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Sample records for activities provide background

  1. 13. I95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. I-95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. Providence, Providence County, RI. sec. 4116, mp 185.15. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  2. Active galaxies and the diffuse Gamma-Ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A model for the origin of relativistic particles and gamma rays in active galactic nuclei and quasars, together with recent HEAO-1 observations of the spectra of active galaxies from 2 to 165 keV, provide the basis for a reexamination of the nature of the extragalactic gamma ray background. Active galaxies account for the observed background if their X-ray spectra steepen to E.021 above 100 keV, as observed in Cen-A, together with a further steepening to E.021 as a result of absorption of gamma rays by photon-photon pair production interactions with X-ray photons. The compactness of active galaxies required to give this steepening is consistent with estimates of their typical luminosity and radius.

  3. Oak Ridge background soils project provides data for remedial action evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.R.; Lee, S.Y.; Hatmaker, T.L.; McGinn, C.W.; Nourse, B.D.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Burgoa, B.B.; Lietzke, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    Many constituents of potential concern for human health occur naturally at low concentrations in soils. The primary objective of the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) was to provide fully validated and defensible, reservation-wide background concentration data on significant potential contaminants of concern (organics, inorganics, and radionuclides) in natural soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The data are particularly significant for remedial action projects; the data can be used to establish technical guidance and the basis for realistic cleanup requirements at hazardous waste sites on the reservation. Other objectives included providing baseline data for conducting contaminated site assessments and quantifying estimates of human health risk associated with background levels of potentially hazardous constituents in soils.

  4. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  5. The Importance of Providing Background Information on the Structure and Scoring of Performance Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Karns, Kathy; Hamlett, Carol L.; Dutka, Sue; Katzaroff, Michelle

    2000-01-01

    Examined the effects of providing students with background information about the structure and scoring of mathematics performance assessments (PA). Results for 187 elementary school students who had PA orientation and 182 who did not show the effects of test wiseness training for average and above-average students, but not for below-average…

  6. Providing Rich Art Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahey, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Using works of art with young children is a perfect way to bridge the gap between art activities that are too open or too closed. Teachers of young children sometimes try to find a middle ground by allowing free painting time at an easel in addition to recipe-oriented activities such as putting together precut shapes to create a spider or an apple…

  7. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  8. Providing Transition Services for Students with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avoke, Selete Kofi; Simon-Burroughs, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Youth with disabilities from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds are at high risk for a number of negative postschool outcomes including high unemployment, low wages, and limited access to postsecondary education and training. Cultural and linguistic differences may negatively impact transition planning for these youth as they…

  9. Canada's physical activity guides: background, process, and development.

    PubMed

    Sharratt, Michael T; Hearst, William E

    2007-01-01

    This historical background paper chronicles the major events leading to the development of Canada's physical activity guides (for children, youth, adults, and older adults). The paper outlines the process and the steps used, including information (where applicable) regarding national partners, project administration, Health Canada communications, product development, endorsement, distribution and implementation, collateral activities, media relations and evaluation framework. Brief summaries of the science that led to the recommended guidelines are included. The paper also summarizes the various physical activity guide assessment and evaluation projects and their findings, particularly as they relate to research carried out on Canada's physical activity guides for children and youth (and the associated support resources). PMID:18213939

  10. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  11. Active galaxies and the diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Active galaxies are shown to account for the observed gamma ray background radiation if a steepening of the spectra above about 100 keV is present. An analytical model is discussed in which protons undergo Fermi acceleration at a shock in a spherical accretion flow onto a massive black hole. Relativistic protons with power law spectra, nuclear interactions producing gamma rays from neutal pion decay and electrons from pion-mu meson-electron decay, with a power law spectrum above several hundred MeV, synchrotron and inverse Compton losses steepening the electron spectrum, a photon spectrum close to the pion gamma spectrum and a high-energy gamma ray spectrum steepened by photon-photon pair production interactions with X rays are covered in the model. Comparisons are made with HEAO 2 data on active galaxies, which have estimated luminosities and radii consistent with the compactness necessary for producing the steepening predicted by the model. The active galaxies spectra would be described by a spherical accretion-shock model.

  12. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  13. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  14. Increased Background Activity in DMSA Scintigraphy of a Nonazotemic Patient With β-Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Tsiouris, Spyridon

    2016-09-01

    Renal DMSA uptake provides an index for evaluation of the functional tubular mass, which depends on the renal blood flow, proximal tubular cell membrane function, and urinary acid-base balance. We present a case of a nonazotemic 48-year-old adult with β-thalassemia major under regular blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy that underwent DMSA scan showing minor cortical abnormalities and high background activity, featuring prominent cardiac blood pool and liver uptake. This case highlights the pitfall of high background activity during DMSA study in patients with β-thalassemia major due to tubular disorders. PMID:27280908

  15. Masticatory Muscle Sleep Background EMG Activity is Elevated in Myofascial TMD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Karen G.; Janal, Malvin N.; Sirois, David A.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Wigren, Pia E.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite theoretical speculation and strong clinical belief, recent research using laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording has provided new evidence that frequency of sleep bruxism (SB) masseter muscle events, including grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep, is not increased for women with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The current case-control study compares a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n=124) with a demographically matched control group without TMD (n=46) on sleep background electromyography (EMG) during a laboratory PSG study. Background EMG activity was measured as EMG root mean square (RMS) from the right masseter muscle after lights out. Sleep background EMG activity was defined as EMG RMS remaining after activity attributable to SB, other orofacial activity, other oromotor activity and movement artifacts were removed. Results indicated that median background EMG during these non SB-event periods was significantly higher (p<.01) for women with myofascial TMD (median=3.31 μV and mean=4.98 μV) than for control women (median=2.83 μV and mean=3.88 μV) with median activity in 72% of cases exceeding control activity. Moreover, for TMD cases, background EMG was positively associated and SB event-related EMG was negatively associated with pain intensity ratings (0–10 numerical scale) on post sleep waking. These data provide the foundation for a new focus on small, but persistent, elevations in sleep EMG activity over the course of the night as a mechanism of pain induction or maintenance. PMID:24237356

  16. Physical Activity at Daycare: Childcare Providers' Perspectives for Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Patricia; van Zandvoort, Melissa M.; Burke, Shauna M.; Irwin, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    In London, Ontario, approximately 45 percent of preschoolers are insufficiently active.With the large number of preschoolers who attend childcare (54%), and the low levels of physical activity among preschool-aged children, daycare centers may be an appropriate avenue to intervene. This study sought to collect childcare providers' suggestions for…

  17. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  18. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  19. Activities of coordinated dietetic program directors compared by educational background.

    PubMed

    Nyland, N K; Spears, M C; Myers, E F

    1989-12-01

    This study was designed to ascertain the activities performed by coordinated program directors, compare current activities with 5-year expectations, and identify differences in importance and time spent on 14 pertinent activities by directors with master's degrees and those with doctorates. Responses were collected by a descriptive survey of 64 directors, all of whom participated. Program directors with master's degrees considered public relations with affiliations, attending faculty meetings, student advisement, and reading professional materials significantly more important (p less than .05) than did directors with doctorates, who considered faculty evaluations and research significantly more important (p less than .01). Directors with doctorates spent significantly less time in teaching (p less than .05) than those with master's degrees. Responsibilities of directors in the 22 submitted descriptions were organized into five categories: program management, curricular affairs, policies impacting on programs, student advisement and counseling, and academic activities. In the ADA Standards of Education, responsibilities of directors include program assessment, planning, and evaluation; in this study, those responsibilities were placed in the program management category. Exhibition of leadership qualities, revision of curriculum, and counseling and recruitment of students were responsibilities most frequently included in the position descriptions; however, those responsibilities were in categories other than program management. The responsibilities could serve as a guide for the development of a position description and as criteria for the role of a coordinated program director. PMID:2592717

  20. Aerobic Activity--Do Physical Education Programs Provide Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGing, Eileen

    1989-01-01

    High school physical education curricula should concentrate less on sport skill development and competition, and more on health-related fitness and aerobic activity. Results are reported from a study of the type and amount of aerobic exercise provided in 29 high school physical education programs in a large metropolitan area. (IAH)

  1. Rhythmic auditory cortex activity at multiple timescales shapes stimulus-response gain and background firing.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Christoph; Wilson, Caroline; Safaai, Houman; Sakata, Shuzo; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-05-20

    The phase of low-frequency network activity in the auditory cortex captures changes in neural excitability, entrains to the temporal structure of natural sounds, and correlates with the perceptual performance in acoustic tasks. Although these observations suggest a causal link between network rhythms and perception, it remains unknown how precisely they affect the processes by which neural populations encode sounds. We addressed this question by analyzing neural responses in the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats using stimulus-response models. These models included a parametric dependence on the phase of local field potential rhythms in both stimulus-unrelated background activity and the stimulus-response transfer function. We found that phase-dependent models better reproduced the observed responses than static models, during both stimulation with a series of natural sounds and epochs of silence. This was attributable to two factors: (1) phase-dependent variations in background firing (most prominent for delta; 1-4 Hz); and (2) modulations of response gain that rhythmically amplify and attenuate the responses at specific phases of the rhythm (prominent for frequencies between 2 and 12 Hz). These results provide a quantitative characterization of how slow auditory cortical rhythms shape sound encoding and suggest a differential contribution of network activity at different timescales. In addition, they highlight a putative mechanism that may implement the selective amplification of appropriately timed sound tokens relative to the phase of rhythmic auditory cortex activity. PMID:25995464

  2. Signal detection in a lumpy background: effects of providing more information to the human than just raw data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallas, Brandon D.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we present a modification to the standard two- alternative forced-choice (2AFC) experiment in an attempt to help the human detect signals by providing redundant information. We call the old experiment 2AFC_RAW, and the new experiment, 2AFC_FILTER. In the 2AFC_FILTER experiment, we provide the observer with the pair of raw data images (as in 2AFC_RAW) plus filtered versions of the raw data. The thought behind this modification is that the human might benefit from generic pre-processing of the data into multiple images, each extracting different information. We defined two different 2AFC_FILTER experiments, each using Laguerre-Gauss functions as the filters. The difference between the two was their defining Gaussian envelope. We tested human performance given a variety of image classes with the 2AFC_RAW and the two 2AFC_FILTER experiments. The same raw data were used in each. We found that there was a significant human performance increase from the 2AFC_RAW to the 2AFC_FILTER experiment. It was also seen that the choice of the filters made a difference. Specifically, human performance was better when the Gaussian envelope of the Laguerre-Gauss functions matched the signal.

  3. Impairments in Background and Event-Related Alpha-Band Oscillatory Activity in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Abeles, Ilana Y.; Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Studies show that patients with schizophrenia exhibit impaired responses to sensory stimuli, especially at the early stages of neural processing. In particular, patients’ alpha-band (8–14 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) and visual P1 event-related potential (ERP) component tend to be significantly reduced, with P1 ERP deficits greater for visual stimuli biased towards the magnocellular system. In healthy controls, studies show that pre-stimulus alpha (background alpha) plays a pivotal role in sensory processing and behavior, largely by shaping the neural responses to incoming stimuli. Here, we address whether patients’ ERD and P1 deficits stem from impairments in pre-stimulus alpha mechanisms. To address this question we recorded electrophysiological activity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls while they engaged in a visual discrimination task with low, medium, and high contrast stimuli. The results revealed a significant decrease in patients’ ERDs, which was largely driven by reductions in pre-stimulus alpha. These reductions were most prominent in right-hemispheric areas. We also observed a systematic relationship between pre-stimulus alpha and the P1 component across different contrast levels. However, this relationship was only observed in healthy controls. Taken together, these findings highlight a substantial anomaly in patients’ amplitude-based alpha background activity over visual areas. The results provide further support that pre-stimulus alpha activity plays an active role in perception by modulating the neural responses to incoming sensory inputs, a mechanism that seems to be compromised in schizophrenia. PMID:24646909

  4. Right Back at 'Cha--Boomerang Activity Provides Educational Returns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Motivating students to get actively involved in the curriculum and understand the application of academic content has been a challenge for many educators. Technology education instructors have traditionally had little difficulty showing their students the connection between their classroom and lab learning and a practical application of the skills…

  5. LArGe R&D for active background suppression in Gerda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; D'Andragora, A.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-07-01

    LArGe is a GERDA low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the GERDA experiment. Similar to GERDA, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m3, 1.4tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The light is used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to GERDA. Suppression factors of a few times 103 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of the order 10-2 cts/(keV-kg-y), which is at the level of the GERDA phase I design goal. As a consequence of these results, the development of an active liquid argon veto in GERDA is pursued.

  6. The Effect of Background Muscle Activity on Computerized Detection of sEMG Onset and Offset

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela S.; Cholewicki, Jacek; Reeves, N. Peter

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two computerized algorithms for the detection of muscle onset and offset was compared. Standard deviation (SD) method, a commonly used algorithm, and approximated generalized likelihood ratio (AGLR) method, a more recently developed algorithm, were evaluated at different levels of background surface EMG (sEMG) activity. For this purpose, the amplitude ratio between the period of muscle inactivity and activity was varied from 0.125 to 1 in artificially assembled sEMG traces. In addition, 1230 real sEMG signals, obtained from various trunk muscles, were raised to a power of 3 to change the relative amplitude ratio. As the relative level of background activity increased, both the SD and AGLR methods produced longer latencies and detected fewer muscle responses, suggesting that a detection artifact can be introduced if the subject populations being compared have different levels of background muscle activity. Of the two methods, AGLR appears to be the least affected by background activity. However, above the ratio 0.8, results from AGLR are also unreliable particularly in detecting offsets. Average latency artifacts near this ratio were 8 ms for AGLR and 46 ms for SD. PMID:17588589

  7. Probing the circumgalactic medium of active galactic nuclei with background quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Cooke, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    We performed a detailed study of the extended cool gas, traced by Mg II absorption [Wr(2796) ≥ 0.3 Å], surrounding 14 narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 0.12 ≤ z ≤ 0.22 using background quasar sightlines. The background quasars probe the AGNs at projected distances of 60 ≤ D ≤ 265 kpc. We find that, between 100 ≤ D ≤ 200 kpc, AGNs appear to have lower Mg II gas covering fractions (0.09^{+0.18}_{-0.08}) than quasars (0.47^{+0.16}_{-0.15}) and possibly lower than inactive field galaxies (0.25^{+0.11}_{-0.09}). We do not find a statistically significant azimuthal angle dependence for the Mg IIcovering fraction around AGNs, though the data hint at one. We also study the `down-the-barrel' outflow properties of the AGNs themselves and detect intrinsic Na ID absorption in 8/8 systems and intrinsic Mg II absorption in 2/2 systems, demonstrating that the AGNs have significant reservoirs of cool gas. We find that 6/8 Na ID and 2/2 Mg II intrinsic systems contain blueshifted absorption with Δv > 50 km s-1, indicating outflowing gas. The 2/2 intrinsic Mg II systems have outflow velocities a factor of ˜4 higher than the Na ID outflow velocities. Our results are consistent with AGN-driven outflows destroying the cool gas within their haloes, which dramatically decreases their cool gas covering fraction, while starburst-driven winds are expelling cool gas into their circumgalactic media (CGM). This picture appears contrary to quasar-quasar pair studies which show that the quasar CGM contains significant amounts of cool gas whereas intrinsic gas found `down-the-barrel' of quasars reveals no cool gas. We discuss how these results are complementary and provide support for the AGN unified model.

  8. 'Palliative care': a contradiction in terms? A qualitative study of cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their relatives and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative cancer care aims to improve quality of life and ultimately quality of dying, while prolonging life is not an objective anymore when death nears. The question is, however, whether these perspectives on palliative care are congruent with the perspectives of immigrant families with a Turkish or Moroccan background. Methods A qualitative design was used as we were looking for the personal views of 'very ill' cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their family members and their Dutch care providers. We interviewed 83 people, involved in 33 cases to obtain information about their views, values and norms on 'good care'. Results The main concerns about 'good care' expressed by Turkish and Moroccan families were: maximum treatment and curative care until the end of their lives, never having hope taken away, devoted care by their families, avoiding shameful situations, dying with a clear mind and being buried in their own country. Their views conflict, to some extent, with the dominant principles in palliative care, for example, the emphasis on quality of life and advanced care planning, which includes discussing diagnosis and prognosis with the patient. Conclusions Patients and their families with a Turkish or Moroccan background often have different ideas about 'good care' than their Dutch care providers. As many of them are aiming at cure until the end of life, they find 'good palliative care' a contradiction in terms. PMID:20831777

  9. Two sides of the coin: patient and provider perceptions of health care delivery to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia is a culturally diverse nation with one in seven Australians born in a non-English speaking country. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations are at a high risk of developing preventable chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal disease, and chronic respiratory disease, especially communities from the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, North Africa, the Indian subcontinent and China. Previous studies have shown that access to services may be a contributing factor. This study explores the experiences, attitudes and opinions of immigrants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds and their health care providers with regard to chronic disease care. Methods Five focus groups were conducted comprising participants from an Arabic speaking background, or born in Sudan, China, Vietnam or Tonga. A total of 50 members participated. All focus groups were conducted in the participants’ language and facilitated by a trained multicultural health worker. In addition, 14 health care providers were interviewed by telephone. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. All qualitative data were analysed with the assistance of QSR NVivo 8 software. Results Participants were generally positive about the quality and accessibility of health services, but the costs of health care and waiting times to receive treatment presented significant barriers. They expressed a need for greater access to interpreters and culturally appropriate communication and education. They mentioned experiencing racism and discriminatory practices. Health professionals recommended recruiting health workers from CALD communities to assist them to adequately elicit and address the needs of patients from CALD backgrounds. Conclusions CALD patients, carers and community members as well as health professionals all highlighted the need for establishing culturally tailored programs for chronic disease prevention and management

  10. Very low luminosity active galaxies and the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.; Soltan, A.; Keel, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of very low luminosity active galactic nuclei are not well studied, and, in particular, their possible contribution to the diffuse X-ray background is not known. In the present investigation, an X-ray luminosity function for the range from 10 to the 39th to 10 to the 42.5th ergs/s is constructed. The obtained X-ray luminosity function is integrated to estimate the contribution of these very low luminosity active galaxies to the diffuse X-ray background. The construction of the X-ray luminosity function is based on data obtained by Keel (1983) and some simple assumptions about optical and X-ray properties.

  11. Effect of Parental Migration Background on Childhood Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Matteo; Kull, Inger; Wickman, Magnus; Wolk, Alicja; Moradi, Tahereh

    2014-01-01

    Background. Poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and obesity in children have important public health implications but, to date, their effects have not been studied in the growing population of children in Sweden with immigrant parents. Methods. We estimated the association between parental migration background and nutrition, physical activity, and weight in 8-year-old children born in Stockholm between 1994 and 1996 of immigrants and Swedish parents (n = 2589). Data were collected through clinical examination and questionnaires filled out by parents. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Children of immigrants complied more closely with Nordic Nutrition Recommendations compared with those of Swedes (OR = 1.35, 95% CI 1.11–1.64). They had higher intake of dietary fibre, vitamins C, B6, and E, folic acid, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) reflecting higher consumption of foods of plant origin, but lower intake of vitamins A and D, calcium, and iron reflecting lower consumption of dairy products. Children of immigrants had higher intake of sucrose reflecting higher consumption of sugar and sweets. Furthermore, these children had a higher risk of having low physical activity (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.06–1.62) and being overweight (OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.06–1.65) compared with children of Swedish parents. The odds of having low physical activity and being overweight were even higher in children whose parents were both immigrants. A low level of parental education was associated with increased risk of low physical activity regardless of immigration background. Conclusions. Culturally appropriate tools to capture the diverse range of ethnic foods and other lifestyle habits are needed. Healthcare professionals should be aware of the low levels of physical activity, increased weight, and lack of consumption of some important vitamins among children of immigrants

  12. Patient–Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegría, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project–Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients’ participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were conducted in Spanish. The authors present the steps participants undertook in the process of becoming “activated” to formulate effective questions and develop decision-making skills in relation to their care. Findings suggest that patient activation and empowerment are interdependent because many of the skills (i.e., question formulation, direct patient–provider communication) required to become an “activated patient” are essential to achieve empowerment. Also, findings suggest that cultural and contextual factors can influence the experience of Latinos regarding participation in health care interactions. The authors provide recommendations for continued research on the patient activation process and further application of this strategy in the mental health field, especially with Latinos. PMID:18413668

  13. Automatic classification of background EEG activity in healthy and sick neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfhede, Johan; Thordstein, Magnus; Löfgren, Nils; Flisberg, Anders; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Kjellmer, Ingemar; Lindecrantz, Kaj

    2010-02-01

    The overall aim of our research is to develop methods for a monitoring system to be used at neonatal intensive care units. When monitoring a baby, a range of different types of background activity needs to be considered. In this work, we have developed a scheme for automatic classification of background EEG activity in newborn babies. EEG from six full-term babies who were displaying a burst suppression pattern while suffering from the after-effects of asphyxia during birth was included along with EEG from 20 full-term healthy newborn babies. The signals from the healthy babies were divided into four behavioural states: active awake, quiet awake, active sleep and quiet sleep. By using a number of features extracted from the EEG together with Fisher's linear discriminant classifier we have managed to achieve 100% correct classification when separating burst suppression EEG from all four healthy EEG types and 93% true positive classification when separating quiet sleep from the other types. The other three sleep stages could not be classified. When the pathological burst suppression pattern was detected, the analysis was taken one step further and the signal was segmented into burst and suppression, allowing clinically relevant parameters such as suppression length and burst suppression ratio to be calculated. The segmentation of the burst suppression EEG works well, with a probability of error around 4%.

  14. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  15. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Oritz, Carlos A.; Marlow, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  16. Human Activity Recognition from Environmental Background Sounds for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yi; Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    Sound feature extraction Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) and Vector Quantization (VQ) classification Linde-Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) algorithms are applied for recognizing the background sounds in the human daily activities. Applying these algorithms to twenty typical daily activity sounds, average recognition accuracy of 93.8% can be achieved. In these algorithms, how three parameters (i.e., Mel filters number, frame-to-frame overlap and LBG codebook cluster number) affect system's calculation burden and accuracy is also investigated. By adjusting these three parameters to an optimized combination, the multiplication and addition calculation burden can be reduced by 87.0% and 87.1% individually while maintaining the system's average accuracy rate at 92.5%. This is promising for future integration with other sensor (s) to fulfill daily activity recognition by using power aware Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) systems.

  17. Service Providers' Perceptions of Active Ageing among Older Adults with Lifelong Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buys, L.; Aird, R.; Miller, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable attention is currently being directed towards both active ageing and the revising of standards for disability services within Australia and internationally. Yet, to date, no consideration appears to have been given to ways to promote active ageing among older adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs). Methods:…

  18. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  19. Social Support and Youth Physical Activity: The Role of Provider and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Vogel, Randy; Forlaw, Loretta; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine provider and type variation in social support (SS) for activity. Methods: Three hundred sixty-three fifth to eighth-grade students completed a questionnaire assessing self-reported activity and social support (SS) from 3 providers: mom, dad, and peers. Important covariates of activity were included in the analysis: age, BMI,…

  20. Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dan M.

    2012-05-15

    The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

  1. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Takakura, Ana C.; Moreira, Thiago S.; Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO2/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of a Na+-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K+ current. Single cell RT-PCR analysis of dissociated GFP-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (K2P13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na+, and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO2 levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated largely by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  2. Spectral-luminosity evolution of active galactic nuclei and the cosmic X- and gamma ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1992-01-01

    Coherent electromagnetic dynamo acceleration processes, which act on charge particles within the context of black hole accretion disk scenarios, are generally regarded as the underlying central power source for active galactic nuclei (AGN). If the precursor active galaxies (PAG) for such AGN are formed at high redshift and contain initial seed black holes with mass approximately equal to 10(exp 4) solar masses, then the Eddington limited X-ray radiation emitted during their lifetime will undergo the phenomenon of 'spectral-luminosity evolution'. When accretion disks are first formed at the onset of galaxy formation the accretion rate occurs at very high values of luminosity/size compactness parameter L/R greater than 10(exp 30) erg/cm-sec. In the absence of extended structure, such high values of L/R generate dynamic constraints which suppress coherent, black hole/accretion disk dynamo particle acceleration processes. This inhibits nonthermal radiation processes and causes the spectrum of X-radiation emitted by PAG to be predominantly thermal. A superposition of PAG sources at z is greater than or equal to 6 can account for the residual cosmic X-ray background (CXB) obtained from the total CXB after subtraction of foreground AGN sources associated with present epoch Seyfert galaxies. The manner in which the PAG undergo spectral-luminosity evolution into Seyfert galaxies is investigated.

  3. Phase I Rinal Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-07-22

    signal processor we easily distinguish between these two risetimes and thereby count only alpha particles emitted by the sample. Alpha particles emitted from the sample tray are absorbed in the rear of the sample, so the tray's emissivity does not contribute to the background either. Extensions of the method to the counter's sidewalls similarly allow us to reject alpha particles emitted from the sidewalls. We can thus able obtain background rates over a factor of 1000 lower than in conventional instruments without active background rejection. Extending this principle to count at the 0.00001 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hour, level encounters difficulties because there will typically be only 2.4 alpha particles per square meter per day. Since about 6 counts are required to measure activity at the 95% confidence level, large sample areas are required to make measurements in reasonable times. Unfortunately, increasing the counter's anode area to a square meter raises its capacitance so much that the preamplifier noise levels swamp the alpha particle signals and make counting impossible. In this SBIR we worked to solve this dilemma by segmenting the single large area electrode into several smaller, lower capacitance electrodes that could still detect the alpha particles reliably. Each electrode would have its own electronic and we would capture signals from all of them in coincidence (since an alpha track might well deposit charge on more than one electrode), a technique in which XIA is experienced. Therefore, in Phase I we worked to show proof of principle by subdividing our original 1,800 cm{sup 2} electrode into 4 square segments, each 625 cm{sup 2} and demonstrating that signal noise on individual channels reduced as expected. Because the Phase II counter with a 1 m{sup 2} segmented anode would require 16 segments plus a segmented guard as well, we also designed low cost signal processing electronics to instrument it in Phase II. Our Phase I effort met our major proof of principle

  4. A Possible Model for Developing Performance Based Inservice Modules that Provide Elementary Teachers with Content Background in Science: An Application of the Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Winston E.; Uffelman, Robert L.

    Presented in this report is a discussion of a model for developing modularized and behaviorized inservice materials that meet the needs of individual teachers for improving their background in science and for relating this knowledge directly to their classroom experiences. The model consists of four stages: (1) needs analysis of curriculum for…

  5. Influence of Task Difficulty and Background Music on Working Memory Activity: Developmental Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaniel, Shlomo; Aram, Dorit

    1998-01-01

    A study of 300 children in kindergarten, grade 2, and grade 6 found that background music improved visual discrimination task performance at the youngest and middle ages and had no effect on the oldest participants. On a square identification task, background music had no influence on easy and difficult tasks but lowered performance on…

  6. Prediction of solar activity from solar background magnetic field variations in cycles 21-23

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V. E-mail: s.zharkov@hull.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  7. Mildly obscured active galaxies and the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, V.; Walter, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The diffuse cosmic X-ray background (CXB) is the sum of the emission of discrete sources, mostly massive black-holes accreting matter in active galactic nuclei (AGN). The CXB spectrum differs from the integration of the spectra of individual sources, calling for a large population, undetected so far, of strongly obscured Compton-thick AGN. Such objects are predicted by unified models, which attribute most of the AGN diversity to their inclination on the line of sight, and play an important role for the understanding of the growth of black holes in the early Universe. Aims: The percentage of strongly obscured Compton-thick AGN at low redshift can be derived from the observed CXB spectrum, if we assume AGN spectral templates and luminosity functions. Methods: We show that high signal-to-noise stacked hard X-ray spectra, derived from more than a billion seconds of effective exposure time with the Swift/BAT instrument, imply that mildly obscured Compton-thin AGN feature a strong reflection and contribute massively to the CXB. Results: A population of Compton-thick AGN larger than that which is effectively detected is not required to reproduce the CXB spectrum, since no more than 6% of the CXB flux can be attributed to them. The stronger reflection observed in mildly obscured AGN suggests that the covering factor of the gas and dust surrounding their central engines is a key factor in shaping their appearance. These mildly obscured AGN are easier to study at high redshift than Compton-thick sources are.

  8. Background gravity wave activity and its variability as determined from Dynasonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, C.; Zabotin, N. A.; Bullett, T. W.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of gravity waves for the dynamics of the thermosphere-ionosphere system is a well-known fact. Numerical models of the thermosphere-ionosphere must account for gravity wave effects by using various parameterization schemes with currently unknown levels of accuracy. There are several existing methods allowing for the detection of individual instances of gravity wave manifestations. However, little information exists regarding the background wave spectrum and its variability in the thermosphere. We employ Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's) as tracers for gravity wave propagation, using results of Dynasonde data analysis as the starting point in our calculations. Data from the Wallops Island (VA), San Juan (Puerto Rico), Boulder (CO), Tromso and Svalbard (Norway) instruments are used. The interval between the sounding sessions is 2 minutes and the NeXtYZ inversion procedure (a part of the Dynasonde software package) allows us to obtain a vertical resolution for the parameters of ionospheric plasma in real height better than 1 km. The full output of the inversion procedure consists of height profiles of electron density, X (East-West) and Y (North-South) tilts of the constant plasma density contours and Doppler velocities, all of which showing persistent signs of gravity wave induced TID's. We demonstrate using a few examples that the characteristics of the observed TID's are in good agreement with the dispersion relation describing gravity waves. The ionospheric tilt measurements allow for determination of the direction of propagation for every wave mode. For each calendar month of 2013, the tilt spectra is obtained as a function of altitude using a Lomb-Scargle Welch implementation. The analysis is applied to all 6 stations proving unprecedented geographical coverage. The result is a complete picture of the altitude, temporal and location variability of gravity wave activity in the accessible thermospheric altitude interval with included

  9. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... may include college preparatory, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate programs, and... career plans, including career awareness and planning assistance as they relate to a rigorous academic...; or (2) Assistance with college admission applications. (j) Providing other activities designed...

  10. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... may include college preparatory, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate programs, and... career plans, including career awareness and planning assistance as they relate to a rigorous academic...; or (2) Assistance with college admission applications. (j) Providing other activities designed...

  11. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... may include college preparatory, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate programs, and... career plans, including career awareness and planning assistance as they relate to a rigorous academic...; or (2) Assistance with college admission applications. (j) Providing other activities designed...

  12. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... may include college preparatory, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate programs, and... career plans, including career awareness and planning assistance as they relate to a rigorous academic...; or (2) Assistance with college admission applications. (j) Providing other activities designed...

  13. LArGe: active background suppression using argon scintillation for the Gerda 0ν β β -experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Barnabé-Heider, M.; Budjáš, D.; Cattadori, C.; Gangapshev, A.; Gusev, K.; Heisel, M.; Junker, M.; Klimenko, A.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Pelczar, K.; Schönert, S.; Smolnikov, A.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-10-01

    LArGe is a Gerda low-background test facility to study novel background suppression methods in a low-background environment, for future application in the Gerda experiment. Similar to Gerda, LArGe operates bare germanium detectors submersed into liquid argon (1 m^3, 1.4 tons), which in addition is instrumented with photomultipliers to detect argon scintillation light. The scintillation signals are used in anti-coincidence with the germanium detectors to effectively suppress background events that deposit energy in the liquid argon. The background suppression efficiency was studied in combination with a pulse shape discrimination (PSD) technique using a BEGe detector for various sources, which represent characteristic backgrounds to Gerda. Suppression factors of a few times 10^3 have been achieved. First background data of LArGe with a coaxial HPGe detector (without PSD) yield a background index of (0.12-4.6)× 10^{-2} cts/(keV kg year) (90 % C.L.), which is at the level of Gerda Phase I. Furthermore, for the first time we monitor the natural ^{42}Ar abundance (parallel to Gerda), and have indication for the 2ν β β -decay in natural germanium. These results show the effectivity of an active liquid argon veto in an ultra-low background environment. As a consequence, the implementation of a liquid argon veto in Gerda Phase II is pursued.

  14. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services may a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What activities and services may a project provide? 646.4 Section 646.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM General § 646.4 What activities and services may a...

  15. On Day-to-Day Variability of Global Lightning Activity as Quantified from Background Schumann Resonance Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    Among the palette of methods (satellite, VLF, ELF) for monitoring global lightning activity, observations of the background Schumann resonances (SR) provide a unique prospect for estimating the integrated activity of global lightning activity in absolute units (coul2 km2/sec). This prospect is ensured by the SR waves' low attenuation, with wavelengths commensurate with the dimensions of dominant regional lightning "chimneys", and by the accumulating methodology for background SR techniques. Another benefit is the reduction of SR measurements into a compact set of resonance characteristics (modal frequencies, intensities, and quality factors). Suggested and tested in numerical simulations by T.R. Madden in the 1960s, the idea to invert the SR characteristics for the global lightning source has been farther developed, statistically substantiated, and practically realized here on the basis of the computing power and the quantity of experimental material way beyond what the SR pioneers had at their disposal. The critical issue of the quality of the input SR parameters is addressed by implementing a statistically substantiated sanitizing procedure to dispose of the fragments of the observed time series containing unrepresentative elements - local interference of various origin and strong ELF transients originating outside the major "chimneys" represented in the source model. As a result of preliminary research, a universal empirical sanitizing criterion has been established. Due to the fact that the actual observations have been collected from a set of individually organized ELF stations with various equipment sets and calibration techniques, the relative parameters in both input (the intensities) and output (the "chimney" activities) are being used as far as possible in the inversion process to avoid instabilities caused by calibration inconsistencies. The absolute regional activities - and so the sought for global activity in absolute units - is determined in the

  16. Providing Outreach to Families of Youth with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds by Working with Cultural Groups and Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tracey R.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how informal community networks (i.e., faith based organizations, community cultural centers and service agencies) provided information to culturally and linguistically diverse families. The goals of this study were, first, to gain a better understanding of the methods the informal community networks used to…

  17. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What activities and services does a project provide? 646.4 Section 646.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM General §...

  18. Inheritance of grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in multiple wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genetic backgrounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity can cause discoloration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) food products. Five crosses (PI 117635/Antelope; Fielder/NW03681; Fielder/Antelope; NW07OR1070/Antelope; NW07OR1066/OR2050272H) were selected to study the genetic inheritance of PPO activity. STS marker...

  19. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  20. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  1. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Luke A.; Durrant, Benjamin P.; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J.; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3′ ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164–N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes—for example by the binding of protein co-factors—may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3′ termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  2. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity. PMID:19765013

  3. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    The awesome power and intricate inner workings of volcanoes have made them a popular subject with scientists and the general public alike. About 1500 known volcanoes have been active on Earth during the Holocene, approximately 50 of which erupt per year. With so much activity occurring around the world, often in remote locations, it can be difficult to find up-to-date information about current volcanism from a reliable source. To satisfy the desire for timely volcano-related information the Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey combined their strengths to create the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) has developed a network of correspondents while reporting worldwide volcanism for over 30 years in their monthly Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network. The US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program studies and monitors volcanoes in the United States and responds (upon invitation) to selected volcanic crises in other countries. The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is one of the most popular sites on both organization's websites. The core of the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is the brief summaries of current volcanic activity around the world. In addition to discussing various types of volcanism, the summaries also describe precursory activity (e.g. volcanic seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions), secondary activity (e.g. debris flows, mass wasting, and rockfalls), volcanic ash hazards to aviation, and preventative measures. The summaries are supplemented by links to definitions of technical terms found in the USGS photoglossary of volcano terms, links to information sources, and background information about reported volcanoes. The site also includes maps that highlight the location of reported volcanoes, an archive of weekly reports sorted by volcano and date, and links to commonly used acronyms. Since the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report's inception in November 2000, activity has been reported at

  4. Impacts of background field removal on CMIP5 projected changes in Pacific winter cyclone activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Edmund K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Cyclones are responsible for much of the high impact weather in the extratropics, thus how they will change under global warming is of great concern. Several studies have used the multimodel climate simulations conducted under Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to examine such changes. One study suggested that the frequency of strong cyclones is projected to decrease over the North Pacific, while another concluded that this frequency will increase. A single tracking algorithm has been used to derive cyclone statistics from 23 CMIP5 simulations using two different definitions of cyclones: cyclones as minima in total sea level pressure (SLP) or cyclones as minima in SLP perturbations about a large scale, low-frequency background. When cyclones are defined by total SLP, the frequency of deep cyclones over the Pacific is projected to increase, while if cyclones are defined as perturbations, this frequency is projected to decrease. These differences are shown to be due to a projected deepening of the climatological mean Aleutian low. In view of these results, it is important to critically assess how cyclones should be defined. Preliminary results suggest that among CMIP5 simulations, over the Pacific, both the projected changes in the frequency of high wind events and mean available potential energy are better correlated with the projected changes in the frequency of cyclones defined as perturbations. It is concluded that more research should be done to quantify and understand the impacts of the different definitions of cyclones.

  5. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  6. Leisure time physical activity, screen time, social background, and environmental variables in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mota, Jorge; Gomes, Helena; Almeida, Mariana; Ribeiro, José Carlos; Santos, Maria Paula

    2007-08-01

    This study analyzes the relationships between leisure time physical activity (LTPA), sedentary behaviors, socioeconomic status, and perceived environmental variables. The sample comprised 815 girls and 746 boys. In girls, non-LTPA participants reported significantly more screen time. Girls with safety concerns were more likely to be in the non-LTPA group (OR = 0.60) and those who agreed with the importance of aesthetics were more likely to be in the active-LTPA group (OR = 1.59). In girls, an increase of 1 hr of TV watching was a significant predictor of non-LTPA (OR = 0.38). LTPA for girls, but not for boys, seems to be influenced by certain modifiable factors of the built environment, as well as by time watching TV. PMID:18019587

  7. Providing a Background for British Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre

    One consequence of teaching British literature far away from British shores is the loss of intimacy that comes from a shared culture. American teachers can help bring Britain into their classrooms by requesting audiovisual aids from the various museums and galleries in Britain that are willing to supply material. Among such sources are (1) Walton…

  8. 2-165 keV observations of active galaxies and the diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    HEAO 1 spectral observations of 12 active galaxies in the 12-165 keV and 2-50 keV ranges are reported. The spectra of these galaxies in the 2-165 keV range are well represented by a single power law model; within experimental uncertainties a narrow dispersion in power law index attributable to the individual galaxies is observed, while the 2-165 keV luminosities of these galaxies ranged from 3 x 10 to the 43rd to 3 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s. An apparent universality of the spectral form is found which can be interpreted as due to a common electron distribution with a temperature of tens of keV in the Compton scattering region or as a common nonthermal power-law distribution generating the observed flux through synchrotron-Compton processes. The data indicate that relativistic particles are likely to be responsible for the X-rays from cores of active galaxies through synchroton-Compton processes. In addition, it is noted that only weak number evolution, if any at all, is present in active galaxies.

  9. Reducing background noise in near-infrared medical imaging: Routes to activated fluorescing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, Mary K.; Bandera, Yuriy; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Foulger, Stephen H.

    2016-03-01

    Activated fluorescence was achieved for nanoparticle based systems. One particulate system consisting of a poly(propargyl acrylate) (PA) core with covalently attached derivatized fluorescein and modified bovine serum albumin covalently conjugated to a cyanine 3 derivative was initially nonfluorescent. Upon trypsin addition and subsequent proteolytic digestion, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was induced. The other particulate system consisted of a PA core with covalently attached azide modified BSA, which was covalently attached to a silicon phthalocyanine derivative (PA/BSA/akSiPc600). Both systems were biocompatible. To investigate activated fluorescence with the PA/BSA/akSiPc600 system in cancer cells, human non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549 cell line) were used as a model system. The PA/BSA/akSiPc600 system was incubated with the cells at varying time points in an effort to see a fluorescence increase over time as the cells uptake the particles and as they digest the BSA, most probably, via endocytosis. It was seen, through live cell scanning confocal microscopy, that the fluorescence was activated in the cell.

  10. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    PubMed

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  11. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  12. Keratinocyte Production of Cathelicidin Provides Direct Activity against Bacterial Skin Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Braff, Marissa H.; Zaiou, Mohamed; Fierer, Joshua; Nizet, Victor; Gallo, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Immune defense at an interface with the external environment reflects the functions of physical and chemical barriers provided by epithelial and immune cells. Resident epithelial cells, such as keratinocytes, produce numerous peptides with direct antimicrobial activity but also provide a physical barrier against invading pathogens and signal the recruitment of circulating immune cells, such as neutrophils. Antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidin are produced constitutively by neutrophils and are inducible in keratinocytes in response to infection. The multiplicity of antimicrobial peptides and their cellular sources has resulted in an incomplete understanding of the role of cathelicidin production by epithelial cells in cutaneous immune defense. Therefore, this study sought to evaluate keratinocyte antimicrobial activity and the potential contribution of keratinocyte cathelicidin to host protection against two leading human skin pathogens. Wild-type mice and those with a targeted deletion of the cathelicidin gene, Cnlp, were rendered neutropenic prior to cutaneous infection. Interestingly, Cnlp-deficient mice remained more susceptible to group A streptococcus infection than mice with Cnlp intact, suggesting the involvement of epithelial cell-derived cathelicidin in host immune defense. Keratinocytes were then isolated in culture and found to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, an effect that was partially dependent on their ability to synthesize and activate cathelicidin. Further, lentivirus-mediated delivery of activated human cathelicidin enhanced keratinocyte antimicrobial activity. Combined, these data illustrate the potential contribution of keratinocyte cathelicidin to the innate immune defense of skin against bacterial pathogens and highlight the need to consider epithelial antimicrobial function in the diagnosis and therapy of skin infection. PMID:16177355

  13. A background traffic activity analysis in a canonical NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) defense

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1989-04-01

    A canonical defense study in a NATO brigade sector on the northern flank of the US V Corps sector in the Federal Republic of Germany is wargamed to depict the expected vehicular movements during a 24 hour time period. All NATO and Warsaw Pact situations and forces played intentionally portray a ''normal'' battlefield situation, that is one in which events occur according to the established tactics and doctrines for both NATO and WP forces. Activity details which are almost always ignored in broader studies are included. The periodic displacement of high value units (e.g., artillery, air defense, headquarters and target acquisition) to preclude enemy fixing and targeting; the resupply down to company and occasionally platoon level of ammunition, petroleum, rations, etc.; the movement of commanders and staffs; the activity of combat engineers to include site preparation, construction and minefield emplacement; the action of reconnaissance and patrol units; the security of the rear area and POW processing; and the evacuation of casualties are analyzed. The resulting database records the position for every vehicle in both forces at each minute during the period of analysis and is thus an ideal framework for a variety of further studies, such as analyses of intelligence collection devices and modern ordinances. 9 refs., 30 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. The Impact of a Statewide Training To Increase Child Care Providers' Knowledge of Nutrition and Physical Activity Rules in Delaware

    PubMed Central

    Van Stan, Stefanie; Dupont Phillips, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Childhood obesity has been recognized as a national problem of epidemic proportions. Child care represents an ideal venue in which to address this problem, as many young children spend a significant amount of time and consume the majority of their meals in this setting. Recognizing this opportunity, Delaware recently enacted reforms to statewide licensing regulations designed to improve the quality of the nutrition-, physical activity-, and screen viewing–related environments in child care settings. Methods To facilitate the translation of these regulations into practices, a series of broad-scale trainings was held throughout the state. Attendance was required for all Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)-participating facilities, although child care providers from non-CACFP facilities also attended. Pre- and posttraining surveys were used to assess changes in providers' knowledge of the regulations and satisfaction with the training. Results In total 1094 presurveys and 1076 postsurveys were received. Participants were highly satisfied with the training format and content, including the instructors, materials, and schedule. Data analysis demonstrates improved knowledge of all 26 regulation components from presurvey to postsurvey. Family child care providers, providers with more years of experience, CACFP-participating facilities, and facilities with food service personnel scored significantly higher than their center staff, less experienced and non-CACFP counterparts, as well as those without food service personnel. Conclusions Broad-scale, in-person training can effectively increase child care providers' knowledge of the regulations and is well received by this audience. Other states and jurisdictions seeking to improve nutrition, physical activity, and screen-viewing practices in child care settings should consider this model of quality improvement. PMID:23327747

  15. The photochemical reflectance index provides an optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation in evergreen conifers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    In evergreens, the seasonal down-regulation and reactivation of photosynthesis is largely invisible and difficult to assess with remote sensing. This invisible phenology may be changing as a result of climate change. To better understand the mechanism and timing of these hidden physiological transitions, we explored several assays and optical indicators of spring photosynthetic activation in conifers exposed to a boreal climate. The photochemical reflectance index (PRI), chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf pigments for evergreen conifer seedlings were monitored over 1 yr of a boreal climate with the addition of gas exchange during the spring. PRI, electron transport rate, pigment levels, light-use efficiency and photosynthesis all exhibited striking seasonal changes, with varying kinetics and strengths of correlation, which were used to evaluate the mechanisms and timing of spring activation. PRI and pigment pools were closely timed with photosynthetic reactivation measured by gas exchange. The PRI provided a clear optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation that was detectable at leaf and stand scales in conifers. We propose that PRI might provide a useful metric of effective growing season length amenable to remote sensing and could improve remote-sensing-driven models of carbon uptake in evergreen ecosystems. PMID:25641209

  16. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  17. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  18. Locadiff with ambient seismic noise : theoretical background and application to monitoring volcanoes and active faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, Eric; Obermann, Anne; Planes, Thomas; Rossetto, Vincent; Margerin, Ludovic; Sens-Schoenfelder, Christoph; Campillo, Michel

    2015-04-01

    This contribution will cover recent theoretical, numerical, and field data processing developments aiming at modeling how coda waves are perturbed (in phase and amplitude) by mechanical changes in the crust. Using continuous ambient seismic noise, we cross-correlate data every day and compare the coda of the correlograms. We can relative velocity changes and waveform decorrelation along the year, that are related to mechanical changes in the shallow crust, associated to the seismic or volcanic activity, but also to environmental effects such as hydrology. Bibliography : Anne Obermann, Thomas Planes, Eric Larose and Michel Campillo, Imaging pre- and co-eruptive structural changes of a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. Geophys. Res. 118 6285-6294 (2013). A. Obermann, B. Froment, M. Campillo, E. Larose, T. Planès, B. Valette, J. H. Chen, and Q. Y. Liu, Seismic noise correlations to image structural and mechanical changes associated with the Mw7.9 2008-Wenchuan earthquake, J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 119, 1-14,(2014). Thomas Planès, Eric Larose, Ludovic Margerin, Vincent Rossetto, Christoph Sens-Schoenfelder, Decorrelation and phase-shift of coda waves induced by local changes : Multiple scattering approach and numerical validation, Waves in Random and Complex Media 24, 99-125, (2014)

  19. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  20. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general. PMID:26415918

  1. [The activity of antioxidant enzymes of erythrocytes under intensive physical activity on the background of D-ribose use].

    PubMed

    Konvaĭ, V D; Chigrinskiĭ, E A; Korniakova, V V; Reĭs, B A

    2011-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of blood of 30 male rats with 240 +/- 20 g mass and 50 sportsmen at the age 17-20 years were done. They were subjected by intensive physical activity with D-ribose use and without it. Carbohydrate was being put into them before and after intensive physical activity during 5-7 days. The dose was 30-50 mg/kg of their body mass. Concentration of glucose, lactate and uric acids, level of malondialdehyde, activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were defined in the male rats and sportsmen blood. It is shown that D-ribose use influences positive by to the dynamics of biochemical data in blood. It has taken place owing to the intensification of reutilization of purine mononucleotides and the activity of pentose cycle, as a result lipid peroxidation of membrane of erythrocytes reduces and state of antioxidation system improves. PMID:21842760

  2. Subway construction activity influence on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine particles: Comparison with a background mountainous site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Li, Xuxu; Li, Qi; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Chen, Kui; Liu, Dantong; Yuan, Liang; Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Intensive construction activities worsened the surrounding atmospheric environment in China. Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles (PM2.5) were collected at a subway construction site (SC) of Nanjing and compared with a regional background mountainous site (BM) to examine the influence of anthropogenic activities on concentrations, sources and health risks of PAHs. Average PAH concentrations at SC were higher than BM at a factor of about 5.9. All PAH species at SC were higher than BM, with the SC/BM ratios ranging from 1.3 (NaP) to 10.3 (BaP). PAH profiles differed for the two sites. The SC site had higher mass fractions of PAHs from coal combustion and vehicle emission, while the BM site held higher mass percentages of PAHs from long-range transported wood combustion and industrial activities. Lower temperature at BM may lead to the higher mass percentages of low ring PAHs. Coal combustion, traffic emissions and biomass burning were the common sources for PAHs at both SC and BM. Construction workers were exposed to higher BaPeq concentrations, nearly ten times of the background site and their lifetime cancer risk reached to 0.6 per 1,000,000 exposed worker, owing to the influence of coal combustion, vehicle emission and industrial activities at the surroundings of SC.

  3. Inversion of Multi-Station Schumann Resonance Background Records for Global Lightning Activity in Absolute Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. R.; Mushtak, V. C.; Guha, A.; Boldi, R. A.; Bor, J.; Nagy, T.; Satori, G.; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, R.; Hobara, Y.; Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Price, C. G.; Neska, M.; Alexander, K.; Yampolski, Y.; Moore, R. C.; Mitchell, M. F.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Every lightning flash contributes energy to the TEM mode of the natural global waveguide that contains the Earth's Schumann resonances. The modest attenuation at ELF (0.1 dB/Mm) allows for the continuous monitoring of the global lightning with a small number of receiving stations worldwide. In this study, nine ELF receiving sites (in Antarctica (3 sites), Hungary, India, Japan, Poland, Spitsbergen and USA) are used to provide power spectra at 12-minute intervals in two absolutely calibrated magnetic fields and occasionally, one electric field, with up to five resonance modes each. The observables are the extracted modal parameters (peak intensity, peak frequency and Q-factor) for each spectrum. The unknown quantities are the geographical locations of three continental lightning 'chimneys' and their lightning source strengths in absolute units (C2 km2/sec). The unknowns are calculated from the observables by the iterative inversion of an evolving 'sensitivity matrix' whose elements are the partial derivatives of each observable for all receiving sites with respect to each unknown quantity. The propagation model includes the important day-night asymmetry of the natural waveguide. To overcome the problem of multiple minima (common in inversion problems of this kind), location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network has been used to make initial guess solutions based on centroids of stroke locations in each chimney. Results for five consecutive days in 2009 (Jan 7-11) show UT variations with the African chimney dominating on four of five days, and America dominating on the fifth day. The amplitude variations in absolute source strength exceed that of the 'Carnegie curve' of the DC global circuit by roughly twofold. Day-to-day variations in chimney source strength are of the order of tens of percent. Examination of forward calculations performed with the global inversion solution often show good agreement with the observed diurnal variations at

  4. Study provides data on active plate tectonics in southeast Asia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Rais, J.; Reigber, Ch.; Reinhart, E.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Le Pichon, X.; Kasser, M.; Suharto, P.; Majid, Dato'Abdul; Yaakub, Dato'Paduka Awang Haji Othman Bin Haji; Almeda, R.; Boonphakdee, C.

    A major geodynamic study has provided significant new information about the location of active plate boundaries in and around Southeast Asia, as well as deformation processes in the Sulawesi region of Indonesia and tectonic activity in the Philippine archipelago. Results also have confirmed the existence of the so-called Sunda Block, which appears to be rotating with respect to adjacent plates.The study, known as the Geodynamics of South and South-East Asia (GEODYSSEA) project, has been a joint venture of the European Commission and the Association of South- East Asian Nations. It began in 1991 and involved a large team of European and Asian scientists and technicians studying the complex geodynamic processes and natural hazards of the region from the Southeast Asia mainland to the Philippines to northern Australia. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, and tectonically induced landslides endanger the lives of millions of people in the region, and the tectonic activity behind these natural hazards results from the convergence and collision of the Eurasian, Philippine, and Indo-Australian Plates at relative velocities of up to 10 cm per year.

  5. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  6. Multidrug efflux transporter activity in sea urchin embryos:Does localization provide a diffusive advantage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xianfeng; Setayeshgar, Sima; Cole, Bryan; Hamdoun, Amro; Epel, David

    2008-03-01

    Experiments have shown upregulation of multidrug efflux transporter activity approximately 30 min after fertilization in the sea urchin embryo [1]. These ATP-hydrolyzing transporter proteins pump moderately hydrophobic molecules out of the cell and represent the cell's first line of defense againstexogenous toxins. It has also been shown that transporters are moved in vesicles along microfilaments and localized to tips of microvilli prior to activation. We have constructed a geometrically realistic model of the embryo, including microvilli, to explore the functional role of this localization in the efficient elimination of toxins from the standpoint of diffusion. We compute diffusion of toxins in extracellular, membrane and intracellular spaces coupled with transporter activity, using experimentally derived values for physical parameters. For transporters uniformly distributed along microvilli and tip-localized transporters we compare regions in parameter space where each distribution provides diffusive advantage, and comment on the physically expected conditions. [1] A. M. Hamdoun, G. N. Cherr, T. A. Roepke and D. Epel, Developmental Biology 276 452 (2004).

  7. The Feasibility of Using Nature-Based Settings for Physical Activity Programming: Views from Urban Youth and Program Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Jedediah E.; Oregon, Evelyn M.; Flett, M. Ryan; Gould, Daniel R.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the urgency to design programs to increase physical activity, especially to combat obesity in children, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions and opinions of a nature-based physical activity intervention designed for low-income urban adolescents. Methods: Four focus groups of adolescents,…

  8. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration. PMID:25195174

  9. The Evidence in Support of Physicians and Health Care Providers as Physical Activity Role Models

    PubMed Central

    Lobelo, Felipe; de Quevedo, Isabel Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity constitutes the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Health care providers (HCPs) should play a key role in counseling and appropriately referring their patients to adopt physical activity (PA). Previous reports suggest that active HCPs are more likely to provide better, more credible, and motivating preventive counseling to their patients. This review summarizes the available evidence on the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their related PA counseling practices. Based on relevant studies, a snowball search strategy identified, out of 196 studies screened, a total of 47 pertinent articles published between 1979 and 2012. Of those, 23 described HCPs’ PA habits and/or their counseling practices and 24 analytic studies evaluated the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their PA counseling practices. The majority of studies came from the United States (n = 33), and 9 studies included nonphysicians (nurses, pharmacists, and other HCPs). PA levels were mostly self-reported, and counseling was typically assessed as self-reported frequency or perceived self-efficacy in clinical practice. Most (19 out of 24) analytic studies reported a significant positive association between HCPs’ PA habits and counseling frequency, with odds ratios ranging between 1.4 and 5.7 (P < .05), in 6 studies allowing direct comparison. This review found consistent evidence supporting the notion that physically active physicians and other HCPs are more likely to provide PA counseling to their patients and can indeed become powerful PA role models. This evidence appears sufficient to justify randomized trials to determine if adding interventions to promote PA among HCPs, also results in improvements in the frequency and quality of PA preventive counseling and referrals, delivered by HCPs, to patients in primary care settings. Future studies should also aim at objectively quantifying the effect of HCPs’ PA role-modeling and how it

  10. Lipid activation of the signal recognition particle receptor provides spatial coordination of protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vinh Q.; Akopian, David; Rome, Michael; Henningsen, Doug

    2010-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor comprise the major cellular machinery that mediates the cotranslational targeting of proteins to cellular membranes. It remains unclear how the delivery of cargos to the target membrane is spatially coordinated. We show here that phospholipid binding drives important conformational rearrangements that activate the bacterial SRP receptor FtsY and the SRP–FtsY complex. This leads to accelerated SRP–FtsY complex assembly, and allows the SRP–FtsY complex to more efficiently unload cargo proteins. Likewise, formation of an active SRP–FtsY GTPase complex exposes FtsY’s lipid-binding helix and enables stable membrane association of the targeting complex. Thus, membrane binding, complex assembly with SRP, and cargo unloading are inextricably linked to each other via conformational changes in FtsY. These allosteric communications allow the membrane delivery of cargo proteins to be efficiently coupled to their subsequent unloading and translocation, thus providing spatial coordination during protein targeting. PMID:20733058

  11. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data. PMID:12674203

  12. Genetic and epigenetic background and protein expression profiles in relation to telomerase activation in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Kjellin, Hanna; Sofiadis, Anastasios; Fotouhi, Omid; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Bäckdahl, Martin; Zedenius, Jan; Xu, Dawei; Lehtiö, Janne; Larsson, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs) exhibit telomerase activation in strong association with shorter patient survival. To understand the background of telomerase activation we quantified TERT copy numbers and TERT promoter methylation in 42 MTCs and normal thyroid references. Gain of TERT was demonstrated by quantitative PCR in 5/39 sporadic MTC. Increased methylation index (MetI) for CpG methylation at the TERT promoter was found in sporadic MTCs (P < 0.0001) and in MEN 2 associated MTCs (P = 0.011) vs. normal thyroid tissues. MetI correlated positively with TERT gene expression (r = 0.432, P = 0.006) and negatively with telomere length (r = −0.343, P = 0.032). MTC cases with MetI above the median of 52% had shorter survival as compared to cases with lower MetI (P = 0.005 for overall survival and P = 0.007 for disease-related survival). Protein expression profiles obtained by mass spectrometry were then studied in relation to telomerase activation in MTCs. Comparing protein levels between tumors defined by telomerase activity status, 240 proteins were associated with telomerase activity. Among telomerase activation positive cases a set of proteins was found to discriminate between MTCs with high and low TERT gene expression with enrichment for proteins involved in telomerase regulation. XRCC5 mRNA expression was found increased in MTCs vs. normal thyroid (P = 0.007). In conclusion the findings suggest a role for TERT copy number gain, TERT promoter methylation and XRCC5 expression in telomerase activation and telomere maintenance of MTC. PMID:26870890

  13. Probiotics Modulate Intestinal Expression of Nuclear Receptor and Provide Counter-Regulatory Signals to Inflammation-Driven Adipose Tissue Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Distrutti, Eleonora; Renga, Barbara; D'Amore, Claudio; Cipriani, Sabrina; Palladino, Giuseppe; Donini, Annibale; Ricci, Patrizia; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Background Adipocytes from mesenteric white adipose tissue amplify the inflammatory response and participate in inflammation-driven immune dysfunction in Crohn's disease by releasing proinflammatory mediators. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)-α and -γ, pregnane x receptor (PXR), farnesoid x receptor (FXR) and liver x-receptor (LXR) are ligand-activated nuclear receptor that provide counter-regulatory signals to dysregulated immunity and modulates adipose tissue. Aims To investigate the expression and function of nuclear receptors in intestinal and adipose tissues in a rodent model of colitis and mesenteric fat from Crohn's patients and to investigate their modulation by probiotics. Methods Colitis was induced by TNBS administration. Mice were administered vehicle or VSL#3, daily for 10 days. Abdominal fat explants obtained at surgery from five Crohn's disease patients and five patients with colon cancer were cultured with VSL#3 medium. Results Probiotic administration attenuated development of signs and symptoms of colitis, reduced colonic expression of TNFα, IL-6 and IFNγ and reserved colonic downregulation of PPARγ, PXR and FXR caused by TNBS. Mesenteric fat depots isolated from TNBS-treated animals had increased expression of inflammatory mediators along with PPARγ, FXR, leptin and adiponectin. These changes were prevented by VSL#3. Creeping fat and mesenteric adipose tissue from Crohn's patients showed a differential expression of PPARγ and FXR with both tissue expressing high levels of leptin. Exposure of these tissues to VSL#3 medium abrogates leptin release. Conclusions Mesenteric adipose tissue from rodent colitis and Crohn's disease is metabolically active and shows inflammation-driven regulation of PPARγ, FXR and leptin. Probiotics correct the inflammation-driven metabolic dysfunction. PMID:21829567

  14. Patient-Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegria, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project-Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients' participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were…

  15. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei: A unified description of the X-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Letter, D.; Boldt, E.

    1982-09-01

    A model for spectral evolution is presented whereby active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the type observed individually have emerged from an earlier stage at zroughly-equal4 in which they are the thermal X-ray sources responsible for most of the comic X-ray background (CXB). We pursue the conjecture that these precursor objects are initially supermassive Schwarzschild black holes with accretion disks radiating near the Eddington luminosity limit. It is noted that after approx.10/sup 8/ years these central black holes are spun up to a ''canonical'' Kerr equilibriuim state (a/M = 0.998) and shown how they can lead to spectral evolution involving nonthermal emission extending to gamma-rays, at the expense of reduced thermal disk radiation. A superposition of sources in the precursor stage can thereby account for that major portion of the CXB remaining after the contributions of usual AGN are considered, while a superposition of AGN sources at z<1 can account for the gamima-ray background. Extensive X-ray measurements carried out with the HEAO 1 and HEAO 2 missions, as well as gamma-ray and optical data, are shown to compare favorably with principal features of this model. Several further observational tests are suggested for establishing the validity of this scenario for AGN spectral evolution.

  16. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  17. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  18. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  19. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  20. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  1. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private...

  2. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private...

  3. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private...

  4. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private...

  5. 45 CFR 287.120 - What work activities may be provided under the NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., alternative education, post secondary education, job readiness activity, job search, job skills training, training and employment activities, job development and placement, on-the-job training (OJT), employer work... employment services, job retention services, unsubsidized employment, subsidized public or private...

  6. [Zinc homeostasis and indicators of muscle activity in experimental graduated exercise on the background of zinc asparaginate].

    PubMed

    Skalny, A A; Tinkov, A A; Medvedeva, Yu S; Alchinova, I B; Bonitenko, E Yu; Karganov, M Yu; Nikonorov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a regular (for 7 and 14 days) 10-minute dosed exercise in isolation and on the background of intragastric administration of 5 and 15 mg/kg of zinc (II) asparaginate on the distribution of this metal in the organs and tissues of experimental animals and the indicators of muscle activity such as the level of lactate, creatinine and creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2.) serum were studied. It has been shown that exercise stress for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in homeostasis Zn, compared with 7 day, it is reflected in increased levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. It has been shown that graduated exercise for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in Zn homeostasis, compared with 7 day that expressed in increased its levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. Introduction zinc (II) asparaginate accompanied by an increase of its content in the liver, kidneys, hair and serum, but not skeletal and cardiac muscle. The combination of physical activity and the introduction of zinc positive effect on homeostasis of Zn, and the terms of muscle activity. The protective effect of zinc asparaginate with graduated exercise in the experiment was concluded. PMID:27116879

  7. Providing Physical Activity for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: The Motivate, Adapt, and Play Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathy; Hodson, Patricia; Zhang, Guili; Boswell, Boni; Decker, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that regular physical activity helps to prevent major health problems, such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. However, little research has been conducted on classroom-based physical activity programs for students with disabilities. In North Carolina, the Healthy Active Children Policy was implemented in 2006, requiring…

  8. Alkyl Galactofuranosides Strongly Interact with Leishmania donovani Membrane and Provide Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Muhammad; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Legentil, Laurent; Belaz, Sorya; Cabezas, Yari; Manuel, Christelle; Dureau, Rémy; Sergent, Odile; Burel, Agnès; Daligault, Franck; Ferrières, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effects of four alkyl-galactofuranoside derivatives, i.e., octyl-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 1), 6-amino-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 2), 6-N-acetamido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 3), and 6-azido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 4), on Leishmania donovani. Their mechanism of action was explored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultrastructural alterations were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compound 1 showed the most promising effects by inhibiting promastigote growth at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8.96 ± 2.5 μM. All compounds exhibit low toxicity toward human macrophages. Compound 1 had a higher selectivity index than the molecule used for comparison, i.e., miltefosine (159.7 versus 37.9, respectively). EPR showed that compound 1 significantly reduced membrane fluidity compared to control promastigotes and to compound 3. The furanose ring was shown to support this effect, since the isomer galactopyranose had no effect on parasite membrane fluidity or growth. NMR showed a direct interaction of all compounds (greatest with compound 1, followed by compounds 2, 3, and 4, in descending order) with the promastigote membrane and with octyl-galactopyranose and octanol, providing evidence that the n-octyl chain was primarily involved in anchoring with the parasite membrane, followed by the putative crucial role of the furanose ring in the antileishmanial activity. A morphological analysis of compound 1-treated promastigotes by TEM revealed profound alterations in the parasite membrane and organelles, but this was not the case with compound 3. Quantification of annexin V binding by flow cytometry confirmed that compound 1 induced apoptosis in >90% of promastigotes. The effect of compound 1 was also assessed on intramacrophagic amastigotes and showed a reduction in amastigote growth associated with an increase of reactive oxygen

  9. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  10. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  11. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  12. Physical activity when young provides lifelong benefits to cortical bone size and strength in men

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Stuart J.; Mantila Roosa, Sara M.; Kersh, Mariana E.; Hurd, Andrea L.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Pandy, Marcus G.; Fuchs, Robyn K.

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads during youth but is more at risk for failure during aging. Do the skeletal benefits of physical activity during youth persist with aging? To address this question, we used a uniquely controlled cross-sectional study design in which we compared the throwing-to-nonthrowing arm differences in humeral diaphysis bone properties in professional baseball players at different stages of their careers (n = 103) with dominant-to-nondominant arm differences in controls (n = 94). Throwing-related physical activity introduced extreme loading to the humeral diaphysis and nearly doubled its strength. Once throwing activities ceased, the cortical bone mass, area, and thickness benefits of physical activity during youth were gradually lost because of greater medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. However, half of the bone size (total cross-sectional area) and one-third of the bone strength (polar moment of inertia) benefits of throwing-related physical activity during youth were maintained lifelong. In players who continued throwing during aging, some cortical bone mass and more strength benefits of the physical activity during youth were maintained as a result of less medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. These data indicate that the old adage of “use it or lose it” is not entirely applicable to the skeleton and that physical activity during youth should be encouraged for lifelong bone health, with the focus being optimization of bone size and strength rather than the current paradigm of increasing mass. The data also indicate that physical activity should be encouraged during aging to reduce skeletal structural decay. PMID:24706816

  13. 75 FR 9903 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Service; Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ...; Comment Request; Service; Provider Study AGENCY: Administration on Aging, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... collection requirements relating to Area Agency on Aging and Local Service Provider Study. DATES: Submit... programs to seniors. This data collection focuses on two areas: an investigation of the feasibility...

  14. 30 CFR 250.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Plans and... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  15. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... postsecondary course selection. (3)(i) Information on both the full range of Federal student financial aid... the financial and economic literacy of students, including financial planning for postsecondary... counselors. (2) Information, activities, and instruction designed to acquaint students participating in...

  16. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... postsecondary course selection. (3)(i) Information on both the full range of Federal student financial aid... the financial and economic literacy of students, including financial planning for postsecondary... counselors. (2) Information, activities, and instruction designed to acquaint students participating in...

  17. Soil Microbial Activity Provides Insight to Carbon Cycling in Shrub Ecotones of Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, E.; Kashi, N. N.; Chen, J.; Hobbie, E. A.; Schwan, M. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Shrubs are expanding in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to rising atmospheric temperatures. Microbial activity increases as growing temperatures cause permafrost warming and subsequent thaw, leading to a greater resource of soil nutrients enabling shrub growth. Increased carbon inputs from shrubs is predicted to result in faster carbon turnover by microbial decomposition. Further understanding of microbial activity underneath shrubs could uncover how microbes and soil processes interact to promote shrub expansion and carbon cycling. To address how higher soil carbon input from shrubs influences decomposition, soil samples were taken across a heath, shrub, and forest ecotone gradient at two sites near Abikso, Sweden. Samples were analyzed for soluble carbon and nitrogen, microbial abundance, and microbial activity of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase to reflect organic matter decomposition and availability of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphate respectively. Chitinase activity positively correlated with shrub cover, suggesting microbial demands for nitrogen increase with higher shrub cover. Glucosidase activity negatively correlated with shrub cover and soluble carbon, suggesting decreased microbial demand for carbon as shrub cover and carbon stores increase. Lower glucosidase activity in areas with high carbon input from shrubs implies that microbes are decomposing carbon less readily than carbon is being put into the soil. Increasing soil carbon stores in shrub covered areas can lead to shrubs becoming a net carbon sink and a negative feedback to changing climate.

  18. PPAR-gamma activation fails to provide myocardial protection in ischemia and reperfusion in pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ya; Gen, Michael; Lu, Li; Fox, Jennifer; Weiss, Sara O; Brown, R Dale; Perlov, Daniel; Ahmad, Hasan; Zhu, Peili; Greyson, Clifford; Long, Carlin S; Schwartz, Gregory G

    2005-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma modulates substrate metabolism and inflammatory responses. In experimental rats subjected to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), thiazolidinedione PPAR-gamma activators reduce infarct size and preserve left ventricular function. Troglitazone is the only PPAR-gamma activator that has been shown to be protective in I/R in large animals. However, because troglitazone contains both alpha-tocopherol and thiazolidinedione moieties, whether PPAR-gamma activation per se is protective in myocardial I/R in large animals remains uncertain. To address this question, 56 pigs were treated orally for 8 wk with troglitazone (75 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)), rosiglitazone (3 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)), or alpha-tocopherol (73 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1), equimolar to troglitazone dose) or received no treatment. Pigs were then anesthetized and subjected to 90 min of low-flow regional myocardial ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion. Myocardial expression of PPAR-gamma, determined by ribonuclease protection assay, increased with troglitazone and rosiglitazone compared with no treatment. Rosiglitazone had no significant effect on myocardial contractile function (Frank-Starling relations), substrate uptake, or expression of proinflammatory cytokines during I/R compared with untreated pigs. In contrast, preservation of myocardial contractile function and lactate uptake were greater and cytokine expression was attenuated in pigs treated with troglitazone or alpha-tocopherol compared with untreated pigs. Multivariate analysis indicated that presence of an alpha-tocopherol, but not a thiazolidinedione, moiety in the test compound was significantly related to greater contractile function and lactate uptake and lower cytokine expression during I/R. We conclude that PPAR-gamma activation is not protective in a porcine model of myocardial I/R. Protective effects of troglitazone are attributable to its alpha-tocopherol moiety. These findings, in

  19. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhao, Zuowei; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  20. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 5. Enrichment Activities for the Gifted/Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallis, Jackie; Gilman, Sharlene

    The document presents Module 5, enrichment activities for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  1. Can the Interactive Whiteboard Help to Provide "Dialogic Space" for Children's Collaborative Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Neil; Warwick, Paul; Kershner, Ruth; Kleine Staarman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on a project investigating the use of interactive whiteboards (IWBs) as tools for children's group-based learning in primary science. A series of science activities were designed with participating teachers, in which groups of three or four children used the IWB to access information, consider options, plan actions and make…

  2. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services may a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... effective preparation for doctoral study. (b) Summer internships. (c) Seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare participants for doctoral study. (d) Tutoring. (e) Academic counseling. (f..., or any combination of faculty members and students. (h) Exposure to cultural events and...

  3. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare students for doctoral study. (4) Tutoring. (5) Academic counseling. (6... higher education, students, or a combination of faculty members and students. (3) Exposure to...

  4. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare students for doctoral study. (4) Tutoring. (5) Academic counseling. (6... higher education, students, or a combination of faculty members and students. (3) Exposure to...

  5. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare students for doctoral study. (4) Tutoring. (5) Academic counseling. (6... higher education, students, or a combination of faculty members and students. (3) Exposure to...

  6. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational activities designed to prepare students for doctoral study. (4) Tutoring. (5) Academic counseling. (6... higher education, students, or a combination of faculty members and students. (3) Exposure to...

  7. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... enrolling and maintaining active enrollment status in the Medicare program. 424.516 Section 424.516 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  8. PPAR-γ activation fails to provide myocardial protection in ischemia and reperfusion in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ya; Gen, Michael; Lu, Li; Fox, Jennifer; Weiss, Sara O.; Brown, R. Dale; Perlov, Daniel; Ahmad, Hasan; Zhu, Peili; Greyson, Clifford; Long, Carlin S.; Schwartz, Gregory G.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ modulates substrate metabolism and inflammatory responses. In experimental rats subjected to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R), thiazolidinedione PPAR-γ activators reduce infarct size and preserve left ventricular function. Troglitazone is the only PPAR-γ activator that has been shown to be protective in I/R in large animals. However, because troglitazone contains both α-tocopherol and thiazolidinedione moieties, whether PPAR-γ activation per se is protective in myocardial I/R in large animals remains uncertain. To address this question, 56 pigs were treated orally for 8 wk with troglitazone (75 mg·kg−1 ·day−1), rosiglitazone (3 mg·kg−1 ·day−1), or α-tocopherol (73 mg·kg−1 ·day−1, equimolar to troglitazone dose) or received no treatment. Pigs were then anesthetized and subjected to 90 min of low-flow regional myocardial ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion. Myocardial expression of PPAR-γ, determined by ribonuclease protection assay, increased with troglitazone and rosiglitazone compared with no treatment. Rosiglitazone had no significant effect on myocardial contractile function (Frank-Starling relations), substrate uptake, or expression of proinflammatory cytokines during I/R compared with untreated pigs. In contrast, preservation of myocardial contractile function and lactate uptake were greater and cytokine expression was attenuated in pigs treated with troglitazone or α-tocopherol compared with untreated pigs. Multivariate analysis indicated that presence of an α-tocopherol, but not a thiazolidinedione, moiety in the test compound was significantly related to greater contractile function and lactate uptake and lower cytokine expression during I/R. We conclude that PPAR-γ activation is not protective in a porcine model of myocardial I/R. Protective effects of troglitazone are attributable to its α-tocopherol moiety. These findings, in conjunction with prior rat studies, suggest

  9. After-School All-Stars: Providing Structured Health and Physical Activity Programs in Urban Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical education time has been reduced or even eliminated in middle and high schools in favor of more time for standardized test preparation, especially in urban schools and inner cities. One way to replace the time lost is by providing it after school as part of a comprehensive program. After-School All-Stars (ASAS) is such a program, networked…

  10. 78 FR 74151 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Providing Waiver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... with an addendum issued in 2004. In the Federal Register of April 11, 2012 (77 FR 21782), FDA announced..., in the Federal Register of April 8, 2013 (78 FR 20926), announced the availability of a draft... Industry on Providing Postmarket Periodic Safety Reports in the International Conference on...

  11. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.516 Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and... including but not limited to instrument and medical certifications. (ii) Airworthiness certification....

  12. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.516 Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and... including but not limited to instrument and medical certifications. (ii) Airworthiness certification....

  13. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... Medicare Billing Privileges § 424.516 Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and... including but not limited to instrument and medical certifications. (ii) Airworthiness certification....

  14. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... Billing Privileges § 424.516 Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining... including but not limited to instrument and medical certifications. (ii) Airworthiness certification....

  15. Activated cholinergic signaling provides a target in squamous cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Pingfang; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Fu, Xiao Wen; Maier, Michelle; Jia, Yibing; Duan, Jie; Proskosil, Becky J; Gravett, Courtney; Lindstrom, Jon; Mark, Gregory P; Saha, Saurabh; Spindel, Eliot R

    2008-06-15

    The binding of exogenous nicotine to nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChR) and the binding of endogenous ACh to both nAChR and muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChR) stimulate growth of both small cell and non-small cell lung carcinomas. Understanding how cholinergic signaling is up-regulated in lung cancer may suggest new therapeutic approaches. Analysis of 28 squamous cell lung carcinomas (SCC) showed increased levels of alpha5 and beta3 nAChR mRNA and increased levels of ACh associated with increased levels of choline acetyltransferase mRNA and decreased cholinesterase mRNAs. Lynx1, an allosteric inhibitor of nAChR activity, was also decreased in SCC. Thus, cholinergic signaling is broadly increased in SCC caused by increased levels of receptors, increased levels of ligands, and decreased levels of receptor inhibitors. Partially explaining the cholinergic up-regulation seen in SCC, incubation of the H520 SCC cell line with nicotine increased levels of ACh secretion, increased expression of nAChR, and, as measured by electrophysiologic recording, increased activity of the expressed nAChR. Consistent with these effects, nicotine stimulated proliferation of H520 cells. One approach to blocking proliferative effects of nicotine and ACh on growth of lung cancers may be through M3 mAChR antagonists, which can limit the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase that is caused by both nicotinic and muscarinic signaling. This was tested with the M3-selective muscarinic antagonist darifenacin. Darifenacin blocked nicotine-stimulated H520 growth in vitro and also blocked H520 growth in nude mice in vivo. Thus, cholinergic signaling is broadly up-regulated in SCC and blocking cholinergic signaling can limit basal and nicotine-stimulated growth of SCC. PMID:18559515

  16. Dissecting Complex Metabolic Integration Provides Direct Genetic Evidence for CodY Activation by Guanine Nucleotides▿

    PubMed Central

    Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2011-01-01

    The global regulator CodY controls the expression of dozens of metabolic genes and genes mediating adaptation to nutrient availability in many low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria. Branched-chain amino acids l-isoleucine, l-leucine, and l-valine (ILV) activate CodY both in vivo and in vitro, and genes that direct their synthesis (ilv, ybgE, and ywaA) are highly repressed by CodY, creating a potential negative feedback loop. The nucleoside triphosphate GTP also activates CodY in vitro, but the evidence for activation by GTP in vivo is limited and indirect. We constructed a Bacillus subtilis strain (ybgE bcd ywaA) that is unable to convert branched-chain α-keto acids to ILV or to use ILV as a precursor for branched-chain fatty acid synthesis. Unexpectedly, the strain was not viable on rich medium. Supplementing rich medium with short, branched-chain fatty acids or derepressing expression of genes for de novo ILV synthesis bypassed the original lethality, restoring growth and showing that the lack of viability was due to insufficient intracellular production of the precursors of branched-chain fatty acids. Spontaneous extragenic suppressor mutants that arose in the triple mutant population proved to have additional mutations in guaA or guaB or codY. Expression of ILV biosynthetic genes in codY mutants was increased. The gua mutations caused guanine/guanosine auxotrophy and led to partial derepression of direct CodY-repressed targets, including ILV biosynthetic genes, under conditions similar to those that caused the original lethality. We conclude that a guanine derivative, most likely GTP, controls CodY activity in vivo. PMID:21856856

  17. A JOINT MODEL OF X-RAY AND INFRARED BACKGROUNDS. II. COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee

    2013-11-01

    We estimate the abundance of Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) based on our joint model of X-ray and infrared backgrounds. At L{sub rest2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1}, the CT AGN density predicted by our model is a few ×10{sup –4} Mpc{sup –3} from z = 0 up to z = 3. CT AGNs with higher luminosity cuts (>10{sup 43}, 10{sup 44}, and 10{sup 45} erg s{sup –1}) peak at higher redshift and show a rapid increase in number density from z = 0 to z ∼ 2-3. The CT AGN to all AGN ratio appears to be low (2%-5%) at f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –15} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} but rises rapidly toward fainter flux levels. The CT AGNs account for ∼38% of the total accreted supermassive black hole mass and contribute ∼25% of the cosmic X-ray background spectrum at 20 keV. Our model predicts that the majority (90%) of luminous and bright CT AGNs (L{sub rest2-10keV} > 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1} or f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –15} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}) have detectable hot dust 5-10 μm emission, which we associate with a dusty torus. The fraction drops for fainter objects, to around 30% at L{sub rest2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup –1} or f{sub 2-10{sub keV}} > 10{sup –17} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Our model confirms that heavily obscured AGNs (N{sub H{sub I}} > 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) can be separated from unobscured and mildly obscured ones (N{sub H{sub I}} < 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}) in the plane of observed frame X-ray hardness versus mid-IR/X-ray ratio.

  18. Activity-based funding model provides foundation for province-wide best practices in renal care.

    PubMed

    Levin, Adeera; Lo, Clifford; Noel, Kevin; Djurdjev, Ogjnenka; Amano, Erlyn C

    2013-01-01

    British Columbia has a unique funding model for renal care in Canada. Patient care is delivered through six health authorities, while funding is administered by the Provincial Renal Agency using an activity-based funding model. The model allocates funding based on a schedule of costs for every element of renal care, excluding physician fees. Accountability, transparency of allocation and tracking of outcomes are key features that ensure successful implementation. The model supports province-wide best practices and equitable care and fosters innovation. Since its introduction, the outpatient renal services budget has grown less than the population, while maintaining or improving clinical outcomes. PMID:24485244

  19. A tumor-derived protein which provides T-cell costimulation through accessory cell activation.

    PubMed

    Powell, T J; Schreck, R; McCall, M; Hui, T; Rice, A; App, H; Azam, M; Ullrich, A; Shawver, L K

    1995-05-01

    A recently described tumor-derived glycoprotein, designated 90K, has been shown to have positive effects on the generation of cytotoxic effector cells (NK/LAK) from human PBMC. To determine the mechanism of these effects, we have examined the effects of 90K on cytokine production by human PBMC. A culture of normal PBMC with 90K alone did not result in IL-2 secretion; however, in coculture with suboptimal doses of ConA, 90K increased IL-2 secretion by PBMC. Coculture of PBMC with 90K and ConA also resulted in increased production of the cytokines IL-1, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNF alpha. T cells depleted of accessory cells failed to respond to ConA alone, 90K alone, or the combination of ConA and 90K, suggesting that this protein does not have a direct effect on T cells. However, 90K alone was sufficient to induce cytokine production by unfractionated PBMC (IL-1, IL-6, GM-CSF, and TNF alpha) or by CD14-enriched PBMC (IL-1 and IL-6). In addition, expression of ICAM-1 was increased on a human monocytic cell line cultured with purified 90K in the absence of any other stimulus. This 90K-induced upregulation of ICAM-1 expression was accompanied by an increased accessory function of the monocytes, demonstrated by their ability to support ConA-induced activation of peripheral blood T cells. Based on the current data, we propose a model in which 90K activates accessory cells, resulting in the secretion of cytokines and the expression of adhesion molecules, which in turn act as costimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Activated T cells then produce cytokines such as IL-2, which lead to a more vigorous cell-mediated immune response to tumor cells and virus-infected cells. Thus, 90K shows promise as an immunotherapeutic reagent for diseases such as cancer and viral infection. PMID:7582257

  20. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services that conform to the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the...

  1. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW...

  2. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services that conform to the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the...

  3. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services that conform to the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the...

  4. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW...

  5. Two Adaptation Processes in Auditory Hair Cells Together Can Provide an Active Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals. Two adaptation mechanisms are known to modify the ionic current flowing through the transduction channels of the hair bundles: a rapid process involves Ca2+ ions binding to the channels; and a slower adaptation is associated with the movement of myosin motors. We present a mathematical model of the hair cell which demonstrates that the combination of these two mechanisms can produce “self-tuned critical oscillations”, i.e., maintain the hair bundle at the threshold of an oscillatory instability. The characteristic frequency depends on the geometry of the bundle and on the Ca2+ dynamics, but is independent of channel kinetics. Poised on the verge of vibrating, the hair bundle acts as an active amplifier. However, if the hair cell is sufficiently perturbed, other dynamical regimes can occur. These include slow relaxation oscillations which resemble the hair bundle motion observed in some experimental preparations. PMID:12829475

  6. Muscles provide protection during microbial infection by activating innate immune response pathways in Drosophila and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Arunita; Roy, Debasish; Patnaik, Esha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle contraction brings about movement and locomotion in animals. However, muscles have also been implicated in several atypical physiological processes including immune response. The role of muscles in immunity and the mechanism involved has not yet been deciphered. In this paper, using Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) as a model, we show that muscles are immune-responsive tissues. Flies with defective IFMs are incapable of mounting a potent humoral immune response. Upon immune challenge, the IFMs produce anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) through the activation of canonical signaling pathways, and these IFM-synthesized AMPs are essential for survival upon infection. The trunk muscles of zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, also possess the capacity to mount an immune response against bacterial infections, thus establishing that immune responsiveness of muscles is evolutionarily conserved. Our results suggest that physiologically fit muscles might boost the innate immune response of an individual. PMID:27101844

  7. Differential activation of inflammatory pathways in testicular macrophages provides a rationale for their subdued inflammatory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Lu, Yongning; Fröhlich, Suada; Fijak, Monika; Vijayan, Vijith; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Spermatogenic cells express cell-specific molecules with the potential to be seen as "foreign" by the immune system. Owing to the time difference between their appearance in puberty and the editing of the lymphocyte repertoire around birth, local adaptations of the immune system coined immune privilege are required to confer protection from autoattack. Testicular macrophages (TM) play an important role in maintaining testicular immune privilege and display reduced proinflammatory capacity compared with other macrophages. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this macrophage phenotype remained elusive. We demonstrate that TM have a lower constitutive expression of TLR pathway-specific genes compared with peritoneal macrophages. Moreover, in TM stimulated with LPS, the NF-κB signaling pathway is blocked due to lack of IκBα ubiquitination and, hence, degradation. Instead, challenge of TM with LPS or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid induces MAPK, AP-1, and CREB signaling pathways, which leads to production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, although at much lower levels than in peritoneal macrophages. Pretreatment of TM with inhibitors for MAPKs p38 and ERK1/2 suppresses activation of AP-1 and CREB signaling pathways and attenuates LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-10 secretion. High levels of IL-10 production and activation of STAT3 by LPS stimulation in TM indicate a regulatory macrophage phenotype. Our results suggest that TM maintain testicular immune privilege by inhibiting NF-κB signaling through impairment of IκBα ubiquitination and a general reduction of TLR cascade gene expression. However, TM do maintain some capacity for innate immune responses through AP-1 and CREB signaling pathways. PMID:25917085

  8. The Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia by Different Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Venugopalan, B; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    We examined variations in dengue vector control costs and resource consumption between the District Health Departments (DHDs) and Local Authorities (LAs) to assist informed decision making as to the future roles of these agencies in the delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. Data were collected from the vector control units of DHDs and LAs in 8 selected districts. We captured costs and resource consumption in 2010 for premise inspection for mosquito breeding sites, fogging to destroy adult mosquitoes and larviciding of potential breeding sites. Overall, DHDs spent US$5.62 million or US$679 per case and LAs spent US$2.61 million or US$499 per case. The highest expenditure for both agencies was for fogging, 51.0% and 45.8% of costs for DHDs and LAs, respectively. The DHDs had higher resource costs for human personnel, vehicles, pesticides, and equipment. The findings provide some evidence to rationalize delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. PMID:26047628

  9. Hygroscopicity Behavior, Activation Properties and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosol at a Background Site in the Megacity Region of Peking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Nowak, Andreas; Mildenberger, Katrin; Göbel, Tina; Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of China suffer from heavy air pollution (both gaseous and particulate) caused by strong economic growth in the last two decades. However, knowledge concerning the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol particles populations, and their effects on the optical properties of the atmosphere, is still sparse. In the framework of the investigations presented here, comprehensive measurements concerning aerosol particle hygroscopicity, CCN ability, composition, and optical properties were performed. The investigations are part of the DFG-funded project HaChi (Haze in China) and are conducted in collaboration with the Peking University. A conclusive parameterization of aerosol hygroscopicity and activation data is aimed for, which will then be implemented in a meso-scale model to investigate aerosol-cloud-radiation and precipitation interactions. During two intensive measurements campaigns (March 2009 and July/ August 2009), in-situ aerosol measurements have been performed in an air-conditioned mobile laboratory next to the Wuqing Meteorological Station (39°23'8.53"N, 117°1'25.88"E), which is located between Bejing and Tijanjin and is thereby an ideal background site in a megacity region. The particle number size distribution (TDMPS), the particle optical properties (MAAP and nephelometer) and their hygroscopic properties at high RH (HH-TDMA, LACIS-mobile) were characterized as well as their cloud nucleating properties above supersaturation (DMT-CCNC). 24 h PM1 particle samples were continuously collected over the two campaigns in winter and summer using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). Additionally two 6h size-resolved samples (daytime and night-time) were collected each day applying an 11-stage Berner impactor. The size-selection of HH-TDMA, LACIS and the CCNC was synchronized with the Berner stages. Opening analysis of the winter campaign data showed that the HH-TDMA usually detected a hydrophobic and a hygroscopic mode, i.e., the

  10. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  11. Active Detection of Shielded Special Nuclear Material in the Presence of Variable High Backgrounds Using a Mixed Photon-Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philip N.; Clemett, Ceri D.; Hill, Cassie; O'Malley, John; Campbell, Ben

    This paper describes and compares two approaches to the analysis of active interrogation data containing high photon backgrounds associated with mixed photon-neutron source flash active interrogation. Results from liquid scintillation detectors (EJ301/EJ309) fielded at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in collaboration with the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), using the NRL Mercury Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) operating in both a photon and mixed photon-neutron mode at a Depleted Uranium (DU) target are presented. The standard approach applying a Figure of Merit (FOM) consisting of background sigma above background is compared with an approach looking to fit only the time-decaying photon signal with standard delayed photon emission from ∼10-MeV end-point-energy Bremsstrahlung photofission of DU. Examples where each approach does well and less well are presented together with a discussion of the relative limitations of both approaches to the type of mixed photon-neutron flash active interrogation being considered.

  12. Usability and acceptability of a website that provides tailored advice on falls prevention activities for older people.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Samuel R; Yardley, Lucy

    2009-03-01

    This article presents the usability and acceptability of a website that provides older people with tailored advice to help motivate them to undertake physical activities that prevent falls. Views on the website from interviews with 16 older people and 26 sheltered housing wardens were analysed thematically. The website was well received with only one usability difficulty with the action plan calendar. The older people selected balance training activities out of interest or enjoyment, and appeared to carefully add them into their current routine. The wardens were motivated to promote the website to their residents, particularly those who owned a computer, had balance problems, or were physically active. However, the participants noted that currently a minority of older people use the Internet. Also, some older people underestimated how much activity was enough to improve balance, and others perceived themselves as too old for the activities. PMID:19218310

  13. Parent-School Partnership: An Analysis of Service Delivery and Technical Assistance Activities Provided Under P.L. 94-142. Resource Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, James A., Ed.

    By providing background information, reviewing current practice, and identifying and analyzing related issues, the authors formulate and recommend solutions for strengthening the parent-school relationship, particularly as related to P.L. 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act). Section I provides background information on the law…

  14. Backgrounds in Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, John C.; Long, Barbara K.

    "Backgrounds in Language," a field-tested inservice course designed for use by groups of 15 or 25 language arts teachers, provides the subject matter background teachers need to make informed decisions about what curriculum materials to use in what way, at what time, and with which students. The course is comprised of eight 2-hour sessions,…

  15. A Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach for Providing Instant Learning Support in Personal Computer Assembly Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Personal computer assembly courses have been recognized as being essential in helping students understand computer structure as well as the functionality of each computer component. In this study, a context-aware ubiquitous learning approach is proposed for providing instant assistance to individual students in the learning activity of a…

  16. Treatment with an activator of hypoxia-inducible factor 1, DMOG provides neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tanusree; Sen, Nilkantha

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality and it affects more than 1.7 million people in the USA. A couple of regenerative pathways including activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) are initiated to reduce cellular damage following TBI; however endogenous activation of these pathways is not enough to provide neuroprotection after TBI. Thus we aimed to see whether sustained activation of HIF-1α can provide neuroprotection and neurorepair following TBI. We found that chronic treatment with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) markedly increases the expression level of HIF-1α and mRNA levels of its downstream proteins such as Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and 4 (PDK1, PDK4) and Erythropoietin (EPO). Treatment of DMOG activates a major cell survival protein kinase Akt and reduces both cell death and lesion volume following TBI. Moreover, administration of DMOG augments cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) staining in pericontusional cortex after TBI, which suggests that DMOG stimulates angiogenesis after TBI. Treatment with DMOG also improves both memory and motor functions after TBI. Taken together our results suggest that sustained activation of HIF-1α provides significant neuroprotection following TBI. PMID:26970014

  17. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related programs? 645.225 Section 645.225 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS General Program and...

  18. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related programs? 645.225 Section 645.225 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS General Program and...

  19. A qualitative study of women’s perceptions of provider advice about diet and physical activity during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Renée M.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moos, Merry-K.; Carrier, Kathryn S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this qualitative study was to gather insights into pregnant women’s experiences with provider advice about diet and physical activity. METHODS We conducted a series of 13 focus groups with a total of 58 pregnant African American, Caucasian, and Hispanic women of varying body sizes. Statements were independently coded, reduced, and then reconstructed to identify overarching themes with the assistance of ATLAS/ti software. RESULTS Mean gestational age at the time of the focus groups was 30 weeks. Women commonly reported overwhelming and confusing diet advice and a paucity of physical activity advice that was largely limited to walking. Many reported following advice; when advice was not followed, it was because women disagreed with it or simply did not want to do it. CONCLUSION Women would benefit from more clear guidance from physicians and other providers regarding dietary choices and physical activity in pregnancy. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS Providers should make dietary and physical activity advice in pregnancy more clear and individualized and offer such guidance multiple times throughout pregnancy. PMID:23399436

  20. Health/Service Providers' Perspectives on Barriers to Healthy Weight Gain and Physical Activity in Pregnant, Urban First Nations Women.

    PubMed

    Darroch, Francine E; Giles, Audrey R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine health/service providers' perspectives of barriers to healthy weight gain and physical activity for urban, pregnant First Nations women in Ottawa, Canada. Through the use of semi-structured interviews, we explored 15 health/service providers' perspectives on the complex barriers their clients face. By using a postcolonial feminist lens and a social determinants of health framework, we identified three social determinants of health that the health/service providers believed to have the greatest influence on their clients' weight gain and physical activity during pregnancy: poverty, education, and colonialism. Our findings are then contextualized within existing Statistics Canada and the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study data. We found that health/service providers are in a position to challenge colonial relations of power. We conclude by urging health/service providers, researchers, and policymakers alike to take into consideration the ways in which these social determinants of health and their often synergistic effects affect urban First Nations women during pregnancy. PMID:25779985

  1. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  2. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Taian M.; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  3. [Post-marketing clinical safety assessment of Shenmai injection based on active monitoring and passive monitoring in large data background].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Ai, Qing-hua; Song, Nian-bin

    2015-12-01

    This paper adopted a series of related analysis methods to comprehensively analyze post-marketing clinical safety data of Shenmai injection from 4,220 cases of SRS and 32,358 cases of multicenter, prospective, registered hospital centralized monitoring in large data background, calculated ADR incidence rate was 0.93 per 1,000, main symptoms of ADR includes chest pain, chills, skin itching, palpitations, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, flushing, numbness, allergic reaction, cyanosis, rash, low back pain, and "breath", "anaphylactoid reaction" and "flush" were the safety warning signals of Shenmai injection. Primary disease for chronic pulmonary heart disease, thyroid disease, and combined with cerebral vascular disease, prior to the injection and continuous use of alprostadil, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, combined with quinolones, penicillins were suspicious influence factors of ADR of Shenmai injection, these promot the clinical safety. PMID:27245017

  4. Family Background, School-Age Trajectories of Activity Participation, and Academic Achievement at the Start of High School

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe, Robert; Smith, Chelsea; Leventhal, Tama

    2014-01-01

    Applying latent class and regression techniques to data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 997), this study explored the potential academic advantages of time spent in out-of-school activities. Of particular interest was how these potential advantages played out in relation to the timing and duration of activity participation and the family contexts in which it occurred. Participation closer to the start of high school—including consistent participants and latecomers—was associated with higher grades at the transition into high school, especially for youth from low-income families. Sensitivity analyses indicated that this link between school-age activity participation and adolescent academic progress was unlikely to be solely a function of selection. It also tended to be more pronounced among youth from lower-income families, although without varying by other aspects of family status or process. PMID:26279615

  5. Providers, Payers, The Community, And Patients Are All Obliged To Get Patient Activation And Engagement Ethically Right

    PubMed Central

    Danis, Marion; Solomon, Mildred

    2016-01-01

    Active and engaged patients seek the understanding, knowledge, and skills to promote their own health. Efforts to promote such patient activation and engagement are ethically justified because they are consonant with the well-established principle of respect for persons and, as the evidence shows, because they are likely to produce better outcomes for patients. Yet patient activation and engagement can also go ethically awry if, for example, nonadherent patients are abandoned or are unduly disadvantaged by punitive policies and practices, or if the conditions for successful activation and engagement are missing. In this article we discuss the ethical issues and responsibilities that pertain to patients, clinicians, health care organizations, delivery systems, insurers, payers, and communities. For example, physicians or payers could hold patients blameworthy for not following recommendations, but we suggest that a better approach would be for providers and payers to empower patients to effectively share responsibility for defining goals and achieving them. An ethical approach to patient activation and engagement should place obligations not only on patients but also on clinicians, health care organizations and delivery systems, insurers, and communities. PMID:23381534

  6. [Thrombocyte lysosomal hydrolase activity in patients with ischemic heart disease, hyperlipidemia and obesity against a background of different diets].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A V; Shimanovskaia, N P; Pogozheva, A V; Samsonov, M A; Tutel'ian, V A

    1987-01-01

    Investigation of lysosomal hydrolase activity in platelets of patients has revealed drastic activation of cathepsins B, C and phospholipase A1, the degree of which rose in the following range: coronary heart disease; coronary heart disease aggravated by obesity: obesity and hyperlipidemia (type II). Administration of the adequate dietotherapy resulted in normalization of enzymologic parameters, whereas the results of the clinico-biochemical analysis of the blood were less informative in all cases. The data obtained could be used in the evaluation of the dietotherapy effectiveness, as well as for the early diagnosis of the corresponding diseases. PMID:3439081

  7. Ribonuclease Activity of Dis3 Is Required for Mitotic Progression and Provides a Possible Link between Heterochromatin and Kinetochore Function

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Hiroaki; Goto, Derek B.; Toda, Takashi; Chen, Ee Sin; Grewal, Shiv I.; Martienssen, Robert A.; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Background Cellular RNA metabolism has a broad range of functional aspects in cell growth and division, but its role in chromosome segregation during mitosis is only poorly understood. The Dis3 ribonuclease is a key component of the RNA-processing exosome complex. Previous isolation of the dis3-54 cold-sensitive mutant of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe suggested that Dis3 is also required for correct chromosome segregation. Methodology/Principal Findings We show here that the progression of mitosis is arrested in dis3-54, and that segregation of the chromosomes is blocked by activation of the mitotic checkpoint control. This block is dependent on the Mad2 checkpoint protein. Double mutant and inhibitor analyses revealed that Dis3 is required for correct kinetochore formation and function, and that this activity is monitored by the Mad2 checkpoint. Dis3 is a member of the highly conserved RNase II family and is known to be an essential subunit of the exosome complex. The dis3-54 mutation was found to alter the RNaseII domain of Dis3, which caused a reduction in ribonuclease activity in vitro. This was associated with loss of silencing of an ura4+ reporter gene inserted into the outer repeats (otr) and central core (cnt and imr) regions of the centromere. On the other hand, centromeric siRNA maturation and formation of the RITS RNAi effector complex was normal in the dis3-54 mutant. Micrococcal nuclease assay also suggested the overall chromatin structure of the centromere was not affected in dis3-54 mutant. Conclusions/Significance RNase activity of Dis3, a core subunit of exosome, was found to be required for proper kinetochore formation and establishment of kinetochore-microtubule interactions. Moreover, Dis3 was suggested to contribute to kinetochore formation through an involvement in heterochromatic silencing at both outer centromeric repeats and within the central core region. This activity is likely monitored by the mitotic checkpoint, and distinct

  8. Slowing of EEG Background Activity in Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s Disease with Early Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Nina; Hatz, Florian; Bousleiman, Habib; Ehrensperger, Michael M.; Gschwandtner, Ute; Hardmeier, Martin; Ruegg, Stephan; Schindler, Christian; Zimmermann, Ronan; Monsch, Andreas Urs; Fuhr, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: Slowing of the electroencephalogram (EEG) is frequent in Parkinson’s (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and correlates with cognitive decline. As overlap pathology plays a role in the pathogenesis of dementia, it is likely that demented patients in PD show similar physiological alterations as in AD. Objective: To analyze distinctive quantitative EEG characteristics in early cognitive dysfunction in PD and AD. Methods: Forty patients (20 PD- and 20 AD patients with early cognitive impairment) and 20 normal controls (NC) were matched for gender, age, and education. Resting state EEG was recorded from 256 electrodes. Relative power spectra, median frequency (4–14 Hz), and neuropsychological outcome were compared between groups. Results: Relative theta power in left temporal region and median frequency separated the three groups significantly (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001). Relative theta power was increased and median frequency reduced in patients with both diseases compared to NC. Median frequency was higher in AD than in PD and classified groups significantly (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Increase of theta power in the left temporal region and a reduction of median frequency were associated with presence of AD or PD. PD patients are characterized by a pronounced slowing as compared to AD patients. Therefore, in both disorders EEG slowing might be a useful biomarker for beginning cognitive decline. PMID:25477817

  9. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  10. The Crystal Structure of Thrombin-activable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFI) Provides the Structural Basis for Its Intrinsic Activity and the Short Half-life of TAFIa*♦

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kanchan; Pallares, Irantzu; Valnickova, Zuzana; Christensen, Trine; Vendrell, Josep; Wendt, K. Ulrich; Schreuder, Herman A.; Enghild, Jan J.; Avilés, Francesc X.

    2008-01-01

    Mature thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) is a highly unstable metallocarboxypeptidase that stabilizes blood clots by clipping C-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin. In accordance with its in vitro antifibrinolytic activity, animal studies have reported that inhibition of mature TAFI aids in the prevention of thrombosis. The level of TAFI activity is stringently regulated through (i) controlled proteolytic truncation of the zymogen (TAFI), generating the mature enzyme, TAFIa, and (ii) the short half-life of TAFIa. TAFI itself exhibits an intrinsic enzymatic activity, which is likely required to provide a baseline level of antifibrinolytic activity. The novel crystal structure presented here reveals that the active site of TAFI is accessible, providing the structural explanation for the its intrinsic activity. It also supports the notion that an “instability region” exists, in agreement with site-directed mutagenesis studies. Sulfate ions, bound to this region, point toward a potential heparin-binding site and could explain how heparin stabilizes TAFIa. PMID:18669641

  11. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  12. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze the o-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme’s interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate–enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO’s acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their—so far unknown—natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  13. Properdin can initiate complement activation by binding specific target surfaces and providing a platform for de novo convertase assembly.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Dirk; Mitchell, Lynne M; Atkinson, John P; Hourcade, Dennis E

    2007-08-15

    Complement promotes the rapid recognition and elimination of pathogens, infected cells, and immune complexes. The biochemical basis for its target specificity is incompletely understood. In this report, we demonstrate that properdin can directly bind to microbial targets and provide a platform for the in situ assembly and function of the alternative pathway C3 convertases. This mechanism differs from the standard model wherein nascent C3b generated in the fluid phase attaches nonspecifically to its targets. Properdin-directed complement activation occurred on yeast cell walls (zymosan) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Properdin did not bind wild-type Escherichia coli, but it readily bound E. coli LPS mutants, and the properdin-binding capacity of each strain correlated with its respective serum-dependent AP activation rate. Moreover, properdin:single-chain Ab constructs were used to direct serum-dependent complement activation to novel targets. We conclude properdin participates in two distinct complement activation pathways: one that occurs by the standard model and one that proceeds by the properdin-directed model. The properdin-directed model is consistent with a proposal made by Pillemer and his colleagues >50 years ago. PMID:17675523

  14. Zonarol, a sesquiterpene from the brown algae Dictyopteris undulata, provides neuroprotection by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Hiroya; Koyama, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Sohsuke; Lipton, Stuart A.; Satoh, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Seaweed-origin electrophilic compounds are proposed as a class of neuroprotective compounds that provide neuroprotection through activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Electrophilic hydroquinones are of particular interest due to their ability to become electrophilic quinones upon auto-oxidation. Although many marine plants produce a variety of electrophilic compounds, the detailed mechanism of action of these compounds remain unknown. Here, we focused on the neuroprotective effects of zonarol (ZO), a para-hydroquinone-type pro-electrophilic compound from the brown algae Dictyopteris undulata. We show that ZO activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway, induces phase-2 enzymes, and protects neuronal cells from oxidative stress. ZO is the first example of a neuroprotective pro-electrophilic compound obtained from brown algae. PMID:25623531

  15. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  16. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Debra M; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C; Wirth, Christopher K; Kraus, Caroline; Venezia, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  17. Specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Jonas J.; Diniz, Breno S.; Bicalho, Maria A.; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Nicolato, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Edgar N.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive functioning influences activities of daily living (ADL). However, studies reporting the association between ADL and neuropsychological performance show inconsistent results regarding what specific cognitive domains are related to each specific functional domains. Additionally, whether depressive symptoms are associated with a worse functional performance in older adults is still under explored. We investigated if specific cognitive domains and depressive symptoms would affect different aspects of ADL. Participants were 274 older adults (96 normal aging participants, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 patients probable with mild Alzheimer’s disease dementia) with low formal education (∼4 years). Measures of ADL included three complexity levels: Self-care, Instrumental-Domestic, and Instrumental-Complex. The specific cognitive functions were evaluated through a factorial strategy resulting in four cognitive domains: Executive Functions, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, and Visuospatial Abilities. The Geriatric Depression Scale measured depressive symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed executive functions and episodic memory as significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL, and executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory as predictors of Instrumental-Complex ADL (22 and 28% of explained variance, respectively). Ordinal regression analysis showed the influence of specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms on each one of the instrumental ADL. We observed a heterogeneous pattern of association with explained variance ranging from 22 to 38%. Different instrumental ADL had specific cognitive predictors and depressive symptoms were predictive of ADL involving social contact. Our results suggest a specific pattern of influence depending on the specific instrumental daily living activity. PMID:26257644

  18. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  19. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Effect of intense background radiation on the sensitivity of a laser receiver with an iodine active quantum filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutaev, Yu F.; Mankevich, S. K.; Nosach, O. Yu; Orlov, E. P.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of background light on the sensitivity of a laser receiver with an iodine active quantum filter (λ=1.315 μm) was theoretically and experimentally investigated. Upon the reception of a 40-ns pulsed signal against the background of 2.5-fold attenuated radiation of a pulsed light source with a brightness temperature of 4 × 104 K, the sensitivity of this receiver for a signal-to-noise ratio of three and a diffraction-limited acceptance angle was experimentally shown to be equal to 20 photons, which exceeds the quantum limit by about a factor of two. This is consistent with the results of theoretical treatment and suggests that upon the detection of optical signals against the background of the solar disk, the sensitivity of this receiver should decrease by only 12%. This receiver was compared with a receiver employing a photomultiplier of the visible range. Upon the reception of optical signals with the same parameters against the background of the solar disk and an interference filter with a transmission band width of 5 nm, the sensitivity of a receiver equipped with an FEU-115 photomultiplier was shown to be equal to about 1400 photons for a signal-to-noise ratio of three.

  20. Elucidation of tonic and activated B-cell receptor signaling in Burkitt's lymphoma provides insights into regulation of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Corso, Jasmin; Pan, Kuan-Ting; Walter, Roland; Doebele, Carmen; Mohr, Sebastian; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Ströbel, Philipp; Lenz, Christof; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Hüllein, Jennifer; Comoglio, Federico; Rieger, Michael A; Zenz, Thorsten; Wienands, Jürgen; Engelke, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Urlaub, Henning; Oellerich, Thomas

    2016-05-17

    Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a highly proliferative B-cell neoplasm and is treated with intensive chemotherapy that, because of its toxicity, is often not suitable for the elderly or for patients with endemic BL in developing countries. BL cell survival relies on signals transduced by B-cell antigen receptors (BCRs). However, tonic as well as activated BCR signaling networks and their relevance for targeted therapies in BL remain elusive. We have systematically characterized and compared tonic and activated BCR signaling in BL by quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify novel BCR effectors and potential drug targets. We identified and quantified ∼16,000 phospho-sites in BL cells. Among these sites, 909 were related to tonic BCR signaling, whereas 984 phospho-sites were regulated upon BCR engagement. The majority of the identified BCR signaling effectors have not been described in the context of B cells or lymphomas yet. Most of these newly identified BCR effectors are predicted to be involved in the regulation of kinases, transcription, and cytoskeleton dynamics. Although tonic and activated BCR signaling shared a considerable number of effector proteins, we identified distinct phosphorylation events in tonic BCR signaling. We investigated the functional relevance of some newly identified BCR effectors and show that ACTN4 and ARFGEF2, which have been described as regulators of membrane-trafficking and cytoskeleton-related processes, respectively, are crucial for BL cell survival. Thus, this study provides a comprehensive dataset for tonic and activated BCR signaling and identifies effector proteins that may be relevant for BL cell survival and thus may help to develop new BL treatments. PMID:27155012

  1. Foregrounding the Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Argues that when introductory activities to the classics begin with background information, it can upstage or confine the life of the story, and shows little faith in the students as readers or in the literature itself. Suggests sometimes letting the literature begin, and then helping students make sense of it. Discusses examples from "To Kill a…

  2. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Two-level statistical modeling of background exposure and time-activity patterns during three seasons.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Pitz, Mike; Cyrys, Josef; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Gu, Jianwei; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Personal exposure to air pollution is associated with time- and location-specific factors including indoor and outdoor air pollution, meteorology and time activities. Our investigation aims at the description and identification of factors determining personal exposure to particle number concentration (PNC) in everyday situations. Ten volunteers recorded their personal exposure to PNC and kept an activity diary in three different seasons besides stationary measurements of ambient air pollution and meteorology. Background exposure to PNC was modelled using the most predictive variables. In a second step, the effects of the activities were calculated adjusted for the background exposure. The average personal PNC level was highest in winter and was three times higher than the mean stationary PNC level while staying indoors and two times higher while staying outdoors. Personal indoor PNC levels were significantly increased during the use of candles, cooking and the occurrence of smell of food. High stationary outdoor PNC levels and low dew point temperatures were associated with increased personal outdoor PNC levels. Times spent in public transport were associated with lower personal PNC levels than other times spent in transportation. Personal PNC levels in everyday situations exhibited a large variability because of seasonal, microenvironment-specific and activity-specific influences. PMID:25407347

  3. Zero-Background Helicase-Dependent Amplification and Its Application to Reliable Assay of Telomerase Activity in Cancer Cell by Eliminating Primer-Dimer Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhang, Dexin; Zhang, Qing; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Zhao, Yongxi

    2016-06-16

    Primer-dimer artifacts resulting from unintended template-independent primer-primer interactions often hinder the specific amplification of nucleic acids. We demonstrate, for the first time, zero-background helicase-dependent amplification (HDA), with low concentrations of both ATP and dNTPs. This strategy achieved the reliable evaluation of telomerase activity in cancer cells by eliminating primer-dimer artifacts, which have plagued many previous methods with reduced specificity. We found that the performance of the telomerase assay by zero-background HDA was negatively affected by highly concentrated cellular proteins. This inhibitory effect is attributed to the binding of DNA templates to proteins, thus making them unavailable for polymerases. However, gold nanoparticles were demonstrated to highly attenuate such inhibition by abundant proteins, and to enhance the assay sensitivity and reliability when the reaction was performed with concentrated cell extracts. PMID:26690725

  4. Polarised skylight and the landmark panorama provide night-active bull ants with compass information during route following.

    PubMed

    Reid, Samuel F; Narendra, Ajay; Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-02-01

    Navigating animals are known to use a number of celestial and terrestrial compass cues that allow them to determine and control their direction of travel. Which of the cues dominate appears to depend on their salience. Here we show that night-active bull ants attend to both the pattern of polarised skylight and the landmark panorama in their familiar habitat. When the two directional cues are in conflict, ants choose a compromise direction. However, landmark guidance appears to be the primary mechanism of navigation used by forager ants, with those cues in the direction of heading having the greatest influence on navigation. Different colonies respond to the removal of these cues to different degrees, depending on the directional information provided by the local landmark panorama. Interestingly, other parts of the surrounding panorama also influence foraging speed and accuracy, suggesting that they too play a role in navigation. PMID:21228195

  5. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced. PMID:26705419

  6. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  7. Monitored background radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruel, C.; Larouche, M.; Donato, M.

    1986-01-01

    The infrared (IR) testing of the Olympus thermal model has provided a capability to perform cost effective thermal balance testing of satellites and satellite components. A high-accuracy monitored background radiometer was developed for the measurement of absorbed radiation heat flux encountered during IR thermal vacuum testing of spacecraft. The design, development, and calibration of this radiometer is described.

  8. Immunoglobulin class-switched B cells provide an active immune axis between CNS and periphery in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengzhi; Pitts, Steven J.; Sundar, Purnima D.; Telman, Dilduz; Zhao, Lora Z.; Derstine, Mia; Abounasr, Aya; Hauser, Stephen L.; von Büdingen, H.-Christian

    2014-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), an exchange of lymphocytes, in particular B cells, between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery is believed to be required for the maintenance of active disease. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that prevent lymphocytes from crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or induce near-complete peripheral B cell depletion rapidly mitigate MS disease activity. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we recently found that clonally related B cells exist in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral blood (PB) of MS patients, establishing the existence of an immune axis across the BBB. However, it remains unclear which subpopulations of the highly diverse peripheral B cell compartment share antigen-specificity with intrathecal B cell repertoires, and whether their antigen stimulation occurs on both sides of the BBB. To address these questions, we combined flow cytometry sorting of PB B cell subsets with deep immune repertoire sequencing of CSF and PB B cells. Immunoglobulin (IgM and IgG) heavy chain variable (VH) region repertoires of five PB B cell subsets from MS patients (n=8) were compared with their CSF Ig-VH transcriptomes. In 6 of 8 patients, we identified peripheral CD27+IgD−memory B cells, CD27hiCD38hi plasma cells/plasmablasts, or CD27−IgD− B cells providing an immune connection to the CNS compartment. Pinpointing Ig class-switched B cells as key component of the immune axis thought to contribute to ongoing MS disease activity strengthens the rationale of current therapeutic strategies and may lead to more targeted approaches. PMID:25100740

  9. Some background about satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Four tables of planetary and satellite data are presented which list satellite discoveries, planetary parameters, satellite orbits, and satellite physical properties respectively. A scheme for classifying the satellites is provided and it is noted that most known moons fall into three general classes: regular satellites, collisional shards, and irregular satellites. Satellite processes are outlined with attention given to origins, dynamical and thermal evolution, surface processes, and composition and cratering. Background material is provided for each family of satellites.

  10. 4-Amino-7-chloroquinolines: probing ligand efficiency provides botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain inhibitors with significant antiprotozoal activity

    PubMed Central

    Opsenica, Igor M.; Tot, Mikloš; Gomba, Laura; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Sciotti, Richard J.; Bavari, Sina; Burnett, James C.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.

    2013-01-01

    Structurally simplified analogs of dual antimalarial and botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A LC) inhibitor bis-aminoquinoline (1) were prepared. New compounds were designed to improve ligand efficiency while maintaining or exceeding the inhibitory potency of 1. Three of the new compounds are more active than 1 against both indications. Metabolically, the new inhibitors are relatively stable and non-toxic. Twelve, 14, and 15 are more potent BoNT/A LC inhibitors than 1. Additionally, 15 has excellent in vitro antimalarial efficacy, with IC90 values ranging from 4.45-12.11 nM against five Plasmodium falciparum (P.f.) strains: W2, D6, C235, C2A, C2B. The results indicate that the same level of inhibitory efficacy provided by 1 can be retained/exceeded with less structural complexity. Twelve, 14, and 15 provide new platforms for the development of more potent dual BoNT/A LC and P.f. inhibitors adhering to generally accepted chemical properties associated with the druggability of synthetic molecules. PMID:23815186

  11. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320... ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply...

  12. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320... ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply...

  13. Plutonium and Uranium Atom Ratios and Activity Levels in Cochiti Lake Bottom Sediments Provided by Pueblo de Cochiti

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.

    1999-05-01

    Historical operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory have contaminated stream sediments with plutonium and other radionuclides. A small portion of these contaminated sediments has been carried by floods into the Rio Grande drainage system, eventually to be trapped by Cochiti Lake located on Pueblo de Cochiti lands approximately 8 km downstream of the Laboratory. In this study, lake bottom sediment samples provided by the Pueblo de Cochiti were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine plutonium and uranium activity levels and isotopic atom ratios. This specialized analytical method allows us to take isotopic fingerprints of radionuclides found in the sediment and to determine how much plutonium and uranium came from the Laboratory and how much was deposited by worldwide fallout or is natural. Two distinct types of samples were processed: segments of a continuous vertical core of the entire accumulated sediment sequence and other samples from across the lake bottom at the water/sediment interface. Based on measurement of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio, Laboratory-derived plutonium is present in eight of nine samples at the core site. On a depth-weighted basis, approximately one-half of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu came from early operations at the Laboratory; the remaining plutonium came from fallout dispersed by above-ground nuclear tests. In contrast to the core site, the samples from the other locations showed little or no evidence of Laboratory-derived plutonium, with more than 90 percent of the plutonium attributable to fallout. The overall amount of plutonium in all the samples is of the same magnitude as other reservoirs in the region. The net increase in plutonium over upstream reservoirs unaffected by Laboratory activities is a maximum of 0.014 pCi/g or 3.5 times. All of the samples reflect natural uranium compositions. Laboratory-derived uranium is not identifiable, presumably because the sediment contains abundant

  14. Var Gene promoter activation in clonal Plasmodium falciparum isolates follows a hierarchy and suggests a conserved switching program that is independent of genetic background.

    PubMed

    Enderes, Corinna; Kombila, Davy; Dal-Bianco, Matthias; Dzikowski, Ron; Kremsner, Peter; Frank, Matthias

    2011-11-15

    Antigenic variation of Plasmodium falciparum is mediated by a mutually exclusive expression mechanism that limits expression to an individual member of the multicopy var gene family. This process determines the antigenic and adhesive phenotype of the infected red blood cell. Previously, we showed that var gene switching is influenced by chromosomal position. Here, we address whether var gene transcription follows a general conserved pattern in long-term laboratory parasites and in recently culture-adapted field parasites. Activation of the var gene family was monitored in biological replicates in each parasite isolate every 3-5 generations for up to 3 months. We used transgenic parasites carrying a drug-selectable marker at a defined var locus to characterize var gene activation after the exclusive expression of the transgene. Transgenic parasites exhibited a repeatable hierarchy of var gene activation and a fluctuating transcriptional activity of the transgenic var locus. Transcriptional profiling of wild-type laboratory and field parasites showed a universal bias toward transcription of UpsC var genes and a fluctuating transcriptional activity of the dominant var promoter. The data suggest the existence of an intrinsic var gene transcription program that is independent of genetic background. PMID:21926380

  15. Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Active-Duty Military Personnel: Utilization of Chaplains and Other Mental Health Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Hourani, Laurel; Lane, Marian E; Tueller, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Military chaplains not only conduct religious services, but also provide counseling and spiritual support to military service members, operating as liaisons between soldiers and mental health professionals. In this study, active-duty soldiers (N = 889) reported help-seeking behaviors and mental health. Using logistic regressions, we describe the issues for which soldiers reported seeking help, then outline the characteristics of those who are most likely to seek help from a chaplain. Of the soldiers who sought help from a chaplain within the previous year, 29.9% reported high levels of combat exposure, 50.8% screened positive for depression, 39.1% had probable PTSD, and 26.6% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder. The participant's unit firing on the enemy, personally firing on the enemy, and seeing dead bodies or human remains predicted seeing a chaplain. Future research should examine ways to engage soldiers who have had more combat experiences with the chaplain community to address spiritual issues. PMID:27191375

  16. Active fiber-based retroreflector providing phase-retracing anti-parallel laser beams for precision spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Maisenbacher, L; Matveev, A; Pohl, R; Khabarova, K; Chang, Y; Grinin, A; Lamour, T; Shi, T; Yost, D C; Udem, Th; Hänsch, T W; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-07-25

    We present an active fiber-based retroreflector providing high quality phase-retracing anti-parallel Gaussian laser beams for precision spectroscopy of Doppler sensitive transitions. Our design is well-suited for a number of applications where implementing optical cavities is technically challenging and corner cubes fail to match the demanded requirements, most importantly retracing wavefronts and preservation of the laser polarization. To illustrate the performance of the system, we use it for spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen and demonstrate an average suppression of the first order Doppler shift to 4 parts in 106 of the full collinear shift. This high degree of cancellation combined with our cryogenic source of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state is sufficient to enable determinations of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius with competitive uncertainties. Advantages over the usual Doppler cancellation based on corner cube type retroreflectors are discussed as well as an alternative method using a high finesse cavity. PMID:27464193

  17. Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Active-Duty Military Personnel: Utilization of Chaplains and Other Mental Health Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Hourani, Laurel; Lane, Marian E.; Tueller, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Military chaplains not only conduct religious services, but also provide counseling and spiritual support to military service members, operating as liaisons between soldiers and mental health professionals. In this study, active-duty soldiers (N = 889) reported help-seeking behaviors and mental health. Using logistic regressions, we describe the issues for which soldiers reported seeking help, then outline the characteristics of those who are most likely to seek help from a chaplain. Of the soldiers who sought help from a chaplain within the previous year, 29.9% reported high levels of combat exposure, 50.8% screened positive for depression, 39.1% had probable PTSD, and 26.6% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder. The participant’s unit firing on the enemy, personally firing on the enemy, and seeing dead bodies or human remains predicted seeing a chaplain. Future research should examine ways to engage soldiers who have had more combat experiences with the chaplain community to address spiritual issues. PMID:27191375

  18. A new UK Greenhouse Gas measurement network providing ultra high-frequency measurements of key radiatively active trace gases taken from a network of tall towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Manning, A. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Derwent, R. G.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Sturges, W. T.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric concentrations of gases is important in assessing the impact of international policies related to the atmospheric environment. The effects of control measures on greenhouse gases introduced under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols are now being observed. Continued monitoring is required to assess the overall success of the Protocols. For over 15 years the UK Government have funded high-frequency measurements of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting gases at Mace Head, a global background measurement station on the west coast of Ireland. These continuous, high-frequency, high-precision measurements are used to estimate regional (country-scale) emissions of greenhouse gases across the UK using an inversion methodology (NAME-Inversion) that links the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment - NAME) with the Mace Head observations. This unique inversion method acts to independently verify bottom up emission estimates of radiatively active and ozone-depleting trace gases. In 2011 the UK government (DECC) funded the establishment and integration of three new tall tower measurements stations in the UK, to provide enhanced resolution emission maps and decrease uncertainty of regional emission estimates produced using the NAME-Inversion. One station included in this new UK network was already established in Scotland and was used in collaboration with Edinburgh University. The two other new stations are in England and were set-up early in 2012, they contain brand new instrumentation for measurements of greenhouse gases. All three additional stations provide ultra high-frequency (1 sec) data of CO2 and CH4 using the Picarro© Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer and high frequency (20 min) measurements of N2O and SF6 from custom built sample modules with GC-ECD. We will present the new tall tower UK measurement network in detail. Using high-frequency measurements at new operational sites, including Mace

  19. Brief Report: Understanding Intention to Be Physically Active and Physical Activity Behaviour in Adolescents from a Low Socio-Economic Status Background: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Michael J.; Rivis, Amanda; Jordan, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this brief report is to report on the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for predicting the physical activity intentions and behaviour of British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. A prospective questionnaire design was employed with 197, 13-14 year olds (76 males, 121 females). At time 1…

  20. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task.

    PubMed

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F

    2013-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making. PMID:24478664

  1. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task

    PubMed Central

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2014-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making. PMID:24478664

  2. Background illumination simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Towry, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes a testing apparatus for testing and evaluating the performance of laser seeking warheads for missiles, under simulated weather conditions. It comprises support means for supporting a warhead seeker; laser means for generating a laser beam and for directing a laser beam towards the seeker; a diffusion screen interposed between the seeker support means and the laser means for diffusing the laser beam; a collimating lens interposed between the diffusion screen and the seeker support means for collimating the diffused laser beam and for directing the collimated laser beam onto a warhead seeker, supported in the seeker support; background illuminator means for illuminating the seeker support and a seeker disposed therein, supported for movement into and out of an operating position between the diffusion means and the collimating lens for providing background lighting in simulation of weather lighting conditions; and control means for controlling the intensity of the light provided by the illuminator means to simulate various weather conditions.

  3. Background Synaptic Activity in Rat Entorhinal Cortex Shows a Progressively Greater Dominance of Inhibition over Excitation from Deep to Superficial Layers

    PubMed Central

    Greenhill, Stuart David; Chamberlain, Sophie Elizabeth Lyn; Lench, Alex; Massey, Peter Vernon; Yuill, Kathryn Heather; Woodhall, Gavin Lawrence; Jones, Roland Spencer Gwynne

    2014-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) controls hippocampal input and output, playing major roles in memory and spatial navigation. Different layers of the EC subserve different functions and a number of studies have compared properties of neurones across layers. We have studied synaptic inhibition and excitation in EC neurones, and we have previously compared spontaneous synaptic release of glutamate and GABA using patch clamp recordings of synaptic currents in principal neurones of layers II (L2) and V (L5). Here, we add comparative studies in layer III (L3). Such studies essentially look at neuronal activity from a presynaptic viewpoint. To correlate this with the postsynaptic consequences of spontaneous transmitter release, we have determined global postsynaptic conductances mediated by the two transmitters, using a method to estimate conductances from membrane potential fluctuations. We have previously presented some of this data for L3 and now extend to L2 and L5. Inhibition dominates excitation in all layers but the ratio follows a clear rank order (highest to lowest) of L2>L3>L5. The variance of the background conductances was markedly higher for excitation and inhibition in L2 compared to L3 or L5. We also show that induction of synchronized network epileptiform activity by blockade of GABA inhibition reveals a relative reluctance of L2 to participate in such activity. This was associated with maintenance of a dominant background inhibition in L2, whereas in L3 and L5 the absolute level of inhibition fell below that of excitation, coincident with the appearance of synchronized discharges. Further experiments identified potential roles for competition for bicuculline by ambient GABA at the GABAA receptor, and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in residual inhibition in L2. We discuss our results in terms of control of excitability in neuronal subpopulations of EC neurones and what these may suggest for their functional roles. PMID:24454801

  4. Low background screening capability in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-01

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  5. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  6. A unique horizontal gene transfer event has provided the octocoral mitochondrial genome with an active mismatch repair gene that has potential for an unusual self-contained function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome of the Octocorallia has several characteristics atypical for metazoans, including a novel gene suggested to function in DNA repair. This mtMutS gene is favored for octocoral molecular systematics, due to its high information content. Several hypotheses concerning the origins of mtMutS have been proposed, and remain equivocal, although current weight of support is for a horizontal gene transfer from either an epsilonproteobacterium or a large DNA virus. Here we present new and compelling evidence on the evolutionary origin of mtMutS, and provide the very first data on its activity, functional capacity and stability within the octocoral mitochondrial genome. Results The mtMutS gene has the expected conserved amino acids, protein domains and predicted tertiary protein structure. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that mtMutS is not a member of the MSH family and therefore not of eukaryotic origin. MtMutS clusters closely with representatives of the MutS7 lineage; further support for this relationship derives from the sharing of a C-terminal endonuclease domain that confers a self-contained mismatch repair function. Gene expression analyses confirm that mtMutS is actively transcribed in octocorals. Rates of mitochondrial gene evolution in mtMutS-containing octocorals are lower than in their hexacoral sister-group, which lacks the gene, although paradoxically the mtMutS gene itself has higher rates of mutation than other octocoral mitochondrial genes. Conclusions The octocoral mtMutS gene is active and codes for a protein with all the necessary components for DNA mismatch repair. A lower rate of mitochondrial evolution, and the presence of a nicking endonuclease domain, both indirectly support a theory of self-sufficient DNA mismatch repair within the octocoral mitochondrion. The ancestral affinity of mtMutS to non-eukaryotic MutS7 provides compelling support for an origin by horizontal gene transfer. The immediate vector of transmission

  7. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    The authors have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  8. The influence of providing perches and string on activity levels, fearfulness and leg health in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailie, C L; O'Connell, N E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of providing environmental enrichment in the form of perches and string on the behaviour and welfare of commercial broiler chickens. Houses containing ~23 000 broiler chickens were assigned to one of four treatments in a 2×2 factorial design. Treatments involved two levels of access to perches (P) (present (24/house) '+P' or absent '-P') and two levels of access to string (S) (present (24/house) '+S' or absent '-S'). All houses contained windows, and 30 straw bales were provided from day 10 of the rearing cycle. Treatments were applied in one of four houses on a single farm, and were replicated over four production cycles. Behaviour and leg health were observed in weeks 3 to 5 of the rearing cycle. Production performance and environmental parameters were also measured. There was an interaction between perches and age in the percentage of birds observed lying, with higher percentages of birds observed lying in the +P treatment than in the -P treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also a significant interaction between string and age in the percentage of birds observed in locomotion, with higher percentages observed in locomotion in the -S treatment than in the +S treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also an interaction between string and age in average gait scores, with lower gait scores in the +S treatment than in the -S treatment during weeks 3 and 5 but not within week 4. Daytime observations showed that perches and strings were used frequently, with one bout of perching occurring approximately every 80 s/perch, and one bout of pecking at string occurring every 78 s/string on average. There was a significant effect of age on use of perches (P<0.001) and string (P<0.001), with perching peaking during week 5 and string pecking peaking during week 3. We conclude that commercial broilers in windowed houses with access to straw bales display an interest in additional enrichment stimuli in the form of perches and

  9. Structure-Function Analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster Caudal Transcription Factor Provides Insights into Core Promoter-preferential Activation.

    PubMed

    Shir-Shapira, Hila; Sharabany, Julia; Filderman, Matan; Ideses, Diana; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Mannervik, Mattias; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-07-10

    Regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription is critical for the proper development, differentiation, and growth of an organism. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters encompass the RNA start site and consist of functional elements such as the TATA box, initiator, and downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. We have previously discovered that Drosophila Caudal, which is a master regulator of genes involved in development and differentiation, is a DPE-specific transcriptional activator. Here, we show that the mouse Caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) proteins (mCdx1, mCdx2, and mCdx4) are also preferential core promoter transcriptional activators. To elucidate the mechanism that enables Caudal to preferentially activate DPE transcription, we performed structure-function analysis. Using a systematic series of deletion mutants (all containing the intact DNA-binding homeodomain) we discovered that the C-terminal region of Caudal contributes to the preferential activation of the fushi tarazu (ftz) Caudal target gene. Furthermore, the region containing both the homeodomain and the C terminus of Caudal was sufficient to confer core promoter-preferential activation to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Importantly, we discovered that Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a co-activator for Caudal-regulated activation of ftz. Strikingly, dCBP conferred the ability to preferentially activate the DPE-dependent ftz reporter to mini-Caudal proteins that were unable to preferentially activate ftz transcription themselves. Taken together, it is the unique combination of dCBP and Caudal that enables the co-activation of ftz in a core promoter-preferential manner. PMID:26018075

  10. A European Network of Email and Telephone Help Lines Providing Information and Support on Rare Diseases: Results From a 1-Month Activity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez de Vega, Rosa; Brignol, Tuy Nga; Mazzucato, Monica; Polizzi, Agata

    2014-01-01

    Background Information on rare diseases are often complex to understand, or difficult to access and additional support is often necessary. Rare diseases helplines work together across Europe to respond to calls and emails from the public at large, including patients, health care professionals, families, and students. Measuring the activity of helplines can help decision makers to allocate adequate funds when deciding to create or expand an equivalent service. Objective Data presented are referred to a monthly user profile analysis, which is one of the activities that each helpline has to carry out to be part of the network. This survey aimed to explore the information requests and characteristics of users of rare diseases helplines in different European countries. Another aim was to analyze these data with respect to users’ characteristics, helpline characteristics, topics of the inquiries, and technologies used to provide information. With this survey, we measure data that are key for planning information services on rare diseases in the context of the development of national plans for rare diseases. Methods A survey was conducted based on all calls, emails, visits, or letters received from November 1 to 30, 2012 to monitor the activity represented by 12 helplines. Data were collected by a common standardized form, using ORPHA Codes for rare diseases, when applicable. No personal data identifying the inquirer were collected. It was a descriptive approach documenting on the number and purpose of inquiries, the number of respondents, the mode of contact, the category of the inquirer in relation to the patient, the inquirer’s gender, age and region of residence, the patient’s age when applicable, the type and duration of response, and the satisfaction as scored by the respondents. Results A total of 1676 calls, emails, or letters were received from November 1 to 30, 2012. Inquiries were mostly about specific diseases. An average of 23 minutes was spent for each

  11. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf... providing accommodation service on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. DATES: Comments and related material... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73...

  12. Attracting Non-Traditional Students to Campus Activities and Leadership Programs: Providing Links to Academics, Persistence Are Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Marcie S.

    2003-01-01

    Explores some strategies to attract non-traditional students to campus activities, highlights a model program that integrates scholarship support and leadership programs, explores new ways of marketing to these students, and offers some suggestions for continued development. (EV)

  13. Combined PI3K/mTOR and MEK Inhibition Provides Broad Antitumor Activity in Faithful Murine Cancer Models

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick J.; Usary, Jerry E.; Darr, David B.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Pfefferle, Adam D.; Whittle, Martin C.; Duncan, James S.; Johnson, Soren M.; Combest, Austin J.; Jin, Jian; Zamboni, William C.; Johnson, Gary L.; Perou, Charles M.; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anticancer drug development is inefficient, but genetically engineered murine models (GEMM) and orthotopic, syngeneic transplants (OST) of cancer may offer advantages to in vitro and xenograft systems. Experimental Design We assessed the activity of 16 treatment regimens in a RAS-driven, Ink4a/Arf-deficient melanoma GEMM. In addition, we tested a subset of treatment regimens in three breast cancer models representing distinct breast cancer subtypes: claudin-low (T11 OST), basal-like (C3-TAg GEMM), and luminal B (MMTV-Neu GEMM). Results Like human RAS-mutant melanoma, the melanoma GEMM was refractory to chemotherapy and single-agent small molecule therapies. Combined treatment with AZD6244 [mitogen-activated protein–extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor] and BEZ235 [dual phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor] was the only treatment regimen to exhibit significant antitumor activity, showed by marked tumor regression and improved survival. Given the surprising activity of the "AZD/BEZ" combination in the melanoma GEMM, we next tested this regimen in the "claudin-low" breast cancer model that shares gene expression features with melanoma. The AZD/BEZ regimen also exhibited significant activity in this model, leading us to testing in even more diverse GEMMs of basal-like and luminal breast cancer. The AZD/BEZ combination was highly active in these distinct breast cancer models, showing equal or greater efficacy compared with any other regimen tested in studies of over 700 tumor-bearing mice. This regimen even exhibited activity in lapatinib-resistant HER2+ tumors. Conclusion These results show the use of credentialed murine models for large-scale efficacy testing of diverse anticancer regimens and predict that combinations of PI3K/mTOR and MEK inhibitors will show antitumor activity in a wide range of human malignancies. PMID:22872574

  14. Pathway activation profiling reveals new insights into Age-related Macular Degeneration and provides avenues for therapeutic interventions

    PubMed Central

    Makarev, Evgeny; Cantor, Charles; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander; Csoka, Antonei Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in older people and is caused by loss of the central region of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Conventional methods of gene expression analysis have yielded important insights into AMD pathogenesis, but the precise molecular pathway alterations are still poorly understood. Therefore we developed a new software program, “AMD Medicine”, and discovered differential pathway activation profiles in samples of human RPE/choroid from AMD patients and controls. We identified 29 pathways in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes: 27 pathways were activated in AMD compared to controls, and 2 pathways were activated in controls compared to AMD. In AMD, we identified a graded activation of pathways related to wound response, complement cascade, and cell survival. Also, there was downregulation of two pathways responsible for apoptosis. Furthermore, significant activation of pro-mitotic pathways is consistent with dedifferentiation and cell proliferation events, which occur early in the pathogenesis of AMD. Significantly, we discovered new global pathway activation signatures of AMD involved in the cell-based inflammatory response: IL-2, STAT3, and ERK. The ultimate aim of our research is to achieve a better understanding of signaling pathways involved in AMD pathology, which will eventually lead to better treatments. PMID:25543336

  15. Brief report: understanding intention to be physically active and physical activity behaviour in adolescents from a low socio-economic status background: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Rivis, Amanda; Jordan, Caroline

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this brief report is to report on the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for predicting the physical activity intentions and behaviour of British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. A prospective questionnaire design was employed with 197, 13-14 year olds (76 males, 121 females). At time 1 participant completed standard measures of TPB variables. One week later (Time 2), participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A) as a measure of physical activity behaviour. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that attitude and perceived behavioural control jointly accounted for 25% of the variance in intention (p = 0.0001). Perceived behavioural control emerged as the only significant predictor of physical activity behaviour and explained 3.7% of the variance (p = 0.001). Therefore, attitude and PBC successfully predicts intention towards physical activity and PBC predicts physical activity behaviour in British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. PMID:21820730

  16. Human C3 mutation reveals a mechanism of dense deposit disease pathogenesis and provides insights into complement activation and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; Valdes-Cañedo, Francisco; Vazquez-Martul, Eduardo; Torreira, Eva; Montes, Tamara; Tortajada, Agustín; Pinto, Sheila; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is a severe renal disease characterized by accumulation of electron-dense material in the mesangium and glomerular basement membrane. Previously, DDD has been associated with deficiency of factor H (fH), a plasma regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation, and studies in animal models have linked pathogenesis to the massive complement factor 3 (C3) activation caused by this deficiency. Here, we identified a unique DDD pedigree that associates disease with a mutation in the C3 gene. Mutant C3923ΔDG, which lacks 2 amino acids, could not be cleaved to C3b by the AP C3-convertase and was therefore the predominant circulating C3 protein in the patients. However, upon activation to C3b by proteases, or to C3(H2O) by spontaneous thioester hydrolysis, C3923ΔDG generated an active AP C3-convertase that was regulated normally by decay accelerating factor (DAF) but was resistant to decay by fH. Moreover, activated C3b923ΔDG and C3(H2O)923ΔDG were resistant to proteolysis by factor I (fI) in the presence of fH, but were efficiently inactivated in the presence of membrane cofactor protein (MCP). These characteristics cause a fluid phase–restricted AP dysregulation in the patients that continuously activated and consumed C3 produced by the normal C3 allele. These findings expose structural requirements in C3 that are critical for recognition of the substrate C3 by the AP C3-convertase and for the regulatory activities of fH, DAF, and MCP, all of which have implications for therapeutic developments. PMID:20852386

  17. 20 CFR 665.300 - What are rapid response activities and who is responsible for providing them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation. (b) The State is responsible for providing... experience disasters, mass layoffs, plant closings, or other dislocation events when such...

  18. 20 CFR 665.300 - What are rapid response activities and who is responsible for providing them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation. (b) The State is responsible for providing... experience disasters, mass layoffs, plant closings, or other dislocation events when such...

  19. Propeptide of carboxypeptidase Y provides a chaperone-like function as well as inhibition of the enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Winther, J R; Sørensen, P

    1991-01-01

    The zymogen of the vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified and characterized with respect to activation as well as refolding in vitro. The purified procarboxypeptidase Y has no detectable activity but can be efficiently activated by proteinase K from Tritirachium album. We used this method of activation as a tool for the investigation of refolding procarboxypeptidase Y in vitro. The proenzyme, denatured in 6 M guanidinium chloride, is renatured efficiently after dilution of the denaturant, whereas the mature enzyme regains little activity in the same procedure. Changes in intrinsic fluorescence reveal the mature enzyme to be considerably more stable than the proenzyme toward denaturation with guanidinium chloride. This suggests that the propeptide induces a metastable structure important for overcoming energy barriers that might otherwise obstruct a productive folding pathway. The relatively large number of charged amino acid residues and a high theoretical potential for alpha-helix formation in the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide suggest a structural similarity to a number of other propeptides and heat shock proteins. PMID:1924396

  20. The PPAR-α activator fenofibrate fails to provide myocardial protection in ischemia and reperfusion in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ya; Lu, Li; Greyson, Clifford; Rizeq, Mona; Nunley, Karin; Wyatt, Beata; Bristow, Michael R.; Long, Carlin S.; Schwartz, Gregory G.

    2010-01-01

    Rodent studies suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) activation reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and infarct size; however, effects of PPAR-α activation in large animal models of myocardial I/R are unknown. We determined whether chronic treatment with the PPAR-α activator fenofibrate affects myocardial I/R injury in pigs. Domestic farm pigs were assigned to treatment with fenofibrate 50 mg·kg−1 ·day−1 orally or no drug treatment, and either a low-fat (4% by weight) or a high-fat (20% by weight) diet. After 4 wk, 66 pigs underwent 90 min low-flow regional myocardial ischemia and 120 min reperfusion under anesthetized open-chest conditions, resulting in myocardial stunning. The high-fat group received an infusion of triglyceride emulsion and heparin during this terminal experiment to maintain elevated arterial free fatty acid (FFA) levels. An additional 21 pigs underwent 60 min no-flow ischemia and 180 min reperfusion, resulting in myocardial infarction. Plasma concentration of fenofibric acid was similar to the EC50 for activation of PPAR-α in vitro and to maximal concentrations achieved in clinical use. Myocardial expression of PPAR-α mRNA was prominent but unaffected by fenofibrate treatment. Fenofibrate increased expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-I mRNA in liver and decreased arterial FFA and lactate concentrations (each P < 0.01). However, fenofibrate did not affect myocardial CPT-I expression, substrate uptake, lipid accumulation, or contractile function during low-flow I/R in either the low- or high-fat group, nor did it affect myocardial infarct size. Despite expression of PPAR-α in porcine myocardium and effects of fenofibrate on systemic metabolism, treatment with this PPAR-α activator does not alter myocardial metabolic or contractile responses to I/R in pigs. PMID:16339839

  1. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    We have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The zones extended through all laminae except IVc beta and, when viewed tangentially, formed separate patches 500 microns apart. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. When monkeys were kept in the dark during 2-DG exposure, 2-DG-labeled patches were not seen but cytochrome oxidase-positive patches remained. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake in layers I to IVa and VI. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  2. Physical Activity for Young Children: A Quantitative Study of Child Care Providers' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Health Promotion Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Many preschool children fail to achieve the National Association for Sport and Physical Education physical activity recommendations placing themselves at increased risk of overweight and its associated health consequences. The early learning and care system is well positioned to intervene. Yet few child obesity prevention efforts have focused on…

  3. The soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) mission: How we got here and what it will provide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  4. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts.

    PubMed

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance. PMID:25824278

  5. Can an active aging index (AAI) provide insight into reducing elder abuse? A case study in Rajshahi District, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Ahmed, Md Munsur; Tiedt, Andrew D; Hoque, Nazrul

    2014-01-01

    We use data from respondents aged 60 years and above, collected during April 2009 in the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh, to examine whether high activeness, as captured by an AAI or in sub-domains, can help reduce the risk of elder abuse. The findings suggest that more than half of rural elderly and 14 percent of urban elderly were at some point abused. High activeness in health and security dimensions lowers the risk of being abused while those who are low active in community participation have the lowest risk of being abused in both rural and urban areas. Being literate (elderly with primary/secondary education) is revealed to be a significant factor that lowers the risk of abuse in both rural and urban areas. These results imply a need for educational programs that bolster positive and proper community interaction, in turn promoting a secure later life for elders, and reducing burden for families and society. High activeness in health and security dimensions should also be promoted to keep the elderly healthy and protect from abusive behavior. PMID:24331549

  6. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance. PMID:25824278

  7. Domain organization of DNase from Thioalkalivibrio sp. provides insights into retention of activity in high salt environments

    PubMed Central

    Alzbutas, Gediminas; Kaniusaite, Milda; Grybauskas, Algirdas; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2015-01-01

    Our study indicates that DNA binding domains are common in many halophilic or halotolerant bacterial DNases and they are potential activators of enzymatic activity at high ionic strength. Usually, proteins adapt to high ionic strength by increasing the number of negatively charged residues on the surface. However, in DNases such adaptation would hinder the binding to negatively charged DNA, a step critical for catalysis. In our study we demonstrate how evolution has solved this dilemma by engaging the DNA binding domain. We propose a mechanism, which enables the enzyme activity at salt concentrations as high as 4 M of sodium chloride, based on collected experimental data and domain structure analysis of a secreted bacterial DNase from the extremely halotolerant bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix. The enzyme harbors two domains: an N-terminal domain, that exhibits DNase activity, and a C-terminal domain, comprising a duplicate DNA binding helix-hairpin-helix motif. Here we present experimental data demonstrating that the C-terminal domain is responsible for the enzyme's resistance to high ionic strength. PMID:26191053

  8. Variation in background concentrations and specific activities of 36Cl, 129I and U/Th-series radionuclides in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Herod, M

    2012-04-01

    Assessment of the potential environmental impacts of nuclear fuel waste involves multiple lines of argument, one of which is an evaluation of the possible increments to background concentrations of certain radionuclides. This is especially relevant for radionuclides such as (3)H, (36)Cl and (129)I where there is continuous cosmogenic or geogenic production. However, for (36)Cl and (129)I and certain U/Th-series radionuclides, data are scarce because the analysis methods are complex and costly. The present study used accelerator mass spectroscopy (AMS) to measure(36)Cl and (129)I in river waters throughout Canada. Radiochemical methods were used for (3)H and the selected U/Th-series radionuclides, and stable element concentrations were also determined. There were distinct differences in concentrations among the sites. Stable Cl and I tended to be at higher concentrations near the ocean or population centres. The (3)H was high in regions with power reactors. The (226)Ra, (235)U and (238)U concentrations were high in areas with known U mineralizations, as expected. The (36)Cl and (129)I concentrations were generally homogenous in mid-latitudes, but the (129)I concentration was lower in the one arctic site sampled. Because the stable and radioactive isotopes of Cl and I varied in response to different factors, the resulting specific activities were especially variable. Both Cl and I are homeostatically controlled in animals, thus it follows that dose from (36)Cl and (129)I will depend more closely on specific activity than concentration, and therefore the environmental increments of interest are in the specific activities rather than simply concentrations. PMID:22304997

  9. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  10. Activities of Secreted Aryl Alcohol Quinone Oxidoreductases from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Provide Insights into Fungal Degradation of Plant Biomass.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Yann; Piumi, Francois; Valli, Richard; Aramburu, Juan Carro; Ferreira, Patricia; Faulds, Craig B; Record, Eric

    2016-04-15

    Auxiliary activities family 3 subfamily 2 (AA3_2) from the CAZy database comprises various functions related to ligninolytic enzymes, such as fungal aryl alcohol oxidases (AAO) and glucose oxidases, both of which are flavoenzymes. The recent study of thePycnoporus cinnabarinusCIRM BRFM 137 genome combined with its secretome revealed that four AA3_2 enzymes are secreted during biomass degradation. One of these AA3_2 enzymes, scf184803.g17, has recently been produced heterologously inAspergillus niger Based on the enzyme's activity and specificity, it was assigned to the glucose dehydrogenases (PcinnabarinusGDH [PcGDH]). Here, we analyze the distribution of the other three AA3_2 enzymes (scf185002.g8, scf184611.g7, and scf184746.g13) to assess their putative functions. These proteins showed the highest homology with aryl alcohol oxidase fromPleurotus eryngii Biochemical characterization demonstrated that they were also flavoenzymes harboring flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor and able to oxidize a wide variety of phenolic and nonphenolic aryl alcohols and one aliphatic polyunsaturated primary alcohol. Though presenting homology with fungal AAOs, these enzymes exhibited greater efficiency in reducing electron acceptors (quinones and one artificial acceptor) than molecular oxygen and so were defined as aryl-alcohol:quinone oxidoreductases (AAQOs) with two enzymes possessing residual oxidase activity (PcAAQO2 andPcAAQO3). Structural comparison ofPcAAQO homology models withP. eryngiiAAO demonstrated a wider substrate access channel connecting the active-site cavity to the solvent, explaining the absence of activity with molecular oxygen. Finally, the ability ofPcAAQOs to reduce radical intermediates generated by laccase fromP. cinnabarinuswas demonstrated, shedding light on the ligninolytic system of this fungus. PMID:26873317

  11. The solution structures of two soybean calmodulin isoforms provide a structural basis for their selective target activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroaki; Huang, Hao; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Takaya, Yoshiaki; Vogel, Hans J

    2008-05-23

    The intracellular calcium ion is one of the most important secondary messengers in eukaryotic cells. Ca(2+) signals are translated into physiological responses by EF-hand calcium-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM). Multiple CaM isoforms occur in plant cells, whereas only a single CaM protein is found in animals. Soybean CaM isoform 1 (sCaM1) shares 90% amino acid sequence identity with animal CaM (aCaM), whereas sCaM4 is only 78% identical. These two sCaM isoforms have distinct target-enzyme activation properties and physiological functions. sCaM4 is highly expressed during the self-defense reaction of the plant and activates the enzyme nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), whereas sCaM1 is incapable of activating NOS. The mechanism of selective target activation by plant CaM isoforms is poorly understood. We have determined high resolution NMR solution structures of Ca(2+)-sCaM1 and -sCaM4. These were compared with previously determined Ca(2+)-aCaM structures. For the N-lobe of the protein, the solution structures of Ca(2+)-sCaM1, -sCaM4, and -aCaM all closely resemble each other. However, despite the high sequence identity with aCaM, the C-lobe of Ca(2+)-sCaM1 has a more open conformation and consequently a larger hydrophobic target-protein binding pocket than Ca(2+)-aCaM or -sCaM4, the presence of which was further confirmed through biophysical measurements. The single Val-144 --> Met substitution in the C-lobe of Ca(2+)-sCaM1, which restores its ability to activate NOS, alters the structure of the C-lobe to a more closed conformation resembling Ca(2+)-aCaM and -sCaM4. The relationships between the structural differences in the two Ca(2+)-sCaM isoforms and their selective target activation properties are discussed. PMID:18347016

  12. The Role of Security Concerns in Determining Information Systems/Technology Activities Outsourced to Offshore Service Providers in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocholi, Smart

    2012-01-01

    Based on research studies, the Information System/Technology (IS/T) outsourcing industry in India is reasoned to maintain the status quo of providing IS/T services at the lower level of the IS/T value chain. The 2006 study conducted by Walsh supported the 2001 findings by Arora, Arunachalam, Asundi, and Fernandes that India-based IS /T service…

  13. Revealing the Whiteboard to Blind Students: An Inclusive Approach to Provide Mediation in Synchronous E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Andre P.; Linhalis, Flavia; Bianchini, Sandro L.; Fortes, Renata P. M.; Pimentel, Maria de Graca C.

    2010-01-01

    Promoting the inclusion of students with disabilities in e-learning systems has brought many challenges for researchers and educators. The use of synchronous communication tools such as interactive whiteboards has been regarded as an obstacle for inclusive education. In this paper, we present the proposal of an inclusive approach to provide blind…

  14. Evaluation of a real world intervention using professional football players to promote a healthy diet and physical activity in children and adolescents from a lower socio-economic background: a controlled pretest-posttest design

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing rates of obesity among children and adolescents, especially in those from lower socio-economic backgrounds, emphasise the need for interventions promoting a healthy diet and physical activity. The present study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the ‘Health Scores!’ program, which combined professional football player role models with a school-based program to promote a healthy diet and physical activity to socially vulnerable children and adolescents. Methods The intervention was implemented in two settings: professional football clubs and schools. Socially vulnerable children and adolescents (n = 165 intervention group, n = 440 control group, aged 10-14 year) provided self-reported data on dietary habits and physical activity before and after the four-month intervention. Intervention effects were evaluated using repeated measures analysis of variance. In addition, a process evaluation was conducted. Results No intervention effects were found for several dietary behaviours, including consumption of breakfast, fruit, soft drinks or sweet and savoury snacks. Positive intervention effects were found for self-efficacy for having a daily breakfast (p < 0.01), positive attitude towards vegetables consumption (p < 0.01) and towards lower soft drink consumption (p < 0.001). A trend towards significance (p < 0.10) was found for self-efficacy for reaching the physical activity guidelines. For sports participation no significant intervention effect was found. In total, 92 pupils completed the process evaluation, the feedback was largely positive. Conclusions The ‘Health Scores!’ intervention was successful in increasing psychosocial correlates of a healthy diet and PA. The use of professional football players as a credible source for health promotion was appealing to socially vulnerable children and adolescents. PMID:24886227

  15. Activity-Dependent and Experience-Driven Myelination Provide New Directions for the Management of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Samuel K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-06-01

    Despite an appreciation of the importance of myelination and the consequences of pathological demyelination, the fundamental mechanisms regulating myelination are only now being resolved. Neuronal activity has long been considered a plausible regulatory signal for myelination. However, controversy surrounding its dispensability in certain contexts and the difficulty in determining to what degree it influences myelination has limited its widespread acceptance. Recent studies have shed new light on the role of neuronal activity in regulating oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Further, the dynamics of myelin in adulthood and the association between skilled learning and myelination have become increasingly well characterized. These advances present new considerations for the management of multiple sclerosis and open up new approaches to facilitate remyelination following pathological demyelination. PMID:27113322

  16. FAMILY BACKGROUND OF RURAL YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COPP, JAMES H.

    FAMILY BACKGROUNDS OF RURAL YOUTH ARE DISCUSSED. THE BACKGROUND PROVIDED BY THE FAMILY HAS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ADJUSTMENT OF RURAL YOUTH IN AN URBANIZED, HIGHLY TECHNICAL SOCIETY. THE BASIC ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF RURAL AREAS INFLUENCE THE RATE OF SOCIAL CHANGE, THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FAMILY AS A SOCIAL UNIT, AND THE ORIENTATION TOWARD LEGAL…

  17. The active site of hydroxynitrile lyase from Prunus amygdalus: Modeling studies provide new insights into the mechanism of cyanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dreveny, Ingrid; Kratky, Christoph; Gruber, Karl

    2002-01-01

    The FAD-dependent hydroxynitrile lyase from almond (Prunus amygdalus, PaHNL) catalyzes the cleavage of R-mandelonitrile into benzaldehyde and hydrocyanic acid. Catalysis of the reverse reaction—the enantiospecific formation of α-hydroxynitriles—is now widely utilized in organic syntheses as one of the few industrially relevant examples of enzyme-mediated C–C bond formation. Starting from the recently determined X-ray crystal structure, systematic docking calculations with the natural substrate were used to locate the active site of the enzyme and to identify amino acid residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. Analysis of the modeled substrate complexes supports an enzymatic mechanism that includes the flavin cofactor as a mere "spectator" of the reaction and relies on general acid/base catalysis by the conserved His-497. Stabilization of the negative charge of the cyanide ion is accomplished by a pronounced positive electrostatic potential at the binding site. PaHNL activity requires the FAD cofactor to be bound in its oxidized form, and calculations of the pKa of enzyme-bound HCN showed that the observed inactivation upon cofactor reduction is largely caused by the reversal of the electrostatic potential within the active site. The suggested mechanism closely resembles the one proposed for the FAD-independent, and structurally unrelated HNL from Hevea brasiliensis. Although the actual amino acid residues involved in the catalytic cycle are completely different in the two enzymes, a common motif for the mechanism of cyanogenesis (general acid/base catalysis plus electrostatic stabilization of the cyanide ion) becomes evident. PMID:11790839

  18. Crystal structure analysis of ornithine transcarbamylase from Thermus thermophilus --HB8 provides insights on the plasticity of the active site.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Ramya; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2015-09-18

    The enzymatic biosynthesis of L-arginine involves complex, sequential action of many enzymes and ornithine transcarbamylase (OTCase) is one of the essential enzymes in the pathway. In mammals OTCase is part of the urea cycle. Arginine is used in a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial applications and therefore engineering arginine biosynthesis pathway for overproduction of arginine has gained importance. On the other hand, it was found that detrimental mutations in the human OTCase gene resulted clinical hyperammonemia, with subsequent neurological damage. Therefore a better understanding of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme from various sources could be useful for modifying its enzymatic action. Here we report the structure of ornithine transcarbamylase of Thermus thermophilus HB8 (aTtOTCase) at 2.0 Å resolution. On comparison with its homologs, aTtOTCase showed maximum variation at the substrate binding loops namely 80s and SMG/240s loops. The active site geometry of aTtOTCase is unique among its homologs where the side chain of certain residues (Leu57, Arg58 and Arg288) is oriented differently. To study the structural insights of substrate binding in aTtOTCase, docking of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and ornithine (Orn) was carried out sequentially. Both substrates were unable to bind in a proper orientation in the active site pocket and this could be due to the differently oriented side chains. This suggests that the active site geometry should also undergo fine tuning besides the large structural changes as the enzyme switches from completely open to a substrate bound closed state. PMID:26210451

  19. The active site of hydroxynitrile lyase from Prunus amygdalus: modeling studies provide new insights into the mechanism of cyanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dreveny, Ingrid; Kratky, Christoph; Gruber, Karl

    2002-02-01

    The FAD-dependent hydroxynitrile lyase from almond (Prunus amygdalus, PaHNL) catalyzes the cleavage of R-mandelonitrile into benzaldehyde and hydrocyanic acid. Catalysis of the reverse reaction-the enantiospecific formation of alpha-hydroxynitriles--is now widely utilized in organic syntheses as one of the few industrially relevant examples of enzyme-mediated C-C bond formation. Starting from the recently determined X-ray crystal structure, systematic docking calculations with the natural substrate were used to locate the active site of the enzyme and to identify amino acid residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. Analysis of the modeled substrate complexes supports an enzymatic mechanism that includes the flavin cofactor as a mere "spectator" of the reaction and relies on general acid/base catalysis by the conserved His-497. Stabilization of the negative charge of the cyanide ion is accomplished by a pronounced positive electrostatic potential at the binding site. PaHNL activity requires the FAD cofactor to be bound in its oxidized form, and calculations of the pKa of enzyme-bound HCN showed that the observed inactivation upon cofactor reduction is largely caused by the reversal of the electrostatic potential within the active site. The suggested mechanism closely resembles the one proposed for the FAD-independent, and structurally unrelated HNL from Hevea brasiliensis. Although the actual amino acid residues involved in the catalytic cycle are completely different in the two enzymes, a common motif for the mechanism of cyanogenesis (general acid/base catalysis plus electrostatic stabilization of the cyanide ion) becomes evident. PMID:11790839

  20. Transforming growth factor beta 1 and gamma interferon provide opposing signals to lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, E H; Hao, S Y; Pace, J L; Parmely, M J

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are potent inducers of macrophage activation, leading to the production of a number of proinflammatory mediators. Although several cytokines that prime macrophages for enhanced LPS-triggered responses have been identified, far less is known regarding the role that cytokines play in down-regulating macrophage responses to LPS. This study was designed to determine the effects of recombinant transforming growth factor beta 1 (rTGF-beta 1) on macrophage activation by LPS. Pretreatment of either mouse peritoneal macrophages or cells of the RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cell line with rTGF-beta 1 inhibited their ability to produce both tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) in response to LPS. These inhibitory effects were reversed by increasing the concentration of LPS or by priming cells with optimal concentrations of recombinant gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma). Pretreatment of cells with rTGF-beta 1 had only a modest inhibitory effect on the expression of TNF-alpha mRNA. By contrast, the expression of mRNA for the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is responsible for NO production in activated macrophages, was significantly inhibited by rTGF-beta 1 pretreatment. Thus, rTGF-beta 1-dependent suppression of macrophage TNF-alpha biosynthesis was manifest at a posttranscriptional level, whereas the inhibition of NO production correlated with a direct effect on iNOS gene expression. Importantly, both of these suppressive effects of rTGF-beta 1 were reversed by exposing the cells to priming concentrations of rIFN-gamma. As with NO production, immunocytochemical analysis of iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages revealed that rIFN-gamma and rTGF-beta 1 had antagonistic effects, with the former increasing, and the latter reducing, the number of iNOS-expressing cells induced by LPS. These data suggest that a balance between the priming effects of IFN-gamma and the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta 1 can

  1. Neutrino and Cosmic-Ray Emission and Cumulative Background from Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows in Low-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta; Toma, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    We study high-energy neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission from the cores of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). In LLAGN, the thermalization of particles is expected to be incomplete in radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAF), allowing the existence of non-thermal particles. In this work, assuming stochastic particle acceleration due to turbulence in RIAFs, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate spectra of escaping neutrinos and CRs. The RIAF in LLAGN can emit CR protons with ≳ 10 PeV energies and TeV-PeV neutrinos generated via pp and/or pγ reactions. We find that, if ˜1% of the accretion luminosity is carried away by non-thermal ions, the diffuse neutrino intensity from the cores of LLAGN may be as high as {E}ν 2{{Φ }}ν ˜ 3× {10}-8 {GeV} {{cm}}-2 {{s}}-1 {{sr}}-1, which can be compatible with the observed IceCube data. This result does not contradict either of the diffuse gamma-ray background observed by Fermi or observed diffuse CR flux. Our model suggests that, although very-high-energy gamma-rays may not escape, radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with RIAFs can emit GeV gamma-rays, which could be used for testing the model. We also calculate the neutron luminosity from RIAFs of LLAGN, and discuss a strong constraint on the model of jet mass loading mediated by neutrons from the diffuse neutrino observation.

  2. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%. PMID:27154827

  3. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2). (b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320...) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does...

  4. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2). (b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320...) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does...

  5. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2). (b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320...) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does...

  6. Matriptase-2 mutations in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients provide new insights into protease activation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Andrew J; Quesada, Victor; Sanchez, Mayka; Garabaya, Cecilia; Sardà, María P; Baiget, Montserrat; Remacha, Angel; Velasco, Gloria; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Mutations leading to abrogation of matriptase-2 proteolytic activity in humans are associated with an iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) due to elevated hepcidin levels. Here we describe two novel heterozygous mutations within the matriptase-2 (TMPRSS6) gene of monozygotic twin girls exhibiting an IRIDA phenotype. The first is the frameshift mutation (P686fs) caused by the insertion of the four nucleotides CCCC in exon 16 (2172_2173insCCCC) that is predicted to terminate translation before the catalytic serine. The second mutation is the di-nucleotide substitution c.467C>A and c.468C>T in exon 3 that causes the missense mutation A118D in the SEA domain of the extracellular stem region of matriptase-2. Functional analysis of both variant matriptase-2 proteases has revealed that they lead to ineffective suppression of hepcidin transcription. We also demonstrate that the A118D SEA domain mutation causes an intra-molecular structural imbalance that impairs matriptase-2 activation. Collectively, these results extend the pattern of TMPRSS6 mutations associated with IRIDA and functionally demonstrate that mutations affecting protease regions other than the catalytic domain may have a profound impact in the regulatory role of matriptase-2 during iron deficiency. PMID:19592582

  7. Dynamic QTLs for sugars and enzyme activities provide an overview of genetic control of sugar metabolism during peach fruit development.

    PubMed

    Desnoues, Elsa; Baldazzi, Valentina; Génard, Michel; Mauroux, Jehan-Baptiste; Lambert, Patrick; Confolent, Carole; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the genetic control of sugar metabolism is essential to enhance fruit quality and promote fruit consumption. The sugar content and composition of fruits varies with species, cultivar and stage of development, and is controlled by multiple enzymes. A QTL (quantitative trait locus) study was performed on peach fruit [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], the model species for Prunus Progeny derived from an interspecific cross between P. persica cultivars and P. davidiana was used. Dynamic QTLs for fresh weight, sugars, acids, and enzyme activities related to sugar metabolism were detected at different stages during fruit development. Changing effects of alleles during fruit growth were observed, including inversions close to maturity. This QTL analysis was supplemented by the identification of genes annotated on the peach genome as enzymes linked to sugar metabolism or sugar transporters. Several cases of co-locations between annotated genes, QTLs for enzyme activities and QTLs controlling metabolite concentrations were observed and discussed. These co-locations raise hypotheses regarding the functional regulation of sugar metabolism and pave the way for further analyses to enable the identification of the underlying genes. In conclusion, we identified the potential impact on fruit breeding of the modification of QTL effect close to maturity. PMID:27117339

  8. MOV10 Provides Antiviral Activity against RNA Viruses by Enhancing RIG-I-MAVS-Independent IFN Induction.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Rolando A; Ghosh, Arundhati; Wallerath, Christina; Hornung, Veit; Coyne, Carolyn B; Sarkar, Saumendra N

    2016-05-01

    Moloney leukemia virus 10, homolog (MOV10) is an IFN-inducible RNA helicase, associated with small RNA-induced silencing. In this article, we report that MOV10 exhibits antiviral activity, independent of its helicase function, against a number of positive- and negative-strand RNA viruses by enhancing type I IFN induction. Using a number of genome-edited knockout human cells, we show that IFN regulatory factor 3-mediated IFN induction and downstream IFN signaling through IFN receptor was necessary to inhibit virus replication by MOV10. MOV10 enhanced IFN regulatory factor 3-mediated transcription of IFN. However, this IFN induction by MOV10 was unique and independent of the known retinoic acid-inducible gene I/mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein-mediated RNA-sensing pathway. Upon virus infection, MOV10 specifically required inhibitor of κB kinase ε, not TANK-binding kinase 1, for its antiviral activity. The important role of MOV10 in mediating antiviral signaling was further supported by the finding that viral proteases from picornavirus family specifically targeted MOV10 as a possible innate immune evasion mechanism. These results establish MOV10, an evolutionary conserved protein involved in RNA silencing, as an antiviral gene against RNA viruses that uses an retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptor-independent pathway to enhance IFN response. PMID:27016603

  9. Dynamic QTLs for sugars and enzyme activities provide an overview of genetic control of sugar metabolism during peach fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Desnoues, Elsa; Baldazzi, Valentina; Génard, Michel; Mauroux, Jehan-Baptiste; Lambert, Patrick; Confolent, Carole; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic control of sugar metabolism is essential to enhance fruit quality and promote fruit consumption. The sugar content and composition of fruits varies with species, cultivar and stage of development, and is controlled by multiple enzymes. A QTL (quantitative trait locus) study was performed on peach fruit [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], the model species for Prunus. Progeny derived from an interspecific cross between P. persica cultivars and P. davidiana was used. Dynamic QTLs for fresh weight, sugars, acids, and enzyme activities related to sugar metabolism were detected at different stages during fruit development. Changing effects of alleles during fruit growth were observed, including inversions close to maturity. This QTL analysis was supplemented by the identification of genes annotated on the peach genome as enzymes linked to sugar metabolism or sugar transporters. Several cases of co-locations between annotated genes, QTLs for enzyme activities and QTLs controlling metabolite concentrations were observed and discussed. These co-locations raise hypotheses regarding the functional regulation of sugar metabolism and pave the way for further analyses to enable the identification of the underlying genes. In conclusion, we identified the potential impact on fruit breeding of the modification of QTL effect close to maturity. PMID:27117339

  10. The Transcriptomic Signature of RacA Activation and Inactivation Provides New Insights into the Morphogenetic Network of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Jin; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Arentshorst, Mark; Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Ram, Arthur F. J.; Meyer, Vera

    2013-01-01

    RacA is the main Rho GTPase in Aspergillus niger regulating polarity maintenance via controlling actin dynamics. Both deletion and dominant activation of RacA (RacG18V) provoke an actin localization defect and thereby loss of polarized tip extension, resulting in frequent dichotomous branching in the ΔracA strain and an apolar growing phenotype for RacG18V. In the current study the transcriptomics and physiological consequences of these morphological changes were investigated and compared with the data of the morphogenetic network model for the dichotomous branching mutant ramosa-1. This integrated approach revealed that polar tip growth is most likely orchestrated by the concerted activities of phospholipid signaling, sphingolipid signaling, TORC2 signaling, calcium signaling and CWI signaling pathways. The transcriptomic signatures and the reconstructed network model for all three morphology mutants (ΔracA, RacG18V, ramosa-1) imply that these pathways become integrated to bring about different physiological adaptations including changes in sterol, zinc and amino acid metabolism and changes in ion transport and protein trafficking. Finally, the fate of exocytotic (SncA) and endocytotic (AbpA, SlaB) markers in the dichotomous branching mutant ΔracA was followed, demonstrating that hyperbranching does not per se result in increased protein secretion. PMID:23894378

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RsdA provides a conformational rationale for selective regulation of σ-factor activity by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Ravi K.; Prabha, Tangirala Surya; Manjeera, Gowravaram; Gopal, Balasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    The relative levels of different σ factors dictate the expression profile of a bacterium. Extracytoplasmic function σ factors synchronize the transcriptional profile with environmental conditions. The cellular concentration of free extracytoplasmic function σ factors is regulated by the localization of this protein in a σ/anti-σ complex. Anti-σ factors are multi-domain proteins with a receptor to sense environmental stimuli and a conserved anti-σ domain (ASD) that binds a σ factor. Here we describe the structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis anti-σD (RsdA) in complex with the -35 promoter binding domain of σD (σD4). We note distinct conformational features that enable the release of σD by the selective proteolysis of the ASD in RsdA. The structural and biochemical features of the σD/RsdA complex provide a basis to reconcile diverse regulatory mechanisms that govern σ/anti-σ interactions despite high overall structural similarity. Multiple regulatory mechanisms embedded in an ASD scaffold thus provide an elegant route to rapidly re-engineer the expression profile of a bacterium in response to an environmental stimulus. PMID:23314154

  12. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  13. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Bruce; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean; Jordan, David; Kulisek, Jonathan; Stewart, Trevor; Seifert, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km - 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRlS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  14. Activation of the Albino Sterlet Acipenser ruthenus Eggs by UV-Irradiated Bester Hybrid Spermatozoa to Provide Gynogenetic Progeny.

    PubMed

    Fopp-Bayat, D; Ocalewicz, K

    2015-08-01

    Meiotic gynogenesis was induced in the albino form of sterlet Acipenser ruthenus by activation of eggs with UV-irradiated bester (Huso huso x Acipenser ruthenus) spermatozoa followed by inhibition of the second meiotic division performed by a heat shock. Obtained putative gynogenetic progeny were all albinos. The genetic verification based on three microsatellite DNA markers confirmed the only maternal inheritance of the progeny from the gynogenetic experimental groups. Cytogenetic analysis proved the gynogenetic sterlets were diploids. Application of the albino phenotype together with the molecular and the cytogenetic diagnostic approaches enabled to evaluate the efficiency of the spermatozoa irradiation and application of the heat shock to restore diploid state in the gynogenetic zygotes. PMID:25858073

  15. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew P; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca(2+) However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca(2+) it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca(2+) binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its 'c' conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca(2+)]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  16. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  17. Large-Scale Phosphoprotein Analysis in Medicago truncatula Roots Provides Insight into in Vivo Kinase Activity in Legumes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  18. Large-scale phosphoprotein analysis in Medicago truncatula roots provides insight into in vivo kinase activity in legumes.

    PubMed

    Grimsrud, Paul A; den Os, Désirée; Wenger, Craig D; Swaney, Danielle L; Schwartz, Daniel; Sussman, Michael R; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in legumes requires the development of root organs called nodules and their infection by symbiotic rhizobia. Over the last decade, Medicago truncatula has emerged as a major model plant for the analysis of plant-microbe symbioses and for addressing questions pertaining to legume biology. While the initiation of symbiosis and the development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules depend on the activation of a protein phosphorylation-mediated signal transduction cascade in response to symbiotic signals produced by the rhizobia, few sites of in vivo phosphorylation have previously been identified in M. truncatula. We have characterized sites of phosphorylation on proteins from M. truncatula roots, from both whole cell lysates and membrane-enriched fractions, using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Here, we report 3,457 unique phosphopeptides spanning 3,404 nonredundant sites of in vivo phosphorylation on 829 proteins in M. truncatula Jemalong A17 roots, identified using the complementary tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation methods electron transfer dissociation and collision-activated dissociation. With this being, to our knowledge, the first large-scale plant phosphoproteomic study to utilize electron transfer dissociation, analysis of the identified phosphorylation sites revealed phosphorylation motifs not previously observed in plants. Furthermore, several of the phosphorylation motifs, including LxKxxs and RxxSxxxs, have yet to be reported as kinase specificities for in vivo substrates in any species, to our knowledge. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were identified on several key proteins involved in initiating rhizobial symbiosis, including SICKLE, NUCLEOPORIN133, and INTERACTING PROTEIN OF DMI3. Finally, we used these data to create an open-access online database for M. truncatula phosphoproteomic data. PMID:19923235

  19. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energy’s support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombia’s national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy

  20. Lectin binding to surface Ig variable regions provides a universal persistent activating signal for follicular lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Linley, Adam; Krysov, Sergey; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Johnson, Peter W; Packham, Graham; Stevenson, Freda K

    2015-10-15

    The vast majority of cases of follicular lymphoma (FL), but not normal B cells, acquire N-glycosylation sites in the immunoglobulin variable regions during somatic hypermutation. Glycans added to sites are unusual in terminating at high mannoses. We showed previously that the C-type lectins, dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and mannose receptor, bound to FL surface immunoglobulin (sIg), generating an intracellular Ca(2+) flux. We have now mapped further intracellular pathways activated by DC-SIGN in a range of primary FL cells with detection of phosphorylated ERK1/2, AKT, and PLCγ2. The SYK inhibitor (tamatinib) or the BTK inhibitor (ibrutinib) each blocked phosphorylation. Activation by DC-SIGN occurred in both IgM(+) and IgG(+) cases and led to upregulation of MYC expression, with detection in vivo observed in lymph nodes. Unlike cells of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, FL cells expressed relatively high levels of sIg, unchanged by long-term incubation in vitro, indicating no antigen-mediated downregulation in vivo. In contrast, expression of CXCR4 increased in vitro. Engagement of sIg in FL cells or normal B cells by anti-Ig led to endocytosis in vitro as expected, but DC-SIGN, even when cross-linked, did not lead to significant endocytosis of sIg. These findings indicate that lectin binding generates signals via sIg but does not mediate endocytosis, potentially maintaining a supportive antigen-independent signal in vivo. Location of DC-SIGN in FL tissue revealed high levels in sinusoidlike structures and in some colocalized mononuclear cells, suggesting a role for lectin-expressing cells at this site. PMID:26194765

  1. Principal Component Analysis of Solar Background and Sunspot Magnetic Field in cycles 21-24 and its implications for the solar activity prediction in cycles 25-27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Popova, Helen; Zharkov, Sergei; Shepherd, Simon

    Principle component analysis (PCA) of the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) measured from Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) and sunspot magnetic field (SMF) measured by SOHO/MDI magnetograms reveals the two principal components (PCs) of waves travelling in time. In addition, the independent components analysis helps to uncover 8 pairs of SBMF waves in latitudes: two large symmetric magnetic waves , which are the same for all cycles 21-23, and three pairs of asymmetric magnetic waves, which are unique for each cycle. In each pair the waves travel slightly off phase with different phase shift for each cycle and have a different number of equator crossings (Zharkova et al, 2012). These SBMF variations are assumed to be those of poloidal magnetic field traveling slightly off-phase from pole to pole which are caused by a joint action of dipole and quadruple magnetic sources in the Sun. The simulations with the two layer Parker's dynamo model with meridional circulation revealed that the dominant pair of PCs can be produced by a magnetic dipole accounting for the two main dynamo waves operating between the two magnetic poles. The further three pairs of the waves are unique to each cycle and associated with the multiple magnetic sources in the solar interior: with a quadruple symmetry in both layers for cycle 21, with quadruple magnetic sources in the upper layer and dipole sources in the inner layer for cycle 22 and with the quadruple magnetic sources in the inner layer and the dipole sources in the upper layer for cycle 23 (Popova et al, 2013). The PCs derived for all three cycles from SMBF were used as a training set for the magnetic wave prediction for the cycles 24-27 by using Hamiltonian approach (Shepherd and Zharkova, 2014) and verifying by the SBMF observations in the current cycle 24. The prediction results indicate that the solar activity is defined mainly by the solar background magnetic fields while the sunspots and their magnetic fields seem to be

  2. Providers issue brief: alternative providers.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M

    1999-06-29

    Access by managed care plan enrollees, scope of practice issues and fee reimbursement by Medicaid and third parties such as insurance carriers is the engine that drives legislation recognizing alternative health care providers--chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, naturopaths, massage therapists, homeopaths, and dietitians and nutritionists. PMID:11073386

  3. An Introduction to the New Data Streaming and Data Mining Services Provided by the ESA Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C. H.; McCaffrey, S.; Laakso, H. E.; Taylor, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive has been operating since 2006 and is the principal repository for high quality data from the European Space Agency's cornerstone space physics Cluster mission. The archive holds nearly 10 years of high resolution in-situ plasma, particles and waves data from the 11 instruments on each of the four Cluster spacecraft. The archive has more than 1200 registered users and includes processed science data amounting to tens of terabytes of time series data divided into around 1400 logical datasets. We present an introduction to the capabilities and implementation of two new web based services that have been developed to enhance access to the archive data holdings and to assisting science users in locating intervals of scientific interest. i. The new data streaming service supports requests for arbitrary lengths of time series data from a single dataset and supplements the existing web GUI and machine interfaces. The service is primarily aimed at science tool developers who want a simple REST based mechanism to load Cluster data into their application. ii. The data mining service, which makes use of the streaming interface, allows the construction of complex conditions incorporating multiple datasets to identify lists of time intervals of interest for further analysis. For example searching a year of data for tail crossings (identified by rapid change in the azimuth direction of the magnetic field), when the spacecraft is in Burst Mode involves joining three independent datasets and takes about 30 seconds.

  4. A Forced Damped Oscillation Framework for Undulatory Swimming Provides New Insights into How Propulsion Arises in Active and Passive Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions (“active” swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid (“passive” swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  5. Facile Probe Design: Fluorescent Amphiphilic Nucleic Acid Probes without Quencher Providing Telomerase Activity Imaging Inside Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yongmei; Gao, Pengcheng; Zhuang, Yuan; Miao, Mao; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-06-21

    Nowadays, the probe with fluorophore but no quencher is promising for its simple preparation, environmental friendliness, and wide application scope. This study designs a new amphiphilic nucleic acid probe (ANAP) based on aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ) effect without any quencher. Upon binding with targets, the dispersion of hydrophobic part (conjugated fluorene, CF) in ANAP is enhanced as a signal-on model for proteins, nucleic acids, and small molecules detection or the aggregation of CF is enhanced as a signal-off model for ion detection. Meanwhile, because of the high specificity of ANAP, a one-step method is developed powerfully for monitoring the telomerase activity not only from the cell extracts but also from 50 clinic urine samples (positive results from 45 patients with bladder cancer and negative results from 5 healthy people). ANAPs can also readily enter into cells and exhibit a good performance for distinguishing natural tumor cells from the tumor cells pretreated by telomerase-related drugs or normal cells. In contrast to our previous results ( Anal. Chem. 2015 , 87 , 3890 - 3894 ), the present CF is a monomer which is just the structure unit of the previous fluorescent polymer. Since the accurate molecular structure and high DNA/CF ratio of the present CF, these advanced experiments obtain an easier preparation of probes, an improved sensitivity and specificity, and broader detectable targets. PMID:27223599

  6. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  7. Active compounds and distinctive sensory features provided by American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) extract in a new functional milk beverage.

    PubMed

    Tárrega, A; Salvador, A; Meyer, M; Feuillère, N; Ibarra, A; Roller, M; Terroba, D; Madera, C; Iglesias, J R; Echevarría, J; Fiszman, S

    2012-08-01

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) has recognized neurocognitive effects, and a ginsenoside-rich extract of the root of the plant has been shown to improve cognitive functions in young adults. This study aimed at assessing the chemical and sensory profiles of a UHT-treated, low-lactose functional milk containing American ginseng. Individual ginsenosides in the milk were analyzed by HPLC. Descriptive sensory analysis was performed by a trained panel to quantitatively document sensory changes resulting from the addition of ginseng and the UHT process on flavored and unflavored milks. Consumer acceptance of the product was also investigated. Total ginsenoside content in the UHT-treated milk enriched with the ginseng extract after UHT process treatment was 7.52 mg/100 g of milk, corresponding to a recovery of 67.6% compared with the content in the unprocessed extract. The intake of 150 to 300 mL of this ginseng-enriched milk provides the amount of total ginsenosides (11.5 to 23 mg) necessary to improve cognitive function after its consumption. Both the presence of ginsenosides and their thermal treatment affected some sensory properties of the milk, most notably an increase in bitterness and metallic taste, the appearance of a brownish color, and a decrease in milky flavor. Levels of brown color, bitterness, and metallic taste were highest in the industrially processed ginseng-enriched milk. The bitterness attributable to ginseng extract was reduced by addition of vanilla flavor and sucralose. A consumer exploratory study revealed that a niche of consumers exists who are willing to consume this type of product. PMID:22818438

  8. Human B cell activation. Evidence for diverse signals provided by various monoclonal anti-IgM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with different binding characteristics for human IgM varied markedly in their ability to induce proliferation of T cell-depleted human splenocytes. Two mAb (HB57 and 5D7) that bound to distinct epitopes on IgM were highly effective initiators of B cell proliferation at very low concentrations, in the presence of a T cell factor source. In the absence of T cell supernatant, both HB57 and 5D7 mAbs produced a markedly reduced degree of stimulation at all concentrations. Two additional anti-IgM mAb (VIIIE11 and Mu53) were distinctive in that, even at high concentrations, only limited proliferation was observed compared with the first group of mAb. This proliferation depended on the presence of T cell supernatant. Competitive-binding studies revealed that the epitope recognized by mAb Mu53 may be identical or very proximate to that recognized by HB57. Three other mAb (1G6, XG9, and P24) induced little or no proliferation. 1G6 bound to a unique epitope on the IgM molecule, whereas XG9 shared a determinant with VIIIE11 mAb. Regulatory influences of Fc receptor binding cannot account for all the diversity in proliferation observed with the individual anti-IgM mAb. Markedly augmented proliferation was obtained when B cells were cultured with certain combinations of anti-IgM mAb in the presence of exogenous T cell supernatant. The proliferation induced in the absence of T cell supernatant by high concentrations of mAb mixtures that included 1G6 approached that observed for the same mixtures in the presence of T cell supernatant. The data suggest that certain signals delivered through membrane IgM can bypass the need for T cell supernatant in the activation of human B lymphocytes. PMID:2413155

  9. Very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei: Cascading on the cosmic background radiation fields and the formation of pair halos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aharonian, F. A.; Coppi, P. S.; Voelk, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent high-energy gamma-ray observations (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 MeV) of blazar Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) show emission spectra with no clear upper energy cutoff. AGNs, considered to be possible sources for the observed flux of cosmic rays beyond 10(exp 19) eV, may well have emission extending into the very high energy (VHE), (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV) domain. Because VHE gamma-rays are absorbed by pair production on the intergalactic background radiation fields, much of this emission may not be directly visible. The electromagnetic cascades initiated by absorbed VHE gamma-rays, however, may be observable. Since, most probably, the velocities of (e(+), e(-)) pairs produced in a cascade are quickly isotropized by an ambient random magnetic field, extended 'halos' (R greater than 1 Mpc) of pairs will be formed around AGNs with VHE emission. The cascade radiation from these pair halos is emitted isotropically and should be observable at energies below a few TeV. The halo radiation can be distinguished by its characteristic variation in spectrum and intensity with angular distance from the central source. This variation depends weakly on the details of the central source model, e.g., the orientation and beaming/opening angle of an emitting jet. Limiting or determining the intensity of the pair halo can thus serve as a model-independent bound on or measure of the VHE power of AGNs. Next-generation Cherenkov telescopes may be able to image a pair halo.

  10. Second-generation Notch1 activity-trap mouse line (N1IP::CreHI) provides a more comprehensive map of cells experiencing Notch1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brunskill, Eric; Boyle, Scott; Chen, Shuang; Turkoz, Mustafa; Guo, Yuxuan; Grant, Rachel; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described the creation and analysis of a Notch1 activity-trap mouse line, Notch1 intramembrane proteolysis-Cre6MT or N1IP::CreLO, that marked cells experiencing relatively high levels of Notch1 activation. Here, we report and characterize a second line with improved sensitivity (N1IP::CreHI) to mark cells experiencing lower levels of Notch1 activation. This improvement was achieved by increasing transcript stability and by restoring the native carboxy terminus of Cre, resulting in a five- to tenfold increase in Cre activity. The magnitude of this effect probably impacts Cre activity in strains with carboxy-terminal Ert2 fusion. These two trap lines and the related line N1IP::CreERT2 form a complementary mapping tool kit to identify changes in Notch1 activation patterns in vivo as the consequence of genetic or pharmaceutical intervention, and illustrate the variation in Notch1 signal strength from one tissue to the next and across developmental time. PMID:25725069

  11. Second-generation Notch1 activity-trap mouse line (N1IP::CreHI) provides a more comprehensive map of cells experiencing Notch1 activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brunskill, Eric; Boyle, Scott; Chen, Shuang; Turkoz, Mustafa; Guo, Yuxuan; Grant, Rachel; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-03-15

    We have previously described the creation and analysis of a Notch1 activity-trap mouse line, Notch1 intramembrane proteolysis-Cre6MT or N1IP::Cre(LO), that marked cells experiencing relatively high levels of Notch1 activation. Here, we report and characterize a second line with improved sensitivity (N1IP::Cre(HI)) to mark cells experiencing lower levels of Notch1 activation. This improvement was achieved by increasing transcript stability and by restoring the native carboxy terminus of Cre, resulting in a five- to tenfold increase in Cre activity. The magnitude of this effect probably impacts Cre activity in strains with carboxy-terminal Ert2 fusion. These two trap lines and the related line N1IP::Cre(ERT2) form a complementary mapping tool kit to identify changes in Notch1 activation patterns in vivo as the consequence of genetic or pharmaceutical intervention, and illustrate the variation in Notch1 signal strength from one tissue to the next and across developmental time. PMID:25725069

  12. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  14. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., including the TANF assessment and any JTPA assessment. Where appropriate, the TANF individual responsibility plan (IRP), a WIA individual employment plan, or a JTPA individual service strategy should be used for... colleges and universities which provide some of the assistance needed by the targeted population...

  15. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., including the TANF assessment and any JTPA assessment. Where appropriate, the TANF individual responsibility plan (IRP), a WIA individual employment plan, or a JTPA individual service strategy should be used for... colleges and universities which provide some of the assistance needed by the targeted population...

  16. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., including the TANF assessment and any JTPA assessment. Where appropriate, the TANF individual responsibility plan (IRP), a WIA individual employment plan, or a JTPA individual service strategy should be used for... colleges and universities which provide some of the assistance needed by the targeted population...

  17. Activity-Modulating Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Serine Protease HtrA3 Provide Novel Insights into Regulating HtrA Proteolytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harmeet; Nero, Tracy L.; Wang, Yao; Parker, Michael W.; Nie, Guiying

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian HtrA (high temperature requirement factor A) proteases, comprising 4 multi-domain members HtrA1-4, play important roles in a number of normal cellular processes as well as pathological conditions such as cancer, arthritis, neurodegenerative diseases and pregnancy disorders. However, how HtrA activities are regulated is not well understood, and to date no inhibitors specific to individual HtrA proteins have been identified. Here we investigated five HtrA3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that we have previously produced, and demonstrated that two of them regulated HtrA3 activity in an opposing fashion: one inhibited while the other stimulated. The inhibitory mAb also blocked HtrA3 activity in trophoblast cells and enhanced migration and invasion, confirming its potential in vivo utility. To understand how the binding of these mAbs modulated HtrA3 protease activity, their epitopes were visualized in relation to a 3-dimensional HtrA3 homology model. This model suggests that the inhibitory HtrA3 mAb blocks substrate access to the protease catalytic site, whereas the stimulatory mAb may bind to the PDZ domain alone or in combination with the N-terminal and protease domains. Since HtrA1, HtrA3 and HtrA4 share identical domain organization, our results establish important foundations for developing potential therapeutics to target these HtrA proteins specifically for the treatment of a number of diseases, including cancer and pregnancy disorders. PMID:25248123

  18. Providing for Under-Achieving Students Using Renzulli's Type III Enrichment Activities: Gifted and Talented Video Projects at Holland Park Comprehensive School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, Ian

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how an inner-city school used Renzulli's enrichment activities model to provide opportunities to above-average students who may not have been identified by traditional identification procedures. The program offered students opportunities to produce "real world" videos utilizing a production company who trained them in media…

  19. Activation of glycosyl trichloroacetimidates with perchloric acid on silica (HClO4–SiO2) provides enhanced α-selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ludek, Olaf R.; Gu, Wenlu; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining high stereoselectivity in glycosylation reactions is often challenging in the absence of neighboring group participation. In this study, we demonstrate that activation of glycosyl trichloroacetimidate donors with immobilized perchloric acid on silica (HClO4–SiO2) provides higher α-selectivity than trimethylsilyl triflate (TMSOTf) for reactions that do not involve neighboring group participation. PMID:20692651

  20. The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]): A Program Activity to Provide Group Facilitators Insight into Teen Sexual Behaviors and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sclafane, Jamie Heather; Merves, Marni Loiacono; Rivera, Angelic; Long, Laura; Wilson, Ken; Bauman, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]) is an activity designed to provide group facilitators who lead HIV/STI prevention and sexual health promotion programs with detailed and current information on teenagers' sexual behaviors and beliefs. This information can be used throughout a program to tailor content. Included is a detailed lesson plan of…

  1. The Expression of a Xylanase Targeted to ER-Protein Bodies Provides a Simple Strategy to Produce Active Insoluble Enzyme Polymers in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Llop-Tous, Immaculada; Ortiz, Miriam; Torrent, Margarita; Ludevid, M. Dolors

    2011-01-01

    Background Xylanases deserve particular attention due to their potential application in the feed, pulp bleaching and paper industries. We have developed here an efficient system for the production of an active xylanase in tobacco plants fused to a proline-rich domain (Zera) of the maize storage protein γ-zein. Zera is a self-assembling domain able to form protein aggregates in vivo packed in newly formed endoplasmic reticulum-derived organelles known as protein bodies (PBs). Methodology/Principal Findings Tobacco leaves were transiently transformed with a binary vector containing the Zera-xylanase coding region, which was optimized for plant expression, under the control of the 35S CaMV promoter. The fusion protein was efficiently expressed and stored in dense PBs, resulting in yields of up to 9% of total protein. Zera-xylanase was post-translationally modified with high-mannose-type glycans. Xylanase fused to Zera was biologically active not only when solubilized from PBs but also in its insoluble form. The resistance of insoluble Zera-xylanase to trypsin digestion demonstrated that the correct folding of xylanase in PBs was not impaired by Zera oligomerization. The activity of insoluble Zera-xylanase was enhanced when substrate accessibility was facilitated by physical treatments such as ultrasound. Moreover, we found that the thermostability of the enzyme was improved when Zera was fused to the C-terminus of xylanase. Conclusion/Significance In the present work we have successfully produced an active insoluble aggregate of xylanase fused to Zera in plants. Zera-xylanase chimeric protein accumulates within ER-derived protein bodies as active aggregates that can easily be recovered by a simple density-based downstream process. The production of insoluble active Zera-xylanase protein in tobacco outlines the potential of Zera as a fusion partner for producing enzymes of biotechnological relevance. Zera-PBs could thus become efficient and low-cost bioreactors for

  2. Child Care Provider Adherence to Infant and Toddler Feeding Recommendations: Findings from the Baby Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (Baby NAP SACC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Kirsten K.; Hesketh, Kathryn; Taveras, Elsie M.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Identifying characteristics associated with the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) recommended feeding practices among infant and toddler care providers in child care centers could help in preventing childhood obesity. Methods: In 2009, at baseline in a pilot intervention study of 29 licensed Massachusetts child care centers with at least 50% of enrolled children identified as racial minorities, 57 infant and 109 toddler providers completed feeding questionnaires. To assess provider adherence to six IOM-recommended behaviors, we used cluster-adjusted multivariable logistic regression models including provider type (infant or toddler), race, education, and center Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) participation. Results: In multivariable analysis, CACFP participation was associated with providers sitting with children at meals (odds ratio [OR], 5.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–21.7), offering fruits and vegetables (OR, 3.3; 95% CI 1.7–6.2), and limiting fast food (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.8–6.7). Providers at centers serving meals family style were less likely to allow children to leave food unfinished (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.09–0.77). Infant providers were more likely than toddler providers to sit with children at meals (OR, 6.98; 95% CI, 1.51–32.09), allow children to eat when hungry (OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.34–9.16), and avoid serving sugary (OR, 8.74; 95% CI, 3.05–25.06) or fast foods (OR, 11.56; 95% CI, 3.20–41.80). Conclusions: CACFP participation may encourage IOM-recommended feeding practices among infant and toddler providers. Child care providers may benefit from education about how to feed infants and toddlers responsively, especially when offering foods family style. Future research should explore ways to promote child-centered feeding practices, while addressing barriers to providing children with nutrient-rich foods. PMID:25918873

  3. Clark County Community College Students: Highlights from a Survey of their Backgrounds, Activities, Ratings of Skills, Use of Support Services, and Educational Attainments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Jack

    This series of 15 brief reports summarizes findings for a survey of 564 Clark County Community College students which was conducted in Spring 1981 to determine: (1) student characteristics and educational background; (2) student usage of campus support services; (3) student ratings of their abilities in eight academic skill areas; (4) the extent…

  4. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  5. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  6. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  7. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  8. Relative Preservation of Advanced Activities in Daily Living among Patients with Mild-to-Moderate Dementia in the Community and Overview of Support Provided by Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Takechi, Hajime; Kokuryu, Atsuko; Kubota, Tomoko; Yamada, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which advanced activities of daily living among patients with dementia are preserved and how family caregivers of these patients support them in the community. In this cross-sectional assessment of pairs of patients with dementia and their family caregivers, we evaluated basic, instrumental, and advanced activities of daily living by comparing past and present status observed by caregivers with subjective estimations by patients with dementia. We also asked about ways in which support was provided by family caregivers. Thirty-nine pairs of patients with dementia and caregivers who presented to our memory clinic were interviewed. The mean age of patients with dementia was 75.3 ± 7.0 years, and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were 22.3 ± 3.4. We found relative preservation of advanced activities of daily living compared with instrumental activities of daily living. Caregivers provided instrumental, informational, and reminding support to patients with dementia. These findings may reinforce the concept of person-centered support of patients with dementia in the community. PMID:22811947

  9. Mathematical background of Parrondo's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Ehrhard

    2004-05-01

    Parrondo's paradox states that there are losing gambling games which, when being combined stochastically or in a suitable deterministic way, give rise to winning games. Here we investigate the probabilistic background. We show how the properties of the equilibrium distributions of the Markov chains under consideration give rise to the paradoxical behavior, and we provide methods how to find the best a priori strategies.

  10. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  11. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  12. Adaptive background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun; Xiao, Yijun; Chai, Zhi; Wang, Bangping

    2007-11-01

    An adaptive background model aiming at outdoor vehicle detection is presented in this paper. This model is an improved model of PICA (pixel intensity classification algorithm), it classifies pixels into K-distributions by color similarity, and then a hypothesis that the background pixel color appears in image sequence with a high frequency is used to evaluate all the distributions to determine which presents the current background color. As experiments show, the model presented in this paper is a robust, adaptive and flexible model, which can deal with situations like camera motions, lighting changes and so on.

  13. Reducing background neutron rates in NERO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Eric

    2003-10-01

    The experimental study of neutron rich nuclei can provide important data to better model the production and abundances of heavy elements from the r-process. In order to measure low emission rates of neutrons in certain nuclei, efforts have been made to reduce background rates in NERO (1). Simulations were done to calculate effective passive shielding and testing was carried out to evaluate it. Also, an active shielding system was designed to detect cosmic ray muons in an effort to create a veto in the data acquisition. The results of these efforts are presented here. 1. http://www.nscl.msu.edu/tech/devices/nero/

  14. Rare loss-of-function mutation in complement component C3 provides insight into molecular and pathophysiological determinants of complement activity

    PubMed Central

    Sfyroera, Georgia; Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S.; Chen, Hui; Wu, Emilia L.; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma protein C3 is a central element in the activation and effector functions of the complement system. A hereditary dysfunction of C3 that prevents complement activation via the alternative pathway (AP) was described previously in a Swedish family, but its genetic cause and molecular consequences have remained elusive. Here we provide these missing links by pinpointing the dysfunction to a point mutation in the β-chain of C3 (c.1180T>C; p.Met373Thr). In the patient’s plasma, AP activity was completely abolished and could only be reconstituted with the addition of normal C3. The M373T mutation was localized to the macroglobulin domain 4 (MG4) of C3, which contains a binding site for the complement inhibitor compstatin and is considered critical for the interaction of C3 with the AP C3 convertase. Structural analyses suggested that the mutation disturbs the integrity of MG4 and induces conformational changes that propagate into adjacent regions. Indeed, C3 M373T showed an altered binding pattern for compstatin and surface-bound C3b, and the presence of Thr-373 in either the C3 substrate or convertase-affiliated C3b impaired C3 activation and opsonization. In contrast to known gain-of-function mutations in C3, patients affected by this loss-of-function mutation did not develop familial disease, but rather showed diverse and mostly episodic symptoms. Our study therefore reveals the molecular mechanism of a relevant loss-of-function mutation in C3 and provides insight into the function of the C3 convertase, the differential involvement of C3 activity in clinical conditions, and some potential implications of therapeutic complement inhibition. PMID:25712219

  15. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  16. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  17. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    PubMed

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  18. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Van Kanegan, Michael J.; Dunn, Denise E.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D.; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H.; Newman, Robert A.; Lo, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0–4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0–4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  19. Glucocerebrosidase 1 deficient Danio rerio mirror key pathological aspects of human Gaucher disease and provide evidence of early microglial activation preceding alpha-synuclein-independent neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, Marcus; Bui, Hai; Menke, Aswin; Chen, Yu-Chia; Sokol, Anna M.; Bai, Qing; Ellett, Felix; Da Costa, Marc; Burke, Derek; Gegg, Matthew; Trollope, Lisa; Payne, Thomas; McTighe, Aimee; Mortiboys, Heather; de Jager, Sarah; Nuthall, Hugh; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Fleming, Angeleen; Schapira, Anthony H.V.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Highley, J. Robin; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Panula, Pertti; Burton, Edward A.; O'Neill, Michael J.; Bandmann, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessively inherited glucocerebrosidase 1 (GBA1) mutations cause the lysosomal storage disorder Gaucher's disease (GD). Heterozygous GBA1 mutations (GBA1+/−) are the most common risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies typically focused on the interaction between the reduction of glucocerebrosidase (enzymatic) activity in GBA1+/− carriers and alpha-synuclein-mediated neurotoxicity. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also contribute to the increased risk of PD in GBA1+/− carriers. The zebrafish genome does not contain alpha-synuclein (SNCA), thus providing a unique opportunity to study pathogenic mechanisms unrelated to alpha-synuclein toxicity. Here we describe a mutant zebrafish line created by TALEN genome editing carrying a 23 bp deletion in gba1 (gba1c.1276_1298del), the zebrafish orthologue of human GBA1. Marked sphingolipid accumulation was already detected at 5 days post-fertilization with accompanying microglial activation and early, sustained up-regulation of miR-155, a master regulator of inflammation. gba1c.1276_1298del mutant zebrafish developed a rapidly worsening phenotype from 8 weeks onwards with striking reduction in motor activity by 12 weeks. Histopathologically, we observed marked Gaucher cell invasion of the brain and other organs. Dopaminergic neuronal cell count was normal through development but reduced by >30% at 12 weeks in the presence of ubiquitin-positive, intra-neuronal inclusions. This gba1c.1276_1298del zebrafish line is the first viable vertebrate model sharing key pathological features of GD in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissue. Our study also provides evidence for early microglial activation prior to alpha-synuclein-independent neuronal cell death in GBA1 deficiency and suggests upregulation of miR-155 as a common denominator across different neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26376862

  20. Delayed Treatment with Systemic (S)-Roscovitine Provides Neuroprotection and Inhibits In Vivo CDK5 Activity Increase in Animal Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Menn, Bénédicte; Bach, Stéphane; Blevins, Teri L.; Campbell, Mark; Meijer, Laurent; Timsit, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Background Although quite challenging, neuroprotective therapies in ischemic stroke remain an interesting strategy to counter mechanisms of ischemic injury and reduce brain tissue damage. Among potential neuroprotective drug, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) inhibitors represent interesting therapeutic candidates. Increasing evidence indisputably links cell cycle CDKs and CDK5 to the pathogenesis of stroke. Although recent studies have demonstrated promising neuroprotective efficacies of pharmacological CDK inhibitors in related animal models, none of them were however clinically relevant to human treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we report that systemic delivery of (S)-roscovitine, a well known inhibitor of mitotic CDKs and CDK5, was neuroprotective in a dose-dependent manner in two models of focal ischemia, as recommended by STAIR guidelines. We show that (S)-roscovitine was able to cross the blood brain barrier. (S)-roscovitine significant in vivo positive effect remained when the compound was systemically administered 2 hrs after the insult. Moreover, we validate one of (S)-roscovitine in vivo target after ischemia. Cerebral increase of CDK5/p25 activity was observed 3 hrs after the insult and prevented by systemic (S)-roscovitine administration. Our results show therefore that roscovitine protects in vivo neurons possibly through CDK5 dependent mechanisms. Conclusions/Significance Altogether, our data bring new evidences for the further development of pharmacological CDK inhibitors in stroke therapy. PMID:20711428

  1. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  2. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  3. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  4. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  5. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Freeze/Thaw Product: Providing a Crucial Linkage between Earth's Water and Carbon Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. C.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth’s Northern Hemisphere, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active-Pasiive (SMAP) mission, currently planned for launch in 2014, will employ a combined radiometer and high-resolution radar to measure surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state, thus providing new opportunities for scientific advances and societal benefits. Major science objectives of SMAP support the understanding of processes linking terrestrial water, energy and carbon cycles, the quantification of net carbon flux and the extension of capabilities for weather and climate prediction models. The SMAP suite of data products will include global maps of landscape freeze/thaw state derived from L-band radar at 1-3 km spatial resolution with a 2-day refresh rate for the high northern latitudes (i.e. latitudes above 50 degrees north). The algorithm employed in derivation of the freeze/thaw product employs a temporal change detection scheme to delineate freeze/thaw state changes associated with temporal variations in landscape microwave dielectric constant properties. Development of the algorithm follows from application of legacy data sets provided by satellite radars, both scatterometers and Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), and radiometers. This presentation reviews algorithm development, product derivation and validation, product applications and associated SMAP science objectives addressed through the derived freeze/thaw data products. We review efforts in which contemporary and legacy active and passive microwave remote sensing data sets have been applied in prototyping the freeze/thaw product and its applications. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and at the University of Montana under

  6. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  7. Crystal structures of Salmonella typhimurium biodegradative threonine deaminase and its complex with CMP provide structural insights into ligand-induced oligomerization and enzyme activation.

    PubMed

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K; Savithri, Handanahal S; Murthy, Mathur R N

    2006-12-22

    Two different pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-containing l-threonine deaminases (EC 4.3.1.19), biosynthetic and biodegradative, which catalyze the deamination of l-threonine to alpha-ketobutyrate, are present in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of l-threonine to propionate. TdcB, unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, is insensitive to l-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. In the present study, TdcB from S. typhimurium was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. In the presence of AMP or CMP, the recombinant enzyme was converted to the tetrameric form accompanied by significant enzyme activation. To provide insights into ligand-mediated oligomerization and enzyme activation, crystal structures of S. typhimurium TdcB and its complex with CMP were determined. In the native structure, TdcB is in a dimeric form, whereas in the TdcB.CMP complex, it exists in a tetrameric form with 222 symmetry and appears as a dimer of dimers. Tetrameric TdcB binds to four molecules of CMP, two at each of the dimer interfaces. Comparison of the dimer structure in the ligand (CMP)-free and -bound forms suggests that the changes induced by ligand binding at the dimer interface are essential for tetramerization. The differences observed in the tertiary and quaternary structures of TdcB in the absence and presence of CMP appear to account for enzyme activation and increased binding affinity for l-threonine. Comparison of TdcB with related pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes points to structural and mechanistic similarities. PMID:17046821

  8. Direct contacts between conserved motifs of different subunits provide major contribution to active site organization in human and mycobacterial dUTPases

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Enikő; Nagy, Gergely; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Lopata, Anna; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2010-01-01

    dUTPases are essential for genome integrity. Recent results allowed characterization of the role of conserved residues. Here we analyzed the Asp/Asn mutation within conserved Motif I of human and mycobacterial dUTPases, wherein the Asp residue was previously implicated in Mg2+-coordination. Our results on transient/steady-state kinetics, ligand-binding and a 1.80 Å-resolution structure of the mutant mycobacterial enzyme, in comparison with wild type and C-terminally truncated structures, argue that this residue has a major role in providing intra- and intersubunit contacts, but is not essential for Mg2+ accommodation. We conclude that in addition to the role of conserved motifs in substrate accommodation, direct subunit interaction between protein atoms of active site residues from different conserved motifs are crucial for enzyme function. PMID:20493855

  9. Direct contacts between conserved motifs of different subunits provide major contribution to active site organization in human and mycobacterial dUTPases.

    PubMed

    Takács, Eniko; Nagy, Gergely; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Lopata, Anna; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2010-07-16

    dUTP pyrophosphatases (dUTPases) are essential for genome integrity. Recent results allowed characterization of the role of conserved residues. Here we analyzed the Asp/Asn mutation within conserved Motif I of human and mycobacterial dUTPases, wherein the Asp residue was previously implicated in Mg(2+)-coordination. Our results on transient/steady-state kinetics, ligand binding and a 1.80 A resolution structure of the mutant mycobacterial enzyme, in comparison with wild type and C-terminally truncated structures, argue that this residue has a major role in providing intra- and intersubunit contacts, but is not essential for Mg(2+) accommodation. We conclude that in addition to the role of conserved motifs in substrate accommodation, direct subunit interaction between protein atoms of active site residues from different conserved motifs are crucial for enzyme function. PMID:20493855

  10. Structure and Activity Analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 NagD Provide Insight into the Evolution of Biochemical Function in the Haloakanoic Acid Dehlogenase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay,L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2006-01-01

    The HAD superfamily is a large superfamily of proteins which share a conserved core domain that provides those active site residues responsible for the chemistry common to all family members. The superfamily is further divided into the four subfamilies I, IIA, IIB, and III, based on the topology and insertion site of a cap domain that provides substrate specificity. This structural and functional division implies that members of a given HAD structural subclass may target substrates that have similar structural characteristics. To understand the structure/function relationships in all of the subfamilies, a type IIA subfamily member, NagD from Escherichia coli K-12, was selected (type I, IIB, and III members have been more extensively studied). The structure of the NagD protein was solved to 1.80 Angstroms with R{sub work} = 19.8% and R{sub free} = 21.8%. Substrate screening and kinetic analysis showed NagD to have high specificity for nucleotide monophosphates with kcat/Km = 3.12 x 10{sup 4} and 1.28 x 10{sup 4} {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for UMP and GMP, respectively. This specificity is consistent with the presence of analogues of NagD that exist as fusion proteins with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase from the Nudix family. Docking of the nucleoside substrate in the active site brings it in contact with conserved residues from the cap domain that can act as a substrate specificity loop (NagD residues 144-149) in the type IIA subfamily. NagD and other subfamily IIA and IIB members show the common trait that substrate specificity and catalytic efficiencies (k{sub cat}/K{sub m}) are low (1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and the boundaries defining physiological substrates are somewhat overlapping. The ability to catabolize other related secondary metabolites indicates that there is regulation at the genetic level.

  11. The LBNL Low Background Facility - Services and Recent Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Smith, Alan; Norman, Eric; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Poon, Alan; Lesko, Kevin

    2014-09-01

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described in detail including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects. The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at a recently established underground location (4300 m.w.e) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD (relocated from Oroville, CA). These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic

  12. China takes an active role in combating an Ebola outbreak: On-site observations and reflections from a Chinese healthcare provider

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Summary As one of the active participants in the global fight against the 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, China supplied many resources, including medical experts and scientists as well as medical supplies, to the affected countries. A member of the first contingent of Chinese public health experts who worked in Sierra Leone for 65 days, I am pleased to have this opportunity to review the major work done by our team to help deal with the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. This is the first time that a Chinese public health training team has worked in West Africa. The team provides trainings for people from local communities in an effort to encourage local residents to get involved in the war against Ebola. However, the implementation of active measures against Ebola in West Africa was hampered somewhat by certain drawbacks in the area in terms of the health system, the shortage of medical resources, the high illiteracy rate, unhealthy lifestyles, and traditional funeral rites. All of these aspects need to be gradually improved in the aftermath of Ebola, and I believe that this is an area in which the Chinese public health system can play an important role. PMID:26668785

  13. Seismicity at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia: Volcano-Tectonic Earthquake Swarms Triggered by the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake and Non-Triggered Background Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, D. H.; Chartrand, Z. A.; Jay, J.; Pritchard, M. E.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We find that the 270 ky dormant Uturuncu Volcano in SW Bolivia exhibits relatively high rates of shallow, volcano-tectonic seismicity that is dominated by swarm-like activity. We also document that the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake triggered an exceptionally high rate of seismicity in the seconds to days following the main event. Although dormant, Uturuncu is currently being studied due to its large-scale deformation rate of 1-2 cm/yr uplift as revealed by InSAR. As part of the NASA-funded Andivolc project to investigate seismicity of volcanoes in the central Andes, a seismic network of 15 stations (9 Mark Products L22 short period and 6 Guralp CMG40T intermediate period sensors) with an average spacing of about 10 km was installed at Uturuncu from April 2009 to April 2010. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur at an average rate of about 3-4 per day, and swarms of 5-60 events within a span of minutes to hours occur a few times per month. Most of these earthquakes are located close to the summit at depths near and above sea level. The largest swarm occurred on 28 September 2009 and consisted of 60 locatable events over a time span of 28 hours. The locations of volcano-tectonic earthquakes at Uturuncu are oriented in a NW-SE trend, which matches the dominant orientation of regional faults and suggests a relationship between the fault system at Uturuncu and the regional tectonics of the area; a NW-SE trending fault beneath Uturuncu may serve to localize stresses that are accumulating over the broad area of uplift. Based on automated locations, the maximum local magnitude of these events is approximately M = 4 and the average magnitude is approximately M = 2. An initial estimate of the b-value is about b = 1.2. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake on 27 February 2010 triggered hundreds of local volcano-tectonic events at Uturuncu. High-pass filtering of the long period surface waves reveals that the first triggered events occurred with the onset of the Rayleigh

  14. Vision Therapy News Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    The booklet provides an overview on vision therapy to aid writers, editors, and broadcasters help parents, teachers, older adults, and all consumers learn more about vision therapy. Following a description of vision therapy or vision training, information is provided on how and why vision therapy works. Additional sections address providers of…

  15. 21. Providence & Worchester RR: Freight house. Providence, Providence Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Providence & Worchester RR: Freight house. Providence, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4119, mp 185.66 (See HAER no. RI-3 for further documentation on this site.) - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  16. Hot Universe Background Explorer (HUBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.; Ford, H.; Peacock, K.; Burrows, D. N.; Smith, B. W.; Bloch, J. J.

    1998-05-01

    The study of diffuse backgrounds has played an important role in the recent history of astronomy. From the microwave discovery of the 2.7 K background to the soft X-ray detection of coronal gas to the diffuse H2 emission from warm interstellar gas in our galaxy to the infrared mapping of wisps of dust at high galactic latitudes, diffuse background astronomy has provided fundamental insights into the nature of the universe. As the various regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been explored, their diffuse backgrounds have been found to arise from the widest possible range of sources: from the local interstellar medium to the farthest reaches of the observable universe; from the wrinkled echo of the Big Bang to the million degree plasma between the stars. Most astronomers are ``point-source" astronomers, and the history of astronomy space missions is that few have been dedicated to the elucidation of the nature of the truly diffuse radiation. And yet a large fraction of the total electromagnetic energy in the universe occurs in the form of diffuse radiation. In some spectral ranges, we do not yet know the fraction of radiation that is diffuse; we are dealing with genuinely unexplored frontiers. We will describe the extraordinary science that can be obtained through a MIDEX mission that is dedicated to the exploration of the diffuse emission in the far ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions of the spectrum, where the diffuse radiation is dominated by emission from the hottest components of the interstellar medium and, perhaps, from the intergalactic medium. HUBE currently enjoys the status of being NASA's MIDEX Alternate Astrophysics Mission. We are re-proposing HUBE in the current MIDEX competition with a much broader scientific set of goals, aiming at a definitive spectroscopic survey of the diffuse background over a greatly-expanded spectral range. Our HUBE proposal effort is being supported by Ball Aerospace Corporation.

  17. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  18. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  19. A genomic region encompassing a newly identified exon provides enhancing activity sufficient for normal myo7aa expression in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Sylvain; Rosa, Frédéric M

    2015-09-01

    MYO7A is an unconventional myosin involved in the structural organization of hair bundles at the apex of sensory hair cells (SHCs) where it serves mechanotransduction in the process of hearing and balance. Mutations of MYO7A are responsible for abnormal shaping of hair bundles, resulting in human deafness and murine deafness/circling behavior. Myo7aa, expressed in SHCs of the inner ear and lateral line of zebrafish, causes circling behavior and abnormal hair cell function when deficient in mariner mutant. This work identifies a new hair cell-specific enhancer, highly conserved between species, located within Intron 2-3 of zebrafish myosin 7a (myo7aa) gene. This enhancer is contained within a 761-bp DNA fragment that encompasses a newly identified Exon of myo7aa and whose activity does not depend on orientation. Compensation of mariner mutation by expression of mCherry-Myo7aa fusion protein under the control of this 761-bp DNA fragment results in recovery of balance, normal hair bundle shape and restored hair cell function. Two smaller adjacent fragments (344-bp and 431-bp), extracted from the 761-bp fragment, both show hair cell-specific enhancing activity, with apparently reduced intensity and coverage. These data should help understand the role of Myo7aa in sensory hair cell differentiation and function. They provide tools to decipher how myo7aa gene is expressed and regulated in SHCs by allowing the identification of potential transcription factors involved in this process. The discovered enhancer could represent a new target for the identification of deafness-causing mutations affecting human MYO7A. PMID:25556989

  20. PDZ-RhoGEF and LARG Are Essential for Embryonic Development and Provide a Link between Thrombin and LPA Receptors and Rho Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Palmby, Todd R.; Simaan, May; Li, Wenling; Szabo, Roman; Lyons, Ruth; Martin, Daniel; Yagi, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Shigetomo; Chikumi, Hiroki; Galisteo, Rebeca; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to both members of the Gα12 family of heterotrimeric G proteins α subunits, Gα12 and Gα13, regulate the activation of Rho GTPases, thereby contributing to many key biological processes. Multiple Rho GEFs have been proposed to link Gα12/13 GPCRs to Rho activation, including PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), leukemia-associated Rho GEF (LARG), p115-RhoGEF (p115), lymphoid blast crisis (Lbc), and Dbl. PRG, LARG, and p115 share the presence of a regulator of G protein signaling homology (RGS) domain. There is limited information on the biological roles of this RGS-containing family of RhoGEFs in vivo. p115-deficient mice are viable with some defects in the immune system and gastrointestinal motor dysfunctions, whereas in an initial study we showed that mice deficient for Larg are viable and resistant to salt-induced hypertension. Here, we generated knock-out mice for Prg and observed that these mice do not display any overt phenotype. However, deficiency in Prg and Larg leads to complex developmental defects and early embryonic lethality. Signaling from Gα11/q-linked GPCRs to Rho was not impaired in mouse embryonic fibroblasts defective in all three RGS-containing RhoGEFs. However, a combined lack of Prg, Larg, and p115 expression abolished signaling through Gα12/13 to Rho and thrombin-induced cell proliferation, directional migration, and nuclear signaling through JNK and p38. These findings provide evidence of an essential role for the RGS-containing RhoGEF family in signaling to Rho by Gα12/13-coupled GPCRs, which may likely play a critical role during embryonic development. PMID:23467409

  1. Single concentration loss of activity assay provides an improved assessment of drug-drug interaction risk compared to IC50-shift.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon G; Lee, Mey; Wong, Bradley K

    2016-11-01

    1. The utility of two abbreviated, higher-throughput assays [IC50-shift and the loss of activity (LOA) assay] to evaluate time-dependent inhibition (TDI) of 24 structurally related compounds was compared. 2. Good correlation (R(2)  = 0.90) between % inhibition and kinact/KI suggested that the LOA assay has utility as an indicator of TDI potential. Weaker correlation was observed for the shifted IC50 (IC50(T = 30)) (R(2) = 0.61) and the fold-shift in IC50 (R(2) = 0.17). 3. Primary mechanism for poor correlation was depletion of active enzyme at concentrations > 1 μM leading to greater than predicted inhibition in the IC50-shift assay. 4. Previously reported strong correlations between IC50(T = 30) and kinact/KI were found to be dependent on potent TDI compounds with kinact/KI > 30; correlation was reduced for moderate inhibitors (kinact/KI < 30). LOA assay maintained good correlation even when strong TDI compounds were excluded. 5. LOA assay (% Inhibition at 30 min, 10 μM) was a good predictor of in vivo DDI (AUCr), providing a graded response with low potential for false negatives or positives. IC50-shift assay had bias for over-predicting in vivo DDI and was more likely to identify false positives. PMID:26956546

  2. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  3. 16 CFR 1031.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Background. 1031.2 Section 1031.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.2 Background. (a) Congress enacted...

  4. 16 CFR 1031.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1031.2 Section 1031.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.2 Background. (a) Congress enacted...

  5. Expression profiles of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in teleost fish provide evidence for its active role in initiation and resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chadzinska, Magdalena; Baginski, Pawel; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Lidy Verburg-van Kemenade, B M

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) belongs to a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases. As a consequence of its ability to cleave structural extracellular matrix molecules, mammalian MMP-9 is associated with vital inflammatory processes such as leucocyte migration and tissue remodelling and regeneration. Interestingly, MMP-9 genes have been identified in fish, but functional data are still limited and focus on the involvement of MMP-9 in embryonic development, reproduction and post-mortem tenderization. Here, we describe the involvement of MMP-9 in the innate immunity of carp. In carp, MMP-9 was most notably expressed in classical fish immune organs and in peritoneal and peripheral blood leucocytes, indicating a role of MMP-9 in immune responses. In our well-characterized zymosan-induced peritonitis model for carp, we analysed expression of the MMP-9 gene and the gelatinolytic levels of both pro- and activated forms of MMP-9. The biphasic profile of MMP-9 mRNA expression indicated involvement during the initial phase of inflammation and during the later phase of tissue remodelling. Also, in vitro stimulation of carp phagocytes with lipopolysaccharide or concanavalin A increased MMP-9 gene expression, with a peak at 24 hr. The increase of MMP-9 mRNA correlated with the peak of MMP-9 gelatinolytic level in culture supernatants. These results provide evidence for an evolutionarily conserved and relevant role of MMP-9 in the innate immune response. PMID:18557954

  6. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  7. Divergence in Enzymatic Activities in the Soybean GST Supergene Family Provides New Insight into the Evolutionary Dynamics of Whole-Genome Duplicates

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Tang, Zhen-Xin; Han, Xue-Min; Yang, Zhi-Ling; Zhang, Fu-Min; Yang, Hai-Ling; Liu, Yan-Jing; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD), or polyploidy, is a major force in plant genome evolution. A duplicate of all genes is present in the genome immediately following a WGD event. However, the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for the loss of, or retention and subsequent functional divergence of polyploidy-derived duplicates remain largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene family from the soybean genome, and identified 72 GST duplicated gene pairs formed by a recent Glycine-specific WGD event occurring approximately 13 Ma. We found that 72% of duplicated GST gene pairs experienced gene losses or pseudogenization, whereas 28% of GST gene pairs have been retained in the soybean genome. The GST pseudogenes were under relaxed selective constraints, whereas functional GSTs were subject to strong purifying selection. Plant GST genes play important roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism. By examining the gene expression responses to abiotic stresses and enzymatic properties of the ancestral and current proteins, we found that polyploidy-derived GST duplicates show the divergence in enzymatic activities. Through site-directed mutagenesis of ancestral proteins, this study revealed that nonsynonymous substitutions of key amino acid sites play an important role in the divergence of enzymatic functions of polyploidy-derived GST duplicates. These findings provide new insights into the evolutionary and functional dynamics of polyploidy-derived duplicate genes. PMID:26219583

  8. El Niño-Southern Oscillation influence on the dust storm activity in Australia: Can the past provide a key to the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudmenzky, C.; Stone, R.; Allan, R.; Butler, H.

    2011-12-01

    impacts on rural communities. All major continental scale dust storm events have occurred after periods of prolonged drought. The reconstruction of the ENSO history using longer-term meteorological data, historical records, and other proxy data that may otherwise have been available provides a far more lengthy and detailed global picture of past ENSO and other climate variability thereby allowing recent climate variability to be assessed from a long-term "multi-proxy" perspective. The resulting dataset can be used to better understand the range of past, present and future climate variability and the influence these have on the dust storm activity in Australia. In addition the information gained can provide an independent means of verifying climate model simulations. The scientific community is well aware that climate change is happening to some degree and Australia is already starting to experience the effects. In order to employ adaptation and mitigating measures it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for climate change.

  9. Perfluorocarbon background concentrations in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, Anne Grete; Dietz, Russel N.; Koffı̀, Ernest N.'dri; Nodop, Katrin

    Five studies of the background level of several perfluorocarbon compounds in Europe are here presented together with measurements from the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX). The tracers used during the two ETEX tracer releases were the perfluorocarbons (PFCs); perfluoromethylcyclohexane (C 7F 14, PMCH) and perfluoromethylcyclopentane (C 6F 12, PMCP). Their background concentrations were detected by using both passive and active sampling techniques, to define the spatial and temporal variation of the PFCs over Europe. Also the background variations of four isomers of the PFC compound perfluorodimethylcyclohexane (C 8F 16, PDCH) were studied. The results were compared to other PFC tracer studies in the U.S.A. and Europe. The mean and median values of the measured PFCs were found to vary slightly and randomly in space and time. They were found to be higher and to have a larger standard deviation than the measurements from the American studies. The background concentrations were still found to be low and stable enough for PFCs to be highly suitable for use in tracer studies. The following concentrations were found: PMCP; 4.6±0.3 fl ℓ -1, PMCH: 4.6±0.8 fl ℓ -1, ocPDCH: 0.96±0.33 fl ℓ -1, mtPDCH: 9.3±0.8 fl ℓ -1, mcPDCH: 8.8±0.8 fl ℓ -1, ptPDCH: 6.1±0.8 fl ℓ -1. A study of the correlation between the measured PFC compounds showed a significant correlation between most of the compounds, which indicate that there are no major PFC sources in Europe.

  10. 32 CFR 770.54 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 770.54 Section 770.54 National... Hampshire § 770.54 Background. (a) Portsmouth Naval Shipyard maintains and operates facilities “to provide... assigned; to perform manufacturing, research, development, and test work, as assigned; and to...

  11. Child Care: State Requirements for Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia

    Background checks involve gathering information from state and federal databases to determine if child care providers have a history of child abuse or other criminal convictions that would make them unacceptable for working with children. Background checks include state criminal history checks, state child abuse registry checks, and Federal Bureau…

  12. Background Information for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring and widely used element that can cause health and ecological problems when released to the environment through human activities. Though a national and even international issue, the health and environmental impacts of mercury are best understood when studied at the local level. "Mercury: An Educator's Toolkit"…

  13. Leukoreduction system chambers provide a valuable source of functional monocytes for the monocyte activation test by comparison with internationally validated methods.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Ida Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite being added to the European Pharmacopoeia in 2010 and strongly supported by the European directive enforcing the "3R's" - Replace, Reduce and Refine, uptake of the monocyte activation test (MAT) in preference over the rabbit pyrogen test for the detection of pyrogens has been limited. This has been attributed to the difficulty in sourcing human monocytes due to the necessity of phlebotomy. This study has attempted to address this issue by evaluating cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from leukoreduction system chambers (LRSCs), a readily available by-product of platelet apheresis, as a source of monocytes for the MAT. Validation was performed by direct comparison with the two most commonly employed primary monocyte sources: fresh whole blood (WB) and PBMCs from fresh blood, assessing their ability to detect a panel of toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands including Pam3CSK4, Lipoteichoic acid, Peptidoglycan, Poly(I:C) and Flagellin, as well as two different endotoxin sources, with IL-1β and IL-6 as the readouts. All three cell sources were able to detect the pyrogens included in the study with comparable sensitivities, with the exception of TLR3 ligand Poly(I:C). The WB assay produced quantifiable, but significantly lower cytokine levels with every pyrogen tested than either of the PBMCs sources used. LRSCs provided an ample and convenient source of PBMCs which were successfully cryopreserved, providing cell banks for each donor, shown to maintain stability for at least a year. The use of cryopreserved PBMCs reduced the time and effort required to set up an assay, and the availability of single donor cell banks will allow investigations into assay variables in the absence of inter-donor variability. Significantly higher sensitivity to Pam3CSK4 was observed with a proportion of donors. This was found to correlate to single nucleotide polymorphisms rs4833095 and rs5743618 of TLR1. This evidence, along with the wide range of other

  14. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  15. Genetical background of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  16. Maritime infrared background clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwering, Piet B. W.

    1996-06-01

    The detection of small targets in maritime infrared surveillance is hampered by the presence of clutter. Sea surface structure, reflection and emission changes related to incident angle variations and surface effects are standard features governing the clutter behavior. Also special effects as sun glint and horizon effects play an important role for clutter. In order to optimize the detection process, quantitative clutter estimates are of use for filter settings. We have recorded a large amount of infrared backgrounds in the last few years, during common NATO trials. A large amount of different meteorological conditions took place during the various experiments. A first set of these data have been analyzed to obtain statistical data that represent the infrared scene. We have derived vertical temperature profiles, vertical fluctuation profiles, horizontal correlation coefficients and temporal correlation functions. In this paper we present the first analysis of these data. We are in the process of obtaining a condensed database of information to regenerate clutter images from bulk meteo parameters, and clutter parameters. The clutter and meteo parameters have been used to simulate various infrared scenes. Examples of this simulation process are shown in the presentation. The simulated images are statistically similar to the original images that were used to derive the parameters. A description of the image- generation is presented. Future expansions of the model are discussed.

  17. Why your practice must do background checks.

    PubMed

    Zupko, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Hiring qualified staff is critical for a medical practice. As many physicians have discovered, taking applicants' resumes on faith can be a mistake. Background company searches show that one in three applicants provide false, inaccurate, misleading, or incomplete information. Fake degrees, false licenses and certifications, and criminal histories are a few of the problems that a proper background check can reveal. This article describes further why background checks are essential, how to incorporate a background check into your hiring process, and some of the legalities involved in the process. PMID:17494489

  18. The Provident Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, David H.

    1988-09-01

    The Provident Sea describes the history of fish stock management (including whales and seals). The book traces, on the basis of the original scientific material, the history of the management of "the provident sea" up to recent times when problems of over-exploitation have had dramatic effects upon stocks. The need for management arose mainly from the increasing industrialization of capture. Hence the preindustrial fisheries are covered, in particular the old cod fishery on the Grand Bank and the herring fishery in the North Sea, as an essential background to current problems. The origins of fisheries and whaling science are described, as is the development up to 1965 of the science and institution in fisheries, whaling, and sealing. In the sixties and seventies, certain major fishing nations took a heavy harvest of fish stocks using sophisticated and efficient gathering methods. This in turn led to conflict and one consequence was the "Law of the Sea" conference set up to try and resolve these issues.

  19. Background sources in optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characterization and measurement of background radiation relevant to optical communications system performance is addressed. The necessary optical receiver parameters are described, and radiometric concepts required for the calculation of collected background power are developed. The most important components of optical background power are discussed, and their contribution to the total collected background power in various communications scenarios is examined.

  20. Background and Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Don B; Fink, Aliza K

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal-recessive disease in white persons. Significant advances in therapies and outcomes have occurred for people with CF over the past 30 years. Many of these improvements have come about through the concerted efforts of the CF Foundation and international CF societies; networks of CF care centers; and the worldwide community of care providers, researchers, and patients and families. There are still hurdles to overcome to continue to improve the quality of life, reduce CF complications, prolong survival, and ultimately cure CF. This article reviews the epidemiology of CF, including trends in incidence and prevalence, clinical characteristics, common complications, and survival. PMID:27469176

  1. Galileons on cosmological backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Trodden, Mark E-mail: kurthi@physics.upenn.edu

    2011-12-01

    We construct four-dimensional effective field theories of a generalized DBI galileon field, the dynamics of which naturally take place on a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The theories are invariant under non-linear symmetry transformations, which can be thought of as being inherited from five-dimensional bulk Killing symmetries via the probe brane technique through which they are constructed. The resulting model provides a framework in which to explore the cosmological role that galileons may play as the universe evolves.

  2. Home Learning Activities Designed to Provide Educational Experiences for Children and Parents: A Home Preschool Program Designed for the Siblings of the Children in the Follow Through Program in the Richmond Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond Public Schools, VA.

    This handbook of home preschool activities is designed to be used with the siblings of the children in Project Follow Through. The suggested activities are to be used by parents in the home to provide learning experiences for their young children and to reinforce concepts being taught in Project Follow Through. Most of the activities were adapted…

  3. A direct pyrophosphatase-coupled assay provides new insights into the activation of the secreted adenylate cyclase from Bordetella pertussis by calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anthony J; Coote, John G; Kazi, Yasmin F; Lawrence, Paul D; MacDonald-Fyall, Julia; Orr, Barbara M; Parton, Roger; Riehle, Mathis; Sinclair, James; Young, John; Price, Nicholas C

    2002-06-21

    Continuous recording of the activity of recombinant adenylate cyclase (CyaA) of Bordetella pertussis (EC ) by conductimetric determination of enzyme-coupled pyrophosphate cleavage has enabled us to define a number of novel features of the activation of this enzyme by calmodulin and establish conditions under which valid activation data can be obtained. Activation either in the presence or absence of calcium is characterized by a concentration-dependent lag phase. The rate of formation and breakdown of the activated complex can be determined from an analysis of the lag phase kinetics and is in good agreement with thermodynamic data obtained by measuring the dependence of activation on calmodulin concentration, which show that calcium increases k(on) by about 30-fold. The rate of breakdown of the activated complex, formed either in the presence or absence of calcium, has been determined by dilution experiments and has been shown to be independent of the presence of calcium. The coupled assay is established as a rapid, convenient and safe method which should be readily applicable to the continuous assays of most other enzymes that catalyze reactions in which inorganic pyrophosphate is liberated. PMID:11934879

  4. Historical Background and Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude

    Forty and twenty years after the two books published by Einar Tandberg-Hanssen (Solar prominences (Geophysics and astrophysics monographs), Vol. 12. Dordrecht: D. Reidel Publishing Co., 1974; The nature of solar prominences, astrophysics and space science library, Vol. 199. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995) on solar prominences, it is time to update our knowledge and understanding of these fascinating solar structures. After a brief history which overviews first eclipse observations (drawings and then photography), spectrographic, coronagraphic and later on polarimetric measurements, the chapter presents samples of the most spectacular results of the last two decades, obtained whether from space or on the ground. It discusses the contents of the book in order to encourage the reader to dip into the following 17 chapters which provide comprehensive and detailed observations, information about the methods used, and interpretation of the results on the basis of the latest theoretical and modelling works.

  5. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  6. Hanford Site background: Evaluation of existing soil radionuclide data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report is an evaluation of the existing data on radiological background for soils in the vicinity of the Hanford Site. The primary purpose of this report is to assess the adequacy of the existing data to serve as a radiological background baseline for use in environmental restoration and remediation activities at the Hanford Site. The soil background data compiled and evaluated in this report were collected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Washington State Department of Health (DOH) radiation surveillance programs in southeastern Washington. These two programs provide the largest well-documented, quantitative data sets available to evaluate background conditions at the Hanford Site. The data quality objectives (DQOs) considered in this evaluation include the amount of data, number of sampling localities, spatial coverage, number and types of radionuclides reported, frequency of reporting, documentation and traceability of sampling and laboratory methods used, and comparability between sets of data. Although other data on soil radionuclide abundances around the Hanford Site exist, they are generally limited in scope and lack the DQOs necessary for consideration with the PNL and DOH data sets. Collectively, these two sources provide data on the activities of 25 radionuclides and four other parameters (gross alpha, gross beta, total uranium, and total thorium). These measurements were made on samples from the upper 2.5 cm of soil at over 70 localities within the region.

  7. Field and Laboratory Studies Provide Insights into the Meaning of Day-Time Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tomotani, Barbara M.; Flores, Danilo E. F. L.; Tachinardi, Patrícia; Paliza, José D.; Oda, Gisele A.; Valentinuzzi, Verônica S.

    2012-01-01

    South American subterranean rodents (Ctenomys aff. knighti), commonly known as tuco-tucos, display nocturnal, wheel-running behavior under light-dark (LD) conditions, and free-running periods >24 h in constant darkness (DD). However, several reports in the field suggested that a substantial amount of activity occurs during daylight hours, leading us to question whether circadian entrainment in the laboratory accurately reflects behavior in natural conditions. We compared circadian patterns of locomotor activity in DD of animals previously entrained to full laboratory LD cycles (LD12∶12) with those of animals that were trapped directly from the field. In both cases, activity onsets in DD immediately reflected the previous dark onset or sundown. Furthermore, freerunning periods upon release into DD were close to 24 h indicating aftereffects of prior entrainment, similarly in both conditions. No difference was detected in the phase of activity measured with and without access to a running wheel. However, when individuals were observed continuously during daylight hours in a semi-natural enclosure, they emerged above-ground on a daily basis. These day-time activities consisted of foraging and burrow maintenance, suggesting that the designation of this species as nocturnal might be inaccurate in the field. Our study of a solitary subterranean species suggests that the circadian clock is entrained similarly under field and laboratory conditions and that day-time activity expressed only in the field is required for foraging and may not be time-dictated by the circadian pacemaker. PMID:22649565

  8. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  9. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  10. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  11. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  12. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is recognized that certain criminal activities including but not limited to loan sharking, drug trafficking... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can...

  13. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  14. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  15. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks. PMID:26239220

  16. TAK-063, a PDE10A Inhibitor with Balanced Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathways, Provides Potent Antipsychotic-Like Effects in Multiple Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Miyamoto, Maki; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors are expected to be novel drugs for schizophrenia through activation of both direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons. However, excess activation of the direct pathway by a dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF82958 canceled antipsychotic-like effects of a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in methamphetamine (METH)-induced hyperactivity in rats. Thus, balanced activation of these pathways may be critical for PDE10A inhibitors. Current antipsychotics and the novel PDE10A inhibitor TAK-063, but not the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10, produced dose-dependent antipsychotic-like effects in METH-induced hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition in rodents. TAK-063 and MP-10 activated the indirect pathway to a similar extent; however, MP-10 caused greater activation of the direct pathway than did TAK-063. Interestingly, the off-rate of TAK-063 from PDE10A in rat brain sections was faster than that of MP-10, and a slower off-rate PDE10A inhibitor with TAK-063-like chemical structure showed an MP-10-like pharmacological profile. In general, faster off-rate enzyme inhibitors are more sensitive than slower off-rate inhibitors to binding inhibition by enzyme substrates. As expected, TAK-063 was more sensitive than MP-10 to binding inhibition by cyclic nucleotides. Moreover, an immunohistochemistry study suggested that cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the direct pathway were higher than those in the indirect pathway. These data can explain why TAK-063 showed partial activation of the direct pathway compared with MP-10. The findings presented here suggest that TAK-063's antipsychotic-like efficacy may be attributable to its unique pharmacological properties, resulting in balanced activation of the direct and indirect striatal pathways. PMID:26849714

  17. The Sirt1 activator SRT3025 provides atheroprotection in Apoe−/− mice by reducing hepatic Pcsk9 secretion and enhancing Ldlr expression

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Melroy X.; van Tits, Lambertus J.; Lohmann, Christine; Arsiwala, Tasneem; Winnik, Stephan; Tailleux, Anne; Stein, Sokrates; Gomes, Ana P.; Suri, Vipin; Ellis, James L.; Lutz, Thomas A.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Sinclair, David A.; Auwerx, Johan; Schoonjans, Kristina; Staels, Bart; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The deacetylase sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) exerts beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, but its roles in plasma LDL-cholesterol regulation and atherosclerosis are controversial. Thus, we applied the pharmacological Sirt1 activator SRT3025 in a mouse model of atherosclerosis and in hepatocyte culture. Methods and results Apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe−/−) mice were fed a high-cholesterol diet (1.25% w/w) supplemented with SRT3025 (3.18 g kg−1 diet) for 12 weeks. In vitro, the drug activated wild-type Sirt1 protein, but not the activation-resistant Sirt1 mutant; in vivo, it increased deacetylation of hepatic p65 and skeletal muscle Foxo1. SRT3025 treatment decreased plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol and reduced atherosclerosis. Drug treatment did not change mRNA expression of hepatic LDL receptor (Ldlr) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (Pcsk9), but increased their protein expression indicating post-translational effects. Consistent with hepatocyte Ldlr and Pcsk9 accumulation, we found reduced plasma levels of Pcsk9 after pharmacological Sirt1 activation. In vitro administration of SRT3025 to cultured AML12 hepatocytes attenuated Pcsk9 secretion and its binding to Ldlr, thereby reducing Pcsk9-mediated Ldlr degradation and increasing Ldlr expression and LDL uptake. Co-administration of exogenous Pcsk9 with SRT3025 blunted these effects. Sirt1 activation with SRT3025 in Ldlr−/− mice reduced neither plasma Pcsk9, nor LDL-cholesterol levels, nor atherosclerosis. Conclusion We identify reduction in Pcsk9 secretion as a novel effect of Sirt1 activity and uncover Ldlr as a prerequisite for Sirt1-mediated atheroprotection in mice. Pharmacological activation of Sirt1 appears promising to be tested in patients for its effects on plasma Pcsk9, LDL-cholesterol, and atherosclerosis. PMID:24603306

  18. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  19. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  20. Polarization of Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Gasperis, G.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present an extension of the ROMA map-making code for data analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background polarization, with particular attention given to the inflationary polarization B-modes. The new algorithm takes into account a possible cross- correlated noise component among the different detectors of a CMB experiment. We tested the code on the observational data of the BOOMERanG (2003) experiment and we show that we are provided with a better estimate of the power spectra, in particular the error bars of the BB spectrum are smaller up to 20% for low multipoles. We point out the general validity of the new method. A possible future application is the LSPE balloon experiment, devoted to the observation of polarization at large angular scales.

  1. Color gradient background-oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Background-oriented schlieren is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances by comparing digital images with and without a refractive disturbance distorting a background pattern. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high-contrast color transitions or speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern between the two images. Here, a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative that eliminates the need to perform a complex image correlation between the digital images. A simple image subtraction can be used instead to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. Gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data only limited by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Quantitative measurement of density in a thermal boundary layer is presented. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are demonstrated to allow measurement of two-dimensional refractions. A computer screen is used as the background, which allows for rapid modification of the gradient to tune sensitivity for a particular application.

  2. Color gradient background oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Background oriented schlieren (BOS) imaging is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances through the comparison of digital images. By comparing images with and without a refractive disturbance visualizations can be achieved via a range of image processing methods. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high contrast speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern. Here a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative. The gradient background eliminates the need to perform an image correlation between the two digital images, as simple image subtraction can be used to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. This allows for quicker processing. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are shown. The gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data limited only by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Additional results include the use of a computer screen as a background.

  3. Remarkable Reproducibility of Enzyme Activity Profiles in Tomato Fruits Grown under Contrasting Environments Provides a Roadmap for Studies of Fruit Metabolism1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biais, Benoît; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’) plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels. PMID:24474652

  4. Provide, provide: the economics of aging.

    PubMed

    1998-06-26

    Most older persons face two potentially serious economic problems: (a) declining earning power and (b) declining health that can be partly offset by increased utilization of health care. The decline in earning power is largely attributable to physiological changes and to obsolescence of skills and knowledge. These adverse effects are exacerbated by public and private policies that reduce the incentives of older persons to continue work and increase the cost to employers of employing older workers. The problems of earnings replacement and health care payment are usually discussed separately, but there are several reasons why they should be considered together. First, there are often tradeoffs between the two. Money is money, and for most people there is never enough to go around. This is self-evident where private funds are concerned. Low-income elderly, for instance, frequently must choose between expensive prescription drugs and an adequate diet. For middle-income elderly, the choice may be between saving on medigap insurance or forgoing an airplane trip to a grandchild's graduation. Difficult choices are also inherent in the allocation of public funds. The same tax receipts that could be used to maintain or increase retirement benefits could be used to fund additional care, and vice versa. In discussing these tradeoffs, some analysts assert that people will gladly give up other goods and services for medical care that cures illness, relieves pain, or restores function. Others believe that some people would forgo some health insurance in order to maintain access to other goods and services. A second reason for looking at the two problems together is that they pose similar questions for public policy. How much should each generation provide for its own needs in old age, and how much should be provided by the generations that follow? How much provision should be voluntary, how much compulsory? How much intra-generational redistribution is appropriate after age 65

  5. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    'Hong Anliu' (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of 'Anliu' (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between 'HAL' and 'AL'. Compared with 'AL', the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in 'HAL'. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, vacuolar H(+)-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in 'HAL'. These results implied that 'HAL' has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with 'AL'. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in 'HAL'. PMID:27385485

  6. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  7. AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN PRIMARY RAINBOW TROUT HEPATOCYTES INTERFERES WITH MEASUREMENT OF OXIDATIVE ACTIVITY VIA THE EXOGENOUS PROBE, DCF, BUT PROVIDES INTRINSIC MEASURE OF CELLULAR OXIDATIVE STATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compound 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluoroscein diacetate is a probe commonly used to detect oxidative activity in live cells. Studies were undertaken to measure reactive oxygen species generated in freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes exposed to a variety of redox cycling c...

  8. Mutagenic and chemical analyses provide new insight into enzyme activation and mechanism of the type 2 iron-sulfur l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2016-04-15

    The crystal structure of the Type 2 l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD), revealed a "tail-in-mouth" configuration where the C-terminal residue acts as an intrinsic competitive inhibitor. This pre-catalytic structure undergoes an activation step prior to catalytic turnover. Mutagenic analysis of residues at or near the active site cleft is consistent with stabilization of substrate binding by many of the same residues that interact with the C-terminal cysteine and highlight the critical role of certain tail residues in activity. pH-rate profiles show that a residue with pK of 5.9 must be deprotonated and a residue with a pK of 8.5 must be protonated for activity. This supports an earlier suggestion that His 61 is the likely catalytic base. An additional residue with a pK of 8.5-9 increases cooperativity when it is deprotonated. This investigation also demonstrates that the Fe-S dehydratases convert the enamine/imine intermediates of the catalytic reaction to products on the enzyme prior to release. This is in contrast to pyridoxyl 5' phosphate based dehydratases that release an enamine/imine intermediate into solution, which then hydrolyzes to produce the ketoamine product. PMID:26971469

  9. Why healthcare providers merge.

    PubMed

    Postma, Jeroen; Roos, Anne-Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In many OECD countries, healthcare sectors have become increasingly concentrated as a result of mergers. However, detailed empirical insight into why healthcare providers merge is lacking. Also, we know little about the influence of national healthcare policies on mergers. We fill this gap in the literature by conducting a survey study on mergers among 848 Dutch healthcare executives, of which 35% responded (resulting in a study sample of 239 executives). A total of 65% of the respondents was involved in at least one merger between 2005 and 2012. During this period, Dutch healthcare providers faced a number of policy changes, including increasing competition, more pressure from purchasers, growing financial risks, de-institutionalisation of long-term care and decentralisation of healthcare services to municipalities. Our empirical study shows that healthcare providers predominantly merge to improve the provision of healthcare services and to strengthen their market position. Also efficiency and financial reasons are important drivers of merger activity in healthcare. We find that motives for merger are related to changes in health policies, in particular to the increasing pressure from competitors, insurers and municipalities. PMID:26055501

  10. Beam induced backgrounds: CDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    We summarize the experiences of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment in the presence of backgrounds originating from the counter circulating beams in the Fermilab Tevatron. These backgrounds are measured and their sources identified. Finally, we outline the strategies employed to reduce the effects of these backgrounds on the experiment.

  11. Repurposing some older drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier and have potential anticancer activity to provide new treatment options for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rundle-Thiele, Dayle; Head, Richard; Cosgrove, Leah; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma is a brain neoplasm with limited 5-year survival rates. Developments of new treatment regimens that improve patient survival in patients with glioblastoma are needed. It is likely that a number of existing drugs used in other conditions have potential anticancer effects that offer significant survival benefit to glioblastoma patients. Identification of such drugs could provide a novel treatment paradigm. PMID:26374633

  12. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  13. Structure and Dynamics of the Second CARD of Human RIG-I Provide Mechanistic Insights into Regulation of RIG-I Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrage, Fabien; Dutta, Kaushik; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Patel, Jenish R.; Sánchez-Aparicio, María T.; De Ioannes, Pablo; Buku, Angeliki; Aseguinolaza, Gloria González; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I is a cytosolic sensor of viral RNA, comprised of two N-terminal CARDs followed by helicase and C-terminal regulatory domains (helicase-CTD). Viral RNA binds to the helicase-CTD and “exposes” the CARDs for downstream signaling. The role of the second CARD (CARD2) is essential as RIG-I activation requires dephosphorylation of Thr170 followed by ubiquitination at Lys172. Here, we present the solution structure and dynamics of human RIG-I CARD2. Surprisingly, we find that Thr170 is mostly buried. Parallel studies on the phosphomimetic T170E mutant suggest that the loss of function upon Thr170 phosphorylation is likely associated with changes in the CARD1–CARD2 interface that may prevent Lys172 ubiquitination and/or binding to free K63-linked polyubiquitin. We also demonstrate a strong interaction between CARD2 and the helicase-CTD, and show that mutations at the interface result in constitutive activation of RIG-I. Collectively, our data suggests a close interplay between phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and activation of human RIG-I, all mediated by CARD2. PMID:23063562

  14. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hopperton, Kathryn E.; Duncan, Robin E.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Archer, Michael C.

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as {sup 14}C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2–3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells. - Highlights: • Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is over-expressed in cancer but its function is unknown. • We compare

  15. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:25797499

  16. Background issues for defensive interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    Mean nuclear backgrounds are large, but are arguably amenable to frame-to-frame subtraction. Striated backgrounds on the sensors for defensive interceptors could, however, cause clutter leak-through, which could make detection and track difficult. Nominal motions and backgrounds give signal to clutter ratios too low to be useful. Clutter leakage due to line-of-sight drift can be reduced by stabilizing the line of sight around the background clutter itself. Current interceptors have detector arrays large enough for operation independent of nuclear backgrounds in their fields of view. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Atorvastatin acts synergistically with N-acetyl cysteine to provide therapeutic advantage against Fas-activated erythrocyte apoptosis during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Sarkar, Avik; Biswas, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant that reduces the lifespan of circulating erythrocytes during chronic exposure. Our previous studies had indicated involvement of hypercholesterolemia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arsenic-induced apoptotic death of erythrocytes. In this study, we have shown an effective recovery from arsenic-induced death signaling in erythrocytes in response to treatment with atorvastatin (ATV) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in rats. Our results emphasized on the importance of cholesterol in the promotion of ROS-mediated Fas signaling in red cells. Arsenic-induced activation of caspase 3 was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure on the cell surface and microvesiculation of erythrocyte membrane. Administration of NAC in combination with ATV, proved to be more effective than either of the drugs alone towards the rectification of arsenic-mediated disorganization of membrane structural integrity, and this could be linked with decreased ROS accumulation through reduced glutathione (GSH) repletion along with cholesterol depletion. Moreover, activation of caspase 3 was capable of promoting aggregation of band 3 with subsequent binding of autologous IgG and opsonization by C3b that led to phagocytosis of the exposed cells by the macrophages. NAC-ATV treatment successfully amended these events and restored lifespan of erythrocytes from the exposed animals almost to the control level. This work helped us to identify intracellular membrane cholesterol enrichment and GSH depletion as the key regulatory points in arsenic-mediated erythrocyte destruction and suggested a therapeutic strategy against Fas-activated cell death related to enhanced cholesterol and accumulation of ROS.

  18. Rapid activation of plasticity-associated gene transcription in hippocampal neurons provides a mechanism for encoding of one-trial experience

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Teiko; Kubik, Stepan; Haghighi, Nahideh; Steward, Oswald; Guzowski, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus is hypothesized to support rapid encoding of ongoing experience. A critical prerequisite for such function is the ability to readily recruit enduring synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory consolidation require expression of the immediate-early gene (IEG) Arc. To determine whether Arc transcription could be driven by limited and controlled behavioral experience, we used a rectangular track paradigm. In past electrophysiological studies, pyramidal neurons recorded from rats running in one direction on similar tracks typically exhibited a single firing field. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we show that the behavioral activity associated with a single lap around the track was sufficient to trigger Arc transcription in complete CA3 neuronal ensembles, as predicted given the role of CA3 in one-trial learning. By contrast, Arc transcription in CA1 ensembles was recruited incrementally, with maximal activation achieved after 4 laps a day for 4 consecutive days. To test whether Arc transcription is linked to learning and plasticity, or merely elicited by location-specific firing, we inactivated the medial septum, a treatment that compromises hippocampus-dependent learning and LTP, but spares location-specific firing in CA1 neurons. Septal inactivation abolished track training-induced Arc transcription in CA1 and CA3 neurons, showing that Arc transcription requires plasticity-inducing stimuli. Accordingly, LTP induction activated Arc transcription in CA1 neurons in vivo. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a single brief experience, equivalent to a single crossing of a firing field, can trigger IEG expression required for long-term plasticity in the hippocampus. PMID:19176799

  19. Hydrolysis of Sequenced β-Casein Peptides Provides New Insight into Peptidase Activity from Thermophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Highlights Intrinsic Resistance of Phosphopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Molle, Daniel; Gagnaire, Valérie; Piot, Michel; Atlan, Danièle; Lortal, Sylvie

    2000-01-01

    The peptidases of thermophilic lactic acid bacteria have a key role in the proteolysis of Swiss cheeses during warm room ripening. To compare their peptidase activities toward a dairy substrate, a tryptic/chymotryptic hydrolysate of purified β-casein was used. Thirty-four peptides from 3 to 35 amino acids, including three phosphorylated peptides, constitute the β-casein hydrolysate, as shown by tandem mass spectrometry. Cell extracts prepared from Lactobacillus helveticus ITG LH1, ITG LH77, and CNRZ 32, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis ITG LL14 and ITG LL51, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CNRZ 397 and NCDO 1489, and Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ 385, CIP 102303, and TA 060 were standardized in protein. The peptidase activities were assessed with the β-casein hydrolysate as the substrate at pH 5.5 and 24°C (conditions of warm room ripening) by (i) free amino acid release, (ii) reverse-phase chromatography, and (iii) identification of undigested peptides by mass spectrometry. Regardless of strain, L. helveticus was the most efficient in hydrolyzing β-casein peptides. Interestingly, cell extracts of S. thermophilus were not able to release a significant level of free proline from the β-casein hydrolysate, which was consistent with the identification of numerous dipeptides containing proline. With the three lactic acid bacteria tested, the phosphorylated peptides remained undigested or weakly hydrolyzed indicating their high intrinsic resistance to peptidase activities. Finally, several sets of peptides differing by a single amino acid in a C-terminal position revealed the presence of at least one carboxypeptidase in the cell extracts of these species. PMID:11097915

  20. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Dimethylglycine Sodium Salt and Its Role in Providing Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bai, Kaiwen; Xu, Wen; Zhang, Jingfei; Kou, Tao; Niu, Yu; Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the free radical scavenging activities (against 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), 2,2'-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6- sulphonate) (ABTS+), Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)) of dimethylglycine sodium salt (DMG-Na) were measured and compared with those of Trolox (6-hydroxy-2, 5, 7, 8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a commonly used antioxidant. The radical scavenging activities of DMG-Na were found to be the highest at 40 mg/ml. In Experiment 2, gastric intubation in mice with 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution significantly increased (P < 0.05) the body weight (BW) (28 d), organ proportion (liver and spleen), and antioxidant capacity in serum and the liver (Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Hydrogen peroxidase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)), and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the activities of serum Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and Glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (AST) and Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) contents in the serum and liver. Specifically, the effect of 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution, which showed the highest antioxidant capacity, was further studied using a mice model. In Experiment 3, the mice CL (CON+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the serum ALT and AST content; hepatic mitochondrial antioxidant capacity (Manganese Superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione reductase (GR), GPx, Glutathione (GSH)); MDA and Protein carbonyl (PC) content; Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) level, and expression of liver antioxidant genes (Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)) relative to the mice CS (CON+ sterile saline) group. The DL (DMG+LPS) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in serum ALT and AST content, ROS level, and expression of liver

  1. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Dimethylglycine Sodium Salt and Its Role in Providing Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingfei; Kou, Tao; Niu, Yu; Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the free radical scavenging activities (against 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), 2,2'-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6- sulphonate) (ABTS+), Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)) of dimethylglycine sodium salt (DMG-Na) were measured and compared with those of Trolox (6-hydroxy-2, 5, 7, 8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a commonly used antioxidant. The radical scavenging activities of DMG-Na were found to be the highest at 40 mg/ml. In Experiment 2, gastric intubation in mice with 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution significantly increased (P < 0.05) the body weight (BW) (28 d), organ proportion (liver and spleen), and antioxidant capacity in serum and the liver (Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Hydrogen peroxidase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)), and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the activities of serum Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and Glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (AST) and Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) contents in the serum and liver. Specifically, the effect of 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution, which showed the highest antioxidant capacity, was further studied using a mice model. In Experiment 3, the mice CL (CON+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the serum ALT and AST content; hepatic mitochondrial antioxidant capacity (Manganese Superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione reductase (GR), GPx, Glutathione (GSH)); MDA and Protein carbonyl (PC) content; Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) level, and expression of liver antioxidant genes (Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)) relative to the mice CS (CON+ sterile saline) group. The DL (DMG+LPS) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in serum ALT and AST content, ROS level, and expression of liver

  2. Spatial variations of groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yunjung; Lee, Soojae

    2014-05-01

    In coastal aquifers the mixing between fresh terrestrial water and seawater occurs, which influences groundwater quality. Due to mixing elevated chloride concentrations are often observed in coastal aquifers. In coastal areas terrestrial water-seawater mixing can be caused by anthropogenic activities or natural factors such as tides and sea level changes. Therefore, it is difficult or even impossible to characterize groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers. Although it is usual to exclude coastal aquifer when characterizing background concentrations, it is essential to accurately characterize naturally-affected groundwater quality in coastal areas because groundwater is a major water resource for potable, irrigation, domestic uses. So in this work we define groundwater background concentrations as naturally occurring ambient concentrations with excluding groundwater abstraction. Based on this definition, we evaluate groundwater background concentrations in various geologic formations and analyze characteristics of groundwater quality in coastal aquifers by utilizing Groundwater Quality Monitoring System (GQMS) data. The results show that high concentrations of chloride are observed in some coastal areas but not always. Tidal effects and topographical characteristics are thought to be as factors affecting such spatial variations. In some coastal areas high concentrations of chloride are observed with high nitrate concentrations. This means that agricultural practices can attribute to anthropogenic background, leading to elevated concentrations of nitrate. These results provide some essential information for groundwater resources management in coastal areas. Further data collection and analysis is required for evaluating the effect of tide and sea level changes on groundwater quality.

  3. Peptide TFP5/TP5 derived from Cdk5 activator P35 provides neuroprotection in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Binukumar, B K; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D; Grant, Philip; Bhaskar, M; Skuntz, Susan; Steiner, Joseph; Pant, Harish C

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, decreased striatal dopamine levels, and consequent extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. Recent evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is inappropriately activated in several neurodegenerative conditions, including PD. To date, strategies to specifically inhibit Cdk5 hyperactivity have not been successful without affecting normal Cdk5 activity. Previously we reported that TFP5 peptide has neuroprotective effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that TFP5/TP5 selective inhibition of Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation in vivo and in vitro rescues nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP/MPP+) in a mouse model of PD. TP5 peptide treatment also blocked dopamine depletion in the striatum and improved gait dysfunction after MPTP administration. The neuroprotective effect of TFP5/TP5 peptide is also associated with marked reduction in neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Here we show selective inhibition of Cdk5/p25 -hyperactivation by TFP5/TP5 peptide, which identifies the kinase as a potential therapeutic target to reduce neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26399293

  4. In vitro antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and protective effect against DNA damage provided by leaves, stems and flowers of Portulaca oleracea (Purslane).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rúben; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the antioxidant properties of Portulaca oleracea L., known as purslane. The samples (leaves, flowers and stems) were collected at two different locations in Portugal: Tavira (L1) and Vendas Novas (L2). Assays for total antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and ferric-reducing antioxidant power were conducted and, for both locations, significantly higher values (P < 0.05) were observed for stems (508.8 and 982.3 mg AAE/100 g DW, 1008.6 and 2285.5 mg GAE/100 g DW, 121.0 and 166.3 mg TE/100 g DW, respectively for each location), than in leaves or flowers. In the DPPH assay, the three-plant parts from L2 reached the 50% inhibition rate in lower concentrations than plants from L1. On the other hand, higher concentrations of total monomeric anthocyanins were found in samples from L1 (95.5, 88.8 and 86.0 mg/L) than in samples from L2 (81.7, 70.5 and 59.8 mg/L). The same was true for phenolic acids, estimated by liquid-chromatography, where methanol extracts were used. Phenolic extracts from all three-plant parts from both locations showed protective effects on DNA against hydroxyl radicals. This work suggests the possibility of benefit to human health from its consumption, related to the high antioxidant activity of purslane, even the stems, usually discarded in daily consumption. PMID:24660460

  5. Peptide TFP5/TP5 derived from Cdk5 activator P35 provides neuroprotection in the MPTP model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Binukumar, BK.; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D.; Grant, Philip; Bhaskar, M.; Skuntz, Susan; Steiner, Joseph; Pant, Harish C.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, decreased striatal dopamine levels, and consequent extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. Recent evidence indicates that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is inappropriately activated in several neurodegenerative conditions, including PD. To date, strategies to specifically inhibit Cdk5 hyperactivity have not been successful without affecting normal Cdk5 activity. Previously we reported that TFP5 peptide has neuroprotective effects in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Here we show that TFP5/TP5 selective inhibition of Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation in vivo and in vitro rescues nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP/MPP+) in a mouse model of PD. TP5 peptide treatment also blocked dopamine depletion in the striatum and improved gait dysfunction after MPTP administration. The neuroprotective effect of TFP5/TP5 peptide is also associated with marked reduction in neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Here we show selective inhibition of Cdk5/p25 ­hyperactivation by TFP5/TP5 peptide, which identifies the kinase as a potential therapeutic target to reduce neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26399293

  6. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    PubMed

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site. PMID:26208466

  7. NATIONAL HEALTH PROVIDER INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health Provider Inventory provides data on services, location, staff, capacity, and other characteristics of selected health care providers in the United States. Information is collected via mail questionnaire with telephone follow up to all providers (100% census) o...

  8. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains. PMID:26946266

  9. HIMSS Venture+ Forum and HX360 Provide Industry View of Health Technology Innovation, Startup and Investment Activity; Advancing the New Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Burde, Howard A; Scarfo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Presented by HIMSS, the Venture+ Forum program and pitch competition provides a 360-degree view on health technology investing and today's top innovative companies. It features exciting 3-minute pitch presentations from emerging and growth-stage companies, investor panels and a networking reception. Recent Venture+ Forum winners include TowerView Health, Prima-Temp, ActuaiMeds and M3 Clinician. As an industry catalyst for health IT innovation and business-building resource for growing companies and emerging technology solutions, HIMSS has co-developed with A VIA, a new initiative that addresses how emerging technologies, health system business model changes and investment will transform the delivery of care. HX360 engages senior healthcare leaders, innovation teams, investors and entrepreneurs around the vision of transforming healthcare delivery by leveraging technology, process and structure. PMID:26571634

  10. Expected background in the LZ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2015-08-17

    The LZ experiment, featuring a 7-tonne active liquid xenon target, is aimed at achieving unprecedented sensitivity to WIMPs with the background expected to be dominated by astrophysical neutrinos. To reach this goal, extensive simulations are carried out to accurately calculate the electron recoil and nuclear recoil rates in the detector. Both internal (from target material) and external (from detector components and surrounding environment) backgrounds are considered. A very efficient suppression of background rate is achieved with an outer liquid scintillator veto, liquid xenon skin and fiducialisation. Based on the current measurements of radioactivity of different materials, it is shown that LZ can achieve the reduction of a total background for a WIMP search down to about 2 events in 1000 live days for 5.6 tonne fiducial mass.

  11. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  12. Co-inoculating ruminal content neither provides active hydrolytic microbes nor improves methanization of ¹³C-cellulose in batch digesters.

    PubMed

    Chapleur, Olivier; Bize, Ariane; Serain, Thibaut; Mazéas, Laurent; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis often limits the kinetics and efficiency of anaerobic degradation in industrial digesters. In animal digestive systems, specialized microorganisms enable cellulose biodegradation at significantly higher rates. This study aims to assess the potential of ruminal microbial communities to settle and to express their cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters. Cellulose-degrading batch incubations were co-inoculated with municipal solid waste digester sludge and ruminal content. ¹³C-labeled cellulose degradation was described over time with Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Results were linked to the identification of the microorganisms assimilating ¹³C and to the monitoring of their relative dynamics. Cellulose degradation in co-inoculated incubations was efficient but not significantly improved. Transient disturbances in degradation pathways occurred, as revealed by propionate accumulation. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis dynamics and pyrosequencing revealed that expected classes of Bacteria and Archaea were active and degraded cellulose. However, despite the favorable co-inoculation conditions, molecular tools also revealed that no ruminal species settled in the bioreactors. Other specific parameters were probably needed for this to happen. This study shows that exploiting the rumen's cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters is not straightforward. Co-inoculation can only be successful if ruminal microorganisms manage to thrive in the anaerobic digester and outcompete native microorganisms, which requires specific nutritional and environmental parameters, and a meticulous reproduction of the selection pressure encountered in the rumen. PMID:24219327

  13. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  14. Holographic thermalization in a quark confining background

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, D. S. Aref’eva, I. Ya.

    2015-03-15

    We study holographic thermalization of a strongly coupled theory inspired by two colliding shock waves in a vacuum confining background. Holographic thermalization means a black hole formation, in fact, a trapped surface formation. As the vacuum confining background, we considered the well-know bottom-up AdS/QCD model that provides the Cornell potential and reproduces the QCD β-function. We perturb the vacuum background by colliding domain shock waves that are assumed to be holographically dual to heavy ions collisions. Our main physical assumption is that we can make a restriction on the time of trapped surface formation, which results in a natural limitation on the size of the domain where the trapped surface is produced. This limits the intermediate domain where the main part of the entropy is produced. In this domain, we can use an intermediate vacuum background as an approximation to the full confining background. We find that the dependence of the multiplicity on energy for the intermediate background has an asymptotic expansion whose first term depends on energy as E{sup 1/3}, which is very similar to the experimental dependence of particle multiplicities on the colliding ion energy obtained from the RHIC and LHC. However, this first term, at the energies where the approximation of the confining metric by the intermediate background works, does not saturate the exact answer, and we have to take the nonleading terms into account.

  15. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  16. Ultrastructure of the liver microcirculation influences hepatic and systemic insulin activity and provides a mechanism for age-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Mashani; Mitchell, Sarah Jayne; Wu, Lindsay Edward; White, Melanie Yvonne; Cordwell, Stuart James; Mach, John; Solon-Biet, Samantha Marie; Boyer, Dawn; Nines, Dawn; Das, Abhirup; Catherine Li, Shi-Yun; Warren, Alessandra; Hilmer, Sarah Nicole; Fraser, Robin; Sinclair, David Andrew; Simpson, Stephen James; de Cabo, Rafael; Le Couteur, David George; Cogger, Victoria Carroll

    2016-08-01

    While age-related insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are usually considered to be secondary to changes in muscle, the liver also plays a key role in whole-body insulin handling and its role in age-related changes in insulin homeostasis is largely unknown. Here, we show that patent pores called 'fenestrations' are essential for insulin transfer across the liver sinusoidal endothelium and that age-related loss of fenestrations causes an impaired insulin clearance and hyperinsulinemia, induces hepatic insulin resistance, impairs hepatic insulin signaling, and deranges glucose homeostasis. To further define the role of fenestrations in hepatic insulin signaling without any of the long-term adaptive responses that occur with aging, we induced acute defenestration using poloxamer 407 (P407), and this replicated many of the age-related changes in hepatic glucose and insulin handling. Loss of fenestrations in the liver sinusoidal endothelium is a hallmark of aging that has previously been shown to cause deficits in hepatic drug and lipoprotein metabolism and now insulin. Liver defenestration thus provides a new mechanism that potentially contributes to age-related insulin resistance. PMID:27095270

  17. Anisotropies in the neutrino background: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo

    2006-12-15

    We update a previous search for anisotropies in the neutrino background using the new results from the WMAP satellite. We found that the new data confirm the indication for anisotropies in the neutrino background at about {approx}2{sigma} c.l.. Parametrizing the neutrino background through the viscosity parameter c{sub vis}{sup 2}, we demonstrate that current cosmological data provide the constraint c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.145 at 95% c.l. We discuss the stability of the result when the assumptions of massless neutrinos and the number of massless neutrino families are relaxed. In particular, we found that an extra background of relativistic particles, still compatible with the data, prefers anisotropic stresses with c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.09 at 95% c.l.

  18. Pre-treatment of a single high-dose of atorvastatin provided cardioprotection in different ischaemia/reperfusion models via activating mitochondrial KATP channel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhifang; Cui, Wei; Zhang, Hailin; Gao, Haixia; Li, Xuze; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Haijuan; Li, Bo

    2015-03-15

    A number of clinical trials have shown that a high loading dose of atorvastatin (Ator) within 24h before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) exerts protective effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the potential mechanisms regarding this rapid benefit of Ator remain elusive. Our study introduced three different ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) models: I/R in vivo, I/R in vitro and oxygen-glucose deprivation/recovery (OGD/R) in primary neonatal rat cardiac myocytes to observe the protective effect of a single loading dose of Ator pre-treatment and further to explore the potential mechanisms of this protective effect with confocal laser scanning microscopy, flow cytometry, biochemical and morphology methods. We found that the pre-treatment of high-dose Ator decreased the cardiac injury and maintained the integrity of mitochondria in all three of the I/R models, which was similar to ischaemic pre-conditioning (IPC). We used the mitochondrial K(ATP) channels (mitoKATP channels) inhibitor 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opener lonidamine (LND) to analyse the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that the pre-treatment of Ator significantly decreased I/R-induced injury, and maintained the functional integrity of mitochondria through alleviating Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species burst, inhibiting the opening of mPTP and preventing mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) depolarisation. The present results demonstrated that a single dose of Ator might protect the myocardium from I/R-induced injury by inhibiting the mPTP opening through activating the mitoKATP channels. This result may contribute toward the development of novel strategies for clinical cardioprotection against I/R injury. PMID:25641746

  19. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  20. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  1. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF... designates military commanders of Army, Navy, Air Force, and Defense Agency activities as having authority...

  2. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF... designates military commanders of Army, Navy, Air Force, and Defense Agency activities as having authority...

  3. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  4. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  5. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  6. Background Television and Reading Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, G. Blake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Tests G. Armstrong's and B. Greenberg's model of the effect of background television on cognitive performance, applied to reading comprehension and memory. Finds significant deleterious effects of background television, stronger and more consistent effects when testing immediately after reading, and more consistently negative effects resulting…

  7. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  8. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  9. Civil Law: 12 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresbach, Debra

    These learning activities on civil law are intended to supplement the secondary level Scholastic materials "Living Law." Case studies, simulations, and role-play activities are included. Information provided for each activity includes a brief overview, background information, teacher instructions and a description of each activity. Activities…

  10. Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

  11. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C... CFR parts 1500-1508, (“The NEPA regulations”). These regulations provide that each federal...

  12. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C... CFR parts 1500-1508, (“The NEPA regulations”). These regulations provide that each federal...

  13. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C... CFR parts 1500-1508, (“The NEPA regulations”). These regulations provide that each federal...

  14. 28 CFR 61.1 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 61.1 Background. (a) The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 U.S.C... CFR parts 1500-1508, (“The NEPA regulations”). These regulations provide that each federal...

  15. Family Background Factors and Originality in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldous, Joan

    Results from a study of family background variables as related to third graders' performance on non-verbal tests of creativity provide suggestions to teachers concerned with creating a climate conducive to originality. Sex did not differentiate the sample, but children from large, working class families appeared less original. This was also true…

  16. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  17. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  18. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  19. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  20. Italian Basic Course: Area Background Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This supplement to the Basic Course in Italian developed by the Defense Language Institute provides area background information on a variety of topics. They include: (1) housing and servants, (2) dining and a glossary of gastronomic terminology, (3) driving in Italy, and (4) relations with the police. The appendix contains material on: the Italian…

  1. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  2. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  3. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  4. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  5. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  6. MiniCLEAN surface backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Boqian; Schnee, Richard; Deap/Clean Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    MiniCLEAN is a dark matter experiment using 150kg fiducial mass of liquid cryogen (argon or neon) to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). MiniCLEAN seeks to detect scintillation photons from WIMP-induced argon recoils. A potentially dominant background is from alpha decays on the inner surfaces of the containment vessel. Such events can mimic the prompt signal characteristic of nuclear recoils. This talk will show the expected background rates, methods of background discrimination, and their expected effectiveness.

  7. Granularity of the Diffuse Background Observed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, D. E.; MacDonald, D.; Rothschild, R. E.; Boldt, E.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Fabian, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    First results are reported from a program for measuring the field-to-field fluctuation level of the cosmic diffuse background by using differences between the two background positions of each deep exposure with the High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE) instrument on the Remote X Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). With 8 million live seconds accumulated to date a fluctuation level on the 15-25 keV band is observed which is consistent with extrapolations from the High Energy Astrophysical Observatory-1 (HEAO-1) measurements. Positive results are expected eventually at higher energies. Models of (active galactic nuclei) AGN origin will eventually be constrained by this program.

  8. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    that the highest power fluctuations occur at scales of about one degree. A number of ground-based interferometers provided measurements of the fluctuations with higher accuracy over the next three years, including the Very Small Array [16], Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) [61], and the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) [78]. DASI was the first to detect the polarization of the CMB and the CBI provided the first E-mode polarization spectrum with compelling evidence that it is out of phase with the T-mode spectrum. In June 2001, NASA launched its second CMB mission (after COBE), Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Explorer (WMAP) [44], to make much more precise measurements of the CMB sky. WMAP measured the differences in the CMB temperature across the sky creating a full-sky map of the CMB in five different frequency bands. The mission also measured the CMB's E-mode and the foreground polarization. As of October 2010, the WMAP spacecraft has ended its mission after nine years of operation. Although WMAP provided very accurate measurements of the large angular-scale fluctuations in the CMB, it did not have the angular resolution to cover the smaller-scale fluctuations that had been observed by previous ground-based interferometers. A third space mission, the Planck Surveyor [1], was launched by ESA* in May 2009 to measure the CMB on smaller scales than WMAP, as well as making precise measurements of the polarization of CMB. Planck represents an advance over WMAP in several respects: it observes in higher resolution, hence allowing one to probe the CMB power spectrum to smaller scales; it has a higher sensitivity and observes in nine frequency bands rather than five, hence improving the astrophysical foreground models. The mission has a wide variety of scientific aims, including: (1) detecting the total intensity/polarization of the primordial CMB anisotropies; (2) creating a galaxy-cluster catalogue through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect [93]; (3) observing the

  9. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Mally

    1992-01-01

    A series of four activities are presented to enhance students' abilities to appreciate and use trigonometry as a tool in problem solving. Activities cover problems applying the law of sines, the law of cosines, and matching equivalent trigonometric expressions. A teacher's guide, worksheets, and answers are provided. (MDH)

  10. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  11. Toward the Standard Population Synthesis Model of the X-Ray Background: Evolution of X-Ray Luminosity and Absorption Functions of Active Galactic Nuclei Including Compton-thick Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-01

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ~ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  12. 'Microquasars' and the X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, M.

    1984-01-01

    The recent discovery of small active nuclei (via emission lines) in normal spiral galaxies greatly expands the range of the quasar phenomenon. By using the relationship between Lx and L(H-alpha) found in more luminous Seyfert galaxies and assuming that it holds for smaller active nuclei, a bivariate X-ray luminosity function can be calculated. This luminosity function fits naturally onto the higher luminosity X-ray luminosity function derived from the HEAO-1/A2 survey. The contribution to the X-ray background from small active nuclei hiding in large spiral galaxies is greater than 15 percent.

  13. Bringing genetic background into focus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clement Y

    2016-02-01

    Researchers should embrace differences in genetic background to build richer disease models that more accurately reflect the level of variation in the human population, posits Clement Chow. PMID:26659016

  14. Geodesic Dome Activity Provides Serious Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    After the author's class completed last year's 44'-long timber-framed covered bridge project, he was pondering what other learning challenge he could pose to his students. He came across an article on geodesic dome construction in the September 2007 issue of "Tech Directions" and, he had his answer. In this article, the author and his students…

  15. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  16. Requirements To Obtain a Pupil Activity Validation To Direct, Supervise, or Coach a Pupil Activity Program (3301-27-01). Guidelines for School Administration and First Aid Program Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    Administrative Code 3301-27-01, revised in June 1995, replaces what was previously known as the sports medicine certification program. The revision changes requirements for individuals who supervise, direct, or coach a pupil activity program that involves athletes, routine/regular physical activity, or health and safety consideration as determined…

  17. Background Research and Mapping. Australian School Science Education National Action Plan, 2008-2012. Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rennie, Leonie J.; Goodrum, Denis

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide background to the text and recommended actions of the Australian School Science Education National Action Plan, 2007-2012. The first part presents a synthesis of the national and international research used to identify gaps and overlaps amongst activities related to school science education in …

  18. The large-scale surface brightness distribution of the x ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The x-ray background (XRB) and the microwave background are the dominant isotropic radiation fields available for measurement. There was extensive work on trying to determine the physical origin of the background. That is, whether it is due to a superposition of numerous faint well-known sources, such as active galaxies, an early unidentified population of AGN at high redshift, a new population of objects, or to truly diffuse processes or to a superposition of these. However, while of great intrinsic interest, these studies were not aimed at using the XRB to provide the cosmological information that was gleaned from the microwave background. An alternate approach is presented, which uses the available information on the large, greater than 5 deg, scale distribution of the sky flux to see if the XRB can provide such constraints.

  19. Background reduction in the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segui, L.

    2015-08-01

    SNO+ is a large multi-purpose liquid scintillator experiment, which first aim is to detect the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. It is placed at SNOLAB, at 6000 m.w.e. and it is based on the SNO infrastructure. SNO+ will contain approximately 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator, loaded with 130Te inside an acrylic vessel (AV) with an external volume of ultra pure water to reduce the external backgrounds. Light produced in the scintillator by the interaction of particles will be detected with about 9,000 photomultiplier's. For the neutrinoless double beta decay phase, due to its the extremely low rate expected, the control, knowledge and reduction of the background is essential. Moreover, it will also benefit other phases of the experiment focused on the study of solar neutrinos, nucleon decay, geoneutrinos and supernovae. In order to reduce the internal background level, a novel purification technique for tellurium loaded scintillators has been developed by the collaboration that reduces the U/Th concentration and several cosmic-activated isotopes by at least a factor 102 -103 in a single pass. In addition, different rejection techniques have been developed for the remaining internal backgrounds based on Monte-Carlo simulations. In this work, the scintillator purification technique and the levels obtained with it will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview of the different backgrounds for the double-beta phase will be presented, highlighting some of the techniques developed to reject the remained decays based on their expected timing differences.

  20. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  1. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

  2. Gravitino condensation in fivebrane backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2002-04-01

    We calculate the tension of the D3-brane in the fivebrane background which is described by the exactly solvable SU(2)k×U(1) world-sheet conformal field theory with large Kač-Moody level k. The D3-brane tension is extracted from the amplitude of one closed string exchange between two parallel D3-branes, and the amplitude is calculated by utilizing the open-closed string duality. The tension of the D3-brane in the background does not coincide with the one in the flat space-time even in the flat space-time limit: k-->∞. The finite curvature effect should vanish in the flat space-time limit and only the topological effect can remain. Therefore, the deviation suggests the condensation of the gravitino and/or dilatino which has been expected in the fivebrane background as a gravitational instanton.

  3. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.

  4. Background music and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance. PMID:20865993

  5. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  6. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  7. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries. PMID:20867363

  8. Arizona's Application Service Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Darla

    2002-01-01

    Describes the U.S.'s first statewide K-12 application service provider (ASP). The ASP, implemented by the Arizona School Facilities Board, provides access to productivity, communications, and education software programs from any Internet-enabled device, whether in the classroom or home. (EV)

  9. Provider 1997 corporate profiles.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    As the long term care industry seeks out new products, new solutions, and new ways of providing quality care, it is important for long term care providers to know more about the companies they do business with. The following corporate profiles showcase information about leading companies in the long term health care industry. Some of the areas highlighted include: mission of company, history, product lines, support services. We hope you will find this information useful when making purchasing decisions, and we're confident you'll keep this issue of Provider as a handy reference guide. The information in the following corporate profiles was supplied by the companies. Neither Provider magazine nor the American Health Care Association endorses the products and services listed in this section. Provider magazine and the American Health Care Association disclaim any and all liability related to or arising from the information contained in the profiles. PMID:10166888

  10. Comparative assessment of endocrine modulators with oestrogenic activity: I. Definition of a hygiene-based margin of safety (HBMOS) for xeno-oestrogens against the background of European developments.

    PubMed

    Bolt, H M; Janning, P; Michna, H; Degen, G H

    2001-01-01

    A novel concept - the hygiene-based margin of safety (HBMOS) - is suggested for the assessment of the impact of potential endocrine modulators. It integrates exposure scenarios and potency data for industrial chemicals and naturally occurring dietary compounds with oestrogenic activity. An HBMOS is defined as a quotient of estimated daily intakes weighted by the relative in vivo potencies of these compounds. The Existing Chemicals Programme of the European Union provides Human and Environmental Risk Assessments of Existing Chemicals which include human exposure scenarios. Such exposure scenarios, along with potency estimates for endocrine activities, may provide a basis for a quantitative comparison of the potential endocrine-modulating effects of industrial chemicals with endocrine modulators as natural constituents of human diet. Natural phyto-oestrogens exhibit oestrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. Important phyto-oestrogens for humans are isoflavones (daidzein, genistein) and lignans, with the highest quantities found in soybeans and flaxseed, respectively. Daily isoflavone exposures calculated for infants on soy-based formulae were in the ranges of 4.5-8 mg/kg body wt.; estimates for adults range up to 1 mg/kg body wt. The Senate Commission on the Evaluation of Food Safety (SKLM) of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft has also indicated a wide range of dietary exposures. For matters of risk assessment, the SKLM has based recommendations on dietary exposure scenarios, implying a daily intake of phyto-oestrogens in the order of 1 mg/kg body wt. On the basis of information compiled within the Existing Chemicals Programme of the EU, it appears that a daily human exposure to nonylphenol of 2 microg/kg body wt. may be a worst-case assumption, but which is based on valid scenarios. The intake of octylphenol is much lower, due to a different use pattern and applications, and may be neglected. Data from migration studies led to estimations of the daily human

  11. BLAST: RESOLVING THE COSMIC SUBMILLIMETER BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Gaelen; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Ngo, Henry; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has made 1 deg{sup 2}, deep, confusion-limited maps at three different bands, centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South Field. By calculating the covariance of these maps with catalogs of 24 mum sources from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we have determined that the total submillimeter intensities are 8.60 +- 0.59, 4.93 +- 0.34, and 2.27 +- 0.20 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. These numbers are more precise than previous estimates of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and are consistent with 24 mum-selected galaxies generating the full intensity of the CIB. We find that the fraction of the CIB that originates from sources at z >= 1.2 increases with wavelength, with 60% from high-redshift sources at 500 mum. At all BLAST wavelengths, the relative intensity of high-z sources is higher for 24 mum-faint sources than that for 24 mum-bright sources. Galaxies identified as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by their Infrared Array Camera colors are 1.6-2.6 times brighter than the average population at 250-500 mum, consistent with what is found for X-ray-selected AGNs. BzK-selected galaxies are found to be moderately brighter than typical 24 mum-selected galaxies in the BLAST bands. These data provide high-precision constraints for models of the evolution of the number density and intensity of star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

  12. Background'' soil concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Burlington, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.L.; Sparks, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) were identified in soils from waterfront industrial land in Burlington prior to conversion to a park. PAH's ranged from 2,457 to 16,005 ppb. As a result, this area was placed on the Vt. DEC list of active'' hazardous sites. The few studies available regarding background concentrations of PAH's (i.e. ATSDR, 1990), suggested that the waterfront PAH values were low for urban soils. To provide a context for evaluating the waterfront PAH concentrations, a background study of soils in the City of Burlington was conducted. Twelve composite soil samples were collected from within a 1-mile radius of the proposed park; an area that encompasses a large portion of the City. To correlate PAH concentrations with land-uses, three samples were collected from each of four zones: industrial, mixed commercial-residential, residential and recreational. Samples (and one field blank) were analyzed via EPA method 8100. Total PAH's from the study ranged from 105.7 to 122,035 ppb. The minimum value was from a baseball field; the maximum value from a residential lawn. The arithmetic mean for the Burlington study was 19,380 ppb (compared to 10,530 ppb for the waterfront). The background'' values indicate that the waterfront park soils are below the study background'' mean. It is difficult to assess the origin of the elevated PAH values because of the numerous contributors of environmental PAH. One common element that appears to characterize soils with the highest background'' PAH values is linkage to recent or historic building fires. In many instances building combustion may be a dominant local source of soil PAH's.

  13. Cultural Backgrounds and Textual Appropriation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Ling

    2006-01-01

    This study examines interviews with 46 undergraduates to explore if participants with differing language and cultural backgrounds view plagiarism or textual appropriation primarily as a) a language problem because of a lack of words of one's own, or b) a cultural challenge as a result of either some first language (L1) cultural training to…

  14. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  15. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Naktani, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-08-01

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  16. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  17. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  18. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  19. Polarization observations with the Cosmic Background Imager.

    PubMed

    Readhead, A C S; Myers, S T; Pearson, T J; Sievers, J L; Mason, B S; Contaldi, C R; Bond, J R; Bustos, R; Altamirano, P; Achermann, C; Bronfman, L; Carlstrom, J E; Cartwright, J K; Casassus, S; Dickinson, C; Holzapfel, W L; Kovac, J M; Leitch, E M; May, J; Padin, S; Pogosyan, D; Pospieszalski, M; Pryke, C; Reeves, R; Shepherd, M C; Torres, S

    2004-10-29

    Polarization observations of the cosmic microwave background with the Cosmic Background Imager from September 2002 to May 2004 provide a significant detection of the E-mode polarization and reveal an angular power spectrum of polarized emission showing peaks and valleys that are shifted in phase by half a cycle relative to those of the total intensity spectrum. This key agreement between the phase of the observed polarization spectrum and that predicted on the basis of the total intensity spectrum provides support for the standard model of cosmology, in which dark matter and dark energy are the dominant constituents, the geometry is close to flat, and primordial density fluctuations are predominantly adiabatic with a matter power spectrum commensurate with inflationary cosmological models. PMID:15472038

  20. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, R.; Mattson, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Mission will measure the diffuse radiation from the universe in the wavelength band 1 micron to 9.6 mm. The band includes the 3 K cosmic background radiation, the known relic of the primeval cosmic explosion. The COBE satellite will be launched from the Western Space and Missile Center (EWSMC) via a Delta launch vehicle into a circular parking orbit of about 300 km. COBE will be placed into a 900-km altitude circular orbit. Coverage will be provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN) for COBE emergencies that would prevent communications via the normal channels of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Emergency support will be provided by the DSN 26-m subnetwork. Information is given in tabular form for DSN network support, frequency assignments, telemetry, and command.

  1. 14 CFR § 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background. § 1217.102 Section § 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES...

  2. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  3. Improved Background Corrections for Uranium Holdup Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.; Gunn, C.A.; Chiang, L.G.

    2004-06-21

    In the original Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) model, all holdup deposits were modeled as points, lines, and areas[1, 5]. Two improvements[4] were recently made to the GGH model and are currently in use at the Y-12 National Security Complex. These two improvements are the finite-source correction CF{sub g} and the self-attenuation correction. The finite-source correction corrects the average detector response for the width of point and line geometries which in effect, converts points and lines into areas. The result of a holdup measurement of an area deposit is a density-thickness which is converted to mass by multiplying it by the area of the deposit. From the measured density-thickness, the true density-thickness can be calculated by correcting for the material self-attenuation. Therefore the self-attenuation correction is applied to finite point and line deposits as well as areas. This report demonstrates that the finite-source and self-attenuation corrections also provide a means to better separate the gamma rays emitted by the material from the gamma rays emitted by background sources for an improved background correction. Currently, the measured background radiation is attenuated for equipment walls in the case of area deposits but not for line and point sources. The measured background radiation is not corrected for attenuation by the uranium material. For all of these cases, the background is overestimated which causes a negative bias in the measurement. The finite-source correction and the self-attenuation correction will allow the correction of the measured background radiation for both the equipment attenuation and material attenuation for area sources as well as point and line sources.

  4. Physiologic correlates to background noise acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampas, Joanna; Harkrider, Ashley; Nabelek, Anna

    2001-05-01

    Acceptance of background noise can be evaluated by having listeners indicate the highest background noise level (BNL) they are willing to accept while following the words of a story presented at their most comfortable listening level (MCL). The difference between the selected MCL and BNL is termed the acceptable noise level (ANL). One of the consistent findings in previous studies of ANL is large intersubject variability in acceptance of background noise. This variability is not related to age, gender, hearing sensitivity, personality, type of background noise, or speech perception in noise performance. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if individual differences in physiological activity measured from the peripheral and central auditory systems of young female adults with normal hearing can account for the variability observed in ANL. Correlations between ANL and various physiological responses, including spontaneous, click-evoked, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem and middle latency evoked potentials, and electroencephalography will be presented. Results may increase understanding of the regions of the auditory system that contribute to individual noise acceptance.

  5. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  6. General Aviation in Nebraska: Nebraska SATS Project Background Paper No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell; Wachal, Jocelyn

    2000-01-01

    The Nebraska SATS project is a state-level component of NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). During the next several years the project will examine several different factors affecting SATS implementation in Nebraska. These include economic and taxation issues, public policy issues, airport planning processes, information dissemination strategies, and systemic change factors. This background paper profiles the general aviation system in Nebraska. It is written to provide information about the "context" within which SATS will be pursued. The primary focus is thus on describing and providing background information about the current situation. A secondary focus is on drawing general conclusions about the ability of the current system to incorporate the types of changes implied by SATS. First, some brief information on the U.S. aviation system is provided. The next two sections profile the current general aviation aircraft and pilot base. Nebraska's system of general aviation airports is then described. Within this section of the paper, information is provided on the different types of general aviation airports in Nebraska, airport activity levels and current infrastructure. The fourth major section of the background paper looks at Nebraska's local airport authorities. These special purpose local governments oversee the majority of the general aviation airports in the state. Among the items examined are total expenditures, capital expenditures and planning activities. Next, the paper provides background information on the Nebraska Department of Aeronautics (NDA) and recent Federal funding for general aviation in Nebraska. The final section presents summary conclusions.

  7. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2015-08-01

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α's. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of 82Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ's. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  8. Depth Dependent Background Measurements with the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Chang, H.; Boggs, S. E.; NCT Collaboration

    2012-05-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is a compact array of 12 cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs), providing high spectral resolution ( 0.3-0.9% FWHM at 662 keV for most channels) and capability of tracking each photon interaction with full 3D position resolution to 2 mm3. NCT has flown successfully on two conventional balloon flights to date, and the Crab Nebula was detected at a significance of 4σ in the second flight, which occurred on 2009 May 17 and 18 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Here approximately 38 ks of background measurements in the second flight is studied from ground altitude to average float altitude (1.2-40 km). We discuss the expected contributions to the background component through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Complete depth dependent environmental inputs are introduced, considering cosmic and atmospheric photon distributions, primary cosmic rays (protons), cosmic ray secondaries (protons and neutrons), and activation induced components. Imaging of the 511 keV annihilation line from the background is also attempted.

  9. Slănic-Prahova low background calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Celarel, Aurelia; Duliu, O G; Bercea, S; Cenusa, C

    2016-03-01

    The reduced background of 2 nSv h(-1) of the Slănic-Prahova Low Background Radiation Laboratory allowed installing a calibration stand for low-dose-rates dosimetry. The stand is provided with (60)Co, (137)Cs and (241)Am low activity sources. A Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt-calibrated AUTOMESS 6150 AD-6 dose rate meter with a 6150 AD-b/H external probe was used to check to what extent this stand could serve as a low background calibration facility. A detailed analysis of possible uncertainties in measuring dose rates evidenced an extended uncertainty related to the certified calibration as well as instrument readings of about 3 % for a confidence level of 95 %. In these conditions, the experimentally determined dose rates for all three gamma ray sources and for source-to-probe distances varying between 0.3 and 2.0 m confirmed a good correlation between the calculated and measured dose rates. At the same time, dose rates perfectly obey to an inverse squared distances law. PMID:26001826

  10. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  11. Dim point target detection against bright background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Qiheng; Xu, Zhiyong; Xu, Junping

    2010-05-01

    For target detection within a large-field cluttered background from a long distance, several difficulties, involving low contrast between target and background, little occupancy, illumination ununiformity caused by vignetting of lens, and system noise, make it a challenging problem. The existing approaches to dim target detection can be roughly divided into two categories: detection before tracking (DBT) and tracking before detection (TBD). The DBT-based scheme has been widely used in practical applications due to its simplicity, but it often requires working in the situation with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In contrast, the TBD-based methods can provide impressive detection results even in the cases of very low SNR; unfortunately, the large memory requirement and high computational load prevents these methods from real-time tasks. In this paper, we propose a new method for dim target detection. We address this problem by combining the advantages of the DBT-based scheme in computational efficiency and of the TBD-based in detection capability. Our method first predicts the local background, and then employs the energy accumulation and median filter to remove background clutter. The dim target is finally located by double window filtering together with an improved high order correlation which speeds up the convergence. The proposed method is implemented on a hardware platform and performs suitably in outside experiments.

  12. Model-based target and background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Markus; Krueger, Wolfgang; Heinze, Norbert

    2000-07-01

    Up to now most approaches of target and background characterization (and exploitation) concentrate solely on the information given by pixels. In many cases this is a complex and unprofitable task. During the development of automatic exploitation algorithms the main goal is the optimization of certain performance parameters. These parameters are measured during test runs while applying one algorithm with one parameter set to images that constitute of image domains with very different domain characteristics (targets and various types of background clutter). Model based geocoding and registration approaches provide means for utilizing the information stored in GIS (Geographical Information Systems). The geographical information stored in the various GIS layers can define ROE (Regions of Expectations) and may allow for dedicated algorithm parametrization and development. ROI (Region of Interest) detection algorithms (in most cases MMO (Man- Made Object) detection) use implicit target and/or background models. The detection algorithms of ROIs utilize gradient direction models that have to be matched with transformed image domain data. In most cases simple threshold calculations on the match results discriminate target object signatures from the background. The geocoding approaches extract line-like structures (street signatures) from the image domain and match the graph constellation against a vector model extracted from a GIS (Geographical Information System) data base. Apart from geo-coding the algorithms can be also used for image-to-image registration (multi sensor and data fusion) and may be used for creation and validation of geographical maps.

  13. DUSEL Ultra-Low Background Counting Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan

    2007-10-01

    The Homestake Mine in western South Dakota has been confirmed by the National Science Foundation (NSF) as the site for a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). Many of the physics, geosciences, and microbiology experiments in the facility will be funded by DOE and NSF, and will benefit the missions of these agencies. In support of these programs, physics faculty in South Dakota and scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been working together to establish a multidisciplinary research cluster to provide baseline characterization for physics and geosciences/geomicrobiology experiments at the Homestake Mine through an Ultra-Low Background Counting Facility (ULBCoF). The proposed project utilizes two low-background germanium detectors with massive shielding underground to carefully analyze materials for low background experiments. Low background experiments such as double-beta decay, solar neutrino, geoneutrino, and dark matter must control the purity of all the materials used in the construction of a detector. Measuring such low counting rates is a very challenging task that will be best accomplished by primarily using high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors.

  14. Testing Provides Crucial Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morial, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    The National Urban League president and CEO Marc H. Morial weighs in on what he sees as the need for continued annual assessments of students, rejecting the course of opting out that has taken hold in some places across America. Assessment data provides students with the opportunity to receive personalized supports and necessary interventions to…

  15. The Provident Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  16. Providers get their due.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J

    1994-11-01

    Providers are getting their due, but only after employing computer software programs to help sort through the complex managed-care contracts they've negotiated. More and more accounting departments are relying on contract management systems to ensure accurate billing. PMID:10138187

  17. Background reduction in the SNO+ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Segui, L.

    2015-08-17

    SNO+ is a large multi-purpose liquid scintillator experiment, which first aim is to detect the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. It is placed at SNOLAB, at 6000 m.w.e. and it is based on the SNO infrastructure. SNO+ will contain approximately 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator, loaded with {sup 130}Te inside an acrylic vessel (AV) with an external volume of ultra pure water to reduce the external backgrounds. Light produced in the scintillator by the interaction of particles will be detected with about 9,000 photomultiplier’s. For the neutrinoless double beta decay phase, due to its the extremely low rate expected, the control, knowledge and reduction of the background is essential. Moreover, it will also benefit other phases of the experiment focused on the study of solar neutrinos, nucleon decay, geoneutrinos and supernovae. In order to reduce the internal background level, a novel purification technique for tellurium loaded scintillators has been developed by the collaboration that reduces the U/Th concentration and several cosmic-activated isotopes by at least a factor 10{sup 2} -10{sup 3} in a single pass. In addition, different rejection techniques have been developed for the remaining internal backgrounds based on Monte-Carlo simulations. In this work, the scintillator purification technique and the levels obtained with it will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview of the different backgrounds for the double-beta phase will be presented, highlighting some of the techniques developed to reject the remained decays based on their expected timing differences.

  18. Achieving Provider Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  19. Provider panel presentations.

    PubMed

    Buckelew, Larry C; Harvey, Deborah; Mello, Joe

    2003-08-01

    To wrap up the three big items--attracting talent, the professional nurse role, and our structural disadvantages--I would offer the following take-away thoughts: We ought to do what we can to get our disproportionate share of RNs out of the health care system to work in dialysis. If we work together, we have a shot at making that happen. As an industry, we must exploit our strengths. We have to exploit the pride that comes in the services and the care that we provide. We need to create in a very visual way that difference for nurses who are considering which area of specialty to go into and where to create their careers. We, as providers, have a huge opportunity to create the right environment for our nurses. That's something we own. We have to fix it. We have to create a better place to work for nurses than any place else. We must create a more enriching place for nurses than anywhere else. That's up to us. I know a lot of us on the provider side are doing tons of things to make that happen and we need to keep driving that. We need a level playing field. We've proven the fact that we can deliver clinical outcomes with the best. Now we need help from our biggest customer to make sure we can compete for the resources that are necessary to sustain and improve those clinical outcomes on an ongoing basis. PMID:14533522

  20. PROVIDING WOMEN, KEPT MEN

    PubMed Central

    Mojola, Sanyu A

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on ethnographic and interview based fieldwork to explore accounts of intimate relationships between widowed women and poor young men that emerged in the wake of economic crisis and a devastating HIV epidemic among the Luo ethnic group in Western Kenya. I show how the cooptation of widow inheritance practices in the wake of an overwhelming number of widows as well as economic crisis resulted in widows becoming providing women and poor young men becoming kept men. I illustrate how widows in this setting, by performing a set of practices central to what it meant to be a man in this society – pursuing and providing for their partners - were effectively doing masculinity. I will also show how young men, rather than being feminized by being kept, deployed other sets of practices to prove their masculinity and live in a manner congruent with cultural ideals. I argue that ultimately, women’s practice of masculinity in large part seemed to serve patriarchal ends. It not only facilitated the fulfillment of patriarchal expectations of femininity – to being inherited – but also served, in the end, to provide a material base for young men’s deployment of legitimizing and culturally valued sets of masculine practice. PMID:25489121

  1. The Quest for the astrophysical background with Advanced LIGO/Virgo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regimbau, Tania; LIGO Virgo Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the cosmological background, an astrophysical background may have resulted from the superposition of a large number of unresolved sources since the beginning of stellar activity. This astrophysical contribution could be a foreground masking the cosmological background but it can also provide very interesting informations, not only about the physical properties of the respective astrophysical populations, complementing individual GW detections, but also about the evolution of these objects with redshift, the star formation history or the metallicity. In this talk, predictions of the gravitational wave background formed by all the compact binary coalescences at cosmological distances will be given, as well as a discussion of their accessibility with the network of Advanced LIGO/Virgo detectors. Finally, the expected astrophysical and cosmological constraints to be made by Advanced LIGO/Virgo will be presented.

  2. Background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    thermospheric wave activity. Tropospheric disturbances exciting background Lamb waves may also be responsible for seismic hum at frequencies below 5 mHz.

  3. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan

    Nearly global SAGE I satellite observations in the nonvolcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980 are used to produce a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model. Zonally average profiles of the 1.0-micron aerosol extinction for the tropics, midlatitudes, and high latitudes for both hemispheres are given in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. A third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set is used to derive analytic expressions for the seasonal global means and the yearly global mean. The results have application to the simulation of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  4. High background photon counting lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Photon counting with lidar returns is usually limited to low light levels, while wide dynamic range is achieved by counting for long times. The broad emission spectrum of inexpensive high-power semiconductor lasers makes receiver filters pass too much background light for traditional photon counting in daylight. Very high speed photon counting is possible, however, at more than 500 MHz which allows the construction of eyesafe lidar operating in the presence of bright clouds. Detector improvements are possible to count to 20 GHz producing a single shot dynamic range of ten decades.

  5. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    PubMed

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background. PMID:26181392

  6. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  7. The technical background to standards for shackles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorley, T. A. E.; Anthony, G. T.

    1992-03-01

    The technical background to British and international standards for shackles is documented in order to provide a reference for future drafting and revisions of standards. The following are discussed: the stress analysis of shackles, a test program for shackles, the work performed by a working group set up to rationalize the design of cage suspension gear, shackle design formula, the development of International Standards Organization (ISO) standards for shackles, and the development of revised British standards. Under the technical background to the revision of BS3032, the following are considered: marking, material and heat treatment, hardness, mechanical properties, form and dimensions, tolerances, and screw threads. The decisions upon which the revision of the BS3551 were based are described.

  8. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  9. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand. PMID:26598305

  10. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  11. Immunopathogenic Background of Pars Planitis.

    PubMed

    Przeździecka-Dołyk, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Agnieszka; Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Pars planitis is defined as an intermediate uveitis of unknown background of systemic disease with characteristic formations such as vitreous snowballs, snowbanks and changes in peripheral retina. The incidence of pars planitis varies 2.4-15.4 % of the uveitis patients. The pathogenesis of the disease is to be determined in future. Clinical and histopathological findings suggest an autoimmune etiology, most likely as a reaction to endogenous antigen of unknown source, with T cells predominant in both vitreous and pars plana infiltrations. T cells subsets play an important role as a memory-effector peripheral cell. Snowbanks are formed as an effect of post inflammatory glial proliferation of fibrous astrocytes. There is also a genetic predisposition for pars planitis by human leukocyte antigen and several other genes. A coexistence of multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis has been described in numerous studies. Epiretinal membrane, cataract, cystoid macular edema, retinal detachment, retinal vasculitis, neovascularization, vitreous peripheral traction, peripheral hole formation, vitreous hemorrhage, disc edema are common complications observed in pars planitis. There is a need to expand the knowledge of the pathogenic and immunologic background of the pars planitis to create an accurate pharmacological treatment. PMID:26438050

  12. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  13. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  14. Empirical Confirmation of the Critical Level for Zero and Near Zero Background Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Simpson, T

    2001-06-01

    The alpha spectroscopy system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Hazards Control Department evaluates electroplated samples, typically urine and feces, for alpha emitting radionuclides. Most of the samples processed by the alpha spectroscopy system are evaluated for Plutonium-239 (Pu-239), an important radionuclide used in research. This paper evaluates the Pu-239 background response of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hazards Control Department's alpha spectroscopy system. Background measurements of the alpha spectroscopy system have been studied to determine an appropriate method for establishing the a postori critical level for detection of plutonium alpha activity. Several methods of establishing the 95% confidence interval for over 4,900 background measurements were evaluated. Two methods appear to provide reasonable results so as to assure an appropriate 95% confidence interval. This report provides the results of this evaluation and the comparison of the various methods tested to establish an empirical evaluation of the critical level using a commercially available analysis program.

  15. Confusion background from compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regimbau, T.; Hughes, Scott A.

    2010-05-01

    Double neutron stars are one of the most promizing sources for terrestrial gravitational wave interferometers. For actual interferometers and their planned upgrades, the probability of having a signal present in the data is small, but as the sensitivity improves, the detection rate increases and the waveforms may start to overlap, creating a confusion background, ultimately limiting the capabilities of future detectors. The third generation Einstein Telescope, with an horizon of z > 1 and very low frequency "seismic wall" may be affected by such confusion noise. At a minimum, careful data analysis will be require to separate signals which will appear confused. This result should be borne in mind when designing highly advanced future instruments.

  16. Recognizing foreground-background interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jeffrey; Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Can the background affect a foreground target in distant, low-quality imagery? If it does, it might occur in our mind, or perhaps it may represent a snapshot of our early vision. An affirmative answer, one way or another, may affect our current understanding of this phenomena and potentially for related applications. How can we be sure about this in the psycho-physical sense? We begin with the physiology of our brain's homeostasis, of which an isothermal equilibrium is characterized by the minimum of Helmholtz isothermal Free Energy: A = U - T0S >= 0, where T0 = 37°C, the Boltzmann Entropy S = KB1n(W), and U is the unknown internal energy to be computed.

  17. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  18. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  19. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The Berkeley Low Background Facility and the Black Hills State University Underground Campus at SURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Keenan; Mount, Brianna; Lesko, Kevin; Norman, Eric; Smith, Alan; Poon, Alan; Chan, Yuen-Dat

    2015-10-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility at LBNL provides a variety of low background gamma spectroscopy services to a variety of projects and experiments. It operates HPGe spectrometers in two unique facilities: a surface low background lab at LBNL and underground (4300 m.w.e.) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. A large component of the measurements performed by the BLBF are for ultralow background experiments concerned with U, Th, K, and other radioisotopes within candidate construction materials to be used to construct sensitive detectors, such as those studying dark matter or neutrinos. The BLBF also makes a variety of environmental measurements in search of other radioisotopes, such as fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in 2011 and other radioisotope monitoring activities. A general overview of the services and facilities will be presented. In 2015, the BLBF will be relocating its underground counting stations to a new, dedicated space on the 4850L of SURF. The Black Hills State University Underground Campus will host several low background counting stations and operate in a coordinated manner to provide low background measurements to the scientific community. An overview and description of the BHUC will be presented.