee, Juni; Jang, Christopher; Sehgal, Amita; Stone, Richard A.; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Aqueous humor inflow falls 50% during sleeping hours without proportional fall in IOP, partly reflecting reduced outflow facility. The mechanisms underlying outflow facility cycling are unknown. One outflow facility regulator is matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release from trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Because anterior segment temperature must oscillate due to core temperature cycling and eyelid closure during sleep, we tested whether physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive cycles in the activity of secreted MMP. Methods. Temperature of transformed normal human TM cells (hTM5 line) was fixed or alternated 12 hours/12 hours between 33°C and 37°C. Activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 was measured by zymography, and gene expression by RT-PCR and quantitative PCR. Results. Raising temperature to 37°C increased, and lowering to 33°C reduced, activity of secreted MMP. Switching between 37°C and 33°C altered MMP-9 by 40% ± 3% and MMP-2 by 22% ± 2%. Peripheral circadian clocks did not mediate temperature-driven cycling of MMP secretion because MMP-release oscillations did not persist at constant temperature after 3 to 6 days of alternating temperatures, and temperature cycles did not entrain clock-gene expression in these cells. Furthermore, inhibiting heat shock transcription factor 1, which links temperature and peripheral clock-gene oscillations, inhibited MMP-9 but not MMP-2 temperature-driven MMP cycling. Inhibition of heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels altered total MMP secretion but not temperature-induced modulations. Inhibiting cold-sensitive TRPM-8 channels had no effect. Conclusions. Physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive fluctuations of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in hTM5 cells independent of peripheral clock genes and temperature-sensitive TRP channels. PMID:25655795

  13. Pastoral and woodcutting activities drive Cedrus atlantica Mediterranean forest structure in the Moroccan Middle Atlas.

    PubMed

    Coudel, Marc; Aubert, Pierre-Marie; Aderghal, Mohammed; Hély, Christelle

    2016-03-01

    Human activities are historical ecological drivers, and we need to better understand their effects on ecosystems. In particular, they have been very important in the shaping of the Mediterranean biodiversity hotspot. Researchers and managers nonetheless lack knowledge concerning the impacts of their combinations and their current intensity on the structure of forest ecosystems of the southern part of the Mediterranean basin. In this study, we have develped a new methodology in order to understand the impacts of combined pastoral and woodcutting activities on the forest structure of the still ill-described but ecologically and economically important Moroccan Middle Atlas cedar forests. In a 40 000 ha forest, we chose 103 sites and sampled human activities through proxies and forest structures through circumference and vertical structures. A typology of sites yielded four human activity types: dominant pastoral activities, dominant oak cutting or cedar cutting activities, and an intermediate mid-disturbance type. This typology did not depend on altitude or substrate, confirming that the ecosystem structures linked to the different types depend more on human activities than on main environmental parameters. Pastoral activities modified forests the most, converting them to parklands with reduced canopies and low dynamics but high tree maturation. Woodcutting activities induced gap dynamics, favoring Cedrus atlantica in favorable environmental conditions and Quercus ilex otherwise, while they affected vertical structure depending on the local environment and competition for light and soil resources. Moderately disturbed stands showed forest maturation with low competition for light. Unlike previous studies, we found no evidence of a general degradation of cedar forests due to local human activities. However, cedar logging has reduced standing basal area regionally and one third of the sites may have vulnerable cedar populations due to pastoral activities and to

  14. Inhibitory synaptic drive patterns motoneuronal activity in rhythmic preparations of isolated thoracic ganglia in the stick insect.

    PubMed

    Büschges, A

    1998-02-09

    During active leg movements of an insect leg, the activity of the motoneuron pools of each individual leg joint is generated by the interaction between signals from central rhythm generating sources, peripheral signals as well as coordinating signals from other leg joints and legs. The nature of the synaptic drive from the central rhythm generators onto the motoneuron pools of the individual leg joints during rhythmic motor activity of the stick insect (Carausius morosus) middle leg has been investigated. In the isolated mesothoracic ganglion central rhythm generators were activated pharmacologically by topical application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. Motoneurons supplying the femur-tibia (FT) joint were investigated in detail. Recordings from neuropil processes of these motoneurons revealed that patterning of their rhythmic activity is based on cyclic hyperpolarizing synaptic inputs. These inputs are in clear antiphase for extensor and flexor motoneurons. DCC (discontinuous current clamp) and dSEVC (discontinuous single electrode voltage clamp) recordings showed reversal potentials of the inhibitory inputs between -80 to -85 mV (FETi, N=7; Flex MN, N=3). After intracellular injection of TEA rhythmic inhibition in FETi was decreased by about 84% (N=4). Both findings indicate that the cyclic inhibition is mediated by potassium ions. Thus, it appears that central rhythm generators pattern motor activity in antagonistic tibial motoneuron pools by cyclic alternating inhibition.

  15. Constitutively Active Lck Kinase in T Cells Drives Antigen Receptor Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Konstantina; Soldani, Cristiana; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Paster, Wolfgang; Gray, Adrian; Etzensperger, Ruth; Fugger, Lars; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Dushek, Omer; Höfer, Thomas; Viola, Antonella; Acuto, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    Summary T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and coreceptor ligation is thought to initiate signal transduction by inducing activation of the kinase Lck. Here we showed that catalytically active Lck was present in unstimulated naive T cells and thymocytes and was readily detectable in these cells in lymphoid organs. In naive T cells up to ∼40% of total Lck was constitutively activated, part of which was also phosphorylated on the C-terminal inhibitory site. Formation of activated Lck was independent of TCR and coreceptors but required Lck catalytic activity and its maintenance relied on monitoring by the HSP90-CDC37 chaperone complex to avoid degradation. The amount of activated Lck did not change after TCR and coreceptor engagement; however it determined the extent of TCR-ζ phosphorylation. Our findings suggest a dynamic regulation of Lck activity that can be promptly utilized to initiate T cell activation and have implications for signaling by other immune receptors. PMID:20541955

  16. Prediction of AMD generation potential in mining waste piles, in the Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit, Iran.

    PubMed

    Modabberi, Soroush; Alizadegan, Ali; Mirnejad, Hassan; Esmaeilzadeh, Esmat

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates the possibility of acid mine drainage (AMD) generation in active and derelict mine waste piles in Sarcheshmeh Copper Mine produced in several decades, using static tests including acid-base accounting (ABA) and net acid-generating pH (NAGpH). In this study, 51 composite samples were taken from 11 waste heaps, and static ABA and NAGpH tests were carried out on samples. While some piles are acid producing at present and AMD is discharging from the piles, most of them do not show any indication on their AMD potential, and they were investigated to define their acid-producing potential. The analysis of data indicates that eight waste piles are potentially acid generating with net neutralization potentials (NNPs) of -56.18 to -199.3, net acid generating of 2.19-3.31, and NPRs from 0.18 to 0.44. Other waste piles exhibited either a very low sulfur, high carbonate content or excess carbonate over sulfur; hence, they are not capable of acid production or they can be considered as weak acid producers. Consistency between results of ABA and NAGpH tests using a variety of classification criteria validates these tests as powerful means for preliminary evaluation of AMD/ARD possibilities in any mining district. It is also concluded that some of the piles with very negative NNPs are capable to produce AMD naturally, and they can be used in heap leaching process for economic recovery of trace amounts of metals without applying any biostimulation methods.

  17. Litter use by laying hens in a commercial aviary: dust bathing and piling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L M; Makagon, M M; Swanson, J C; Siegford, J M

    2016-01-01

    The laying hen industry, including in the United States, is responding to social concerns about hen welfare by implementing alternative housing systems such as the aviary, to provide more space and resources to large groups of hens. Data detailing the behavior of hens in commercial aviaries is needed to determine hens' use of the resources in order to understand their impact on hen welfare. The open litter area of aviaries provides additional space for hens during the day. Litter is also a substrate for dust bathing which is a strongly motivated natural behavior. Hens are often synchronous in their performance of dust bathing, which may lead to overcrowding in the litter area. Additionally, the open litter area can facilitate expression of unusual behavior such as flock piling (defined as the occurrence of densely grouped clusters of hens, resulting from no obvious cause and occurring randomly throughout the day and flock cycle) which may be a welfare concern. Therefore, we conducted observations of hen occupancy of the open litter area and the performance of dust bathing and flock piling across 3 production points (peak lay, mid lay and end of lay) for two flocks of Lohmann White laying hens housed in a commercial aviary. All areas of the open litter area were occupied to the same degree. Hens performed dust bathing throughout the day but showed peak dust bathing activity in the afternoon for Flock 1 (all P < 0.001) and in the late morning for Flock 2 (all P < 0.001). Overall, 174 incidents of piling behavior were observed between the 2 flocks, with piles varying in size, duration, and time of occurrence; however, no smothering was detected. Crowding on the open litter area sometimes occurred during peak periods of synchronous dust bathing and when hens piled. Further research is needed to understand the welfare implications of individual hen use of the open litter area and the causes and welfare implications of hen piling.

  18. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-04-19

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal.

  19. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal. PMID:27091106

  20. IKKβ Activity Drives Fetal Lung Macrophage Maturation Along a Non-M1/M2 Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Stouch, Ashley N.; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Barham, Whitney J.; Stinnett, Amanda M.; Slaughter, James C.; Yull, Fiona E.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Prince, Lawrence S.

    2014-01-01

    In preterm infants, exposure to inflammation increases the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic, developmental lung disease. While macrophages are the key cells that initiate lung inflammation, less is known about lung macrophage phenotype and maturation. We hypothesized that fetal lung macrophages mature into distinct subpopulations during mouse development, and that activation could influence macrophage maturation. Expression of the fetal macrophage markers CD68, CD86, CD206, Ym1, fibrinogen-like protein 2 (FGL2), and indolamine-2, 3-dioxygenase (Ido1) were developmentally regulated, with each marker having different temporal patterns. Flow cytometry analysis showed macrophages within the fetal lung were less diverse than the distinctly separate subpopulations in newborn and adult lungs. Similar to adult alveolar macrophages, fetal lung macrophages responded to the TLR4 agonist LPS and the alternative activation cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Using a macrophage-specific constitutively active IKKβ transgenic model (IKFM), we demonstrated that macrophage activation increased proinflammatory gene expression and reduced the response of fetal lung macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. Activation also increased fetal lung macrophage proliferation. Fetal IKFM lungs contained increased percentages of more mature, CD11bloF4/80hi cells that also expressed higher levels of the alternative activation markers CD204 and CD206. Development of fetal lung macrophages into mature alveolar macrophages may therefore include features of both proinflammatory and alternative activation paradigms. PMID:24981452

  1. CXCL13 drives spinal astrocyte activation and neuropathic pain via CXCR5.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bao-Chun; Cao, De-Li; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; He, Li-Na; Li, Chun-Hua; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Bo; Berta, Temugin; Ji, Ru-Rong; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have implicated chemokines in microglial activation and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13) is a B lymphocyte chemoattractant that activates CXCR5. Using the spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain, we found that CXCL13 was persistently upregulated in spinal cord neurons after SNL, resulting in spinal astrocyte activation via CXCR5 in mice. shRNA-mediated inhibition of CXCL13 in the spinal cord persistently attenuated SNL-induced neuropathic pain. Interestingly, CXCL13 expression was suppressed by miR-186-5p, a microRNA that colocalized with CXCL13 and was downregulated after SNL. Spinal overexpression of miR-186-5p decreased CXCL13 expression, alleviating neuropathic pain. Furthermore, SNL induced CXCR5 expression in spinal astrocytes, and neuropathic pain was abrogated in Cxcr5-/- mice. CXCR5 expression induced by SNL was required for the SNL-induced activation of spinal astrocytes and microglia. Intrathecal injection of CXCL13 was sufficient to induce pain hypersensitivity and astrocyte activation via CXCR5 and ERK. Finally, intrathecal injection of CXCL13-activated astrocytes induced mechanical allodynia in naive mice. Collectively, our findings reveal a neuronal/astrocytic interaction in the spinal cord by which neuronally produced CXCL13 activates astrocytes via CXCR5 to facilitate neuropathic pain. Thus, miR-186-5p and CXCL13/CXCR5-mediated astrocyte signaling may be suitable therapeutic targets for neuropathic pain.

  2. Polyhedron Modeling of Rubble-Pile Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on progress in modeling of asteroids as collections of rigid polyhedra ("rubble piles"). Such models are (idealized) candidates for asteroid structures: aggregates of irregular rocky subunits that are held together by self-gravity and friction. We have taken several steps toward greater realism and physical interest in construction of the models (although the gravitational fields are being treated in a simplified manner). -

  3. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  4. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-05-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells.

  5. The DEG/ENaC cation channel protein UNC-8 drives activity-dependent synapse removal in remodeling GABAergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Fleming, Tyne W; Petersen, Sarah C; Manning, Laura; Matthewman, Cristina; Gornet, Megan; Beers, Allison; Hori, Sayaka; Mitani, Shohei; Bianchi, Laura; Richmond, Janet; Miller, David M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic programming and neural activity drive synaptic remodeling in developing neural circuits, but the molecular components that link these pathways are poorly understood. Here we show that the C. elegans Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel (DEG/ENaC) protein, UNC-8, is transcriptionally controlled to function as a trigger in an activity-dependent mechanism that removes synapses in remodeling GABAergic neurons. UNC-8 cation channel activity promotes disassembly of presynaptic domains in DD type GABA neurons, but not in VD class GABA neurons where unc-8 expression is blocked by the COUP/TF transcription factor, UNC-55. We propose that the depolarizing effect of UNC-8-dependent sodium import elevates intracellular calcium in a positive feedback loop involving the voltage-gated calcium channel UNC-2 and the calcium-activated phosphatase TAX-6/calcineurin to initiate a caspase-dependent mechanism that disassembles the presynaptic apparatus. Thus, UNC-8 serves as a link between genetic and activity-dependent pathways that function together to promote the elimination of GABA synapses in remodeling neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14599.001 PMID:27403890

  6. Response of shallow geothermal energy pile from laboratory model tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marto, A.; Amaludin, A.

    2015-09-01

    In shallow geothermal energy pile systems, the thermal loads from the pile, transferred and stored in the soil will cause thermally induced settlement. This factor must be considered in the geotechnical design process to avoid unexpected hazards. Series of laboratory model tests were carried out to study the behaviour of energy piles installed in kaolin soil, subjected to thermal loads and a combination of axial and thermal loads (henceforth known as thermo-axial loads). Six tests which included two thermal load tests (35°C and 40°C) and four thermo-axial load tests (100 N and 200 N, combined with 35°C and 40°C thermal loads) were conducted. To simulate the behaviour of geothermal energy piles during its operation, the thermo-axial tests were carried out by applying an axial load to the model pile head, and a subsequent application of thermal load. The model soil was compacted at 90% maximum dry density and had an undrained shear strength of 37 kPa, thus classified as having a firm soil consistency. The behaviour of model pile, having the ultimate load capacity of 460 N, was monitored using a linear variable displacement transducer, load cell and wire thermocouple, to measure the pile head settlement, applied axial load and model pile temperature. The acquired data from this study was used to define the thermo-axial response characteristics of the energy pile model. In this study, the limiting settlement was defined as 10% of the model pile diameter. For thermal load tests, higher thermal loads induced higher values of thermal settlement. At 40°C thermal load an irreversible settlement was observed after the heating and cooling cycle was applied to the model pile. Meanwhile, the pile response to thermo-axial loads were attributed to soil consistency and the magnitude of both the axial and thermal loads applied to the pile. The higher the thermoaxial loads, the higher the settlements occurred. A slight hazard on the model pile was detected, since the settlement

  7. Neural correlates of episodic memory: associative memory and confidence drive hippocampus activations.

    PubMed

    Kuchinke, Lars; Fritzemeier, Steffen; Hofmann, Markus J; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2013-10-01

    The present study used a study-test recognition memory task to examine the brain regions engaged in episodic and associative memory processes. Participants evaluated on a six-point rating scale how confident they were on whether or not an item was presented in a previous study phase. Neural activations for high- and low-confidence decisions were examined in old and new items at two levels of between-item-associations. Items had different amounts of associations within the stimulus set, while associations were defined by co-occurrence statistics. The medial frontal gyrus, the posterior cingulate gyrus, the superior temporal gyrus and the right hippocampus revealed U-shaped activation functions with greater activations for high-confidence OLD and NEW decisions. This was independent of the associative memory manipulation, which suggests that not episodic memory, but rather processes related to confidence account for the activation in these brain regions. In contrast, left hippocampus followed a different activation pattern that was modulated by the amount of associations. This provides evidence for the role of the left hippocampus in associative memory.

  8. LOXL2 drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition via activation of IRE1-XBP1 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Eva P.; Eraso, Pilar; Mazón, María J.; Santos, Vanesa; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Cano, Amparo; Portillo, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a key process contributing to the aggressiveness of cancer cells. EMT is triggered by activation of different transcription factors collectively known as EMT-TFs. Different cellular cues and cell signalling networks activate EMT at transcriptional and posttranscriptional level in different biological and pathological situations. Among them, overexpression of LOXL2 (lysyl oxidase-like 2) induces EMT independent of its catalytic activity. Remarkably, perinuclear/cytoplasmic accumulation of LOXL2 is a poor prognosis marker of squamous cell carcinomas and is associated to basal breast cancer metastasis by mechanisms no yet fully understood. Here, we report that overexpression of LOXL2 promotes its accumulation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum where it interacts with HSPA5 leading to activation of the IRE1-XBP1 signalling pathway of the ER-stress response. LOXL2-dependent IRE1-XBP1 activation induces the expression of several EMT-TFs: SNAI1, SNAI2, ZEB2 and TCF3 that are direct transcriptional targets of XBP1. Remarkably, inhibition of IRE1 blocks LOXL2-dependent upregulation of EMT-TFs thus hindering EMT induction. PMID:28332555

  9. A spinal opsin controls early neural activity and drives a behavioral light response

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Drew; Hoagland, Adam; Berlin, Shai; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2014-01-01

    Non-visual detection of light by the vertebrate hypothalamus, pineal, and retina is known to govern seasonal and circadian behaviors [1]. However, the expression of opsins in multiple other brain structures [2–4] suggests a more expansive repertoire for light-regulation of physiology, behavior, and development. Translucent zebrafish embryos express extra-retinal opsins early on [5, 6], at a time when spontaneous activity in the developing central nervous system plays a role in neuronal maturation and circuit formation [7]. Though the presence of extra-retinal opsins is well documented, the function of direct photoreception by the central nervous system remains largely unknown. Here we show that early activity in the zebrafish spinal central pattern generator (CPG) and the earliest locomotory behavior are dramatically inhibited by physiological levels of environmental light. We find that the photo-sensitivity of this circuit is conferred by vertebrate ancient long opsin (VALopA), which we show to be a Gαi-coupled receptor that is expressed in the neurons of the spinal network. Sustained photo-activation of VALopA not only suppresses spontaneous activity but also alters the maturation of time-locked correlated network patterns. These results uncover a novel role for non-visual opsins and a mechanism for environmental regulation of spontaneous motor behavior and neural activity in a circuit previously thought to be governed only by intrinsic developmental programs. PMID:25484291

  10. Daytime spikes in dopaminergic activity drive rapid mood-cycling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sidor, Michelle M.; Spencer, Sade M.; Dzirasa, Kafui; Parekh, Puja K.; Tye, Kay M.; Warden, Melissa R.; Arey, Rachel N.; Enwright, John F; Jacobsen, Jacob PR; Kumar, Sunil; Remillard, Erin M; Caron, Marc G.; Deisseroth, Karl; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-01-01

    Disruptions in circadian rhythms and dopaminergic activity are involved in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, though their interaction remains unclear. Moreover, a lack of animal models that display spontaneous cycling between mood states has hindered our mechanistic understanding of mood switching. Here we find that mice with a mutation in the circadian Clock gene (ClockΔ19) exhibit rapid mood-cycling, with a profound manic-like phenotype emerging during the day following a period of euthymia at night. Mood cycling coincides with abnormal daytime spikes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopaminergic activity, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, and dopamine synthesis. To determine the significance of daytime increases in VTA dopamine activity to manic behaviors, we developed a novel optogenetic stimulation paradigm that produces a sustained increase in dopamine neuronal activity and find that this induces a manic-like behavioral state. Time-dependent dampening of TH activity during the day reverses manic-related behaviours in ClockΔ19 mice. Finally, we show that CLOCK acts as a negative regulator of TH transcription, revealing a novel molecular mechanism underlying cyclic changes in mood-related behaviour. Taken together, these studies have identified a mechanistic connection between circadian gene disruption and the precipitation of manic episodes in bipolar disorder. PMID:25560763

  11. Persistent activation of microglia and NADPH drive hippocampal dysfunction in experimental multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, Massimiliano; de Iure, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Mancini, Andrea; Costa, Cinzia; Sarchielli, Paola; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Unfortunately, the synaptic and molecular mechanisms underlying MS-associated cognitive dysfunction are largely unknown. We explored the presence and the underlying mechanism of cognitive and synaptic hippocampal dysfunction during the remission phase of experimental MS. Experiments were performed in a chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, after the resolution of motor deficits. Immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings were performed in the CA1 hippocampal area. The hole-board was utilized as cognitive/behavioural test. In the remission phase of experimental MS, hippocampal microglial cells showed signs of activation, CA1 hippocampal synapses presented an impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and an alteration of spatial tests became evident. The activation of hippocampal microglia mediated synaptic and cognitive/behavioural alterations during EAE. Specifically, LTP blockade was found to be caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We suggest that in the remission phase of experimental MS microglia remains activated, causing synaptic dysfunctions mediated by NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of microglial activation and NADPH oxidase may represent a promising strategy to prevent neuroplasticity impairment associated with active neuro-inflammation, with the aim to improve cognition and counteract MS disease progression. PMID:26887636

  12. Minifilament Eruptions that Drive Coronal Jets in a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David; Panesar, Navdeep; Akiyama, Sachiko; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2016-05-01

    Solar coronal jets are common in both coronal holes and in active regions. Recently, Sterling et al. (2015), using data from Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA, found that coronal jets originating in polar coronal holes result from the eruption of small-scale filaments (minifilaments). The jet bright point (JBP) seen in X-rays and hotter EUV channels off to one side of the base of the jet's spire develops at the location where the minifilament erupts, consistent with the JBPs being miniature versions of typical solar flares that occur in the wake of large-scale filament eruptions. Here we consider whether active region coronal jets also result from the same minifilament-eruption mechanism, or whether they instead result from a different mechanism, such as the hitherto popular ``emerging flux'' model for jets. We present observations of an on-disk active region that produced numerous jets on 2012 June 30, using data from SDO/AIA and HMI, and from GOES/SXI. We find that several of these active region jets also originate with eruptions of miniature filaments (size scale ~20'') emanating from small-scale magnetic neutral lines of the region. This demonstrates that active region coronal jets are indeed frequently driven by minifilament eruptions. Other jets from the active region were also consistent with their drivers being minifilament eruptions, but we could not confirm this because the onsets of those jets were hidden from our view. This work was supported by funding from NASA/LWS, NASA/HGI, and Hinode.

  13. Chromatin recruitment of activated AMPK drives fasting response genes co-controlled by GR and PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Ratman, Dariusz; Mylka, Viacheslav; Bougarne, Nadia; Pawlak, Michal; Caron, Sandrine; Hennuyer, Nathalie; Paumelle, Réjane; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Rider, Mark H.; Libert, Claude; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; Staels, Bart; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to fasting involves both Glucocorticoid Receptor (GRα) and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) activation. Given both receptors can physically interact we investigated the possibility of a genome-wide cross-talk between activated GR and PPARα, using ChIP- and RNA-seq in primary hepatocytes. Our data reveal extensive chromatin co-localization of both factors with cooperative induction of genes controlling lipid/glucose metabolism. Key GR/PPAR co-controlled genes switched from transcriptional antagonism to cooperativity when moving from short to prolonged hepatocyte fasting, a phenomenon coinciding with gene promoter recruitment of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and blocked by its pharmacological inhibition. In vitro interaction studies support trimeric complex formation between GR, PPARα and phospho-AMPK. Long-term fasting in mice showed enhanced phosphorylation of liver AMPK and GRα Ser211. Phospho-AMPK chromatin recruitment at liver target genes, observed upon prolonged fasting in mice, is dampened by refeeding. Taken together, our results identify phospho-AMPK as a molecular switch able to cooperate with nuclear receptors at the chromatin level and reveal a novel adaptation mechanism to prolonged fasting. PMID:27576532

  14. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  15. What drives centuries-long polygenetic scoria cone activity at Barren Island volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu

    2014-12-01

    Barren Island in the Andaman Sea is an active mafic stratovolcano, which had explosive and effusive eruptions, followed by caldera formation, in prehistoric time (poorly dated). A scoria cone within the caldera, marking volcanic resurgence, was active periodically from 1787 to 1832 (the historic eruptions). Since 1991, the same scoria cone has produced six eruptions, commonly including lava flows. Links between Barren Island's eruptions and giant earthquakes (such as the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra megathrust earthquake) have been suggested, though there is no general correlation between them. The ≥ 227-year-long activity of the scoria cone, named here Shanku ("cone"), is normally driven by purely magmatic processes. I present a "source to surface" model for Barren Island and Shanku, including the source region, deeper and shallow magma chambers, volcanotectonics, dyking from magma chambers, and eruptions and eruptive style as controlled by crustal stresses, composition and volatile content. Calculations show that dykes ~ 0.5 m thick and a few hundred meters long, originating from shallow-level magma chambers (~ 5 km deep), are suitable feeders of the Shanku eruptions. Shanku, a polygenetic scoria cone (at least 13 eruptions since 1787), has three excellent analogues, namely Anak Krakatau (40 eruptions since 1927), Cerro Negro (23 eruptions since 1850), and Yasur (persistent activity for the past hundreds of years). This is an important category of volcanoes, gradational between small "monogenetic" scoria cones and larger "polygenetic" volcanoes.

  16. Conversion of abiraterone to D4A drives anti-tumour activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenfei; Bishop, Andrew C; Alyamani, Mohammad; Garcia, Jorge A; Dreicer, Robert; Bunch, Dustin; Liu, Jiayan; Upadhyay, Sunil K; Auchus, Richard J; Sharifi, Nima

    2015-07-16

    Prostate cancer resistance to castration occurs because tumours acquire the metabolic capability of converting precursor steroids to 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), promoting signalling by the androgen receptor and the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Essential for resistance, DHT synthesis from adrenal precursor steroids or possibly from de novo synthesis from cholesterol commonly requires enzymatic reactions by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD), steroid-5α-reductase (SRD5A) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17βHSD) isoenzymes. Abiraterone, a steroidal 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) inhibitor, blocks this synthetic process and prolongs survival. We hypothesized that abiraterone is converted by an enzyme to the more active Δ(4)-abiraterone (D4A), which blocks multiple steroidogenic enzymes and antagonizes the androgen receptor, providing an additional explanation for abiraterone's clinical activity. Here we show that abiraterone is converted to D4A in mice and patients with prostate cancer. D4A inhibits CYP17A1, 3βHSD and SRD5A, which are required for DHT synthesis. Furthermore, competitive androgen receptor antagonism by D4A is comparable to the potent antagonist enzalutamide. D4A also has more potent anti-tumour activity against xenograft tumours than abiraterone. Our findings suggest an additional explanation-conversion to a more active agent-for abiraterone's survival extension. We propose that direct treatment with D4A would be more clinically effective than abiraterone treatment.

  17. The IL-1 receptor and Rho directly associate to drive cell activation in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R.; Wang, B.; Shirvaikar, A.; Khan, S.; Kamat, S.; Schelling, J.R.; Konieczkowski, M.; Sedor, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    IL-1–stimulated mesenchymal cells model molecular mechanisms of inflammation. Binding of IL-1 to the type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) clusters a multi-subunit signaling complex at focal adhesion complexes. Since Rho family GTPases coordinately organize actin cytoskeleton and signaling to regulate cell phenotype, we hypothesized that the IL-1R signaling complex contained these G proteins. IL-1 stimulated actin stress fiber formation in serum-starved HeLa cells in a Rho-dependent manner and rapidly activated nucleotide exchange on RhoA. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, containing either the full-length IL-1R cytosolic domain (GST-IL-1Rcd) or the terminal 68 amino acids of IL-1R required for IL-1–dependent signal transduction, specifically coprecipitated both RhoA and Rac-1, but not p21ras, from Triton-soluble HeLa cell extracts. In whole cells, a small-molecular-weight G protein coimmunoprecipitated by anti–IL-1R antibody was a substrate for C3 transferase, which specifically ADP-ribosylates Rho GTPases. Constitutively activated RhoA, loaded with [γ-32P]GTP, directly interacted with GST-IL-1Rcd in a filter-binding assay. The IL-1Rcd-RhoA interaction was functionally important, since a dominant inhibitory mutant of RhoA prevented IL-1Rcd–directed transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene. Consistent with our previous data demonstrating that IL-1R–associated myelin basic protein (MBP) kinases are necessary for IL-1–directed gene expression, cellular incorporation of C3 transferase inhibited IL-1R–associated MBP kinase activity both in solution and in gel kinase assays. In summary, IL-1 activated RhoA, which was physically associated with IL-1Rcd and necessary for activation of cytosolic nuclear signaling pathways. These findings suggest that IL-1–stimulated, Rho-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization may cluster signaling molecules in specific architectures that are necessary for persistent cell activation in chronic inflammatory disease

  18. NADPH oxidase and aging drive microglial activation, oxidative stress, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration following systemic LPS administration.

    PubMed

    Qin, Liya; Liu, Yuxin; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Crews, Fulton T

    2013-06-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive degeneration of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic neurons with age. We previously found that a single systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) injection caused a slow progressive loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH+IR) neurons in SN associated with increasing motor dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in inflammation-mediated SN neurotoxicity. A comparison of control (NOX2(+/+) ) mice with NOX subunit gp91(phox) -deficient (NOX2(-/-) ) mice 10 months after LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a 39% (P < 0.01) loss of TH+IR neurons in NOX2(+/+) mice, whereas NOX2(-/-) mice did not show a significant decrease. Microglia (Iba1+IR) showed morphological activation in NOX2(+/+) mice, but not in NOX2(-/-) mice at 1 hr. Treatment of NOX2(+/+) mice with LPS resulted in a 12-fold increase in NOX2 mRNA in midbrain and 5.5-6.5-fold increases in NOX2 protein (+IR) in SN compared with the saline controls. Brain reactive oxygen species (ROS), determined using diphenyliodonium histochemistry, was increased by LPS in SN between 1 hr and 20 months. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), an NOX inhibitor, blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia and production of ROS, TNFα, IL-1β, and MCP-1. Although LPS increased microglial activation and ROS at all ages studied, saline control NOX2(+/+) mice showed age-related increases in microglial activation, NOX, and ROS levels at 12 and 22 months of age. Together, these results suggest that NOX contributes to persistent microglial activation, ROS production, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration that persist and continue to increase with age.

  19. NADPH oxidase and aging drive microglial activation, oxidative stress and dopaminergic neurodegeneration following systemic LPS administration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Liya; Liu, Yuxin; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Crews, Fulton T.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by a progressive degeneration of substantia nigra (SN) dopaminergic neurons with age. We previously found that a single systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg, i.p.) injection caused a slow progressive loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (TH+IR) neurons in SN associated with increasing motor dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in inflammation-mediated SN neurotoxicity. A comparison of control (NOX2+/+) mice with NOX subunit gp91phox-deficient (NOX2−/−) mice 10 months after LPS administration (5 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a 39% (p<0.01) loss of TH+IR neurons in NOX2+/+ mice, whereas, NOX2−/− mice did not show a significant decrease. Microglia (Iba1+IR) showed morphological activation in NOX2+/+ mice, but not in NOX2−/− mice at 1 hour. Treatment of NOX2+/+ mice with LPS resulted in a 12 fold increase in NOX2 mRNA in midbrain and 5.5–6.5 fold increases in NOX2 protein (+IR) in SN compared to the saline controls. Brain reactive oxygen species (ROS), determined by hydroethidine histochemistry, was increased by LPS in SN between 1 hour and 20 months. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), a NOX inhibitor, blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia and production of ROS, TNFα, IL-1β, and MCP-1. Although LPS increased microglial activation and ROS at all ages studied, saline control NOX2+/+ mice showed age-related increases in microglial activation, NOX and ROS levels at 12 and 22 months of age. Together, these results suggest that NOX contributes to persistent microglial activation, ROS production and dopaminergic neurodegeneration that persist and continue to increase with age. PMID:23536230

  20. Task-induced brain activity in aphasic stroke patients: what is driving recovery?

    PubMed

    Geranmayeh, Fatemeh; Brownsett, Sonia L E; Wise, Richard J S

    2014-10-01

    The estimated prevalence of aphasia in the UK and the USA is 250 000 and 1 000 000, respectively. The commonest aetiology is stroke. The impairment may improve with behavioural therapy, and trials using cortical stimulation or pharmacotherapy are undergoing proof-of-principle investigation, but with mixed results. Aphasia is a heterogeneous syndrome, and the simple classifications according to the Broca-Wernicke-Lichtheim model inadequately describe the diverse communication difficulties with which patients may present. Greater knowledge of how intact neural networks promote recovery after aphasic stroke, either spontaneously or in response to interventions, will result in clearer hypotheses about how to improve the treatment of aphasia. Twenty-five years ago, a pioneering study on healthy participants heralded the introduction of functional neuroimaging to the study of mechanisms of recovery from aphasia. Over the ensuing decades, such studies have been interpreted as supporting one of three hypotheses, which are not mutually exclusive. The first two predate the introduction of functional neuroimaging: that recovery is the consequence of the reconstitution of domain-specific language systems in tissue around the lesion (the 'perilesional' hypothesis), or by homotopic cortex in the contralateral hemisphere (the 'laterality-shift' hypothesis). The third is that loss of transcallosal inhibition to contralateral homotopic cortex hinders recovery (the 'disinhibition' hypothesis). These different hypotheses at times give conflicting views about rehabilitative intervention; for example, should one attempt to activate or inhibit a contralateral homotopic region with cortical stimulation techniques to promote recovery? This review proposes that although the functional imaging data are statistically valid in most cases, their interpretation has often favoured one explanation while ignoring plausible alternatives. In our view, this is particularly evident when recovery is

  1. Conversion of abiraterone to D4A drives antitumor activity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenfei; Bishop, Andrew; Alyamani, Mohammad; Garcia, Jorge A.; Dreicer, Robert; Bunch, Dustin; Liu, Jiayan; Upadhyay, Sunil K.; Auchus, Richard J.; Sharifi, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Summary Prostate cancer resistance to castration occurs because tumors acquire the metabolic capability of converting precursor steroids to 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), promoting signaling by the androgen receptor (AR) and the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC)1–3. Essential for resistance, DHT synthesis from adrenal precursor steroids or possibly from de novo synthesis from cholesterol commonly require enzymatic reactions by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD), steroid-5α-reductase (SRD5A) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17βHSD) isoenzymes4,5. Abiraterone, a steroidal 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) inhibitor, blocks this synthetic process and prolongs survival6,7. We hypothesized that abiraterone is converted by an enzyme to the more active Δ4-abiraterone (D4A) that blocks multiple steroidogenic enzymes and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), providing an additional explanation for abiraterone’s clinical activity. Here we show that abiraterone is converted to D4A in mice and patients with prostate cancer. D4A inhibits CYP17A1, 3βHSD and SRD5A, which are required for DHT synthesis. Furthermore, competitive AR antagonism by D4A is comparable to the potent antagonist, enzalutamide. D4A also has more potent antitumor activity against xenograft tumors than abiraterone. Our findings suggest an additional explanation – conversion to a more active agent – for abiraterone’s survival extension. We propose that direct treatment with D4A would be more clinically effective than abiraterone treatment. PMID:26030522

  2. An Exploratory Simulator Study on the Use of Active Control Devices in Car Driving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-04

    system to the driver and therefore concurrently serve as a proprioceptive -tactual display (RPihmann, 1981). The term "tactual" is used in the meaning of...displayed proprioceptive -tactual cues (see common coding approach in information processing, Prinz, 1990). The control loop for an active control...KlMckner & St6cker; 1990). In its present form the accelerator hardly pvrode- any systematic proprioceptive - tactual feedback to the driver abot.t the

  3. Exhalation of (222)Rn from phosphogypsum piles located at the Southwest of Spain.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, C; Liger, E; Cañete, S; Pérez, M; Bolívar, J P

    2007-01-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste product of the phosphoric acid production process and contains, generally, high activity concentrations of uranium series radionuclides. It is stored in piles formed over the last 40 years close to the town of Huelva (Southwest of Spain). The very broad expanse of the PG piles (about 1200 ha) produces a local, but unambiguous, radioactive impact to their surroundings. In 1992, the regional government of Andalusia restored an area of 400 ha by covering it with a 25-cm thick layer of natural soil and, currently, there is an additional zone of 400 ha in course of restoration (unrestored) and the same area of active PG stacks. Due to the high activity concentration of (226)Ra in active PG stacks (average 647 Bq kg(-1)), a significant exhalation of (222)Rn could be produced from the surface of the piles. Measurements have been made of (222)Rn exhalation from active PG stacks and from restored and unrestored zones. The (222)Rn exhalation from unrestored zones is half of that of the active PG stacks. Following restoration, the (222)Rn exhalation is approximately eight times lower than the active PG stacks. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (40)K, (232)Th) in the mentioned zones have been determined. This study was also conducted to determine the effect of (226)Ra activity concentration on the (222)Rn exhalation, and a good correlation was obtained between the (222)Rn exhalation and (226)Ra activity, porosity and density of soil.

  4. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  5. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Mårten C.G.; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N.; Boxer, Lisa M.; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K.; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W.; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Nguyen, Ngon T.; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A.; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A.; Marinkovich, M. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions. PMID:27294528

  6. F-actin polymerization and retrograde flow drive sustained PLCγ1 signaling during T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Babich, Alexander; Li, Shuixing; O'Connor, Roddy S.; Milone, Michael C.; Freedman, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of T cells by antigen-presenting cells involves assembly of signaling molecules into dynamic microclusters (MCs) within a specialized membrane domain termed the immunological synapse (IS). Actin and myosin IIA localize to the IS, and depletion of F-actin abrogates MC movement and T cell activation. However, the mechanisms that coordinate actomyosin dynamics and T cell receptor signaling are poorly understood. Using pharmacological inhibitors that perturb individual aspects of actomyosin dynamics without disassembling the network, we demonstrate that F-actin polymerization is the primary driver of actin retrograde flow, whereas myosin IIA promotes long-term integrity of the IS. Disruption of F-actin retrograde flow, but not myosin IIA contraction, arrested MC centralization and inhibited sustained Ca2+ signaling at the level of endoplasmic reticulum store release. Furthermore, perturbation of retrograde flow inhibited PLCγ1 phosphorylation within MCs but left Zap70 activity intact. These studies highlight the importance of ongoing actin polymerization as a central driver of actomyosin retrograde flow, MC centralization, and sustained Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22665519

  7. Damage Identification of Piles Based on Vibration Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaozhong; Yao, Wenjuan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    A method of damage identification of piles was established by using vibration characteristics. The approach focused on the application of the element strain energy and sensitive modals. A damage identification equation of piles was deduced using the structural vibration equation. The equation contained three major factors: change rate of element modal strain energy, damage factor of pile, and sensitivity factor of modal damage. The sensitive modals of damage identification were selected by using sensitivity factor of modal damage firstly. Subsequently, the indexes for early-warning of pile damage were established by applying the change rate of strain energy. Then the technology of computational analysis of wavelet transform was used to damage identification for pile. The identification of small damage of pile was completely achieved, including the location of damage and the extent of damage. In the process of identifying the extent of damage of pile, the equation of damage identification was used in many times. Finally, a stadium project was used as an example to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method of damage identification for piles. The correctness and practicability of the proposed method were verified by comparing the results of damage identification with that of low strain test. The research provided a new way for damage identification of piles. PMID:25506062

  8. Reducing Local Scouring at Bridge Piles Using Collars and Geobags

    PubMed Central

    Akib, Shatirah; Liana Mamat, Noor; Basser, Hossein; Jahangirzadeh, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the use of collars and geobags for reducing local scour around bridge piles. The efficiency of collars and geobags was studied experimentally. The data from the experiments were compared with data from earlier studies on the use of single piles with a collar and with a geobag. The results showed that using a combination of a steel collar and a geobag yields the most significant scour reduction for the front and rear piles, respectively. Moreover, the independent steel collar showed better efficiency than the independent geobag below the sediment level around the bridge piles. PMID:25247201

  9. Driving reactions: Surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry using hydroxide melts and RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Todd Lawrence

    1997-11-01

    This thesis explores several techniques for surmounting activation barriers in solid state chemistry. The two major issues addressed are the use of a solution-based molten hydroxide system to increase the rate of reactant diffusion over that in the solid state, and the use of an RF plasma to break bonds in gaseous reactants for subsequent reaction with a solid. Part I describes the use of molten alkali metal hydroxides as a low-temperature solvent system for both electrodeposition and precipitation of high valent copper oxides. Cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the effects of various reaction conditions on copper dissolved in the melts, including copper activity, temperature, and atmosphere composition. The results of this study indicate that copper oxide phases become less soluble at higher copper activities, temperatures, and pHsb2O values. Also, the Cu(II)/Cu(III) redox wave, important for the electrodeposition of cuprate phases with high copper formal oxidation states, is observed below 300sp°C in air and at 350sp°C in dry argon. NaCuOsb2 was electrodeposited under constant current conditions. Iodometric titrations and annealing studies indicate that NaCuOsb2 is oxygen deficient and tends to lose additional oxygen on heating. The hydroxide method was also successful in the deposition of thin films of superconducting EuBasb2Cusb4Osb8 on SrTiOsb3 substrates. The films were found to be superconducting with a Tsbc of 75 K in the absence of annealing. In Part II, the idea of circumventing activation energy barriers is applied to the problem of environmentally harmful perfluorocarbons (PFCs). Mass spectrometry was used to determine the PFC emissions from two semiconductor manufacturing processes: oxide etch and post-CVD chamber clean. Because of radical recombination to thermodynamically stable species, most of the PFCs used in these processes are emitted to the atmosphere. A prototype abatement device which uses an RF plasma to provide the activation energy

  10. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... the road Your hands on the wheel Your mind on driving Distracted driving occurs when something gets in the way of you doing all 3 things. Examples include: Talking on a cell phone Reading or sending text messages Eating and drinking Grooming ( ...

  11. Perceived social pressures and the internalization of the mesomorphic ideal: The role of drive for muscularity and autonomy in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Christian; Tod, David; Molnar, Gyozo; Markland, David

    2016-03-01

    We examined if there were both direct and indirect relationships (via the drive for muscularity) between the perceived pressure to be muscular and internalization of the mesomorphic ideal, and if autonomy moderates these relationships in physically active men. A sample of 330 men, who were undergraduate students studying sport, completed the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, the Mesomorphic Ideal Internalization subscale of the revised male version Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire, the Perceived Sociocultural Pressure Scale-Modified, and the Drive for Muscularity Scale Attitudes subscale. Perceived pressure predicted internalization directly, and indirectly through the drive for muscularity. The direct relationship between pressure and internalization was weaker under higher levels of autonomy. The indirect path, via drive for muscularity, was stronger under higher levels of autonomy. These results provide insights into why men vary in the degree to which they internalize pressure to develop a mesomorphic ideal, supporting further examination of autonomy.

  12. Chemogenetic Activation of ipRGCs Drives Changes in Dark-Adapted (Scotopic) Electroretinogram

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Nina; Allen, Annette E.; Cehajic-Kapetanovic, Jasmina; Lucas, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of activating melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) on dark-adapted (scotopic) electroretinograms (ERG). Methods We used mice (Opn4Cre/+) expressing cre recombinase in melanopsin-expressing cells for a targeted gene delivery of a chemogenetic Gq-coupled receptor, hM3Dq, to ipRGCs. Intraperitoneal injection of clozapine N-oxide (CNO) at 5 mg/kg was used for acute activation of hM3Dq and thus excitation of ipRGCs in darkness. Dark-adapted flash ERGs were recorded across a 9-fold range of irradiances from hM3Dq Opn4Cre/+ and control Opn4Cre/+ mice before and after intraperitoneal injection of CNO. A- and b-wave amplitudes and implicit times and oscillatory potentials (OPs) were analyzed. Paired-flash stimuli were used to isolate cone-driven responses. Results Clozapine N-oxide application suppressed a- and b-wave amplitudes of the dark-adapted ERG across the flash intensity range in hM3Dq Opn4Cre/+ mice compared to control mice. Examination of the normalized irradiance-response functions revealed a shift in b-wave but not a-wave sensitivity. No changes in a- and b-wave implicit times were detected. Total OP amplitudes were also reduced in hM3Dq Opn4Cre/+ mice compared to controls following CNO administration. The paired-flash method revealed reduction in both the first (rods and cones) and second (cones only) flash response. Conclusions Acute and selective activation of ipRGCs modulates the amplitude of both a- and b-waves of the scotopic ERG, indicating that the influence of this ganglion cell class on the retinal physiology extends to the photoreceptors as well as their downstream pathways. PMID:27893096

  13. CCL2 Mediates Neuron-Macrophage Interactions to Drive Proregenerative Macrophage Activation Following Preconditioning Injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Jung; Shin, Hae Young; Cui, Yuexian; Kim, Hyosil; Thi, Anh Hong Le; Choi, Jun Young; Kim, Eun Young; Hwang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Byung Gon

    2015-12-02

    CNS neurons in adult mammals do not spontaneously regenerate axons after spinal cord injury. Preconditioning peripheral nerve injury allows the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory axons to regenerate beyond the injury site by promoting expression of regeneration-associated genes. We have previously shown that peripheral nerve injury increases the number of macrophages in the DRGs and that the activated macrophages are critical to the enhancement of intrinsic regeneration capacity. The present study identifies a novel chemokine signal mediated by CCL2 that links regenerating neurons with proregenerative macrophage activation. Neutralization of CCL2 abolished the neurite outgrowth activity of conditioned medium obtained from neuron-macrophage cocultures treated with cAMP. The neuron-macrophage interactions that produced outgrowth-promoting conditioned medium required CCL2 in neurons and CCR2/CCR4 in macrophages. The conditioning effects were abolished in CCL2-deficient mice at 3 and 7 d after sciatic nerve injury, but CCL2 was dispensable for the initial growth response and upregulation of GAP-43 at the 1 d time point. Intraganglionic injection of CCL2 mimicked conditioning injury by mobilizing M2-like macrophages. Finally, overexpression of CCL2 in DRGs promoted sensory axon regeneration in a rat spinal cord injury model without harmful side effects. Our data suggest that CCL2-mediated neuron-macrophage interaction plays a critical role for amplification and maintenance of enhanced regenerative capacity by preconditioning peripheral nerve injury. Manipulation of chemokine signaling mediating neuron-macrophage interactions may represent a novel therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.

  14. Active Nerve Regeneration with Failed Target Reinnervation Drives Persistent Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral nerves can regenerate and, when injured, may cause neuropathic pain. We propose that the active regeneration process plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. In one commonly used rodent neuropathic pain model, pronounced pain behaviors follow ligation and cutting of the L5 spinal nerve. We found that the injured nerve regenerates into the sciatic nerve and functionally reinnervates target tissues: the regenerated nerve conducts electrical signals, mechanical responses, and tracers between the leg/hindpaw and axotomized sensory ganglion. The regenerating nerve is the primary source of abnormal spontaneous activity detected in vivo. Disrupting the regeneration inhibited pain. First, semaphorin 3A, an inhibitory axonal guidance molecule, reduced functional regeneration, spontaneous activity, and pain behaviors when applied to the injury site in vivo. Second, knockdown of the upregulated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) with siRNA injected into the axotomized sensory ganglion reduced pain behaviors. We next examined the spared nerve injury model, in which pain behaviors are essentially permanent. The regeneration resulted in tangled GAP43-positive neuromas at the nerve injury site without target reinnervation. Perfusing the nerve stump with semaphorin 3A, but not removing the tangled fibers, prevented or reversed pain behaviors. This effect far outlasted the semaphorin 3A perfusion. Hence, in this model the long-lasting chronic pain may reflect the anatomical inability of regenerating nerves to successfully reinnervate target tissues, resulting in an ongoing futile regeneration process. We propose that specifically targeting the regeneration process may provide effective long-lasting pain relief in patients when functional reinnervation becomes impossible. PMID:28197545

  15. Small surfactant-like peptides can drive soluble proteins into active aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inactive protein inclusion bodies occur commonly in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells expressing heterologous proteins. Previously several independent groups have found that active protein aggregates or pseudo inclusion bodies can be induced by a fusion partner such as a cellulose binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans (CBDclos) when expressed in E. coli. More recently we further showed that a short amphipathic helical octadecapeptide 18A (EWLKAFYEKVLEKLKELF) and a short beta structure peptide ELK16 (LELELKLKLELELKLK) have a similar property. Results In this work, we explored a third type of peptides, surfactant-like peptides, for performing such a "pulling-down" function. One or more of three such peptides (L6KD, L6K2, DKL6) were fused to the carboxyl termini of model proteins including Aspergillus fumigatus amadoriase II (AMA, all three peptides were used), Bacillus subtilis lipase A (LipA, only L6KD was used, hereinafter the same), Bacillus pumilus xylosidase (XynB), and green fluorescent protein (GFP), and expressed in E. coli. All fusions were found to predominantly accumulate in the insoluble fractions, with specific activities ranging from 25% to 92% of the native counterparts. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses confirmed the formation of protein aggregates in the cell. Furthermore, binding assays with amyloid-specific dyes (thioflavin T and Cong red) to the AMA-L6KD aggregate and the TEM analysis of the aggregate following digestion with protease K suggested that the AMA-L6KD aggregate may contain structures reminiscent of amyloids, including a fibril-like structure core. Conclusions This study shows that the surfactant-like peptides L6KD and it derivatives can act as a pull-down handler for converting soluble proteins into active aggregates, much like 18A and ELK16. These peptide-mediated protein aggregations might have important implications for protein aggregation in vivo, and can be

  16. Interleukin-33 drives activation of alveolar macrophages and airway inflammation in a mouse model of acute exacerbation of chronic asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Melissa M; Shadie, Alexander M; Flesher, Rylie P; Nikiforova, Valentina; Garthwaite, Linda; Tedla, Nicodemus; Herbert, Cristan; Kumar, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of interleukin-33 (IL-33) in airway inflammation in an experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, which reproduces many of the features of the human disease. Systemically sensitized female BALB/c mice were challenged with a low mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks to induce chronic asthmatic inflammation and then received a single moderate-level challenge to trigger acute airway inflammation simulating an asthmatic exacerbation. The inflammatory response and expression of cytokines and activation markers by alveolar macrophages (AM) were assessed, as was the effect of pretreatment with a neutralizing antibody to IL-33. Compared to chronically challenged mice, AM from an acute exacerbation exhibited significantly enhanced expression of markers of alternative activation, together with enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and of cell surface proteins associated with antigen presentation. In parallel, there was markedly increased expression of both mRNA and immunoreactivity for IL-33 in the airways. Neutralization of IL-33 significantly decreased both airway inflammation and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines by AM. Collectively, these data indicate that in this model of an acute exacerbation of chronic asthma, IL-33 drives activation of AM and has an important role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammation.

  17. SIGMAR1 Regulates Membrane Electrical Activity in Response to Extracellular Matrix Stimulation to Drive Cancer Cell Invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Rapetti-Mauss, Raphael; Alcaraz-Perez, Francisca; Tichet, Mélanie; Gariano, Giuseppina; Martial, Sonia; Guizouarn, Hélène; Pellissier, Bernard; Loubat, Agnès; Popa, Alexandra; Paquet, Agnès; Presta, Marco; Tartare-Deckert, Sophie; Cayuela, Maria Luisa; Martin, Patrick; Borgese, Franck; Soriani, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The sigma 1 receptor (Sig1R) is a stress-activated chaperone that regulates ion channels and is associated with pathologic conditions, such as stroke, neurodegenerative diseases, and addiction. Aberrant expression levels of ion channels and Sig1R have been detected in tumors and cancer cells, such as myeloid leukemia and colorectal cancer, but the link between ion channel regulation and Sig1R overexpression during malignancy has not been established. In this study, we found that Sig1R dynamically controls the membrane expression of the human voltage-dependent K(+) channel human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG) in myeloid leukemia and colorectal cancer cell lines. Sig1R promoted the formation of hERG/β1-integrin signaling complexes upon extracellular matrix stimulation, triggering the activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Consequently, the presence of Sig1R in cancer cells increased motility and VEGF secretion. In vivo, Sig1R expression enhanced the aggressiveness of tumor cells by potentiating invasion and angiogenesis, leading to poor survival. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel function for Sig1R in mediating cross-talk between cancer cells and their microenvironment, thus driving oncogenesis by shaping cellular electrical activity in response to extracellular signals. Given the involvement of ion channels in promoting several hallmarks of cancer, our study also offers a potential strategy to therapeutically target ion channel function through Sig1R inhibition.

  18. PPFIA1 drives active α5β1 integrin recycling and controls fibronectin fibrillogenesis and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mana, Giulia; Clapero, Fabiana; Panieri, Emiliano; Panero, Valentina; Böttcher, Ralph T.; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Saltarin, Federico; Astanina, Elena; Wolanska, Katarzyna I.; Morgan, Mark R.; Humphries, Martin J.; Santoro, Massimo M.; Serini, Guido; Valdembri, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Basolateral polymerization of cellular fibronectin (FN) into a meshwork drives endothelial cell (EC) polarity and vascular remodelling. However, mechanisms coordinating α5β1 integrin-mediated extracellular FN endocytosis and exocytosis of newly synthesized FN remain elusive. Here we show that, on Rab21-elicited internalization, FN-bound/active α5β1 is recycled to the EC surface. We identify a pathway, comprising the regulators of post-Golgi carrier formation PI4KB and AP-1A, the small GTPase Rab11B, the surface tyrosine phosphatase receptor PTPRF and its adaptor PPFIA1, which we propose acts as a funnel combining FN secretion and recycling of active α5β1 integrin from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the EC surface, thus allowing FN fibrillogenesis. In this framework, PPFIA1 interacts with active α5β1 integrin and localizes close to EC adhesions where post-Golgi carriers are targeted. We show that PPFIA1 is required for FN polymerization-dependent vascular morphogenesis, both in vitro and in the developing zebrafish embryo. PMID:27876801

  19. Thalamocortical Connections Drive Intracortical Activation of Functional Columns in the Mislaminated Reeler Somatosensory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Robin J; Witte, Mirko; Guy, Julien; Mingo-Moreno, Nieves; Kügler, Sebastian; Staiger, Jochen F

    2016-02-01

    Neuronal wiring is key to proper neural information processing. Tactile information from the rodent's whiskers reaches the cortex via distinct anatomical pathways. The lemniscal pathway relays whisking and touch information from the ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus to layer IV of the primary somatosensory "barrel" cortex. The disorganized neocortex of the reeler mouse is a model system that should severely compromise the ingrowth of thalamocortical axons (TCAs) into the cortex. Moreover, it could disrupt intracortical wiring. We found that neuronal intermingling within the reeler barrel cortex substantially exceeded previous descriptions, leading to the loss of layers. However, viral tracing revealed that TCAs still specifically targeted transgenically labeled spiny layer IV neurons. Slice electrophysiology and optogenetics proved that these connections represent functional synapses. In addition, we assessed intracortical activation via immediate-early-gene expression resulting from a behavioral exploration task. The cellular composition of activated neuronal ensembles suggests extensive similarities in intracolumnar information processing in the wild-type and reeler brains. We conclude that extensive ectopic positioning of neuronal partners can be compensated for by cell-autonomous mechanisms that allow for the establishment of proper connectivity. Thus, genetic neuronal fate seems to be of greater importance for correct cortical wiring than radial neuronal position.

  20. PAK4 suppresses PDZ-RhoGEF activity to drive invadopodia maturation in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Nicole S.; Pipili, Aikaterini; Lesjak, Michaela S.; Ameer, Simon M.; Geh, Jenny L. C.; Healy, Ciaran; Ross, Alistair D. MacKenzie; Parsons, Maddy; Nestle, Frank O.; Lacy, Katie E.; Wells, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are thought to use actin rich invadopodia to facilitate matrix degradation. Formation and maturation of invadopodia requires the co-ordained activity of Rho-GTPases, however the molecular mechanisms that underlie the invadopodia lifecycle are not fully elucidated. Previous work has suggested a formation and disassembly role for Rho family effector p-21 activated kinase 1 (PAK1) however, related family member PAK4 has not been explored. Systematic analysis of isoform specific depletion using in vitro and in vivo invasion assays revealed there are differential invadopodia-associated functions. We consolidated a role for PAK1 in the invadopodia formation phase and identified PAK4 as a novel invadopodia protein that is required for successful maturation. Furthermore, we find that PAK4 (but not PAK1) mediates invadopodia maturation likely via inhibition of PDZ-RhoGEF. Our work points to an essential role for both PAKs during melanoma invasion but provides a significant advance in our understanding of differential PAK function. PMID:27765920

  1. Optogenetic Activation of a Lateral Hypothalamic-Ventral Tegmental Drive-Reward Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Eduardo D.; Benaliouad, Faiza; Zamora-Olivencia, Veronica; Wise, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus can motivate feeding or can serve as a reward in its own right. It remains unclear whether the same or independent but anatomically overlapping circuitries mediate the two effects. Electrical stimulation findings implicate medial forebrain bundle (MFB) fibers of passage in both effects, and optogenetic studies confirm a contribution from fibers originating in the lateral hypothalamic area and projecting to or through the ventral tegmental area. Here we report that optogenetic activation of ventral tegmental fibers from cells of origin in more anterior or posterior portions of the MFB failed to induce either reward or feeding. The feeding and reward induced by optogenetic activation of fibers from the lateral hypothalamic cells of origin were influenced similarly by variations in stimulation pulse width and pulse frequency, consistent with the hypothesis of a common substrate for the two effects. There were, however, several cases where feeding but not self-stimulation or self-stimulation but not feeding were induced, consistent with the hypothesis that distinct but anatomically overlapping systems mediate the two effects. Thus while optogenetic stimulation provides a more selective tool for characterizing the mechanisms of stimulation-induced feeding and reward, it does not yet resolve the question of common or independent substrates. PMID:27387668

  2. Activating mutations in the NT5C2 nucleotidase gene drive chemotherapy resistance in relapsed ALL.

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, Gannie; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Carpenter, Zachary; Khiabanian, Hossein; Tosello, Valeria; Allegretta, Maddalena; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Rowe, Jacob M; Tallman, Martin S; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Hof, Jana; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2013-03-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an aggressive hematological tumor resulting from the malignant transformation of lymphoid progenitors. Despite intensive chemotherapy, 20% of pediatric patients and over 50% of adult patients with ALL do not achieve a complete remission or relapse after intensified chemotherapy, making disease relapse and resistance to therapy the most substantial challenge in the treatment of this disease. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identify mutations in the cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II gene (NT5C2), which encodes a 5'-nucleotidase enzyme that is responsible for the inactivation of nucleoside-analog chemotherapy drugs, in 20/103 (19%) relapse T cell ALLs and 1/35 (3%) relapse B-precursor ALLs. NT5C2 mutant proteins show increased nucleotidase activity in vitro and conferred resistance to chemotherapy with 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine when expressed in ALL lymphoblasts. These results support a prominent role for activating mutations in NT5C2 and increased nucleoside-analog metabolism in disease progression and chemotherapy resistance in ALL.

  3. Molecular crowding drives active Pin1 into nonspecific complexes with endogenous proteins prior to substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Luh, Laura M; Hänsel, Robert; Löhr, Frank; Kirchner, Donata K; Krauskopf, Katharina; Pitzius, Susanne; Schäfer, Birgit; Tufar, Peter; Corbeski, Ivan; Güntert, Peter; Dötsch, Volker

    2013-09-18

    Proteins and nucleic acids maintain the crowded interior of a living cell and can reach concentrations in the order of 200-400 g/L which affects the physicochemical parameters of the environment, such as viscosity and hydrodynamic as well as nonspecific strong repulsive and weak attractive interactions. Dynamics, structure, and activity of macromolecules were demonstrated to be affected by these parameters. However, it remains controversially debated, which of these factors are the dominant cause for the observed alterations in vivo. In this study we investigated the globular folded peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in native-like crowded oocyte extract by in-cell NMR spectroscopy. We show that active Pin1 is driven into nonspecific weak attractive interactions with intracellular proteins prior to substrate recognition. The substrate recognition site of Pin1 performs specific and nonspecific attractive interactions. Phosphorylation of the WW domain at Ser16 by PKA abrogates both substrate recognition and the nonspecific interactions with the endogenous proteins. Our results validate the hypothesis formulated by McConkey that the majority of globular folded proteins with surface charge properties close to neutral under physiological conditions reside in macromolecular complexes with other sticky proteins due to molecular crowding. In addition, we demonstrate that commonly used synthetic crowding agents like Ficoll 70 are not suitable to mimic the intracellular environment due to their incapability to simulate biologically important weak attractive interactions.

  4. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Guilherme M; Patist, Amanda L; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T; Martinez-Barbera, Juan Pedro; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T; Andoniadou, Cynthia L

    2015-09-28

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma.

  5. Activated WNT signaling in postnatal SOX2-positive dental stem cells can drive odontoma formation

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Guilherme M.; Patist, Amanda L.; Healy, Chris; Pagrut, Ankita; Carreno, Gabriela; Sharpe, Paul T.; Pedro Martinez-Barbera, Juan; Thavaraj, Selvam; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Andoniadou, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    In common with most mammals, humans form only two dentitions during their lifetime. Occasionally, supernumerary teeth develop in addition to the normal complement. Odontoma represent a small group of malformations containing calcified dental tissues of both epithelial and mesenchymal origin, with varying levels of organization, including tooth-like structures. The specific cell type responsible for the induction of odontoma, which retains the capacity to re-initiate de novo tooth development in postnatal tissues, is not known. Here we demonstrate that aberrant activation of WNT signaling by expression of a non-degradable form of β-catenin specifically in SOX2-positive postnatal dental epithelial stem cells is sufficient to generate odontoma containing multiple tooth-like structures complete with all dental tissue layers. Genetic lineage-tracing confirms that odontoma form in a similar manner to normal teeth, derived from both the mutation-sustaining epithelial stem cells and adjacent mesenchymal tissues. Activation of the WNT pathway in embryonic SOX2-positive progenitors results in ectopic expression of secreted signals that promote odontogenesis throughout the oral cavity. Significantly, the inductive potential of epithelial dental stem cells is retained in postnatal tissues, and up-regulation of WNT signaling specifically in these cells is sufficient to promote generation and growth of ectopic malformations faithfully resembling human odontoma. PMID:26411543

  6. Evolution of muscle activity patterns driving motions of the jaw and hyoid during chewing in Gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Herrel, Anthony; Ross, Callum F; Williams, Susan H; German, Rebecca Z; Sanford, Christopher P J; Gintof, Chris

    2011-08-01

    Although chewing has been suggested to be a basal gnathostome trait retained in most major vertebrate lineages, it has not been studied broadly and comparatively across vertebrates. To redress this imbalance, we recorded EMG from muscles powering anteroposterior movement of the hyoid, and dorsoventral movement of the mandibular jaw during chewing. We compared muscle activity patterns (MAP) during chewing in jawed vertebrate taxa belonging to unrelated groups of basal bony fishes and artiodactyl mammals. Our aim was to outline the evolution of coordination in MAP. Comparisons of activity in muscles of the jaw and hyoid that power chewing in closely related artiodactyls using cross-correlation analyses identified reorganizations of jaw and hyoid MAP between herbivores and omnivores. EMG data from basal bony fishes revealed a tighter coordination of jaw and hyoid MAP during chewing than seen in artiodactyls. Across this broad phylogenetic range, there have been major structural reorganizations, including a reduction of the bony hyoid suspension, which is robust in fishes, to the acquisition in a mammalian ancestor of a muscle sling suspending the hyoid. These changes appear to be reflected in a shift in chewing MAP that occurred in an unidentified anamniote stem-lineage. This shift matches observations that, when compared with fishes, the pattern of hyoid motion in tetrapods is reversed and also time-shifted relative to the pattern of jaw movement.

  7. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    PubMed

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies.

  8. Induction Motor Drive System Based on Linear Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liying; Zhang, Yongli; Yao, Qingmei

    It is difficult to establish an exact mathematical model for the induction motor and the robustness is poor of the vector control system using PI regulator. This paper adopts the linear active disturbance rejection controller (LADRC) to control inductor motor. LADRC doesn't need the exact mathematical model of motor and it can not only estimate but also compensate the general disturbance that includes the coupling items in model of motor and parameters perturbations by linear extended state observer (LESO), so the rotor flux and torque fully decouple. As a result, the performance is improved. To prove the above control scheme, the proposed control system has been simulated in MATLAB/SIMULINK, and the comparison was made with PID. Simulation results show that LADRC' has better performance and robustness than PID.

  9. Nutrient gradients in a granular activated carbon biofilter drives bacterial community organization and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boon, Nico; Pycke, Benny F G; Marzorati, Massimo; Hammes, Frederik

    2011-12-01

    The quality of drinking water is ensured by hygienic barriers and filtration steps, such as ozonation and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Apart from adsorption, GAC filtration involves microbial processes that remove biodegradable organic carbon from the ozonated ground or surface water and ensures biological stability of the treated water. In this study, microbial community dynamics in were monitored during the start-up and maturation of an undisturbed pilot-scale GAC filter at 4 depths (10, 45, 80 and 115 cm) over a period of 6 months. New ecological tools, based on 16S rRNA gene-DGGE, were correlated to filter performance and microbial activity and showed that the microbial gradients developing in the filter was of importance. At 10 cm from the top, receiving the freshly ozonated water with the highest concentration of nutrients, the microbial community dynamics were minimal and the species richness remained low. However, the GAC samples at 80-115 cm showed a 2-3 times higher species richness than the 10-45 cm samples. The highest biomass densities were observed at 45-80 cm, which corresponded with maximum removal of dissolved and assimilable organic carbon. Furthermore, the start-up period was clearly distinguishable using the Lorenz analysis, as after 80 days, the microbial community shifted to an apparent steady-state condition with increased evenness. This study showed that GAC biofilter performance is not necessarily correlated to biomass concentration, but rather that an elevated functionality can be the result of increased microbial community richness, evenness and dynamics.

  10. Cross-dressed dendritic cells drive memory CD8+ T-cell activation after viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Linda M; Bevan, Michael J

    2011-03-31

    After an infection, cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors proliferate and become effector cells by recognizing foreign peptides in the groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules expressed by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Professional APCs specialized for T-cell activation acquire viral antigen either by becoming infected themselves (direct presentation) or by phagocytosis of infected cells, followed by transfer of antigen to the cytosol, processing and MHC class I loading in a process referred to as cross-presentation. An alternative way, referred to as 'cross-dressing', by which an uninfected APC could present antigen was postulated to be by the transfer of preformed peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of an infected cell to the APC without the need of further processing. Here we show that this mechanism exists and boosts the antiviral response of mouse memory CD8(+) T cells. A number of publications have demonstrated sharing of peptide-loaded MHC molecules in vitro. Our in vitro experiments demonstrate that cross-dressing APCs do not acquire peptide-MHC complexes in the form of exosomes released by donor cells. Rather, the APCs and donor cells have to contact each other for the transfer to occur. After a viral infection, we could isolate cross-dressed APCs able to present viral antigen in vitro. Furthermore, using the diphtheria toxin system to selectively eliminate APCs that could only acquire viral peptide-MHC complexes by cross-dressing, we show that such presentation can promote the expansion of resting memory T cells. Notably, naive T cells were excluded from taking part in the response. Cross-dressing is a mechanism of antigen presentation used by dendritic cells that may have a significant role in activating previously primed CD8(+) T cells.

  11. NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    JE Daw; JL Rempe; BR Tittmann; B Reinhardt; P Ramuhalli; R Montgomery; HT Chien

    2012-09-01

    Several Department Of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development, Advanced Reactor Concepts, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Plant programs, are investigating new fuels and materials for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials when irradiated. The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) in-pile instrumentation development activities are focused upon addressing cross-cutting needs for DOE-NE irradiation testing by providing higher fidelity, real-time data, with increased accuracy and resolution from smaller, compact sensors that are less intrusive. Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes, under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues associated with in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. Due to the harsh nature of in-pile testing, and the range of measurements that are desired, an enhanced signal processing capability is needed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. This project addresses these technology deployment issues.

  12. Multibody dynamics driving GNC and system design in tethered nets for active debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Riccardo; Lavagna, Michèle; Salvi, Samuele

    2016-07-01

    Debris removal in Earth orbits is an urgent issue to be faced for space exploitation durability. Among different techniques, tethered-nets present appealing benefits and some open points to fix. Former and latter are discussed in the paper, supported by the exploitation of a multibody dynamics tool. With respect to other proposed capture mechanisms, tethered-net solutions are characterised by a safer capturing distance, a passive angular momentum damping effect and the highest flexibility to unknown shape, material and attitude of the target to interface with. They also allow not considering the centre of gravity alignment with thrust axis as a constraint, as it is for any rigid link solution. Furthermore, the introduction of a closing thread around the net perimeter ensures safer and more reliable grasping and holding. In the paper, a six degrees of freedom multibody dynamics simulator is presented: it was developed at Politecnico di Milano - Department of Aerospace Science and Technologies - and it is able to describe the orbital and attitude dynamics of tethered-nets systems and end-bodies during different phases, with great flexibility in dealing with different topologies and configurations. Critical phases as impact and wrapping are analysed by simulation to address the tethered-stack controllability. It is shown how the role of contact modelling is fundamental to describe the coupled dynamics: it is demonstrated, as a major novel contribution, how friction between the net and a tumbling target allows reducing its angular motion, stabilizing the system and allowing safer towing operations. Moreover, the so-called tethered space tug is analysed: after capture, the two objects, one passive and one active, are connected by the tethered-net flexible link, the motion of the system being excited by the active spacecraft thrusters. The critical modes prevention during this phase, by means of a closed-loop control synthesis is shown. Finally, the connection between

  13. ZIC2-dependent OCT4 activation drives self-renewal of human liver cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingping; Wang, Yanying; He, Lei; Huang, Guanling; Du, Ying; Zhang, Geng; Yan, Xinlong; Xia, Pengyan; Ye, Buqing; Wang, Shuo; Hao, Lu; Wu, Jiayi; Fan, Zusen

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified and shown to have self-renewal and differentiation properties; however, the biology of these hepatic CSCs remains largely unknown. Here, we analyzed transcriptome gene expression profiles of liver CSCs and non-CSCs from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells lines and found that the transcription factor (TF) ZIC2 is highly expressed in liver CSCs. ZIC2 was required for the self-renewal maintenance of liver CSCs, as ZIC2 depletion reduced sphere formation and xenograft tumor growth in mice. We determined that ZIC2 acts upstream of the TF OCT4 and that ZIC2 recruits the nuclear remodeling factor (NURF) complex to the OCT4 promoter, thereby initiating OCT4 activation. In HCC patients, expression levels of the NURF complex were consistent with clinical severity and prognosis. Moreover, ZIC2 and OCT4 levels positively correlated to the clinicopathological stages of HCC patients. Altogether, our results indicate that levels of ZIC2, OCT4, and the NURF complex can be detected and used for diagnosis and prognosis prediction of HCC patients. Moreover, these factors may be potential therapeutic targets for eradicating liver CSCs. PMID:26426078

  14. Occupational PAH Exposures during Prescribed Pile Burns

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, M. S.; Anthony, T. R.; Littau, S. R.; Herckes, P.; Nelson, X.; Poplin, G. S.; Burgess, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    Wildland firefighters are exposed to particulate matter and gases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which are known carcinogens. Our objective was to evaluate the extent of firefighter exposure to particulate and PAHs during prescribed pile burns of mainly ponderosa pine slash and determine whether these exposures were correlated with changes in urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP), a PAH metabolite. Personal and area sampling for particulate and PAH exposures were conducted on the White Mountain Apache Tribe reservation, working with 21 Bureau of Indian Affairs/Fort Apache Agency wildland firefighters during the fall of 2006. Urine samples were collected pre- and post-exposure and pulmonary function was measured. Personal PAH exposures were detectable for only 3 of 16 PAHs analyzed: naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluorene, all of which were identified only in vapor-phase samples. Condensed-phase PAHs were detected in PM2.5 area samples (20 of 21 PAHs analyzed were detected, all but naphthalene) at concentrations below 1 μg m−3. The total PAH/PM2.5 mass fractions were roughly a factor of two higher during smoldering (1.06 ± 0.15) than ignition (0.55 ± 0.04 μg mg−1). There were no significant changes in urinary 1-HP or pulmonary function following exposure to pile burning. In summary, PAH exposures were low in pile burns, and urinary testing for a PAH metabolite failed to show a significant difference between baseline and post-exposure measurements. PMID:18515848

  15. Photosynthetically active radiation and carbon gain drives the southern orientation of Myrtillocactus geometrizans fruits.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Bautista, A; Valverde, P L; Flores, J; Zavala-Hurtado, A; Vite, F; López-Ortega, G; Pérez-Hernández, M A

    2017-03-01

    The equatorial orientation of reproductive structures is known in some columnar cacti from extratropical deserts. It has been hypothesised that photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) interception is the main reason for this orientation, because of its key effect on nocturnal CO2 uptake. However, there are no studies addressing both the effect of PAR and its consequence, carbon gain, on fruit orientation. Accordingly, we tested whether PAR and carbon gain could explain the southern fruit orientation of Myrtillocactus geometrizans, an inter-tropical columnar cactus. We studied three populations of M. geometrizans in Mexico. For each population, azimuth of fruits, total daily PAR, nocturnal acid accumulation (NAA) and fruit production were measured. The relationships between rib orientation and number of fruits, as well as total daily PAR, were evaluated using periodic regressions. The effect of total daily PAR and NAA on number of fruits was assessed using generalised linear models. During spring, mean fruit orientation had a south azimuth for three populations. Likewise, rib orientation had a significant effect on fruit production, with the south-facing ribs having the maximum number of fruits. Total daily PAR was highest in the south-facing ribs, at least for those in the northern and central populations. Furthermore, during spring, there was a significant positive effect of total daily PAR and NAA on fruit production. Our results provide strong evidence that the higher carbon gain in equatorial ribs, through a highest interception of PAR, would be the responsible factor for equatorial orientation of fruits in an inter-tropical columnar cactus.

  16. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 promotes angiogenesis and drives malignant progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Tiffany A; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Yang, Yuhui; Ferguson, Sherise D; Yang, Jinbo; Wei, Jun; Qiao, Wei; Fuller, Gregory N; Bhat, Krishna P; Aldape, Kenneth; Priebe, Waldemar; Bögler, Oliver; Heimberger, Amy B; Rao, Ganesh

    2012-09-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been described as a "master regulator" of signaling pathways involved in the transition from low-grade glioma (LGG) to high-grade glioma (HGG). Although STAT3 is overexpressed in HGGs, it remains unclear whether its overexpression is sufficient to induce or promote the malignant progression of glioma. To characterize the effect of STAT3 expression on tumor progression in vivo, we expressed the STAT3 gene in glioneuronal progenitor cells in mice. STAT3 was expressed alone or concurrently with platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), a well-described initiator of LGG. STAT3 alone was insufficient to induce tumor formation; however, coexpression of STAT3 with PDGFB in mice resulted in a significantly higher incidence of HGGs than PDGFB alone. The median symptomatic tumor latency in mice coexpressing STAT3 and PDGFB was significantly shorter, and mice that developed symptomatic tumors demonstrated significantly higher expression of phosphorylated STAT3 intratumorally. In HGGs, expression of STAT3 was associated with suppression of apoptosis and an increase in tumor cell proliferation. HGGs induced by STAT3 and PDGFB also displayed frequent foci of necrosis and microvascular proliferation. The expression of CD31 (a marker of endothelial proliferation) was significantly higher in tumors induced by coexpression of STAT3 and PDGFB. When mice injected with PDGFB and STAT3 were treated with a STAT3 inhibitor, median survival increased and the incidence of HGG and CD31 expression decreased significantly. These results demonstrate that STAT3 promotes the malignant progression of glioma. Inhibiting STAT3 expression mitigates tumor progression and improves survival, validating it as a therapeutic target.

  17. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis. PMID:24474769

  18. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-28

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis.

  19. Realization and drive tests of active thin glass x-ray mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Collura, A.; Basso, S.; Candia, R.; Civitani, M.; Di Cicca, G.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.; Varisco, S.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to obtain lightweight and high-resolution focusing mirror segments for large aperture X-ray telescopes is the hot slumping of thin glass foils. In this approach, already successfully experimented to manufacture the optics of the NuSTAR X-ray telescope, thin glasses are formed at high temperature onto a precisely figured mould. The formed glass foils are subsequently stacked onto a stiff backplane with a common axis and focus to form an XOU (X-ray Optical Unit), to be later integrated in the telescope optic structure. In this process, the low thickness of the glass foils guarantees a low specific mass and a very low obstruction of the effective area. However, thin glasses are subject to deformations that may arise at any stage of the production process, thereby degrading the angular resolution. To solve this problem, several groups are working on the possibility to correct the mirror profile post-manufacturing, using piezoelectric elements exerting a tangential strain on the non-optical side of the glass mirrors. In this paper we show the results of the approach we have adopted, based on the application of piezoceramic patches on the backside of thin glass foils, previously formed by hot slumping. The voltage signals are supplied to the piezoelectric elements by a system of electrodes deposited on the same side of the mirror via a photolithographic process. Finally, the matrix of voltages to be used to correct the mirror shape can be determined in X-rays illumination by detection of the intra-focal image and consequent reconstruction of the longitudinal profile. We describe the production of some active mirrors with different arrangements of piezoelectric elements and the X-ray tests performed at the XACT X-ray facility to determine the optimal actuator geometry.

  20. ROCK PILE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, MISSOURI.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.; Ellis, Clarence

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and mineral-occurrence survey of the Rock Pile Mountain Wilderness study area in southeastern Missouri indicates the area has little promise for the occurrence of energy and mineral resources. Exploratory drill holes on private land along the west side of the area encountered no mineralization, and none of the rocks or sediments exposed in the area contain any detectable evidence of significant mineralization. Drilling through the Bonneterre Formation, supplemented by geochemical studies of the drill-hole samples, would test the remote possibility of lead mineralization close to the contact with Precambrian rocks.

  1. INEFFICIENT DRIVING OF BULK TURBULENCE BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2015-12-10

    Central jetted active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appear to heat the core regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) in cooling-core galaxy clusters and groups, thereby preventing a cooling catastrophe. However, the physical mechanism(s) by which the directed flow of kinetic energy is thermalized throughout the ICM core remains unclear. We examine one widely discussed mechanism whereby the AGN induces subsonic turbulence in the ambient medium, the dissipation of which provides the ICM heat source. Through controlled inviscid three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we verify that explosive AGN-like events can launch gravity waves (g-modes) into the ambient ICM, which in turn decays to volume-filling turbulence. In our model, however, this process is found to be inefficient, with less than 1% of the energy injected by the AGN activity actually ending up in the turbulence of the ambient ICM. This efficiency is an order of magnitude or more too small to explain the observations of AGN-feedback in galaxy clusters and groups with short central cooling times. Atmospheres in which the g-modes are strongly trapped/confined have an even lower efficiency since, in these models, the excitation of turbulence relies on the g-modes’ ability to escape from the center of the cluster into the bulk ICM. Our results suggest that, if AGN-induced turbulence is indeed the mechanism by which the AGN heats the ICM core, its driving may rely on physics beyond that captured in our ideal hydrodynamic model.

  2. New region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for driving geometric active contours in medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Niu, Yanmin; Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Shao-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel region-based geometric active contour model that uses region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional for handling the intensity inhomogeneity and weak boundary problems in medical image segmentation. The region-scalable discriminant and fitting energy functional is defined to capture the image intensity characteristics in local and global regions for driving the evolution of active contour. The discriminant term in the model aims at separating background and foreground in scalable regions while the fitting term tends to fit the intensity in these regions. This model is then transformed into a variational level set formulation with a level set regularization term for accurate computation. The new model utilizes intensity information in the local and global regions as much as possible; so it not only handles better intensity inhomogeneity, but also allows more robustness to noise and more flexible initialization in comparison to the original global region and regional-scalable based models. Experimental results for synthetic and real medical image segmentation show the advantages of the proposed method in terms of accuracy and robustness.

  3. Antiosteoporotic Activity of Dioscorea alata L. cv. Phyto through Driving Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation for Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kang-Yung; Horng, Lin-Yea; Sung, Hui-Ching; Huang, Hui-Chuan; Wu, Rong-Tsun

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of the rhizomes of Dioscorea alata L. cv. Phyto, Dispo85E, on bone formation and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Our results showed that Dispo85E increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone nodule formation in primary bone marrow cultures. In addition, Dispo85E stimulated pluripotent C3H10T1/2 stem cells to differentiate into osteoblasts rather than adipocytes. Our in vivo data indicated that Dispo85E promotes osteoblastogenesis by increasing ALP activity and bone nodule formation in both intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice. Microcomputed tomography (μCT) analysis also showed that Dispo85E ameliorates the deterioration of trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD), trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and trabecular bone number (Tb.N) in OVX mice. Our results suggested that Dispo85E is a botanical drug with a novel mechanism that drives the lineage-specific differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and is a candidate drug for osteoporosis therapy. PMID:21760825

  4. Noise dependence with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. Pile-up noise studies in the ATLAS TileCal calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Araque, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions, which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one, will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects calorimeter noise under different circumstances are described. (author)

  5. Dementia & Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Resource Center Family Care Navigator Research Registry Support Groups Caregiver Stories Connections e-Newsletter FCA+(plus) Services ... be like if you could no longer drive. Support groups provide a good venue for both the caregivers ...

  6. Environmentally Friendly Solution to Ground Hazards in Design of Bridges in Earthquake Prone Areas Using Timber Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, H.

    2015-12-01

    Bridges are major elements of infrastructure in all societies. Their safety and continued serviceability guaranties the transportation and emergency access in urban and rural areas. However, these important structures are subject to earthquake induced damages in structure and foundations. The basic approach to the proper support of foundations are a) distribution of imposed loads to foundation in a way they can resist those loads without excessive settlement and failure; b) modification of foundation ground with various available methods; and c) combination of "a" and "b". The engineers has to face the task of designing the foundations meeting all safely and serviceability criteria but sometimes when there are numerous environmental and financial constrains, the use of some traditional methods become inevitable. This paper explains the application of timber piles to improve ground resistance to liquefaction and to secure the abutments of short to medium length bridges in an earthquake/liquefaction prone area in Bohol Island, Philippines. The limitations of using the common ground improvement methods (i.e., injection, dynamic compaction) because of either environmental or financial concerns along with the abundance of timber in the area made the engineers to use a network of timber piles behind the backwalls of the bridge abutments. The suggested timber pile network is simulated by numerical methods and its safety is examined. The results show that the compaction caused by driving of the piles and bearing capacity provided by timbers reduce the settlement and lateral movements due to service and earthquake induced loads.

  7. View south along subtle ridgeline across a pile of removed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south along subtle ridgeline across a pile of removed gravestones to Doughty-Beck monument, another gravestone pile, and Mill Street houses. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 6. UPPER NOTTINGHAM TAILING PILE LOOKING DOWN STREAM BED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. UPPER NOTTINGHAM TAILING PILE LOOKING DOWN STREAM BED TO LOWER NOTTINGHAM. COLLAPSED BUILDINGS, 'B' AND 'C' AND TOP EDGE OF TAILING PILES ARE VISIBLE IN CENTRAL ARE OF PRINT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  9. [Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology for car driving, airplane flying,and underwater activities in subjects with heart disease].

    PubMed

    García-Cosío Mir, F; Alberca Vela, T; Rubio Sanz, J; Grande Ruiz, A; Viqueira Caamaño, J A; Curcio Ruigómez, A; Navarro Ruiz, V

    2001-04-01

    Car driving, airplane piloting and underwater activities by subjects with heart disease may cause sudden incapacitation leading to the loss of the safety margins necessary to avoid accidents. In the case of car driving and airplane piloting the risk affects, not only the driver or pilot, but also passengers and/or bystanders within an accident zone. In the case of diving the risk resides basically in the loss of control of the vital support mechanisms necessary in a very hostile medium. This document reviews the possible causes of unexpected incapacitation, with or without loss of consciousness, in the light of the pathophysiologic consequences of fatigue, hypoxia, stress or barotrauma posed by each activity. Detailed recommendations are made for limiting driving, piloting and diving, based on official Spanish and European regulations and the addresses of specialized centers are provided for consultation. Moreover, recommendations for airplane travel for patients with heart disease are indicated.

  10. Distributed fibre optic strain measurements on a driven pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woschitz, Helmut; Monsberger, Christoph; Hayden, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In civil engineering pile systems are used in unstable areas as a foundation of buildings or other structures. Among other parameters, the load capacity of the piles depends on their length. A better understanding of the mechanism of load-transfer to the soil would allow selective optimisation of the system. Thereby, the strain variations along the loaded pile are of major interest. In this paper, we report about a field trial using an optical backscatter reflectometer for distributed fibre-optic strain measurements along a driven pile. The most significant results gathered in a field trial with artificial pile loadings are presented. Calibration results show the performance of the fibre-optic system with variations in the strain-optic coefficient.

  11. Optimal Design of Sheet Pile Wall Embedded in Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Manas Ranjan; Das, Sarat Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Sheet pile wall is a type of flexible earth retaining structure used in waterfront offshore structures, river protection work and temporary supports in foundations and excavations. Economy is an essential part of a good engineering design and needs to be considered explicitly in obtaining an optimum section. By considering appropriate embedment depth and sheet pile section it may be possible to achieve better economy. This paper describes optimum design of both cantilever and anchored sheet pile wall penetrating clay using a simple optimization tool Microsoft Excel ® Solver. The detail methodology and its application with examples are presented for cantilever and anchored sheet piles. The effects of soil properties, depth of penetration and variation of ground water table on the optimum design are also discussed. Such a study will help professional while designing the sheet pile wall penetrating clay.

  12. Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile

    DOEpatents

    Yavorsky, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

  13. Drive System Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Drive Systems Research will be presented. The primary purpose of this research is to improve performance, reliability, and integrity of aerospace drive systems and space mechanisms. The research is conducted through a combination of in-house, academia, and through contractors. Research is conducted through computer code development and validated through component and system testing. The drive system activity currently has four major thrust areas including: thermal behavior of high speed gearing, health and usage monitoring, advanced components, and space mechanisms.

  14. Motor activity in the isolated spinal cord of the chick embryo: synaptic drive and firing pattern of single motoneurons.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J

    1989-03-01

    input impedance. Injection of depolarizing current steps into motoneurons produced steady firing with no evidence of a pause in discharge, indicating that the depolarization accompanying synaptic activity was not responsible for the pause in firing of flexor motoneurons. These results suggest that flexor and extensor motoneurons receive a similar depolarizing drive from a common set of excitatory premotor interneurons. The alternating pattern of flexor and extensor discharge is produced, in part, by the timing of a depolarizing IPSP coincident with extensor activity that silences flexor discharge.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  15. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  16. Reduction of a Redox-Active Ligand Drives Switching in a Cu(I) Pseudorotaxane by a Bimolecular Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McNitt, Kristy A.; Parimal, Kumar; Share, Andrew I.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Witlicki, Edward H.; Pink, Maren; Bediako, D. Kwabena; Plaisier, Christina L.; Le, Nga; Heeringa, Lee P.; Vander Griend, Douglas A.; Flood, Amar H.

    2009-04-02

    The reduction of a redox-active ligand is shown to drive reversible switching of a Cu(I) [2]pseudorotaxane ([2]PR{sup 2+}) into the reduced [3]pseudorotaxane ([3]PR{sup 2+}) by a bimolecular mechanism. The unreduced pseudorotaxanes [2]PR{sup 2+} and [3]PR{sup 2+} are initially self-assembled from the binucleating ligand, 3,6-bis(5-methyl-2-pyridine)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (Me2BPTZ), and a preformed copper-macrocycle moiety (Cu-M{sup 2+}) based on 1,10-phenanthroline. X-ray crystallography revealed a syn geometry of the [3]PR{sup 2+}. The UV-vis-NIR spectra show low-energy metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions that red shift from 808 nm for [2]PR{sup 2+} to 1088 nm for [3]PR{sup 2+}. Quantitative analysis of the UV-vis-NIR titration shows the stepwise formation constants to be K{sub 1} = 8.9 x 10{sup 8} M{sup -1} and K{sub 2} = 3.1 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1}, indicative of negative cooperativity. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) and coulometry of Me{sub 2}BPTZ, [2]PR{sup 2+}, and [3]PR{sup 2+} shows the one-electron reductions at E{sub 1/2} = -0.96, -0.65, and -0.285 V, respectively, to be stabilized in a stepwise manner by each Cu{sup 2+} ion. CVs of [2]PR{sup 2+} show changes with scan rate consistent with an EC mechanism of supramolecular disproportionation after reduction: [2]PR{sup 0} + [2]PR{sup 2+} = [3]PR{sup 2+} + Me{sub 2}BPTZ{sup 0} (K*{sub D}, k{sub d}). UV-vis-NIR spectroelectrochemistry was used to confirm the 1:1 product stoichiometry for [3]PR{sup 2+}:Me{sub 2}BPTZ. The driving force ({Delta}G*{sub D} = -5.1 kcal mol{sup -1}) for the reaction is based on the enhanced stability of the reduced [3]PR{sup 2+} over reduced [2]PR{sup 0} by 365 mV (8.4 kcal mol{sup -1}). Digital simulations of the CVs are consistent with a bimolecular pathway (k{sub d} = 12,000 s{sup -1} M{sup -1}). Confirmation of the mechanism provides a basis to extend this new switching modality to molecular machines.

  17. 75 FR 74687 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction of the Parsons Slough...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... estimated distances to NMFS' current threshold sound levels from pile driving proposed at the Kirby Park... is required during construction, cushioning blocks would be used to attenuate the sound. Vibratory... confident that the sound produced during vibratory pile driving will not approach the threshold for Level...

  18. NK-, NKT- and CD8-Derived IFNγ Drives Myeloid Cell Activation and Erythrophagocytosis, Resulting in Trypanosomosis-Associated Acute Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cnops, Jennifer; De Trez, Carl; Stijlemans, Benoit; Keirsse, Jiri; Kauffmann, Florence; Barkhuizen, Mark; Keeton, Roanne; Boon, Louis; Brombacher, Frank; Magez, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are the causative agents of Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT/Sleeping Sickness) and Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT/Nagana). A common hallmark of African trypanosome infections is inflammation. In murine trypanosomosis, the onset of inflammation occurs rapidly after infection and is manifested by an influx of myeloid cells in both liver and spleen, accompanied by a burst of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines. Within 48 hours after reaching peak parasitemia, acute anemia develops and the percentage of red blood cells drops by 50%. Using a newly developed in vivo erythrophagocytosis assay, we recently demonstrated that activated cells of the myeloid phagocytic system display enhanced erythrophagocytosis causing acute anemia. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism and immune pathway behind this phenomenon in a murine model for trypanosomosis. Results indicate that IFNγ plays a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of erythrophagocytic myeloid cells, as mice lacking the IFNγ receptor were partially protected against trypanosomosis-associated inflammation and acute anemia. NK and NKT cells were the earliest source of IFNγ during T. b. brucei infection. Later in infection, CD8+ and to a lesser extent CD4+ T cells become the main IFNγ producers. Cell depletion and transfer experiments indicated that during infection the absence of NK, NKT and CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, resulted in a reduced anemic phenotype similar to trypanosome infected IFNγR-/- mice. Collectively, this study shows that NK, NKT and CD8+ T cell-derived IFNγ is a critical mediator in trypanosomosis-associated pathology, driving enhanced erythrophagocytosis by myeloid phagocytic cells and the induction of acute inflammation-associated anemia. PMID:26070118

  19. NK-, NKT- and CD8-Derived IFNγ Drives Myeloid Cell Activation and Erythrophagocytosis, Resulting in Trypanosomosis-Associated Acute Anemia.

    PubMed

    Cnops, Jennifer; De Trez, Carl; Stijlemans, Benoit; Keirsse, Jiri; Kauffmann, Florence; Barkhuizen, Mark; Keeton, Roanne; Boon, Louis; Brombacher, Frank; Magez, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomes are the causative agents of Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT/Sleeping Sickness) and Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT/Nagana). A common hallmark of African trypanosome infections is inflammation. In murine trypanosomosis, the onset of inflammation occurs rapidly after infection and is manifested by an influx of myeloid cells in both liver and spleen, accompanied by a burst of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines. Within 48 hours after reaching peak parasitemia, acute anemia develops and the percentage of red blood cells drops by 50%. Using a newly developed in vivo erythrophagocytosis assay, we recently demonstrated that activated cells of the myeloid phagocytic system display enhanced erythrophagocytosis causing acute anemia. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism and immune pathway behind this phenomenon in a murine model for trypanosomosis. Results indicate that IFNγ plays a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of erythrophagocytic myeloid cells, as mice lacking the IFNγ receptor were partially protected against trypanosomosis-associated inflammation and acute anemia. NK and NKT cells were the earliest source of IFNγ during T. b. brucei infection. Later in infection, CD8+ and to a lesser extent CD4+ T cells become the main IFNγ producers. Cell depletion and transfer experiments indicated that during infection the absence of NK, NKT and CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, resulted in a reduced anemic phenotype similar to trypanosome infected IFNγR-/- mice. Collectively, this study shows that NK, NKT and CD8+ T cell-derived IFNγ is a critical mediator in trypanosomosis-associated pathology, driving enhanced erythrophagocytosis by myeloid phagocytic cells and the induction of acute inflammation-associated anemia.

  20. Threat from Rubble-Pile Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    While chondrites are the most common meteoroids to enter our atmosphere, they represent a small fraction of recovered falls. Most stony meteorites disrupt during entry, consumed by ablation or lost by weathering; in contrast, small iron meteorites (<10 m) disrupt and disperse to create strewnfields due to interacting atmospheric bow shocks [e.g., Passey and Melosh, 1980]. The Carancas impact crater in 2007, however, challenged our understanding [Tancredi et al., 2008]: (a) first eyewitness of a crater formed by a stony meteorite; (b) undetected thermal entry at altitude; (c) no accessory meteorite falls; (d) "explosion" (not low-speed compression) crater; (e) infrasound/seismic data indicating a high-speed entry/collision; and (f) petrologic evidence for shock deformation/melting in breccias indicative of speeds >4 km/s. Although a monolithic chondrite (~ 10 m across) might allow surviving entry, most objects of this size contain multiple flaws, ensuring atmospheric disruption. Hence, an alternative "needle model" was proposed wherein a small rubble-pile object gradually re-shaped itself during entry [Schultz, 2008], a process that minimizes drag, thermal signatures of entry, and catastrophic disruption. First proposed to account for smaller than expected craters on Venus [Schultz, 1992], such a process resembles subsequent Shoemaker-Levy entry models [Boslough and Crawford, 1997] that predicted much deeper entry than standard models. Laboratory experiments at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range simulated this process by breaking-up hypervelocity projectiles into a cloud of debris and tracking its path at near-full atmospheric pressure. The resulting cloud of fragments exhibited less deceleration than a solid sphere at the same speed. Moreover, shadowgraphs revealed constituent fragments "surfing" the pressure jump within the mach cone/column. Previous models proposed that crater-forming impacts must be >50-100 m in diameter in order to survive entry [Bland and

  1. Small asteroids - rubble piles or boulders?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Alan W.

    2013-10-01

    The asteroid rotation spin barrier at ~2.2 h period among asteroids 10 km > D > 200 m doesn’t prove all such asteroids are rubble piles, and the faster rotations among smaller asteroids doesn’t require monolithic strength, either. Only a very modest strength, perhaps no more than van der Waals force, might suffice to hold regolith together on a small super-fast rotator (Sanchez & Scheeres, 2013, arXif:1306.1622v1). The problem is that for a constant or only slowly varying strength with respect to diameter, the spin barrier becomes proportional to 1/D below the size where material strength is dominant, or perhaps a bit steeper if strength increases with decreasing D. What we observe in the distribution of asteroid spins versus diameter is that below D ~ 200 m, the spin barrier goes up at least ~D-3.5, if not abruptly. Models with constant or slowly varying strength fail to fit this observation, and the abrupt transition cannot be an observational selection effect: the void in the phase space of rotations would be among the easiest rotations to observe, e.g. the one conspicuous exception, 2001 OE84 (D ~ 0.7 km, P = 0.5 h) was easily and unambiguously measured (Pravec, et al. 2002, Proc. ACM 2002, ESA SP-500, 743-745). This abrupt transition is most easily explained as a real transition in material properties of asteroids in the size range ~200 m diameter, from “rubble pile” to “boulder”, although neither term may be fully descriptive of the actual structure. Two other lines of evidence suggest that this transition in properties is real: the dip in the size-frequency distribution of NEAs is maximum at ~150 m, suggesting that a transition to stronger material structure occurs about there, and we observe, e.g., Tunguska and the recent Chelyabinsk bolide, that bodies in the tens of meters size range entering the atmosphere behave more like solid rocks than rock piles (Boslough & Crawford 2008, Int. J. Imp. Eng. 35, 1441-1448). I encourage those doing computer

  2. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  3. Unsaturated flow modeling of a retorted oil shale pile.

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, F.W.; Freshley, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-10-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capabilities of the UNSAT1D model for assessing this potential threat to the environment by understanding water movement through spent shale piles. Infiltration, redistribution, and drainage of water in a spent shale pile were simulated with the UNSAT1D model for two test cases: (1) an existing 35 m pile; and (2) a transient pile growing at a rate of 10 m/year for 5 years. The first test case simulated three different layering scenarios with each one being run for 1 year. The second test case simulated two different initial moisture contents in the pile with each simulation being run for 30 years. Grand Junction and Rifle, Colorado climatological data were used to provide precipitation and potential evapotranspiration for a wet (1979) and dry (1976) year, respectively. Hydraulic properties obtained from the literature on Paraho process spent shale soil, and clay were used as model input parameters to describe water retention and hydraulic conductivity characteristics. Plant water uptake was not simulated in either test case. The two test cases only consider the evaporation component of evapotranspiration, thereby maximizing the amount of water infiltrating into the pile. The results of the two test cases demonstrated that the UNSAT1D model can adequately simulate flow in a spent shale pile for a variety of initial and boundary conditions, hydraulic properties, and pile configurations. The test cases provided a preliminary sensitivity analysis in which it was shown that the material hydraulic properties, material layering, and initial moisture content are the principal parameters influencing drainage from the base of a pile. 34 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Pile mixing increases greenhouse gas emissions during composting of dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of pile mixing on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from stored dairy manure was determined using large flux chambers designed to completely cover pilot-scale manure piles. GHG emissions from piles that were mixed four times during the 80 day trial were about 20% higher than unmixed piles. ...

  5. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  6. Formation of pebble-pile planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlberg Jansson, Karl; Johansen, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Asteroids and Kuiper belt objects are remnant planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. The first stage of planet formation is the accumulation of dust and ice grains into mm- and cm-sized pebbles. These pebbles can clump together through the streaming instability and form gravitationally bound pebble clouds. Pebbles inside such a cloud will undergo mutual collisions, dissipating energy into heat. As the cloud loses energy, it gradually contracts towards solid density. We model this process and investigate two important properties of the collapse: (i) the collapse timescale and (ii) the temporal evolution of the pebble size distribution. Our numerical model of the pebble cloud is zero-dimensional and treats collisions with a statistical method. We find that planetesimals with radii larger than ~100 km collapse on the free-fall timescale of ~25 years. Lower-mass clouds have longer pebble collision timescales and collapse much more slowly, with collapse times of a few hundred years for 10 km scale planetesimals and a few thousand years for 1 km scale planetesimals. The mass of the pebble cloud also determines the interior structure of the resulting planetesimal. The pebble collision speeds in low-mass clouds are below the threshold for fragmentation, forming pebble-pile planetesimals consisting of the primordial pebbles from the protoplanetary disk. Planetesimals above 100 km in radius, on the other hand, consist of mixtures of dust (pebble fragments) and pebbles which have undergone substantial collisions with dust and other pebbles. The Rosetta mission to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and the New Horizons mission to Pluto will provide valuable information about the structure of planetesimals in the solar system. Our model predicts that 67P is a pebble-pile planetesimal consisting of primordial pebbles from the solar nebula, while the pebbles in the cloud which contracted to form Pluto must have been ground down substantially during the collapse.

  7. Tally modifying of MCNP and post processing of pile-up simulation with time convolution method in PGNAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar Mowlavi, Ali; Koohi-Fayegh, Rahim

    2005-11-01

    Time convolution method has been employed for pile-up simulation in prompt gamma neutron activation analysis with an Am-Be neutron source and a 137Cs gamma source. A TALLYX subroutine has been written to design a new tally in the MCNP code. This tally records gamma particle information for the detector cell into an output file to be processed later. The times at which the particles are emitted by the source have been randomly generated following an exponential decay time distribution. A time convolution program was written to process the data produced and simulate more realistic pile-up. This method can be applied in optimization studies.

  8. CTGF drives autophagy, glycolysis and senescence in cancer-associated fibroblasts via HIF1 activation, metabolically promoting tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Capparelli, Claudia; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Guido, Carmela; Balliet, Renee; Pestell, Timothy G.; Howell, Anthony; Sneddon, Sharon; Pestell, Richard G.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that loss of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in stromal cells drives the activation of the TGF-β signaling, with increased transcription of TGF-β target genes, such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). In addition, loss of stromal Cav-1 results in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts, with the induction of autophagy and glycolysis. However, it remains unknown if activation of the TGF-β / CTGF pathway regulates the metabolism of cancer-associated fibroblasts. Therefore, we investigated whether CTGF modulates metabolism in the tumor microenvironment. For this purpose, CTGF was overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts or MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Overexpression of CTGF induces HIF-1α-dependent metabolic alterations, with the induction of autophagy/mitophagy, senescence, and glycolysis. Here, we show that CTGF exerts compartment-specific effects on tumorigenesis, depending on the cell-type. In a xenograft model, CTGF overexpressing fibroblasts promote the growth of co-injected MDA-MB-231 cells, without any increases in angiogenesis. Conversely, CTGF overexpression in MDA-MB-231 cells dramatically inhibits tumor growth in mice. Intriguingly, increased extracellular matrix deposition was seen in tumors with either fibroblast or MDA-MB-231 overexpression of CTGF. Thus, the effects of CTGF expression on tumor formation are independent of its extracellular matrix function, but rather depend on its ability to activate catabolic metabolism. As such, CTGF-mediated induction of autophagy in fibroblasts supports tumor growth via the generation of recycled nutrients, whereas CTGF-mediated autophagy in breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth, via tumor cell self-digestion. Our studies shed new light on the compartment-specific role of CTGF in mammary tumorigenesis, and provide novel insights into the mechanism(s) generating a lethal tumor microenvironment in patients lacking stromal Cav-1. As loss of Cav-1 is a

  9. Piled tool will level subsea well template for Heidrun TLP

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-13

    This paper reports on piled leveling tools that were contracted for use during the installation of the subsea well template for Conoco Norway Inc.'s Heidrun tension leg platform (TLP) in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea. The leveling tools are employed after a template has been positioned on the seafloor and anchor pilings have been driven through the template sleeves. One or more tools are lowered and landed on anchor pilings at the low side of the template. No diver support or guidelines are required.

  10. COOPERATIVE MARINE PILING INVESTIGATION. PHASE IIIA. INSPECTION AFTER FIVE YEARS EXPOSURE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Cooperative Marine Piling Committee and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command exposed 54 specially treated piles at Coco Solo Annex, Rodman...Pearl Harbor were still undamaged by marine borers. In March 1967, after four years of exposure, eight of the 54 piles at Coco Solo have been attacked by...Limnoria and one was also attacked by Martesia. By March 1968 the piles at Pearl Harbor were still unattacked but the number of piles at Coco Solo

  11. Early corrosion monitoring of prestressed concrete piles using acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, William; Matta, Fabio; Ziehl, Paul H.

    2013-04-01

    The depassivation and corrosion of bonded prestressing steel strands in concrete bridge members may lead to major damage or collapse before visual inspections uncover evident signs of damage, and well before the end of the design life. Recognizing corrosion in its early stage is desirable to plan and prioritize remediation strategies. The Acoustic Emission (AE) technique is a rational means to develop structural health monitoring and prognosis systems for the early detection and location of corrosion in concrete. Compelling features are the sensitivity to events related to micro- and macrodamage, non-intrusiveness, and suitability for remote and wireless applications. There is little understanding of the correlation between AE and the morphology and extent of early damage on the steel surface. In this paper, the evidence collected from prestressed concrete (PC) specimens that are exposed to salt water is discussed vis-à-vis AE data from continuous monitoring. The specimens consist of PC strips that are subjected to wet/dry salt water cycles, representing portions of bridge piles that are exposed to tidal action. Evidence collected from the specimens includes: (a) values of half-cell potential and linear polarization resistance to recognize active corrosion in its early stage; and (b) scanning electron microscopy micrographs of steel areas from two specimens that were decommissioned once the electrochemical measurements indicated a high probability of active corrosion. These results are used to evaluate the AE activity resulting from early corrosion.

  12. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  13. Biodeterioration of concrete piling in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Jadkowski, T.K.; Wiltsie, E.A.

    1985-03-01

    Concrete is one of the most widely used materials in marine construction because of its characteristic durability in sea environments. Recent inspection of concrete piles installed in the Arabian Gulf has revealed that concrete with high content of calcareous aggregate is susceptible to biodeterioration. Marine rock borers and sponges, which are common in areas where the seabed is composed of limestone rock, have been identified as the marine species responsible for the biodeterioration. Boring organisms pose a significant threat to concrete pile structural integrity. Boreholes deteriorate concrete and expose outer pile reinforcement to seawater. This paper describes the causes and magnitude of biodeterioration of piles installed in the Arabian Gulf and presents design parameters and material specifications for the selected preventive repair system.

  14. 6. Photocopy of drawing showing pile bridge construction on Erie ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of drawing showing pile bridge construction on Erie Railway in 1841. Original illustration in DeGolyer Collection, Dallas, Texas. - Erie Railway, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Deposit, Broome County, NY

  15. 1. Photocopy of drawing showing pile superstructure of early railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of drawing showing pile superstructure of early railroad track construction. Original illustration in Degolyer Collection, Dallas, Texas - Erie Railway, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Deposit, Broome County, NY

  16. Airborne thermography of temperature patterns in sugar beet piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Bichsel, S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of thermography for locating spoilage areas (chimneys) within storage piles and to subsequently use the information for the scheduling of their processing. Thermal-infrared quantitative scanner data were acquired initially on January 16, 1975, over the storage piles at Moorhead, Minnesota, both during the day and predawn. Photographic data were acquired during the day mission to evaluate the effect of uneven snow cover on the thermal emittance, and the predawn thermography was used to locate potential chimneys. The piles were examined the day prior for indications of spoilage areas, and the ground crew indicated that no spoilage areas were located using their existing methods. Nine spoilage areas were interpreted from the thermography. The piles were rechecked by ground methods three days following the flights. Six of the nine areas delineated by thermography were actual spoilage areas.

  17. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK TOP, WITH VERTICAL ELEMENTS IN BACKGROUND, LEVEL 0’, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  18. 69. VIEW OF DECK AND PILINGS FROM LIFEGUARD TOWER AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. VIEW OF DECK AND PILINGS FROM LIFEGUARD TOWER AT 2ND TEE, LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING NEPTUNE'S LOCKER AND CAPTAIN'S GALLEY IN BACKGROUND AT RIGHT - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENGINE PILE OF AGGREGATE AND MEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF ENGINE PILE OF AGGREGATE AND MEN WAITING WITH WHEELBARROWS FILLED WITH AGGREGATE. TAKE DEC. 7, 1927. - Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge, West Eighth Street North, Newton, Jasper County, IA

  20. 52. VIEW SHOWING RAILROAD CRANEMOUNTED PILE DRIVER WORKING ON PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. VIEW SHOWING RAILROAD CRANE-MOUNTED PILE DRIVER WORKING ON PIER 2 OF SHOOFLY BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHWEST FROM M STREET BRIDGE, December 28, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. 33. Steampowered pile driver working on footings for Pier 3, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Steam-powered pile driver working on footings for Pier 3, with south abutment visible at right; view to south. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  2. VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTHERN QUARRY, FACING SOUTH, WITH ROCK PILES IN FOREGROUND - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  3. 8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, handbuilt rock pile. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, hand-built rock pile. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  4. 2. Pilings at end of Pier 11, low tide, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Pilings at end of Pier 11, low tide, view to north. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 11, Charlestown Waterfront at confluence of Little Mystic Channel & Mystic River at northernmost ent of Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. 12. Underneath view of pilings and chain supports on sw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Underneath view of pilings and chain supports on sw side near midsection; looking SE at low tide. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, West Dock, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  6. 4. West side of pier showing distinct piling configuration. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West side of pier showing distinct piling configuration. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. 4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. From west side of boat slip; ore piles, unloaders, blast furnaces, tube conveyors, ore conveyors, stock house, powerhouse. Looking north/northeast - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, MI

  8. Processing Satellite Imagery To Detect Waste Tire Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cynthia; Wuinlan, Becky; Huybrechts, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    A methodology for processing commercially available satellite spectral imagery has been developed to enable identification and mapping of waste tire piles in California. The California Integrated Waste Management Board initiated the project and provided funding for the method s development. The methodology includes the use of a combination of previously commercially available image-processing and georeferencing software used to develop a model that specifically distinguishes between tire piles and other objects. The methodology reduces the time that must be spent to initially survey a region for tire sites, thereby increasing inspectors and managers time available for remediation of the sites. Remediation is needed because millions of used tires are discarded every year, waste tire piles pose fire hazards, and mosquitoes often breed in water trapped in tires. It should be possible to adapt the methodology to regions outside California by modifying some of the algorithms implemented in the software to account for geographic differences in spectral characteristics associated with terrain and climate. The task of identifying tire piles in satellite imagery is uniquely challenging because of their low reflectance levels: Tires tend to be spectrally confused with shadows and deep water, both of which reflect little light to satellite-borne imaging systems. In this methodology, the challenge is met, in part, by use of software that implements the Tire Identification from Reflectance (TIRe) model. The development of the TIRe model included incorporation of lessons learned in previous research on the detection and mapping of tire piles by use of manual/ visual and/or computational analysis of aerial and satellite imagery. The TIRe model is a computational model for identifying tire piles and discriminating between tire piles and other objects. The input to the TIRe model is the georeferenced but otherwise raw satellite spectral images of a geographic region to be surveyed

  9. The equivalence between dislocation pile-ups and cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. W.; Gao, Q.

    1990-01-01

    Cracks and dislocation pile-ups are equivalent to each other. In this paper, the physical equivalence between cracks and pile-ups is delineated, and the relationshps between crack-extension force, force on the leading dislocation, stress-intensity factor, and dislocation density are reviewed and summarized. These relations make it possible to extend quantitatively the recent advances in the concepts and practices of fracture mechanics to the studies of microfractures and microplastic deformations.

  10. 1982 Inspection of Experimental Marine Piling at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    m N atN c S LL. c00 Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF T.IIS PAGE (Wh.n n"-,. P’. l ...d) SR O N PREAD INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE...most were treated with another preservative. Treatment of piles with ammoniacal copper arsenite (ACA) followed by creosote appears to offer considerable...Mechanical properties of preservative treated marine piles: Results of limited full scale testing, by M. L . Eaton, J. A. Drelicharz, and T. Roe, Jr. Port

  11. Emissions from prescribed burning of timber slash piles in Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Johanna; Gullett, Brian K.; Tabor, Dennis; Yonker, Nick

    2017-02-01

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash (Douglas-fir) in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon, ultraviolet absorbing PM, elemental/organic carbon, filter-based metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled to determine emission factors, the amount of pollutant formed per amount of biomass burned. The effect on emissions from covering the piles with polyethylene (PE) sheets to prevent fuel wetting versus uncovered piles was also determined. Results showed that the uncovered ("wet") piles burned with lower combustion efficiency and higher emission factors for VOCs, PM2.5, PCDD/PCDF, and PAHs. Removal of the PE prior to ignition, variation of PE size, and changing PE thickness resulted in no statistical distinction between emissions. Results suggest that dry piles, whether covered with PE or not, exhibited statistically significant lower emissions than wet piles due to better combustion efficiency.

  12. Slime thickness evaluation of bored piles by electrical resistivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ok-Hyun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Park, Min-Chul; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-09-01

    The bottoms of bored piles are generally stacked with soil particles, both while boreholes are being drilled, and afterward. The stacked soils are called slime, and when loads are applied on the pile, increase the pile settlement. Thus to guarantee the end bearing capacity of bored piles, the slime thickness should be precisely detected. The objective of this study is to suggest a new method for evaluating the slime thickness, using temperature compensated electrical resistivity. Laboratory studies are performed in advance, to estimate and compare the resolution of the electrical resistivity probe (ERP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The electrical properties of the ERP and TDR are measured using coaxial type electrodes and parallel type two-wire electrodes, respectively. Penetration tests, conducted in the fully saturated sand-clay mixtures, demonstrate that the ERP produces a better resolution of layer detection than TDR. Thus, field application tests using the ERP with a diameter of 35.7 mm are conducted for the investigation of slime thickness in large diameter bored piles. Field tests show that the slime layers are clearly identified by the ERP: the electrical resistivity dramatically increases at the interface between the slurry and slime layer. The electrical resistivity in the slurry layer inversely correlates with the amount of circulated water. This study suggests that the new electrical resistivity method may be a useful method for the investigation of the slime thickness in bored piles.

  13. Conoco installs eight-pile rig on four-pile platform

    SciTech Connect

    Albaugh, E.K.

    1983-11-01

    Rig 122 recently became the largest standard self-contained drilling rig ever to be mounted on a four-pile, tender-style platform. The conversion sacrificed none of the rig's deep drilling capability, and enabled Conoco to utilize a self-contained platform drilling rig on a satellite platform in the same field. Two cantilever beams, extending some 42 ft beyond platform columns on two sides, support rig weight. Modifications to the rig include separation of pump and engine packages, a pipe-rack extension and a novel skidding system.

  14. Preliminary report on coal pile, coal pile runoff basins, and ash basins at the Savannah River Site: effects on groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1997-04-28

    Coal storage piles, their associated coal pile runoff basins and ash basins could potentially have adverse environmental impacts, especially on groundwater. This report presents and summarizes SRS groundwater and soil data that have been compiled. Also, a result of research conducted on the subject topics, discussions from noted experts in the field are cited. Recommendations are made for additional monitor wells to be installed and site assessments to be conducted.

  15. Snowfall induced severe pile-ups in southern Finland on 17 March 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juga, I.; Hippi, M.

    2009-09-01

    Weather has a great impact on road traffic and several studies have shown that accident risk increases especially during wintry weather conditions. Heavy snowfall, rain or sleet on an icy road surface and formation of hoar frost can make the driving conditions hazardous. Poor visibility, caused by snowfall or dense fog can increase the accident risk significantly and severe pile-ups on highways are possible. The risk for accidents increases, when many drivers can't adjust their speed to the worsening driving conditions even though the hazard is visible. This study presents a severe pile-up case that occurred in southern Finland near Helsinki city on Thursday 17 March 2005. Before this occasion, cold and clear weather prevailed for many days and the driving conditions were mostly fair. On 17 March a low pressure was approaching southern Finland from west. Light snowfall reached the Helsinki metropolitan area early in the morning and it was followed by a band of dense snowfall. During the rush hours, just before 0800 h, pile-ups occurred on four separate highways near Helsinki city almost at the same time (within about ten minutes). In total, almost 300 cars were crashed, 3 persons died and more than 60 persons got injured. The occurrence of dense snowfall during the rush hours had a great impact on driving conditions. The drivers heading towards Helsinki from north or northeast drove at first in clear, dry conditions, with only local light snowfall. But the sudden worsening of weather (and visibility) was a surprise for many although warnings for poor driving conditions were issued the previous evening on radio and TV. In addition to this, automatic vehicle speed measurements showed that the mean speed that morning was only a few km/h lower than on a normal day. When studying the weather situation, it appeared that near the surface there was a thin layer of cold air (2 m temperature being -5…-8 degrees) and warmer air above it. In this kind of situation super

  16. The Drive to Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Diego

    2017-01-01

    At the heart of the educational vocation is a drive to influence, to meaningfully affect the learning and development of others. For adult educators working in higher education, daily activities--from teaching classes to supervising student research to attending faculty meetings to sitting on advisory boards--are full of opportunities to…

  17. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  18. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present the spectral and temporal radiative signatures expected within the "Supercritical Pile" model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined scheme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same time it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst nuF(sub nu) distribution at an energy E(sub p) approx. equal to 1 MeV in the observer s frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor r of the associated relativistic outflow. Futhermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow bulk kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4 log10Gamma decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  19. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2005-01-01

    We present the spectral and tempora1 radiative signatures expected within the "Supercritical Pile" model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined theme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst vFv, distribution at an energy Ep l. MeV in the observer's frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor P of the associated relativistic outflow. Furthermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW within the framework of this model to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4log10P decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  20. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos

    2006-01-01

    We present the spectral and temporal radiative signatures expected within the Supercritical Pile model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined scheme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same time it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst nuF(sub nu) distribution at an energy E(sub p) approximately equal to 1 MeV in the observer s frame, in agreement with observation and largely independent of the Lorentz factor GAMMA of the associated relativistic outflow. Furthermore, this scheme does not require (but does not preclude) acceleration of particles at the shock other than that provided by the isotropization of the flow bulk kinetic energy on the RBW frame. In the present paper we model in detail the evolution of protons, electrons and photons from a RBW to produce detailed spectra of the prompt GRB phase as a function of time from across a very broad range spanning roughly 4 log10 GAMMA decades in frequency. The model spectra are in general agreement with observations and provide a means for the delineating of the model parameters through direct comparison with trends observed in GRB properties.

  1. Diverse archaeal community of a bat guano pile in Domica Cave (Slovak Karst, Slovakia).

    PubMed

    Chronáková, A; Horák, A; Elhottová, D; Kristůfek, V

    2009-09-01

    The molecular diversity of Archaea in a bat guano pile in Cave Domica (Slovakia), temperate cave ecosystem with significant bat colony (about 1600 individuals), was examined. The guano pile was created mainly by an activity of the Mediterranean horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus euryale) and provides a source of organic carbon and other nutrients in the oligotrophic subsurface ecosystem. The upper and the basal parts of guano surface were sampled where the latter one had higher pH and higher admixture of limestone bedrock and increased colonization of invertebrates. The relative proportion of Archaea determined using CARD-FISH in both parts was 3.5-3.9 % (the basal and upper part, respectively). The archaeal community was dominated by non-thermophilic Crenarchaeota (99 % of clones). Phylogenetic analysis of 115 16S rDNA sequences revealed the presence of Crenarchaeota previously isolated from temperate surface soils (group 1.1b, 62 clones), deep subsurface acid waters (group 1.1a, 52 clones) and Euryarchaeota (1 clone). Four of the analyzed sequences were found to have little similarity to those in public databases. The composition of both archaeal communities differed, with respect to higher diversity of Archaea in the upper part of the bat guano pile. High diversity archaeal population is present in the bat guano deposit and consists of both soil- and subsurface-born Crenarchaeota.

  2. Dynamic load testing on the bearing capacity of prestressed tubular concrete piles in soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chuang; Liu, Songyu

    2008-11-01

    Dynamic load testing (DLT) is a high strain test method for assessing pile performance. The shaft capacity of a driven PTC (prestressed tubular concrete) pile in marine soft ground will vary with time after installation. The DLT method has been successfully transferred to the testing of prestressed pipe piles in marine soft clay of Lianyungang area in China. DLT is investigated to determine the ultimate bearing capacity of single pile at different period after pile installation. The ultimate bearing capacity of single pile was founded to increase more than 70% during the inventing 3 months, which demonstrate the time effect of rigid pile bearing capacity in marine soft ground. Furthermore, the skin friction and axial force along the pile shaft are presented as well, which present the load transfer mechanism of pipe pile in soft clay. It shows the economy and efficiency of DLT method compared to static load testing method.

  3. Guidelines for estimating volume, biomass, and smoke production for piled slash. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, C.C.

    1996-02-01

    Guidelines in the form of a six-step approach are provided for estimating volumes, oven-dry mass, consumption, and particulate matter emissions for piled logging debris. Seven stylized pile shapes and their associated geometric volume formulae are used to estimate gross pile volumes. The gross volumes are then reduced to net wood volume by applying an appropriate wood-to-pile volume packing ratio. Next, the oven-dry mass of the pile is determined by using the wood density, or a weighted-average of two wood densitities, for any of 14 tree species commonly piled and burned in the Western United States. Finally, the percentage of biomass consumed is multiplied by an appropriate emission factor to determine the mass of PM, PM10, and PM2.5 produced from the burned pile. These estimates can be extended to represent multiple piles, or multiple groups of similar piles, to estimate the particulate emissions from an entire burn project.

  4. The drive-wise project: driving simulator training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Gianclaudio; Theill, Nathan; Martin, Mike; Keller, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training. Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62–87 years) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) a driving simulator training group, (2) an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention), or (3) a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85%) completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned orthogonal comparisons. Results: The driving simulator-training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention-training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers' safety on the road. PMID:24860497

  5. Mental workload and driving

    PubMed Central

    Paxion, Julie; Galy, Edith; Berthelon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the most representative measures of subjective and objective mental workload in driving, and to understand how the subjective and objective levels of mental workload influence the performance as a function of situation complexity and driving experience, i.e., to verify whether the increase of situation complexity and the lack of experience increase the subjective and physiological levels of mental workload and lead to driving performance impairments. This review will be useful to both researchers designing an experimental study of mental workload and to designers of drivers’ training content. In the first part, we will broach the theoretical approach with two factors of mental workload and performance, i.e., situation complexity and driving experience. Indeed, a low complex situation (e.g., highways), or conversely a high complex situation (e.g., town) can provoke an overload. Additionally, performing the driving tasks implies producing a high effort for novice drivers who have not totally automated the driving activity. In the second part, we will focus on subjective measures of mental workload. A comparison of questionnaires usually used in driving will allow identifying the most appropriate ones as a function of different criteria. Moreover, we will review the empirical studies to verify if the subjective level of mental workload is high in simple and very complex situations, especially for novice drivers compared to the experienced ones. In the third part, we will focus on physiological measures. A comparison of physiological indicators will be realized in order to identify the most correlated to mental workload. An empirical review will also take the effect of situation complexity and experience on these physiological indicators into consideration. Finally, a more nuanced comparison between subjective and physiological measures will be established from the impact on situation complexity and experience. PMID:25520678

  6. Characterization of Odorant Compounds from Mechanical Aerated Pile Composting and Static Aerated Pile Composting

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Priyanka; Lee, Joonhee; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-01-01

    We studied airborne contaminants (airborne particulates and odorous compounds) emitted from compost facilities in South Korea. There are primarily two different types of composting systems operating in Korean farms, namely mechanical aerated pile composting (MAPC) and aerated static pile composting (SAPC). In this study, we analyzed various particulate matters (PM10, PM7, PM2.5, PM1, and total suspended particles), volatile organic compounds and ammonia, and correlated these airborne contaminants with microclimatic parameters, i.e., temperature and relative humidity. Most of the analyzed airborne particulates (PM7, PM2.5, and PM1) were detected in high concentration at SAPC facilities compered to MAPC; however these differences were statistically non-significant. Similarly, most of the odorants did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, except for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and skatole. DMS concentrations were significantly higher in MAPC facilities, whereas skatole concentrations were significantly higher in SAPC facilities. The microclimate variables also did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, and did not correlate significantly with most of the airborne particles and odorous compounds, suggesting that microclimate variables did not influence their emission from compost facilities. These findings provide insight into the airborne contaminants that are emitted from compost facilities and the two different types of composting agitation systems. PMID:26949962

  7. Contribution to Estimating Bearing Capacity of Pile in Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drusa, Marián; Gago, Filip; Vlček, Jozef

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of real geotechnical parameters is key factor for safe and economic design of geotechnical structures. One of these are pile foundations, which require proper design and evaluation due to accessing more deep foundation soil and because remediation work of not bearable piles or broken piles is a crucial operation. For this reason, geotechnical field testing like cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration (SPT) or dynamic penetration test (DP) are realized in order to receive continuous information about soil strata. Comparing with rotary core drilling type of survey with sampling, these methods are more progressive. From engineering geologist point of view, it is more important to know geological characterization of locality but geotechnical engineers have more interest above the real geotechnical parameters of foundation soils. The role of engineering geologist cannot be underestimated because important geological processes in origin or during history can explain behaviour of a geological environment. In effort to streamline the survey, investigation by penetration tests is done as it is able to provide enough information for designers. This paper deals with actual trends in pile foundation design; because there are no new standards and usable standards are very old. Estimation of the bearing capacity of a single pile can be demonstrated on the example of determination of the cone factor Nk from CPT testing. Then results were compared with other common methods.

  8. Numerical experiments with rubble piles: equilibrium shapes and spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-02-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a variety of investigations, ranging from the formation of asteroid satellites to the dynamical properties of Saturn's densest rings. We find that, owing to cannonball stacking behavior, rubble piles can maintain non-spherical shapes without bulk spin, unlike a fluid, and can spin faster than a perfect fluid before shedding mass, consistent with the theory for the more general continuum rubble pile model (Holsapple, 2004, Icarus 172, 272-303). Rubble piles that reassemble following a catastrophic disruption reconfigure themselves to lie within stability limits predicted by the continuum theory. We also find that coarse configurations consisting of a small number of particles are more resistant to tidal disruption than fine configurations with many particles. Overall this study shows that idealized rubble piles behave qualitatively in a manner similar to certain granular materials, at least in the limit where global shape readjustments and/or mass shedding begins. The limits obtained here may provide constraints on the possible internal structure of some small Solar System bodies that have extreme shapes or are under high stress. Amalthea is presented as a case study.

  9. Parallel input parallel output high voltage bi-directional converters for driving dielectric electro active polymer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thummala, P.; Zhang, Z.; Andersen, M. A. E.; Rahimullah, S.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators are capacitive devices which provide mechanical motions when charged electrically. The charging characteristics of a DEAP actuator depends on its size, voltage applied to its electrodes, and its operating frequency. The main idea of this paper is to design and implement driving circuits for the DEAP actuators for their use in various applications. This paper presents implementation of parallel input, parallel output, high voltage (~2.5 kV) bi-directional DC-DC converters for driving the DEAP actuators. The topology is a bidirectional flyback DC-DC converter incorporating commercially available high voltage MOSFETs (4 kV) and high voltage diodes (5 kV). Although the average current of the aforementioned devices is limited to 300 mA and 150 mA, respectively, connecting the outputs of multiple converters in parallel can provide a scalable design. This enables operating the DEAP actuators in various static and dynamic applications e.g. positioning, vibration generation or damping, and pumps. The proposed idea is experimentally verified by connecting three high voltage converters in parallel to operate a single DEAP actuator. The experimental results with both film capacitive load and the DEAP actuator are shown for a maximum charging voltage of 2 kV.

  10. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  11. The Pressure Limitations on Flux Pile-Up Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Y. E.

    1999-05-01

    Flux pile-up magnetic reconnection was thought to be able to provide fast energy dissipation a strongly magnetized plasma, for example, in solar flares. We examine the problem of the plasma pressure limitations on the rapidity of flux pile-up reconnection. It is shown that for a two-dimensional stagnation point flow with nonzero vorticity the magnetic merging rate cannot exceed the Sweet-Parker scaling in a low-beta plasma, which is too slow to explain flares. Moreover, the solution has some undesireable properties such as a diffusion layer at the external boundary and the massively increasing inflow speed. The pressure limitation appears to be somewhat less restrictive for three-dimensional flux pile-up. This work was supported by NSF grant ATM-9813933.

  12. Design of Jetty Piles Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To overcome the complication of jetty pile design process, artificial neural networks (ANN) are adopted. To generate the training samples for training ANN, finite element (FE) analysis was performed 50 times for 50 different design cases. The trained ANN was verified with another FE analysis case and then used as a structural analyzer. The multilayer neural network (MBPNN) with two hidden layers was used for ANN. The framework of MBPNN was defined as the input with the lateral forces on the jetty structure and the type of piles and the output with the stress ratio of the piles. The results from the MBPNN agree well with those from FE analysis. Particularly for more complex modes with hundreds of different design cases, the MBPNN would possibly substitute parametric studies with FE analysis saving design time and cost. PMID:25177724

  13. Avalanche prediction in a self-organized pile of beads.

    PubMed

    Ramos, O; Altshuler, E; Måløy, K J

    2009-02-20

    It is a common belief that power-law distributed avalanches are inherently unpredictable. This idea affects phenomena as diverse as evolution, earthquakes, superconducting vortices, stock markets, etc., from atomic to social scales. It mainly comes from the concept of "self-organized criticality" (SOC), where criticality is interpreted in the way that, at any moment, any small avalanche can eventually cascade into a large event. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates experimentally the possibility of avalanche prediction in the classical paradigm of SOC: a pile of grains. By knowing the position of every grain in a two-dimensional pile, avalanches of moving grains follow a distinct power-law distribution. Large avalanches, although uncorrelated, are on average preceded by continuous, detectable variations in the internal structure of the pile that are monitored in order to achieve prediction.

  14. Avalanche Prediction in a Self-Organized Pile of Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, O.; Altshuler, E.; Måløy, K. J.

    2009-02-01

    It is a common belief that power-law distributed avalanches are inherently unpredictable. This idea affects phenomena as diverse as evolution, earthquakes, superconducting vortices, stock markets, etc., from atomic to social scales. It mainly comes from the concept of “self-organized criticality” (SOC), where criticality is interpreted in the way that, at any moment, any small avalanche can eventually cascade into a large event. Nevertheless, this work demonstrates experimentally the possibility of avalanche prediction in the classical paradigm of SOC: a pile of grains. By knowing the position of every grain in a two-dimensional pile, avalanches of moving grains follow a distinct power-law distribution. Large avalanches, although uncorrelated, are on average preceded by continuous, detectable variations in the internal structure of the pile that are monitored in order to achieve prediction.

  15. A simple approach for calculating pile skin friction in clays

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, U.A.A.

    1995-12-31

    A simple method is presented for calculating static shaft resistance of a pile driven into clay. The method is based on correlations established for North Sea clays between index properties and strengths. Application of the method to half a dozen full scale pile load tests which are part of the API RP2A`s data base and include a wide range of plasticity properties, overconsolidation ratios and strengths, is described. Except for short piles in very stiff to hard clays, the predictions agree very well with the measurements. The correlations presented allows an assessment of residual skin friction and indicate the importance of the liquidity index of the clay in static capacity calculations.

  16. Cumulative Damage in Strength-Dominated Collisions of Rocky Asteroids: Rubble Piles and Brick Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory impact experiments were performed to investigate the conditions that produce large-scale damage in rock targets. Aluminum cylinders (6.3 mm diameter) impacted basalt cylinders (69 mm diameter) at speeds ranging from 0.7 to 2.0 km/s. Diagnostics included measurements of the largest fragment mass, velocities of the largest remnant and large fragments ejected from the periphery of the target, and X-ray computed tomography imaging to inspect some of the impacted targets for internal damage. Significant damage to the target occurred when the kinetic energy per unit target mass exceeded roughly 1/4 of the energy required for catastrophic shattering (where the target is reduced to one-half its original mass). Scaling laws based on a rate-dependent strength were developed that provide a basis for extrapolating the results to larger strength-dominated collisions. The threshold specific energy for widespread damage was found to scale with event size in the same manner as that for catastrophic shattering. Therefore, the factor of four difference between the two thresholds observed in the lab also applies to larger collisions. The scaling laws showed that for a sequence of collisions that are similar in that they produce the same ratio of largest fragment mass to original target mass, the fragment velocities decrease with increasing event size. As a result, rocky asteroids a couple hundred meters in diameter should retain their large ejecta fragments in a jumbled rubble-pile state. For somewhat larger bodies, the ejection velocities are sufficiently low that large fragments are essentially retained in place, possibly forming ordered "brick-pile" structures.

  17. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  18. 75 FR 75845 - National Impaired Driving Prevention Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... active role in preventing debilitated driving. Individuals, families, businesses, community organizations... employees from texting while driving on Government business or when using a Government device. This...

  19. 27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. The top of a typical pile, F Reactor in February 1945 in this case, showing the vertical safety rods (VSRs) and the cables that support them. The rods could be dropped into the pile to effect a rapid shutdown. The four silvered-colored drums on the left contained boron solution and are part of the last ditch safety system. Should the VSRs channels become blocked by an occurrence such as an earthquake, the solution could be dumped into the VSR channels to help shut down the reactor. D-8334 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  20. Thermocouples For High Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding and structural materials. Data are needed to characeterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed htat can survive proposed test conditions. Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project was intiated to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications (see Rempe and Wilkins, 2005). This paper summarizes efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate these specialized thermocouples.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of a jacket type offshore structure considering non-linear behavior of pile foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Aaghaakouchak, A.A.; Asgarian, B.

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic characteristics of a typical six legged jacket type platform in Persian Gulf have been studied. An equivalent linearized pile stub has been used to model the pile-soil system. The properties of pile stub have been calculated for different levels of the pile-head deformations resulting from the action of different waves. Natural frequencies and mode shapes of resulting linear models have been determined and compared to each other.

  2. Alteration and arenization processes of granitic waste rock piles from former uranium Mines in Limousin, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzari, Aisha; Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Galoisy, Laurence; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    France counts approximately 200 former uranium mines, 50 of which are located in the Limousin region. Mining activities between 1945 and 2001 have generated close to 200 000 tons of waste rocks in the Limousin, with uranium levels corresponding essentially to the geological background. Waste rock piles from three former mining sites in this region, were selected according to their age, uranium content and petrological signature. These sites are part of the two-mica granitic complex of St Sylvestre massif, formed 324 million years ago. Granitic blocks that build up the waste rock piles have experienced different processes and intensities of alteration before their emplacement at the surface. These processes are responsible for the petrological heterogeneity throughout the waste rock pile at the time of construction. It is important to make a distinction within waste rocks between natural-cut-off waste rocks and economic-cut-off waste rocks. The latter represents a minority and is linked to stock prices. Natural-cut-off waste rocks contain about 20 ppm of uranium; economic-cut-off waste rocks contain about 100 to 300 ppm of uranium. The aims of this study are to 1) assess the neo-formation of U-bearing minerals hosted by these rocks, and 2) to characterize the weathering processes since the construction of the rock piles, including both mechanical and chemical processes. The structure of the waste rocks piles, from metric blocks to boulders of tens centimeters, induces an enhanced weathering rate, compared to a granitic massif. Mechanical fracturing and chemical leaching by rainwater (arenization) of the waste rocks produce a sandy-silty alteration phase. Silty-clay weathering aureoles of submetric-granitic blocks evolving into technic soil are mainly located below growing birch trees. Sampling on the rock piles was restricted to surface rocks. Samples collected consist mainly of granites, and rare lamprophyres with a high radiometric signal, thereby especially

  3. Npas4 Is Activated by Melatonin, and Drives the Clock Gene Cry1 in the Ovine Pars Tuberalis

    PubMed Central

    West, A.; Dupré, S.M.; Yu, L.; Paton, I.R.; Miedzinska, K.; McNeilly, A.S.; Davis, J.R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal mammals integrate changes in the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion to drive annual physiologic cycles. Melatonin receptors within the proximal pituitary region, the pars tuberalis (PT), are essential in regulating seasonal neuroendocrine responses. In the ovine PT, melatonin is known to influence acute changes in transcriptional dynamics coupled to the onset (dusk) and offset (dawn) of melatonin secretion, leading to a potential interval-timing mechanism capable of decoding changes in day length (photoperiod). Melatonin offset at dawn is linked to cAMP accumulation, which directly induces transcription of the clock gene Per1. The rise of melatonin at dusk induces a separate and distinct cohort, including the clock-regulated genes Cry1 and Nampt, but little is known of the up-stream mechanisms involved. Here, we used next-generation sequencing of the ovine PT transcriptome at melatonin onset and identified Npas4 as a rapidly induced basic helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim domain transcription factor. In vivo we show nuclear localization of NPAS4 protein in presumptive melatonin target cells of the PT (α-glycoprotein hormone-expressing cells), whereas in situ hybridization studies identified acute and transient expression in the PT of Npas4 in response to melatonin. In vitro, NPAS4 forms functional dimers with basic helix loop helix-PAS domain cofactors aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), ARNT2, and ARNTL, transactivating both Cry1 and Nampt ovine promoter reporters. Using a combination of 5′-deletions and site-directed mutagenesis, we show NPAS4-ARNT transactivation to be codependent upon two conserved central midline elements within the Cry1 promoter. Our data thus reveal NPAS4 as a candidate immediate early-response gene in the ovine PT, driving molecular responses to melatonin. PMID:23598442

  4. Geochemical characterization of acid mine drainage from a waste rock pile, Mine Doyon, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sracek, O.; Choquette, M.; Gélinas, P.; Lefebvre, R.; Nicholson, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Water quality in the unsaturated and saturated zones of a waste rock pile containing sulphides was investigated. The main objectives of the project were (1) the evaluation of geochemical trends including the acid mine drainage (AMD)-buffering mechanism and the role of secondary minerals, and (2) the investigation of the use of stable isotopes for the interpretation of physical and geochemical processes in waste rock. Pore water in unsaturated zone was sampled from suction lysimeters and with piezometers in underlying saturated rocks. The investigation revealed strong temporal (dry period vs. recharge period), and spatial (slope vs. central region of pile) variability in the formation of acid mine drainage. The main secondary minerals observed were gypsum and jarosite. There was a higher concentration of gypsum in solid phase at Site TBT than at Site 6, suggesting that part of the gypsum formed at Site 6 in the early stage of AMD has been already dissolved. Formation of secondary minerals contributed to the formation of AMD by opening of foliation planes in waste rock, thus increasing the access of oxidants like O 2 and Fe 3+ to previously encapsulated pyrite. The behavior of several dissolved species such as Mg, Al, and Fe 2+ can be considered as conservative in the leachate. Stable isotopes, deuterium and 18O, indicated internal evaporation within the pile, and were used to trace recharge pulses from snowmelt. Isotope trends for 34S and 18O(SO 4) indicated a lack of sulfate reduction and zones of active oxidation of pyrite, respectively. Results of numerical modeling of pyrite oxidation and gas and water transport were consistent with geochemical and isotopic trends and confirmed zones of high evaporation rate within the rock pile close to the slope. The results indicate that physical and chemical processes within the pile are strongly coupled and cannot be considered separately when oxidation rates are high and influence gas transport as a result of heat

  5. Risk-Taking Behavior in a Computerized Driving Task: Brain Activation Correlates of Decision-Making, Outcome, and Peer Influence in Male Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyev, Victor; Kwon, Myoung Soo; Moe, Dagfinn; Parkkola, Riitta; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2015-01-01

    Increased propensity for risky behavior in adolescents, particularly in peer groups, is thought to reflect maturational imbalance between reward processing and cognitive control systems that affect decision-making. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain functional correlates of risk-taking behavior and effects of peer influence in 18–19-year-old male adolescents. The subjects were divided into low and high risk-taking groups using either personality tests or risk-taking rates in a simulated driving task. The fMRI data were analyzed for decision-making (whether to take a risk at intersections) and outcome (pass or crash) phases, and for the influence of peer competition. Personality test-based groups showed no difference in the amount of risk-taking (similarly increased during peer competition) and brain activation. When groups were defined by actual task performance, risk-taking activated two areas in the left medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) significantly more in low than in high risk-takers. In the entire sample, risky decision-specific activation was found in the anterior and dorsal cingulate, superior parietal cortex, basal ganglia (including the nucleus accumbens), midbrain, thalamus, and hypothalamus. Peer competition increased outcome-related activation in the right caudate head and cerebellar vermis in the entire sample. Our results suggest that the activation of the medial (rather than lateral) PFC and striatum is most specific to risk-taking behavior of male adolescents in a simulated driving situation, and reflect a stronger conflict and thus increased cognitive effort to take risks in low risk-takers, and reward anticipation for risky decisions, respectively. The activation of the caudate nucleus, particularly for the positive outcome (pass) during peer competition, further suggests enhanced reward processing of risk-taking under peer influence. PMID:26052943

  6. A Pressuremeter Method for Single Piles Subjected to Cyclic Lateral Loads in Sand

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    Tests at the University of Houston Foundation Test Facility Sand Site. Is-p 103 -k % Figure 66. Come of Depresion Around Driven ,:.. Co ne Pr e s u r...curves, the model piles for which placement entailed post- compaction were treated as bored piles. The others were driven piles and treated as such

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions during composting of dairy manure: Delaying pile mixing does not reduce overall emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of the timing of pile mixing on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during dairy manure composting was determined using large flux chambers designed to completely cover replicate pilot-scale compost piles. GHG emissions from compost piles that were mixed at 2, 3, 4, or 5 weeks after initial c...

  8. COOPERATIVE MARINE PILING INVESTIGATION - PHASE III. INSPECTION AFTER FOUR YEARS EXPOSURE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The Cooperative Piling Committee and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command exposed 54 specially treated piles at Coco Solo Annex, Rodman Naval...undamaged by marine borers. In March 1967, after 4 years of exposure, 8 of the 54 piles at Coco Solo have been attacked by Limnoria and one was also

  9. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 780.25 Section 780.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  10. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 784.16 Section 784.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  11. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 784.16 Section 784.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  12. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 780.25 Section 780.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  13. 30 CFR 780.25 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 780.25 Section 780.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  14. 30 CFR 784.16 - Reclamation plan: Siltation structures, impoundments, and refuse piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., impoundments, and refuse piles. 784.16 Section 784.16 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION..., and refuse piles. (a) General. Each application must include a general plan and a detailed design plan for each proposed siltation structure, impoundment, and refuse pile within the proposed permit...

  15. 40 CFR 761.347 - First level sampling-waste from existing piles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... destined for off-site disposal stacked up uniformly to a peak that is a point centered above the center of...) Setting up the sample site selection system from a pile. Locate a sample in a pile by the use of three... distance around the bottom of the pile. Determine r from b in one of two ways: (1) Multiply c by a...

  16. Driving on the Descartes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 16 mission commander, drives the 'Rover', Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to its final parking place near the end of the third extravehicular activity (EVA-3) at the Descartes landing site. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot, took this photograph looking southward. The flank of Stone Mountain can be seen on the horizon at left. The shadow of the Lunar Module 'Orion' is visible in the foreground.

  17. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  18. Study on the Deformation Measurement of the Cast-In-Place Large-Diameter Pile Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lei; Yang, Kai; Chen, Xiaorui; Yu, Xiangjuan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with conventional piles such as the circle pile, the cast-in-place large-diameter pile (PCC pile) has many advantages: the lateral area of PCC pile is larger and the bearing capacity of PCC pile is higher. It is more cost-effective than other piles such as square pile under the same condition. The deformation of the PCC pile is very important for its application. In order to obtain the deformation of the PCC pile, a new type of quasi-distributed optical fiber sensing technology named a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used to monitor the deformation of the PCC pile. The PCC model pile is made, the packaging process of the PCC model pile and the layout of fiber sensors are designed, and the strains of the PCC model pile based on FBG sensors are monitored. The strain of the PCC pile is analyzed by the static load test. The results show that FBG technology is successfully applied for monitoring the deformation of the PCC pile, the monitoring data is more useful for the PCC pile. It will provide a reference for the engineering applications. PMID:28273817

  19. Study on the Deformation Measurement of the Cast-In-Place Large-Diameter Pile Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Yang, Kai; Chen, Xiaorui; Yu, Xiangjuan

    2017-03-03

    Compared with conventional piles such as the circle pile, the cast-in-place large-diameter pile (PCC pile) has many advantages: the lateral area of PCC pile is larger and the bearing capacity of PCC pile is higher. It is more cost-effective than other piles such as square pile under the same condition. The deformation of the PCC pile is very important for its application. In order to obtain the deformation of the PCC pile, a new type of quasi-distributed optical fiber sensing technology named a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is used to monitor the deformation of the PCC pile. The PCC model pile is made, the packaging process of the PCC model pile and the layout of fiber sensors are designed, and the strains of the PCC model pile based on FBG sensors are monitored. The strain of the PCC pile is analyzed by the static load test. The results show that FBG technology is successfully applied for monitoring the deformation of the PCC pile, the monitoring data is more useful for the PCC pile. It will provide a reference for the engineering applications.

  20. Behavior of pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-min; Gu, Ming; Chen, Ren-peng; Kong, Ling-gang; Zhang, Zhe-hang; Bian, Xue-cheng

    2015-06-01

    The pile group with elevated cap is widely used as foundation of offshore structures such as turbines, power transmission towers and bridge piers, and understanding its behavior under cyclic lateral loads induced by waves, tide water and winds, is of great importance to designing. A large-scale model test on 3×3 pile group with elevated cap subjected to cyclic lateral loads was performed in saturated silts. The preparation and implementation of the test is presented. Steel pipes with the outer diameter of 114 mm, thickness of 4.5 mm, and length of 6 m were employed as model piles. The pile group was cyclic loaded in a multi-stage sequence with the lateral displacement controlled. In addition, a single pile test was also conducted at the same site for comparison. The displacement of the pile cap, the internal forces of individual piles, and the horizontal stiffness of the pile group are presented and discussed in detail. The results indicate that the lateral cyclic loads have a greater impact on pile group than that on a single pile, and give rise to the significant plastic strain in the soil around piles. The lateral loads carried by each row of piles within the group would be redistributed with loading cycles. The lateral stiffness of the pile group decreases gradually with cycles and broadly presents three different degradation patterns in the test. Significant axial forces were measured out in some piles within the group, owing to the strong restraint provided by the cap, and finally lead to a large settlement of the pile group. These findings can be referred for foundation designing of offshore structures.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's activities to achieve ignition by x-ray drive on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, T P; Hammel, B A; Kauffman, R L; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; MacGowan, B J; Paisner, J A; Powell, H T

    1998-07-20

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a MJ-class glass laser-based facility funded by the Department of Energy which has achieving thermonuclear ignition and moderate gain as one of its main objectives. In the summer of 1998, the project is about 40% complete, and design and construction is on schedule and on cost. The NIF will start firing onto targets in 2001, and will achieve full energy in 2004. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), together with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have the main responsibility for achieving x-ray driven ignition on the NIF. In the 1990's, a comprehensive series of experiments on Nova at LLNL, followed by recent experiments on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, demonstrated confidence in understanding the physics of x-ray drive implosions. The same physics at equivalent scales is used in calculations to predict target performance on the NIF, giving credence to calculations of ignition on the NIF. An integrated program of work in preparing the NIF for x-ray driven ignition in about 2007, and the key issues being addressed on the current ICF facilities [(Nova, Omega, Z at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and NIKE at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)] are described.

  2. 61. Picking Floor, Large Pile of Waste Rock and Wood ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Picking Floor, Large Pile of Waste Rock and Wood date unknown Historic Photograph, Photographer Unknown; Collection of William Everett, Jr. (Wilkes-Barre, PA), photocopy by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  3. Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling.

    PubMed

    Van Renterghem, T; Botteldooren, D; Dekoninck, L

    2014-02-01

    Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology, the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study, detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10 km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2, 3, and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface, which decreases sound pressure levels, exceeds refractive effects, which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind, even when blowing downwind to potential receivers, is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario.

  4. Aerial sampling of emissions from biomass pile burns in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5 µm), black carbon, ultraviolet absorbing PM, elemental/organic carbon, semi-volatile organics (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans), filter-based metals, and volatile organics were sampled for determination of emission factors. The effect on emissions from covering or not covering piles with polyethylene sheets to prevent fuel wetting was determined. Results showed that the uncovered (“wet”) piles burned with lower combustion efficiency and higher emissions of volatile organic compounds. Results for other pollutants will also be discussed. This work determined the emissions from open burning of forest slash wood, with and without plastic sheeting. The foresters advocate the use of plastic to keep the slash wood dry and aid in the controlled combustion of the slash to reduce fuel loading. Concerns about the emissions from the burning plastic prompted this work which conducted an extensive characterization of dry, wet, and dry with plastic slash pile emissions.

  5. VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK, LOOKING WESTSOUTHWEST, BASEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PROCESS DEVELOPMENT PILE (PDP) TANK, LOOKING WEST-SOUTHWEST, BASEMENT LEVEL -15’. EDGE O FRESONANCE TEST REACTOR (RTR), LATER KNOWN AS LATTICE TEST REACTOR (LTR), VISIBLE TO RIGHT OF PDP TANK - Physics Assembly Laboratory, Area A/M, Savannah River Site, Aiken, Aiken County, SC

  6. Detail section extending from shore. Note the paired support pilings, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail section extending from shore. Note the paired support pilings, concrete curbs with rectangular openings for drainage, and large-diameter metal pipe suspended under the deck. USS MISSOURI in background - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Gasoline Wharf, Offshore, near the intersection of Hornet Avenue & Curtis Street, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 5. VIEW OF UPPER NOTTINGHAM TAILING PILES LOOKING TOWARDS ROCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF UPPER NOTTINGHAM TAILING PILES LOOKING TOWARDS ROCK WALL VISIBLE ON SLOPE JUST RIGHT OF CENTER. CAMERA POINTED SOUTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  8. 3. VIEW OF EMPIRE STATE MINE WITH TAILING PILE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF EMPIRE STATE MINE WITH TAILING PILE IN BOTTOM LEFT AND COLLAPSED ADIT LOCATED BELOW DARK SHADOWS IN FAR RIGHT/LOWER THIRD. COLLAPSED BUILDING AND PARTIAL VIEW OF ORE CHUTE/BIN IS VISIBLE ON HILLSIDE ABOVE TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED NORTH/NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Empire State Mine, West side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  9. The impact of wind energy turbine piles on ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grashorn, Sebastian; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-04-01

    The small- and meso-scale ocean response to wind parks has not been investigated in the southern North Sea until now with the help of high-resolution numerical modelling. Obstacles such as e.g. wind turbine piles may influence the ocean current system and produce turbulent kinetic energy which could affect sediment dynamics in the surrounding area. Two setups of the unstructured-grid model SCHISM (Semi-implicit Cross-scale Hydroscience Integrated System Model) have been developed for an idealized channel including a surface piercing cylindrical obstacle representing the pile and a more realistic test case including four exemplary piles. Experiments using a constant flow around the obstacles and a rotating M2 tidal wave are carried out. The resulting current and turbulence patterns are investigated to estimate the influence of the obstacles on the surrounding ocean dynamics. We demonstrate that using an unstructured ocean model provides the opportunity to embed a high-resolution representation of a wind park turbine pile system into a coarser North Sea setup, which is needed in order to perform a seamless investigation of the resulting geophysical processes.

  10. SPH simulations of impacts on rubble pile asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, J.; Lowry, S.; Price, M. C.; Sierks, H.; Snodgrass, C.

    2013-09-01

    Many rubble pile asteroids with low bulk densities, like Itokawa, must include a high level of macroporosity, probably more than 40% [1]. Although little is known about their internal structure, numerical simulations of impact events on these rubble pile asteroids rely on assumptions on how the voids are distributed. While most hydrocodes do not distinguish between microand macroporosity, Benavidez et al. [2] introduced a rubble pile model where the asteroid is represented as a spherical target shell filled with an uneven distribution of basalt spheres ranging in radius from 8% to 20% of the asteroid's radius. In this study, we present a new approach to create rubble pile simulants for the use in impact simulations and quantify the dependence of impact outcomes on the internal structure of the target. The formation of the asteroid is modelled as a gravitational aggregation of spherical 'pebbles', that form the building blocks of our target. This aggregate is then converted into a high-resolution Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model, which also accounts for macroporosity inside the pebbles'. To simulate high-velocity impacts on these models, we use the SPH solver in the code Autodyn. We will compare impact event outcomes for a large set of internal configurations to explore the parameter space of our model-building process. The analysis of the fragment size distribution and the disruption threshold will quantify the specific influence of each set-up parameter. This work is ongoing and we will present preliminary results at the meeting.

  11. Aerial sampling of emissions from biomass pile burns in Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5 µm), ...

  12. Enhanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material Testing Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley

    2012-07-01

    An increasing number of U.S. nuclear research programs are requesting enhanced in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiations. For example, fuel research and development funded by the U.S. Department of Energy now emphasize approaches that rely on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data must be miniature, reliable and able to withstand high flux/high temperature conditions. Depending on user requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these user needs, in-pile instrumentation development efforts have been initiated as part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF), the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D), and the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) programs. This paper reports on recent INL achievements to support these programs. Specifically, an overview of the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to MTR users are identified. In addition, recent results and products available from sensor research and development are detailed. Specifically, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and thermal conductivity are reported. Results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are also summarized.

  13. Rate of loading parameters for vertically loaded piles in clay

    SciTech Connect

    Briaud, J.L.; Felio, G.Y.; Garland, E.

    1984-05-01

    The analysis of 152 laboratory tests and 32 pile load tests confirms that for clays, the faster the rate of loading, the higher the undrained shear strength and the higher the pile capacity. The data shows that the gain in undrained shear strength due to increasing rate of loading increases with increasing water content, plasticity index, liquidity index, overconsolidation ratio but with decreasing undrained shear strength. A simple model is proposed to quantify the rate of loading effects on undrained shear strength. The viscous exponent n which is the main parameter of the model can be measured by conventional laboratory tests or possibly by cone penetrometer testing, or as a last resort by the proposed empirical correlations to index properties. This model is used to develop rate dependent t-z curves and a computer program to predict the response of a pile subjected to a certain rate of vertical loading. The model and the program are checked by comparing the predicted and measured behavior of two piles.

  14. Corrosion in prestressed concrete: Pipes, piles, and decks

    SciTech Connect

    Szeliga, M.

    1995-12-31

    This is the first compilation or book focusing on prestressed concrete. It features 21 classic NACE papers on prestressed concrete piping, piles, bridge decks, and cathodic protection. It includes basic corrosion mechanisms of prestressed concrete structures with detailed case histories of corrosion failures and corrective measures.

  15. Aerial Sampling of Emissions from Biomass Pile Burns in Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract (already cleared). Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, pa...

  16. 11. Historic drawing, Pier 10. Plan of deck and pilings, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Historic drawing, Pier 10. Plan of deck and pilings, 1932. Photographic copy of original. Boston National Historical Park Archives, Charlestown Navy Yard. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  18. 1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW FROM BONY PILE LOOKING SOUTH. WASH HOUSE IN LEFT BACKGROUND. TIPPLE AND CLEANING PLANT TO RIGHT. IN CENTER IS A TANK USED FOR TREATING MINE REFUSE AND ACID RUNOFF. - Eureka No. 40, Tipple & Cleaning Plant, East of State Route 56, north of Little Paint Creek, Scalp Level, Cambria County, PA

  19. Driving When You Have Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Driving When You Have Parkinson’s Disease DRIVEWELL You have been a safe driver for years. For you, driving means freedom and control. As you get older, ... it can interfere with your daily activities, including driving safely. Early symptoms vary from person to person, ...

  20. A population of gap junction-coupled neurons drives recurrent network activity in a developing visual circuit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyu; Ciarleglio, Christopher M.; Hamodi, Ali S.; Aizenman, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    In many regions of the vertebrate brain, microcircuits generate local recurrent activity that aids in the processing and encoding of incoming afferent inputs. Local recurrent activity can amplify, filter, and temporally and spatially parse out incoming input. Determining how these microcircuits function is of great interest because it provides glimpses into fundamental processes underlying brain computation. Within the Xenopus tadpole optic tectum, deep layer neurons display robust recurrent activity. Although the development and plasticity of this local recurrent activity has been well described, the underlying microcircuitry is not well understood. Here, using a whole brain preparation that allows for whole cell recording from neurons of the superficial tectal layers, we identified a physiologically distinct population of excitatory neurons that are gap junctionally coupled and through this coupling gate local recurrent network activity. Our findings provide a novel role for neuronal coupling among excitatory interneurons in the temporal processing of visual stimuli. PMID:26763780

  1. Simplified Analysis Procedures for Flexible Approach Wall Systems Founded on Groups of Piles and Subjected to Barge Train Impact

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    top (Hf) is equal to 0.51. The moment below the mudline ( Mmf ) occurring at the time the moment at the pile to pile cap connection reaches ultimate is...mudline ( Mmf ) occurring at the time the moment at the pile to pile cap connection reaches ultimate is equal to: ( ) ( )( ). . , . hf mf f P T M H

  2. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, I. Matias; Combe, Gaeel; Foray, Pierre; Flin, Frederic; Lesaffre, Bernard

    2013-06-18

    Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety of cyclic loading paths due to their complex environment. While many studies focus on global pile behaviour, the soil-pile interface is explored here by a micromechanical study of the soil layer in contact with the pile surface. This work is devoted to the analysis of frozen post-mortem silica sand samples recovered at the pile interface following installation and cyclic loading tests in a calibration chamber using x-ray tomography. An experimental procedure developed for three dimensional (3D) snow imaging was adapted for the recovery of the in-situ sand samples to preserve their structure during tomography scans. 3D images at a pixel size of 7 {mu}m were then obtained using a cryogenic cell. Results confirm the presence of a shear band at the pile surface as well as void ratios changes in the direction of the pile's radius.

  3. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, I. Matías; Combe, Gaël; Foray, Pierre; Flin, Frédéric; Lesaffre, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety of cyclic loading paths due to their complex environment. While many studies focus on global pile behaviour, the soil-pile interface is explored here by a micromechanical study of the soil layer in contact with the pile surface. This work is devoted to the analysis of frozen post-mortem silica sand samples recovered at the pile interface following installation and cyclic loading tests in a calibration chamber using x-ray tomography. An experimental procedure developed for three dimensional (3D) snow imaging was adapted for the recovery of the in-situ sand samples to preserve their structure during tomography scans. 3D images at a pixel size of 7 μm were then obtained using a cryogenic cell. Results confirm the presence of a shear band at the pile surface as well as void ratios changes in the direction of the pile's radius.

  4. Car driving with and without a movable back support: Effect on transmission of vibration through the trunk and on its consequences for muscle activation and spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Kingma, Idsart; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of a movable backrest on vibration transmission through the trunk during driving and on the physiological consequences thereof. Eleven healthy male subjects drove for about 1 h on normal roads with a movable and with a fixed backrest while surface electromyography (EMG) was measured at the level of the fifth lumbar vertebra (L5) and vertical accelerations were measured at the seat, backrest and at the spine at the levels of the second sacral vertebra (S2) and seventh cervical vertebra (C7). The movable backrest significantly reduced accelerations at C7 by up to 11.9% at the 5 Hz frequency band. The movable backrest also significantly reduced the coherence and transmission between S2 and C7 accelerations, but not the differential motion between these sensors. EMG at both sides of L5 was on average 28% lower when using the movable backrest. Spinal shrinkage was unaffected by backrest type. It is concluded that a movable backrest reduces the transmission of vibration through the trunk and that it reduces low back EMG. Car driving is associated with the risk of developing low back pain and this may be related to exposure to whole body vibration. This study found an effect of a simple ergonomics measure on the transmission of vibration through the trunk as well as on back muscle activation.

  5. Cosmological, large-scale simulations of BH growth: demographics, the AGN-host connection and the relevance of mergers in driving nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, Michaela; Dolag, Klaus; Bachmann, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    We provide new insights into the cosmic evolution of black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies by employing large-scale cosmological, hydrodynamic simulations capturing a huge volume of (500 Mpc)3. They are shown to be successful in reproducing a number of observational, statistical constraints, e.g. the evolution of the AGN luminosity function (in the soft and hard X-ray band) together with the corresponding downsizing trend. This is mainly due to the evolution of the gas density in the vicinity of a BH and due to the correction for dust obscuration on a torus-level. We further demonstrate that only luminous AGN are preferentially triggered by merger events, while for the majority of moderately luminous AGN, additional driving mechanisms seem to be necessary. Exploring the AGN-host connection, we find that host SFRs and AGN luminosities are always correlated (albeit with a large scatter) when averaging over the AGN luminosities (but not when averaging over SFR) in reasonably good agreement with recent observations. Interestingly, for the most luminous AGN, a slightly tighter and steeper correlation between AGN luminosities and SFRs emerges, which may originate from the increasing relevance of mergers in driving their nuclear activity. Overall, the new generation AGN, BH and galaxy catalogues, provided by our simulation, are expected to significantly contribute to the interpretation of current and up-coming large-scale surveys (XMM, ATHENA, eRosita, Euclid) with respect to the evolution of BHs within the emerging cosmic structure.

  6. Novel activation domain derived from Che-1 cofactor coupled with the artificial protein Jazz drives utrophin upregulation.

    PubMed

    Desantis, Agata; Onori, Annalisa; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Passananti, Claudio; Corbi, Nicoletta

    2009-02-01

    Our aim is to upregulate the expression level of the dystrophin related gene utrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, thus complementing the lack of dystrophin functions. To this end, we have engineered synthetic zinc finger based transcription factors. We have previously shown that the artificial three-zinc finger protein named Jazz fused with the Vp16 activation domain, is able to bind utrophin promoter A and to increase the endogenous level of utrophin in transgenic mice. Here, we report on an innovative artificial protein, named CJ7, that consists of Jazz DNA binding domain fused to a novel activation domain derived from the regulatory multivalent adaptor protein Che-1/AATF. This transcriptional activation domain is 100 amino acids in size and it is very powerful as compared to the Vp16 activation domain. We show that CJ7 protein efficiently promotes transcription and accumulation of the acetylated form of histone H3 on the genomic utrophin promoter locus.

  7. Human U6 promoter drives stronger shRNA activity than its schistosome orthologue in Schistosoma mansoni and human fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Duvoisin, Raphaël; Ayuk, Mary A; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mann, Victoria H; Lee, Clarence M; Harris, Nicola; Brindley, Paul J

    2012-06-01

    Blood flukes or schistosomes are the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, one of the major neglected tropical diseases. Draft genome sequences have been reported for schistosomes, but functional genomics tools are needed to investigate the role and essentiality of the newly reported genes. Vector based RNA interference can contribute to functional genomics analysis for schistosomes. Using mRNA encoding reporter firefly luciferase as a model target, we compared the performance of a schistosome and a human promoter from the U6 gene in driving shRNA in human fibrosarcoma cells and in cultured schistosomes. Further, both a retroviral [Murine leukemia virus (MLV)] and plasmid (piggyBac, pXL-Bac II) vector were utilized. The schistosome U6 gene promoter was 270 bp in length, the human U6 gene promoter was 264 bp; they shared 41% identity. Following transduction of both HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and schistosomules of Schistosoma mansoni with pseudotyped MLV virions, stronger knockdown of luciferase activity was seen with the virions encoding the human U6 promoter driven shRNA than the schistosome U6 promoter. A similar trend was seen after transfection of HT1080 cells and schistosomules with the pXL-Bac-II constructs-stronger knockdown of luciferase activity was seen with constructs encoding the human compared to schistosome U6 promoter. The findings indicate that a human U6 gene promoter drives stronger shRNA activity than its schistosome orthologue, not only in a human cancer cell line but also in larval schistosomes. This RNA polymerase III promoter represents a potentially valuable component for vector based RNA interference studies in schistosomes and related platyhelminth parasites.

  8. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated.

  9. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  10. DMXL2 drives epithelial to mesenchymal transition in hormonal therapy resistant breast cancer through Notch hyper-activation.

    PubMed

    Faronato, Monica; Nguyen, Van T M; Patten, Darren K; Lombardo, Ylenia; Steel, Jennifer H; Patel, Naina; Woodley, Laura; Shousha, Sami; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Coombes, R Charles; Magnani, Luca

    2015-09-08

    The acquisition of endocrine therapy resistance in estrogen receptor α (ERα) breast cancer patients represents a major clinical problem. Notch signalling has been extensively linked to breast cancer especially in patients who fail to respond to endocrine therapy. Following activation, Notch intracellular domain is released and enters the nucleus where activates transcription of target genes. The numerous steps that cascade after activation of the receptor complicate using Notch as biomarker. Hence, this warrants the development of reliable indicators of Notch activity. DMXL2 is a novel regulator of Notch signalling not yet investigated in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that DMXL2 is overexpressed in a subset of endocrine therapy resistant breast cancer cell lines where it promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition through hyper-activation of Notch signalling via V-ATPase dependent acidification. Following DMXL2 depletion or treatment with Bafilomycin A1, both EMT targets and Notch signalling pathway significantly decrease. We show for the first time that DMXL2 protein levels are significantly increased in ERα positive breast cancer patients that progress after endocrine therapy. Finally, we demonstrate that DMXL2 is a transmembrane protein with a potential extra-cellular domain. These findings identify DMXL2 as a novel, functional biomarker for ERα positive breast cancer.

  11. The extracellular matrix microtopography drives critical changes in cellular motility and Rho A activity in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rapier, Rebecca; Huq, Jameela; Vishnubhotla, Ramana; Bulic, Marinka; Perrault, Cecile M; Metlushko, Vitali; Cho, Michael; Tay, Roger Tran Son; Glover, Sarah C

    2010-07-28

    We have shown that the microtopography (mT) underlying colon cancer changes as a tumor de-differentiates. We distinguish the well-differentiated mT based on the increasing number of "pits" and poorly differentiated mT on the basis of increasing number of "posts." We investigated Rho A as a mechanosensing protein using mT features derived from those observed in the ECM of colon cancer. We evaluated Rho A activity in less-tumorogenic (Caco-2 E) and more tumorigenic (SW620) colon cancer cell-lines on microfabricated pits and posts at 2.5 mum diameter and 200 nm depth/height. In Caco-2 E cells, we observed a decrease in Rho A activity as well as in the ratio of G/F actin on surfaces with either pits or posts but despite this low activity, knockdown of Rho A led to a significant decrease in confined motility suggesting that while Rho A activity is reduced on these surfaces it still plays an important role in controlling cellular response to barriers. In SW620 cells, we observed that Rho A activity was greatest in cells plated on a post microtopography which led to increased cell motility, and an increase in actin cytoskeletal turnover.

  12. DMXL2 drives epithelial to mesenchymal transition in hormonal therapy resistant breast cancer through notch hyper-activation

    PubMed Central

    Faronato, Monica; Nguyen, Van T.M.; Patten, Darren K.; Lombardo, Ylenia; Steel, Jennifer H.; Patel, Naina; Woodley, Laura; Shousha, Sami; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Coombes, R. Charles; Magnani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of endocrine therapy resistance in estrogen receptor α (ERα) breast cancer patients represents a major clinical problem. Notch signalling has been extensively linked to breast cancer especially in patients who fail to respond to endocrine therapy. Following activation, Notch intracellular domain is released and enters the nucleus where activates transcription of target genes. The numerous steps that cascade after activation of the receptor complicate using Notch as biomarker. Hence, this warrants the development of reliable indicators of Notch activity. DMXL2 is a novel regulator of Notch signalling not yet investigated in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that DMXL2 is overexpressed in a subset of endocrine therapy resistant breast cancer cell lines where it promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition through hyper-activation of Notch signalling via V-ATPase dependent acidification. Following DMXL2 depletion or treatment with Bafilomycin A1, both EMT targets and Notch signalling pathway significantly decrease. We show for the first time that DMXL2 protein levels are significantly increased in ERα positive breast cancer patients that progress after endocrine therapy. Finally, we demonstrate that DMXL2 is a transmembrane protein with a potential extra-cellular domain. These findings identify DMXL2 as a novel, functional biomarker for ERα positive breast cancer. PMID:26093085

  13. Conditions of Proper Interaction of Low-Pressure Injection Piles (LIP) with Structure and Soil, Carrying Capacity of Pile Anchorage in Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachla, Henryk

    2016-12-01

    The formation of a pile in the existing foundation and soil creates a new foundation construction which has a structure of foundation-pile-soil. This construction must be able to transfer loads from the foundation to the pile and from the pile to the soil. The pile structure has to transfer an imposed load. From the point of view of continuum mechanics determination of the capacity of such a system is preceded by the analysis of contact problem of three contact surfaces. Each of these surfaces is determined by different pairs of materials. The pair which creates a pile anchorage is a material from which the foundation is built (structure of stone and grout, brick and grout, concrete or reinforced concrete and grout. The pile structure is formed by grout and steel rebar. The pile formed in soil is created by a pair of grout and soil. What is important is that on contact surfaces the materials adhering to one another are subjected to different deformation types that are controlled by mechanical properties and geometry of these surfaces. In the paper, additional conditions that should be fulfilled for the foundation-pile-soil system to make load transfer from foundation to soil possible and safe are presented. The results of research done by the author on foundation-pile contact surface are discussed. The tests were targeted at verifying the bearing capacity of anchorage and deformation of piles made of grout and other materials from which foundations are built. The specimens were tested in tension and compression. The experiments were conducted on the amount specimens which is regarded as small sample to enable the statistical analysis of the results.

  14. Differential pathway coupling efficiency of the activated insulin receptor drives signaling selectivity by xmeta, an allosteric partial agonist antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    XMetA, an anti-insulin receptor (IR) monoclonal antibody, is an allosteric partial agonist of the IR. We have previously reported that XMetA activates the “metabolic-biased” Akt kinase signaling pathway while having little or no effect on the “mitogenic” MAPK signaling pathwayof ERK 1/2. To inves...

  15. Phosphotyrosine-mediated LAT assembly on membranes drives kinetic bifurcation in recruitment dynamics of the Ras activator SOS

    PubMed Central

    Huang, William Y. C.; Yan, Qingrong; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chung, Jean K.; Hansen, Scott D.; Christensen, Sune M.; Tu, Hsiung-Lin; Kuriyan, John; Groves, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly of cell surface receptors with downstream signaling molecules is a commonly occurring theme in multiple signaling systems. However, little is known about how these assemblies modulate reaction kinetics and the ultimate propagation of signals. Here, we reconstitute phosphotyrosine-mediated assembly of extended linker for the activation of T cells (LAT):growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2):Son of Sevenless (SOS) networks, derived from the T-cell receptor signaling system, on supported membranes. Single-molecule dwell time distributions reveal two, well-differentiated kinetic species for both Grb2 and SOS on the LAT assemblies. The majority fraction of membrane-recruited Grb2 and SOS both exhibit fast kinetics and single exponential dwell time distributions, with average dwell times of hundreds of milliseconds. The minor fraction exhibits much slower kinetics, extending the dwell times to tens of seconds. Considering this result in the context of the multistep process by which the Ras GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor) activity of SOS is activated indicates that kinetic stabilization from the LAT assembly may be important. This kinetic proofreading effect would additionally serve as a stochastic noise filter by reducing the relative probability of spontaneous SOS activation in the absence of receptor triggering. The generality of receptor-mediated assembly suggests that such effects may play a role in multiple receptor proximal signaling processes. PMID:27370798

  16. Increasing β-catenin/Wnt3A activity levels drive mechanical strain-induced cell cycle progression through mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Benham-Pyle, Blair W; Sim, Joo Yong; Hart, Kevin C; Pruitt, Beth L; Nelson, William James

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical force and Wnt signaling activate β-catenin-mediated transcription to promote proliferation and tissue expansion. However, it is unknown whether mechanical force and Wnt signaling act independently or synergize to activate β-catenin signaling and cell division. We show that mechanical strain induced Src-dependent phosphorylation of Y654 β-catenin and increased β-catenin-mediated transcription in mammalian MDCK epithelial cells. Under these conditions, cells accumulated in S/G2 (independent of DNA damage) but did not divide. Activating β-catenin through Casein Kinase I inhibition or Wnt3A addition increased β-catenin-mediated transcription and strain-induced accumulation of cells in S/G2. Significantly, only the combination of mechanical strain and Wnt/β-catenin activation triggered cells in S/G2 to divide. These results indicate that strain-induced Src phosphorylation of β-catenin and Wnt-dependent β-catenin stabilization synergize to increase β-catenin-mediated transcription to levels required for mitosis. Thus, local Wnt signaling may fine-tune the effects of global mechanical strain to restrict cell divisions during tissue development and homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19799.001 PMID:27782880

  17. Impact simulations on the rubble pile asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Jakob; Lowry, Stephen; Snodgrass, Colin; Price, Mark; Sierks, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Images from the OSIRIS camera system on board the Rosetta spacecraft (Keller et al. 2010) have revealed several interesting features on asteroid (2867) Steins. Its macro porosity of 40%, together with the shape that looks remarkably like a YORP evolved body, both indicate a rubble pile structure. A large crater on the southern pole is evidence for collisional evolution of this rubble pile asteroid. We have developed a new approach for simulating impacts on asteroid bodies that connects formation history to their collisional evolution. This is achieved by representing the interior as a 'rubble pile', created from the gravitational aggregation of spherical 'pebbles' that represent fragments from a major disruption event. These 'pebbles' follow a power-law size function and constitute the building blocks of the rubble pile. This allows us to explicitly model the interior of rubble pile asteroids in hyper-velocity impact simulations in a more realistic way. We present preliminary results of a study validating our approach in a large series of simulated impacts on a typical small main-belt rubble pile asteroid using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics solver in LS-DYNA. We show that this approach allows us to explicitly follow the behavior of a single 'pebble', while preserving the expected properties of the bulk asteroid as known from observations and experiments (Holsapple 2009). On the example of Steins, we use this model to relate surface features like the northern hill at 75/100 degrees lon/lat distance to the largest crater (Jorda et al. 2012), or the catena of depletion pits, to the displacement of large fragments in the interior of the asteroid during the impact. We do this by following the movement of pebbles below the surface feature in simulations that recreate the shape of the impact crater. We show that while it is not straightforward to explain the formation of the hill-like structure, the formation of cracks possibly leading to depletion zones can be

  18. Picking up Clues from the Discard Pile (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    As NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander excavates trenches, it also builds piles with most of the material scooped from the holes. The piles, like this one called 'Caterpillar,' provide researchers some information about the soil.

    On Aug. 24, 2008, during the late afternoon of the 88th Martian day after landing, Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager took separate exposures through its left eye and right eye that have been combined into this stereo view. The image appears three dimensional when seen through red-blue glasses.

    This conical pile of soil is about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The sources of material that the robotic arm has dropped onto the Caterpillar pile have included the 'Dodo' and ''Upper Cupboard' trenches and, more recently, the deeper 'Stone Soup' trench.

    Observations of the pile provide information, such as the slope of the cone and the textures of the soil, that helps scientists understand properties of material excavated from the trenches.

    For the Stone Soup trench in particular, which is about 18 centimeters (7 inches) deep, the bottom of the trench is in shadow and more difficult to observe than other trenches that Phoenix has dug. The Phoenix team obtained spectral clues about the composition of material from the bottom of Stone Soup by photographing Caterpillar through 15 different filters of the Surface Stereo Imager when the pile was covered in freshly excavated material from the trench.

    The spectral observation did not produce any sign of water-ice, just typical soil for the site. However, the bigger clumps do show a platy texture that could be consistent with elevated concentration of salts in the soil from deep in Stone Soup. The team chose that location as the source for a soil sample to be analyzed in the lander's wet chemistry laboratory, which can identify soluble salts in the soil.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA

  19. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-12-29

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL.

  20. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, Yijing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  1. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-23

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  2. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  3. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  4. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  5. IL-2 phosphorylates STAT5 to drive IFN-γ production and activation of human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, Florence; Lemoine, Roxane; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Meley, Daniel; Kazma, Ihab; Heraud, Audrey; Velge-Roussel, Florence; Baron, Christophe; Lebranchu, Yvon

    2014-06-15

    Human dendritic cells (hDCs) produce IL-2 and express IL-2R α-chain (CD25), but the role of IL-2 in DC functions is not well defined. A recent study suggested that the main function of CD25 on hDCs was to transpresent IL-2 to activate T lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate the expression of the three chains of the IL-2R on hDCs and that IL-2 induces STAT5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, use of inhibitors of p-STAT5 revealed that IL-2 increases LPS-induced IFN-γ through STAT5 phosphorylation. Finally, we report that IL-2 increases the ability of hDCs to activate helpless CD8(+) T cells, most likely because of IL-2-triggered IFN-γ synthesis, as we previously described. For the first time, to our knowledge, we disclose that IL-2 induces monocyte-derived hDC's functional maturation and activation through IL-2R binding. Interestingly, our study suggests a direct effect of anti-CD25 mAbs on hDCs that may contribute to their clinical efficacy.

  6. Experimental investigation on seismic behavior of single piles in sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raongjant, Werasak; Meng, Jing

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a quasi-static test program featuring lateral cyclic loading on single piles in sandy soil. The tests were conducted on 18 aluminum model piles with different cross sections and lateral load eccentricity ratios, e/d, ( e is the lateral load eccentricity and d is the diameter of pile) of 0, 4 and 8, embedded in sand with a relative density of 30% and 70%. The experimental results include lateral load-displacement hysteresis loops, skeleton curves and energy dissipation curves. Lateral capacity, ductility and energy dissipation capacity of single piles under seismic load were evaluated in detail. The lateral capacities and the energy dissipation capacity of piles in dense sand were much higher than in loose sand. When embedded in loose sand, the maximum lateral load and the maximum lateral displacement of piles increased as e/d increased. On the contrary, when embedded in dense sand, the maximum lateral load of piles decreased as e/d increased. Piles with a higher load eccentricity ratio experienced higher energy dissipation capacity than piles with e/d of 0 in both dense and loose sand. At a given level of displacement, piles with circular cross sections provided the best energy dissipation capacity in both loose and dense sand.

  7. New Analysis Techniques for Avalanches in a Conical Bead Pile with Cohesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieman, Catherine; Lehman, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Avalanche statistics and pile geometry for 3 mm steel spheres dropped on a conical bead pile were studied at different drop heights and different cohesion strengths. The pile is initially built on a circular base and is subsequently slowly driven by adding one bead at a time to the apex of the pile. We investigate the dynamic response of the pile by recording avalanches off the pile over the course of tens of thousands of bead drops. The level of cohesion is tuned through use of an applied uniform magnetic field. Changes in the pile mass and geometry were investigated to determine the effect of cohesion and drop height on the angle of repose. The angle of repose increased with cohesion strength, and decreased somewhat for higher drop heights. The packing density of beads is expected to decrease as magnetic cohesion increases, but for our 20 000-bead pile, this effect has not been observed. The proportion of beads removed from the pile by different avalanche sizes was also calculated. Although larger avalanches are much rarer occurrences, they carry away a larger fraction of the total avalanched mass than small avalanches. As the pile cohesion increases, the number of small and medium avalanches decreases so that this mass loss distribution shifts more strongly to large sizes.

  8. The Pressure Limitations on Flux Pile-up Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.

    1999-05-01

    The problem of the plasma pressure limitations on the rapidity of flux pile-up magnetic reconnection is re-examined, following the claim made by Jardine and Allen (1998) that the limitations can be removed by relaxing the assumption of zero-vorticity two-dimensional plasma flows. It is shown that for a two-dimensional stagnation point flow with nonzero vorticity the magnetic merging rate cannot exceed the Sweet-Parker scaling in a low-beta plasma. The pressure limitation appears to be much less restrictive for weak three-dimensional flux pile-up, provided the perturbation length scale in the third dimension is much less than the global length scale. The actual reconnection rate in the latter case, however, is much lower than this upper estimate unless the current sheet width is also much less than the global scale.

  9. The Supercritical Pile Model: Prompt Emission Across the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demos; Mastichiadis, A.

    2008-01-01

    The "Supercritical Pile" GRB model is an economical model that provides the dissipation necessary to convert explosively the energy stored in relativistic protons in the blast wave of a GRB into radiation; at the same time it produces spectra whose luminosity peaks at 1 MeV in the lab frame, the result of the kinematics of the proton-photon - pair production reaction that effects the conversion of proton energy to radiation. We outline the fundamental notions behind the "Supercritical Pile" model and discuss the resulting spectra of the prompt emission from optical to gamma-ray energies of order Gamma^2 m_ec^2, (Gamma is the Lorentz factor of the blast wave) present even in the absence of an accelerated particle distribution and compare our results to bursts that cover this entire energy range. Particular emphasis is given on the emission at the GLAST energy range both in the prompt and the afterglow stages of the burst.

  10. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  11. c-Abl and Arg are activated in human primary melanomas, promote melanoma cell invasion via distinct pathways, and drive metastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, S S; Fiore, L S; Sims, J T; Friend, J W; Srinivasan, D; Thacker, M A; Cibull, M L; Wang, C; Novak, M; Kaetzel, D M; Plattner, R

    2012-04-05

    Despite 35 years of clinical trials, there is little improvement in 1-year survival rates for patients with metastatic melanoma, and the disease is essentially untreatable if not cured surgically. The paucity of chemotherapeutic agents that are effective for treating metastatic melanoma indicates a dire need to develop new therapies. Here, we found a previously unrecognized role for c-Abl and Arg in melanoma progression. We demonstrate that the kinase activities of c-Abl and Arg are elevated in primary melanomas (60%), in a subset of benign nevi (33%) and in some human melanoma cell lines. Using siRNA and pharmacological approaches, we show that c-Abl/Arg activation is functionally relevant because it is requiredfor melanoma cell proliferation, survival and invasion. Significantly, we identify the mechanism by which activated c-Abl promotes melanoma invasion by showing that it transcriptionally upregulates matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and using rescue approaches we demonstrate that c-Abl promotes invasion through a STAT3 → MMP-1 pathway. Additionally, we show that c-Abl and Arg are not merely redundant, as active Arg drives invasion in a STAT3-independent manner, and upregulates MMP-3 and MT1-MMP, in addition to MMP-1. Most importantly, c-Abl and Arg not only promote in vitro processes important for melanoma progression, but also promote metastasis in vivo, as inhibition of c-Abl/Arg kinase activity with the c-Abl/Arg inhibitor, nilotinib, dramatically inhibits metastasis in a mouse model. Taken together, these data identify c-Abl and Arg as critical, novel, drug targets in metastatic melanoma, and indicate that nilotinib may be useful in preventing metastasis in patients with melanomas harboring active c-Abl and Arg.

  12. Epidermal YAP2-5SA-ΔC Drives β-Catenin Activation to Promote Keratinocyte Proliferation in Mouse Skin In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Akladios, Bassem; Mendoza-Reinoso, Veronica; Samuel, Michael S; Hardeman, Edna C; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Key, Brian; Beverdam, Annemiek

    2017-03-01

    The epidermis is a highly regenerative tissue. YAP is a pivotal regulator of stem/progenitor cells in tissue regeneration, including in the epidermis. The molecular mechanisms downstream of YAP that activate epidermal cell proliferation remain largely unknown. We found that YAP and β-catenin co-localize in the nuclei of keratinocytes in the regenerating epidermis in vivo and in proliferating HaCaT keratinocytes in vitro. Inactivation of YAP in HaCaT keratinocytes resulted in reduced activated β-catenin and reduced keratinocyte numbers in vitro. In addition, we found that in the hyperplastic epidermis of YAP2-5SA-ΔC mice, the mutant YAP2-5SA-ΔC protein was predominantly localized in the keratinocyte nuclei and caused increased expression of activated nuclear β-catenin. Accordingly, β-catenin transcriptional activity was elevated in the skin of live YAP2-5SA-ΔC/TOPFLASH mice. Lastly, loss of β-catenin in basal keratinocytes of YAP2-5SA-ΔC/K14-creERT/CtnnB1(-/-) mice resulted in reduced proliferation of basal keratinocytes and a striking rescue of the hyperplastic abnormalities. Taken together, our work shows that YAP2-5SA-ΔC drives β-catenin activity to promote basal keratinocyte proliferation in the mouse skin in vivo. Our data shine new light on the etiology of regenerative dermatological disorders and other human diseases that display increased YAP and β-catenin activity.

  13. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  14. Identification and Characterization of the Ca2+-ATPase which Drives Active Transport of Ca2+ at the Plasma Membrane of Radish Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Rasi-Caldogno, Franca; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; Olivari, Claudio; De Michelis, Maria Ida

    1989-01-01

    In microsomes from 24-hour-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake occurs only in inside-out plasma membrane vesicles (F Rasi-Caldogno, MC Pugliarello, MI De Michelis [1987] Plant Physiol 83: 994-1000). A Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity can be shown in the same microsomes, when assays are performed at pH 7.5. The Ca2+-dependent ATPase is stimulated by the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 and is localized at the plasma membrane. Ca2+-dependent ATPase activity and ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake present very similar saturation kinetics with erythrosin B (50% inhibition at about 0.1 micromolar), free Ca2+ (half-maximal rate at about 70 nanomolar), and MgATP (Km 15-20 micromolar). Ca2+ uptake can be sustained by GTP or ITP at about 60% the rate measured in the presence of ATP; only very low Ca2+ uptake is sustained by CTP or UTP and none by ADP. These results indicate that the Ca2+-ATPase described in this paper is the enzyme which drives active transport of Ca2+ at the plasma membrane of higher plants. PMID:16666947

  15. VLA-4 integrin concentrates at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex of the immune synapse and drives T helper 1 responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelbrunn, María; Molina, Ana; Escribese, María M.; Yáñez-Mó, María; Escudero, Ester; Ursa, Ángeles; Tejedor, Reyes; Mampaso, Francisco; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2004-07-01

    The integrin 41 (VLA-4) not only mediates the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, but also provides costimulatory signals that contribute to the activation of T lymphocytes. However, the behavior of 41 during the formation of the immune synapse is currently unknown. Here, we show that 41 is recruited to both human and murine antigen-dependent immune synapses, when the antigen-presenting cell is a B lymphocyte or a dendritic cell, colocalizing with LFA-1 at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex. However, when conjugates are formed in the presence of anti-4 antibodies, VLA-4 colocalizes with the CD3- chain at the center of the synapse. In addition, antibody engagement of 4 integrin promotes polarization toward a T helper 1 (Th1) response in human in vitro models of CD4+ T cell differentiation and naïve T cell priming by dendritic cells. The in vivo administration of anti-4 integrin antibodies also induces an immune deviation to Th1 response that dampens a Th2-driven autoimmune nephritis in Brown Norway rats. These data reveal a regulatory role of 4 integrins on T lymphocyte-antigen presenting cell cognate immune interactions.

  16. VLA-4 integrin concentrates at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex of the immune synapse and drives T helper 1 responses.

    PubMed

    Mittelbrunn, María; Molina, Ana; Escribese, María M; Yáñez-Mó, María; Escudero, Ester; Ursa, Angeles; Tejedor, Reyes; Mampaso, Francisco; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2004-07-27

    The integrin alpha 4 beta 1 (VLA-4) not only mediates the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, but also provides costimulatory signals that contribute to the activation of T lymphocytes. However, the behavior of alpha 4 beta 1 during the formation of the immune synapse is currently unknown. Here, we show that alpha 4 beta 1 is recruited to both human and murine antigen-dependent immune synapses, when the antigen-presenting cell is a B lymphocyte or a dendritic cell, colocalizing with LFA-1 at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex. However, when conjugates are formed in the presence of anti-alpha 4 antibodies, VLA-4 colocalizes with the CD3-zeta chain at the center of the synapse. In addition, antibody engagement of alpha 4 integrin promotes polarization toward a T helper 1 (Th1) response in human in vitro models of CD4(+) T cell differentiation and naïve T cell priming by dendritic cells. The in vivo administration of anti-alpha 4 integrin antibodies also induces an immune deviation to Th1 response that dampens a Th2-driven autoimmune nephritis in Brown Norway rats. These data reveal a regulatory role of alpha 4 integrins on T lymphocyte-antigen presenting cell cognate immune interactions.

  17. Human metapneumovirus infection activates the TSLP pathway that drives excessive pulmonary inflammation and viral replication in mice.

    PubMed

    Lay, Margarita K; Céspedes, Pablo F; Palavecino, Christian E; León, Miguel A; Díaz, Rodrigo A; Salazar, Francisco J; Méndez, Gonzalo P; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-06-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory tract infections in children and the elderly. The mechanism by which this virus triggers an inflammatory response still remains unknown. Here, we evaluated whether the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) pathway contributes to lung inflammation upon hMPV infection. We found that hMPV infection promotes TSLP expression both in human airway epithelial cells and in the mouse lung. hMPV infection induced lung infiltration of OX40L(+) CD11b(+) DCs. Mice lacking the TSLP receptor deficient mice (tslpr(-/-) ) showed reduced lung inflammation and hMPV replication. These mice displayed a decreased number of neutrophils as well a reduction in levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17, IL-5, IL-13, and TNF-α in the airways upon hMPV infection. Furthermore, a higher frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was found in tslpr(-/-) mice compared to WT mice, which could contribute to controlling viral spread. Depletion of neutrophils in WT and tslpr(-/-) mice decreased inflammation and hMPV replication. Remarkably, blockage of TSLP or OX40L with specific Abs reduced lung inflammation and viral replication following hMPV challenge in mice. Altogether, these results suggest that activation of the TSLP pathway is pivotal in the development of pulmonary pathology and pulmonary hMPV replication.

  18. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    PubMed

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  19. A mechanically active heterotypic E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion enables fibroblasts to drive cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Kato, Takuya; Brugués, Agustí; Serra-Picamal, Xavier; Derzsi, Stefanie; Arwert, Esther; Weston, Anne; González-Tarragó, Victor; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Alcaraz, Jordi; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Sahai, Erik; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) promote tumour invasion and metastasis. We show that CAFs exert a physical force on cancer cells that enables their collective invasion. Force transmission is mediated by a heterophilic adhesion involving N-cadherin at the CAF membrane and E-cadherin at the cancer cell membrane. This adhesion is mechanically active; when subjected to force it triggers β-catenin recruitment and adhesion reinforcement dependent on α-catenin/vinculin interaction. Impairment of E-cadherin/N-cadherin adhesion abrogates the ability of CAFs to guide collective cell migration and blocks cancer cell invasion. N-cadherin also mediates repolarization of the CAFs away from the cancer cells. In parallel, nectins and afadin are recruited to the cancer cell/CAF interface and CAF repolarization is afadin dependent. Heterotypic junctions between CAFs and cancer cells are observed in patient-derived material. Together, our findings show that a mechanically active heterophilic adhesion between CAFs and cancer cells enables cooperative tumour invasion.

  20. Determining chemical reactivity driving biological activity from SMILES transformations: the bonding mechanism of anti-HIV pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Dudaş, Nicoleta A

    2013-07-30

    Assessing the molecular mechanism of a chemical-biological interaction and bonding stands as the ultimate goal of any modern quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study. To this end the present work employs the main chemical reactivity structural descriptors (electronegativity, chemical hardness, chemical power, electrophilicity) to unfold the variational QSAR though their min-max correspondence principles as applied to the Simplified Molecular Input Line Entry System (SMILES) transformation of selected uracil derivatives with anti-HIV potential with the aim of establishing the main stages whereby the given compounds may inhibit HIV infection. The bonding can be completely described by explicitly considering by means of basic indices and chemical reactivity principles two forms of SMILES structures of the pyrimidines, the Longest SMILES Molecular Chain (LoSMoC) and the Branching SMILES (BraS), respectively, as the effective forms involved in the anti-HIV activity mechanism and according to the present work, also necessary intermediates in molecular pathways targeting/docking biological sites of interest.

  1. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  2. Improved radon-flux-measurement system for uranium-tailings pile measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.

    1981-10-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing cover technology for uranium mill tailings that will inhibit the diffusion of radon to the atmosphere. As part of this cover program, an improved radon flux measurement system has been developed. The radon measurement system is a recirculating, pressure-balanced, flow-through system that uses activated carbon at ambient temperatures to collect the radon. With the system, an area of 0.93 m/sup 2/ is sampled for periods ranging from 1 to 12 h. The activated carbon is removed from the radon trap and the collected radon is determined by counting the /sup 214/Bi daughter product. Development of the system included studies to determine the efficiency of activated carbon, relative calibration measurements and field measurements made during 1980 at the inactive tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado. Results of these studies are presented.

  3. Pile response to lateral spread: A benchmark case

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, D.; Toprak, S.; O`Rourke, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The paper compares analytical results with field observations of piles damaged during the 1964 Niigata earthquake. Three different models for liquefied soil-structure interaction are used, including two subgrade reaction models with both drained and undrained strength parameters and a model to account for the viscosity of liquefied soil. The subgrade reaction model provides for the bet agreement between analytical and observed behavior. Recommendations are made for selecting the most appropriate drained and undrained parameters for analysis and design.

  4. Analytical Constraints on Rubble Pile Fission, Dynamics and End States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel Jay; Gabriel, Travis

    2015-08-01

    Recent progress in the study and analysis of rubble pile asteroids has focused on the numerical simulation of self-gravitating collections of rigid components that can rest on each other. These simulations are complex and can model thousands of grains interacting with each other, but due to this can sometimes present barriers to the understanding of their behavior in terms of fundamental physical principles.To address this we have embarked on an analytical study of the energetics and stability of few-body granular mechanics systems, comprised of gravitationally attracting elements that can rest on each other and transmit surface forces through friction or cohesion. These studies have primarily focused on simple shapes such as spheres and ellipsoids in contact. We have found that rigorous results can be placed on the stability of these resting and orbiting configurations as a function of their total angular momentum. These results shed direct light into the manner in which rubble pile asteroids can fail and what stable configurations they can settle in, accounting only for internal forces and dynamics. We note that these studies are also applicable for the accumulation stage of a rubble pile formation, following the catastrophic disruption of its parent body.There are several fundamental results from these analyses that have physical implications. A notable result provides conditions for when fissioned rubble piles can escape from each other, or conversely remain bound. It is significant that recent observations of asteroid pairs are consistent with these limits. Another result is that when a given configuration becomes unstable due to an increase in its total angular momentum (for example due to YORP), that it may sometimes settle into one of several stable configurations depending on how its energy is dissipated. This introduces a level of indeterminacy into the physical evolution of gravitational aggregates, and motivates the development of statistical approaches

  5. Vegetative cover grows directly on acidic mine refuse pile

    SciTech Connect

    Nickeson, F.H.

    1984-02-01

    The paper reports how permanent, self-sustaining vegetation has been established on an acidic, 80-year old coal refuse pile without using a soil cover. Tests were carried out on a number of 1-acre plots which were treated with different mixtures of lime, fertiliser and seeds of grasses and legumes. The results of the tests are discussed and the way in which the final treatment was chosen is explained. The work is considered to have been successful.

  6. Clearing a Pile of Unknown Objects using Interactive Perception

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    blocks and the shampoo . The robot now decides to grasp the bottle of shampoo . Next, the tissue box and the chunk of wood are pushed and grasped. The...20 seconds. Poking an object requires 12 (a) Initial pile (b) Poking macaroni box (c) After poking (d) Grasping shampoo (e) After grasping (f) Pooking...objects: a tissue box, a chunk of wood, a bottle of shampoo , a box of macaroni, and toy blocks. The algorithm switches between pushing to verify

  7. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R; Li, David D-U; Richardson, Justin A; Henderson, Robert K

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  8. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  9. A study of pile-up in integrated time-correlated single photon counting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlt, Jochen; Tyndall, David; Rae, Bruce R.; Li, David D.-U.; Richardson, Justin A.; Henderson, Robert K.

    2013-10-01

    Recent demonstration of highly integrated, solid-state, time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems in CMOS technology is set to provide significant increases in performance over existing bulky, expensive hardware. Arrays of single photon single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) detectors, timing channels, and signal processing can be integrated on a single silicon chip with a degree of parallelism and computational speed that is unattainable by discrete photomultiplier tube and photon counting card solutions. New multi-channel, multi-detector TCSPC sensor architectures with greatly enhanced throughput due to minimal detector transit (dead) time or timing channel dead time are now feasible. In this paper, we study the potential for future integrated, solid-state TCSPC sensors to exceed the photon pile-up limit through analytic formula and simulation. The results are validated using a 10% fill factor SPAD array and an 8-channel, 52 ps resolution time-to-digital conversion architecture with embedded lifetime estimation. It is demonstrated that pile-up insensitive acquisition is attainable at greater than 10 times the pulse repetition rate providing over 60 dB of extended dynamic range to the TCSPC technique. Our results predict future CMOS TCSPC sensors capable of live-cell transient observations in confocal scanning microscopy, improved resolution of near-infrared optical tomography systems, and fluorescence lifetime activated cell sorting.

  10. Changes in oxidized lipids drive the improvement in monocyte activation and vascular disease after statin therapy in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hileman, Corrilynn O.; Turner, Randi; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Semba, Richard D.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a significant role in atherosclerosis development. HIV infection has been linked with heightened cardiovascular disease risk. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may reduce oxidative stress and subsequently subclinical vascular disease in HIV. Design/methods This is a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of rosuvastatin in HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy with low-density lipoprotein less than 130 mg/dl and increased inflammation or T-cell activation on subclinical vascular disease. Changes over 48 weeks in oxidative stress markers, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and F2-isoprostane/creatinine ratio (F2-Iso-P/Cr), were compared between groups. Spearman correlation and multivariable linear regression were used to evaluate relationships between changes in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and monocyte activation and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT). Results One hundred and forty-seven adults enrolled (72 to rosuvastatin and 75 to placebo). In the rosuvastatin group, oxLDL decreased significantly over 24 weeks compared to placebo [mean absolute change in log-oxLDL for rosuvastatin −0.2 ± 0.468 log U/l (P < 0.001 within-group) vs. placebo −0.018 ± 0.456 log U/l (P = 0.83 within-group); P = 0.004 between groups] and this change was linked with changes in soluble CD14 and proportion of patrolling monocytes (CD14dimCD16+). Although oxLDL levels increased after initially declining and were not different from placebo at week 48, the early improvement in oxLDL was associated with improved CIMT at week 48. Changes in F2-IsoP/Cr were not significant between groups. Conclusion Rosuvastatin decreases oxLDL levels early after initiation and is associated with decreased monocyte activation. Early improvement in oxLDL is linked with improved CIMT in treated HIV infection. PMID:26731754

  11. AB296. SPR-23 Aberrant bladder reflexes can drive hind limb locomotor activity following complete suprasacral spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Brian M.; Brooks, Jillene M.; Degoski, Danielle J.; Hughes, Francis M.; Purves, J. Todd; Fraser, Matthew O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many rats with chronic suprasacral spinal cord injury (SCI) demonstrate hind limb locomotor activity (HLLA) in response to external crede or high pressure contractions during cystometry. We propose that this aberrant, pressure-driven bladder reflex pathway may be harnessed to facilitate walking in SCI patients. As a first step in exploring this possibility, we examined the relationship between intravesical pressure (IVP) and HLLA in chronic suprasacral SCI rats. Methods Female rats (4 weeks post-SCI at T9-10, n=16) were anesthetized with isoflurane and fitted with transvesical catheters and right quadriceps EMG electrodes to monitor bladder and hind limb locomotor activities, respectively. The animals were mounted in Ballman restraint cages to which they had been previously acclimated. The catheter was connected to a pressure transducer, an infusion pump, and a saline-filled reservoir mounted on a metered vertical pole (pressure clamp). After 30 min of recovery from anesthesia, the bladder was filled at 0.1 mL/min with saline to verify bladder-to-bladder reflex activity for 30 min. IVP was then increased in an interrupted stepwise fashion from 0–120 cmH2O at 10 cmH2O increments. Each step consisted of five minutes: 3 minutes at the new pressure followed by 2 minutes at 0 cmH2O. IVP and the number of HLLA events (as defined by rhythmic EMG discharges of 3–10 cycles/event) were recorded for each pressure step. This process was repeated for two more trials for each rat to assess the durability of the reflex. Data were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures both within and across pressure escalation trials. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results ANOVA revealed that locomotor events increased with increasing IVP and decreased with the number of escalation trials (P<0.0001 for both effects). The increase in the number of locomotor events with increasing IVP appeared to plateau at ~50–60 cmH2O (P<0.05 for all). The average of the maximal number of

  12. Enhanced In-Pile Instrumentation at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley; Steven Taylor

    2012-08-01

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper provides an update on this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and real-time flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted.

  13. Enhanced In-Pile Instrumentation at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; K. Condie

    2011-06-01

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and real-time flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted.

  14. NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Daw; J. Rempe; J. Palmer; P. Ramuhalli; R. Montgomery; H.T. Chien; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; P. Keller

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters during irradiation of fuels and materials, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues that currently limit in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. The harsh nature of in-pile testing and the variety of desired measurements demand that an enhanced signal processing capability be developed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. To address these issues, the NEET ASI program funded a three year Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation and Signal Processing Enhancements project, which is a collaborative effort between the Idaho National Laboratory, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory, and the Pennsylvania State University. The objective of this report is to document the objectives and accomplishments from this three year project. As summarized within this document, significant work has been accomplished during this three year project.

  15. Economics of neuraminidase inhibitor stock piling for pandemic influenza, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vernon J; Phua, Kai Hong; Chenm, Mark I; Chow, Angela; Ma, Stefan; Goh, Kee Tai; Leo, Yee Sin

    2006-01-01

    We compared strategies for stock piling neuraminidase inhibitors to treat and prevent influenza in Singapore. Cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses, with Monte Carlo simulations, were used to determine economic outcomes. A pandemic in a population of 4.2 million would result in an estimated 525-1,775 deaths, 10,700-38,600 hospitalization days, and economic costs of 0.7 dollars to 2.2 billion Singapore dollars. The treatment-only strategy had optimal economic benefits: stock piles of antiviral agents for 40% of the population would save an estimated 418 lives and 414 million dollars, at a cost of 52.6 million dollars per shelf-life cycle of the stock pile. Prophylaxis was economically beneficial in high-risk subpopulations, which account for 78% of deaths, and in pandemics in which the death rate was >0.6%. Prophylaxis for pandemics with a 5% case-fatality rate would save 50,000 lives and 81 billion dollars. These models can help policymakers weigh the options for pandemic planning.

  16. LncBRM initiates YAP1 signalling activation to drive self-renewal of liver cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pingping; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Jiayi; Huang, Guanling; Liu, Benyu; Ye, Buqing; Du, Ying; Gao, Guangxia; Tian, Yong; He, Lei; Fan, Zusen

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) may contribute to the high rate of recurrence and heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the biology of hepatic CSCs remains largely undefined. Through analysis of transcriptome microarray data, we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) called lncBRM, which is highly expressed in liver CSCs and HCC tumours. LncBRM is required for the self-renewal maintenance of liver CSCs and tumour initiation. In liver CSCs, lncBRM associates with BRM to initiate the BRG1/BRM switch and the BRG1-embedded BAF complex triggers activation of YAP1 signalling. Moreover, expression levels of lncBRM together with YAP1 signalling targets are positively correlated with tumour severity of HCC patients. Therefore, lncBRM and YAP1 signalling may serve as biomarkers for diagnosis and potential drug targets for HCC. PMID:27905400

  17. Bacterial community dynamics in full-scale activated sludge bioreactors: operational and ecological factors driving community assembly and performance.

    PubMed

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Toro-Labrador, Gladys; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A

    2012-01-01

    The assembling of bacterial communities in conventional activated sludge (CAS) bioreactors was thought, until recently, to be chaotic and mostly unpredictable. Studies done over the last decade have shown that specific, and often, predictable random and non-random factors could be responsible for that process. These studies have also motivated a "structure-function" paradigm that is yet to be resolved. Thus, elucidating the factors that affect community assembly in the bioreactors is necessary for predicting fluctuations in community structure and function. For this study activated sludge samples were collected during a one-year period from two geographically distant CAS bioreactors of different size. Combining community fingerprinting analysis and operational parameters data with a robust statistical analysis, we aimed to identify relevant links between system performance and bacterial community diversity and dynamics. In addition to revealing a significant β-diversity between the bioreactors' communities, results showed that the largest bioreactor had a less dynamic but more efficient and diverse bacterial community throughout the study. The statistical analysis also suggests that deterministic factors, as opposed to stochastic factors, may have a bigger impact on the community structure in the largest bioreactor. Furthermore, the community seems to rely mainly on mechanisms of resistance and functional redundancy to maintain functional stability. We suggest that the ecological theories behind the Island Biogeography model and the species-area relationship were appropriate to predict the assembly of bacterial communities in these CAS bioreactors. These results are of great importance for engineers and ecologists as they reveal critical aspects of CAS systems that could be applied towards improving bioreactor design and operation.

  18. Constitutive activation of epithelial TLR4 augments inflammatory responses to mucosal injury and drives colitis-associated tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Shang, Limin; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Sotolongo, John; Pastorini, Cristhine; España, Cecilia; Ungaro, Ryan; Harpaz, Noam; Cooper, Harry S.; Elson, Greg; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Zaias, Julia; Perez, Maria T.; Mayer, Lloyd; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Lira, Sergio A.; Abreu, Maria T.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation culminates in cancer and a link to TLR4 has been suggested by our observation that TLR4 deficiency prevents colitis-associated neoplasia. In the current study, we address the effect of the aberrant activation of epithelial TLR4 on induction of colitis and colitis-associated tumor development. We take a translational approach to address the consequences of increased TLR signaling in the intestinal mucosa. Mice transgenic for a constitutively-active TLR4 under the intestine-specific villin promoter (villin-TLR4 mice) were treated with DSS for acute colitis and azoxymethane-dextran sulfate sodium. TLR4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in colonic tissue from patients with ulcerative colitis and ulcerative colitis associated cancer. The effect of an antagonist TLR4 Ab was tested in prevention of colitis-associated neoplasia in the AOM-DSS model. Villin-TLR4 mice were highly susceptible to both acute colitis and colitis-associated neoplasia. Villin-TLR4 mice had increased epithelial expression of COX-2 and mucosal PGE2 production at baseline. Increased severity of colitis in villin-TLR4 mice was characterized by enhanced expression of inflammatory mediators and increased neutrophilic infiltration. In human UC samples, TLR4 expression was upregulated in almost all CAC and progressively increases with grade of dysplasia. As a proof of principle, a TLR4/MD-2 antagonist antibody inhibited colitis-associated neoplasia in the mouse model. Our results show that regulation of TLR's can affect the outcome of both acute colitis and its consequences—cancer. Targeting TLR4 and other TLR's may ultimately play a role in prevention or treatment of colitis-associated cancer. PMID:21674704

  19. Bacterial Community Dynamics in Full-Scale Activated Sludge Bioreactors: Operational and Ecological Factors Driving Community Assembly and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Toro-Labrador, Gladys; Massol-Deyá, Arturo A.

    2012-01-01

    The assembling of bacterial communities in conventional activated sludge (CAS) bioreactors was thought, until recently, to be chaotic and mostly unpredictable. Studies done over the last decade have shown that specific, and often, predictable random and non-random factors could be responsible for that process. These studies have also motivated a “structure–function” paradigm that is yet to be resolved. Thus, elucidating the factors that affect community assembly in the bioreactors is necessary for predicting fluctuations in community structure and function. For this study activated sludge samples were collected during a one-year period from two geographically distant CAS bioreactors of different size. Combining community fingerprinting analysis and operational parameters data with a robust statistical analysis, we aimed to identify relevant links between system performance and bacterial community diversity and dynamics. In addition to revealing a significant β-diversity between the bioreactors’ communities, results showed that the largest bioreactor had a less dynamic but more efficient and diverse bacterial community throughout the study. The statistical analysis also suggests that deterministic factors, as opposed to stochastic factors, may have a bigger impact on the community structure in the largest bioreactor. Furthermore, the community seems to rely mainly on mechanisms of resistance and functional redundancy to maintain functional stability. We suggest that the ecological theories behind the Island Biogeography model and the species-area relationship were appropriate to predict the assembly of bacterial communities in these CAS bioreactors. These results are of great importance for engineers and ecologists as they reveal critical aspects of CAS systems that could be applied towards improving bioreactor design and operation. PMID:22880016

  20. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

    2000-12-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low

  1. Tractor Mechanics. Maintaining and Servicing the Power Train, Learning Activity Packages 49-53; Maintaining and Servicing the Clutch, Learning Activity Packages 54-59; Maintaining and Servicing the Transmission and Differential, Learning Activity Packages 60-68; Maintaining and Servicing the Final Drive, Learning Activity Packages 69-77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This series of learning activity packages focuses on four areas of tractor mechanics: (1) maintaining and servicing the power train, (2) maintaining and servicing the clutch, (3) maintaining and servicing the transmission and differential, and (4) maintaining and servicing the final drive. Each of the twenty-nine illustrated learning activity…

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) drives mTOR pathway activation and proliferation of human melanoma by reversible nitrosylation of TSC2

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rivera, Esther; Jayaraman, Padmini; Parikh, Falguni; Davies, Michael A.; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Milton, Denái R.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Grimm, Elizabeth A.; Estrada, Yeriel; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Sikora, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the cancers of fastest-rising incidence in the world. iNOS is overexpressed in melanoma and other cancers, and previous data suggest that iNOS and nitric oxide (NO) drive survival and proliferation of human melanoma cells. However, specific mechanisms through which this occurs are poorly defined. One candidate is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which plays a major role in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis of melanoma and other cancers. We used the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay to test the hypothesis that melanoma growth is regulated by iNOS-dependent mTOR pathway activation. Both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of iNOS suppressed melanoma proliferation and in vivo growth on the CAM in human melanoma models. This was associated with strong downregulation of mTOR pathway activation by Western blot analysis of p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, p-S6RP, and p-4EBP1. iNOS expression and NO were associated with reversible nitrosylation of TSC2, and inhibited dimerization of TSC2 with its inhibitory partner TSC1, enhancing GTPase activity of its target Rheb, a critical activator of mTOR signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from stage III melanoma patients showed a significant correlation between iNOS expression levels and expression of mTOR pathway members. Exogenously-supplied NO was also sufficient to reverse mTOR pathway inhibition by the B-Raf inhibitor Vemurafenib. In summary, covalent modification of TSC2 by iNOS-derived NO is associated with impaired TSC2/TSC1 dimerization, mTOR pathway activation, and proliferation of human melanoma. This model is consistent with the known association of iNOS overexpression and poor prognosis in melanoma and other cancers. PMID:24398473

  3. Brain stem activity changes associated with restored sympathetic drive following CPAP treatment in OSA subjects: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Linda C; Fatouleh, Rania H; McKenzie, David K; Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with significantly elevated muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), leading to hypertension and increased cardiovascular morbidity. Although little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the sympathoexcitation, we have recently shown that the elevated MSNA in OSA is associated with altered neural processing in various brain stem sites, including the dorsolateral pons, rostral ventrolateral medulla, medullary raphe, and midbrain. Given the risk associated with elevated MSNA, we aimed to determine if treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) would reduce the elevated MSNA and reverse the brain stem functional changes associated with the elevated MSNA. We performed concurrent recordings of MSNA and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity of the brain stem, using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, in 15 controls and 13 subjects with OSA, before and after 6 mo CPAP treatment. As expected, 6 mo of CPAP treatment significantly reduced MSNA in subjects with OSA, from 54 ± 4 to 23 ± 3 bursts/min and from 77 ± 7 to 36 ± 3 bursts/100 heart beats. Importantly, we found that MSNA-coupled changes in BOLD signal intensity within the dorsolateral pons, medullary raphe, and rostral ventrolateral medulla returned to control levels. That is, CPAP treatment completely reversed brain stem functional changes associated with elevated MSNA in untreated OSA subjects. These data highlight the effectiveness of CPAP treatment in reducing one of the most significant health issues associated with OSA, that is, elevated MSNA and its associated elevated morbidity.

  4. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  5. Transient microbiota exposures activate dormant Escherichia coli infection in the bladder and drive severe outcomes of recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Pathogens often inhabit the body asymptomatically, emerging to cause disease in response to unknown triggers. In the bladder, latent intracellular Escherichia coli reservoirs are regarded as likely origins of recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI), a problem affecting millions of women worldwide. However, clinically plausible triggers that activate these reservoirs are unknown. Clinical studies suggest that the composition of a woman’s vaginal microbiota influences her susceptibility to rUTI, but the mechanisms behind these associations are unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that the urinary tract is routinely exposed to vaginal bacteria, including Gardnerella vaginalis, a dominant member of the vaginal microbiota in some women. Using a mouse model, we show that bladder exposure to G. vaginalis triggers E. coli egress from latent bladder reservoirs and enhances the potential for life-threatening outcomes of the resulting E. coli rUTI. Transient G. vaginalis exposures were sufficient to cause bladder epithelial apoptosis and exfoliation and interleukin-1-receptor-mediated kidney injury, which persisted after G. vaginalis clearance from the urinary tract. These results support a broader view of UTI pathogenesis in which disease can be driven by short-lived but powerful urinary tract exposures to vaginal bacteria that are themselves not “uropathogenic” in the classic sense. This “covert pathogenesis” paradigm may apply to other latent infections, (e.g., tuberculosis), or for diseases currently defined as noninfectious because routine culture fails to detect microbes of recognized significance. PMID:28358889

  6. Alcohol drives S-nitrosylation and redox activation of protein phosphatase 1, causing bovine airway cilia dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael E; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Liu, Miao; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with alcohol (ethanol)-use disorders are at increased risk for lung infections, in part, due to defective mucociliary clearance driven by motile cilia in the airways. We recently reported that isolated, demembranated bovine cilia (axonemes) are capable of producing nitric oxide ((∙)NO) when exposed to biologically relevant concentrations of alcohol. This increased presence of (∙)NO can lead to protein S-nitrosylation, a posttranslational modification signaling mechanism involving reversible adduction of nitrosonium cations or (∙)NO to thiolate or thiyl radicals, respectively, of proteins forming S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We quantified and compared SNO content between isolated, demembranated axonemes extracted from bovine tracheae, with or without in situ alcohol exposure (100 mM × 24 h). We demonstrate that relevant concentrations of alcohol exposure shift the S-nitrosylation status of key cilia regulatory proteins, including 20-fold increases in S-nitrosylation of proteins that include protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). With the use of an ATP-reactivated axoneme motility system, we demonstrate that alcohol-driven S-nitrosylation of PP1 is associated with PP1 activation and dysfunction of axoneme motility. These new data demonstrate that alcohol can shift the S-nitrothiol balance at the level of the cilia organelle and highlight S-nitrosylation as a novel signaling mechanism to regulate PP1 and cilia motility.

  7. Chemoproteomic profiling reveals that cathepsin D off-target activity drives ocular toxicity of β-secretase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zuhl, Andrea M.; Nolan, Charles E.; Brodney, Michael A.; Niessen, Sherry; Atchison, Kevin; Houle, Christopher; Karanian, David A.; Ambroise, Claude; Brulet, Jeffrey W.; Beck, Elizabeth M.; Doran, Shawn D.; O'Neill, Brian T.; am Ende, Christopher W.; Chang, Cheng; Geoghegan, Kieran F.; West, Graham M.; Judkins, Joshua C.; Hou, Xinjun; Riddell, David R.; Johnson, Douglas S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of β-secretase BACE1 is considered one of the most promising approaches for treating Alzheimer's disease. Several structurally distinct BACE1 inhibitors have been withdrawn from development after inducing ocular toxicity in animal models, but the target mediating this toxicity has not been identified. Here we use a clickable photoaffinity probe to identify cathepsin D (CatD) as a principal off-target of BACE1 inhibitors in human cells. We find that several BACE1 inhibitors blocked CatD activity in cells with much greater potency than that displayed in cell-free assays with purified protein. Through a series of exploratory toxicology studies, we show that quantifying CatD target engagement in cells with the probe is predictive of ocular toxicity in vivo. Taken together, our findings designate off-target inhibition of CatD as a principal driver of ocular toxicity for BACE1 inhibitors and more generally underscore the power of chemical proteomics for discerning mechanisms of drug action. PMID:27727204

  8. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-09-01

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity.

  9. Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

  10. Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurement of forces inside a three-dimensional pile of frictionless droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Long, S; Wang, Q; Dinsmore, A D

    2006-06-16

    We present systematic and detailed measurements of interparticle contact forces inside three-dimensional piles of frictionless liquid droplets. We measured long-range chainlike correlations of the directions and magnitudes of large forces, thereby establishing the presence of force chains in three dimensions. Our correlation definition provides a chain persistence length of 10 mean droplet diameters, decreasing as load is applied to the pile. We also measured the angles between contacts and showed that the chainlike arrangement arises from the balance of forces. Moreover, we found that piles whose height was comparable to the chain persistence length exhibited substantially greater strain hardening than did tall piles, which we attributed to the force chains. Together, the results establish a connection between the microscopic force network and the elastic response of meso- or macroscopic granular piles. The conclusions drawn here should be relevant in jammed systems generally, including concentrated emulsions and piles of sand or other heavy particles.

  12. Impact Simulations on the Rubble Pile Asteroid (2867) Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deller, Jakob; Snodgrass, Colin; Lowry, Stephen C.; Price, Mark C.; Sierks, Holger

    2014-11-01

    Images from the OSIRIS camera system on board the Rosetta spacecraft (Keller et al. 2010) has revealed several interesting features on asteroid (2867) Steins. Its macro porosity of 40%, together with the shape that looks remarkably like a YORP evolved body, both indicate a rubble pile structure. A large crater on the southern pole is evidence for collisional evolution of this rubble pile asteroid. We have developed a new approach for simulating impacts on asteroid bodies that connects formation history to their collisional evolution. This is achieved by representing the interior as a ‘rubble pile’, created from the gravitational aggregation of spherical ‘pebbles’ that represent fragments from a major disruption event. These ‘pebbles’ follow a power law size function and constitute the building blocks of the rubble pile. This allows us to explicitly model the interior of rubble pile asteroids in hyper-velocity impact simulations in a more realistic way. We present preliminary results of a study validating our approach in a large series of simulated impacts on a typical small main belt rubble pile asteroid using the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics solver in Autodyn. We show that this approach allows us to explicitly follow the behavior of a single ‘pebble’, while preserving the expected properties of the bulk asteroid as known from observations and experiments (Holsapple 2009). On the example of Steins, we use this model to investigate if surface features like the northern hill at 75/100 degrees lon/lat distance to the largest crater (Jorda et al. 2012), or the catena of depletion pits, can be explained by the displacement of large fragments in the interior of the asteroid during the impact. We do this by following the movement of pebbles below the surface feature in simulations that recreate the shape of the impact crater.Acknowledgements: Jakob Deller thanks the Planetary Science Institute for a Pierazzo International Student Travel Award that funds

  13. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cloern, James E; Abreu, Paulo C; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John Olov Roger; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-02-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2-5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine-coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  14. DRIVING OUTFLOWS WITH RELATIVISTIC JETS AND THE DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK EFFICIENCY ON INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INHOMOGENEITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-10-01

    We examine the detailed physics of the feedback mechanism by relativistic active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets interacting with a two-phase fractal interstellar medium (ISM) in the kpc-scale core of galaxies using 29 three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback efficiency, as measured by the amount of cloud dispersal generated by the jet-ISM interactions, is sensitive to the maximum size of clouds in the fractal cloud distribution but not to their volume filling factor. Feedback ceases to be efficient for Eddington ratios P{sub jet}/L{sub edd} {approx}< 10{sup -4}, although systems with large cloud complexes {approx}> 50 pc require jets of Eddington ratio in excess of 10{sup -2} to disperse the clouds appreciably. Based on measurements of the bubble expansion rates in our simulations, we argue that sub-grid AGN prescriptions resulting in negative feedback in cosmological simulations without a multi-phase treatment of the ISM are good approximations if the volume filling factor of warm-phase material is less than 0.1 and the cloud complexes are smaller than {approx}25 pc. We find that the acceleration of the dense embedded clouds is provided by the ram pressure of the high-velocity flow through the porous channels of the warm phase, flow that has fully entrained the shocked hot-phase gas it has swept up, and is additionally mass loaded by ablated cloud material. This mechanism transfers 10% to 40% of the jet energy to the cold and warm gas, accelerating it within a few 10 to 100 Myr to velocities that match those observed in a range of high- and low-redshift radio galaxies hosting powerful radio jets.

  15. Human activities and climate variability drive fast-paced change across the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Abreu, Paulo C.; Carstensen, Jacob; Chauvaud, Laurent; Elmgren, Ragnar; Grall, Jacques; Greening, Holly; Johansson, John O.R.; Kahru, Mati; Sherwood, Edward T.; Xu, Jie; Yin, Kedong

    2016-01-01

    Time series of environmental measurements are essential for detecting, measuring and understanding changes in the Earth system and its biological communities. Observational series have accumulated over the past 2–5 decades from measurements across the world's estuaries, bays, lagoons, inland seas and shelf waters influenced by runoff. We synthesize information contained in these time series to develop a global view of changes occurring in marine systems influenced by connectivity to land. Our review is organized around four themes: (i) human activities as drivers of change; (ii) variability of the climate system as a driver of change; (iii) successes, disappointments and challenges of managing change at the sea-land interface; and (iv) discoveries made from observations over time. Multidecadal time series reveal that many of the world's estuarine–coastal ecosystems are in a continuing state of change, and the pace of change is faster than we could have imagined a decade ago. Some have been transformed into novel ecosystems with habitats, biogeochemistry and biological communities outside the natural range of variability. Change takes many forms including linear and nonlinear trends, abrupt state changes and oscillations. The challenge of managing change is daunting in the coastal zone where diverse human pressures are concentrated and intersect with different responses to climate variability over land and over ocean basins. The pace of change in estuarine–coastal ecosystems will likely accelerate as the human population and economies continue to grow and as global climate change accelerates. Wise stewardship of the resources upon which we depend is critically dependent upon a continuing flow of information from observations to measure, understand and anticipate future changes along the world's coastlines.

  16. Interleukin (IL)-9/IL-9R axis drives γδ T cells activation in psoriatic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Guggino, G; Ciccia, F; Di Liberto, D; Lo Pizzo, M; Ruscitti, P; Cipriani, P; Ferrante, A; Sireci, G; Dieli, F; Fourniè, J J; Giacomelli, R; Triolo, G

    2016-12-01

    Cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-12, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-23 and, more recently, IL-9, have been implicated in the initiation/maintenance of inflammation in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In the present study we aimed to characterize the role of γδ T cells in peripheral blood and synovial fluid of PsA patients and to investigate their response to in-vitro stimulation with antigen or cytokines (IL-9 and IL-23). γδ T cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial fluid were analysed by flow cytometry to evaluate the phenotype and cytokine production. IL-23R and IL-9R gene expression were also evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), sorted γδ T cells and γδ cell lines were also stimulated in vitro with isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), recombinant IL-9 or recombinant IL-23. Our results show an expansion of γδ T cells with a predominant effector memory phenotype in peripheral blood and synovium of untreated PsA patients, which reverses significantly after treatment with anti-TNF-α or anti-IL-12/IL-23R monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Moreover, in PsA patients γδ T cells activation is driven prevalently by IL-9/IL-9R interaction, and not only by IL-23/IL-23R. Together these findings indicate γδ T cells and IL-9 as new players in the pathogenesis of PsA.

  17. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Lindsey A.; Reich, Kira L.; Taylor, Braden E.; Blatt, Eliot B.; Middleton, Sydney M.; Burke, Shawnecca D.; Stultz, Laura K.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Partridge, Janet F.; Miller, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage–including that induced by many anticancer drugs–results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events. PMID:26375390

  18. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bierle, Lindsey A; Reich, Kira L; Taylor, Braden E; Blatt, Eliot B; Middleton, Sydney M; Burke, Shawnecca D; Stultz, Laura K; Hanson, Pamela K; Partridge, Janet F; Miller, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage--including that induced by many anticancer drugs--results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events.

  19. Safety Education in Driving. 2nd Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Intended for driving instruction students, this publication contains instructional materials for safety education. It contains six sections on facts and figures; defensive driving; safety devices; restraints; emergency situations; and other highway users. Each section consists of reading material followed by an activity or activities. A total of…

  20. Numerical modeling of Thermal Response Tests in Energy Piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Toledo, M.; Moffat, R.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, thermal response tests (TRT) are used as the main tools for the evaluation of low enthalpy geothermal systems such as heat exchangers. The results of TRT are used for estimating thermal conductivity and thermal resistance values of those systems. We present results of synthetic TRT simulations that model the behavior observed in an experimental energy pile system, which was installed at the new building of the Faculty of Engineering of Universidad de Chile. Moreover, we also present a parametric study to identify the most influent parameters in the performance of this type of tests. The modeling was developed using the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows the incorporation of flow and heat transport processes. The modeled system consists on a concrete pile with 1 m diameter and 28 m deep, which contains a 28 mm diameter PEX pipe arranged in a closed circuit. Three configurations were analyzed: a U pipe, a triple U and a helicoid shape implemented at the experimental site. All simulations were run considering transient response in a three-dimensional domain. The simulation results provided the temperature distribution on the pile for a set of different geometry and physical properties of the materials. These results were compared with analytical solutions which are commonly used to interpret TRT data. This analysis demonstrated that there are several parameters that affect the system response in a synthetic TRT. For example, the diameter of the simulated pile affects the estimated effective thermal conductivity of the system. Moreover, the simulation results show that the estimated thermal conductivity for a 1 m diameter pile did not stabilize even after 100 hours since the beginning of the test, when it reached a value 30% below value used to set up the material properties in the simulation. Furthermore, we observed different behaviors depending on the thermal properties of concrete and soil. According to the simulations, the thermal

  1. Power semiconductor controlled drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Gopal K.

    This book presents power semiconductor controlled drives employing dc motors, induction motors, and synchronous motors. The dynamics of motor and load systems are covered. Open-loop and closed-loop drives are considered, and thyristor, power transistor, and GTO converters are discussed. In-depth coverage is given to ac drives, particularly those fed by voltage and current source inverters and cycloconverters. Full coverage is given to brushless and commutatorless dc drives, including load-commuted synchronous motor drives. Rectifier-controlled dc drives are presented in detail.

  2. Application of CFG Piles to Soft Soil Treatment of Municipal Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qingli; Song, Yan; Han, Xinzhan

    With rapid development of constructional engineering, methods used for soft soil foundation treatment become increasingly diversified. Because composite foundation has the peculiar advantage that that it makes full use of earth among piles and piles and is featured by short construction period, large treatment depth and relatively good effect, it has been applied more and more widely. The engineering applies CFG pipes, utilizes high bearing capacity of piles and gives full play to carrying capacity of earth among piles by establishing a mattress layer.

  3. Design of anti-slide piles for slope stabilization in Wanzhou city, Three Gorges Area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunmei; van Westen, Cees

    2013-04-01

    This study is related to the design of anti-slide piles for several landslides in Wanzhou city located in the Three Gorges area. Due to the construction of the Three Gorges Reservoir the hydro-geological conditions in this area have deteriorated significantly, leading to larger instability problems. China has invested a lot of money in slope stabilization measures for the treatment of landslides in the Three Gorges area. One of the methods for the stabilization of large landslides is the design of anti-sliding piles. This paper focuses on extensive slope stability analysis and modeling of the mechanical behavior of the landslide masses, and the parameters required for designing the number, size and dimensions of reinforced concrete stabilization piles. The study focuses on determining the rock parameters, anchor depth, and the pile and soil interaction coefficient. The study aims to provide guidelines for anti-slide pile stabilization works for landslides in the Wanzhou area. The research work contains a number of aspects. First a study is carried out on the distribution of pressures expected on the piles, using two different methods that take into account the expected pore water pressure and seismic acceleration. For the Ercengyan landslide , the Limit Equilibrium Method and Strength Reduction Method of FEM are compared through the results of the landslide pressure distributions on the piles and stress fields in the piles. The second component is the study of the required anchor depth of antislide piles, which is carried out using a statistical analysis with data from 20 landslides that have been controlled with anti-sliding piles. The rock characteristics of the anchor locations were obtained using laboratory tests, and a classification of rock mass quality is made for the anchors of antislide piles. The relationship between the critical anchor height and the angle of the landslide slip surface is determined. Two different methods are presented for the length

  4. Numerical Estimation of the Pile Toe and Shaft Unit Resistances During the Installation Process in Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkol, Jakub

    2015-03-01

    Numerical simulations of a pile jacking were carried out. A Coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian (CEL) formulation was used to treat with large deformation problems. An Abaqus, a commercial Finite Element Method software suit, was used as a computing environment. The Mohr-Coulomb constitutive model was applied and the Coulomb model of friction was used to describe pile-soil interaction. Calculations were made for three different pile diameters. Toe and shaft unit resistances versus depth for each pile were investigated and plotted. CPT-based solutions were compared with the results of numerical simulations.

  5. Comparative Model Tests of SDP and CFA Pile Groups in Non-Cohesive Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasiński, Adam; Kusio, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    The research topic relates to the subject of deep foundations supported on continuous flight auger (CFA) piles and screw displacement piles (SDP). The authors have decided to conduct model tests of foundations supported on the group of piles mentioned above and also the tests of the same piles working as a single. The tests are ongoing in Geotechnical Laboratory of Gdaňsk University of Technology. The description of test procedure, interpretation and analysis of the preliminary testing series results are presented in the paper.

  6. Development of p-y curves of laterally loaded piles in cohesionless soil.

    PubMed

    Khari, Mahdy; Kassim, Khairul Anuar; Adnan, Azlan

    2014-01-01

    The research on damages of structures that are supported by deep foundations has been quite intensive in the past decade. Kinematic interaction in soil-pile interaction is evaluated based on the p-y curve approach. Existing p-y curves have considered the effects of relative density on soil-pile interaction in sandy soil. The roughness influence of the surface wall pile on p-y curves has not been emphasized sufficiently. The presented study was performed to develop a series of p-y curves for single piles through comprehensive experimental investigations. Modification factors were studied, namely, the effects of relative density and roughness of the wall surface of pile. The model tests were subjected to lateral load in Johor Bahru sand. The new p-y curves were evaluated based on the experimental data and were compared to the existing p-y curves. The soil-pile reaction for various relative density (from 30% to 75%) was increased in the range of 40-95% for a smooth pile at a small displacement and 90% at a large displacement. For rough pile, the ratio of dense to loose relative density soil-pile reaction was from 2.0 to 3.0 at a small to large displacement. Direct comparison of the developed p-y curve shows significant differences in the magnitude and shapes with the existing load-transfer curves. Good comparison with the experimental and design studies demonstrates the multidisciplinary applications of the present method.

  7. OVERALL CONTROL SYSTEM FOR HIGH FLUX PILE

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.; Durham, N.C.; Wigner, E.P.; Princeton, N.J.; Epler, E.P.

    1961-05-23

    A control system is given for a high fiux reactor incorporating an anti- scram control feature whereby a neutron absorbing control rod acts as a fine adjustment while a neutron absorbing shim rod, actuated upon a command received from reactor period and level signals, has substantially greater effect on the neutron level and is moved prior to scram conditions to alter the reactor activity before a scram condition is created. Thus the probability that a scram will have to be initiated is substantially decreased.

  8. Feasibility Study of Thin Film Thermocouple Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisk, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, thermopile detectors, generators, and refrigerators based on bulk materials have been used to measure temperature, generate power for spacecraft, and cool sensors for scientific investigations. New potential uses of small, low-power, thin film thermopiles are in the area of microelectromechanical systems since power requirements decrease as electrical and mechanical machines shrink in size. In this research activity, thin film thermopile devices are fabricated utilizing radio frequency sputter coating and photoresist lift-off techniques. Electrical characterizations are performed on two designs in order to investigate the feasibility of generating small amounts of power, utilizing any available waste heat as the energy source.

  9. Ocular disease and driving.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Black, Alex A

    2016-09-01

    As the driving population ages, the number of drivers with visual impairment resulting from ocular disease will increase given the age-related prevalence of ocular disease. The increase in visual impairment in the driving population has a number of implications for driving outcomes. This review summarises current research regarding the impact of common ocular diseases on driving ability and safety, with particular focus on cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, hemianopia and diabetic retinopathy. The evidence considered includes self-reported driving outcomes, driving performance (on-road and simulator-based) and various motor vehicle crash indices. Collectively, this review demonstrates that driving ability and safety are negatively affected by ocular disease; however, further research is needed in this area. Older drivers with ocular disease need to be aware of the negative consequences of their ocular condition and in the case where treatment options are available, encouraged to seek these earlier for optimum driving safety and quality of life benefits.

  10. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on this page, ... their independence is being taken away. Signs That Driving May No Longer be Safe People with signs ...

  11. Safe driving for teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/pubmed/25837240 . Simons-Morton B, Ouimet MC. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: a review of the ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16788109 . Simons-Morton B. Parent involvement in novice teen driving: rationale, evidence of effects, ...

  12. Distinctive activation patterns under intrinsically versus extrinsically driven cognitive loads in prefrontal cortex: a near-infrared spectroscopy study using a driving video game.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Saito, Hirofumi; Oi, Misato

    2012-01-11

    To investigate the neural bases of intrinsically and extrinsically driven cognitive loads in daily life, we measured repetitively prefrontal activation in three (one control and two experimental) groups during a driving video game using near-infrared spectroscopy. The control group drove to goal four times with distinct route-maps illustrating default turning points. In contrast, the memory group drove the memorized default route without a route-map, and the emergency group drove with a route-map, but was instructed to change the default route by an extrinsically given verbal command (turn left or right) as an envisioned emergency. The predictability of a turning point in the route in each group was relatively different: due to extrinsic dictate of others in the emergency group, intrinsic memory in the memory group, and route-map aid in the control group. We analyzed concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin (CoxyHb) in the three critical periods (pre-turning, actual-turning, and post-turning). The emergency group showed a significantly increasing pattern of CoxyHb throughout the three periods, and a significant reduction in CoxyHb throughout the repetitive trials, but the memory group did not, even though both experimental groups showed higher activation than the control group in the pre-turning period. These results suggest that the prefrontal cortex differentiates the intrinsically (memory) and the extrinsically (dictate of others) driven cognitive loads according to the predictability of turning behavior, although the two types of cognitive loads commonly show increasing activation in the pre-turning period as the preparation effect.

  13. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  14. Parkinson's disease and issues related to driving.

    PubMed

    Uitti, Ryan J

    2009-12-01

    Driving a motor vehicle represents an important activity associated with personal independence and freedom. Being told that one can no longer drive is itself associated with loss of independence, depression, low self-esteem and reduced activities [1,2]. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), therefore, understandably wish to continue to be able to maintain their ability to drive automobiles, motorcycles, airplanes, and boats, etc. The ability to determine if and when a PD patient is no longer fit to drive a motor vehicle is important for maintaining safety for the PD patient and the public. There are numerous requirements for being able to drive a motor vehicle safely. When any of these capacities deteriorate, the ability to drive safely may be lost. This review will concentrate upon common issues that would be peculiar to patients with PD.

  15. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  16. Magnetic drive coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Edward L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The driving and driven members of a magnetic drive are separated by en enlarged gap to provide clearance for a conduit or other member. Flux pins in the gap maintain the torque transmitting capability of the drive. The spacing between two of the flux pins is increased to provide space for the conduit.

  17. Driving, brain injury and assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Lane, Amy K; Benoit, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with brain injury often present with cognitive, physical and emotional impairments which impact their ability to resume independence in activities of daily living. Of those activities, the resumption of driving privileges is cited as one of the greatest concerns by survivors of brain injury. The integration of driving fundamentals within the hierarchical model proposed by Keskinen represents the complexity of skills and behaviors necessary for driving. This paper provides a brief review of specific considerations concerning the driver with TBI and highlights current vehicle technology which has been developed by the automotive industry and by manufacturers of adaptive driving equipment that may facilitate the driving task. Adaptive equipment technology allows for compensation of a variety of operational deficits, whereas technological advances within the automotive industry provide drivers with improved safety and information systems. However, research has not yet supported the use of such intelligent transportation systems or advanced driving systems for drivers with brain injury. Although technologies are intended to improve the safety of drivers within the general population, the potential of negative consequences for drivers with brain injury must be considered. Ultimately, a comprehensive driving evaluation and training by a driving rehabilitation specialist is recommended for individuals with brain injury. An understanding of the potential impact of TBI on driving-related skills and knowledge of current adaptive equipment and technology is imperative to determine whether return-to-driving is a realistic and achievable goal for the individual with TBI.

  18. HES6 drives a critical AR transcriptional programme to induce castration-resistant prostate cancer through activation of an E2F1-mediated cell cycle network

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Lamb, Alastair D; Russell, Roslin; Carroll, Thomas; Jurmeister, Sarah; Galeano-Dalmau, Nuria; Massie, Charlie E; Boren, Joan; Bon, Helene; Theodorou, Vasiliki; Vias, Maria; Shaw, Greg L; Sharma, Naomi L; Ross-Adams, Helen; Scott, Helen E; Vowler, Sarah L; Howat, William J; Warren, Anne Y; Wooster, Richard F; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E

    2014-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is poorly characterized and heterogeneous and while the androgen receptor (AR) is of singular importance, other factors such as c-Myc and the E2F family also play a role in later stage disease. HES6 is a transcription co-factor associated with stem cell characteristics in neural tissue. Here we show that HES6 is up-regulated in aggressive human prostate cancer and drives castration-resistant tumour growth in the absence of ligand binding by enhancing the transcriptional activity of the AR, which is preferentially directed to a regulatory network enriched for transcription factors such as E2F1. In the clinical setting, we have uncovered a HES6-associated signature that predicts poor outcome in prostate cancer, which can be pharmacologically targeted by inhibition of PLK1 with restoration of sensitivity to castration. We have therefore shown for the first time the critical role of HES6 in the development of CRPC and identified its potential in patient-specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:24737870

  19. Firearms, alcohol and crime: convictions for driving under the influence (DUI) and other alcohol-related crimes and risk for future criminal activity among authorised purchasers of handguns.

    PubMed

    Wintemute, Garen J; Wright, Mona A; Castillo-Carniglia, Alvaro; Shev, Aaron; Cerdá, Magdalena

    2017-01-30

    Firearm violence frequently involves alcohol, but there are no studies of misuse of alcohol and risk for future violence among firearm owners. We examined the association between prior convictions for alcohol-related crimes, chiefly driving under the influence (DUI), and risk of subsequent arrest among 4066 individuals who purchased handguns in California in 1977. During follow-up through 1991, 32.8% of those with prior alcohol-related convictions and 5.7% of those with no prior criminal history were arrested for a violent or firearm-related crime; 15.9% and 2.7%, respectively, were arrested for murder, rape, robbery or aggravated assault. Prior alcohol-related convictions were associated with a fourfold to fivefold increase in risk of incident arrest for a violent or firearm-related crime, a relative increase greater than that seen for age, sex or prior violence. Prior convictions for alcohol-related crime may be an important predictor of risk for future criminal activity among purchasers of firearms.

  20. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling and ETS1/2 cooperatively drive C250T mutant TERT promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghui; Zhou, Qi-Ling; Sun, Wenjie; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Cheng, Hui Shan; Ying, Zhe; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Raju, Anandhkumar; Tenen, Daniel G.; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Li, Jun; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Mengfeng; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional reactivation of TERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is necessary for cancer progression in about 90% of human cancers. The recent discovery of two prevalent somatic mutations—C250T and C228T—in the TERT promoter in various cancers has provided insight into a plausible mechanism of TERT reactivation. Although the two hotspot mutations create a similar binding motif for E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors, we show that they are functionally distinct, in that the C250T unlike the C228T TERT promoter is driven by non-canonical NF-κB signalling. We demonstrate that binding of ETS to the mutant TERT promoter is insufficient in driving its transcription but this process requires non-canonical NF-κB signalling for stimulus responsiveness, sustained telomerase activity and hence cancer progression. Our findings highlight a previously unrecognized role of non-canonical NF-κB signalling in tumorigenesis and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for TERT reactivation in cancers, which if targeted could have immense therapeutic implications. PMID:26389665