Science.gov

Sample records for activities procedures evaluation

  1. A standardized procedure for using human corpus cavernosum strips to evaluate drug activity.

    PubMed

    Mirone, V; Sorrentino, R; di Villa Bianca, R; Imbimbo, C; Palmieri, A; Fusco, F; Tajana, G; Cirino, G

    2000-01-01

    The main problem of using human corpus cavernosum (HCC) tissue to perform bioassay is linked to its limited availability further complicated by the heterogeneous source of the tissues used. Here, we show that gender reassignment is a reliable source of human tissue without major ethical problems. Indeed, the entire corpus cavernosum is obtained from the surgery procedure, which allows creating a standardized procedure to prepare HCC strip. In addition, human tissue, if kept in the fridge in the condition described, does not loose its ability to contract to phenylephrine (PE; alpha agonist), angiotensin II (AG II) and KCl up to 4 days. Furthermore, once contracted with PE, HCC relaxes to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent mechanism); sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent mechanism); cromakalim (CRK), a K(ATP) channel opener; or alprostadil, a synthetic PGE2 (ALPR). In conclusion, we have standardized a procedure that allows the use of HCC strips to evaluate drug activity and/or to study pathophysiological mechanisms with an intact functional human tissue up to 4 days from the surgery procedure. PMID:11395325

  2. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  3. Methods and procedures for evaluation of neutron-induced activation cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, M.A.

    1981-09-01

    One cannot expect measurements alone to supply all of the neutron-induced activation cross-section data required by the fission reactor, fusion reactor, and nuclear weapons development communities, given the wide ranges of incident neutron energies, the great variety of possible reaction types leading to activation, and targets both stable and unstable. Therefore, the evaluator must look to nuclear model calculations and systematics to aid in fulfilling these cross-section data needs. This review presents some of the recent developments and improvements in the prediction of neutron activation cross sections, with specific emphasis on the use of empirical and semiempirical methods. Since such systematics require much less nuclear informaion as input and much less computational time than do the multistep Hauser-Feshbach codes, they can often provide certain cross-section data at a sufficient level of accuracy within a minimum amount of time. The cross-section information that these systematics can and cannot provide and those cases in which they can be used most reliably are discussed.

  4. An evaluation of procedure 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, S. G.; Heydorn, R. P.; Misra, P. N.; Lee, W., Jr.; Smart, R. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    LACIE Procedure 1 has undergone continuous testing and evaluation, starting with analytical and experimental studies even before it was implemented in ERIPS software and continuing to the present with performance evaluations using blind-site data. The strengths and weaknesses of the procedure are indicated and some areas for possible improvement are identified. Results from three of the experiments performed and an evaluation of LACIE Procedure 1 proportion estimates for some blind-site segments are discussed.

  5. Formation evaluation: Geological procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    This volume goes beyond a discussion of petroleum geology and the techniques of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) logging as a reservoir evaluation tool. It provides the logging geologist with a review of geological techniques and classification systems that will ensure the maximum development of communicable geological information. Contents include: 1. Introduction--cuttings recovery, cutting sampling, core sampling, rock classification; 2. Detrital rocks--classification, description; 3. Carbonate rocks--classification, description; 4. Chemical rocks-introduction, siliceous rocks, ferruginous rocks, aluminous rocks, phosphatic rocks, aluminous rocks, carbonaceous rocks; 5. Igneous and metamorpbic rocks; Appendix; References and Index.

  6. Evaluation of the calibration procedure of active personal dosemeters for interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Bordy, J-M; Daures, J; Clairand, I; Denozière, M; Donadille, L; d'Errico, F; Gouriou, J; Itié, C; Struelens, L

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the use of active personal dosemeters (APD) in interventional radiology is presented. It is based on the work done by the working package 7 of the CONRAD coordinated action supported by the EC within the frame of the 6th FP. This study was done in collaboration with the working package 4 of CONRAD to deal with the calculations required for studying the new calibration facility. The main requirements of the standard for the APD and the difficulties caused by the use of pulsed radiations are presented through the results of an intercomparison organised in a realistic calibration facility similar to the workplace situation in interventional radiology. The main characteristics of this facility are presented. PMID:18757898

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Computer-based procedure for field activities: results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  8. 48 CFR 45.202 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... offeror's property management plans, methods, practices, or procedures for accounting for property are... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 45.202 Evaluation procedures. (a) The contracting officer shall consider any potentially unfair competitive advantage that may result from...

  9. EVALUATION OF OZONE CALIBRATION PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In October of 1976, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced that the calibration procedure then currently in use for reference methods for the measurement of ozone in the atmosphere -- the neutral buffered potassium iodide procedure -- had been found variable and in so...

  10. Evaluating EOPS: A User Oriented Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Stecher, Brian M.

    This seven-part report presents a recommended plan for state-wide evaluation of the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) program in the California Community College System. Chapter I describes the procedures used by Educational Evaluation Associates in devising the plan, discusses the role played by evaluation study groups,…

  11. Evaluation of surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Keng, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a type of facial pain that is difficult to treat. The pain can be excruciating and debilitating. The wide range of treatments currently used for trigeminal neuralgia is ample evidence that there is no simple answer to how it should be managed. This review will evaluate the current surgical procedures used for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. A critical analysis of the evidence-based studies to date was done to evaluate and compare the efficacy of the different surgical procedures. Arguments for and against the use of surgery for trigeminal neuralgia are presented. In addition, the surgical procedures were compared with other treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:14959906

  12. Accuracy test procedure for image evaluation techniques.

    PubMed

    Jones, R A

    1968-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to determine the accuracy of image evaluation techniques. In the procedure, a target having orthogonal test arrays is photographed with a high quality optical system. During the exposure, the target is subjected to horizontal linear image motion. The modulation transfer functions of the images in the horizontal and vertical directions are obtained using the evaluation technique. Since all other degradations are symmetrical, the quotient of the two modulation transfer functions represents the modulation transfer function of the experimentally induced linear image motion. In an accurate experiment, any discrepancy between the experimental determination and the true value is due to inaccuracy in the image evaluation technique. The procedure was used to test the Perkin-Elmer automated edge gradient analysis technique over the spatial frequency range of 0-200 c/m. This experiment demonstrated that the edge gradient technique is accurate over this region and that the testing procedure can be controlled with the desired accuracy. Similarly, the test procedure can be used to determine the accuracy of other image evaluation techniques. PMID:20062421

  13. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  14. Faculty Ratings: Procedures for Interpreting Student Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    The author contends that student evaluations of faculty should be adjusted before use in tenure, salary, and promotion decisions to eliminate irrelevant course and teacher attributes which color students' opinions and confound analysis. To eliminate possible bias, a multiple regression analysis procedure for the adjustment of student evaluations…

  15. Training Procedure to Evaluate Visible Emissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Air Pollution Control Commission, Charleston.

    Described in this pamphlet is a procedure used by the West Virginia Air Pollution Control Commission to train personnel in evaluating visible emissions. For this purpose a "Smoke Observer's Training Unit" has been designed, a machine capable of generating both gray/black plumes for training in the use of Ringlemann readings and white plumes for…

  16. Activities and Procedures for Teacher Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    1986-01-01

    Provides an analytical framework for describing various kinds of teacher-training activities and distinguishes between experiential and awareness-raising practices. Presents a taxonomy of awareness-raising practices in terms of activities and procedures. To illustrate the descriptive framework, a sample training activity and training plan for…

  17. Neutral buoyancy test evaluation of hardware and extravehicular activity procedures for on-orbit assembly of a 14 meter precision reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to perform efficient on-orbit assembly of large paraboloidal precision reflectors is presented. The procedure and associated hardware are verified in simulated Og (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14 m diameter precision reflector mockup. The test article represents a precision reflector having a reflective surface which is segmented into 37 individual panels. The panels are supported on a doubly curved tetrahedral truss consisting of 315 struts. The entire truss and seven reflector panels were assembled in three hours and seven minutes by two pressure-suited test subjects. The average time to attach a panel was two minutes and three seconds. These efficient assembly times were achieved because all hardware and assembly procedures were designed to be compatible with EVA assembly capabilities.

  18. 42 CFR 422.502 - Evaluation and determination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.502 Evaluation and determination procedures. (a) Basis...

  19. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  20. 29 CFR 1956.22 - Procedures for evaluation and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Change, Evaluation and Withdrawal of Approval Procedures § 1956.22 Procedures for evaluation and... enforcement authority under section 18(e) of the Act is not relevant to Phase II and III monitoring...

  1. Status of French flaw evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Faidy, C.; Barthelet, B.; Drubay, B.

    1996-12-01

    The RSE-M Code is under development in France and the 1996 edition will include a complete flaw evaluation procedure for operating PWRs. For FBRs the authors have developed the RCC-MR for design and they are now developing RSE-MR rules for operating plants; a first set of flaw evaluation rules are proposed in the A16 document for low and high temperature regime. After some comments on the organization of RSE and RCC Committees, the paper presents: (1) the status of the different French code rules (RSE-M and A16 document); (2) how can one take into consideration some complex geometry or loading case situations; (3) some comparisons with ASME Code-Section XI; and (4) few examples of major on-going developments for flaw evaluation for different components. In conclusion, two different sets of rules are under development one in RSE-M for PWRs and one in RSE-MR for FBRs using partly the A16 proposals. These rules have to remain consistent, but not necessary identical due to the specific components covered by these documents. The components can be very different in term of pressure load, operating temperature, transient thermal loads and seismic loads.

  2. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  3. Constraint-based evaluation of sequential procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    1990-01-01

    Constraining the operation of an agent requires knowledge of the restrictions to physical and temporal capabilities of that agent, as well as an inherent understanding of the desires being processed by that agent. Usually a set of constraints are available that must be adhered to in order to foster safe operations. In the worst case, violation of a constraint may be cause to terminate operation. If the agent is carrying out a plan, then a method for predicting the agent's desires, and therefore possible constraint violations, is required. The conceptualization of constraint-based reasoning used herein assumes that a system knows how to select a constraint for application as well as how to apply that constraint once it is selected. The application of constraint-based reasoning for evaluating certain kinds of plans known as sequential procedures is discussed. By decomposing these plans, it is possible to apply context dependent constraints in production system fashion without incorporating knowledge of the original planning process.

  4. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for claims evaluation....

  5. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for claims evaluation....

  6. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for claims evaluation....

  7. 76 FR 27016 - Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems AGENCY... assess NIST's test procedures for voting equipment. Manufacturers interested in participating in this... for certification) by the Election Assistance Commission to develop and assess NIST test protocols...

  8. A procedure for evaluating environmental impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Clarke, F.E.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Balsley, J.R.

    1971-01-01

    The procedure does not limit the development of detail in any specific aspect of the environment; a separate expanded matrix for any environmental aspect can easily be developed within the framework provided.

  9. Evaluation of sexual function in patients submitted to ureteroscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Eryildirim, Bilal; Tuncer, Murat; Sahin, Cahit; Yucetas, Ugur; Sarica, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: We aimed to evaluate the possible effects of ureteroscopic procedures on the sexual function of both genders. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 sexually active cases (60 male, 42 female) undergoing ureteroscopic procedures were included in this study. Sexual function has been evaluated in detail by using International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) in male and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) forms in female cases both before and 1-month after the procedures. Pre-and postoperative data were evaluated in a comparative manner. Results: The pre-and postoperative mean IIEF scores were 57.86±2.26 and 54.57±2.48 (p=0.19) in males and the mean FSFI scores were 13.58±1.46 and 14.46±1.52 (p=0.41), respectively in females. Evaluation of these values showed that regarding the effects of this procedure on male cases although the total scores for sexual function were not influenced it was observed a significant reduction in the intercourse satisfaction sub-domain (IIEF-IS) in males (p<0.05). In female cases however, unlike the male cases no statistically significant alterations with respect to these scores were noted (p=0.418). Conclusion: Ureteroscopic interventions could have some adverse effects on the sexual function particularly in male cases. However, it is clear that further prospective studies in both genders with large population of cases are certainly needed in order to outline this unresolved but important subject. PMID:26401873

  10. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for...

  11. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM... any required documents. (b) Procedural tracks. Each claim will be placed on a procedural...

  12. A Procedure for Evaluating Environmental Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Luna B.; And Others

    This report contains one of the first procedures available to environmental impact statements. The heart of the system is a matrix which is general enough to be used as a reference checklist or a reminder of the full range of actions and impacts on the environment that may relate to any proposed action. This comparatively simple system is intended…

  13. Systematic Evaluation of Professional Performance: Legally Supported Procedure and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerl, Stella Beatriz; Garcia, John L.; McCullough, C. Sue; Maxwell, Melissa Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Legal challenges to counseling students' dismissal that are based on interpersonal or clinical incompetence require sound systematic academic evaluation and adherence to procedural and substantive due process. Presents an examination of professional competency from counselor education and legal perspectives, an evaluation procedure and process,…

  14. FLES Program Evaluation: Rationale and Procedural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heining-Boynton, Audrey L.

    Evaluation of foreign languages in the elementary school (FLES) programs is needed to provide feedback (descriptive data about a school's offerings) and accountability (program accomplishments). Thorough program evaluation verifies both a district's thoughtful, written philosophy of foreign language education and local goals. Some FLES program…

  15. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

  16. 77 FR 31615 - Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Improving Mail Management Policies, Procedures, and Activities AGENCY: Office of Governmentwide... Services Administration (GSA) has issued Federal Management Regulation (FMR) Bulletin G-03 which provides guidance to Executive Branch agencies for improving mail management policies, procedures, and...

  17. DESIGN PROCEDURES FOR DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTROL OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents design procedures and guidelines for the selection of aeration equipment and dissolved (DO) control systems for activated sludge treatment plants. Aeration methods, equipment and application techniques are examined and selection procedures offered. Various DO...

  18. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  19. Program Review/Evaluation Policy and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Northwestern Community Coll., Rangely.

    At Colorado Northwestern Community College (CNCC), all educational programs, as well as student services and support functions, are formally reviewed/evaluated in depth at least once every five years. This nine-part outline, providing a step-by-step description of the program review process at CNCC, includes the following sections: (1) the value…

  20. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  1. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  2. Evaluating Univariate, Bivariate, and Multivariate Normality Using Graphical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdenski, Thomas K., Jr.

    This paper reviews graphical and nongraphical procedures for evaluating multivariate normality by guiding the reader through univariate and bivariate procedures that are necessary, but insufficient, indications of a multivariate normal distribution. A data set using three dependent variables for two groups provided by D. George and P. Mallery…

  3. DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY: EVALUATION OF TESTING PROCEDURES WITH METHYLAZOXYMETHANOL AND METHYLMERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing procedures that allow for early, rapid and cost-effective investigation of potential developmental neurotoxicants were evaluated using two prototypical developmental neurotoxicants, methylazoxymethanol (MAM) and methylmercury (MeHg). valuation of offspring of Long-Evans r...

  4. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  5. Procedure for evaluating nuclear power plant relay seismic functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Betlack, J.; Carritte, R.; Schmidt, W. )

    1990-12-01

    This procedure has been prepared for use in evaluating relays as part of plant specific resolution of USI A-46. It is also expected to be generally applicable in other seismic evaluations, such as seismic margins determinations. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Faculty Evaluation Procedures in Southern Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, James E.; Schietinger, E. F.

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) survey of faculty procedures determines the nature and extent of faculty evaluation programs in the South. The president of each college was sent a copy of a questionnaire designed to provide data on existing policies, practices, and criteria for faculty evaluation. One of the most noticable aspects of…

  7. Evaluation Procedures for Training Psychotherapists in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevron, Eve S.; And Others

    The training of psychotherapists has been an ongoing process in psychiatry and clinical psychology. Recently, however, a growing demand to operationalize competence criteria to enable independent evaluation of therapists' skills in specifically defined psychotherapies has occurred. To examine this phenomenon, evaluation procedures were developed…

  8. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-A: Calculation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the second in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals exclusively with the calculation procedures, including simplified mixing formulas, aeration tank…

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  12. 42 CFR 85.3 - Procedures for requesting health hazard evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for requesting health hazard evaluations. 85.3 Section 85.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES REQUESTS FOR HEALTH HAZARD EVALUATIONS §...

  13. EVALUATION OF PROCEDURES FOR IDENTIFICATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES. PART 1. SAMPLING, EXTRACTION, AND INORGANIC ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed to evaluate the sampling, extraction, and analytical procedures (inorganic) proposed in the RCRA regulations for identifying wastes as hazardous by the toxicity characteristic. Twenty-seven different wastes were sampled and analyzed in accordance with the RC...

  14. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  15. Procedures manual for the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, M.R.

    1987-10-01

    This manual is a collection of various notes, memoranda and instructions on procedures for the evaluation of data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). They were distributed at different times over the past few years to the evaluators of nuclear structure data and some of them were not readily avaialble. Hence, they have been collected in this manual for ease of reference by the evaluators of the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) network contribute mass-chains to the ENSDF. Some new articles were written specifically for this manual and others are reivsions of earlier versions.

  16. Statistical Scoring Procedures Applicable to Laboratory Performance Evaluation1

    PubMed Central

    Hedayat, A. S.; Su, Guoqin; Streets, W. Elane

    2009-01-01

    Two statistical scoring procedures based on p-values have been developed to evaluate the overall performance of analytical laboratories performing environmental measurements. The overall score of bias and standing are used to determine how consistently a laboratory is able to measure the true (unknown) value correctly over time. The overall score of precision and standing are used to determine how well a laboratory is able to reproduce its measurements in the long run. Criteria are established for qualitatively labeling measurements as Acceptable, Warning, and Not Acceptable, and for identifying areas where laboratories should re-evaluate their measurement procedures. These statistical scoring procedures are applied to two real environmental data sets. PMID:19885371

  17. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL PROCEDURES TO EVALUATE LIVER INTOXICATION IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Procedures were developed to clinically evaluate liver damage and liver function in rainbow trout following either acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment or subacute bath exposure to selected mammalian hepatotoxic agents. Elevations in serum of liver specific enzymes such as aspa...

  18. An Evaluation of NO Procedures on Children with Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippner, Stanley

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated were the effects of therapeutic procedures (crawling, creeping, response to sensory stimulation, and patterning) carried out by neurological organization rehabilitationists on the language and social competence of nine 2-to 8-year-old neurologically handicapped children and on the children's families. (MC)

  19. Procedures at NREL for Evaluating Multijunction Concentrator Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, T.; Emery, K.

    2000-01-01

    The procedures for evaluating the performance of multijunctiion-concentrator cells at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are described. The accurate measurement of the performance of multijunction cells requires accurate relative-quantum-efficiency-measurements, "matched" reference cells, and a spectrally adjustable solar simulator.

  20. 34 CFR 303.166 - Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Statewide System-Application Requirements § 303.166 Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures. Each application must include information to demonstrate that the requirements in §§ 303.322 and 303.323 are met. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  1. 34 CFR 303.166 - Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... System-Application Requirements § 303.166 Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures. Each application must include information to demonstrate that the requirements in §§ 303.322 and 303.323 are met. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1820-0550) (Authority: 20 U.S.C....

  2. Against the Rules: Procedural Problems in Institutional Self-Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Helen

    This paper addresses the problem of how to introduce new forms of evaluation into school organization without a damaging loss of trust. The evaluators here are teachers engaged in curriculum policy evaluation within the schools in which they work. One way of conceptualizing and rooting contemporary activity under the label of school…

  3. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  4. A fundamental procedure and calculation formula for evaluating gravel liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaoming; Cao, Zhenzhong

    2011-09-01

    Field investigations following the 2008 M s8.0 Wenchuan earthquake identified 118 liquefaction sites, most of which are underlain by gravelly sediment in the Chengdu Plain and adjacent Mianyang area, in the Sichuan Province. Gravel sediment in the Sichuan province is widely distributed; hence it is necessary to develop a method for prediction and evaluation of gravel liquefaction behavior. Based on liquefaction investigation data and in-situ testing, and with reference to existing procedures for sandy soil liquefaction evaluation, a fundamental procedure for gravel liquefaction evaluation using dynamic penetration tests (DPT) is proposed along with a corresponding model and calculation formula. The procedure contains two stages, i.e., pre-determination and re-determination. Pre-determination excludes impossible liquefiable or non-liquefiable soils, and re-determination explores a DPT-based critical N 120 blows calculation model. Pre-determination includes three criteria, i.e., geological age, gravel contents, gravel sediment depths and water tables. The re-determination model consists of five parameters, i.e., DPT reference values, gravel contents, gravel sediment depths, water tables and seismic intensities. A normalization method is used for DPT reference values and an optimization method is used for the gravel sediment depth coefficient and water table coefficient. The gravel liquefaction evaluation method proposed herein is simple and takes most influencing factors on gravel sediment liquefaction into account.

  5. 34 CFR 602.30 - Activities covered by recognition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Activities covered by recognition procedures. 602.30... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Recognition Process Application and Review by Department Staff § 602.30 Activities covered by...

  6. 34 CFR 602.30 - Activities covered by recognition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Activities covered by recognition procedures. 602.30... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Recognition Process Application and Review by Department Staff § 602.30 Activities covered by...

  7. 34 CFR 602.30 - Activities covered by recognition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Activities covered by recognition procedures. 602.30... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Recognition Process Application and Review by Department Staff § 602.30 Activities covered by...

  8. 34 CFR 602.30 - Activities covered by recognition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Activities covered by recognition procedures. 602.30... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Recognition Process Application and Review by Department Staff § 602.30 Activities covered by...

  9. 34 CFR 602.30 - Activities covered by recognition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities covered by recognition procedures. 602.30... POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE SECRETARY'S RECOGNITION OF ACCREDITING AGENCIES The Recognition Process Application and Review by Department Staff § 602.30 Activities covered by...

  10. On evaluating clustering procedures for use in classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pore, M. D.; Moritz, T. E.; Register, D. T.; Yao, S. S.; Eppler, W. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The problem of evaluating clustering algorithms and their respective computer programs for use in a preprocessing step for classification is addressed. In clustering for classification the probability of correct classification is suggested as the ultimate measure of accuracy on training data. A means of implementing this criterion and a measure of cluster purity are discussed. Examples are given. A procedure for cluster labeling that is based on cluster purity and sample size is presented.

  11. A Formal Approach for Designing and Evaluating Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael; Shafto, Michael; Remington, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Operator interaction with modern control systems is a topic of great concern in high-risk industries such as nuclear power and commercial aviation. The issues associated with such systems focus on the ability of the operators (e.g., pilots) to achieve mission goals safely while containing failures. Operators must be able to interact safely and reliably with highly automatic and complex systems across the full spectrum of possible operating conditions, including normal, abnormal, and emergency situations. In environments such as commercial aviation, operator interaction with the machine is specified through a set of standard operating procedures (SOP). A procedure represents a collective agreement on the 'best' way to perform a given task. The intent of this paper is to suggest a formal methodology, for designing and evaluating procedures, that is both reliable and systematic. Our approach involves two major elements: a model of the machine and a list of the operator's task specifications (goals). We use formal modeling paradigms for describing the system and super-imposing on it the operator's tasks. Such paradigms, based on recent frameworks such as Statecharts and Hierarchical Hybrid Machines appear to be adequate methods for analyzing operator interaction with modern control systems. To illustrate this methodology, we model and analyze the sequence of actions for an emergency procedure. The procedure, Irregular Engine Start, for a medium-range aircraft, specifies the sequence of immediate actions that must be performed by the crew to avoid an uncontrolled rise in engine temperature during start-up. A model of engine behavior during a hot start is constructed. It also describes the various actions that can be taken by the crew and the resulting outcomes. The model is then opened up as a tree of all possible action sequences. This action tree allows us to trace the correct sequences necessary to achieve the desired end-goal (secure and shut down of the engine). In

  12. Radionuclide studies in postoperative evaluation of the Fontan procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, A.J.; Wynchank, S.; Choussat, A.; Barat, J.L.; Deville, C.; Ducassou, D.; Fontan, F.

    1984-10-01

    Radionuclide studies were performed on 12 patients who had had a Fontan operation for cyanotic congenital heart disease, six of whom had undergone a prior palliative Glenn procedure. The patients without prior Glenn anastomoses were studied by radionuclide first-pass angiocardiography, using a right antecubital vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. The patients with Glenn anastomoses required two injections, one by femoral vein to study the Fontan procedure, using bolus injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate or microspheres, and the second by right anetcubital vein to study the Glenn anastomosis and right lung, using a bolus of microspheres. Noninvasive radionuclide methods seem to be dependable in the postoperative evaluation of patients after the Fontan procedure. First-pass angiocardiography is most helpful in evaluating the dynamics and distribution of blood flow, especially the right atrial output, and gated blood-pool scintigraphy offers a better evaluation of right atrial and left ventricular contraction, so both supply complementary information.

  13. Program Evaluation Project Report, 1969-1973. Chapter One: Basic Goal Attainment Scaling Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiresuk, Thomas J.; Garwick, Geoffrey

    The P.E.P. Report 1969-1973 focuses on the various findings and activities of the Program Evaluation Project. This chapter of the report discusses the basic goal attainment scaling procedures. Goal attainment scaling is a methodology for developing personalized, multivariable, scaled descriptions which can be used for either therapy…

  14. Comparative evaluation of surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Monika; Sharma, Neha; Modgill, Vikas; Naidu, Purushotham

    2013-12-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a debilitating ailment. Pharmacotherapy still remains the first line therapy for the management of TN. However, often the patients become refractory to the pharmacotherapy and need surgical interventions. There is a wide array of surgical treatment modalities available for TN and it is important to select the most appropriate surgery for a patient. This review evaluates the various surgical modalities by employing a comparative analysis with respect to patient selection, success rate, complications and cost effectiveness. For the evaluation, a critical review of literature was done with predefined search terms to obtain the details of individual procedures, which were then compared, under similar parameters. The results suggested that microvascular decompression seem to be the most effective treatment in terms of patient satisfaction and long term cost effectiveness. However, if patient factors do not permit, then the peripheral procedures may be employed as a substitute, though they have higher recurrence rate and complications and have relatively lower long term cost effectiveness. The newer modalities like stereotactic radiosurgery and botulinum injections have promising results and further refinement in these procedures will provide additional options for the patients suffering from TN. PMID:24431878

  15. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  16. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process: Appendix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This document is the appendix for a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Categories discussed include: control test data, trend charts, moving averages, semi-logarithmic plots, probability…

  17. Manual of Alternative Procedures: Activities of Daily Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, James E.; And Others

    Intended for teachers and others providing services for moderately and severely physically and/or mentally handicapped children and young adults, the manual presents strategies, procedures, and task analyses for training in daily living skills. Section I provides an overview of tactics for teaching activities of daily living (ADL) skills,…

  18. Evaluating Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Marshall P.

    This report discusses one of the consistent problems in school counseling and guidance-that of furnishing concrete evidence concerning the effects of counseling and guidance activities on the development of children. The following causal factors are discussed: (1) the difficulty of pinning down abstractly stated goals in an operational manner at…

  19. A procedure to evaluate environmental rehabilitation in limestone quarries.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ana Claudia; Sánchez, Luis Enrique

    2010-11-01

    A procedure to evaluate mine rehabilitation practices during the operational phase was developed and validated. It is based on a comparison of actually observed or documented practices with internationally recommended best practices (BP). A set of 150 BP statements was derived from international guides in order to establish the benchmark. The statements are arranged in six rehabilitation programs under three categories: (1) planning (2) operational and (3) management, corresponding to the adoption of the plan-do-check-act management systems model to mine rehabilitation. The procedure consists of (i) performing technical inspections guided by a series of field forms containing BP statements; (ii) classifying evidences in five categories; and (iii) calculating conformity indexes and levels. For testing and calibration purposes, the procedure was applied to nine limestone quarries and conformity indexes were calculated for the rehabilitation programs in each quarry. Most quarries featured poor planning practices, operational practices reached high conformity levels in 50% of the cases and management practices scored moderate conformity. Despite all quarries being ISO 14001 certified, their management systems pay low attention to issues pertaining to land rehabilitation and biodiversity. The best results were achieved by a quarry whose expansion was recently submitted to the environmental impact assessment process, suggesting that public scrutiny may play a positive role in enhancing rehabilitation practices. Conformity indexes and levels can be used to chart the evolution of rehabilitation practices at regular intervals, to establish corporate goals and for communication with stakeholders. PMID:20630648

  20. Evaluation of the virucidal performance of domestic laundry procedures.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Michael; Kyas, Andrea; Weide, Mirko; Breves, Roland; Bockmühl, Dirk P

    2010-09-01

    Laundering is one of the most important means to ensure a sufficient hygiene standard in the household environment. To evaluate the performance of this process, it is desirable to have methods that mimic the real-life situation as closely as possible. Although methods for the evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal efficacy of domestic laundry procedures are available, the effect of laundering on viruses is still rather unclear. As the influence of laundry process parameters such as mechanical actions, temperature dynamics or liquor ratio cannot be simulated in vitro by suspension assays, a new in situ test method allowing virus simulation tests in washing machines has been developed. Using this in situ method we could show that conventional household washing detergents have a full virucidal efficiency at 40 degrees C also against non-enveloped surrogate viruses. PMID:20630800

  1. Time/Loss Analysis in the development and evaluation of emergency response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.A.

    1994-08-01

    Time/Loss Analysis (T/LA) provides a standard for conducting technically consistent and objective evaluations of emergency response planning and procedures. T/LA is also a sound tool for evaluating the performance of safeguards and procedures.

  2. Analytical evaluation of an improved procedure for measuring thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    González-de-la-Presa, B; Palacios, G; Bonnin, R; Martinez, J M; Navarro, M A

    1998-02-01

    The analytical characteristics of the AxSYM Ultrasensitive hTSH-II (Abbott Laboratories) procedure for quantitation of serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration were evaluated. Within- and between-run imprecisions, functional sensitivity, analytical interval and relative inaccuracy with respect to the Enzymum-Test TSH (Boehringer Mannheim) were studied. In all cases, the within-run and between-run of coefficients variation were lower than 6.69% and 8.12% respectively. The measurement range was tested with serial dilutions of a serum with a high thyrotropin concentration, and the procedure was found to be linear up to at least 87.0 mIU/l. The functional sensitivity was 0.018 mIU/l. The relative inaccuracy study (Passing-Bablok non-parametric linear regression) produced the following linear equation: (AxSYM) = 1.02. (ES-700)-0.03 mIU/l, with 95% confidence intervals of a (-0.05; -0.01); b (0.98; 1.06). PMID:9594047

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  5. NOTE: A rapid procedure for initial drug evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, A. K.; Neti, S.; Macpherson, P. A.

    2001-06-01

    The overall aim of this work is to develop computer simulations to aid in the selection of proposed medicines and identify those most likely to succeed. One important feature is a systems approach to simulate both the target area with which the drug is designed to interact as well as the surrounding areas where feedback mechanisms may alter the expected effect. The simulation must be rapid if it is to be used to evaluate large numbers of potential drugs. Thus the procedure simplifies many of the known complex phenomena to provide a general framework and feedback mechanisms. An example of the use of the simulation to study a drug used to treat hypertension is given. A possible use of the technique is shown using the example of the effect of varying the drug dosage on the contraction of the arteriole muscle.

  6. Stepped heating procedure for experimental SAR evaluation of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iacob, N; Schinteie, G; Palade, P; Ticos, C M; Kuncser, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a reliable procedure for the experimental determination of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in case of superparamagnetic Fe oxide nanoparticles dispersed in liquid environments. It is based on the acquisition of consecutive steps of time-temperature dependences along of both heating and cooling processes. Linear fitting of these recorded steps provides the heating and cooling speeds at different temperatures, which finally allow the determination of the heating profile in adiabatic-like conditions over a broad temperature range. The presented methodology represents on one hand, a useful alternative tool for the experimental evaluation of the heating capability of nanoparticulate systems for magnetic hyperthermia applications and on the other hand, gives support for a more accurate modeling of bio-heat transfer phenomena. PMID:26087918

  7. Evaluation of WES one-dimensional dynamic soil testing procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, L.

    1983-06-01

    The Geomechanics Division of the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) tests soils to provide material property data for ground motion calculations in support of high explosives experiments. Thus, the validity of the ground motion predictions depends greatly on the WES material properties used. The usual WES experiments are uniaxial strain (UX) and triaxial shear (TX) tests that can be performed at static testing rates and at dynamic rates with rise times down to about one millisecond. However, in the field experiments being simulated, the measured rise times are often 0.01 ms up to 0.1 ms. Recently, an effort has been made to obtain test data in UX and TX devices with rise times of about 0.1 ms. Some of the test data obtained at these very high rates have appeared to be anomalous, suggesting that wave propagation or other effects may be invalidating the data. Because of these questions about the high rate soils test data, WES asked SRI to evaluate the testing methods used at WES and the data reduction device. This report documents an evaluation of laboratory test data obtained from the explosive-loaded uniaxial strain device developed at WES and the data analysis procedures currently being used.

  8. Evaluation of lens absorbed dose with Cone Beam IGRT procedures.

    PubMed

    Palomo, R; Pujades, M C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona, V; Lliso, F; Candela-Juan, C; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the absorbed dose to the eye lenses due to the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system used to accurately position the patient during head-and-neck image guided procedures. The on-board imaging (OBI) systems (v.1.5) of Clinac iX and TrueBeam (Varian) accelerators were used to evaluate the imparted dose to the eye lenses and some additional points of the head. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard-Dose Head protocol from Varian. Doses were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were calibrated at the beam quality used to reduce their energy dependence. Average dose to the lens due to the OBI systems of the Clinac iX and the TrueBeam were 0.71  ±  0.07 mGy/CBCT and 0.70  ±  0.08 mGy/CBCT, respectively. The extra absorbed dose received by the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the 500 mGy threshold established by ICRP for cataract formation (ICRP 2011 Statement on Tissue Reactions). However, the incremental effect of several CBCT acquisitions during the whole treatment should be taken into account. PMID:26457404

  9. [Evaluating an internal quality control procedure: application to multidimensional control].

    PubMed

    Marquis, P; Masseyeff, R

    2002-01-01

    Internal quality control keeps in constant evolution in the industrial world. Introducing in clinical chemistry new QC methods derived from the industrial practice raises the point of the means for their evaluation. The main evaluation criteria are discussed in this paper. The importance of ARL (average run length) as a key-criterion of the efficiency of a quality control procedure is stressed. These principles were applied to the multivariate approach of multilevel control with the Hotelling's T2. This method led to a better detection of random errors than the independently managed conventional Shewhart (Levey- Jennings) charts. Applied to systematic errors, both methods gave similar results with a certain lack of sensitivity. However the multivariate method can be sensitised using EWMA (exponentially weighted moving average), a method specific for improved bias detection. EWMA efficiency outperforms that of the older systems of rules. Moreover, in any kind of error, multivariate approach secures a well-defined false rejection rate, whereas this rate is dependant on unknown inter-level correlation coefficients in conventional QC. PMID:12368148

  10. The evaluation ranking scale: clarification of methodological and procedural issues.

    PubMed

    Attkisson, C C; Roberts, R E; Pascoe, G C

    1983-01-01

    Compared with CSQ-8, a typical questionnaire approach to assessing global patient satisfaction, the Evaluation Ranking Scale (ERS) had equally good patient acceptability, yielded more normally distributed satisfaction scores, and results allowed comparative information about patients' evaluation of specific service dimensions. The study also addressed key questions that have emerged about the ERS procedure. Patients apparently do not distinguish conceptually between "importance" of dimensions and "satisfaction" with dimensions in the first phase (ranking) of the ERS. Results did confirm that the ERS sequence of ranking and then rating the dimensions is essential to achieving optimal utility of results. The ranking task seems to have an organizing effect on patients' approach to the rating task. This effect does not work to dictate results in the rating phase but rather seems to familiarize patients with the dimensions to be rated thereby yielding greater potential discriminative capacity for the ERS. Finally, results indicate that the ERS can be administered in a flexible fashion that yields additional information about the absolute importance of the six dimensions without loss of desired operating characteristics for the measure. PMID:10267262

  11. A design procedure for active control of beam vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, S. L.; Jarocki, G.

    1983-01-01

    The transverse vibrations of beams is discussed and a methodology for the design of an active damping device is given. The Bernoulli-Euler equation is used to derive a transcendental transfer function, which relates a torque applied at one end of the beam to the rotational position and velocity at that point. The active damping device consists of a wire, a linear actuator and a short torque arm attached to one end of the beam. The action of the actuator varies a tension in the wire and creates a torque which opposes the rotation of the beam and thus damps vibration. A design procedure for such an active damper is given. This procedure shows the relationships and trade-offs between the actuator stroke, power required, stress levels in the wire and beam and the geometry of the beam and wire. It is shown that by consideration of the frequency response at the beam natural frequencies, the aforementioned relationships can be greatly simplified. Similarly, a simple way of estimating the effective damping ratios and eigenvalue locations of actively controlled beams is presented.

  12. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  13. Evaluation of the CATSIB DIF Procedure in a Pretest Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandakumar, Ratna; Roussos, Louis

    2004-01-01

    A new procedure, CATSIB, for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) on computerized adaptive tests (CATs) is proposed. CATSIB, a modified SIBTEST procedure, matches test takers on estimated ability and controls for impact-induced Type 1 error inflation by employing a CAT version of the IBTEST "regression correction." The performance of…

  14. Thirdhand tobacco smoke: procedures to evaluate cytotoxicity in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Dantas, Denise Conceição Mesquita; Linden, Rafael; Ziulkoski, Ana Luiza

    2016-06-01

    The risks associated to tobacco smoking are not ceased with smoke extinction. Many toxic compounds remain in the environment after the cigarette is extinguished and accumulated in the air or on surfaces. However, little is known about the risks of this exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate procedures to collect thirdhand smoke (THS) and prepare the samples to perform three in vitro toxicity tests. Cellulose papers and cotton wipes were used to impregnate with nicotine solution and smoke cigarette in a chamber or in smoker's home. Samples were immersed in methanol or Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to expose Hep-2 cells. MTT, neutral red uptake (NRU) and trypan blue assays were performed. The concentration of nicotine in DMEM extract of THS in paper and cotton was similar to those in methanol extract (p > 0.05). Alterations in the mitochondrial and lysosomal functions were found in both paper and cotton samples; however, the cytotoxic effect was not always observed. There was a decrease of 21-31% in MTT assay and 38-56% in NRU assay (p < 0.003). There was a dose-response relationship between the amount of cigarettes and lysosomal viability; the correlation was higher for cotton samples (r = -0.843, p < 0.001). As a dose-response relationship was found only in NRU assay, this test may be a more suitable choice rather than the MTT assay. Paper and wipe sampling can be reliable markers of tobacco smoke contamination. Moreover, these materials, if properly prepared, can be used as substrate providers to perform cellular assays. PMID:27268319

  15. Procedures for evaluating pork carcass and cut composition

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, A.L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Five studies were completed to investigate various production and evaluation procedures related to pork carcass composition and meat quality. A comparison of market hog characteristics of pigs selected by feeder pig frame size or current USDA feeder pig standards was made. In general, feeder pig frame size did differentiate between carcass skeletal traits (i.e., carcass length, radius length). However, frame sizing did not improve on current feeder pig grades in discriminating between carcass composition characteristics. Liquid scintillation of potassium-40 was used to estimate pork carcass composition of 124 boars barrows and gilts, ranging from 23 to 114 kg live weight. Pigs were counted live, slaughtered and one side of the carcass was counted. The side was then ground and sampled for percent protein, fat and moisture. Carcass weight and {sup 40}K determined potassium of the carcass explain more of the variation in carcass composition than live animal traits. Carcass measurements were used to determine value and percentages of fat standardized lean, protein, fat and moisture in the carcass using 265 barrow and gilt carcasses. In a separate study, belly composition was estimated from carcass and belly parameters (n = 338). Ribbed carcasses measurements were almost always superior to unribbed carcass measurements when estimating carcass or belly composition. Tenth rib fat depth was the most useful single variable for predicting belly fat, protein, moisture and lean. Some precision and accuracy were lost when using parameters from unribbed carcasses to estimate carcass or belly composition as compared to including parameters from ribbed carcasses. The sensory and nutritive value of cooked pork center loin chops and roasts were investigated. Levels of fat cover and internal temperature did not greatly affect cholesterol content.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Pathogen Reduction Procedures for Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Thomas H.; Montag, Thomas; Seltsam, Axel W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Bacterial contamination remains a leading factor for transfusion-associated serious morbidity and mortality. Pathogen reduction procedures offer a pro-active approach to prevent bacterial contamination of cellular blood components and especially of platelet concentrates. In the past, the laboratory evaluation of the effectiveness of the pathogen reduction procedures to minimise the bacterial load of blood components has been primarily based on log reduction assays similar to the assessment of antiviral activities. Bacteria strains with the ability to multiply in the blood components are seeded in highest possible cell numbers, the pathogen reduction procedure is applied, and the post-treatment number of bacteria is measured. The effectiveness of the procedure is characterised by calculating the log reduction of the post- to pre-treatment bacteria titres. More recently, protocols have been developed for experiments starting with a low bacteria load and monitoring the sterility of the blood component during the entire storage period of the blood component. Results for 3 different pathogen reduction technologies in these experimental models are compared and critical determinants for the results are addressed. The heterogeneity of results observed for different strains suggests that the introduction of international transfusion-relevant bacterial reference strains may facilitate the validity of findings in pathogen reduction experiments. PMID:22016694

  17. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique. PMID:24676627

  18. Data reduction and evaluation procedures. [concerning exhaust gas analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirsky, W.

    1976-01-01

    The computational procedures that are involved in exhaust emissions data reduction and the use of these computational procedures for determining the quality of the data that is obtained from exhaust measurements were considered. Four problem areas were calculated: (1) the various methods for performing the carbon balance, (2) the method for calculating water correction factors, (3) the method for calculating the exhaust molecular weight, and (4) assessing the quality of the data.

  19. Objective evaluation of ERCP procedures: a simple grading scale for evaluating technical difficulty

    PubMed Central

    Ragunath, K; Thomas, L; Cheung, W; Duane, P; Richards, D

    2003-01-01

    Background and objective: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a technically demanding endoscopic procedure that varies from a simple diagnostic to a highly complex therapeutic procedure. Simple outcome measures such as success and complication rates do not reflect the competence of the operator or endoscopy unit, as case mix is not taken into account. A grading scale to assess the technical difficulty of ERCP can improve the objectivity of outcome data. Methods: A I to IV technical difficulty grading scale was constructed and applied prospectively to all ERCPs over a 12 month period at a single centre. The procedures were performed by two senior trainees and two experienced consultants (trainers). The grading scale was validated for construct validity and inter-rater reliability at the end of the study using the χ2 test and κ statistics. Results: There were 305 ERCPs in 259 patients over the 12 months study period (males: 112, females: 147, age range 17–97, mean 70.3 years). There was overall success in 244 (80%) procedures with complications in 13 (4%): bleeding in five (1.6%), cholangitis in one (0.3%), pancreatitis in five (1.6%), and perforation in two (0.7%). Success rate was highest for grade I, 49/55 (89%), compared with grade IV procedures, 8/11 (73%). There was a significant linear trend towards a lower success rate from grade I to IV (p=0.021) for trainees, but not for trainers. Complications were low in grade I, II, and III procedures, 12/295(4%), compared with grade IV procedures, 1/11(9%). The inter-rater reliability for the grading scale was good with a substantial agreement between the raters (κ=0.68, p<0.001). Conclusion: Success and complications of ERCP by trainees are influenced by the technical difficulty of the procedure. Outcome data incorporating a grading scale can give accurate information when auditing the qualitative outcomes. This can provide a platform for structured objective evaluation. PMID:12954961

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991

  1. Application of Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures for the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Montero, N; Belzunce-Segarra, M J; Gonzalez, J-L; Menchaca, I; Garmendia, J M; Etxebarria, N; Nieto, O; Franco, J

    2013-06-15

    This study refers to the performance of Phase I Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures to identify the contaminants (i.e. organic compounds, metals and ammonia) exerting toxicity in marine sediments from the Pasaia harbor (Oiartzun estuary, northern Spain). The effectiveness of the manipulations to reduce toxicity was proved with the marine amphipod survival test (whole-sediment) and the sea urchin embryo-larval assay (elutriates). By means of TIEs it was concluded that organic compounds were the major contaminants exerting toxicity, although toxic effects by metals was also demonstrated. Additionally, the combination of Phase I treatments allowed to investigate the toxicity changes associated to the mobility of contaminants during dredging activities. Therefore, the performance of TIE procedures as another line of evidence in the decision-making process is recommended. They show a great potential to be implemented at different steps of the characterization and management of dredged harbor sediments. PMID:23465571

  2. Evaluation of Operational Procedures for Using a Time-Based Airborne Inter-arrival Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Abbott, Terence S.; Eischeid, Todd M.

    2002-01-01

    An airborne tool has been developed based on the concept of an aircraft maintaining a time-based spacing interval from the preceding aircraft. The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) aircraft state data to compute a speed command for the ATAAS-equipped aircraft to obtain a required time interval behind another aircraft. The tool and candidate operational procedures were tested in a high-fidelity, full mission simulator with active airline subject pilots flying an arrival scenario using three different modes for speed control. The objectives of this study were to validate the results of a prior Monte Carlo analysis of the ATAAS algorithm and to evaluate the concept from the standpoint of pilot acceptability and workload. Results showed that the aircraft was able to consistently achieve the target spacing interval within one second (the equivalent of approximately 220 ft at a final approach speed of 130 kt) when the ATAAS speed guidance was autothrottle-coupled, and a slightly greater (4-5 seconds), but consistent interval with the pilot-controlled speed modes. The subject pilots generally rated the workload level with the ATAAS procedure as similar to that with standard procedures, and also rated most aspects of the procedure high in terms of acceptability. Although pilots indicated that the head-down time was higher with ATAAS, the acceptability of head-down time was rated high. Oculometer data indicated slight changes in instrument scan patterns, but no significant change in the amount of time spent looking out the window between the ATAAS procedure versus standard procedures.

  3. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2006-07-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's NUREG-1400 addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present two detailed examples of the implementation of qualitative air flow studies at different scales using guidelines established by NUREG-1400. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within the transfer area of the 105 KE Basin, located on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The purpose of the study was to determine appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment in support of sludge water pumping activities. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an air flow study, the stagnant layer would not have been identified, and could have resulted in locating samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test.

  4. Environmental impact assessment in flanders, belgium: An evaluation of the administrative procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devuyst, Dimitri; Nierynck, Eddy; Hens, Luc; Ceuterick, Dirk; de Baere, Veerle; Wouters, Guido

    1993-05-01

    Two years of experience with EIA in Flanders (northern Belgium) was evaluated in order to gain perspective on the effectiveness of the administrative procedure. The four essential characteristics of the EIA procedure that were evaluated are: completeness, open and public character, objectivity, and verifiability. Representatives of all parties involved in the EIA procedure were interviewed. The result of the evaluation is a list of major problems with EIA. Recommendations for a more efficient procedure are suggested at a time when a proposal for a new, comprehensive, and permanent EIA decree is being discussed. The evaluation of the administrative procedure for EIA in Flanders shows that several vital characteristics of the EIA procedure are lacking. This reduces the obligatory and open nature of the process, resulting in insufficient guarantees that the environment receives the altention it deserves during the decision-making process.

  5. How to Activate Teachers through Teacher Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    There is a general doubt on whether teacher evaluation can contribute to teachers' professional development. Recently, standards-based teacher evaluation has been introduced in many countries to improve teaching practice. This study wants to investigate which teacher evaluation procedural, leadership, and teacher characteristics can stimulate…

  6. How to Activate Teachers through Teacher Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuytens, Melissa; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    There is a general doubt on whether teacher evaluation can contribute to teachers' professional development. Recently, standards-based teacher evaluation has been introduced in many countries to improve teaching practice. This study wants to investigate which teacher evaluation procedural, leadership, and teacher characteristics can stimulate…

  7. A Utilization-Focused Procedure for Prioritizing Evaluation Questions in the Discrepancy Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cichon, Donald J.

    Procedures for generating evaluation questions in the Discrepancy Evaluation Model (DEM) are problematic as they are described in the literature. These procedures would lead to unmanageably or ineffectively long lists of questions. Any process of narrowing down the list must be drawn from other sources. One such source, developed for a specific…

  8. Judging Transitional Justice: A New Criterion for Evaluating Truth Revelation Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Marek M.; Nalepa, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Truth revelation procedures are evaluated according to various normative criteria. The authors find the concepts of false conviction and false acquittal more adequate for such evaluation than the conformity with the rule of law and apply a useful classification of truth revelation procedures into incentive-based (ITRs) and evidence-based ones…

  9. A Pilot Document of Standards and Procedures Developed to Assist the Multidisciplinary Evaluation Team in the Identification of Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeigler, Carmen S., Comp.; And Others

    Designed by the Bloomfield Hills (Michigan) multidisciplinary evaluation team, the document suggests procedures and enabling activities to implement the assessment and identification of learning disabled students. Individual sections address five areas (ability, achievement, severe discrepancy, exclusionary clause, and need for special education…

  10. Evaluations of the Optimal Discovery Procedure for Multiple Testing.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B

    2016-05-01

    The Optimal Discovery Procedure (ODP) is a method for simultaneous hypothesis testing that attempts to gain power relative to more standard techniques by exploiting multivariate structure [1]. Specializing to the example of testing whether components of a Gaussian mean vector are zero, we compare the power of the ODP to a Bonferroni-style method and to the Benjamini-Hochberg method when the testing procedures aim to respectively control certain Type I error rate measures, such as the expected number of false positives or the false discovery rate. We show through theoretical results, numerical comparisons, and two microarray examples that when the rejection regions for the ODP test statistics are chosen such that the procedure is guaranteed to uniformly control a Type I error rate measure, the technique is generally less powerful than competing methods. We contrast and explain these results in light of previously proven optimality theory for the ODP. We also compare the ordering given by the ODP test statistics to the standard rankings based on sorting univariate p-values from smallest to largest. In the cases we considered the standard ordering was superior, and ODP rankings were adversely impacted by correlation. PMID:27227716

  11. Baseline Assessment in Scotland: An Evaluation of Pilot Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, J. Eric; Johnson, Sandra; Watt, Joyce; Napuk, Angela; Normand, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of a Scottish national pilot "baseline assessment" of preschool and primary students included interviews and surveys of preschool and first-grade teachers and head teachers in schools participating in the pilot. Most welcomed the professional judgment approach to student evaluation but identified significant issues related to…

  12. 43 CFR 10005.20 - Project evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... (e) Using best professional judgement, Commission staff will evaluate each project according to the... professional judgement using quantitative and/or qualitative rating techniques as appropriate. A given project..., the evaluation will be conducted using best professional judgement and may involve a variety...

  13. Evaluation Manual for CIP Courses: Objectives and Implementation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siri, Carmen

    This manual has been designed to guide courses on potato production sponsored by the International Potato Center (CIP) in Lima (Peru). It describes the CIP Course Evaluation System that is presently used and provides guidelines on how to use feedback more effectively for improving training. CIP evaluations are largely formative. The CIP focuses on…

  14. A Systematic Procedure for Assigning Uncertainties to Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2007-02-20

    In this report, an algorithm that automatically constructs an uncertainty band around any evaluation curve is described. Given an evaluation curve and a corresponding set of experimental data points with x and y error bars, the algorithm expands a symmetric region around the evaluation curve until 68.3% of a set of points, randomly sampled from the experimental data, fall within the region. For a given evaluation curve, the region expanded in this way represents, by definition, a one-standard-deviation interval about the evaluation that accounts for the experimental data. The algorithm is tested against several benchmarks, and is shown to be well-behaved, even when there are large gaps in the available experimental data. The performance of the algorithm is assessed quantitatively using the tools of statistical-inference theory.

  15. Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Gerald I.

    2007-02-01

    Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

  16. A combined GIS-HEC procedure for flood hazard evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.

    1993-09-01

    A technique is described for incorporating a drainage recognition capability into a graphical information system (GIS) database. This capability is then utilized to export digital topographic profiles of stream-channel cross-sectional geometries to the Hydrologic Engineering Center`s Water Surface Profile (HEC-2) model. This model is typically used in conjunction with the Flood Hydrograph (HEC-1) package to define floodplain boundaries in complex watersheds. Once these floodplain boundaries are imported back into the GIS framework, they can be uniquely referenced to the New Mexico state plane coordinate system. A combined GIS-HEC application in ungaged watersheds at Los Alamos National Laboratory is demonstrated. This floodplain mapping procedure uses topographic data from the Laboratory`s MOSS database. Targeted stream channel segments are initially specified in the MOSS system, and topographic profiles along stream-channel cross-sections am extracted automatically. This procedure is initiated at a convenient downstream location within each watershed, and proceeds upstream to a selected termination point. HEC-2 utilizes these MOSS channel data and HEC-1 generated storm hydrographs to uniquely define the floodplain. The computed water surface elevations at each channel section am then read back into the MOSS system. In this particular application, 13 separate elongated watersheds traverse Laboratory lands, with individual channels ranging up to 11 miles in length. The 50, 100, and 500-year floods, and the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) are quantified in HEC-1. Individual floodplains are then defined for each channel segment in HEC-2 at 250 foot intervals, and detailed 1:4800 scale maps am generated. Over 100 channel miles were mapped using this combined GIS-HEC procedure.

  17. Evaluation and management of voiding dysfunction after midurethral sling procedures

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Hatice; Harmanlı, Özgür

    2012-01-01

    Midurethral slings have become the most popular surgical procedure for the correction of stress urinary incontinence in women. Urinary retention or obstructive voiding symptoms may arise from partial urethral obstruction as a result of oversuspension of the urethra or exaggerated tension. Fortunately, most cases of voiding dysfunction are transient and resolve spontaneously within days. Clean intermittent self-catheterization is the mainstay of conservative treatment. If symptoms persist, tape mobilization, incision or urethrolysis may be performed. Recurrent stress urinary incontinence may occur in a small group of patients, who may benefit from another incontinence treatment. PMID:24592021

  18. DOT-7A Type A packaging test and evaluation procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for qualifying a DOT-7A Type A packaging for use. WHC qualifies DOT-7A packaging for two purposes. The first is to provide packages for use by WHC (manufacturer-qualified). The second is to provide a contracted service in support of DOE/EM-76 (DOE-qualified). This document includes descriptions of the performance tests, the personnel involved and their qualifications, appropriate safety and quality assurance considerations, and the procedures to be followed when WHC performs the tests (either as the manufacturer, or on behalf of the DOE`s certification program).

  19. Evaluation of assay procedures measuring macrophage stimulation by immunomodulators in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mauël, J; Pham, T V; Kreis, B; Corradin-Betz, S; Bauer, J

    1992-01-01

    Several assay procedures for measuring the stimulatory effect on macrophages (møs) of bacterial-derived immunomodulators (OM-85, OM-89, OM-163, Laboratoires OM, Meyrin/Geneva, Switzerland) were evaluated with regard to their complexity, speed, and general convenience. To this effect, bone marrow-derived or peritoneal exudate macrophages were exposed to the immunomodulators in vitro, then tested for metabolic stimulation (glucose oxidation through the hexosemonophosphate shunt pathway, synthesis of type E prostaglandins, release of superoxide, and production of L-arginine-derived nitrogen oxidation products), as well as for enhancement of functional activities (production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, extracellular cytolysis of P815 target cells, and intracellular parasite destruction). All these tests were found to provide adequate measurements of the mø response to the immunomodulators, with significant effects detectable using the compounds in the ng/ml to microgram/ml range. Concomitant incubation with crude macrophage activating factor or with recombinant murine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) dramatically increased the sensitivity of møs to the immunomodulators, and was an absolute requirement for induction of mø cytotoxic activities by the bacterial extracts. The measurement of nitrite production by møs exposed to the immunomodulators with or without treatment with 10 U/ml of IFN-gamma was found to be a highly convenient procedure, which correlated well with functional assays. PMID:1330790

  20. Implications of the Final Procedures for Evaluating Specific Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senf, Gerald M., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Discussed are some negative implications of the final federal rules for evaluating specific learning disabilities (Federal Register, December 29, 1977), which conceptually redefined learning disabilities to mean an "underachievement." (DLS)

  1. Return to athletic activity after foot and ankle surgery: a preliminary report on select procedures.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A

    2000-01-01

    One hundred thirty-eight "athletic" patients from the author's practice underwent retrospective review of their foot and ankle surgery that was performed from 1990 to 1997 to evaluate the time to return to activity. Athletes were defined as follows: professional, varsity college and high school, runners amassing more than 25 miles per week, or those involved in regular competition. No recreational athletes were included. Average follow-up for the group as a whole was 49.4 months, (range, 12-108 months). One hundred seventeen of the 138 patients were able to be contacted and/or had been evaluated by September 1998. One hundred thirteen patients considered their surgery a success. All but two patients were able to return to the desired level of performance. Twenty-three of the patients increased their activity level after surgery. Twenty-eight athletes underwent Achilles tendon-related surgery (average follow-up was 44.5 months). Runners undergoing peritenolyses had an average return to activity of 4.0 weeks (range, 3-6 weeks). Patients undergoing Achilles procedure involving bone resection had an average return to activity of 13.8 weeks (range, 10-20 weeks). Forty-four bunionectomy procedures were performed, including 31 first metatarsal osteotomies. The group's average follow-up was 52.9 months (range, 13-100 months), and average return to activity for the first metatarsal osteotomies was 8.9 weeks. There were 48 rearfoot procedures. Lateral ankle stabilization procedures returned to activity on an average of 10 weeks (range, 7-16 weeks), while excised ossicles (os tibiale externum, os trigonum) had an average return to activity of 9.1 weeks (range, 8-14 weeks). Seven neuroma patients (via dorsal approach) had a return to activity of 4.0 weeks (range, 2.5-6 weeks), sesamoidectomy 7.5 weeks (range, 4-10 weeks), and Valenti arthroplasty of 6.5 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks), respectively. There were minimal complications. Two patients in the Achilles surgery group

  2. Calcium Activities During Different Ion Exchange Separation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, H.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    Calcium is a major element and participates in many geological processes. Investigations on stable calcium isotopic compositions of natural geological samples provide a great powerful tool to understand all kinds of those geological processes from a view of the field of isotope geochemistry. With the development of modern instruments and chemical separation techniques, calcium isotopic compositions could be determined even more precisely if the column chemistry brings no deviation. Usually, Calcium is separated from matrix elements using cation resin columns and the related chemical separation techniques seem to be robust. However, more detailed work still need to be done on matrix effects and calcium isotopic fractionations on column chemistry or during elution processes. If calcium is run on TIMS instruments, the interference effect could be lower and easier controlled, thus, the requirement to the chemistry is relatively not critic, but calcium fractionation on filaments could be much difficult to monitor. If calcium is run on MC-ICP-MS instruments, the interference effect could be huge and is really difficult to be recognized and subtracted, the requirement to the chemistry is much more critical in order to get a real result of the sample, but the instrument fractionation could be easier to monitor. Here we investigate calcium activities on several kinds of cation resins under different column/acid conditions. We seek to find a good balance between recovery and interference effect on column chemistry and are intend to set up a better chemical separation procedure to satisfy the instrument requirements for calcium. In addition, Calcium isotopic fractionation on column will also be discussed further here based on our previous and ongoing results.

  3. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  4. Control of Risks Through the Use of Procedures: A Method for Evaluating the Change in Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praino, Gregory T.; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers how procedures can be used to control risks faced by an organization and proposes a means of recognizing if a particular procedure reduces risk or contributes to the organization's exposure. The proposed method was developed out of the review of work documents and the governing procedures performed in the wake of the Columbia accident by NASA and the Space Shuttle prime contractor, United Space Alliance, LLC. A technique was needed to understand the rules, or procedural controls, in place at the time in the context of how important the role of each rule was. The proposed method assesses procedural risks, the residual risk associated with a hazard after a procedure's influence is accounted for, by considering each clause of a procedure as a unique procedural control that may be beneficial or harmful. For procedural risks with consequences severe enough to threaten the survival of the organization, the method measures the characteristics of each risk on a scale that is an alternative to the traditional consequence/likelihood couple. The dual benefits of the substitute scales are that they eliminate both the need to quantify a relationship between different consequence types and the need for the extensive history a probabilistic risk assessment would require. Control Value is used as an analog for the consequence, where the value of a rule is based on how well the control reduces the severity of the consequence when operating successfully. This value is composed of two parts: the inevitability of the consequence in the absence of the control, and the opportunity to intervene before the consequence is realized. High value controls will be ones where there is minimal need for intervention but maximum opportunity to actively prevent the outcome. Failure Likelihood is used as the substitute for the conventional likelihood of the outcome. For procedural controls, a failure is considered to be any non-malicious violation of the rule, whether intended or

  5. Development of an Evaluative Procedure for Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Pancorbo, Salvador

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical competencies of graduate pharmacy students upon the completion of a medicine rotation, an oral examination has been developed that requires students to present data and defend decisions. Objectives, responsibilities, and competencies required by the rotation and nine sample exam questions are appended. (JMD)

  6. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  7. Some Procedures for Evaluating Language Development in Young Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Mack L.

    The study was designed to construct and evaluate a language inventory that would measure language ability of severely retarded children, aged 6 1/2 to 10 years. Five of R. M. Gagne's eight types of learning were chosen for identifying language ability, and eight subtests were developed to accompany these learning types. The subtests were stimulus…

  8. A Procedure to Evaluate Cognitive Requirements of Beginning Reading Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Connie K.

    Designed to assess the cognitive requirement expected or implied in beginning reading materials and in their instructional suggestions and to determine whether these materials are appropriate to the cognitive development of the children who will use them, this instrument is for use by evaluators with the first reader in a basal series. It directs…

  9. Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Provided are guidelines for evaluating undergraduate professional education in chemistry. The guidelines summarize an approved program as including: 400 hours of classroom work; 500 hours of laboratory work; a core curriculum covering principles of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry; 1 year of advanced work in chemistry or…

  10. Evaluation of two extraction procedures for the recovery of organic chemicals from spiked soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.J.; Brown, K.W.; Donnelly, K.C.; He, L.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiencies of the automatic Soxtec and US EPA SW846 Soxhlet soil extraction methods. In phases one and two of the experiment, extractions were performed on silicon dioxide matrices and silt-loam soils spiked with benz(a)pyrene, pentachlorophenol, and naphthalene at three concentration levels. Each test sample contained either an individual chemical or a 1:1:1 mixture of all three chemicals. Phase three consisted of extractions performed on a silt-loam soil spiked with a coal tar complex mixture. Soxtec samples were sequentially extracted with dichloromethane and methanol while Soxhlet samples were extracted with dichloromethane. Gas chromatographic results obtained from sample extract analysis were used to calculate percent recoveries of the chemicals. The recoveries of benz(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol in the Soxtec procedure ranged from 55--88% and 49--88%, respectively. For the Soxhlet method, the recoveries ranges from 46--73% and 52--87%, respectively. Complex mixture recoveries ranged from 50--60% for both procedures. The mutagenic potentials of the solvent extracts were evaluated using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 with and without metabolic activation.

  11. 50 CFR 300.206 - Alternative procedures for IUU fishing activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative procedures for IUU fishing activities. 300.206 Section 300.206 Wildlife and Fisheries INTERNATIONAL FISHING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES... for IUU fishing activities. (a) These certification procedures may be applied to fish or fish...

  12. Evaluating and Optimizing Fish Health and Welfare During Experimental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Nicola; Westall, Lynda; Karp, Natasha A; Hazlehurst, Diane; Kovacs, Ceri; Keeble, Rosemary; Thompson, Peter; Collins, Richard; Bussell, James

    2016-07-01

    Many facilities house fish in separate static containers post-procedure, for example, while awaiting genotyping results. This ensures fish can be easily identified, but it does not allow for provision of continuous filtered water or diet. At the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, concern over the housing conditions led to the development of an individual housing system (GeneS) enabling feeding and water filtration. Trials to compare the water quality measures between the various systems found that fish housed in static containers experienced rapid deterioration in water quality. By day 1, measures of ammonia were outside the Institute's prescribed values and continued to rise until it was 25-fold higher than recommended levels. Nitrite levels were also outside recommended levels for all fish by day 9 and were twofold higher by the end of the trial. The water quality measures for tanks held on the recirculating system were stable even though food was provided. These results indicate that for housing zebrafish, running water or appropriately timed water changes are a critical component to ensure that the ethical obligations are met. PMID:26914790

  13. Evaluating and Optimizing Fish Health and Welfare During Experimental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Westall, Lynda; Karp, Natasha A.; Hazlehurst, Diane; Kovacs, Ceri; Keeble, Rosemary; Thompson, Peter; Collins, Richard; Bussell, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many facilities house fish in separate static containers post-procedure, for example, while awaiting genotyping results. This ensures fish can be easily identified, but it does not allow for provision of continuous filtered water or diet. At the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, concern over the housing conditions led to the development of an individual housing system (GeneS) enabling feeding and water filtration. Trials to compare the water quality measures between the various systems found that fish housed in static containers experienced rapid deterioration in water quality. By day 1, measures of ammonia were outside the Institute's prescribed values and continued to rise until it was 25-fold higher than recommended levels. Nitrite levels were also outside recommended levels for all fish by day 9 and were twofold higher by the end of the trial. The water quality measures for tanks held on the recirculating system were stable even though food was provided. These results indicate that for housing zebrafish, running water or appropriately timed water changes are a critical component to ensure that the ethical obligations are met. PMID:26914790

  14. Evaluation of results of surgical procedures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Linn, B S; Linn, M W; Wallen, N

    1982-01-01

    Authorities are not in full agreement in regard to risk of surgery in the elderly. One hundred eight studies of surgery in the elderly over the past 40 years were reviewed. The purpose was not merely to tabulate results, but to identify differences existing between reports with regard to data reported that could affect results independent of the surgical management itself. Sources of variance that need to be taken into account in comparing mortality rates between studies, such as whether mortality was computed by number of patients or operations, differing lengths of follow-up for recording mortality, proportions of emergency versus elective operations, and types of surgical procedures, were documented. A nine-item confidence in results scale was used to classify studies into high and low confidence groups. Surgical specialties scored substantially higher than general surgical studies. More recent studies received higher scores than earlier studies. Although mortality rates varied widely depending on methods of their calculation, there appeared to be a trend toward increases in elective, but not emergency, mortality rates in general surgery since 1941 that should be examined more closely. One thing that cannot be answered clearly from these studies is the relative risk of surgery with age. Some control of variations between studies and standardization of reporting surgical deaths are required before risk of surgery in the elderly can be assessed more accurately. PMID:7055387

  15. Evaluation criteria and procedure for nuclear power plant temporary loads/temporary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.T.; Minichiello, J.C.; Olson, D.E.

    1996-12-01

    Operating nuclear power plants frequently encounter temporary loads/temporary conditions in plant normal operation and maintenance (O and M). The most obvious examples are installation of temporary shielding and scaffolding, or removal of certain supports, to facilitate plant refueling and maintenance outage activities. Short-term operability calls such as those due to snubber failures or unanticipated transients also create temporary loads/temporary conditions. These temporary situations often generate loads that are outside the original plant design basis. Consequently, separate evaluations are needed to ensure that plant structures, systems and components (SSCs) maintain their integrity and functionality while these temporary loads are active. Also, the temporary structures and components need to be evaluated to ensure their integrity during the temporary duration of use. Three types of approaches are normally adopted either individually or in combination to perform needed evaluations: relax the design allowables, use a more refined analysis model but retain the design basis acceptance criteria, or offset temporary loads by eliminating or reducing part of the design basis loads based on short duration considerations. This paper reviews temporary loading/temporary condition issues and the current industry criteria and procedures proposed in dealing with these issues. Where appropriate, regulatory positions on temporary loads/temporary conditions are discussed.

  16. A Standardized Procedure for a Pre-evaluation of the IED Instance.

    PubMed

    Panepinto, Deborah; Ruffino, Barbara; Zanetti, Mariachiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a procedure, called EICS (Enterprise IPPC Compatibility Study) aimed at evaluating, by means of the calculation of three indexes, the compliance of the processes performed in an industrial plant with the guidelines provided by BREFs (BAT References) Documents. In fact, according to European Directive 2010/75/EU (concerning the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control and repealing European Directive 2008/01/EC), industrial plants must require authorizations to the competent authority stating the conformity of their activity, in order to obtain this conformity they are advised to Best Available Technologies (BAT). The aim of the BATs is to avoid or minimize the impact of an industrial activity on the environment through the prevention of the atmospheric emissions, wastewater discharge and energetic consumption, and the correct waste management thus improving the efficiency of the plant. The procedure shown in the present paper has been tested on several types of industrial plant (cement plants, secondary smelt foundries, paper-mill, and automotive industries as regards their paint lines). In this paper, the application of EICS method to a cement plant is presented: the obtained results highlight a good correlation between the index values and the real situation of the plant. PMID:26787013

  17. A Standardized Procedure for a Pre-evaluation of the IED Instance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panepinto, Deborah; Ruffino, Barbara; Zanetti, Mariachiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a procedure, called EICS (Enterprise IPPC Compatibility Study) aimed at evaluating, by means of the calculation of three indexes, the compliance of the processes performed in an industrial plant with the guidelines provided by BREFs (BAT References) Documents. In fact, according to European Directive 2010/75/EU (concerning the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control and repealing European Directive 2008/01/EC), industrial plants must require authorizations to the competent authority stating the conformity of their activity, in order to obtain this conformity they are advised to Best Available Technologies (BAT). The aim of the BATs is to avoid or minimize the impact of an industrial activity on the environment through the prevention of the atmospheric emissions, wastewater discharge and energetic consumption, and the correct waste management thus improving the efficiency of the plant. The procedure shown in the present paper has been tested on several types of industrial plant (cement plants, secondary smelt foundries, paper-mill, and automotive industries as regards their paint lines). In this paper, the application of EICS method to a cement plant is presented: the obtained results highlight a good correlation between the index values and the real situation of the plant.

  18. Synthesis and antitumor activity evaluation of lamiridosin A derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Xia; Yan, Jian-Wei; Yan, Fu-Lin; Yin, Yan-Yan; Zhuang, Fang-Fang; Ji, Zi-Yang

    2016-01-01

    A series of lamiridosin A derivatives were synthesized through simple procedures. Their antitumor activities were evaluated against EC9706, MGC803, and B16 cell lines in vitro. Several compounds showed potent antitumor activity, especially compound 10, with IC50 value of 2.36 μmol/L against MGC803 cell lines, is more potent than marketed positive drug 5-fluorouridine (5-FU). PMID:26757858

  19. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  20. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  1. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  2. Qualitative Parameters for Evaluation Procedures of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2009-01-01

    The article introduces evaluation principles of non-formal and informal learning that determine the quality of evaluation, describes stages of the evaluation procedure, differentiates their qualitative parameters and defines their criteria and indicators. It also brings in the discussion that consideration of qualitative parameters for the…

  3. STD Content in School Health Textbooks: An Evaluation Using the Worth Assessment Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroger, Fred; Yarber, William L.

    1984-01-01

    The worth assessment procedure was used to evaluate secondary education textbooks for information on sexually transmitted diseases. It was found that sex education textbooks are more likely to contribute to sexually transmitted disease control objectives than health science textbooks. This article relates the details of the procedure and its…

  4. Federal Clearance of Educational Evaluation Instruments Procedural Problems and Proposed Remedies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Launor

    1977-01-01

    Presents a case study of how the review and clearance procedures are operating for evaluation instruments used in collecting information in connection with studies for the U.S. Office of Education. The review procedures are defective: They consume too much time. They are very costly. The results are unproductive. (Author/JM)

  5. Recommended Experimental Procedures for Evaluation of Abrupt Wing Stall Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Hall, R. M.; Owens, D. B.; Lamar, J. E.; McMillin, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the experimental program under the Abrupt Wing Stall (AWS) Program. Candidate figures of merit from conventional static tunnel tests are summarized and correlated with data obtained in unique free-to-roll tests. Where possible, free-to-roll results are also correlated with flight data. Based on extensive studies of static experimental figures of merit in the Abrupt Wing Stall Program for four different aircraft configurations, no one specific figure of merit consistently flagged a warning of potential lateral activity when actual activity was seen to occur in the free-to-roll experiments. However, these studies pointed out the importance of measuring and recording the root mean square signals of the force balance.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  8. An Evaluation Procedure for a New Program To Prepare Administrator Change Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Larry W.; Tanner, C. Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    This article describes a new program directed toward preparing principals to function as change agents in elementary and secondary schools in Appalachia. Program evaluation procedures that include cost effectiveness analysis based on Bayesian statistics are described in detail. (JH)

  9. Do participation rates change when active consent procedures replace passive consent.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, S B; Jason, L A; Schoeny, M E; Townsend, S M; Curie, C J

    2001-10-01

    Researchers face considerable ambiguity and controversy regarding the issue of informed consent. Decisions about consent procedures can affect study participation rates and prevalence estimates among specific populations. Changing from passive to active parental consent procedures was examined in a case study with an anonymous survey of sixth- through eighth-grade students' substance use. Four types of procedures for obtaining parental consent were examined. Results suggest that certain types of consent procedures can yield high levels of participation. This study also demonstrates that low participation rates with some active consent procedures can cause biases in sample characteristics and outcome data. PMID:11575030

  10. Statistical procedures for evaluating daily and monthly hydrologic model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffey, M.E.; Workman, S.R.; Taraba, J.L.; Fogle, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The overall study objective was to evaluate the applicability of different qualitative and quantitative methods for comparing daily and monthly SWAT computer model hydrologic streamflow predictions to observed data, and to recommend statistical methods for use in future model evaluations. Statistical methods were tested using daily streamflows and monthly equivalent runoff depths. The statistical techniques included linear regression, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, nonparametric tests, t-test, objective functions, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation. None of the methods specifically applied to the non-normal distribution and dependence between data points for the daily predicted and observed data. Of the tested methods, median objective functions, sign test, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation were most applicable for the daily data. The robust coefficient of determination (CD*) and robust modeling efficiency (EF*) objective functions were the preferred methods for daily model results due to the ease of comparing these values with a fixed ideal reference value of one. Predicted and observed monthly totals were more normally distributed, and there was less dependence between individual monthly totals than was observed for the corresponding predicted and observed daily values. More statistical methods were available for comparing SWAT model-predicted and observed monthly totals. The 1995 monthly SWAT model predictions and observed data had a regression Rr2 of 0.70, a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.41, and the t-test failed to reject the equal data means hypothesis. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and the R r2 coefficient were the preferred methods for monthly results due to the ability to compare these coefficients to a set ideal value of one.

  11. Comparison and evaluation of analysis procedures for the quantification of (2-methoxyethoxy)acetic acid in urine.

    PubMed

    B'Hymer, Clayton; Butler, Mary Ann; Cheever, Kenneth L

    2005-09-01

    Several extraction and derivatization procedures were evaluated for the quantification of (2-methoxyethoxy)acetic acid (MEAA) in urine. MEAA is a metabolite and a biomarker for exposure to 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol, a glycol ether with widespread use in various industrial applications and the specific use as an anti-icing additive in the military jet fuel formulation JP-8. Quantification of glycol ether biomarkers is an active area of analytical research. Various sample preparation procedures were evaluated: liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using ethyl acetate yielded the highest recovery, and solid-phase extraction (SPE) gave low recovery of MEAA. Two derivatization procedures were thoroughly investigated and validated, namely, silylation of MEAA with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), and esterification of MEAA using ethanol. Quantification was performed by gas chromatography (GC) with a mass spectrometer as detector and using a polydimethylsiloxane (HP-1) capillary column. Deuterated 2-butoxyacetic acid (d-BAA) was used as an internal standard. Recovery studies of spiked human urine demonstrated the accuracy and precision of both procedures. The limit of detection (LOD) and other figures of merit for both derivatization procedures will be discussed in detail. Applications of these analysis procedures are also discussed. PMID:16158298

  12. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  13. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Brad G; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P

    2006-08-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's guide, NUREG-1400, addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present detailed examples of the methodology used to conduct two qualitative airflow studies at different sites. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within a high-bay building for the purpose of determining appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an airflow study, the stagnant layer may not have been identified and could have resulted in placement of samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test. The methods described in this article can be applied at most facilities where determination of airflow patterns or the verification of suspected airflow patterns is required. PMID:16823267

  14. Evaluation of computer-aided procedure for detecting surface water. [using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results from an evaluation of a computer-aided procedure for processing ERTS-1 data to detect and locate surface water are presented. The procedure was evaluated using data from a study area in the vicinity of the Lake Somerville area in Washington County, Texas. The procedure consisted of (1) selecting water training fields, (2) aggregating the training samples together and clustering them into unimodal clusters, (3) computing the mean vector and covariance matrix for each cluster, (4) classifying all of the study area into classes corresponding to the clusters using the maximum likelihood classifier, and (5) thresholding out the nonwater pixels.

  15. Antioxidant activities of lignin extracted from sugarcane bagasse via different chemical procedures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Ge, Yuanyuan

    2012-12-01

    Lignin was extracted from sugarcane bagasse via different chemical procedures with ethanol and alkaline solutions. The products (EL, AL) were characterized by UV, FT-IR, (13)C NMR, TGA, GPC and potentiometric titration. The results indicated AL had more phenolic hydroxyl (PhOH) and methoxyl groups (OCH(3)), and larger molecular mass and better thermal stability than EL. The lignins were further evaluated as potential antioxidants. The results demonstrated the radical scavenging activity (RSA) of AL was 79.0%, 91.3% higher than EL at the concentration of 300 mg L(-1). The stronger antioxidant activity of AL was due to its higher quantities of PhOH and OCH(3) groups. PMID:22982809

  16. Starting procedures for the isolation and purification of granulocyte chalone activities.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H R; Weiss, G; Laerum, D

    1976-09-01

    Several starting materials and procedures for the extraction and purification of granulocyte chalone activities were tested and evaluated. Among others, leuko-adhesion of bovine blood granulocytes on nylon and cotton wool and direct extraction with polar organic solvents were found suitable. Following PVP-leukapheresis ascites fluids were collected from rats, purified by ultrafiltration and Sephadex G 25 chromatography to yield 2 inhibitors at Ve/Vo = 2.1 and 2.6 and one stimulator at 2.0 by the in vitro 3H-thymidine test. Fraction 2.1, which has met the criteria of a granulocyte chalone by the diffusion chamber and agar colony test, was found thermostabile and to contain several peptides. Yet evidence for the peptide nature of the inhibitor is not conclusive. Extracts from bovine blood granulocytes contained only the inhibitor at 2.1. Problems related to the in vitro test for chalone activity were discussed. PMID:134753

  17. Are Evaluation Activities Worth the Effort?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    The casual approach to evaluation, the interface of evaluation and research, and various approaches subsumed within evaluation are addressed, and the dimensions that determine the worth of engaging in evaluation activities are examined. Additionally, a statement about the state-of-the-art in regard to the technology of conducting evaluation…

  18. A MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ASSAYING CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY IN HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytotoxic activity assays of Gram-negative, heterotrophic bacteria are often laborious and time consuming. The objective of this study was to develop in situ procedures for testing potential cytotoxic activities of heterotrophic bacteria isolated from drinking water systems. Wate...

  19. Evaluation of multiple comparison correction procedures in drug assessment studies using LORETA maps.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joan Francesc; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel Ángel; Rojas, Mónica; Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel José

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the brain regions involved in the neuropharmacological action is a potential procedure for drug development. These regions are commonly determined by the voxels showing significant statistical differences after comparing placebo-induced effects with drug-elicited effects. LORETA is an electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging technique frequently used to identify brain structures affected by the drug. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for the correction of multiple comparisons in the LORETA maps. These methods which have been commonly used in neuroimaging and also simulated studies have been applied on a real case of pharmaco-EEG study where the effects of increasing benzodiazepine doses on the central nervous system measured by LORETA were investigated. Data consisted of EEG recordings obtained from nine volunteers who received single oral doses of alprazolam 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg, and placebo in a randomized crossover double-blind design. The identification of active regions was highly dependent on the selected multiple test correction procedure. The combined criteria approach known as cluster mass was useful to reveal that increasing drug doses led to higher intensity and spread of the pharmacologically induced changes in intracerebral current density. PMID:26040586

  20. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... child and the child's family must be conducted every six months, or more frequently if...

  1. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... child and the child's family must be conducted every six months, or more frequently if...

  2. Evaluating the Effects of a Video Prompt in a System of Least Prompts Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katie A.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Mechling, Linda C.; Alexander, Jennifer L.; Mataras, Theologia K.; Shepley, Sally B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a system of least prompts procedure with a video prompt serving as the model in teaching office tasks to three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. A multiple probe across behaviors design replicated across participants was used to evaluate the intervention. The…

  3. Evaluation of Microcomputer Software: How Valid Are the Criteria and Procedures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Robert M.

    Three issues are critical to the establishment of valid criteria and procedures for determining effective use of computer-based instruction. One issue related to educational software evaluation is that few of the evaluation criteria have been research validated, but, instead, are often based only on speculation and intuition. Criteria are…

  4. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  5. 48 CFR 1352.213-70 - Evaluation utilizing simplified acquisition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.213-70 Evaluation utilizing simplified acquisition procedures. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1313... experience, education, and qualifications of personnel proposed to work on the contract will be evaluated to... and timeliness of delivery of goods and services, cost management, communications between...

  6. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  7. Numerical evaluation of the performance of active noise control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, C. G.; Bernhard, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a generalized numerical technique for evaluating the optimal performance of active noise controllers. In this technique, the indirect BEM numerical procedures are used to derive the active noise controllers for optimal control of enclosed harmonic sound fields where the strength of the noise sources or the description of the enclosure boundary may not be known. The performance prediction for a single-input single-output system is presented, together with the analysis of the stability and observability of an active noise-control system employing detectors. The numerical procedures presented can be used for the design of both the physical configuration and the electronic components of the optimal active noise controller.

  8. A simplified leak-before-break evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Zahoor, A.; Ghassemi, B.

    1994-10-01

    A simplified procedure has been defined for computing the allowable circumferential throughwall crack length as a function of applied loads in piping. This procedure has been defined to enable leak-before-break (LBB) evaluations to be performed without complex and time consuming analyses. The development of the LBB evaluation procedure is similar to that now used in Section 11 of the ASME Code for evaluation of part-throughwall flaws found in piping. The LBB evaluation procedure was bench marked using experimental data obtained from pipes having circumferential throughwall flaws. Comparisons of the experimental and predicted load carrying capacities indicate that the method has a conservative bias, such that for at least 97% of the experiments the experimental load is equal to or greater than 90% of the predicted load. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austenitic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  9. Evaluation of screening procedures for bioconcentratable organic chemicals in effluents and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, L.P.; Sheedy, B.R.

    1995-04-01

    Screening procedures have been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to isolate and tentatively identify nonpolar organic chemicals in effluent and sediment samples with high potential to form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. The objective of this study was to determine if the sample components tentatively identified by the effluent- and sediment-screening procedures actually form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. This evaluation consisted of analyzing effluent and sediment samples from a field site with discharges from two coke-manufacturing facilities using the screening procedures. Effluent, sediment, crayfish (Decapoda), and sunfish (Lepomis sp.) samples from the field site were also prepared using conventional sample preparation procedures and analyzed for the tentatively identified chemicals (TIDs) reported by the screening procedures. Results of the screening procedures were then compared to the results of the analyses on the samples prepared using the conventional sample preparation procedures. For the effluent-screening procedure, 182 of 183 TIDs in Coke Plant 1 effluent and all of the 7 TIDs in Coke Plant 2 effluent were found in the crayfish, sunfish, and/or sediment samples downstream of the discharges. For the sediment-screening procedure, 92 of 93 TIDs and all of 47 TIDs in sediment samples from two sampling stations downstream of the discharges were found in the crayfish and/or sunfish samples.

  10. An Evaluation of Surgical Prophylaxis Procedures in Turkey: A Multi-Center Point Prevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Selcuk; Aktas, Seyhan; Senbayrak, Seniha; Tekin, Recep; Oztoprak, Nefise; Aksoy, Firdevs; Firat, Pinar; Yenice, Sevinc; Oncul, Ahsen; Gunduz, Alper; Solak, Semiha; Kadanali, Ayten; Cakar, Sule Eren; Caglayan, Derya; Yilmaz, Hava; Bozkurt, Ilkay; Elmaslar, Tulin; Tartar, Ayse Sagmak; Aynioglu, Aynur; Kocyigit, Nilgun Fidan; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate compliance with guidelines in surgical prophylaxis (SP) procedures in Turkey. Materials and Methods: A point prevalence study involving 4 university, 5 education and research and 7 public hospitals was performed assessing compliance with guidelines for antibiotic use in SP. Compliance was based on the “Clinical Practice Guidelines for Antimicrobial Surgery (CPGAS) 2013” guideline. Results: Sixteen centers were included in the study, with 166 operations performed at these being evaluated. Parenteral antibiotic for SP was applied in 161 (96.9%) of these. Type of antibiotic was inappropriate in 66 (40.9%) cases and duration of use in 47 (29.1%). The main antibiotics used inappropriately in SP were ceftriaxone, glycopeptides and aminoglycosides. No significant difference was observed between secondary and tertiary hospitals in terms of inappropriate selection. Duration of prophylaxis was also incompatible with guideline recommendations in approximately half of surgical procedures performed in both secondary and tertiary hospitals, however statistical significance was observed between institutions in favor of tertiary hospitals. Conclusion: Antibiotics are to a considerable extent used in a manner incompatible with guidelines even in tertiary hospitals in Turkey. It must not be forgotten that several pre-, intra- and postoperative factors can be involved in the development of surgical site infections (SSI), and antibiotics are not the only option available for preventing these. A significant improvement can be achieved in prophylaxis with close observation, educational activities, collaboration with the surgical team and increasing compliance with guidelines. All health institutions must establish and apply their own SP consensus accompanied by the guidelines in order to achieve success in SP. PMID:27026760

  11. Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Glove Boxes at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    2001-06-01

    At U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, safety analyses and facility-specific actions require the evaluation of mechanical and electrical equipment subjected to seismic hazards. A seismic evaluation procedure has been developed by the DOE to provide comprehensive guidance for consistent seismic evaluations of equipment and distribution systems in DOE facilities using experience data from past seismic events and shake table tests. The DOE Seismic Evaluation Procedure (SEP) is adapted from the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP) used by the nuclear power industry. The DOE SEP builds on the procedures and screening criteria in the SQUG GIP by incorporating DOE-specific requirements and guidance and broadening the application of the experience-based methodology to equipment classes which are either unique to DOE facilities or not contained in the SQUG GIP. These equipment classes include piping systems, HEPA filters, glove boxes, underground tanks, canisters and gas cylinders, WAC ducts, storage racks, etc. This paper addresses the seismic evaluation procedures developed uniquely for glove boxes.

  12. Expert systems should be more accurate than human experts - Evaluation procedures from human judgment and decisionmaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Keith

    1989-01-01

    Two procedures for the evaluation of the performance of expert systems are illustrated: one procedure evaluates predictive accuracy; the other procedure is complementary in that it uncovers the factors that contribute to predictive accuracy. Using these procedures, it is argued that expert systems should be more accurate than human experts in two senses. One sense is that expert systems must be more accurate to be cost-effective. Previous research is reviewed and original results are presented which show that simple statistical models typically perform better than human experts for the task of combining evidence from a given set of information sources. The results also suggest the second sense in which expert systems should be more accurate than human experts. They reveal that expert systems should share factors that contribute to human accuracy, but not factors that detract from human accuracy. Thus the thesis is that one should both require and expect systems to be more accurate than humans.

  13. Computer–Based Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers: Preliminary Results from Two Evaluation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna H Oxstrand

    2013-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conducted to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.

  14. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: the procedure, the evaluated systems and the evaluation tools.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, M; de Greef, K; Brinkman, D; Cinar, M U; Dourmad, J Y; Edge, H L; Fàbrega, E; Gonzàlez, J; Houwers, H W J; Hviid, M; Ilari-Antoine, E; Klauke, T N; Phatsara, C; Rydhmer, L; van der Oever, B; Zimmer, C; Edwards, S A

    2014-12-01

    Although a few studies consider the sustainability of animal farming systems along the three classical main pillars (economy, environment and society), most studies on pig farming systems address only one of these pillars. The present paper is the introduction to a series of companion papers presenting the results of a study undertaken within the EU-supported project Q-PorkChains, aiming at building a comprehensive tool for the evaluation of pig farming systems, which is robust to accommodate the large variability of systems existing in Europe. The tool is mostly based on questions to farmers and comprises a total of 37 dimensions distributed along eight themes: Animal Welfare, Animal Health, Breeding Programmes, Environmental Sustainability, Meat Safety, Market Conformity, Economy and Working Conditions. The paper describes the procedure that was used for building the tool, using it on 15 contrasted pig farming systems and analysing the results. The evaluated systems are briefly described and a short overview of the dimensions is provided. Detailed descriptions of the theme-wise tools and results, as well as the results of an integrated evaluation, are available in the companion papers. PMID:25166005

  15. Comparing catchment sediment fingerprinting procedures using an auto-evaluation approach with virtual sample mixtures.

    PubMed

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, William H; Smith, Hugh G; Navas, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Information on sediment sources in river catchments is required for effective sediment control strategies, to understand sediment, nutrient and pollutant transport, and for developing soil erosion management plans. Sediment fingerprinting procedures are employed to quantify sediment source contributions and have become a widely used tool. As fingerprinting procedures are naturally variable and locally dependant, there are different applications of the procedure. Here, the auto-evaluation of different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures is proposed to support the selection of the fingerprinting procedure with the best capacity for source discrimination and apportionment. Surface samples from four land uses from a Central Spanish Pyrenean catchment were used i) as sources to generate the virtual sample mixtures and ii) to characterise the sources for the fingerprinting procedures. The auto-evaluation approach involved comparing fingerprinting procedures based on four optimum composite fingerprints selected by three statistical tests, three source characterisations (mean, median and corrected mean) and two types of objective functions for the mixing model. A total of 24 fingerprinting procedures were assessed by this new approach which were solved by Monte Carlo simulations and compared using the root mean squared error (RMSE) between known and assessed source ascriptions for the virtual sample mixtures. It was found that the source ascriptions with the highest accuracy were achieved using the corrected mean source characterisations for the composite fingerprints selected by the Kruskal Wallis H-test and principal components analysis. Based on the RMSE results, high goodness of fit (GOF) values were not always indicative of accurate source apportionment results, and care should be taken when using GOF to assess mixing model performance. The proposed approach to test different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures provides an

  16. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-11-01

    On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  2. Evaluation of BWR emergency procedure guidelines for BWR ATWS using RAMONA-3B code

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.; Slovik, G.; Cazzoli, E.; Saha, P.

    1985-01-01

    An MSIV Closure ATWS calculation for a typical BWR/4 (Browns Ferry, Unit 1) was performed using the RAMONA-3B code which is a BWR systems transient code combining three-dimensional neutronic core representation with multi-channel one-dimensional thermal hydraulics. The main objective of the study was to perform a best-estimate evaluation of the recently proposed Emergency Procedure Guidelines for Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS). Emphasis was placed on evaluating the effects of lowering the downcomer water level to the Top of Active Fuel (TAF) and vessel depressurization. The calculation was run up to approximately 1200 seconds. Both actions, namely, lowering the water level and vessel depressurization, lowered the reactor power to some extent. However, the pressure suppression pool water temperature still reached approximately 90/sup 0/C (potential High Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) pump seal failure temperature) in twenty minutes. Thus, other actions such as boron injection and/or manual control rod insertion are necessary to mitigate a BWR/4 Main Steam Isolation Valve (MSIV) closure ATWS. 19 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Factors Associated with Evaluating Public Relations Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElreath, Mark P.

    More than 150 public relations practitioners responded to a survey designed to identify and clarify factors associated with evaluative research in public relations. Responses indicated that (1) no more than half the practitioners formally evaluate their public relations activities on a regular basis; (2) the majority of evaluation is done…

  4. Active Reading Procedures for Moderating the Effects of Poor Highlighting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki S.; Herring, Daniel; Hudnell, Jason; Montoya, Jodi; Kreiner, David S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated two active reading techniques intended to eliminate the negative effect on reading comprehension of preexisting, inappropriate highlighting. College students read passages in three highlighting conditions: no highlighting, appropriate highlighting, and inappropriate highlighting. In Experiment 1, 30 students read the passages while…

  5. Test and evaluation procedures for Sandia's Teraflops Operating System (TOS) on Janus.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, Daniel Wayne

    2005-10-01

    This report describes the test and evaluation methods by which the Teraflops Operating System, or TOS, that resides on Sandia's massively-parallel computer Janus is verified for production release. Also discussed are methods used to build TOS before testing and evaluating, miscellaneous utility scripts, a sample test plan, and a proposed post-test method for quickly examining the large number of test results. The purpose of the report is threefold: (1) to provide a guide to T&E procedures, (2) to aid and guide others who will run T&E procedures on the new ASCI Red Storm machine, and (3) to document some of the history of evaluation and testing of TOS. This report is not intended to serve as an exhaustive manual for testers to conduct T&E procedures.

  6. The LET Procedure for Prosthetic Myocontrol: Towards Multi-DOF Control Using Single-DOF Activations.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Markus; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous and proportional myocontrol of dexterous hand prostheses is to a large extent still an open problem. With the advent of commercially and clinically available multi-fingered hand prostheses there are now more independent degrees of freedom (DOFs) in prostheses than can be effectively controlled using surface electromyography (sEMG), the current standard human-machine interface for hand amputees. In particular, it is uncertain, whether several DOFs can be controlled simultaneously and proportionally by exclusively calibrating the intended activation of single DOFs. The problem is currently solved by training on all required combinations. However, as the number of available DOFs grows, this approach becomes overly long and poses a high cognitive burden on the subject. In this paper we present a novel approach to overcome this problem. Multi-DOF activations are artificially modelled from single-DOF ones using a simple linear combination of sEMG signals, which are then added to the training set. This procedure, which we named LET (Linearly Enhanced Training), provides an augmented data set to any machine-learning-based intent detection system. In two experiments involving intact subjects, one offline and one online, we trained a standard machine learning approach using the full data set containing single- and multi-DOF activations as well as using the LET-augmented data set in order to evaluate the performance of the LET procedure. The results indicate that the machine trained on the latter data set obtains worse results in the offline experiment compared to the full data set. However, the online implementation enables the user to perform multi-DOF tasks with almost the same precision as single-DOF tasks without the need of explicitly training multi-DOF activations. Moreover, the parameters involved in the system are statistically uniform across subjects. PMID:27606674

  7. An automated procedure for material parameter evaluation for viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbrie, P. K.; James, G. H.; Hill, P. S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated procedure is presented for evaluating the material parameters in Walker's exponential viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature. Both physical and numerical approximations are utilized to compute the constants for Inconel 718 at 1100 F. When intermediate results are carefully scrutinized and engineering judgement applied, parameters may be computed which yield stress output histories that are in agreement with experimental results. A qualitative assessment of the theta-plot method for predicting the limiting value of stress is also presented. The procedure may also be used as a basis to develop evaluation schemes for other viscoplastic constitutive theories of this type.

  8. Evaluating Metacognitive Scaffolding in Guided Invention Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roll, Ido; Holmes, Natasha G.; Day, James; Bonn, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Invention and Productive Failure activities ask students to generate methods that capture the important properties of some given data (e.g., uncertainty) before being taught the expert solution. Invention and Productive Failure activities are a class of scientific inquiry activities in that students create, implement, and evaluate mathematical…

  9. 15 CFR 400.37 - Procedure for notification of proposed production activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedure for notification of proposed production activity. 400.37 Section 400.37 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) FOREIGN-TRADE ZONES BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REGULATIONS OF THE FOREIGN-TRADE ZONES BOARD Procedures...

  10. Effects of Orienting Activities and Instructional Control on Learning Facts and Procedures from Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Mariela; Coldevin, Gary

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that was designed to investigate the interaction between three levels of instructional control (i.e., linear, mixed, and learner) and provision of an orienting activity on college students' learning of factual and procedural knowledge via interactive video. Instructional time and recall of facts and procedures are examined. (35…

  11. 13 CFR 101.402 - What procedures apply to the selection of SBA programs and activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of SBA programs and activities? 101.402 Section 101.402 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION Intergovernmental Partnership § 101.402 What procedures apply to...

  12. Evaluation of a university hospital trauma team activation protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Admission with a multidisciplinary trauma team may be vital for the severely injured patient, as this facilitates rapid diagnosis and treatment. On the other hand, patients with minor injuries do not need the trauma team for adequate care. Correct triage is important for optimal resource utilization. The aim of the study was to evaluate our criteria for activating the trauma team, and identify suboptimal criteria that might be changed in the interest of precision. Methods The study is an observational, retrospective cohort-study. All patients admitted with the trauma team (n = 382), all severely injured (Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15) (n = 161), and all undergoing an emergency procedure aimed at counteracting compromised airways, respiration or circulation at our hospital (n = 142) during 2006-2007 were included. Data were recorded from the admission records and the electronic patient records. The trauma team activation protocol was evaluated against the occurrence of severe injury and the occurrence of emergency procedures. Results A total of 441 patients were included. The overtriage was 71% and undertriage 32% when evaluating against ISS >15 as the standard of reference. When occurrence of emergency procedures was held as the standard of standard of reference, the over- and undertriage was 71% and 21%, respectively. Mechanism of injury-criteria for trauma team activation contributed the most to overtriage. The emergency procedures performed were mostly endotracheal intubation and external fixation of fractures. Less than 3% needed haemostatic laparotomy or thoracotomy. Approximately 2/3 of the overtriage represented isolated head or cervical spine injuries, and/or interhospital transfers. Conclusions The over- and undertriage of our protocol are both too high. To decrease overtriage we suggest omissions and modifications of some of the criteria. To decrease undertriage, transferred patients and patients with head injuries should be more thoroughly

  13. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic elements of…

  14. A novel quality control procedure for the evaluation of laser scanning data segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Durgham, K.; Habib, A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few years, laser scanning systems have been acknowledged as the leading tools for the collection of high density 3D point cloud over physical surfaces for many different applications. However, no interpretation and scene classification is performed during the acquisition of these datasets. Consequently, the collected data must be processed to extract the required information. The segmentation procedure is usually considered as the fundamental step in information extraction from laser scanning data. So far, various approaches have been developed for the segmentation of 3D laser scanning data. However, none of them is exempted from possible anomalies due to disregarding the internal characteristics of laser scanning data, improper selection of the segmentation thresholds, or other problems during the segmentation procedure. Therefore, quality control procedures are required to evaluate the segmentation outcome and report the frequency of instances of expected problems. A few quality control techniques have been proposed for the evaluation of laser scanning segmentation. These approaches usually require reference data and user intervention for the assessment of segmentation results. In order to resolve these problems, a new quality control procedure is introduced in this paper. This procedure makes hypotheses regarding potential problems that might take place in the segmentation process, detects instances of such problems, quantifies the frequency of these problems, and suggests possible actions to remedy them. The feasibility of the proposed approach is verified through quantitative evaluation of planar and linear/cylindrical segmentation outcome from two recently-developed parameter-domain and spatial-domain segmentation techniques.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

    1999-01-01

    Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

  16. Clinical evaluation of a simple, rapid procedure for the presumptive identification of anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J W; Gagnet, S M; Lewis, S A; Stauffer, L R

    1977-01-01

    A simple, rapid procedure for the presumptive identification of anaerobic bacteria has been evaluated. Two hundred and thirty-five clinical isolates were identified using gas-liquid chromatography and 3-ml volumes of a few selected test media. These test media were stored aerobically and incubated in GasPak anaerobic jars. The average incubation time was 39 h. This procedure, when compared to the results of our standard identification procedure, correctly identified 98% of the isolates to the genus level, 83% to the species level, and 83% of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides melaninogenicus to the subspecies level. Fifty-three of the isolates were also identified by using 0.5-ml volumes of test media stored, inoculated, and incubated in an anaerobic glove box. The 3-ml-and the 0.5-ml-volume procedures correctly identified comparable percentages of the 53 isolates. PMID:323283

  17. 40 CFR 63.7112 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use? 63.7112 Section 63.7112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation Quality Procedure: Personnel Qualification and Certification Radiographic Testing-Levels I& II

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, K; Rikard, R D; Rodriquez, J

    2003-07-01

    This Operational Procedure establishes the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification/recertification of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) personnel in the nondestructive testing (NDT) radiographic testing (RT) method. This document is in accordance with the American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice SNT-TC-1A, 1996, except as amended herein.

  19. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  20. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  1. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  2. 14 CFR § 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. § 1216.205 Section § 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action...

  3. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  4. The Use of Formative Evaluation Procedures for Improvement of a Socially-Oriented Course in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novick, Shimshon

    1976-01-01

    Unstructured and structured evaluation modes were used to probe teacher perceptions of a socially-oriented chemistry course for non-science majors. Students' assessments reinforced teacher perceptions. This procedure yielded information concerning course content, societal relevance, motivation, interest, laboratory and demonstration exercises,…

  5. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  6. SEQUENTIALLY SCALED MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT TESTS--CONSTRUCTION METHODOLOGY AND EVALUATION PROCEDURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRAHAM, GLENN T.

    THIS STUDY APPLIED GUTTMAN'S SCALOGRAM ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY TO TEST CONSTRUCTION, AND DEVELOPED EVALUATION PROCEDURES ON THE RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND ITEM ANALYSIS OF THE OBTAINED TESTS. THE METHODOLOGY FOR CONSTRUCTION WAS APPLIED IN FIVE AREAS OF ARITHMETIC ACHIEVEMENT--(1) ADDITION, (2) SUBTRACTION, (3) NUMERATION, (4) TIME-TELLING, AND (5)…

  7. Development of luminescence procedures to evaluate permeation of multi-ring polyaromatic compounds through protective materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; White, D.A.

    1987-04-01

    This study describes two practical and simple luminescence techniques developed to evaluate the efficacy of protective clothing materials against permeation of multi-ring polyaromatic compounds contained in heavy oil and petroleum products. The procedures use a rapid and simple technique based on room temperature phosphorimetry and fluorescence detection in which a portable fiberoptics luminoscope was used.

  8. EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Evaluation of Environmental Hazard Assessment Procedures for Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (Abstract). To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the the Australasian Society of Ecotoxicology, July 2004, Gold Coast, Australia. 1 p. (ERL,GB R98...

  9. 48 CFR 12.203 - Procedures for solicitation, evaluation, and award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION OF COMMERCIAL ITEMS Special Requirements for the Acquisition of Commercial Items 12.203 Procedures for solicitation, evaluation, and award. Contracting officers shall use the policies unique to the acquisition of commercial items prescribed in this part...

  10. EVALUATION OF NEW IN-FACEPIECE SAMPLING PROCEDURES FOR FULL AND HALF FACEPIECES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The precision and bias associated with five different methods of sampling for inboard penetration through three areas on the face seal of full and half facepiece negative pressure respirators were determined. The sampling procedures identified and evaluated in the study were: [1]...

  11. Comparison of sympathetic nerve activity normalization procedures in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sandra L; Lim, Kyungjoon; Moretti, John-Luis; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main constraints associated with recording sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in both humans and experimental animals is that microvolt values reflect characteristics of the recording conditions and limit comparisons between different experimental groups. The nasopharyngeal response has been validated for normalizing renal SNA (RSNA) in conscious rabbits, and in humans muscle SNA is normalized to the maximum burst in the resting period. We compared these two methods of normalization to determine whether either could detect elevated RSNA in hypertensive rabbits compared with normotensive controls. We also tested whether either method eliminated differences based only on different recording conditions by separating RSNA of control (sham) rabbits into two groups with low or high microvolts. Hypertension was induced by 5 wk of renal clipping (2K1C), 3 wk of high-fat diet (HFD), or 3 mo infusion of a low dose of angiotensin (ANG II). Normalization to the nasopharyngeal response revealed RSNA that was 88, 51, and 34% greater in 2K1C, HFD, and ANG II rabbits, respectively, than shams (P < 0.05), but normalization to the maximum burst showed no differences. The RSNA baroreflex followed a similar pattern whether RSNA was expressed in microvolts or normalized. Both methods abolished the difference between low and high microvolt RSNA. These results suggest that maximum burst amplitude is a useful technique for minimizing differences between recording conditions but is unable to detect real differences between groups. We conclude that the nasopharyngeal reflex is the superior method for normalizing sympathetic recordings in conscious rabbits. PMID:26921439

  12. Active travel intervention and physical activity behaviour: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Patricia; Eberth, Barbara; Farrar, Shelley; Anable, Jillian; Ludbrook, Anne

    2014-07-01

    A physically active lifestyle is an important contributor to individual health and well-being. The evidence linking higher physical activity levels with better levels of morbidity and mortality is well understood. Despite this, physical inactivity remains a major global risk factor for mortality and, consequently, encouraging individuals to pursue physically active lifestyles has been an integral part of public health policy in many countries. Physical activity promotion and interventions are now firmly on national health policy agendas, including policies that promote active travel such as walking and cycling. This study evaluates one such active travel initiative, the Smarter Choices, Smarter Places programme in Scotland, intended to encourage uptake of walking, cycling and the use of public transport as more active forms of travel. House to house surveys were conducted before and after the programme intervention, in May/June 2009 and 2012 (12,411 surveys in 2009 and 9542 in 2012), for the evaluation of the programme. This paper analyses the physical activity data collected, focussing on what can be inferred from the initiative with regards to adult uptake of physical activity participation and whether, for those who participated in physical activity, the initiative impacted on meeting recommended physical activity guidelines. The results suggest that the initiative impacted positively on the likelihood of physical activity participation and meeting the recommended physical activity guidelines. Individuals in the intervention areas were on average 6% more likely to meet the physical activity guidelines compared to individuals in the non intervention areas. However, the absolute prevalence of physical activity participation declined in both intervention and control areas over time. Our evaluation of this active transport initiative indicates that similar programmes may aid in contributing to achieving physical activity targets and adds to the international

  13. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for the Display of Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Hoffman, Ronald B.; Litaker, Harry, Jr.; Solem, Jody; Holden, Kritina; Twyford, Evan; Conlee, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Over the past year, NASA's focus has turned to crewed long duration and exploration missions. On these journeys, crewmembers will be required to execute thousands of procedures to maintain life support systems, check out space suits, conduct science experiments, and perform medical exams. To support the many complex tasks crewmembers undertake in microgravity, NASA is interested in providing crewmembers a hands-free work environment to promote more efficient operations. The overarching objective is to allow crewmembers to use both of their hands for tasks related to their mission, versus holding a paper manual or interacting with a display. The use of advanced, hands-free tools will undoubtedly make the crewmembers task easier, but they can also add to overall task complexity if not properly designed. A leading candidate technology for supporting a hands-free environment is the Head-Mounted Display (HMD). A more recent technology (e-book reader) that could be easily temp-stowed near the work area is also a potential hands-free solution. Previous work at NASA involved the evaluation of several commercially available HMDs for visual quality, comfort, and fit, as well as suitability for use in microgravity. Based on results from this work, three HMDs were selected for further evaluation (along with an e-book reader), using International Space Station (ISS)-like maintenance procedures. Two evaluations were conducted in the Space Station Mockup and Trainer Facility (SSMTF) located at the NASA Johnson Space Center (building 9). The SSMTF is a full scale, medium fidelity replica of the pressurized portions of the ISS. It supports crew training such as ingress and egress, habitability, and emergency procedures. In each of the two evaluations, the participants performed two maintenance procedures. One maintenance procedure involved inspecting air filters in a life support system and replacing them with a clean filter if one were found to be contaminated. The second

  14. Application of toxicity identification evaluation procedure to toxic industrial effluent in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Ra, Jin-Sung; Jeong, Tae-Yong; Lee, Sun-Hong; Kim, Sang Don

    2016-01-01

    Toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) was applied to the effluent from a pharmaceutical industrial complex, following the US EPA TIE guidelines. The whole effluent toxicity (WET) test found toxicity greater than 16toxic units (TU) in the effluent. Dissolved non-polar organic compounds were identified as the major contributor to the observed toxicity in the TIE manipulations in phases I and II. Among the 48 organic compounds identified, three compounds (i.e., acetophenone, benzoimide, and benzothiazole) were related to the pharmaceutical production procedure; however, no contribution to toxicity was predicted in the compounds. The results of the ECOSAR model, which predicts toxicity, indicated that the alkane compounds caused significant toxicity in the effluent. The toxicity test and heavy metal analysis, which used IC and ICP/MS, identified that particulate and heavy metals, such as Cu and Zn, contributed to the remaining toxicity, except dissolved organics. The results showed the applicability of the TIE method for predicting regional effluents produced by the industrial pharmaceutical complex in this study. Although the location was assumed to be affected by discharge of pharmaceutical related compounds in the river, no correlations were observed in the study. Based on the results, advanced treatment processes, such as activated carbon adsorption, are recommended for the wastewater treatment process in this location. PMID:25997865

  15. Evaluating SPP/APR Improvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center (NECTAC), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document is intended to assist State Education Agency (SEA) and Lead Agency (LA) staff and technical assistance providers in designing a meaningful evaluation for the State Performance Plan (SPP)/Annual Performance Report (APR) improvement activities. It provides: (1) information about the relevance of evaluation in the context of improvement…

  16. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  17. Evaluation of spiking procedures for the introduction of poorly water soluble contaminants into soil

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.J.; Northcott, G.L.; Jones, K.C.; Semple, K.T.

    1998-10-15

    There is currently considerable interest in the fate and behavior of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) within the soil environment. Processes such as sorption, desorption, subsurface transport, and biodegradation have been the focus of much attention. The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of various spiking procedures for the introduction of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into soil environments. {sup 14}C-radiolabeled analogues of two representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenanthrene (Phe), and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), were introduced into soil using different spiking techniques, and the homogeneity of compound distribution in subsamples was assessed. It was established that under analogous spiking procedures dry soil could be spiked with greater homogeneity than wet soil. The procedure which gave the most homogeneous distribution of compound involved a single spiking/rehydration operation conducted on dry soil. Relative standard deviations of 2.40% for {sup 14}C-9-Phe and 3.65% for {sup 14}C-7-B[a]P were obtained for this procedure. An optimum procedure for the spiking of wet soil was established, giving relative standard deviations of 4.1% for {sup 14}C-9-Phe and 3.7% for {sup 14}C-7-B[a]P. This procedure employed a highly spiked wet soil inoculum to distribute the compound throughout the soil system. The influence of carrier solvent on microbial cell numbers determined as colony forming units was also evaluated and shown to have a dramatic negative impact at high volumes.

  18. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of Active Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Jill; McGill, Peter; Stretton, Rachel; Kelly-Pike, Amanda; Moore, Jane; Macdonald, Susan; Eastop, Zoe; Marks, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Active support was implemented in three community houses (active support houses), with 11 service users with severe learning disabilities. Methods: This was evaluated with reference to changes in levels of engagement, challenging behaviour (major and minor) and staff contact, measured against three comparison services (non-active…

  20. Computational procedures for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of vibration frequencies and Eigenmodes of framed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, Timothy L.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    Computational procedures are presented for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of the vibration frequencies and eigenmodes of framed structures. Both a displacement and a mixed formulation are used. The two key elements of the computational procedure are: (a) Use of dynamic reduction techniques to substantially reduce the number of degrees of freedom; and (b) Application of iterative techniques to improve the accuracy of the derivatives of the eigenmodes. The two reduction techniques considered are the static condensation and a generalized dynamic reduction technique. Error norms are introduced to assess the accuracy of the eigenvalue and eigenvector derivatives obtained by the reduction techniques. The effectiveness of the methods presented is demonstrated by three numerical examples.

  1. Evaluation of the IEP Costing Procedures: A Pilot Study by Six Major Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topping, Jim

    The Information Exchange Procedures (IEP) cost study project of the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems is described and its applicability to six major research universities (MRU) is assessed in this pilot study. The IEP enables peer institutions to compare information about their resources, activities, and educational…

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species

  4. Evaluation of compost activators for yard waste

    SciTech Connect

    Razvi, A.S.; Kramer, D.W.

    1995-12-31

    The evaluation of the efficiency of yard waste composting (grass clippm`gs/wood chip mixture) was studied for seven commercially available activators, two naturally occurring activators, and one control (absence of activator). The overall decomposition response for each activator was evaluated by comparing four indices of composting efficiency. These were weight loss, change in volume, loss of volatile solids, and oxygen uptake rate. Four experimental blocks were set up in the field, and two experimental blocks were set up in the laboratory. The physical/chemical characteristics were monitored for all samples as a function of time, and individual activators were evaluated so interrelationships between indices could be studied. Based on the four indices, grass clippings can be efficiently composted with natural activators such as Surface Soil or Mature Compost. Commercially available compost activators performed similar to the Control. The cost of commercially available activators was $1.37 to $9.36 per cubic yard of grass clippings to be composted. Naturally occurring activators such as Surface Soil and Mature Compost may be available at no cost to the backyard composter.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  7. Evaluating Library Buildings: Principles and Procedures for Post-Occupancy Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    This manual provides the steps in planning a post-occupancy evaluation of library facilities to determine how effective the designed environment is for users. Evaluating a building provides a feedback loop to the planning process and can help fine tune the building or help others. The first actions of the planners are to clarify the purpose; gain…

  8. Teacher Evaluation: Contract Procedures, Contract Clauses, Arbitration Cases. A Handbook for the School Administrator and Evaluator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igoe, Joseph A.; DiRocco, Anthony P.

    This handbook for school administrators (especially principals) was designed to assist those who must evaluate probationary and tenured teachers in keeping with the terms of a negotiated contract. Frequently, the evaluator is not aware of the school district's contractual obligations to teachers, and failure to follow precisely the contract…

  9. 12 CFR 225.27 - Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities. 225.27 Section 225.27 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Nonbanking Activities...

  10. The Risky Situation: A Procedure for Assessing the Father-Child Activation Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Daniel; Bigras, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Initial validation data are presented for the Risky Situation (RS), a 20-minute observational procedure designed to assess the father-child activation relationship with children aged 12-18 months. The coding grid, which is simple and easy to use, allows parent-child dyads to be classified into three categories and provides an activation score. By…

  11. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for Space Habitat Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. B.; Twyford, E.; Conlee, C. S.; Litaker, H. L.; Solemn, J. A.; Holden

    2007-01-01

    Currently, International Space Station (ISS) crews use a laptop computer to display procedures for performing onboard maintenance tasks. This approach has been determined to be suboptimal. A heuristic evaluation and two studies have been completed to test commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) "near-eye" heads up displays (HUDs) for support of these types of maintenance tasks. In both studies, subjects worked through electronic procedures to perform simple maintenance tasks. As a result of the Phase I study, three HUDs were down-selected to one. In the Phase II study, the HUD was compared against two other electronic display devices - a laptop computer and an e-book reader. Results suggested that adjustability and stability of the HUD display were the most significant acceptability factors to consider for near-eye displays. The Phase II study uncovered a number of advantages and disadvantages of the HUD relative to the laptop and e-book reader for interacting with electronic procedures.

  12. Does post-identification feedback affect evaluations of eyewitness testimony and identification procedures?

    PubMed

    Douglass, Amy Bradfield; Neuschatz, Jeffrey S; Imrich, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Miranda

    2010-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test whether post-identification feedback affects evaluations of eyewitnesses. In Experiment 1 (N = 156), evaluators viewed eyewitness testimony. They evaluated witnesses who received confirming post-identification feedback as more accurate and more confident, among other judgments, compared with witnesses who received disconfirming post-identification feedback or no feedback. This pattern persisted regardless of whether the witness's confidence statement was included in the testimony. In Experiment 2 (N = 161), witness evaluators viewed the actual identification procedure in which feedback was delivered. Instructions to disregard the feedback were manipulated. Again, witnesses who received confirming feedback were assessed more positively. This pattern occurred even when witness evaluators received instructions to disregard the feedback. These experiments are the first to confirm researchers' assumptions that feedback effects on witnesses translate to changes in judgments of those witnesses. PMID:19585229

  13. Advanced liquid and solid extraction procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizera, J.; Kučera, J.; Řanda, Z.; Lučaníková, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trioctyl-methyl-ammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented have been compared and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials.

  14. Evaluation of Shiryaev-Roberts Procedure for On-line Environmental Radiation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mara Mae

    An on-line radiation monitoring system that simultaneously concentrates and detects radioactivity is needed to detect an accidental leakage from a nuclear waste disposal facility or clandestine nuclear activity. Previous studies have shown that classical control chart methods can be applied to on-line radiation monitoring data to quickly detect these events as they occur; however, Bayesian control chart methods were not included in these studies. This work will evaluate the performance of a Bayesian control chart method, the Shiryaev-Roberts (SR) procedure, compared to classical control chart methods, Shewhart 3-sigma and cumulative sum (CUSUM), for use in on-line radiation monitoring of 99Tc in water using extractive scintillating resin. Measurements were collected by pumping solutions containing 0.1-5 Bq/L of 99Tc, as 99T cO4-, through a flow cell packed with extractive scintillating resin coupled to a Beta-RAM Model 5 HPLC detector. While 99T cO4- accumulated on the resin, simultaneous measurements were acquired in 10-s intervals and then re-binned to 100-s intervals. The Bayesian statistical method, Shiryaev-Roberts procedure, and classical control chart methods, Shewhart 3-sigma and cumulative sum (CUSUM), were applied to the data using statistical algorithms developed in MATLAB RTM. Two SR control charts were constructed using Poisson distributions and Gaussian distributions to estimate the likelihood ratio, and are referred to as Poisson SR and Gaussian SR to indicate the distribution used to calculate the statistic. The Poisson and Gaussian SR methods required as little as 28.9 mL less solution at 5 Bq/L and as much as 170 mL less solution at 0.5 Bq/L to exceed the control limit than the Shewhart 3-sigma method. The Poisson SR method needed as little as 6.20 mL less solution at 5 Bq/L and up to 125 mL less solution at 0.5 Bq/L to exceed the control limit than the CUSUM method. The Gaussian SR and CUSUM method required comparable solution volumes for test

  15. Evaluation of Early and Intermediate Outcomes of Cryo-MazeProcedure for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Alireza; Rostamzadeh, Mohsen; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Parvizi, Rezayat; Imani, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in patients with mitral valve disease affecting 50% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery, contributing to increased risks of systemic embolization, anticoagulant- related hemorrhage and mortality. The maze procedure is an effective way to treat AF. Over the last several years, cryoablation was substituted for atrial incision in many reports to simplify the maze procedure. However, few studies have been carried out to evaluate the results of cryoablation surgery. In the present study we evaluated the results of this procedure. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 47 AF patients were treated with Cryo-Maze surgery method. Rhythm assessment using electrocardiographic and echocardiographic survey was performed in all patients before surgery, during the patients’ hospital stay, on discharge and after six months. Results: Survival rate of the studied patients at six months was 93.6%. Sinus rhythm restoration rate in Cryo-Maze patients was 72.1% on discharge and 76.7% six months after their operation. Conclusion: The present study revealed that Cryo-Maze procedure is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in AF while normal sinus rhythm can be achieved in patients following this intervention. PMID:24251012

  16. Proceduralism and its role in economic evaluation and priority setting in health.

    PubMed

    Jan, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides a critical overview of Gavin Mooney's proceduralist approach to economic evaluation and priority setting in health. Proceduralism is the notion that the social value attached to alternative courses of action should be determined not only by outcomes, but also processes. Mooney's brand of proceduralism was unique and couched within a broader critique of 'neo-liberal' economics. It operated on a number of levels. At the micro level of the individual program, he pioneered the notion that 'process utility' could be valued and measured within economic evaluation. At a macro level, he developed a framework in which the social objective of equity was defined by procedural justice in which communitarian values were used as the basis for judging how resources should be allocated across the health system. Finally, he applied the notion of procedural justice to further our understanding of the political economy of resource allocation; highlighting how fairness in decision making processes can overcome the sometimes intractable zero-sum resource allocation problem. In summary, his contributions to this field have set the stage for innovative programs of research to help in developing health policies and programs that are both in alignment with community values and implementable. PMID:24647102

  17. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure. PMID:8754724

  18. Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Allen B.

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native

  19. Hardware Testing and System Evaluation: Procedures to Evaluate Commodity Hardware for Production Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, J

    2004-02-27

    Without stable hardware any program will fail. The frustration and expense of supporting bad hardware can drain an organization, delay progress, and frustrate everyone involved. At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we have created a testing method that helps our group, SLAC Computer Services (SCS), weed out potentially bad hardware and purchase the best hardware at the best possible cost. Commodity hardware changes often, so new evaluations happen periodically each time we purchase systems and minor re-evaluations happen for revised systems for our clusters, about twice a year. This general framework helps SCS perform correct, efficient evaluations. This article outlines SCS's computer testing methods and our system acceptance criteria. We expanded the basic ideas to other evaluations such as storage, and we think the methods outlined in this article has helped us choose hardware that is much more stable and supportable than our previous purchases. We have found that commodity hardware ranges in quality, so systematic method and tools for hardware evaluation were necessary. This article is based on one instance of a hardware purchase, but the guidelines apply to the general problem of purchasing commodity computer systems for production computational work.

  20. A Markov Chain Model for evaluating the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    A Markov Chain Model has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures. The model is applicable for surveillance systems that monitor a collection of assets by randomly selecting and inspecting the assets. The model provides an estimate of the detection probability as a function of the amount of time that an adversary would require to steal or sabotage the asset. An interactive computer code has been written to perform the necessary computations.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  2. Procedures to evaluate the efficiency of protective clothing worn by operators applying pesticide.

    PubMed

    Espanhol-Soares, Melina; Nociti, Leticia A S; Machado-Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2013-10-01

    The evaluation of the efficiency of whole-body protective clothing against pesticides has already been carried out through field tests and procedures defined by international standards, but there is a need to determine the useful life of these garments to ensure worker safety. The aim of this article is to compare the procedures for evaluating efficiency of two whole-body protective garments, both new and previously used by applicators of herbicides, using a laboratory test with a mannequin and in the field with the operator. The evaluation of the efficiency of protective clothing used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, leading to a proposal for classification according to efficiency, and determination of the useful life of protective clothing for use against pesticides, based on a quantitative assessment. The procedures used were in accordance with the standards of the modified American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1359:2007 and International Organization for Standardization 17491-4. The protocol used in the field was World Health Organization Vector Biology and Control (VBC)/82.1. Clothing tested was personal water repellent and pesticide protective. Two varieties of fabric were tested: Beige (100% cotton) and Camouflaged (31% polyester and 69% cotton). The efficiency in exposure control of the personal protective clothing was measured before use and after 5, 10, 20, and 30 uses and washes under field conditions. Personal protective clothing was worn by workers in the field during the application of the herbicide glyphosate on weed species in mature sugar cane plantations using a knapsack sprayer. The modified ASTM 1359:2007 procedure was chosen as the most appropriate due to its greater repeatability (lower coefficient of variation). This procedure provides quantitative evaluation needed to determine the efficiency and useful life of individual protective clothing, not just at specific points of failure, but according to dermal

  3. Performance evaluation tests of new laboratory procedures or devices: practical reporting criteria.

    PubMed

    Bridson, E

    1993-06-01

    The publication of papers reporting evaluations of new laboratory procedures and devices has increased rapidly in recent years. As more commercial systems emerge in the market place, and laboratory-based systems disappear, the potential user of the new system turns to his peers for opinions about the function of such systems. Unfortunately, many published reports lack statistical guidance and the reader is too often faced with a recitative about percentage differences and probabilities of significance, frequently reported on unacceptably small sample numbers. This communication offers guidance to those seeking to produce evaluation reports that will be of practical value to others. PMID:8219922

  4. A ruggedness evaluation of procedures for damage threshold testing optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Wise, Stephanie A.; Tappan, Nina D.

    1995-01-01

    A ruggedness evaluation of approaches to damage threshold testing was performed to determine the influence of three procedural variables on damage threshold data. The differences between the number of test sites evaluated at an applied fluence level (1 site versus 10 sites), the number of laser pulses at each test site (1 pulse versus 200 pulses), and the beam diameter (0.35 mm versus 0.70 mm) were all found to significantly influence the damage threshold data over a 99-percent confidence interval.

  5. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part III-B: Calculation Procedures for Step-Feed Process Responses and Addendum No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the third in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. This document deals with the calculation procedures associated with a step-feed process. Illustrations and examples are included to…

  6. Use of the activated clotting time in anticoagulation monitoring of intravascular procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, J; Ferguson, J J

    1993-01-01

    The activated clotting time first came into clinical use in the mid-1970s to guide the administration and reversal of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The explosive growth of cardiopulmonary bypass led to the development of automated techniques for measuring activated clotting times. Recent advances in the field of interventional cardiology have emphasized the importance of the coagulation cascade and the need for the prevention of thrombosis with anticoagulant drugs. The activated clotting time has emerged as an important means of monitoring and guiding heparin therapy during invasive intravascular procedures. This review focuses on the following topics: 1) the development of anticoagulation monitoring techniques; 2) current alternatives in bedside anticoagulation monitoring; and 3) the clinical application of activated clotting times outside surgery. Until prospective studies can establish appropriate "target" activated-clotting-time values for interventional procedures, procedural anticoagulation must be guided empirically. Nevertheless, the activated clotting time is extremely useful in the catheterization laboratory, for monitoring heparin therapy and the adequacy of anticoagulation. PMID:8298321

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area, 2004-2006 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Wagoner, Sara

    2006-05-01

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Management Area (LMWA) in May 2005. The 2005 HEP assessment resulted in a total of 647.44 HUs, or 0.76 HUs/acre. This is an increase of 420.34 HUs (0.49 HUs/acre) over 2001 HEP survey results. The most significant increase in HUs occurred on the Wallender and Simonis parcels which increased by 214.30 HUs and 177.49 HUs respectively. Transects were established at or near 2001 HEP analysis transect locations whenever possible. ODFW staff biologists assisted the RHT re-establish transect locations and/or suggested areas for new surveys. Since 2001, significant changes in cover type acreage and/or structural conditions have occurred due to conversion of agriculture cover types to emergent wetland and grassland cover types. Agricultural lands were seeded to reestablish grasslands and wetlands were restored through active management and manipulation of extant water sources including natural stream hydrology/flood regimes and available irrigation. Grasslands increased on the Wallender parcel by 21% (65 acres), 23% (71 acres) at the Simonis site, and 39% (62 acres) at Conley Lake. The emergent wetland cover type also changed significantly increasing 60% (184 acres) at Wallender and 59% (184 acres) on the Simonis tract. Today, agriculture lands (crop and grazed pasture) have been nearly eliminated from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation project lands located on the LMWA.

  8. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  9. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 242 - Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data C Appendix C to Part 242 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... CERTIFICATION OF CONDUCTORS Pt. 242, App. C Appendix C to Part 242—Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 240 - Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor... Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data The purpose of this appendix is to outline the procedures... that railroads consider the motor vehicle driving record of each person prior to issuing him or...

  11. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 242 - Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating Motor Vehicle Driving Record Data C Appendix C to Part 242 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... CERTIFICATION OF CONDUCTORS Pt. 242, App. C Appendix C to Part 242—Procedures for Obtaining and Evaluating...

  12. Assessing Nontraditional Education. Summary Report of the Project to Develop Evaluative Criteria and Procedures for the Accreditation of Nontraditional Education. Volume 1, September 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Grover J.

    A study was undertaken for the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation to develop evaluative criteria and procedures for the accreditation of nontraditional education. The summary report presents the major activities and findings of the study. The Introduction gives its history and background and outlines its scope, including the goals,…

  13. Evaluation of intranasal Midazolam spray as a sedative in pediatric patients for radiological imaging procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Anisha A.; Patel, Vipul R.; Chauhan, Parthiv R.; Patel, Deep J.; Chadha, Indu A.; Ramani, Monal N.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Preoperative anxiety and uncooperativeness experienced by pediatric patients are commonly associated with postoperative behavioral problems. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal Midazolam as a sedative in a pediatric age group for radiological imaging procedures and to note onset of sedation, level of sedation, condition of patient during separation from parents and effect on the cardio-respiratory system. Settings and Design: Randomized double-blinded study. Subjects and Methods: Fifty patients of the pediatric age group of American Society of Anesthesiologist grade 2 and 3 who came for any radiological imaging procedures were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to receive, intranasally, either Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg (group A N = 25) or normal saline (group B N = 25) in both nostrils (0.25 mg/kg in each) 15 min before the procedure. Time for onset of sedation and satisfactory sedation, sedation score, separation score, hemodynamic changes and side-effects were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test. Results: Intranasal Midazolam group had a significantly shorter time for onset of sedation and satisfactory sedation. Mean sedation score and mean separation score at 10 min and 15 min intervals were significant in intranasal Midazolam as compared with normal saline (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Intranasal Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg is safe and effective and provides adequate sedation for easy separation from the parents and reduced requirement of intravenous supplementation during radiological imaging procedures without any untoward side-effects. PMID:25885831

  14. Reducing the cost of evaluating the committor by a fitting procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2015-11-01

    Correct identification of reaction coordinates in complex systems is essential for understanding the mechanisms of their reaction dynamics. Existing methods for identifying reaction coordinates typically require knowledge of the committor—the probability of a given configuration to reach the product basin. The high computational cost of evaluating committors has limited applications of methods for identifying reaction coordinates. We proposed a fitting procedure that can reduce the cost of evaluating committors by an order of magnitude or more. The method only requires evaluating the committors of a few configurations in a transition path by the standard and costly shooting procedure. The committors of the other configurations are then estimated with great accuracy by a sigmoid function derived from fitting the few numerically evaluated committors. The method has been systematically tested on a model system of a Brownian particle moving in a one-dimensional double-well potential, and a small biomolecular system—the isomerization of alanine dipeptide in vacuum and in explicit water.

  15. Simplified procedure for evaluating liquefaction potential under ocean trench type long period earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Nozomu; Ohya, Yousuke; Sawada, Sumio; Nakamura, Susumu

    A simplified method for evaluating liquefaction potential under ocean trench type long period earthquakes. Since there is no experience on damage or liquefaction under this type of earthquake, effective stress analyses are made on more than 200 sites that are used in the past investigation on liquefaction damage. Accuracy or effectiveness of existing simplified methods is investigated, and is found that they are applicable to near field earthquake, but they result in dangerous evaluation under ocean trench type earthquakes such as artificial earthquake for coming Tonankai earthquake and recorded accelerogram during the Tokachi-oki earthquake of 2003. The reason is found to be effective number of loading cycles; it is about 10 times larger than that considered in the existing simplified procedure. Then a correction factor for liquefaction strength is proposed in order to evaluate liquefaction potential under this type of earthquakes. The factor is a half of the factor in the existing method; liquefaction strength is to be half of the conventional value when comparing maximum shear stress to evaluate FL value. This method works so that dangerous ratio (ratio of number of layers where onset of liquefaction is identified under effective stress analysis but is not identified under existing simplified procedure to the total number of layers) becomes small to be the same order under near field earthquake.

  16. Evaluating Active U: an internet-mediated physical activity program

    PubMed Central

    Buis, Lorraine R; Poulton, Timothy A; Holleman, Robert G; Sen, Ananda; Resnick, Paul J; Goodrich, David E; Palma-Davis, LaVaughn; Richardson, Caroline R

    2009-01-01

    Background Engaging in regular physical activity can be challenging, particularly during the winter months. To promote physical activity at the University of Michigan during the winter months, an eight-week Internet-mediated program (Active U) was developed providing participants with an online physical activity log, goal setting, motivational emails, and optional team participation and competition. Methods This study is a program evaluation of Active U. Approximately 47,000 faculty, staff, and graduate students were invited to participate in the online Active U intervention in the winter of 2007. Participants were assigned a physical activity goal and were asked to record each physical activity episode into the activity log for eight weeks. Statistics for program reach, effectiveness, adoption, and implementation were calculated using the Re-Aim framework. Multilevel regression analyses were used to assess the decline in rates of data entry and goal attainment during the program, to assess the likelihood of joining a team by demographic characteristics, to test the association between various predictors and the number of weeks an individual met his or her goal, and to analyze server load. Results Overall, 7,483 individuals registered with the Active U website (≈16% of eligible), and 79% participated in the program by logging valid data at least once. Staff members, older participants, and those with a BMI < 25 were more likely to meet their weekly physical activity goals, and average rate of meeting goals was higher among participants who joined a competitive team compared to those who participated individually (IRR = 1.28, P < .001). Conclusion Internet-mediated physical activity interventions that focus on physical activity logging and goal setting while incorporating team competition may help a significant percentage of the target population maintain their physical activity during the winter months. PMID:19744311

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native

  18. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Evaluate Current Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marszalek, Jolanta; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Rutkowska, Izabela; Kosmol, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the value of ecological momentary assessment in evaluating physical activity among children, adolescents, and adults. It also determines whether ecological momentary assessment fulfills the criteria of validity, reliability, objectivity, norms, and standardization applied to the tools used for the evaluation of physical activity. Methods. The EBSCO-CINHAL, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, and SPORTDiscuss databases were reviewed in December 2012 for articles associated with EMA. Results. Of the 20 articles examined, half (10) used electronic methods for data collection, although various methods were used, ranging from pen and paper to smartphone applications. Ten studies used objective monitoring equipment. Nineteen studies were performed over 4 days. While the validity of the EMA method was discussed in 18 studies, only four found it to be objective. In all cases, the EMA procedures were precisely documented and confirmed to be feasible. Conclusions. Ecological momentary assessment is a valid, reliable, and feasible approach to evaluate activity and sedentary behavior. Researchers should be aware that while ecological momentary assessment offers many benefits, it simultaneously imposes many limitations which should be considered when studying physical activity. PMID:25126580

  19. The vehicle design evaluation program - A computer-aided design procedure for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, B. H.; Kruse, G. S.; Schrader, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The vehicle design evaluation program is described. This program is a computer-aided design procedure that provides a vehicle synthesis capability for vehicle sizing, external load analysis, structural analysis, and cost evaluation. The vehicle sizing subprogram provides geometry, weight, and balance data for aircraft using JP, hydrogen, or methane fuels. The structural synthesis subprogram uses a multistation analysis for aerodynamic surfaces and fuselages to develop theoretical weights and geometric dimensions. The parts definition subprogram uses the geometric data from the structural analysis and develops the predicted fabrication dimensions, parts material raw stock buy requirements, and predicted actual weights. The cost analysis subprogram uses detail part data in conjunction with standard hours, realization factors, labor rates, and material data to develop the manufacturing costs. The program is used to evaluate overall design effects on subsonic commercial type aircraft due to parameter variations.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

  1. Simplified inelastic analysis procedure to evaluate a butt-welded elbow end

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalla, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    In a thin-walled piping network, the end of an elbow welded to a straignt pipe constitutes one of the highly stressed cross-sections that require structural evaluation. Explicit rules are not provided in the ASME Code for structural evaluation of the elbow ovalization and fabrication effects at the welded end. This paper presents a conservative semi-analytical procedure that can be used with simplified inelastic analysis to evaluate the elbow cross section welded to the straight pipe. The concept of carry-over factors is used to obtain ovalization stresses or strains at the elbow end. The stresses introduced by material and geometric nonuniformities in the fabrication process are then added to the ovalization stresses to complete structural evluation of the girth butt-welded elbow joint.

  2. Object relations theory and activity theory: a proposed link by way of the procedural sequence model.

    PubMed

    Ryle, A

    1991-12-01

    An account of object relations theory (ORT), represented in terms of the procedural sequence model (PSM), is compared to the ideas of Vygotsky and activity theory (AT). The two models are seen to be compatible and complementary and their combination offers a satisfactory account of human psychology, appropriate for the understanding and integration of psychotherapy. PMID:1786224

  3. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR TRANSLATING VIDEOTAPES OF CHILD ACTIVITIES (SOP-4.13)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA will conduct a two-day video translation workshop to demonstrate to coders the procedures for translating the activity patterns of preschool children on videotape. The coders will be required to pass reliability tests to successfully complete the training requirements of ...

  4. Operational Control Procedures for the Activated Sludge Process, Part I - Observations, Part II - Control Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Alfred W.

    This is the first in a series of documents developed by the National Training and Operational Technology Center describing operational control procedures for the activated sludge process used in wastewater treatment. Part I of this document deals with physical observations which should be performed during each routine control test. Part II…

  5. 78 FR 7939 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    .... 75 FR 42579, 42581. In addition, in comments received in response to a separate test procedure notice... referred to as the June 2012 NODA). 77 FR 33106. In the June 2012 NODA, DOE presented test results from... single compartment. 78 FR 4015, 4018 (Jan. 18, 2013). For the purpose of this active mode test...

  6. Rhythms of Dialogue and Referential Activity: Implicit Process across Procedural and Verbal Realms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the relationship between implicit procedural and implicit verbal processes as they occur in natural adult conversation. Theoretical insights and empirical findings are rooted in a move towards integration of Bucci's "Referential Activity" (RA) and "Multiple Code" perspectives and Beebe and Jaffe's "Dyadic Systems" and "Rhythms…

  7. Small Schools Mathematics Curriculum, 9-12: Scope Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, JoAnne, Ed.; And Others

    The grade 9-12 mathematics curriculum learning objectives, activities, monitoring procedures and resources for small schools were developed during 1978-79 through the cooperative efforts of 10 Snohomish and Island County school districts, Educational Service District 189 and the Washington State Office of Public Instruction. The objectives were…

  8. Small Schools Health Curriculum, K-3: Scope, Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInerney, Mike, Ed.; Destito, Therese, Ed.

    The K-3 health curriculum developed during 1975-77 by teachers in small school districts working with district and state health education specialists presents student learning objectives and suggested activities, monitoring procedures and resources which are correlated to the 10 Goals for Washington Common Schools and the nine Small Schools Health…

  9. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  10. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  11. [Aging and cognitive slowing: example of attentional processes--evaluation procedures and related questions].

    PubMed

    Eusop, E; Sebban, C; Piette, F

    2001-01-01

    Slowing is generally associated to ageing. It appears in motor's functions and in cognitive tasks. What is the real nature of this slowing? Is it a general slowing concerning every cognitive processes with the same scale or is this slowing specific of only processes. Or, at least, is it of different magnitude for each cognitive processes? The aim of this paper is to present the state of this debate from results obtained in studies orientated toward attentional processes. Attention allows us to adapt oneself to environment that require in one hand selective mechanisms for pertinence events and in other hand inhibitory mechanisms for interferences. To evaluate these mechanisms priming and cueing procedures are used. Using primes (semantic or conceptual) results in shorter reaction time than for conditions without prime. In some experimental conditions, negative primes can be observed which results for longer reaction time. In these procedures, we need to be careful to the SOA's value (Stimulus Onset Asynchrony) (it represents the time between the end of the prime or cue presentation and the beginning of the stimulus presentation). The longer is the SOA, the shorter is the reaction time increase with a SOA between 200 ms and 400 ms. In these procedures, we now have to understand in the field of information processing what causes this reaction time modification. In other words, increase of reaction time with SOA could be explain increase of all stages of treatment or may be also the consequence of some abolition's of stages? In attentional procedures, we have to consider the automatic or controlled nature of cognitive processes. In target research tasks that implies selective attention, several authors have showed a distinction between automatic and controlled processing. Time to detect prompts increase generally with the distractor number excepted when the prompt is prominent for the subject (because of physical or emotional characteristics). In this second case, the

  12. Laboratory study of the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study was used to evaluate the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Fourteen insecticides, one degradation product, and one synergist were spiked into organic-grade water and carried through toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Concentrations of each compound were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. During Phase I, the water sample was pumped through a C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with methanol. Dimethoate was not removed by the extraction, but remained in the rinsate. In contrast, permethrin was removed by the extraction, but was not recovered by the methanol elution, and 80 percent of the permethrin remained on the cartridge, teflon tubing, and glassware. Chlorpyrifos also was not recovered completely with the methanol elution (only 62 percent was recovered). The other insecticides were extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and recovered by elution with methanol (80 percent or greater). During Phase II, a new spiked water sample was extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with varying concentrations of methanol and water into different fractions. Each methanol:water fraction was analyzed for the added compounds. Most of the insecticides eluted in two fractions, with concentrations of 10 percent or greater. The largest number of insecticides eluted in the 75 percent methanol:water fraction.

  13. Evaluation of a procedure to assess the adverse effects of illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    van Amsterdam, J G C; Best, W; Opperhuizen, A; de Wolff, F A

    2004-02-01

    The assessment procedure of new synthetic illicit drugs that are not documented in the UN treaty on psychotropic drugs was evaluated using a modified Electre model. Drugs were evaluated by an expert panel via the open Delphi approach, where the written score was discussed on 16 items, covering medical, health, legal, and criminalistic issues of the drugs. After this face-to-face discussion the drugs were scored again. Taking the assessment of ketamine as an example, it appeared that each expert used its own scale to score, and that policymakers do not score deviant from experts trained in the medical-biological field. Of the five drugs evaluated by the panel, p-methoxy-metamphetamine (PMMA), gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), and 4-methylthio-amphetamine (MTA) were assessed as more adverse than ketamine and psilocine and psilocybine-containing mushrooms. Whereas some experts slightly adjusted during the assessment procedure their opinion on ketamine and PMMA, the opinion on mushrooms was not affected by the discussion held between the two scoring rounds. All experts rank the five drugs in a similar way on the adverse effect scale i.e., concordance scale of the Electre model, indicating unanimity in the expert panel with respect to the risk classification of these abused drugs. PMID:14746774

  14. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures. PMID:26078779

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) assessment for thermal mitigation alternatives for C and K reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Davis, C.E.; Price, L.M.; Fay, W.; Ezra, C.E.

    1987-10-01

    The potential effects on wildlife of the implementation of thermal mitigation alternatives for C and K reactors were evaluated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and modified by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for the Savannah River Plant (SRP) environment. These procedures allow for the relative ranking of project alternatives and/or mitigation with respect to representative wildlife species over the life of the project or for selected time periods in the future. The Department of Energy-Savannah River was requested by the FWS to provide a HEP analysis for the cooling water alternatives for C and K reactors during the comment period on the Draft Thermal Mitigation Environment Impact Statement, Alternative Cooling Water Systems (DOE, 1986). For C and K reactors the potential wildlife impacts and/or benefits of once-through and recirculating cooling towers were evaluated for both near-term (30-year) and long-term (100-year) time periods.

  16. Influencing Preschoolers' Free-Play Activity Preferences: An Evaluation of Satiation and Embedded Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Gregory P.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Cammilleri, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of classwide satiation and embedded reinforcement procedures on preschoolers' activity preferences during scheduled free-play periods. The goal of the study was to increase time allocation to originally nonpreferred, but important, activities (instructional zone, library, and science) while continuing to…

  17. An international evaluation of the murine local lymph node assay and comparison of modified procedures.

    PubMed

    Kimber, I; Hilton, J; Dearman, R J; Gerberick, G F; Ryan, C A; Basketter, D A; Scholes, E W; Ladics, G S; Loveless, S E; House, R V

    1995-11-20

    The murine local lymph node assay is a predictive test for the identification of skin-sensitizing chemicals. The method has been the subject both of national inter-laboratory studies and of extensive comparisons with guinea pig tests. In the investigations reported here, the local lymph node assay has been evaluated further in the context of an international study comprising five independent laboratories. In addition, the influence of minor modifications to the standard assay procedure on the performance of the test has been examined. The modified procedures investigated were exposure of mice for 4 rather than 3 consecutive days, excision of lymph nodes 4 rather than 5 days after the initiation of exposure and the use of an alternative isotope. All five laboratories, irrespective of whether the standard or a modified protocol was used, were able to identify accurately, and with comparable sensitivity, potassium dichromate and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene as skin sensitizers. Using standard criteria, none of the laboratories recorded positive responses with methyl salicylate, a non-sensitizer. In the standard protocol, lymph nodes are pooled for each experimental group and the vigor of responses measured as a stimulation index relative to vehicle controls. A stimulation index of 3 or greater is considered to indicate skin-sensitizing potential. One further modification adopted by three of the laboratories was to analyze nodes from individual animals and, thereby, permit statistical evaluation. This allowed a direct comparison of statistical significance with the conventional stimulation index as criteria for a positive response. The data indicate that, while statistical evaluation may provide, in some instances, for small increases in sensitivity, this may be at the expense of some loss of selectivity. There are, however, insufficient data presently to draw firm conclusions regarding the relative value of statistical analysis. These studies demonstrate that the local

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  19. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  20. 31 CFR 1025.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. 1025.520 Section 1025.520... Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1025.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. (a) Refer to § 1010.520...

  1. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  2. 31 CFR 1025.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. 1025.520 Section 1025.520... Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1025.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. (a) Refer to § 1010.520...

  3. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  4. 31 CFR 1025.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. 1025.520 Section 1025.520... Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1025.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. (a) Refer to § 1010.520...

  5. 31 CFR 1025.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. 1025.520 Section 1025.520... Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1025.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for insurance companies. (a) Refer to § 1010.520...

  6. 31 CFR 1023.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers in securities. 1023.520... Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1023.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for brokers or dealers...

  7. Multi-function microsystem for cells migration analysis and evaluation of photodynamic therapy procedure in coculture

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska (Jedrych), Elzbieta; Grabowska-Jadach, Ilona; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is an important physiological process, which is involved in cancer metastasis. Therefore, the investigation of cell migration may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we have successfully developed a microsystem for culture of two cell types (non-malignant and carcinoma) and for analysis of cell migration dependence on distance between them. Finally, we studied quantitatively the influence of photodynamic therapy (PDT) procedures on the viability of pairs of non-malignant (MRC5 or Balb/3T3) and carcinoma (A549) cells coculture. The proposed geometry of the microsystem allowed for separate introduction of two cell lines and analysis of cells migration dependence on distance between the cells. We found that a length of connecting microchannel has an influence on cell migration and viability of non-malignant cells after PDT procedure. Summarizing, the developed microsystem can constitute a new tool for carrying out experiments, which offers a few functions: cell migration analysis, carcinoma and non-malignant cells coculture, and evaluation of PDT procedure in the various steps of cell migration. PMID:24339849

  8. Evaluation of a rapid method for the quantitative estimation of coliforms in meat by impedimetric procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Martins, S B; Selby, M J

    1980-01-01

    A 24-h instrumental procedure is described for the quantitative estimation of coliforms in ground meat. The method is simple and rapid, and it requires but a single sample dilution and four replicates. The data are recorded automatically and can be used to estimate coliforms in the range of 100 to 10,000 organisms per g. The procedure is an impedance detection time (IDT) method using a new medium, tested against 131 stock cultures, that markedly enhances the impedance response of gram-negative organisms, and it is selective for coliforms. Seventy samples of ground beef were analyzed for coliforms by the IDT method and the conventional three-dilution, two-step most-probable-number test tube procedure. Seventy-nine percent of the impedimetric estimates fell within the 95% confidence limits of the most-probable-number values. This corresponds to the criteria used to evaluate other coliform tests, with the added advantage of a single dilution and more rapid results. PMID:6992712

  9. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures. PMID:25790729

  10. 3,3,5-Trimethylcyclohexanols and derived esters: green synthetic procedures, odour evaluation and in vitro skin cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, R; Villa, C; Baldassari, S; Mariani, E; Parodi, A; Bassi, A M

    2006-12-01

    The alcohols 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanols (cis, trans epimers, cosmetic fragrance) and some derived esters, potential and well-known actives in the cosmetic field, such as Homosalate, were synthesized using fast solvent-free methodologies with the aim of renewing and simplifying the conventional procedures. The alcohols were prepared by reduction of 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone (dihydroisophorone) with sodium borohydride/alumina in solid state. The esters from propanoic, butanoic, octanoic, 10-undecenoic, cyclopropanecarboxylic, mandelic and salicylic acids were synthesized with microwave-mediated solvent-free procedures under acidic and basic catalysis. Several experiments were carried out to study advantages and limits of the selected methodologies and the results are reported. Microwave irradiation was carried out using a scientific monomode reactor. In order to evaluate the cosmetic interest of the studied compounds, the sweet-scented substances were submitted to an odour evaluation test; the most promising fragrances and the ester from 10-undecenoic acid, as an example of lipophilic derivatives, were tested to assess their in vitro skin toxicity. Résumé PMID:18489288

  11. Qualitative evaluation of the supporting system for diagnosis procedure combination code selection.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Toshio; Takemura, Tadamasa; Kume, Naoto; Adachi, Takayuki; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Tadasu; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, medical staff must select a diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) code for each inpatient upon admission. We report on the development and evaluation of a supporting system for DPC code selection. This system, based on a machine learning method developed by Okamoto et al., makes DPC code suggestions that are derived from medical practice information pertaining to inpatients. The use of the suggestions helps medical staff select an appropriate DPC code for each inpatient. We asked health information management professionals to evaluate the system and to compare the suggested DPC codes with those selected by doctors. They reported that the system was generally useful and that using this system they could find some cases of hospitalized patients whose DPC codes needed correction. However, they also determined the precision of the system needs improvement. PMID:23920805

  12. Criteria for Preparing, Evaluating, and Standardizing Iodinated Globulins for Radioimmunoassay Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Harriet D.; Ziegler, Donald W.

    1974-01-01

    Procedures were examined for labeling immune globulins with radioactive iodine using chloramine-T as the oxidizing agent. The chloramine-T method was critically evaluated to establish the optimal conditions for preparing iodinated globulins with high specific radioactivities without impairing their immunospecificities for use in in vitro radioimmunoassays. The results showed that the use of 100 μg of chloramine-T per ml, 500 to 1,000 μCi of Na 125I per mg of protein, and a 10-min oxidation reaction time produced globulins of both high specific radioactivities and immunospecificities. Criteria were established for evaluating and determining optimal concentrations of iodine-labeled globulin for use in radioimmunoassays. The results of this investigation indicated that the amount of labeled indicator globulin used in radioimmunoassays should be based upon protein concentration rather than radioactivity. PMID:4141599

  13. A universal procedure for evaluation and application of surge-protective devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The source, nature, and frequency of occurrence of transients must be identified and a representative standard test wave chosen for proof testing. The performance of candidate suppressor devices then can be evaluated against the withstand goals set for the equipment. The various suppressors divide into two classes of generic behavior. The key to a universal procedure for evaluating both classes lies in representing transients as quasi-current sources of defined current impulse duration. The available surge current is established by the Thevenin equivalent transient voltage and source impedance. A load line drawn on the V-I characteristic graph of the suppressor quickly determines the clamping voltage and peak current. These values then can be compared to the requirement. The deposited energy and average power dissipation for multiple transients also can be calculated. The method is illustrated with a design example for motor vehicle alternator load dump suppression.

  14. 76 FR 9849 - Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities SUMMARY: The Department of State gives notice of the availability of two draft Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations (CEEs) for activities... Evaluation: Construction and Operation of Jang Bogo Antarctic Research Station, Terra Nova Bay,...

  15. Optimizing experimental procedures for quantitative evaluation of crop plant performance in high throughput phenotyping systems

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Astrid; Muraya, Moses M.; Weigelt-Fischer, Kathleen; Arana-Ceballos, Fernando; Klukas, Christian; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Riewe, David; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Detailed and standardized protocols for plant cultivation in environmentally controlled conditions are an essential prerequisite to conduct reproducible experiments with precisely defined treatments. Setting up appropriate and well defined experimental procedures is thus crucial for the generation of solid evidence and indispensable for successful plant research. Non-invasive and high throughput (HT) phenotyping technologies offer the opportunity to monitor and quantify performance dynamics of several hundreds of plants at a time. Compared to small scale plant cultivations, HT systems have much higher demands, from a conceptual and a logistic point of view, on experimental design, as well as the actual plant cultivation conditions, and the image analysis and statistical methods for data evaluation. Furthermore, cultivation conditions need to be designed that elicit plant performance characteristics corresponding to those under natural conditions. This manuscript describes critical steps in the optimization of procedures for HT plant phenotyping systems. Starting with the model plant Arabidopsis, HT-compatible methods were tested, and optimized with regard to growth substrate, soil coverage, watering regime, experimental design (considering environmental inhomogeneities) in automated plant cultivation and imaging systems. As revealed by metabolite profiling, plant movement did not affect the plants' physiological status. Based on these results, procedures for maize HT cultivation and monitoring were established. Variation of maize vegetative growth in the HT phenotyping system did match well with that observed in the field. The presented results outline important issues to be considered in the design of HT phenotyping experiments for model and crop plants. It thereby provides guidelines for the setup of HT experimental procedures, which are required for the generation of reliable and reproducible data of phenotypic variation for a broad range of applications. PMID

  16. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940’s, and during the last 10–15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence. PMID:26009706

  17. Evaluation of Acid Digestion Procedures to Estimate Mineral Contents in Materials from Animal Trials

    PubMed Central

    Palma, M. N. N.; Rocha, G. C.; Valadares Filho, S. C.; Detmann, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rigorously standardized laboratory protocols are essential for meaningful comparison of data from multiple sites. Considering that interactions of minerals with organic matrices may vary depending on the material nature, there could be peculiar demands for each material with respect to digestion procedure. Acid digestion procedures were evaluated using different nitric to perchloric acid ratios and one- or two-step digestion to estimate the concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in samples of carcass, bone, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Six procedures were evaluated: ratio of nitric to perchloric acid at 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 v/v in a one- or two-step digestion. There were no direct or interaction effects (p>0.01) of nitric to perchloric acid ratio or number of digestion steps on magnesium and zinc contents. Calcium and phosphorus contents presented a significant (p<0.01) interaction between sample type and nitric to perchloric acid ratio. Digestion solution of 2:1 v/v provided greater (p<0.01) recovery of calcium and phosphorus from bone samples than 3:1 and 4:1 v/v ratio. Different acid ratios did not affect (p>0.01) calcium or phosphorus contents in carcass, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Number of digestion steps did not affect mineral content (p>0.01). Estimated concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in carcass, excreta, concentrated, forage, and feces samples can be performed using digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 4:1 v/v in a one-step digestion. However, samples of bones demand a stronger digestion solution to analyze the mineral contents, which is represented by an increased proportion of perchloric acid, being recommended a digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 2:1 v/v in a one-step digestion. PMID:26333671

  18. Evaluation of an Enhanced Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing Procedure to Increase Early Vocalizations of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Barbara E.; Carr, James E.; Grow, Laura L.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence to support stimulus-stimulus pairing (SSP) in speech acquisition is less than robust, calling into question the ability of SSP to reliably establish automatically reinforcing properties of speech and limiting the procedure's clinical utility for increasing vocalizations. We evaluated the effects of a modified SSP procedure on…

  19. Evaluating Teaching and Research Activities--Finding the Right Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidal, Javier; Mora, Jose-Gines

    2003-01-01

    Analyzes on a national, regional, and institutional level the evaluation systems used to assess teaching and research activities at Spanish universities. Also examines ways in which evaluation systems orient to promote research activities to the detriment of teaching activities. (SWM)

  20. Radiological health risks to astronauts from space activities and medical procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Leif E.; Nachtwey, D. Stuart

    1990-01-01

    Radiation protection standards for space activities differ substantially from those applied to terrestrial working situations. The levels of radiation and subsequent hazards to which space workers are exposed are quite unlike anything found on Earth. The new more highly refined system of risk management involves assessing the risk to each space worker from all sources of radiation (occupational and non-occupational) at the organ level. The risk coefficients were applied to previous space and medical exposures (diagnostic x ray and nuclear medicine procedures) in order to estimate the radiation-induced lifetime cancer incidence and mortality risk. At present, the risk from medical procedures when compared to space activities is 14 times higher for cancer incidence and 13 times higher for cancer mortality; however, this will change as the per capita dose during Space Station Freedom and interplanetary missions increases and more is known about the risks from exposure to high-LET radiation.

  1. Radiological health risks to astronauts from space activities and medical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, L.E.; Nachtwey, D.S.

    1990-08-01

    Radiation protection standards for space activities differ substantially from those applied to terrestrial working situations. The levels of radiation and subsequent hazards to which space workers are exposed are quite unlike anything found on Earth. The new more highly refined system of risk management involves assessing the risk to each space worker from all sources of radiation (occupational and non-occupational) at the organ level. The risk coefficients were applied to previous space and medical exposures (diagnostic x ray and nuclear medicine procedures) in order to estimate the radiation-induced lifetime cancer incidence and mortality risk. At present, the risk from medical procedures when compared to space activities is 14 times higher for cancer incidence and 13 times higher for cancer mortality; however, this will change as the per capita dose during Space Station Freedom and interplanetary missions increases and more is known about the risks from exposure to high-LET radiation.

  2. An Inservice Program for Elementary Teachers: Components, Instructional Procedures, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, Willis J.; And Others

    A description and evaluation of a year-long science in-service program for elementary teachers is provided. Consisting of three components, the program was designed to expand teachers' understandings of physics and chemistry concepts and processes and to encourage more science teaching and science activities in their classrooms. The on-campus…

  3. Dose evaluation for skin and organ in hepatocellular carcinoma during angiographic procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiation dose in patients undergoing liver angiographic procedure and verify the usefulness of different dose measurements to prevent deterministic effects. Gafchromic film, MicroMOSFET data and DIAMENTOR device of the X-ray system were used to characterize the examined interventional radiology (IR) procedure. Materials and methods A liver embolization procedure, the SIRT (Selective Internal Radiation Therapy), was investigated. The exposure parameters from the DIAMENTOR as well as patient and geometrical data were registered. Entrance skin dose map obtained using Gafchromic film (ESDGAF) in a standard phantom as well as in 12 patients were used to calculate the maximum skin dose (MSDGAF). MicroMOSFETs were used to assess ESD in relevant points/areas. Moreover, the maximum value of five MicroMOSFETs array, due to the extension of treated area and to the relative distance of 2–3 cm of two adjacent MicroMOSFETs, was useful to predict the MSD without interfering with the clinical practice. PCXMC vers.1.5 was used to calculate effective dose (E) and equivalent dose (H). Results The mean dose-area product (DAPDIAMENTOR) for SIRT procedures was 166 Gycm2, although a wide range was observed. The mean MSDGAF for SIRT procedures was 1090 mGy, although a wide range was experienced. A correlation was found between the MSDGAF measured on a patient and the DAPDIAMENTOR value for liver embolizations. MOSFET and Gafchromic data were in agreement within 5% in homogeneous area and within 20% in high dose gradient regions. The mean equivalent dose in critical organs was 89.8 mSv for kidneys, 22.9 mSv for pancreas, 20.2 mSv for small intestine and 21.0 mSv for spleen. Whereas the mean E was 3.7 mSv (range: 0.5-13.7). Conclusions Gafchromic films result useful to study patient exposure and determine localization and amplitude of high dose skin areas to better predict the skin injuries. Then, DAPDIAMENTOR or MOSFET data

  4. 31 CFR 1026.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing... FUTURES COMMISSION MERCHANTS AND INTRODUCING BROKERS IN COMMODITIES Special Information Sharing Procedures... deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing...

  5. 31 CFR 1027.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or... Terrorist Activity § 1027.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and...

  6. 31 CFR 1027.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or... Terrorist Activity § 1027.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and...

  7. 31 CFR 1027.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or... Terrorist Activity § 1027.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and...

  8. 31 CFR 1027.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for dealers in precious metals, precious stones, or... Terrorist Activity § 1027.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and...

  9. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6... § 1311.6 What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? (a)...

  10. Evaluation of procedures for estimating ruminal particle turnover and diet digestibility in ruminant animals

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures used in estimating ruminal particle turnover and diet digestibility were evaluated in a series of independent experiments. Experiment 1 and 2 evaluated the influence of sampling site, mathematical model and intraruminal mixing on estimates of ruminal particle turnover in beef steers grazing crested wheatgrass or offered ad libitum levels of prairie hay once daily, respectively. Particle turnover rate constants were estimated by intraruminal administration (via rumen cannula) of ytterbium (Yb)-labeled forage, followed by serial collection of rumen digesta or fecal samples. Rumen Yb concentrations were transformed to natural logarithms and regressed on time. Influence of sampling site (rectum versus rumen) on turnover estimates was modified by the model used to fit fecal marker excretion curves in the grazing study. In contrast, estimated turnover rate constants from rumen sampling were smaller (P < 0.05) than rectally derived rate constants, regardless of fecal model used, when steers were fed once daily. In Experiment 3, in vitro residues subjected to acid or neutral detergent fiber extraction (IVADF and IVNDF), acid detergent fiber incubated in cellulase (ADFIC) and acid detergent lignin (ADL) were evaluated as internal markers for predicting diet digestibility. Both IVADF and IVNDF displayed variable accuracy for prediction of in vivo digestibility whereas ADL and ADFIC inaccurately predicted digestibility of all diets.

  11. Training Primary Care Physicians in Flexible Sigmoidoscopy—Performance Evaluation of 17, 167 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Groveman, Howard D.; Sanowski, Robert A.; Klauber, Melville R.

    1988-01-01

    The flexible fiber-optic sigmoidoscope is rapidly replacing the rigid sigmoidoscope in routine screening for colorectal cancer. This study was undertaken to evaluate the safety, usage pattern, and efficacy of fiber-optic sigmoidoscopy by evaluating the outcome of training and the results of procedures carried out by a group of primary care physicians. Of 1,153 participants in one-day flexible sigmoidoscopy workshops, 764 (66%) returned questionnaires evaluating their experiences following this training. Of these, 438 physicians had obtained a flexible sigmoidoscope, used it frequently, and had done a total of 17,167 examinations. The average time of scope usage was nine months. Although additional supervised training was suggested at the time of the workshop, 68% of physicians began doing flexible sigmoidoscopy without it. A total of 465 polyps and 153 cancers were detected by the study group for an overall detection rate of 2.7% for polyps and 0.9% for cancers. Four complications were reported. This study indicates that the technique of flexible sigmoidoscopy is readily learned, is diagnostically productive, and is reasonably safe in the hands of primary care physicians. PMID:3348037

  12. Procedures to Evaluate the Magnitudes and Effects of Total Water Levels at USACE Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, H.; White, K.

    2014-12-01

    USACE is mainstreaming climate preparedness and resilience with a focus on priority areas; we engage in external collaboration to improve our understanding of climate change impacts and vulnerabilities so that we can develop new policy and guidance to support adaptation implementation based on the best available and actionable science. Beginning in 2009, the US Corps of Engineers has taken steps to provide guidance on evaluating and adapting to sea level change. Close collaboration with national and international experts is an essential component in our process of developing practical, nationally consistent, and cost-effective measures to reduce potential vulnerabilities resulting from global changes. The next stage of USACE evaluation is to provide guidance on procedures to evaluate the magnitudes and effects of total water levels at USACE projects. The guidance will outline project specific analysis and assessment of total water level with respect to four primary mission areas: flood damage risk reduction, navigation, coastal storm damage risk reduction, and ecosystems. Federal agency and international sources of information and approaches will be outlined and provided. The various components of total water levels as well as temporal, geomorphic and regional variability will be assessed. A range of analysis level and methods will be outlined ranging from basic water level descriptive statistics to more complex analysis of hydrodynamic processes. The end product will be field level guidance that addresses wide ranges of project stability and performance and the relevant variability and uncertainty which may impact project cost and performance.

  13. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  14. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  15. A procedure for the evaluation of damping effects in composite laminated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovini, Riccardo; Bisagni, Chiara

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an approach based on experimental tests and numerical simulations for taking into account damping effects during the design and the analysis of composite structures. The experiments are conducted using the Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and unidirectional coupons are tested to characterize the damping properties of the plies. Starting from these results, first order shear deformation theory is applied to determine the damping properties of the laminate, which are then used in the context of a numerical procedure based on finite element analyses and strain energy method. The results are presented for an aircraft stiffened panel, illustrating the evaluation of the specific damping capacities of the structure, and performing direct transient analyses to investigate the effect of damping on the panel response to pulse loadings.

  16. An apparatus and procedure for evaluating the toxic hazards of smoldering seating and bedding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Brandt, D. L.; Brauer, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus and procedure are described for evaluating the toxicity of the gases evolved from the smoldering combustion of seating and bedding materials. The method combines initiation of smoldering combustion in fabric/cushion combinations by a lighted cigarette and exposure of laboratory animals to the gases evolved. The ratio of the surface available for smoldering to the compartment volume in this apparatus is approximately five times the ratio expected in a California living room, and 100 times the ratio expected in a wide-body aircraft passenger cabin. Based on fabric/cushion combinations tested, the toxicity of gases from smoldering combustion does not appear to be a significant hazard in aircraft passenger cabins, but seems to be a basis for careful selection of materials for residential environments.

  17. The evaluation of a semi-automated procedure for classifying corn and soybeans without ground data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, M. D.; Cicone, R. C.; Johnson, K. I.

    1982-01-01

    Since the launch of Landsat 1 in 1973, research has been conducted with the objective to develop technology which would make it possible to achieve large area crop estimates on the basis of Landsat Multispectral Sensor (MSS) data without the benefit of ground observed training data. The present investigation is concerned with the evaluation of a technology which was developed to produce estimates of corn and soybean acreage in the central U.S. Corn Belt (Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana). A description of the employed technique is provided and details regarding the test of the developed technology are discussed. The obtained results show that considerable progress has been made toward creating an automatic, self-adapting procedure which has favorable bias and variance characteristics.

  18. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  19. Evaluation of methods to assess physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenders, Nicole Y. J. M.

    Epidemiological evidence has accumulated that demonstrates that the amount of physical activity-related energy expenditure during a week reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and all-cause mortality. To further understand the amount of daily physical activity and related energy expenditure that are necessary to maintain or improve the functional health status and quality of life, instruments that estimate total (TDEE) and physical activity-related energy expenditure (PAEE) under free-living conditions should be determined to be valid and reliable. Without evaluation of the various methods that estimate TDEE and PAEE with the doubly labeled water (DLW) method in females there will be eventual significant limitations on assessing the efficacy of physical activity interventions on health status in this population. A triaxial accelerometer (Tritrac-R3D, (TT)), an uniaxial (Computer Science and Applications Inc., (CSA)) activity monitor, a Yamax-Digiwalker-500sp°ler , (YX-stepcounter), by measuring heart rate responses (HR method) and a 7-d Physical Activity Recall questionnaire (7-d PAR) were compared with the "criterion method" of DLW during a 7-d period in female adults. The DLW-TDEE was underestimated on average 9, 11 and 15% using 7-d PAR, HR method and TT. The underestimation of DLW-PAEE by 7-d PAR was 21% compared to 47% and 67% for TT and YX-stepcounter. Approximately 56% of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the registration of body movement with accelerometry. A larger proportion of the variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} was explained by jointly incorporating information from the vertical and horizontal movement measured with the CSA and Tritrac-R3D (rsp2 = 0.87). Although only a small amount of variance in DLW-PAEE*kgsp{-1} is explained by the number of steps taken per day, because of its low cost and ease of use, the Yamax-stepcounter is useful in studies promoting daily walking. Thus, studies involving the

  20. In Vivo Evaluation of Different Surgical Procedures for Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Marina; Van Hauwermeiren, Hadewych; Neys, Johan; Vanderlinden, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) involves the application of a chondrocyte suspension into a membrane-sealed cartilage defect. Recently, “cell-seeded collagen matrix-supported” ACI has been developed wherein chondrocytes are seeded on a biomembrane. This study aimed at preclinically comparing 4 variant ACI techniques in a refined goat model: 2 traditional procedures, whereby the defect is sealed by a periosteal flap or collagen membrane, and 2 cell-seeding methods, with the collagen membrane either sutured or glued into the defect. Design: The efficacy of the surgical techniques was evaluated in an acute critical size chondral defect in the medial condyle of 32 skeletally mature goats, randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 aforementioned treatment groups. After 10 weeks in vivo, the quality of the repair was graded histologically by 2 independent, blinded readers using the “modified O’Driscoll” score. Results: The cell-seeding procedure whereby the membrane is sutured into the defect has a similar structural repair capacity than traditional ACI techniques. However, when the cell-seeded membrane was glued into the defect, the outcome appeared inferior. Conclusion: These findings indicate that optimizing the goat model and the postoperative recovery does allow preclinical evaluation of ACI-based cartilage implants in a load-bearing setting. This preclinical observation provides support to the clinical utilization of the sutured membrane-seeded (ACI-CS) technique, provided sutures, but not fibrin sealants, are used to fix the cell-seeded membrane in the defect bed. PMID:26069652

  1. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION ON DEVELOPMENTAL HIP DYSPLASIA AFTER SALTER AND OMBRÉDANNE PROCEDURE

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Válney Luiz; Thomé, André Luiz Coelho; da Silva Castro, Daniel Labres; de Oliveira, Leandro Zica; de Moraes, Frederico Barra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and radiological medium-term results from surgical treatment of developmental hip dysplasia through Salter innominate bone osteotomy and Ombrédanne femoral shortening. Methods: Fourteen patients were evaluated, with surgical treatment on 18 hips (seven right-side hips and eleven left-side hips) using the proposal technique, performed between 1998 and 2008. The Dutoit and Severin criteria were used respectively for clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The average preoperative index for the seven right-side hips was 43.3° (40° to 50°), and this was corrected through surgery to an average of 31.57° (24° to 42°). The average preoperative index for the eleven left-side hips was 42.1° (36° to 56°), and this was corrected through surgery to an average of 30.36° (20° to 44°). There was a statistically significant difference between the preoperative and postoperative acetabular indexes, with P > 0.05. The clinical evaluation showed that there were seven excellent hips (38.9%), eight good ones (44.4%), three fair hips (16.7%) and no poor ones (0%). By grouping the hips rated good and excellent as satisfactory and those rated poor and fair as unsatisfactory, 83.3% of the results were seen to be favorable. There were no statistically significant correlations between occurrences of complications and patient age at the time of surgery or between complications and the preoperative acetabular index (p > 0.05). The complications observed consisted of one case each of subluxation, osteonecrosis and osteonecrosis together with subluxation. Conclusion: The combined procedure of Salter and Ombrédanne is a viable option for treating developmental hip dysplasia after patients have started to walk. PMID:27027068

  2. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  3. Battery Separator Characterization and Evaluation Procedures for NASA's Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Richard S.; Bennet, William R.; Wong, Eunice K.; Lewton, MaryBeth R.; Harris, Megan K.

    2010-01-01

    To address the future performance and safety requirements for the electrical energy storage technologies that will enhance and enable future NASA manned aerospace missions, advanced rechargeable, lithium-ion battery technology development is being pursued within the scope of the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program s (ETDP's) Energy Storage Project. A critical cell-level component of a lithium-ion battery which significantly impacts both overall electrochemical performance and safety is the porous separator that is sandwiched between the two active cell electrodes. To support the selection of the optimal cell separator material(s) for the advanced battery technology and chemistries under development, laboratory characterization and screening procedures were established to assess and compare separator material-level attributes and associated separator performance characteristics.

  4. A Procedural Guide For Validating Achievement Gains in Educational Projects. Monograph Series on Evaluation in Education, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horst, Donald P.; Tallmadge, G. Kasten

    The orientation of this report is that of identifying educational projects which can be considered clearly exemplary. The largest section consists of a 22-step procedure for validating the effectiveness of educational projects using existing evaluation data. It is not intended as a guide for conducting evaluations but rather for interpreting data…

  5. Practical Guide for the Selection of Audio Visual Media. General Criteria System and Evaluation Procedure for Educational Media Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klepzig, H. J.; Weiss, M.

    Designed to aid in making concrete decisions on the acquisition and use of media, the criteria system and evaluation procedure described is a multiphase, objective-based decision making process. This report includes guidelines for setting up goal systems and developing criteria for the evaluation of media based on a goal system; an outline of…

  6. IFCC primary reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C. Part 1. The concept of reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Siekmann, Lothar; Bonora, Roberto; Burtis, Carl A; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Clerc-Renaud, Pascale; Férard, Georges; Ferrero, Carlo A; Forest, Jean-Claude; Franck, Paul F H; Gella, F Javier; Hoelzel, Wieland; Jørgensen, Poul Jørgen; Kanno, Takashi; Kessner, Art; Klauke, Rainer; Kristiansen, Nina; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Misaki, Hideo; Mueller, Mathias M; Panteghini, Mauro; Pauwels, Jean; Schiele, Françoise; Schimmel, Heinz G; Vialle, Arlette; Weidemann, Gerhard; Schumann, Gerhard

    2002-06-01

    This paper is the first in a series dealing with reference procedures for the measurement of catalytic activity concentrations of enzymes at 37 degrees C and with the certification of reference preparations. Other parts deal with: Part 2. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Creatine Kinase; Part 3. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Lactate Dehydrogenase; Part 4. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Alanine Aminotransferase; Part 5. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic Concentration of Aspartate Aminotransferase; Part 6. Reference Procedure for the Measurement of Catalytic fication of Four Reference Materials for the Determination of Enzymatic Activity of y-Glutamyltransferase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Creatine Kinase at 37 degrees C. A document describing the determination of preliminary reference values is also in preparation. PMID:12211661

  7. Evaluating bioavailability of organic pollutants in soils by sequential ultrasonic extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2016-08-01

    Under current retrospective risk assessment framework, the total concentrations of organic pollutants in soils have been employed as the standard for over 30 years. The total concentrations reflect the overall accumulation in soils but tend to be overly conservative for assessing the ecological risks, where the bioavailability plays an important role. In this study, the bioavailability of organic pollutants in soils was evaluated using a stepwise and tiered classification method, namely the sequential ultrasonic extraction procedure (SEUP). The water-soluble and acid-soluble fractions extracted by the SEUP were the bioavailable fractions. The reliability and environmental relevance of the speciation method were examined with representative organic pollutants using the root uptake methods and the semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs). The plant uptake amounts corrected with weight were highly correlated with the bioavailable fractions (R(2) > 0.75). The amounts of the bioavailable fractions were negatively correlated with the logKow values (R(2) ranging from 0.71 to 0.77) of the organic pollutants and the contents of soil organic matter (R(2) ranging from 0.68 to 0.96). As a refinement of the current risk assessment framework, the SUEP that has proved to be a reliable and convenient is thus highly recommended for evaluating the bioavailability of organic pollutants in soils. PMID:27156212

  8. What does it take to show that a cognitive training procedure is useful? A critical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Nori; Ahissar, Merav

    2013-01-01

    Individuals substantially improve with training, indicating that a large degree of plasticity is retained across ages. In the past 20 years, many studies explored the ability to boost cognitive skills (reasoning, linguistic abilities, working memory, and attention) by training with other tasks that exploit limited cognitive resources. Indeed, individuals with long-term training on challenging skills (musicians and action video gamers) show impressive behavior on related tasks (linguistic and visual attention, respectively). However, a critical evaluation of training studies that last weeks to months shows typically mild effects, mainly with respect to control groups that either did not practice or practiced with less challenging, rewarding, or exciting conditions. These findings suggest that future training studies should evaluate these factors carefully and assess whether they mainly impact the testing sessions or actual longer-term skills, and whether their impact can be further strengthened. The lack of a comprehensive theory of learning that integrates cognitive, motivational, and alertness aspects poses a bottleneck to improving current training procedures. PMID:24309253

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brent

    2005-01-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

  10. Laboratory design and test procedures for quantitative evaluation of infrared sensors to assess thermal anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.M.; Grot, R.A.; Wood, J.T.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the description of the laboratory apparatus and preliminary results of the quantitative evaluation of three high-resolution and two low-resolution infrared imaging systems. These systems which are commonly used for building diagnostics are tested under various background temperatures (from -20/sup 0/C to 25/sup 0/C) for their minimum resolvable temperature differences (MRTD) at spatial frequencies from 0.03 to 0.25 cycles per milliradian. The calibration curves of absolute and differential temperature measurements are obtained for three systems. The signal transfer function and line spread function at ambient temperature of another three systems are also measured. Comparisons of the dependence of the MRTD on background temperatures from the measured data with the predicted values given in ASHRAE Standards 101-83 are also included. The dependence of background temperatures for absolute temperature measurements are presented, as well as comparison of measured data and data given by the manufacturer. Horizontal on-axis magnification factors of the geometric transfer function of two systems are also established to calibrate the horizontal axis for the measured line spread function to obtain the modulation transfer function. The variation of the uniformity for horizontal display of these two sensors are also observed. Included are detailed descriptions of laboratory design, equipment setup, and evaluation procedures of each test. 10 refs., 38 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of the atmospheric correction procedure for the APEX level 2/3 processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schläpfer, Daniel; Biesemans, Jan; Hueni, Andreas; Meuleman, Koen

    2008-10-01

    The Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX) is a hyperspectral instrument built in a Swiss - Belgian collaboration within the ESA-PRODEX program. It aims at highest possible accuracy of its delivered surface reflectance image data products. The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral imagery is a critical element of a complete processing chain towards unbiased reflectance and for the creation of higher level products. As the first data of APEX is expected to become available in 2009, an appropriate processing chain for higher level processing needs to be defined and evaluated. Standard products have been identified in all application fields of hyperspectral imaging, i.e., geology, vegetation, cryosphere, limnology and atmosphere. They are being implemented at the APEX science center. The according processing procedures rely on data of well-defined processing states which range from calibrated at-sensor radiance to (bihemispherical) spectral albedo. In this paper, the atmospheric processing which is implemented as part of the automated data processing chain for level 2 in the APEX processing and archiving facility (PAF) at VITO (Mol, Belgium) is evaluated together with the ATCOR-4 atmospheric correction program. The evaluation is done regarding flexibility, reflectance output accuracy and processing efficiency. Two test data sets are taken for this purpose: a well-documented set of HYMAP data and a high resolution HYSPEX data set. Both data sets exhibit areas of overlap, which are taken for self-contained analysis of the atmospheric correction procedure. The accuracy tests include plausibility checks on selected regions of interest including a variety of known surfaces in the imagery. As some of the observed effects are related to BRDF differences, the results also give an indication for the inaccuracy related to these reflectance anisotropies. Speed measurements of the processing are then compared to the demand for operational processing of series of data acquisition

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, Brian

    2005-02-01

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

  13. Evaluation of nutrients and major ions in streams-implications of different timescale procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaussê, Thais Carvalho Cerqueira; Dos Santos Brandão, Camila; da Silva, Lenilda Pita; Salamim Fonseca Spanghero, Pedro Enrico; da Silva, Daniela Mariano Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Small watersheds are characterized by a high degree of sensitivity to changes observed in their environment, making them important sampling and management units. Due to this high sensitivity, several studies have shown that intensive collecting may be more effective in these systems compared to other timescale procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of organic and inorganic nutrients and major ions dissolved in two small watersheds with different land uses to determine whether there are differences between these watersheds with different levels of impact and to identify the most appropriate timescale procedure for the variables under analysis. Therefore, monthly, daily, and hourly samples were taken in the two streams in the northeast of Brazil. One of the streams is located in an undisturbed area (environmental protected area) (S1) and one in a disturbed area (S2). The results showed significant differences for conductivity, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen (%), sodium (Na(+)), and chloride (Cl(-)) ions and higher values presented in the anthropogenic stream. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) in S2 mainly comprised ammonium (NH4 (+)), while nitrate (NO3 (-)) predominated in S1. The considerable increase in the concentration of NO3 (-) and dilution of Na(+) and Cl(-) after rain in April in S1 shows how precipitation may change the chemical composition of the water in a 1-day period. No changes were observed in the concentrations of major ions and nutrients that could be related to the cyclical variation of the hours during the day in both small watersheds. Daily collections allow better monitoring of the dynamics of streams and greater robustness of the data. PMID:26681182

  14. Evaluation of the Effects of Standard Rescue Procedure on Severe Trauma Treatment in China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Tian-Bing; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Kou, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Dian-Ying; Yu, Kai; Lyu, De-Cheng; Liu, Mao-Zheng; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Ge, Wei-Wei; Cao, Li-Ying; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Deng, Shao-Jie; Liu, Weng-Hua; Zhang, Mao; Xu, Yong-An; Zhang, Kun; Li, Bing; Wang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-Li; Yi, Cheng-La; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of standard rescue procedure (SRP) in improving severe trauma treatments in China. Methods: This study was conducted in 12 hospitals located in geographically and industrially different cities in China. A standard procedure on severe trauma rescue was established as a general rule for staff training and patient treatment. A regional network (system) efficiently integrating prehospital rescue, emergency room treatments, and hospital specialist treatments was built under the rule for information sharing and improving severe trauma treatments. Treatment outcomes were compared between before and 1 year after the implementation of the SRP. Results: The outcomes of a total of 74,615 and 12,051 trauma cases were collected from 12 hospitals before and after the implementation of the SRP. Implementation of the SRP led to efficient cooperation and information sharing of different treatment services. The emergency response time, prehospital transit time, emergency rescue time, consultation call time, and mortality rate of patients were 24.24 ± 4.32 min, 45.69 ± 3.89 min, 6.38 ± 1.05 min, 17.53 ± 0.72 min, and 33.82% ± 3.87% (n = 441), respectively, before the implementation of the standardization and significantly reduced to 10.11 ± 3.21 min, 22.39 ± 4.32 min, 3.26 ± 0.89 min, 3.45 ± 0.45 min, and 20.49% ± 3.11%, separately (n = 495, P < 0.05) after that. Conclusions: Staff training and SRP can significantly improve the efficiency of severe trauma treatments in China. PMID:25963348

  15. An Evaluation and Comparison of Time-Out Procedures with and without Release Contingencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A common recommendation for implementing time-out procedures is to include a release contingency such that the individual is not allowed to leave time-out until no problem behavior has occurred for a specific amount of time (e.g, 30 s). We compared a fixed duration time-out procedure to a release contingency time-out procedure with 4 young…

  16. Evaluation of, and Revision of Open Laboratory Procedures at the College Freshman Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, William L.

    This report focuses on the open laboratory procedures used in the freshman biology course at Hamline University. The study aimed to review a number of specific methods used in conducting the unstructured and unscheduled laboratory procedures and discover the most effective arrangement using those procedures. The report includes detailed…

  17. Evaluating the utility of 3D TRUS image information in guiding intra-procedure registration for motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In targeted 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, patient and prostate movement during the procedure can cause target misalignments that hinder accurate sampling of pre-planned suspicious tissue locations. Multiple solutions have been proposed for motion compensation via registration of intra-procedural TRUS images to a baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the biopsy procedure. While 2D TRUS images are widely used for intra-procedural guidance, some solutions utilize richer intra-procedural images such as bi- or multi-planar TRUS or 3D TRUS, acquired by specialized probes. In this work, we measured the impact of such richer intra-procedural imaging on motion compensation accuracy, to evaluate the tradeoff between cost and complexity of intra-procedural imaging versus improved motion compensation. We acquired baseline and intra-procedural 3D TRUS images from 29 patients at standard sextant-template biopsy locations. We used the planes extracted from the 3D intra-procedural scans to simulate 2D and 3D information available in different clinically relevant scenarios for registration. The registration accuracy was evaluated by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified homologous fiducial markers (micro-calcifications). Our results indicate that TRE improves gradually when the number of intra-procedural imaging planes used in registration is increased. Full 3D TRUS information helps the registration algorithm to robustly converge to more accurate solutions. These results can also inform the design of a fail-safe workflow during motion compensation in a system using a tracked 2D TRUS probe, by prescribing rotational acquisitions that can be performed quickly and easily by the physician immediately prior to needle targeting.

  18. Evaluation of results of US corn and soybeans exploratory experiment: Classification procedures verification test. [Missouri, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. G.; Baird, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The classification procedure utilized in making crop proportion estimates for corn and soybeans using remotely sensed data was evaluated. The procedure was derived during the transition year of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. Analysis of variance techniques were applied to classifications performed by 3 groups of analysts who processed 25 segments selected from 4 agrophysical units (APU's). Group and APU effects were assessed to determine factors which affected the quality of the classifications. The classification results were studied to determine the effectiveness of the procedure in producing corn and soybeans proportion estimates.

  19. California School Lighting Design and Evaluation. A Procedure for the Prediction, Specification, and Evaluation of Visual Comfort and Visual Performance in Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This guide is intended to help school administrators, members of school district governing boards, architects, and engineers objectively evaluate school lighting systems. The California school lighting design and evaluation procedure described provides a step-by-step design method that, when used properly, results in balanced lighting for school…

  20. Easy Green: A Handbook of Earth-Smart Activities and Operating Procedures for Youth Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerman, Marty

    This book aims to help camp directors and programmers evaluate the environmental impact of camp practices, make informed environmental choices, and make environmental awareness a habit in all operations and activities. Section 1 discusses developing a personal environmental philosophy, and considering possibilities for camp environmental action in…

  1. A neutron activation analysis procedure for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aruscavage, P. J.; Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A neutron activation analysis procedure was developed for the determination of uranium, thorium and potassium in basic and ultrabasic rocks. The three elements are determined in the same 0.5-g sample following a 30-min irradiation in a thermal neutron flux of 2??1012 n??cm-2??sec-1. Following radiochemical separation, the nuclides239U (T=23.5 m),233Th (T=22.2 m) and42K (T=12.36 h) are measured by ??-counting. A computer program is used to resolve the decay curves which are complex owing to contamination and the growth of daughter activities. The method was used to determine uranium, throium and potassium in the U. S. Geological Survey standard rocks DTS-1, PCC-1 and BCR-1. For 0.5-g samples the limits of detection for uranium, throium and potassium are 0.7, 1.0 and 10 ppb, respectively. ?? 1972 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  2. Activity of striatal neurons reflects dynamic encoding and recoding of procedural memories.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Terra D; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Jin, Dezhe Z; Graybiel, Ann M

    2005-10-20

    Learning to perform a behavioural procedure as a well-ingrained habit requires extensive repetition of the behavioural sequence, and learning not to perform such behaviours is notoriously difficult. Yet regaining a habit can occur quickly, with even one or a few exposures to cues previously triggering the behaviour. To identify neural mechanisms that might underlie such learning dynamics, we made long-term recordings from multiple neurons in the sensorimotor striatum, a basal ganglia structure implicated in habit formation, in rats successively trained on a reward-based procedural task, given extinction training and then given reacquisition training. The spike activity of striatal output neurons, nodal points in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, changed markedly across multiple dimensions during each of these phases of learning. First, new patterns of task-related ensemble firing successively formed, reversed and then re-emerged. Second, task-irrelevant firing was suppressed, then rebounded, and then was suppressed again. These changing spike activity patterns were highly correlated with changes in behavioural performance. We propose that these changes in task representation in cortico-basal ganglia circuits represent neural equivalents of the explore-exploit behaviour characteristic of habit learning. PMID:16237445

  3. 47 CFR 79.110 - Complaint procedures for user interfaces, menus and guides, and activating accessibility features...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Complaint procedures for user interfaces, menus and guides, and activating accessibility features on digital apparatus and navigation devices. 79.110... ACCESSIBILITY OF VIDEO PROGRAMMING Apparatus § 79.110 Complaint procedures for user interfaces, menus and...

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

    2000-06-01

    Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  6. A prospective 9-month human clinical evaluation of Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP) therapy.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Marc; Kim, Soo-Woo; Camelo, Marcelo; Martin, Ignacio Sanz; Kim, David; Nevins, Myron

    2014-01-01

    This investigation was designed and implemented as a single-center, prospective study to evaluate the clinical response to the Laser-Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP). Eight patients with advanced periodontitis were enrolled and treated with full-mouth LANAP therapy and monitored for 9 months. Fullmouth clinical measurements, including clinical attachment level (CAL), probing depth (PD), and recession, were provided at baseline and after 9 months of healing by a single calibrated examiner, including a total of 930 sites and 444 sites with initial PD equal to or greater than 5 mm. Clinical results for the 930 sites measured pre- and postoperatively revealed that mean PD was reduced from 4.62 ± 2.29 mm to 3.14 ± 1.48 mm after 9 months (P < .05). CAL decreased from 5.58 ± 2.76 mm to 4.66 ± 2.10 mm (P < .05) and recession increased from 0.86 ± 1.31 mm to 1.52 ± 1.62 after 9 months (P < .05). For the subset of 444 sites with initial PD greater than or equal to 5 mm, the PD decreased from 6.50 ± 2.07 mm to 3.92 ± 1.54 mm (P < .05) and CAL decreased from 7.42 ± 2.70 mm to 5.78 ± 2.06 mm (P < .05). As demonstrated by the clinical evaluation, the majority of treated sites demonstrated clinical improvement. LANAP therapy should be further investigated with long-term clinical trials to compare the stability of clinical results with conventional therapy. PMID:24396837

  7. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  8. Evaluation of a vocal mand assessment and vocal mand training procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Bourret, Jason; Vollmer, Timothy R; Rapp, John T

    2004-01-01

    A common deficiency in the verbal repertoires of individuals with autism and related disorders is the absence of socially appropriate vocal mands. The vocal mand repertoires of these individuals may be lacking in several respects: (a) The individual might engage in no mands whatsoever, (b) the mand might be topographically dissimilar to an appropriate response, (c) the mand might be only partially topographically similar to an appropriate response, and (d) the mand might occur only after prompting. Depending on specific deficiencies in an individual's repertoire, different procedures for establishing appropriate mands may be needed. The purpose of Study 1 was to evaluate an assessment prior to teaching vocal mands for 3 individuals with developmental disabilities. The assessment showed that 1 individual displayed partial utterances of mands, 1 displayed vocal mands after mands had been reinforced, and 1 displayed vocal mands when prompted. Thus, in Study 2, a different teaching strategy was tested for each individual. Results showed that the assessment information could be linked directly to mand training for all 3 participants. PMID:15293633

  9. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  10. Evaluation of procedures for the collection, processing, and analysis of biomolecules from low-biomass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K; Cooper, M; La Duc, M T; Vaishampayan, P; Stam, C; Benardini, J N; Scalzi, G; Moissl-Eichinger, C; Venkateswaran, K

    2011-05-01

    To comprehensively assess microbial diversity and abundance via molecular-analysis-based methods, procedures for sample collection, processing, and analysis were evaluated in depth. A model microbial community (MMC) of known composition, representative of a typical low-biomass surface sample, was used to examine the effects of variables in sampling matrices, target cell density/molecule concentration, and cryogenic storage on the overall efficacy of the sampling regimen. The MMC used in this study comprised 11 distinct species of bacterial, archaeal, and fungal lineages associated with either spacecraft or clean-room surfaces. A known cellular density of MMC was deposited onto stainless steel coupons, and after drying, a variety of sampling devices were used to recover cells and biomolecules. The biomolecules and cells/spores recovered from each collection device were assessed by cultivable and microscopic enumeration, and quantitative and species-specific PCR assays. rRNA gene-based quantitative PCR analysis showed that cotton swabs were superior to nylon-flocked swabs for sampling of small surface areas, and for larger surfaces, biological sampling kits significantly outperformed polyester wipes. Species-specific PCR revealed differential recovery of certain species dependent upon the sampling device employed. The results of this study empower current and future molecular-analysis-based microbial sampling and processing methodologies. PMID:21398492

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Beilke, Susan

    1993-08-01

    Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  12. Evaluation of Patient Perceptions After Vestibuloplasty Procedure: A Comparison of Diode Laser and Scalpel Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Farista, Sana; Koppolu, Pradeep; Baroudi, Kusai; Uppada, Udaykiran; Mishra, Ashank; Savarimath, Abhishek; Lingam, Amara Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate vestibular depth results in poor plaque control owing to an insufficient width of keratinized gingiva. Vestibuloplasty provides the necessary vestibular depth and can be performed either with a scalpel, electrocautery or lasers. Aim To evaluate the patient perceptions related to pain and discomfort on the 1st, 3rd and the 7th day post vestibuloplasty and also assess the healing outcomes related to the treatment of inadequate vestibular depth either with the diode laser or the scalpel. Materials and Methods Twenty patients who had inadequate vestibular depth and required vestibuloplasty were assigned randomly to undergo the procedure either with the scalpel or the laser. The data obtained was analysed for intergroup comparison with an independent paired t-test and intragroup comparison was determined by a paired t-test. Results Intragroup comparison within the laser group for VAS scores of pain and discomfort within all the reported days exhibited a significant difference (p<0.05). Inter group comparison revealed that the patients in the laser group had lower VAS cores for pain and discomfort compared to the scalpel group (p<0.05). Analysis of the three pointer scale for healing revealed that the patients in the laser group exhibited better healing outcomes on the 1st, 3rd and the 7th day compared to the scalpel group. Conclusion Observations from the study highlight the opinion that laser can be a safe and effective alternative to traditional vestibuloplasty performed with the scalpel. PMID:27437370

  13. Collect Available Creep-Fatigue Data and Study Existing Creep-Fatigue Evaluation Procedures for Grade 91 and Hastelloy XR

    SciTech Connect

    Tai Asayama; Yukio Tachibana

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of investigation on Task 5 of DOE/ASME Materials Project based on a contract between ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Task 5 is to collect available creep-fatigue data and study existing creep-fatigue evaluation procedures for Grade 91 steel and Hastelloy XR. Part I of this report is devoted to Grade 91 steel. Existing creep-fatigue data were collected (Appendix A) and analyzed from the viewpoints of establishing a creep-fatigue procedure for VHTR design. A fair amount of creep-fatigue data has been obtained and creep-fatigue phenomena have been clarified to develop design standards mainly for fast breeder reactors. Following this, existing creep-fatigue procedures were studied and it was clarified that the creep-fatigue evaluation procedure of the ASME-NH has a lot of conservatisms and they were analyzed in detail from the viewpoints of the evaluation of creep damage of material. Based on the above studies, suggestions to improve the ASME-NH procedure along with necessary research and development items were presented. Part II of this report is devoted to Hastelloy XR. Existing creep-fatigue data used for development of the high temperature structural design guideline for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) were collected. Creep-fatigue evaluation procedure in the design guideline and its application to design of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was described. Finally, some necessary research and development items in relation to creep-fatigue evaluation for Gen IV and VHTR reactors were presented.

  14. 31 CFR 1020.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. 1020.520 Section 1020.520 Money and... Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1020.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this chapter. (b)...

  15. 31 CFR 1024.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. 1024.520 Section 1024.520 Money... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1024.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this...

  16. 31 CFR 1020.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. 1020.520 Section 1020.520 Money and... Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1020.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this chapter. (b)...

  17. 31 CFR 1020.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. 1020.520 Section 1020.520 Money and... Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1020.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this chapter. (b)...

  18. 31 CFR 1024.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. 1024.520 Section 1024.520 Money... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1024.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this...

  19. 31 CFR 1026.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1026.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing...

  20. 31 CFR 1024.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. 1024.520 Section 1024.520 Money... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1024.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this...

  1. 31 CFR 1024.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. 1024.520 Section 1024.520 Money... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1024.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for mutual funds. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this...

  2. 31 CFR 1026.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1026.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing...

  3. 31 CFR 1020.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. 1020.520 Section 1020.520 Money and... Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1020.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for banks. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this chapter. (b)...

  4. 31 CFR 1026.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing... To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1026.520 Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for futures commission merchants and introducing...

  5. 40 CFR 260.41 - Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of hazardous waste recycling activities. 260.41 Section 260.41 Protection of Environment... Rulemaking Petitions § 260.41 Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities... hazardous waste recycling activities described in § 261.6(a)(2)(iii) under the provisions of § 261.6 (b)...

  6. 40 CFR 260.41 - Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of hazardous waste recycling activities. 260.41 Section 260.41 Protection of Environment... Rulemaking Petitions § 260.41 Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities... hazardous waste recycling activities described in § 261.6(a)(2)(iii) under the provisions of § 261.6 (b)...

  7. 40 CFR 260.41 - Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of hazardous waste recycling activities. 260.41 Section 260.41 Protection of Environment... Rulemaking Petitions § 260.41 Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities... hazardous waste recycling activities described in § 261.6(a)(2)(iii) under the provisions of § 261.6 (b)...

  8. 40 CFR 260.41 - Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of hazardous waste recycling activities. 260.41 Section 260.41 Protection of Environment... Rulemaking Petitions § 260.41 Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities... hazardous waste recycling activities described in § 261.6(a)(2)(iii) under the provisions of § 261.6 (b)...

  9. 40 CFR 260.41 - Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of hazardous waste recycling activities. 260.41 Section 260.41 Protection of Environment... Rulemaking Petitions § 260.41 Procedures for case-by-case regulation of hazardous waste recycling activities... hazardous waste recycling activities described in § 261.6(a)(2)(iii) under the provisions of § 261.6 (b)...

  10. Evaluation and optimization of occupational eye lens dosimetry during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures.

    PubMed

    Guiu-Souto, Jacobo; Sánchez-García, Manuel; Vázquez-Vázquez, Rubén; Otero, Carlos; Luna, Victor; Mosquera, Javier; Busto, Ramón Lobato; Aguiar, Pablo; Ruibal, Álvaro; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Pombar-Cameán, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The last recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for eye lens dose suggest an important reduction on the radiation limits associated with early and late tissue reactions. The aim of this work is to quantify and optimize the eye lens dose associated to nurse staff during positron emission tomography (PET) procedures. PET is one of the most important diagnostic methods of oncological and neurological cancer disease involving an important number of workers exposed to the high energy isotope F-18. We characterize the relevant stages as preparation and administration of monodose syringes in terms of occupational dose. A direct reading silicon dosimeter was used to measure the lens dose to staff. The highest dose of radiation was observed during preparation of the fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) syringes. By optimizing a suitable vials' distribution of FDG we find an important reduction in occupational doses. Extrapolation of our data to other clinical scenarios indicates that, depending on the work load and/or syringes activity, safety limits of the dose might be exceeded. PMID:27182832

  11. Evaluation of the procedure for separating barley from other spring small grains. [North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota and Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magness, E. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The success of the Transition Year procedure to separate and label barley and the other small grains was assessed. It was decided that developers of the procedure would carry out the exercise in order to prevent compounding procedural problems with implementation problems. The evaluation proceeded by labeling the sping small grains first. The accuracy of this labeling was, on the average, somewhat better than that in the Transition Year operations. Other departures from the original procedure included a regionalization of the labeling process, the use of trend analysis, and the removal of time constraints from the actual processing. Segment selection, ground truth derivation, and data available for each segment in the analysis are discussed. Labeling accuracy is examined for North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, and Montana as well as for the entire four-state area. Errors are characterized.

  12. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  13. Measuring the Academic Skills of University Students: Evaluation of a Diagnostic Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erling, Elizabeth J.; Richardson, John T. E.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring the Academic Skills of University Students is a procedure developed in the 1990s at the University of Sydney's Language Centre to identify students in need of academic writing development by assessing examples of their written work against five criteria. This paper reviews the literature relating to the development of the procedure with…

  14. Procedure to evaluate structural adequacy of a piping system in creep range

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalla, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    An inelastic analysis procedure to establish structural adequacy of an elevated temperature piping system is presented in this paper. The analytical method is incidental to the procedure used to comply with Code Case N-47 inelastic strain accumulation and creep-fatigue damage criteria.

  15. Model test evaluation of a frequency-domain procedure for extreme surge response prediction of tension leg platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Botelho, D.L.R.; Finnigan, T.D.; Liu, S.V.; Petrauskas, C.

    1984-05-01

    A frequency-domain procedure for the extreme surge response prediction of tension leg platforms (TLP) under waves and current loading is presented and evaluated. The procedure incorporates both first- and second-order viscous and potential (inviscid) effects. The evaluation is based on results of hydrodynamic tests performed on a 1/60 scale model of a TLP. The tests were specifically designed to quantify the wave current interaction effects on surge. Therefore, the TLP model was tested under currents only (simulated by towing), waves only, and combined waves and current. The procedure is shown to perform well for predicting the extreme response in random waves and current except when groups of large waves are present. In this case, the extreme response is underpredicted. Areas in which this situation can be improved are identified.

  16. Risk Control Through the Use of Procedures - A Method for Evaluating the Change in Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praino, Gregory; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Organizations use procedures to influence or control the behavior of their workers, but often have no basis for determining whether an additional rule, or procedural control will be beneficial. This paper outlines a proposed method for determining if the addition or removal of procedural controls will impact the occurrences of critical consequences. The proposed method focuses on two aspects: how valuable the procedural control is, based on the inevitability of the consequence and the opportunity to intervene; and how likely the control is to fail, based on five procedural design elements that address how well the rule or control has been Defined, Assigned, Trained, Organized and Monitored-referred to as the DATOM elements

  17. Evaluation of a Video Prompting and Fading Procedure for Teaching Dish Washing Skills to Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; O'Reilly, Mark; Cannella, Helen; Edrisinha, Chaturi; de la Cruz, Berenice; Upadhyaya, Megha; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Hundley, Anna; Andrews, Alonzo; Garver, Carolyn; Young, David

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated a video prompting and fading procedure for teaching three adults with developmental disabilities to wash dishes. Video prompting involved showing video clips depicting each step of the task. All three adults reached 90-100% correct when video prompting was implemented. Following acquisition, video prompting was withdrawn, but…

  18. Common Core Curriculum for Vocational Education. Category G: Evaluation and Research. G-3: Introduction to Research Procedures in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moshier, Kenneth

    This module providing an introduction to research procedures is one of a set of five on evaluation and research and is part of a larger series of thirty-four modules constituting a core curriculum for use in the professional preparation of vocational educators in the areas of agricultural, business, home economics, and industrial education.…

  19. Evaluating Generalization of Addition-Fact Fluency Using the Taped-Problems Procedure in a Second-Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kelli C.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Gibby, Lana; Galyon, Charles E.; Meadows-Allen, Sadonya

    2011-01-01

    A multiple-baseline design across math-fact sets was used to evaluate the effects of a taped-problems intervention on students' performance with addition facts and their inverses in an intact, rural, second-grade classroom. Results suggested that the procedure was effective in improving fluency on math facts as well as their inverses. Across 3…

  20. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section 303.109 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT (CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT PROGRAM),...

  1. Procedures Used in Designing a Training Program in Educational Evaluation and Development. Technical Paper No. 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Univ., Boulder. Colorado Center for Training in Educational Evaluation and Development.

    The purpose of this technical paper is to outline the procedures used in designing the training programing in educational evaluation and development involving an elaborate collection of data from many sources and a drafting of a tentative plan which was then screened, reviewed, and critiqued by each of the consortium units. The data sources were…

  2. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT...

  3. METHODS FOR AQUATIC TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS: PHASE III TOXICITY CONFIRMATION PROCEDURES FOR SAMPLES EXHIBITING ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1989, the guidance document for acutely toxic effluents titled Methods for Aquatic Toxicity Identification Evaluations: Phase III Toxicity Confirmation Procedures was published (EPA, 1989D)This manual and its companion documents (EPA, 1991A; EPA, 1992; EPA, 1993A) are intended...

  4. Quantitative evaluation of geodiversity: development of methodological procedures with application to territorial management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, J.; Brilha, J.; Pereira, D.; Nolasco, M.

    2012-04-01

    Although geodiversity is considered the setting for biodiversity, there is still a huge gap in the social recognition of these two concepts. The concept of geodiversity, less developed, is now making its own way as a robust and fundamental idea concerning the abiotic component of nature. From a conservationist point of view, the lack of a broader knowledge concerning the type and spatial variation of geodiversity, as well as its relationship with biodiversity, makes the protection and management of natural or semi-natural areas incomplete. There is a growing need to understand the patterns of geodiversity in different landscapes and to translate this knowledge for territorial management in a practical and effective point of view. This kind of management can also represent an important tool for the development of sustainable tourism, particularly geotourism, which can bring benefits not only for the environment, but also for social and economic purposes. The quantification of geodiversity is an important step in all this process but still few researchers are investing in the development of a proper methodology. The assessment methodologies that were published so far are mainly focused on the evaluation of geomorphological elements, sometimes complemented with information about lithology, soils, hidrology, morphometric variables, climatic surfaces and geosites. This results in very dissimilar areas at very different spatial scales, showing the complexity of the task and the need of further research. This current work aims the development of an effective methodology for the assessment of the maximum elements of geodiversity possible (rocks, minerals, fossils, landforms, soils), based on GIS routines. The main determinant factor for the quantitative assessment is scale, but other factors are also very important, such as the existence of suitable spatial data with sufficient degree of detail. It is expected to attain the proper procedures in order to assess geodiversity

  5. Novel test procedure to evaluate the treatability of wastewater with ozone.

    PubMed

    Schindler Wildhaber, Yael; Mestankova, Hana; Schärer, Michael; Schirmer, Kristin; Salhi, Elisabeth; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-05-15

    Organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, estrogens or pesticides enter the environment continuously through the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Enhanced treatment of wastewater (WW) by ozone (O3) is probably one of the simplest measures for abatement of organic micropollutants to avoid their discharge to the aquatic environment. During ozonation most organic micropollutants present in treated WW are oxidized either by a direct reaction with O3 or by secondarily formed hydroxyl radicals (OH). However, undesired oxidation by-products from the oxidative transformation of matrix components can also be formed. A modular laboratory decision tool based on the findings of previous investigations is presented to test the feasibility of ozonation as an option to upgrade specific WWTPs. These modules consist of investigations to assess (i) the matrix effects on ozone stability, (ii) the efficiency of micropollutant removal, (iii) the oxidation by-product formation, as well as (iv) bioassays to measure specific and unspecific toxicity of the treated WWs. Matrix effects on ozone stability (quantified as O3 and OH exposures) can give first indications on the suitability of an ozonation step. Ozonation of WWs yielding O3 and OH exposures and micropollutant abatement similar to reference values evoked a significant improvement of the water quality as indicated by a broad range of bioassays. Irregular behavior of the ozonation points towards unknown compounds, possibly leading to the formation of undesired degradation products. It has been observed that in such WWs ozonation partly enhanced toxicity. In summary, the presented tiered laboratory test procedure represents a relatively cheap and straight-forward methodology to evaluate the feasibility of ozonation to upgrade specific WWTPs for micropollutant removal based on chemical and biological measurements. PMID:25827671

  6. Preoperative evaluation, surgical procedure, follow up and results of 150 cochlear implantations

    PubMed Central

    Kyriafinis, G; Vital, V; Psifidis, A; Constantinidis, J; Nikolaou, A; Hitoglou-Antoniadou, M; Kouloulas, A

    2007-01-01

    Background: The cochlear implantation is among the most important achievements of medicine and biotechnology in the last 20 years, because it allows individuals who had never heard or had lost their hearing to perceive sound and improve their quality of life. Selection criteria for candidates are strict and are evaluated in each individual by a scientific committee specially trained for implantations which includes Ear Nose and Throat (ENT) surgeon, audiologist, psychiatrist and speech therapist. Patients and methods: In our department, the first cochlear implantation was performed in 1995. During the last ten years more than 250 individuals have been evaluated due to profound hearing loss and 170 of them were found to be suitable candidates for cochlear implantation. One hundred and fifty (150) have already been operated and most of them are children with congenital hearing loss. No major or permanent complications were recorded in any of our 150 patients. Activation and fitting/mapping of the cochlear implant is initiated three weeks post-operatively. Regular follow- up and mapping of the implant are held, more frequently in children, along with specialized speech therapy. Each new mapping is evaluated according to the record of the patient with regard to the acoustic perception of sounds and speech and the discrimination of individual elements of phonation based on a protocol that we have created for the needs of Greek language. Results: Speech discrimination (AHEPA Hospital protocol), before the Implantation, at the activation of the cochlear implant and till 4 years of the follow-up showed that in our patients, we obtained better and faster results in post-speech acquisition adults with recent or chronic deafness and in children with congenital deafness operated before the 5th year of age, who underwent special preoperative speech therapy programme, fact which is in agreement with current literature. Patient satisfaction evaluated by "Sanders" psychometrics

  7. Activity Theory and Higher Education: Evaluating Learning Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, E.; Issroff, K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines current practice in the evaluation of learning technology in the UK and proposes a new approach informed by Activity Theory. It is based on our experiences of using Activity Theory to understand students' and lecturers' experiences of technology-based teaching environments. We discuss the activity of evaluating learning…

  8. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  9. Evaluating a Model of Youth Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzler, Carrie D.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Erickson, Darin J.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Sirard, John R.; Story, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between social influences, self-efficacy, enjoyment, and barriers and physical activity. Methods: Structural equation modeling examined relationships between parent and peer support, parent physical activity, individual perceptions, and objectively measured physical activity using accelerometers among a…

  10. Performance evaluation of different types of particle representation procedures of Particle Swarm Optimization in Job-shop Scheduling Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izah Anuar, Nurul; Saptari, Adi

    2016-02-01

    This paper addresses the types of particle representation (encoding) procedures in a population-based stochastic optimization technique in solving scheduling problems known in the job-shop manufacturing environment. It intends to evaluate and compare the performance of different particle representation procedures in Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in the case of solving Job-shop Scheduling Problems (JSP). Particle representation procedures refer to the mapping between the particle position in PSO and the scheduling solution in JSP. It is an important step to be carried out so that each particle in PSO can represent a schedule in JSP. Three procedures such as Operation and Particle Position Sequence (OPPS), random keys representation and random-key encoding scheme are used in this study. These procedures have been tested on FT06 and FT10 benchmark problems available in the OR-Library, where the objective function is to minimize the makespan by the use of MATLAB software. Based on the experimental results, it is discovered that OPPS gives the best performance in solving both benchmark problems. The contribution of this paper is the fact that it demonstrates to the practitioners involved in complex scheduling problems that different particle representation procedures can have significant effects on the performance of PSO in solving JSP.

  11. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... part 1515 (48 CFR part 1515). The significant features of this procedure are: (1) The Government will... the proposed cost or price provides an adequate reflection of the offeror's understanding of...

  12. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... part 1515 (48 CFR part 1515). The significant features of this procedure are: (1) The Government will... the proposed cost or price provides an adequate reflection of the offeror's understanding of...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... part 1515 (48 CFR part 1515). The significant features of this procedure are: (1) The Government will... the proposed cost or price provides an adequate reflection of the offeror's understanding of...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... part 1515 (48 CFR part 1515). The significant features of this procedure are: (1) The Government will... the proposed cost or price provides an adequate reflection of the offeror's understanding of...

  15. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... part 1515 (48 CFR part 1515). The significant features of this procedure are: (1) The Government will... the proposed cost or price provides an adequate reflection of the offeror's understanding of...

  16. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types

  17. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The global neutronic activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Indeed, data assimilation allows to combine both measurements from instruments and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible neutronic activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates the influence of measures by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations for the instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of the instruments depends both on the independent instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  18. A screening procedure to evaluate air pollution effects on Class I wilderness areas

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D.G.; Bartuska, A.M.; Byrne, J.G.; Cowling, E.; Fisher, R.; Likens, G.E.; Lindberg, S.E.; Linthurst, R.A.; Messer, J.; Nichols, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a screening procedure, intended to help wilderness managers conduct adverse impact determinations as part of Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) applications for sources that emit air pollutants that might impact class I wildernesses. This procedure provides an initial estimate of susceptibility to critical loadings for sulfur, nitrogen, and ozone. It also provides a basis for requesting necessary additional information where potential adverse impacts are identified.

  19. A synthesis procedure for pass-by noise of automotive vehicles employing numerically evaluated source-receiver transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijssen, Jacobus; Hallez, Raphael; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim

    2013-07-01

    A synthesis procedure is presented for the prediction of the sound pressure level (SPL) of passenger vehicles in a pass-by noise test. The proposed synthesis procedure translates the noise from the sources in the moving vehicle to the receivers in two steps. Firstly, the steady-state receiver contributions of the sources are computed as they would arise from a number of static vehicle positions along the drive path. Secondly, these contributions are then combined into a single transient signal from a moving vehicle for each source-receiver pair by means of a travel time correction. The multiple source-receiver transfer functions are numerically evaluated by employing the Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method (FMBEM), which allows for pass-by noise SPL estimation on the basis of the CAD/CAE computer models that are available early in the design stage. Results are presented that show the accuracy of the synthesis procedure and that show the ability of the combination of the synthesis procedure and numerically evaluated transfer functions to predict pass-by noise SPL for a realistic case in an evaluation time of less than a day.

  20. [Evaluating the implementation of involuntary hospitalization procedures: a profile of people, audits and recommendations].

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Line

    2014-01-01

    did not rigorously enter the data required in the new forms. The new form was present in only 51% of files and when consent was given, it was only documented in 27% of the cases.These results highlight the need to improve the documentation process given in the protocol. It would be very useful to establish strategies to obtain this consent in light of the specific characteristics that make up this subgroup of people who have been hospitalized against their will. Legislation alone is not enough to invoke a change in the involuntary hospitalisation rate. The clinical and organisational context must also be actively prepared to receive this new practice. In order to do this, evaluative research could contribute to improving the level of implementation and be of benefit to people in crisis and those with mental disorders. PMID:25120126

  1. Evaluation of antirotavirus activity of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Savi, Luciane Anita; Caon, Thiago; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Sobottka, Andrea Michel; Werner, Wolfgang; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Simões, Cláudia Maria Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Flavonoids are dietary components and the most ubiquitous phenolic compounds found in nature, showing a range of pharmacological activities including antiviral action. This study describes the antiviral screening of 60 different flavones and flavonols against human rotavirus (Wa-1 strain) as well as their cytotoxicity in MA104 cells. Cytotoxicity was investigated by cell morphology assessment and antirotavirus activity by cytopathic effect inhibition. Results were expressed as CC(50) and IC(50), respectively, in order to calculate the selectivity index (SI = CC(50)/IC(50)) of each compound. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) were proposed based on antirotavirus activity. PMID:20659535

  2. A Study of the Norm-Referenced Procedure for Evaluating Project Effectiveness as Applied in the Evaluation of Project Information Packages. Research Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaskowitz, David H.; Norwood, Charles R.

    Project Information Packages (PIPs) are informative kits that describe remedial educational programs and contain instructions for installing the projects in a new site. Six such PIPs were evaluated using a norm-referenced procedure applied to standardized test scores. Pretest scores were compared to posttest scores which were calculated according…

  3. Implications of cost-effectiveness analysis of medical technology. background paper number 5. four common x-ray procedures: problems and prospects for economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.L.; Krieger, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    This paper is about the economic evaluation of diagnostic procedures. The issue of economic evaluation is explored in the context of four common diagnostic X-ray procedures: the chest X-ray, the skull X-ray, the barium enema study, and the excretory urogram. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part summarizes the different evaluative models underlying studies of the four diagnostic X-ray procedures and to lay out the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The second part contains four separate chapters summarizing what is known about the utilization, costs, risks, and benefits of each procedure, with particular emphasis on the evaluative methods employed.

  4. 31 CFR 1028.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit card systems. 1028.520...) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR OPERATORS OF CREDIT CARD SYSTEMS... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit...

  5. 31 CFR 1028.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit card systems. 1028.520...) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR OPERATORS OF CREDIT CARD SYSTEMS... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit...

  6. 31 CFR 1028.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit card systems. 1028.520...) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR OPERATORS OF CREDIT CARD SYSTEMS... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit...

  7. 31 CFR 1028.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit card systems. 1028.520...) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR OPERATORS OF CREDIT CARD SYSTEMS... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for operators of credit...

  8. 45 CFR 100.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 100.6 Section 100.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 100.6...

  9. 31 CFR 1030.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for housing government sponsored enterprises. 1030... ENTERPRISES Special Information Sharing Procedures To Deter Money Laundering and Terrorist Activity § 1030.520... government sponsored enterprises. (a) Refer to § 1010.520 of this chapter. (b)...

  10. Development of transmucosal patch loaded with anesthetic and analgesic for dental procedures and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Nidhi, Malviya; Patro, M Nagaraju; Kusumvalli, Somisetty; Kusumdevi, Vemula

    2016-01-01

    Most of the dental surgeries require preoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic for painless procedures. A multidrug transmucosal drug delivery system loaded with lignocaine (Lig) base for immediate release and solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of diclofenac (Dic) diethylamine for prolonged release was developed. SLNs were prepared by solvent emulsion–evaporation method with Precirol ATO 5 and Geleol as lipids and Pluronic F 68 as surfactant and optimized with Box–Behnken design for particle size and entrapment efficiency. SLNs were incorporated into the transmucosal patch (TP) prepared with hydroxypropyl cellulose-LF (HPC-LF) and with a backing layer of ethyl cellulose. Optimized SLNs and TP were characterized for Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, in vitro release, ex vivo permeation through porcine buccal mucosa, Caco-2 permeability, and residual solvent analysis by gas chromatography. The TP was also evaluated for swelling index, in vitro residence time, tensile strength, and mucoadhesive strength. Preclinical pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and histopathological studies by application of TP on the gingiva of New Zealand rabbits were carried out. Particle size and entrapment efficiency of the optimized SLN “S8” were determined as 98.23 nm and 84.36%, respectively. The gingival crevicular fluid and tissue concentrations were greater than plasma concentrations with increase in Cmax and area under the curve (AUC) of Lig and Dic when compared to the control group. Pain perception by needle prick showed prolonged combined anesthetic and analgesic effect. The developed TP loaded with Lig base and Dic diethylamine-SLNs exhibited immediate and complete permeation with tissue accumulation of Lig followed by controlled prolonged release and tissue accumulation of Dic at the site of application. Thus, it could be anticipated from the in vivo studies that the

  11. Evaluating CO2 mineralization capacity of sedimentary rock Using BCR sequential extraction procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang-Ting; Yu, Chi-Wen; Yang, Hsiao-Ming; Chiao, Chung-Hui; Yang, Ming-Wei

    2015-04-01

    To relief the high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gradually becoming an important concept to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In IPCC Special Report on CCS, the storage mechanisms for geological formations are categorized into structural/stratigraphic, hydrodynamic and geochemical trappings. Geochemical trapping is considered as a storage mechanism, which can further increase storage capacity, effectiveness and security in terms of permanent CO2 sequestration. The injected CO2 can have geochemical interactions with pore fluid and reservoir rocks and transform into minerals. It is important to evaluate the capacity of reservoir rock for sequestrating CO2. In this study, sedimentary rock samples were collected from a 2-km-deep well in Midwestern Taiwan; and, the BCR sequential extraction experiments developed by European Union Measurement and Testing Programme were conducted. BCR was designed for extracting three major phases from soil, including exchangeable phase and carbonates (the first stage), reducible phase (the second stage) and oxidizable phase (the third stage). The chemistry of extracted solutions and rock residues were measured with ICP-MS and XRF, respectively. According to the results of XRF, considerable amounts of calcium and iron can be extracted by BCR procedures but other cations are negligible. In general, shale has a higher capacity of CO2 sequestration than sandstone. The first stage of extraction can release about 6 (sandstone) to 18.5 (shale) g of calcium from 1 kg rock, which are equivalent to 6.6 and 20.4 g CO2/kg rock, respectively. In the second stage extraction, 0.71 (sandstone) to 1.38 (shale) g/kg rock of iron can be released and can mineralized 0.56 to 1.08 g CO2/kg rock. However, there are no considerable cations extracted in the third stage of BCR as shown by the XRF analysis. In addition, the results of ICP-MS show that Mg can be released in the order of 10-3 g from 1 kg rock

  12. Total airborne mold particle sampling: evaluation of sample collection, preparation and counting procedures, and collection devices.

    PubMed

    Godish, Diana; Godish, Thad

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate (i) procedures used to collect, prepare, and count total airborne mold spore/particle concentrations, and (ii) the relative field performance of three commercially available total airborne mold spore/particle sampling devices. Differences between factory and laboratory airflow calibration values of axial fan-driven sampling instruments (used in the study) indicated a need for laboratory calibration using a mass flow meter to ensure that sample results were accurately calculated. An aniline blue-amended Calberla's solution adjusted to a pH of 4.2-4.4 provided good sample mounting/counting results using Dow Corning high vacuum grease, Dow Corning 280A adhesive, and Dow Corning 316 silicone release spray for samples collected using mini-Burkard and Allergenco samplers. Count variability among analysts was most pronounced in 5% counts of relatively low mold particle deposition density samples and trended downward with increased count percentage and particle deposition density. No significant differences were observed among means of 5, 10, and 20% counts and among analysts; a significant interaction effect was observed between analysts' counts and particle deposition densities. Significantly higher mini-Burkard and Air-O-Cell total mold spore/particle counts for 600x vs. 400x (1.9 and 2.3 x higher, respectively), 1000x vs. 600x (1.9 and 2.2 x higher, respectively) and 1000x vs. 400x (3.6 and 4.6 x higher, respectively) comparisons indicated that 1000x magnification counts best quantified total airborne mold spore/particles using light microscopy, and that lower magnification counts may result in unacceptable underreporting of airborne mold spore/particle concentrations. Modest but significantly higher (1.2x) total mold spore concentrations were observed with Allergenco vs. mini-Burkard samples collected in co-located, concurrently operated sampler studies; moderate but significantly higher mini-Burkard count values (1.4x) were

  13. Active spectral sensor evaluation under varying conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant stress has been estimated by spectral signature using both passive and active sensors. As optical sensors measure reflected light from a target, changes in illumination characteristics critically affect sensor response. Active sensors are of benefit in minimizing uncontrolled illumination effe...

  14. The Next Step in Deployment of Computer Based Procedures For Field Workers: Insights And Results From Field Evaluations at Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Le Blanc, Katya L.; Bly, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human operator interacts with the procedures. One way to achieve these improvements is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools (e.g., placekeeping, correct component verification, etc.), and dynamic step presentation. The latter means that the CBP system could only display relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the operator down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the operator’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. The research team at the Idaho National Laboratory has developed a prototype CBP system for field workers, which has been evaluated from a human factors and usability perspective in four laboratory studies. Based on the results from each study revisions were made to the CBP system. However, a crucial step to get the end users' (e.g., auxiliary operators, maintenance technicians, etc.) acceptance is to put the system in their hands and let them use it as a part of their everyday work activities. In the spring 2014 the first field evaluation of the INL CBP system was conducted at a nuclear power plant. Auxiliary operators conduct a functional test of one out of three backup air compressors each week. During the field evaluation activity, one auxiliary operator conducted the test with the paper-based procedure while a second auxiliary operator followed

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power

  16. EVALUATION OF AN ENHANCED STIMULUS–STIMULUS PAIRING PROCEDURE TO INCREASE EARLY VOCALIZATIONS OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Barbara E; Carr, James E; Grow, Laura L

    2009-01-01

    Evidence to support stimulus–stimulus pairing (SSP) in speech acquisition is less than robust, calling into question the ability of SSP to reliably establish automatically reinforcing properties of speech and limiting the procedure's clinical utility for increasing vocalizations. We evaluated the effects of a modified SSP procedure on low-frequency within-session vocalizations that were further strengthened through programmed reinforcement. Procedural modifications (e.g., interspersed paired and unpaired trials) were designed to increase stimulus salience during SSP. All 3 participants, preschoolers with autism, showed differential increases of target over nontarget vocal responses during SSP. Results suggested an automatic reinforcement effect of SSP, although alternative interpretations are discussed, and suggestions are made for future research to determine the utility of SSP as a clinical intervention for speech-delayed children. PMID:19949511

  17. How Do Users Evaluate Individual Documents? An Analysis of Dimensions of Evaluation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Iris; Benoit, Edward, III; Zhang, Huan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation plays an important role in users' information searching and retrieving processes. While previous research mainly focuses on applied criteria, less research is on other dimensions of evaluation. This study explores the dimensions of evaluation activities including criteria applied, elements examined, activity engaged in and…

  18. Evaluation of the phadebact gonococcus test, a coagglutination procedure for confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J S; Martin, J E

    1980-01-01

    Rapid and accurate immunological confirmation of presumptively positive gonococci could be facilitated with the Phadebact Gonococcus Test, a slide coagglutination procedure. The test was compared with carbohydrate utilization and fluorescent-antibody tests on 235 clinical isolates. With the coagglutination procedure, 97.1% of the isolates were identified as compared with 93.1% by carbohydrate utilization and 98.7% by fluorescent antibody. The Phadebact test was highly specific, showing no cross-reactions with 55 other Neisseria species or with 50 miscellaneous organisms occasionally found growing on selective culture media. Because of its high sensitivity and specificity, ease of performance, and ability to provide results in 2 to 3 min, this procedure provides a suitable alternative to the carbohydrate utilization and fluorescent-antibody tests for confirmation of N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:6766952

  19. Evaluation of routine depopulation, cleaning, and disinfection procedures in the live bird markets, New York.

    PubMed

    Trock, Susan C; Gaeta, Michelle; Gonzalez, Annette; Pederson, Janice C; Senne, Dennis A

    2008-03-01

    During the past years surveillance for avian influenza has been conducted in the live bird markets (LBMs) in New York as well as other states along the east coast. Repeated attempts to eradicate H5 and H7 influenza from the New York markets have focused efforts on the LBMs themselves. Despite repeated mandatory market closures accompanied by cleaning and disinfecting (C/D) procedures, avian influenza virus continued to be isolated. In an effort to assess the adequacy of the C/D procedure, samples were collected in temporal proximity to the depopulation and C/D. Comparison of the pre-C/D (83% virus positive), at C/D approval (1.6% positive) and post-C/D testing (33% positive) indicate that the current procedures of C/D can be effective at eliminating these influenza viruses. However, reinfection via introduction of influenza-virus-positive birds can occur shortly after the market reopens. PMID:18459316

  20. Data interpretation, objective evaluation procedures and mathematical techniques for the evaluation of energy-dependent ratio, shape and cross section data

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1980-01-01

    The evaluation of several energy-dependent neutron cross sections which are of importance for practical applications is considered. The evaluation process is defined as the procedure which is used to derive the best knowledge of these cross sections based on the available direct experimental data information, and, using theoretical models, on the auxiliary data base. The experimental data base represents a multiple overdetermination of the unknown cross sections with various correlations between the measured values. Obtaining the least-squares estimator is considered as the standard mathematical procedure to derive a consistent set of evaluated cross section values. Various approximations made in order to avoid the monstrous system of normal equations are considered and the feasibility of the exact solution is demonstrated. The variance-covariance of the result, its reliability and the improvements obtained in iterative steps are discussed. Finally, the inclusion of auxiliary, supplementary information is considered. 45 references.

  1. [Quality evaluation of the orthodontic practice for certification by ISO 9001. A procedure beneficial for medical, medico-dental or hospital service].

    PubMed

    Becker, G

    2001-01-01

    The accreditation of the ISO 9001 certification (ISO = International Standard Organization) is an external evaluation procedure carried out by independent experts, whose object is the analysis of the operational methods and practices of a medical care facility (e.g. hospital, private clinic, general practitioner's or dentist's practice) which decided to assume the concept, implementation and control of its own quality policy. The whole accreditation procedure represents the basic structure of a continuous dynamic progressiveness within a cabinet eager to offer outstanding quality. Moreover, it guarantees active and voluntary participation of every single member of the medical administration or technical team involved in the realization of this primary objective. In other words, we are talking about a very strong dynamic innovation leading to a change of views and the improvement of communication means, while simultaneously enhancing the security and quality aspects of medical care. The continuous guarantee of high quality medical care calls for precise planning and systematization of actions. First of all, these actions are defined, analyzed and listed in precise work procedures. As they are defined with the agreement of the whole team, they implicate respect and self control. This requires of course transparency of the treatment methods, whose different steps and procedures are described in detail in a logogramm set up in common. PMID:11570214

  2. Evaluation of DSS-14 pedestal-review of top surface repair procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oesterle, R. G.; Musser, D. W.; Salse, E. A. B.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed repair procedures for the top surface of the pedestal supporting the hydrostatic bearing runner for the 64m Antenna are presented. These procedures included: (1) removal of existing grout and concrete to approximately 8 in. below original concrete surface using a presplitting technique with expansive cement followed by secondary breaking; (2) preparation of exposed concrete surface including an epoxy bonding agent; and (3) replacement of material removed with 8 in. of new concrete surface including an epoxy bonding agent; and (4) replacement of material removed with 8 in. of new concrete and 4 in. of new grout.

  3. Evaluation of DSS-14 pedestal-review of top surface repair procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesterle, R. G.; Musser, D. W.; Salse, E. A. B.

    1983-05-01

    Proposed repair procedures for the top surface of the pedestal supporting the hydrostatic bearing runner for the 64m Antenna are presented. These procedures included: (1) removal of existing grout and concrete to approximately 8 in. below original concrete surface using a presplitting technique with expansive cement followed by secondary breaking; (2) preparation of exposed concrete surface including an epoxy bonding agent; and (3) replacement of material removed with 8 in. of new concrete surface including an epoxy bonding agent; and (4) replacement of material removed with 8 in. of new concrete and 4 in. of new grout.

  4. Teacher Evaluations: Empty Ceremony or Vital Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    One of the most critical duties of a school principal is to evaluate and lead teachers. A school district in Texas has mandated that all administrators conduct one hundred and forty-four walkthroughs per school year. Given that time is a priceless commodity in a typical school day, how effective is the above mandate to teacher and principal…

  5. Procedure of evaluating parameters of inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults for ground motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Dianshu; Dan, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a procedure of evaluating fault parameters of asperity models for predicting strong ground motions from inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults. In order to obtain averaged dynamic stress drops, we adopted the formula obtained by dynamic fault rupturing simulations for surface faults of the length from 15 to 100 km, because the formula of the averaged static stress drops for circular cracks, commonly adopted in existing procedures, cannot be applied to surface faults or long faults. The averaged dynamic stress drops were estimated to be 3.4 MPa over the entire fault and 12.2 MPa on the asperities, from the data of 10 earthquakes in Japan and 13 earthquakes in other countries. The procedure has a significant feature that the average slip on the seismic faults longer than about 80 km is constant, about 300 cm. In order to validate our proposed procedure, we made a model for a 141 km long strike-slip fault by our proposed procedure for strike-slip faults, predicted ground motions, and showed that the resultant motions agreed well with the records of the 1999 Kocaeli, Turkey, earthquake (Mw 7.6) and with the peak ground accelerations and peak ground velocities by the GMPE of Si and Midorikawa (1999).

  6. Evaluation of solution procedures for material and/or geometrically nonlinear structural analysis by the direct stiffness method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stricklin, J. A.; Haisler, W. E.; Von Riesemann, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the solution procedures available for the analysis of inelastic and/or large deflection structural behavior. A literature survey is given which summarized the contribution of other researchers in the analysis of structural problems exhibiting material nonlinearities and combined geometric-material nonlinearities. Attention is focused at evaluating the available computation and solution techniques. Each of the solution techniques is developed from a common equation of equilibrium in terms of pseudo forces. The solution procedures are applied to circular plates and shells of revolution in an attempt to compare and evaluate each with respect to computational accuracy, economy, and efficiency. Based on the numerical studies, observations and comments are made with regard to the accuracy and economy of each solution technique.

  7. Evaluation and Optimization of an ELISA Procedure to Quantify Antibodies Against Pneumococcal Polysaccharides Included in the 13-Valent Conjugate Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Belmonti, Simone; Lombardi, Francesca; Morandi, Matteo; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Tordini, Giacinta; Cauda, Roberto; De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Montagnani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) is recommended for HIV-infected people, although its effectiveness in this population remains under evaluation. In this study, we describe the development, optimization, and analytical validation of an ELISA procedure to measure specific antibodies for the pneumococcal polysaccharide serotypes included in PCV13 vaccine, testing sera obtained from HIV-infected outpatients (n = 30) who received the vaccine. The protocol followed the last version of WHO guidelines, based on the new standard 007sp, with the modification of employing Statens Serum Institut (SSI) antigens. We supplied the assay performance validation in terms of sensitivity, reproducibility, precision and accuracy. In addition we detailed optimal antigen-coating concentrations and ELISA conditions common to all 13 serotypes, suitable for laboratories performing these assays in order to standardize the method. Our procedure showed reproducibility and reliability, making it a valid alternative for evaluating the response to pneumococcal serotypes included in PCV13 vaccine. PMID:26506438

  8. Some Dilemmas of Institutional Evaluation and Their Relationship to Preconditions and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Clem

    1980-01-01

    Using "A Study of Student Choice in Context of Institutional Change (SCIC)" is an example of an evaluation using social anthropological methods. The problems of confidentiality, rapport, evaluator autonomy, and unclear preconditions are discussed and illustrated. (BW)

  9. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  10. Bargaining Unit Determination Procedures in the Public Sector: A Comparative Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayford, Stephen L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the characteristics and relative efficacy of the procedures used in several states and the federal government to determine appropriate bargaining units. Available from Executive Enterprises Publications Co., Inc., 33 West 60th Street, New York, New York 10023; $48.00 per year. (Author/IRT)

  11. A New Response Surface Analysis Procedure For Evaluating Process Control In Photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, M. P. C.; Hannifan, M. R.; Perera, T.

    1986-07-01

    As integrated circuit feature sizes shrink to sub-micron geometries, the need for a precisely defined and controlled photolithographic process becomes crucial. This paper outlines a method to improve an optical positive photoresist process using an innovative Response Surface Analysis (RSA) procedure. RSA has previously been employed to graphically model simple resist processes. In this procedure, exposure dose, develop time and concentration have been considered. The critical parameter (response), linewidth, is fitted to a set of linear hyperbola expressions. These expressions are then manipulated to directly calculate the conditions which replicate a desired linewidth. The associated process latitudes, response variations per process variable changes, are similarly derived. Optimal processing conditions are obtained mathematically using weighting factors derived from absolute and relative variations in the process. The accuracy and success of this procedure is demonstrated in improved linewidth control when operating at the optimal process condition. This improved control was observed in a stepper based applications laboratory. The results show the utility of this procedure as an effective tool to predict optimal processing conditions in an environment of complex variable interactions confounded by random and systematic errors.

  12. Clustering algorithm evaluation and the development of a replacement for procedure 1. [for crop inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennington, R. K.; Johnson, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient procedure which clusters data using a completely unsupervised clustering algorithm and then uses labeled pixels to label the resulting clusters or perform a stratified estimate using the clusters as strata is developed. Three clustering algorithms, CLASSY, AMOEBA, and ISOCLS, are compared for efficiency. Three stratified estimation schemes and three labeling schemes are also considered and compared.

  13. Evaluation of intranuclear BrdU detection procedures for use in multicolor flow cytometry*

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Background Measurement of cell proliferation via BrdU incorporation in combination with multicolor cell surface staining would facilitate studies on cell subsets that require multiple markers for their identification. However, the extent to which the often harsh cell preparation procedures required affect the staining quality of more recently developed fluorescent dyes has not been assessed. Methods Three cell preparation protocols for BrdU measurement were compared for their ability to maintain fluorescent surface staining and scatter parameters of in vivo BrdU-labeled cells by flow cytometry. A 10-color fluorescent panel was developed to test the quality of surface staining following cell treatment and the ability to perform BrdU measurements on even small B lymphocyte subsets. Results All cell preparation procedures affected the quality of fluorescent and/or scatter parameters to varying degrees. Paraformaldehyde / saponin-based procedures preserved sufficient fluorescent surface staining to determine BrdU incorporation rates among all splenic B cell subsets, including B-1a cells, which constitute roughly 0.5% of cells. Turnover rates of B-1a cells were similar to immature B cells and higher than those of the other mature B cell subsets. Conclusion Paraformaldehyde / saponin-based cell preparation procedures facilitate detailed cell turnover studies on small cell subsets in vivo, revealing new functional information on rare cell populations. PMID:16538653

  14. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-03-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm(2), 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. PMID:26269518

  15. Increasing Seat Belt Use on a College Campus: An Evaluation of Two Prompting Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Michael C.; Helms, Bridgett P.

    2009-01-01

    Seat belt use is an important factor in the prevention of automobile accidents involving injuries and fatalities. The current study used a multielement design to compare the "Click It or Ticket" and "Please Buckle Up--I Care" procedures. Results indicate that the Click It or Ticket prompt resulted in a 20-percentage-point increase in seat belt…

  16. Classical Item Analysis Using Latent Variable Modeling: A Note on a Direct Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A directly applicable latent variable modeling procedure for classical item analysis is outlined. The method allows one to point and interval estimate item difficulty, item correlations, and item-total correlations for composites consisting of categorical items. The approach is readily employed in empirical research and as a by-product permits…

  17. 40 CFR 63.7112 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... any modifications to standard procedures; (4) Test results, including opacity; (5) Quality assurance.../ton) of stone feed. Ck = Concentration of PM in the kiln effluent, grain/dry standard cubic feet (gr... if there is not a separate cooler exhaust to the atmosphere. P = Stone feed rate, tons per hour...

  18. An Evaluation of Three Time-Out Procedures for Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E.; Manos, Michael J.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Chronis, Andrea M.; Onyango, Adia N.; Lopez-Williams, Andy; Burrows-MacLean, Lisa; Coles, Erika K.; Meichenbaum, David L.; Caserta, Donald A.; Swain, Sara

    2004-01-01

    Behavior modification is an evidence-based treatment for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Time-out from positive reinforcement is one behavior-modification procedure commonly recommended to manage disruptive or noncompliant behavior. This investigation examined the effects of time-out on children's behavior within the…

  19. Evaluation of alternative surface runoff accounting procedures using the SWAT model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For surface runoff estimation in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model, the curve number (CN) procedure is commonly adopted to calculate surface runoff by utilizing antecedent soil moisture condition (SCSI) in field. In the recent version of SWAT (SWAT2005), an alternative approach is ava...

  20. The Participation of Schools in the Recruitment of Teachers: Evaluating New Procedures in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefers, Christine; Terhart, Ewald

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, in Germany, the centralized state school administration oversees the staffing of its schools. Specifically, the administration assigns new teachers to designated schools. During the last decade, some German "Bundeslander" have established new procedures for hiring new teachers. Since 1997 the Bundesland "Nordrhein-Westfalen" (NRW)…

  1. Evaluation of Knowledge Structures by Procedures of Networking--in the Context of Commercial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Susanne

    The networking procedure is explored as a way to describe and measure cognitive structures. A research project at Gottingen University (Germany) tried to operationalize economic contextual knowledge as a qualification for teaching in commercial (business) education. Networking was examined as a way to measure this knowledge. Each student should…

  2. Evaluation of eddy-current procedures for measuring wear scars in preheat steam generators

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.D.

    1985-04-01

    Tests show that flat wear scar procedures will provide more accurate measurements of the depth of wear scars in steam generator tubes if they are supplemented by two new techniques. Used together, these methods can detect as little as 5% increase in scar depth.

  3. Establishing and Reversing Equivalence Relations with a Precursor to the Relational Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Paul M.; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Striefel, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the viability of a go/no-go discrimination procedure (pREP) for generating stimulus equivalence. During pREP training, participants receive positive feedback for pressing a bar after the successive presentation of two same-class stimuli and for not pressing after the presentation of two different-class stimuli.…

  4. Evaluating Procedures for Reducing Measurement Error in Math Curriculum-Based Measurement Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Methe, Scott A.; Briesch, Amy M.; Hulac, David

    2015-01-01

    At present, it is unclear whether math curriculum-based measurement (M-CBM) procedures provide a dependable measure of student progress in math computation because support for its technical properties is based largely upon a body of correlational research. Recent investigations into the dependability of M-CBM scores have found that evaluating…

  5. Evaluation of Hearing Impaired Student's Reading Comprehension with the Cloze Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girgin, Umit

    2007-01-01

    Different evaluation methods are applied in order to determine and develop the skills used for reading comprehension. Cloze is an informal evaluation method which is used to determine students' current reading knowledge, to develop their focusing skills on contextual cues and to enhance critical reading. Cloze involves evaluating readers' prior…

  6. Evaluation of a cryopreservation procedure to set up a new bone marrow transplant unit using lymphocyte proliferation test.

    PubMed

    Wong, Peerapon; Pongcharoen, Sutatip; Pangwangthong, Kullanit; Supalap, Kwansuda; Tapprom, Akamon; Deoisares, Rawisut

    2012-01-01

    A bone marrow transplant (BMT) is one kind of standard treatment modality in advanced hemato-oncology. In order to set up a BMT unit, one of the important steps before starting a clinical program is to evaluate the cryopreservation procedure for stem cell storage. Twenty one bags of buffy coat were used to be the testing specimens. They were processed and frozen according to cryopreservation protocol and kept in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks. The evaluation process was carried out with a lymphocyte proliferation test together with trypan blue staining. By measuring the optical density of each lymphocyte containing well after stimulation, the lymphocyte proliferation value (LPV) could be obtained. When comparing them before and after cryopreservation, the LPV was 2.064 ± 0.379 (mean ± SD) and 1.913 ± 0.546, (p = 0.314), respectively. At 2 weeks after cryopreservation, comparing between the frozen group and the unfrozen control, the LPV was 1.913 ± 0.546 and 0.486 ± 0.453, (p < 0.05), respectively. The LPV showed clear efficacy of the procedure, especially for preserving the cellular proliferation function. Our model of the cryopreservation procedure evaluation at pre-clinical phase by use of a buffy coat and lymphocyte proliferation test seems feasible for newly-established small BMT units. With these results, clinical transplantations can be performed with more confidence. PMID:21649473

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Sieglitz, Greg

    2001-03-01

    The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

  8. 12 CFR 225.27 - Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... with the provisions of § 262.3(e) of the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3(e)). ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION...

  9. 12 CFR 225.27 - Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... with the provisions of § 262.3(e) of the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3(e)). ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION...

  10. 12 CFR 225.27 - Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... with the provisions of § 262.3(e) of the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3(e)). ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION...

  11. 12 CFR 225.27 - Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... with the provisions of § 262.3(e) of the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3(e)). ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for determining scope of nonbanking... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION...

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise

  13. Evaluation of ride quality measurement procedures by subjective experiments using simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, L. T., Jr.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Since ride quality is, by definition, a matter of passenger response, there is need for a qualification procedure (QP) for establishing the degree to which any particular ride quality measurement procedure (RQMP) does correlate with passenger responses. Once established, such a QP will provide very useful guidance for optimal adjustment of the various parameters which any given RQMP contains. A QP is proposed based on use of a ride motion simulator and on test subject responses to recordings of actual vehicle motions. Test subject responses are used to determine simulator gain settings for the individual recordings such as to make all of the simulated rides equally uncomfortable to the test subjects. Simulator platform accelerations vs. time are recorded with each ride at its equal discomfort gain setting. The equal discomfort platform acceleration recordings are then digitzed.

  14. Evaluation of the eZono 4000 with eZGuide for ultrasound-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Latmore, Malikah; Levine, Daniel M

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures are increasingly common in a variety of acute care settings, such as the operating room, critical care unit and emergency room. However, accurate judgment of needle tip position using traditional ultrasound technology is frequently difficult, and serious injury can result from inadvertently advancing beyond or through the target. Needle navigation is a recent innovation that allows the clinician to visualize the needle position and trajectory in real time as it approaches the target. A novel ultrasound machine has recently been introduced that is portable and designed for procedural guidance. The eZono 4000™ features an innovative needle navigation technology that is simple to use and permits the use of a wide range of commercially available needles, avoiding the inconvenience and cost of proprietary equipment. This article discusses this new ultrasound machine in the context of other currently available ultrasound machines featuring needle navigation. PMID:25543816

  15. Monitoring low birth weight: an evaluation of international estimates and an updated estimation procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Ann K.; Wardlaw, Tessa

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To critically examine the data used to produce estimates of the proportion of infants with low birth weight in developing countries and to describe biases in these data. To assess the effect of adjustment procedures on the estimates and propose a modified estimation procedure for international reporting purposes. METHODS: Mothers' reports about their recent births in 62 nationally representative Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted between 1990 and 2000 were analysed. The proportion of infants weighed at birth, characteristics of those weighed, extent of misreporting, and mothers' subjective assessments of their children's size at birth were examined. FINDINGS: In many developing countries the majority of infants were not weighed at birth. Those who were weighed were more likely to have mothers who live in urban areas and are educated, and to be born in a medical facility with assistance from medically trained personnel. Birth weights reported by mothers are "heaped" on multiples of 500 grams. CONCLUSION: Current survey-based estimates of the prevalence of low birth weight are biased substantially downwards. Two adjustments to reported data are recommended: a weighting procedure that combines reported birth weights with mothers' assessment of the child's size at birth, and categorization of one-quarter of the infants reported to have a birth weight of exactly 2500 grams as having low birth weight. Averaged over all surveys, these procedures increased the proportion classified as having low birth weight by 25%. We also recommend that the proportion of infants not weighed at birth be routinely reported. Efforts are needed to increase the weighing of newborns and the recording of their weights. PMID:15798841

  16. Evaluation of Flight Deck-Based Interval Management Crew Procedure Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sara R.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Swieringa, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    Air traffic demand is predicted to increase over the next 20 years, creating a need for new technologies and procedures to support this growth in a safe and efficient manner. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration - 1 (ATD-1) will operationally demonstrate the feasibility of efficient arrival operations combining ground-based and airborne NASA technologies. The integration of these technologies will increase throughput, reduce delay, conserve fuel, and minimize environmental impacts. The ground-based tools include Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering for precise time-based scheduling and Controller Managed Spacing decision support tools for better managing aircraft delay with speed control. The core airborne technology in ATD-1 is Flight deck-based Interval Management (FIM). FIM tools provide pilots with speed commands calculated using information from Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast. The precise merging and spacing enabled by FIM avionics and flight crew procedures will reduce excess spacing buffers and result in higher terminal throughput. This paper describes a human-in-the-loop experiment designed to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the ATD-1 procedures used in a voice communications environment. This experiment utilized the ATD-1 integrated system of ground-based and airborne technologies. Pilot participants flew a high-fidelity fixed base simulator equipped with an airborne spacing algorithm and a FIM crew interface. Experiment scenarios involved multiple air traffic flows into the Dallas-Fort Worth Terminal Radar Control airspace. Results indicate that the proposed procedures were feasible for use by flight crews in a voice communications environment. The delivery accuracy at the achieve-by point was within +/- five seconds and the delivery precision was less than five seconds. Furthermore, FIM speed commands occurred at a rate of less than one per minute

  17. Evaluation of pharmacological activity of Hibiscus tiliaceus.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Awal, S M; Nazmir, Sonia; Nasrin, Sonia; Nurunnabi, Tauhidur Rahman; Uddin, Shaikh Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Hibiscus tiliaceus, locally known as Bhola was examined for phytochemical properties and its cytotoxic, antibacterial, analgesic and neuropharmacological activities using the ethanol extract of leaf and bark. The phytochemical analysis of the leaf extract indicated the presence of tannins, whereas bark extract indicated the presence of alkaloid, reducing sugar and tannins. A preliminary cytotoxicity of these extracts was determined by a simple and low cost assay using brine shrimp lethality. The leaf extract of the plant exhibited moderate cytotoxic effect (LC50: 20 µg/ml, LC90: 40 µg/ml) whereas the bark extract exhibited low cytotoxic effect (LC50: 50 µg/ml). In the analgesic test, the leaf extract showed comparatively high analgesic action than bark extract. There was no activity found in the leaf extract against the test bacterial strains, however bark extract exhibited a very little inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In the neuropharmacological test, the leaf and bark extract produced a decrease in both the time of onset of sleeping and the total sleeping time. The present study showed evidence that both leaf and bark extract of H. tiliaceus contain medicinally important bioactive compounds, thereby used as traditional medicine. PMID:27516947

  18. PROCEDURES FOR EVALUATING OPERATIONS OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING NETWORKS - A MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual is designed to evaluate the efficiency of ambient air monitoring networks whose primary objective is to document compliance with or progress toward attaining ambient air quality standards. The manual provides methods to evaluate the efficiency of each of six operation...

  19. Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Kramer, W.; Kroposki, B.; Martin, G.; McNutt, P.; Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Hoke, A.

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a test plan for V2G testing. The test plan is designed to test and evaluate the vehicle's power electronics capability to provide power to the grid, and to evaluate the vehicle's ability to connect and disconnect from the utility according to a subset of the IEEE Std. 1547 tests.

  20. Beyond Satisfaction: Toward an Outcomes-Based, Procedural Model of Faculty Development Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, D. Christopher; Marsh, Lauren; Wilcox, Kimerly; Cohen, Brad

    2011-01-01

    In response to the well-documented need for rigorous evaluations of faculty development programs and increasing demands for institutional accountability, University of Minnesota's Office of Information Technology (OIT) researchers have developed an approach to program evaluation that assesses individual level changes to participants' attitudes,…

  1. 20 CFR 670.965 - What procedures apply to disclosure of information about Job Corps students and program activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What procedures apply to disclosure of information about Job Corps students and program activities? 670.965 Section 670.965 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE JOB CORPS UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative and...

  2. Teaching Core Content Embedded in a Functional Activity to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability Using a Simultaneous Prompting Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Jennifer; Collins, Belva C.; Hager, Karen D.; Ault, Melinda Jones

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching four secondary students with moderate intellectual disability to acquire and generalize core content embedded in a functional activity. Data gathered within the context of a multiple probe design revealed that all participants learned the…

  3. Small Schools Science Curriculum, K-3: Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies. Scope, Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartl, David, Ed.; And Others

    Learning objectives and suggested activities, monitoring procedures and resources for the Washington K-3 Small Schools Science Curriculum are based on the rationale that "young children need the opportunity to observe, classify, predict, test ideas again and again in a variety of contexts, ask questions, explain, discuss ideas, fail, and succeed.…

  4. 31 CFR 1021.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR CASINOS AND CARD CLUBS Special Information Sharing... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for casinos and card clubs. (a... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special information sharing...

  5. 31 CFR 1021.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR CASINOS AND CARD CLUBS Special Information Sharing... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for casinos and card clubs. (a... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special information sharing...

  6. 31 CFR 1021.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for casinos and card clubs. 1021.520 Section 1021.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL CRIMES ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  7. 31 CFR 1021.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT NETWORK, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY RULES FOR CASINOS AND CARD CLUBS Special Information Sharing... information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for casinos and card clubs. (a... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special information sharing...

  8. Small Schools Mathematics Curriculum, 4-6: Reading, Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies. Scope, Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartl, David, Ed.; And Others

    The Washington grade 4-6 mathematics curriculum is organized according to the Small Schools Materials format which lists the sequence of learning objectives related to a specific curriculum area, recommends a teaching and mastery grade placement, and identifies activities, monitoring procedures and possible resources used in teaching to the…

  9. 31 CFR 1029.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan or finance companies. 1029.520 Section 1029.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  10. 31 CFR 1029.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan or finance companies. 1029.520 Section 1029.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  11. 31 CFR 1029.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for loan or finance companies. 1029.520 Section 1029.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  12. Small Schools Visual Arts Curriculum, K-3: Scope, Objectives, Activities, Resources, Monitoring Procedures. The Comprehensive Arts in Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Rachel, Comp.

    Devoted to the visual arts, this volume of the Washington Small Schools Curriculum for grades K-3 utilizes the format of presenting learning objectives with recommended grade placement levels and suggesting activities, monitoring procedures and resources used in teaching the objectives. Chapter 1, Color, presents painter's terms, growth…

  13. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  14. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  15. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  16. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  17. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  18. 31 CFR 1022.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money services businesses. 1022.520 Section 1022.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  19. 31 CFR 1022.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money services businesses. 1022.520 Section 1022.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  20. 31 CFR 1022.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money services businesses. 1022.520 Section 1022.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  1. 31 CFR 1022.520 - Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special information sharing procedures to deter money laundering and terrorist activity for money services businesses. 1022.520 Section 1022.520 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FINANCIAL...

  2. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF...

  3. 18 CFR 1311.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 1311.6 Section 1311.6 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF...

  4. Evaluation of the admission procedure and academic performance on the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana, Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Susec-Michieli, M; Kalisnik, M

    1983-07-01

    The data about the applicants and medical students who matriculated at the Medical Faculty of Ljubljana during the period from 1962-63 to 1969-70 by admission procedure were reviewed. A higher proportion of women than men was accepted, but men went on from year to year more regularly (P less than 0.05). Women graduated significantly later (P less than 0.05). More than half the students came from Ljubljana and its surrounding area. Academic success was correlated with general success in secondary school and with the raw scores at the admission examinations. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated and their values varied greatly between men and women, as well as among single cohorts. The multiple regression analysis showed that the best predictor for academic performance was the average success in secondary school (gymnasium) and in addition, the raw scores in biology and foreign language obtained at the admission examination. The results also showed the standardized regression coefficients beta and these variables should therefore be retained in the admission procedure in future. The cumulated coefficient of determination could explain about 11% to 15% of the variability of dependent variables--i.e., average academic success (mean mark of all examinations) and average academic success standardized to the duration of study. The psychological test was of the least importance and could be omitted in future admission procedures. The mean mark in mathematics in secondary school and the mean mark in somatology (the study of the anatomy and physiology of the body) at the admission examination correlated highly with other admission criteria and could also be omitted in future. PMID:6877106

  5. Emergency evacuation/transportation plan update: Traffic model development and evaluation of early closure procedures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-28

    Prolonged delays in traffic experienced by Laboratory personnel during a recent early dismissal in inclement weather, coupled with reconstruction efforts along NM 502 east of the White Rock Wye for the next 1 to 2 years, has prompted Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to re-evaluate and improve the present transportation plan and its integration with contingency plans maintained in other organizations. Facilities planners and emergency operations staff need to evaluate the transportation system`s capability to inefficiently and safely evacuate LANL under different low-level emergency conditions. A variety of potential procedures governing the release of employees from the different technical areas (TAs) requires evaluation, perhaps with regard to multiple emergency-condition scenarios, with one or more optimal procedures ultimately presented for adoption by Lab Management. The work undertaken in this project will hopefully lay a foundation for an on-going, progressive transportation system analysis capability. It utilizes microscale simulation techniques to affirm, reassess and validate the Laboratory`s Early Dismissal/Closure/Delayed Opening Plan. The Laboratory is required by Federal guidelines, and compelled by prudent practice and conscientious regard for the welfare of employees and nearby residents, to maintain plans and operating procedures for evacuation if the need arises. The tools developed during this process can be used outside of contingency planning. It is anticipated that the traffic models developed will allow site planners to evaluate changes to the traffic network which could better serve the normal traffic levels. Changes in roadway configuration, control strategies (signalization and signing), response strategies to traffic accidents, and patterns of demand can be modelled using the analysis tools developed during this project. Such scenarios typically are important considerations in master planning and facilities programming.

  6. Evaluation of discretization procedures for transition elements in adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Levit, Itzak; Stanley, Gary M.

    1991-01-01

    Three transition interpolation schemes for use in h-or r-refinement have been analyzed in terms of accuracy, implementation ease and extendability. They include blending-function interpolation, displacement averaging, and strain matching at discrete points along the transition edge lines. The results suggest that the choice of matching depends strongly on the element formulations, (viz. displacement or assumed strain, etc.) and mesh refinement criteria employed, and to a lesser extent the choice of computer architecture (serial vs. parallel) and the equation solution procedures. A recommended pairing of some of the elements with the choice factors is suggested.

  7. Initial Field Evaluation of Pilot Procedures for Flying CTAS Descent Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett; Goka, Tsuyoshi; Cashion, Patricia; Feary, Michael; Graham, Holly; Smith, Nancy; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) is a new support system that is designed to assist air traffic controllers in the management of arrival traffic. CTAS will provide controllers with more information about current air traffic, enabling them to provide clearances for efficient, conflict-free descents that help achieve an orderly stream of aircraft at the final approach fix. CTAS is a computer-based system that functions as a "ground-based FMS" that can predict flight trajectories and arrival times for all incoming aircraft. CTAS uses an aircraft's cruise airspeed; current air traffic, winds and temperature; performance characteristics of the aircraft type; and individual airline preferences to create a flight profile from cruise altitude to the final approach fix. Controllers can use this flight profile to provide a descent clearance that will allow an aircraft to fly an efficient descent and merge more smoothly with other arriving aircraft. A field test of the CTAS Descent Advisor software was conducted at the Denver Center for aircraft arriving at the Stapleton International Airport from September 12-29. CTAS Descent clearances were given to a NASA flight test aircraft and to 77 airline flights that arrived during low traffic periods. For the airline portion of the field test, cockpit procedures and pilot briefing packages for both FMS equipped and unequipped aircraft were developed in cooperation with an airline. The procedures developed for the FMS equipped aircraft were to fly a VNAV descent at a controller specified speed to cross a metering fix at a specified altitude and speed. For nonFMS aircraft, the clearance also specified a CTAS calculated top-of-descent point. Some CTAS related flight deck issues included how much time was available to the pilots' for compliance, the amount of information that needed to be interpreted in the clearance and possible repercussions of misunderstandings. Data collected during the study ranged from subjective data

  8. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  9. Evaluation of the contribution of LiDAR data and postclassification procedures to object-based classification accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styers, Diane M.; Moskal, L. Monika; Richardson, Jeffrey J.; Halabisky, Meghan A.

    2014-01-01

    Object-based image analysis (OBIA) is becoming an increasingly common method for producing land use/land cover (LULC) classifications in urban areas. In order to produce the most accurate LULC map, LiDAR data and postclassification procedures are often employed, but their relative contributions to accuracy are unclear. We examined the contribution of LiDAR data and postclassification procedures to increase classification accuracies over using imagery alone and assessed sources of error along an ecologically complex urban-to-rural gradient in Olympia, Washington. Overall classification accuracy and user's and producer's accuracies for individual classes were evaluated. The addition of LiDAR data to the OBIA classification resulted in an 8.34% increase in overall accuracy, while manual postclassification to the imagery+LiDAR classification improved accuracy only an additional 1%. Sources of error in this classification were largely due to edge effects, from which multiple different types of errors result.

  10. Evaluation of a robotic arm for echocardiography to X-ray image registration during cardiac catheterization procedures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingliang; Penney, Graeme P; Bos, Dennis; Frissen, Peter; de Fockert, George; King, Andy; Gao, Gang; Yao, Cheng; Totman, John; Ginks, Matthew; Rinaldi, C; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S

    2009-01-01

    We present an initial evaluation of a robotic arm for positioning a 3D echo probe during cardiac catheterization procedures. By tracking the robotic arm, X-ray table and X-ray C-arm, we are able to register the 3D echo images with live 2D X-ray images. In addition, we can also use tracking data from the robotic arm combined with system calibrations to create extended field of view 3D echo images. Both these features can be used for roadmapping to guide cardiac catheterization procedures. We have carried out a validation experiment of our registration method using a cross-wire phantom. Results show our method to be accurate to 3.5 mm. We have successfully demonstrated the creation of the extended field of view data on 2 healthy volunteers and the registration of echo and X-ray data on 1 patient undergoing a pacing study. PMID:19964867

  11. A sequential extraction procedure to evaluate the mobilization behavior of rare earth elements in soils and tailings materials.

    PubMed

    Mittermüller, Marc; Saatz, Jessica; Daus, Birgit

    2016-03-01

    A novel sequential extraction method for evaluation of the mobilization behavior of rare earth elements in soils and mine tailings materials is presented. The sequence consists of the following four steps: 0.05 mol L(-1) calcium nitrate (easily soluble and ion exchange fraction), 0.1 mol L(-1) citric acid (fraction mobilized by complexation and carbonate bound), 0.05 mol L(-1) hydroxylamine hydrochloride (pH = 2) (reducible fraction), 1.4 mol L(-1) nitric acid (acid soluble fraction). The procedure was optimized with a certified soil material and a mine tailings material and was applied to eight samples of a soil profile. The different results obtained by using either the developed method or the widespread used BCR-Method for comparison are discussed. There were clear advantages using the newly created sequential extraction procedure in getting more detailed information about the bioavailable fraction and a fraction addressing REE phosphates. PMID:26766351

  12. Some fundamental aspects of fault-tree and digraph-matrix relationships for a systems-interaction evaluation procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.

    1982-02-28

    Recent events, such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3, and Crystal River-3, have demonstrated that complex accidents can occur as a result of dependent (common-cause/mode) failures. These events are now being called Systems Interactions. A procedure for the identification and evaluation of Systems Interactions is being developed by the NRC. Several national laboratories and utilities have contributed preliminary procedures. As a result, there are several important views of the Systems Interaction problem. This report reviews some fundamental mathematical background of both fault-oriented and success-oriented risk analyses in order to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each. In addition, it outlines several fault-oriented/dependency analysis approaches and several success-oriented/digraph-matrix approaches. The objective is to obtain a broad perspective of present options for solving the Systems Interaction problem.

  13. Evaluation of a Second Generation Dissemination of a Local Improvement Project: Implications for Theory and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.; Grant, Evelyn T.

    1986-01-01

    Reports three second generation dissemination evaluation studies of the secondary school component of the Improving Citizenship Education Project (ICE). Results show successful adoption was possible when patterned after original school system implementation. (JDH)

  14. Evaluation of two different hand hygiene procedures during routine patient care.

    PubMed

    Eksi, F; Mehli, M; Akgun, S; Bayram, A; Balci, I; Aydin, N

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of hand washing (HW) and hand washing plus rubbing with an alcohol-based solution (HWR) on numbers of total and transient flora colonies on the hands of healthcare workers (HCWs) during routine patient care was assessed. Samples were collected, using a standard bag broth technique, from the hands of 154 HCWs, before and immediately after carrying out a hand hygiene procedure. The numbers of total and transient flora colonies per plate were counted and transient pathogens were identified. A significant statistical difference between ward speciality was detected with respect to the isolation rate of transient flora. Transient hand flora were recovered from 25.3% of HCWs before carrying out the hand hygiene procedure. With respect to the disappearance and prevention of regrowth of transient flora after hand hygiene, the HWR technique was significantly more effective than HW. In conclusion, a disinfectant should be added to the hand washing process to achieve optimum protection against nosocomial infections in routine hospital practice. PMID:21227014

  15. Human factors evaluation of a dynamic channel depiction of navigation procedures in SVS displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pschierer, C.; Schiefele, J.; Howland, D.; Barraci, N.; Sindlinger, A.; Klingauf, U.

    2007-04-01

    Synthetic vision systems (SVS) are studied for some time to improve pilot's situational awareness and lower their workload. Early systems just displayed a virtual outside view of terrain, obstacles or airport elements as it could also be perceived through the cockpit windows in absence of haze, fog or any other factors impairing visibility. Required digital terrain, obstacle and airport databases have been developed and standardized by Jeppesen as part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. Newer SVS displays also introduced different kinds of flight guidance symbology to help pilots to improve the overall flight precision. The method studied in this paper is to display navigation procedures in the form of guidance channels. First releases of the described system used static channels, generated once at the startup at the system or even offline. While this approach is very resource friendly for the avionics hardware, it does not consider the users, which want the system to respond to the current flight conditions dynamically. Therefore, a new application has been developed which generates both the general channel trajectory as well as the channel depiction in a fully dynamic way while the pilot flies a navigation procedure.

  16. Procedures for evaluating filament cracking during fatigue testing of Nb3Sn strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, M. K.; Lee, Peter; McRae, D. M.; Walsh, Robert; Starch, W. L.; Jewell, M. C.; Devred, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2012-06-01

    In Tokamak fusion reactors, such as ITER, superconducting strands are subjected to repeated Lorentz force loading and unloading which may degrade performance over time. The Cu matrix which surrounds the brittle Nb3Sn filaments allows the possibility of some elastic-plastic deformation that can initiate filament cracking. We seek to understand if there are strand design variables that might ameliorate such degradation but before being able to do such experiments, we need to establish procedures that can unambiguously detect the cracking caused by loading, rather than by subsequent metallographic examination. Here we make a first report of our procedures after fatigue testing at 77K. Filament crack densities were quantified from large montages covering ≈20 mm length of strand. Three types of cracks were present. The most common were cracks transverse to the filament axis adjacent to voids. Cracks away from voids were of low density until close to the fracture strain. A third kind of crack which generally initiates at unreacted Nb cores of filaments extends radially and in the plane parallel to the wire axis. Example results on one bronze strand fatigued for 1000 loading cycles at axial strains from 0.4% to 1.14% are shown.

  17. Development and evaluation of a rapid and simple procedure for detection of Pneumocystis carinii by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, C P; Nelson, N A; Gill, V J

    1994-01-01

    We report the development of a simplified PCR-based assay for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in clinical specimens. The adoption of a rapid DNA extraction procedure and the introduction of a type of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for PCR product detection enabled this procedure to be carried out in a single working day in a clinical microbiology laboratory. The PCR assay was prospectively compared with an immunofluorescent-antibody (FA) staining method for the detection of P. carinii in induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens. The results of the study showed that, for induced sputum specimens, FA staining had a sensitivity of 78% (32 of 41 specimens) and a specificity of 100% (166 of 166 specimens); PCR was 100% (41 of 41 specimens) sensitive and 98% (162 of 166 specimens) specific. For BAL specimens, FA staining was 100% sensitive (21 of 21 specimens) and 100% specific (133 of 133 specimens), and PCR had a sensitivity of 100% (21 of 21 specimens) and a specificity of 99% (132 of 133 specimens). These results strongly suggest that use of our PCR-based assay could effect clinically useful improvements in the sensitivity of induced sputum specimens for the detection of P. carinii. Images PMID:7929749

  18. A simple procedure to improve the pressure evaluation in hydrodynamic context using the SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Diego; Colagrossi, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    In literature, it is well know that the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method can be affected by numerical noise on the pressure field when dealing with liquids. This can be highly dangerous when an SPH code is dynamically coupled with a structural solver. In this work a simple procedure is proposed to improve the computation of the pressure distribution in the dynamics of liquids. Such a procedure is based on the use of a density diffusion term in the equation for the mass conservation. This diffusion is a pure numerical effect, similar to the well known artificial viscosity originally proposed in SPH method to smooth out the shock discontinuities. As the artificial viscosity, the density diffusion used here goes to zero increasing the number of particles recovering consistency and convergence of the final numerical scheme adopted. Different artificial density diffusion formulas have been studied, paying attention to prevent unphysical changes of the flows. To show the improvements of the new scheme proposed here, a suitable set of examples, for which reference solutions or experimental data are available, has been tested.

  19. Evaluation of the immunofluorescence procedure for detection of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in water.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Norton, W D; Siegel, J E; Abbaszadegan, M

    1995-01-01

    The accurate determination of the presence of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in surface waters requires a reliable method for the detection and enumeration of these pathogenic organisms. Published methods have usually reported recovery efficiencies of less than 50% for both cysts and oocysts. Typically, the losses are greater for Cryptosporidium oocysts than they are for Giardia cysts. The purpose of this study was to examine procedures used for sample collection, elution, concentration, and clarification to determine when losses of cysts and oocysts occurred during processing. The results showed that major losses of cysts and oocysts occurred during centrifugation and clarification. Depending on the centrifugation force, oocyst losses of as high as 30% occurred for each centrifugation step. A 1.15-specific-gravity Percoll-sucrose gradient was needed to optimize recovery of oocysts from natural water samples. Minor improvements in the procedure could be accomplished by selecting a filter other than the recommended 1-micron-pore-size (nominal-porosity) polypropylene filter. PMID:7574607

  20. Development of a full-scale transmission testing procedure to evaluate advanced lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.; Shimski, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on the OH-58A helicopter main rotor transmission in the NASA Lewis 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. The testing was part of a joint Navy/NASA/Army lubrication program. The objective of the program was to develop a separate lubricant for gearboxes and demonstrate an improved performance in life and load-carrying capacity. The goal of the experiments was to develop a testing procedure to fail certain transmission components using a MIL-L-23699 base reference oil, then run identical tests with improved lubricants and demonstrate performance. The tests were directed at failing components that the Navy has had problems with due to marginal lubrication. These failures included mast shaft bearing micropitting, sun gear and planet bearing fatigue, and spiral bevel gear scoring. A variety of tests were performed and over 900 hours of total run time accumulated for these tests. Some success was achieved in developing a testing procedure to produce sun gear and planet bearing fatigue failures. Only marginal success was achieved in producing mast shaft bearing micropitting and spiral bevel gear scoring.