Science.gov

Sample records for activities provide background

  1. Experiences with active cosmic background suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.; Lamaze, G.P.

    1994-12-31

    The dominant source of background in a bare germanium gamma-ray detector is natural radiation originating from potassium, uranium, and thorium decay in the laboratory environment and from cosmic rays. Most of the background is removed by surrounding the detector with lead shielding, which is commonly 20 cm thick. In a well-shielded detector, the largest contributor to the integral counting rate is cosmic rays, and to a lesser extent beta particles from {sup 210}Pb. Most of the counting rate in the continuum is due to highly penetrating muons. Many of the characteristic peaks in the background also originate from fast tertiary neutrons of cosmic-ray origin, which generate neutron activation products or create gamma rays from inelastic scattering in materials of the detector and shield. Very massive shielding is required to remove this penetrating component of background; we have found a fivefold reduction in the cosmic components by moving the detector into a laboratory 20 m underground. However, lacking an underground lab, we have attempted to use active shielding to reduce the background of a Ge detector located above ground. The guard detector is a proportional counter forming a roof 23 cm above the detector. The counter is placed inside the lead shielding to reduce it`s background counting rate.

  2. 13. I95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. I-95 bridge crossing corridor with Providence Station in background. Providence, Providence County, RI. sec. 4116, mp 185.15. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  3. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  4. Background paper on electrical services provided by the Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, W.F.; Hobbs, B.F.; Samuels, G.; Kawah, L.M.

    1985-07-01

    This report is one of a series of project papers providing background information for an assessment of energy options for Liberia, West Africa; it presents data on electrical services in Liberia (as of early 1983) with primary emphasis on the operations of the Liberia Electricity Corporation (LEC). The LEC is a semiautonomous agency owned by the Government of Liberia that has primary responsibility for generating electricity throughout Liberia. The LEC system consists of a central grid covering an area roughly 175 by 100 km with Monrovia as its focal point, and nine rural stations serving ten towns. The central grid has a total capacity of 177 MW (64 hydro and 113 diesel engines and gas turbines) and produced 378 million kWh in 1981. The rural stations with a total capacity of 13 MW (all diesels) produced 27 million kWh in 1981. Information provided by this paper includes historical sales data by customer class, growth in demand, hourly load data, petroleum consumption, prices, and problems. Major problems include uncollected bills, illegal hookups, inoperable generating equipment, and fuel shortages.

  5. Marketing backgrounds and activities of community mental health center CEOs.

    PubMed

    Whyte, E G; Smith, M; Reidenbach, E N; Sharpe, T R

    1989-01-01

    More than 300 directors of community mental health centers responded to a survey concerning their marketing training and the marketing activities in which their centers had been engaged. Formal marketing training was found to be in the backgrounds of few of the respondents. The majority had not been engaged in a listing of marketing activities.

  6. Providing Rich Art Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahey, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Using works of art with young children is a perfect way to bridge the gap between art activities that are too open or too closed. Teachers of young children sometimes try to find a middle ground by allowing free painting time at an easel in addition to recipe-oriented activities such as putting together precut shapes to create a spider or an apple…

  7. Providing Transition Services for Students with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avoke, Selete Kofi; Simon-Burroughs, Marlene

    2007-01-01

    Youth with disabilities from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds are at high risk for a number of negative postschool outcomes including high unemployment, low wages, and limited access to postsecondary education and training. Cultural and linguistic differences may negatively impact transition planning for these youth as they…

  8. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  9. Attitudes and Perceptions of Patients, Caregivers, and Health Care Providers toward Background Music in Patient Care Areas: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Cruz, Pedro; Nguyen, Linh; Rhondali, Wadih; Hui, David; Palmer, J. Lynn; Sevy, Ingrid; Richardson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Background music can be used to distract from ordinary sounds and improve wellbeing in patient care areas. Little is known about individuals' attitudes and beliefs about music versus ordinary sound in this setting. Objectives To assess the preferences of patients, caregivers and healthcare providers regarding background music or ordinary sound in outpatient and inpatient care areas, and to explore their attitudes and perceptions towards music in general. Methods All participants were exposed to background music in outpatient or inpatient clinical settings. 99 consecutive patients, 101 caregivers and 65 out of 70 eligible healthcare providers (93%) completed a survey about music attitudes and preferences. The primary outcome was a preference for background music over ordinary sound in patient care areas. Results Preference for background music was high and similar across groups (70 patients (71%), 71 caregivers (71%) and 46 providers (71%), p=0.58). The three groups had very low disapproval for background music in patient care areas (10%, 9% and 12%, respectively; p=0.91). Black ethnicity independently predicted lower preference for background music (OR: 0.47, 95%CI: 0.23, 0.98). Patients, caregivers and providers reported recent use of music for themselves for the purpose of enjoyment (69%, 80% and 86% respectively p=0.02). Age, gender, religion and education level significantly predicted preferences for specific music styles. Conclusion Background music in patient care areas was preferred to ordinary sound by patients, caregivers and providers. Demographics of the population are strong determinants of music style preferences. PMID:22957677

  10. Background activities, induction, and behavioral allocation in operant performance.

    PubMed

    Baum, William M; Davison, Michael

    2014-09-01

    In experiments on operant behavior, other activities, called "background" activities, compete with the operant activities. Herrnstein's (1970) formulation of the matching law included background reinforcers in the form of a parameter rO, but remained vague about the activities (BO) that produce rO. To gain more understanding, we analyzed data from three studies of performance with pairs of variable-interval schedules that changed frequently in the relative rate at which they produced food: Baum and Davison (2014), Belke and Heyman (1994), and Soto, McDowell, and Dallery (2005). Results sometimes deviated from the matching law, suggesting variation in rO. When rO was calculated from the matching equation, two results emerged: (a) rO is directly proportional to BO, as in a ratio schedule; and (b) rO and BO depend on the food rate, which is to say that BO consists of activities induced by food, as a phylogenetically important event. Other activities unrelated to food (BN ) correspond to Herrnstein's original conception of rO and may be included in the matching equation. A model based on Baum's (Baum, 2012) concepts of allocation, induction, and contingency explained the deviations from the matching law. In the model, operant activity B, BO, and BN competed unequally in the time allocation: B and BO both replaced BN , BO replaced lever pressing (Soto et al.), and key pecking replaced BO (Baum & Davison). Although the dependence of rO and BO on food rate changes Herrnstein's (1970) formulation, the model preserved the generalized matching law for operant activities by incorporating power-function induction.

  11. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  12. Differential intracochlear recordings of ensemble background activity (EBA) (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianxun; Durrant, John D.; Balaban, Carey

    2004-11-01

    The ensemble background activity (EBA) recorded from the round window has a spectral peak near 900 Hz that is generally attributed to spontaneous eighth-nerve activity, but other frequency regions are less well understood, including the issue of contribution of hair cell (HC) potentials. To further investigate the EBA, an intracochlear electrode pair was employed to record from the basal turn in guinea pig, applying the principles of differential recording. Results confirmed 900 Hz to be the dominant feature of the EBA power spectrum in/near quiet, wherein this peak was more robust in the average derivation and readily suppressed by kainic acid, consistent with its presumptive neural origin. Another broad spectral prominence, centered around 3000 Hz, was more prominent in the difference derivation, dominated the spectrum with increasing external (white) noise, and was much less sensitive to kainic acid, implying a predominantly HC origin. The findings demonstrate efficacy of intracochlear EBA recording, potentially extend EBA utility via the differential recording method, and further validate the EBA for monitoring spontaneous activity of the eighth nerve. .

  13. Active galaxies and the diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Active galaxies are shown to account for the observed gamma ray background radiation if a steepening of the spectra above about 100 keV is present. An analytical model is discussed in which protons undergo Fermi acceleration at a shock in a spherical accretion flow onto a massive black hole. Relativistic protons with power law spectra, nuclear interactions producing gamma rays from neutal pion decay and electrons from pion-mu meson-electron decay, with a power law spectrum above several hundred MeV, synchrotron and inverse Compton losses steepening the electron spectrum, a photon spectrum close to the pion gamma spectrum and a high-energy gamma ray spectrum steepened by photon-photon pair production interactions with X rays are covered in the model. Comparisons are made with HEAO 2 data on active galaxies, which have estimated luminosities and radii consistent with the compactness necessary for producing the steepening predicted by the model. The active galaxies spectra would be described by a spherical accretion-shock model.

  14. Resolution of activated background information in text comprehension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruiming; Mo, Lei; He, Xianyou; Smythe, Ian; Wang, Suiping

    2010-08-01

    The present experiments explored the resolution of activated background information in text comprehension. In Experiment 1, participants read passages that contained an elaboration section that was either consistent or qualified (inconsistent but then corrected to be consistent) with respect to the subsequently presented target sentence (see O'Brien et al., 1998). However, the experiment used two target sentences, and several filler sentences were inserted between the first and second target sentence. The results showed that the reading times for the first target sentence in the qualified elaboration version were significantly longer than those in the consistent elaboration version. These were consistent with O'Brien's study, and further indicated that the basic process captured by the memory-based view appears to generalize to the Chinese reader better than does the here-and-now view. More importantly, the results showed that the reading times for the second target sentence in the qualified elaboration version were as long as those in the consistent elaboration version. These further indicated that the activation of background information not only maintained the coherence of the text, but also allowed for the relevant information to be updated, resulting in a unified information set. When the information was reactivated during ongoing reading, it would be in the form of unified information. In Experiment 2, the first target sentence in each passage from Experiment 1 was converted to a filler sentence, and the second target sentence became the target sentence. The results of Experiment 2 showed that the reading times for the target sentence in the qualified elaboration version were significantly longer than those for the consistent elaboration version. These indicated that the delay between the target sentences and the elaboration section was not responsible for the lack of differences in Experiment 1, and confirmed the conclusion of Experiment 1.

  15. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  16. Increased Background Activity in DMSA Scintigraphy of a Nonazotemic Patient With β-Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Tsiouris, Spyridon

    2016-09-01

    Renal DMSA uptake provides an index for evaluation of the functional tubular mass, which depends on the renal blood flow, proximal tubular cell membrane function, and urinary acid-base balance. We present a case of a nonazotemic 48-year-old adult with β-thalassemia major under regular blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy that underwent DMSA scan showing minor cortical abnormalities and high background activity, featuring prominent cardiac blood pool and liver uptake. This case highlights the pitfall of high background activity during DMSA study in patients with β-thalassemia major due to tubular disorders.

  17. A Work Sampling Study of Provider Activities in School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mavis, Brian; Pearson, Rachel; Stewart, Gail; Keefe, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe provider activities in a convenience sample of School-Based Health Centers (SBHCs). The goal was to determine the relative proportion of time that clinic staff engaged in various patient care and non-patient care activities. Methods: All provider staff at 4 urban SBHCs participated in this…

  18. Masticatory muscle sleep background electromyographic activity is elevated in myofascial temporomandibular disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Raphael, K G; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Dubrovsky, B; Wigren, P E; Klausner, J J; Krieger, A C; Lavigne, G J

    2013-12-01

    Despite theoretical speculation and strong clinical belief, recent research using laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording has provided new evidence that frequency of sleep bruxism (SB) masseter muscle events, including grinding or clenching of the teeth during sleep, is not increased for women with chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The current case-control study compares a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n = 124) with a demographically matched control group without TMD (n = 46) on sleep background electromyography (EMG) during a laboratory PSG study. Background EMG activity was measured as EMG root mean square (RMS) from the right masseter muscle after lights out. Sleep background EMG activity was defined as EMG RMS remaining after activity attributable to SB, other orofacial activity, other oromotor activity and movement artefacts were removed. Results indicated that median background EMG during these non-SB event periods was significantly higher (P < 0·01) for women with myofascial TMD (median = 3·31 μV and mean = 4·98 μV) than for control women (median = 2·83 μV and mean = 3·88 μV) with median activity in 72% of cases exceeding control activity. Moreover, for TMD cases, background EMG was positively associated and SB event-related EMG was negatively associated with pain intensity ratings (0-10 numerical scale) on post-sleep waking. These data provide the foundation for a new focus on small, but persistent, elevations in sleep EMG activity over the course of the night as a mechanism of pain induction or maintenance.

  19. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  20. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  1. Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. Support Document

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This document was produced by the authors based on their research for the report, "Private Training Providers: Their Characteristics and Training Activities," [ED495181] and is an added resource for further information. That study examined the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to Australian…

  2. Physical Activity at Daycare: Childcare Providers' Perspectives for Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Patricia; van Zandvoort, Melissa M.; Burke, Shauna M.; Irwin, Jennifer D.

    2011-01-01

    In London, Ontario, approximately 45 percent of preschoolers are insufficiently active.With the large number of preschoolers who attend childcare (54%), and the low levels of physical activity among preschool-aged children, daycare centers may be an appropriate avenue to intervene. This study sought to collect childcare providers' suggestions for…

  3. [Karl Leonhard is "not interested!" - newly found original sources provide new insights into the organisational background of the Rodewisch propositions].

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Holger

    2014-03-01

    In 2013 at the Rodewisch Clinic for Psychiatry, four folders were found that contain original documents from the office of former head of the clinic Rolf Walther. These original sources provide new insights into the organisational background of the International Symposium on Psychiatric Rehabilitation of 1963, as a result of which the groundbreaking Rodewisch Propositions were framed. The documents founds reveal that, apart from the persons already identified, Halle/Saale - based hygienist Karlheinz Renker was deeply involved in the preparation of this event. They also show that for ideological reasons the GDR Ministry of Health restricted the number of participants from non-socialist countries, in particular Western Germany, to be admitted. Finally, the sources suggest that a volume compiling all talks given at the symposium as one publication and as such making its content and resolutions known to a wider public failed, among other reasons, due to the fact that Karl Leonhard, then head of the GDR Association for Psychiatry and Neurology, was "not interested" in it. PMID:24254427

  4. Correlations in background activity control persistent state stability and allow execution of working memory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dipoppa, Mario; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) requires selective information gating, active information maintenance, and rapid active updating. Hence performing a WM task needs rapid and controlled transitions between neural persistent activity and the resting state. We propose that changes in correlations in neural activity provides a mechanism for the required WM operations. As a proof of principle, we implement sustained activity and WM in recurrently coupled spiking networks with neurons receiving excitatory random background activity where background correlations are induced by a common noise source. We first characterize how the level of background correlations controls the stability of the persistent state. With sufficiently high correlations, the sustained state becomes practically unstable, so it cannot be initiated by a transient stimulus. We exploit this in WM models implementing the delay match to sample task by modulating flexibly in time the correlation level at different phases of the task. The modulation sets the network in different working regimes: more prompt to gate in a signal or clear the memory. We examine how the correlations affect the ability of the network to perform the task when distractors are present. We show that in a winner-take-all version of the model, where two populations cross-inhibit, correlations make the distractor blocking robust. In a version of the mode where no cross inhibition is present, we show that appropriate modulation of correlation levels is sufficient to also block the distractor access while leaving the relevant memory trace in tact. The findings presented in this manuscript can form the basis for a new paradigm about how correlations are flexibly controlled by the cortical circuits to execute WM operations. PMID:24155714

  5. Building and Activating Students' Background Knowledge: It's What They Already Know That Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy; Lapp, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Students enter the middle grades with varying amounts of background knowledge. Teachers must assess student background knowledge for gaps or misconceptions and then provide instruction to build on that base. This article discusses effective strategies for assessing and developing students' background knowledge so they can become independent…

  6. Low level activity determination by means of gamma spectrometry with respect to the natural background fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Dragounová, Lenka; Rulík, Petr

    2013-11-01

    The determination of low level activities of natural radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series by gamma-spectrometry faces the problem of proper natural background subtraction. Background fluctuation can cause differences in activity determination. Also the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of natural and artificial radionuclides can be influenced by background fluctuation. In this paper, results of the background fluctuation of shielded HPGe detectors with relative efficiency of 50-150% are presented together with the assessment of its influence on the determination of natural and artificial radionuclides.

  7. Test-Takers' Background, Literacy Activities, and Views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Ying; Klinger, Don A.; Cheng, Liying; Fox, Janna; Doe, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among students' background information and their in-school and after-school literacy activities, as well as the relationships between students' background and their views of the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). The results showed that students' literacy activities could be grouped into three…

  8. Removing artifacts and background activity in multichannel electroencephalograms by enhancing common activity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Wim; Van Paesschen, Wim; Vanrumste, Bart; Papy, J-M; Vergult, Anneleen; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2005-01-01

    Removing artifacts and background EEG from multichannel interictal and ictal EEG has become a major research topic in EEG signal processing in recent years. We applied for this purpose a recently developed subspace-based method for modelling the common dynamics in multichannel signals. When the epileptiform activity is common in the majority of channels and the artifacts appear only in a few channels the proposed method can be used to remove the latter. The performance of the method was tested on simulated data for different noise levels. For high noise levels the method was still able to identify the common dynamics. In addition, the method was applied to a real life EEG recording. Also in this case the muscle artifacts were removed successfully. For both the synthetic data and the analyzed real life data the results were compared with the results obtained with principal component analysis (PCA). In both cases the proposed method performed better than PCA.

  9. Activation of Background Knowledge for Inference Making: Effects on Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbro, Carsten; Buch-Iversen, Ida

    2013-01-01

    Failure to "activate" relevant, existing background knowledge may be a cause of poor reading comprehension. This failure may cause particular problems with inferences that depend heavily on prior knowledge. Conversely, teaching how to use background knowledge in the context of gap-filling inferences could improve reading comprehension in…

  10. What is the importance of abnormal "background" activity in seizure generation?

    PubMed

    Staba, Richard J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of interictal epileptiform spikes and seizures have played a central role in the study of epilepsy. The background EEG activity, however, has received less attention. In this chapter we discuss the characteristic features of the background activity of the brain when individuals are at rest and awake (resting wake) and during sleep. The characteristic rhythms of the background EEG are presented, and the presence of 1/f (β) behavior of the EEG power spectral density is discussed and its possible origin and functional significance. The interictal EEG findings of focal epilepsy and the impact of interictal epileptiform spikes on cognition are also discussed. PMID:25012365

  11. Background solar velocity spectrum at high and low phases of solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régulo, C.; Roca Cortés, T.; Vázquez Ramió, H.

    2002-12-01

    Using GOLF/SOHO data a detailed analysis of the solar background spectrum has been performed at high and low phases of solar activity cycle. The analysis includes not only the non-periodic components of the background power spectrum but also the periodic ones. Apart from the solar activity, other causes produce similar effects in the data, particularly the different depths in the solar atmosphere where the measurements are done, because due to the sun-satellite relative velocity, we are observing at different positions in the line profile. Another effect is that different line wings are used in the observation at two different epochs, before and after SOHO loss and recovery which, unfortunately, coincide with minimum and maximum of solar activity. In this work we have tried to separate all these effects in order to really understand what is being seen in the data and ultimately extract the effects of solar activity on the acoustic background solar spectrum.

  12. Child Care Providers' Use of HIV/AIDS Information Resources: Links to Professional Background Variables and Feelings about Caring for an HIV-Infected Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mick; Toledo, Carlos; Wallinga, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    Examined child caregivers' use of various HIV/AIDS information resources in relation to professional background and attitudes. Found that providers' education level, child care experience, and the age group for which they were responsible correlated with use of newspaper/magazine articles, pamphlets, and educational workshops. Use of…

  13. Right Back at 'Cha--Boomerang Activity Provides Educational Returns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Motivating students to get actively involved in the curriculum and understand the application of academic content has been a challenge for many educators. Technology education instructors have traditionally had little difficulty showing their students the connection between their classroom and lab learning and a practical application of the skills…

  14. Cosmic-ray-induced background intercomparison with actively shielded HPGe detectors at underground locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szücs, T.; Bemmerer, D.; Reinhardt, T. P.; Schmidt, K.; Takács, M. P.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, L.; Weinberger, D.; Zuber, K.

    2015-03-01

    The main background above 3MeV for in-beam nuclear astrophysics studies with -ray detectors is caused by cosmic-ray-induced secondaries. The two commonly used suppression methods, active and passive shielding, against this kind of background were formerly considered only as alternatives in nuclear astrophysics experiments. In this work the study of the effects of active shielding against cosmic-ray-induced events at a medium deep location is performed. Background spectra were recorded with two actively shielded HPGe detectors. The experiment was located at 148m below the surface of the Earth in the Reiche Zeche mine in Freiberg, Germany. The results are compared to data with the same detectors at the Earth's surface, and at depths of 45m and 1400m, respectively.

  15. 'Palliative care': a contradiction in terms? A qualitative study of cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their relatives and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Palliative cancer care aims to improve quality of life and ultimately quality of dying, while prolonging life is not an objective anymore when death nears. The question is, however, whether these perspectives on palliative care are congruent with the perspectives of immigrant families with a Turkish or Moroccan background. Methods A qualitative design was used as we were looking for the personal views of 'very ill' cancer patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background, their family members and their Dutch care providers. We interviewed 83 people, involved in 33 cases to obtain information about their views, values and norms on 'good care'. Results The main concerns about 'good care' expressed by Turkish and Moroccan families were: maximum treatment and curative care until the end of their lives, never having hope taken away, devoted care by their families, avoiding shameful situations, dying with a clear mind and being buried in their own country. Their views conflict, to some extent, with the dominant principles in palliative care, for example, the emphasis on quality of life and advanced care planning, which includes discussing diagnosis and prognosis with the patient. Conclusions Patients and their families with a Turkish or Moroccan background often have different ideas about 'good care' than their Dutch care providers. As many of them are aiming at cure until the end of life, they find 'good palliative care' a contradiction in terms. PMID:20831777

  16. Low-background instrumental neutron activation analysis of silicon semiconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.R.; McDonald, R.J.; Manini, H.; Hurley, D.L.; Norman, E.B.; Vella, M.C.; Odom, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of silicon wafers, some implanted with zinc, some with memory circuits fabricated on them, and some with oxide coatings were activated with neutrons and analyzed for trace element impurities with low-background germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Results are presented for these samples as well as for a reference material. Because the silicon matrix activation is so small, reduced spectrometer system background permits the detection of significantly lower impurity concentrations than would otherwise be possible. For the highest efficiency and lowest background system, limits on the lowest levels of trace element concentrations have been measured for wafer sized (1 to 10 g) samples and inferred for bulk sized (365 g) samples. For wafer-sized samples, part-per-trillion detection capabilities are demonstrated for a variety of elemental contaminants important in semiconductor fabrication.

  17. Influence of OSEM, elliptical orbits and background activity on SPECT 3D resolution recovery.

    PubMed

    Pan, T S; Luo, D S; Kohli, V; King, M A

    1997-12-01

    In maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) reconstruction of SPECT images, if both attenuation correction (AC) and detector response correction (DRC) are included, the reconstruction can be too time consuming to be clinically useful. With use of the ordered-subset expectation-maximization (OSEM) reconstruction, it has been reported that the reconstruction time can be substantially reduced. We investigated the reconstruction of point sources in a non-uniform attenuation medium in terms of the normalized FWHM of these sources. We compared MLEM versus OSEM reconstructions; circular versus elliptical orbits; and the presence versus the absence of background activity in the object. We found: (i) that OSEM does speed up the reconstruction by a factor of 10 over MLEM; (ii) that the resolution recovery does not depend on the type of orbit if both AC and DRC are included in the reconstruction; however, when there is background activity, a significant number of iterations are required to alleviate the effect of orbit; (iii) that background activity significantly slows down the resolution recovery of the point sources; and (iv) that if reconstruction only includes AC, and not DRC, changing orbit can change isotropy of recovered resolution, whereas introducing background activity may degrade the recovered resolution and also changes the isotropy.

  18. Activating Student Background Knowledge in a Take Charge Approach to Foreign Language Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dolly Jesusita

    A guide for teachers of second language reading offers ideas for using authentic texts as instructional materials. The guide focuses on how to teach students to become strategic readers and use their background knowledge to enhance comprehension. Schema theory is proposed as a framework for approaching reading tasks, by providing relevant pre- and…

  19. Two sides of the coin: patient and provider perceptions of health care delivery to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Australia is a culturally diverse nation with one in seven Australians born in a non-English speaking country. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) populations are at a high risk of developing preventable chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, renal disease, and chronic respiratory disease, especially communities from the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, North Africa, the Indian subcontinent and China. Previous studies have shown that access to services may be a contributing factor. This study explores the experiences, attitudes and opinions of immigrants from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds and their health care providers with regard to chronic disease care. Methods Five focus groups were conducted comprising participants from an Arabic speaking background, or born in Sudan, China, Vietnam or Tonga. A total of 50 members participated. All focus groups were conducted in the participants’ language and facilitated by a trained multicultural health worker. In addition, 14 health care providers were interviewed by telephone. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed. All qualitative data were analysed with the assistance of QSR NVivo 8 software. Results Participants were generally positive about the quality and accessibility of health services, but the costs of health care and waiting times to receive treatment presented significant barriers. They expressed a need for greater access to interpreters and culturally appropriate communication and education. They mentioned experiencing racism and discriminatory practices. Health professionals recommended recruiting health workers from CALD communities to assist them to adequately elicit and address the needs of patients from CALD backgrounds. Conclusions CALD patients, carers and community members as well as health professionals all highlighted the need for establishing culturally tailored programs for chronic disease prevention and management

  20. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method

    PubMed Central

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17–19 mCi of 99mTc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of 99mTc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  1. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  2. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan.

  3. Automatic classification of background EEG activity in healthy and sick neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfhede, Johan; Thordstein, Magnus; Löfgren, Nils; Flisberg, Anders; Rosa-Zurera, Manuel; Kjellmer, Ingemar; Lindecrantz, Kaj

    2010-02-01

    The overall aim of our research is to develop methods for a monitoring system to be used at neonatal intensive care units. When monitoring a baby, a range of different types of background activity needs to be considered. In this work, we have developed a scheme for automatic classification of background EEG activity in newborn babies. EEG from six full-term babies who were displaying a burst suppression pattern while suffering from the after-effects of asphyxia during birth was included along with EEG from 20 full-term healthy newborn babies. The signals from the healthy babies were divided into four behavioural states: active awake, quiet awake, active sleep and quiet sleep. By using a number of features extracted from the EEG together with Fisher's linear discriminant classifier we have managed to achieve 100% correct classification when separating burst suppression EEG from all four healthy EEG types and 93% true positive classification when separating quiet sleep from the other types. The other three sleep stages could not be classified. When the pathological burst suppression pattern was detected, the analysis was taken one step further and the signal was segmented into burst and suppression, allowing clinically relevant parameters such as suppression length and burst suppression ratio to be calculated. The segmentation of the burst suppression EEG works well, with a probability of error around 4%.

  4. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Oritz, Carlos A.; Marlow, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  5. The Effectiveness of Abstinence Education Programs in Reducing Sexual Activity among Youth. The Heritage Foundation Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rector, Robert

    Teenage sexual activity is a major problem confronting the nation and has led to a rising incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, emotional and psychological injuries, and out-of-wedlock childbearing. Abstinence education programs for youth have proven effective in reducing early sexual activity. They can also provide the foundation for…

  6. Service Providers' Perceptions of Active Ageing among Older Adults with Lifelong Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buys, L.; Aird, R.; Miller, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable attention is currently being directed towards both active ageing and the revising of standards for disability services within Australia and internationally. Yet, to date, no consideration appears to have been given to ways to promote active ageing among older adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs). Methods:…

  7. Memory Maintenance in Synapses with Calcium-Based Plasticity in the Presence of Background Activity

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David; Graupner, Michael; Brunel, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Most models of learning and memory assume that memories are maintained in neuronal circuits by persistent synaptic modifications induced by specific patterns of pre- and postsynaptic activity. For this scenario to be viable, synaptic modifications must survive the ubiquitous ongoing activity present in neural circuits in vivo. In this paper, we investigate the time scales of memory maintenance in a calcium-based synaptic plasticity model that has been shown recently to be able to fit different experimental data-sets from hippocampal and neocortical preparations. We find that in the presence of background activity on the order of 1 Hz parameters that fit pyramidal layer 5 neocortical data lead to a very fast decay of synaptic efficacy, with time scales of minutes. We then identify two ways in which this memory time scale can be extended: (i) the extracellular calcium concentration in the experiments used to fit the model are larger than estimated concentrations in vivo. Lowering extracellular calcium concentration to in vivo levels leads to an increase in memory time scales of several orders of magnitude; (ii) adding a bistability mechanism so that each synapse has two stable states at sufficiently low background activity leads to a further boost in memory time scale, since memory decay is no longer described by an exponential decay from an initial state, but by an escape from a potential well. We argue that both features are expected to be present in synapses in vivo. These results are obtained first in a single synapse connecting two independent Poisson neurons, and then in simulations of a large network of excitatory and inhibitory integrate-and-fire neurons. Our results emphasise the need for studying plasticity at physiological extracellular calcium concentration, and highlight the role of synaptic bi- or multistability in the stability of learned synaptic structures. PMID:25275319

  8. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  9. Background solar irradiance spectrum at high and low phases of the solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Ramió, H.; Roca Cortés, T.; Régulo, C.

    2002-12-01

    Two data series of disk integrated solar irradiance, taken by the Variability of the solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) experiment on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) mission, corresponding to epochs of minimum and maximum solar activity have been analysed in order to study the background signal of the associated power spectra. We fit the most apparent convective structures that appear at low frequencies in the spectrum as well as non-periodic components. We aim to compare the results found in the three observed bands (centered in λ=402nm, λ=500nm and λ=862nm) as well as to find dependences of the non-periodic convective structures parameters with the solar cycle.

  10. A comparative study of thorium activity in NORM and high background radiation area.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Tokonami, S; Sorimachi, A; Kranrod, C; Janik, M; Hosoda, M; Hassan, N M; Chanyotha, S; Parami, V K; Yonehara, H; Ramola, R C

    2010-10-01

    Several industrial processes are known to enrich naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). To assess such processes with respect to their radiological relevance, characteristic parameters describing this enrichment will lead to interesting information useful to UNSCEAR. In case of mineral treatment plants, the high temperatures used in smelting and refining processes lead to high concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th. Also due to thermal power combustion, concentration of U and Th in the fly ash increases manifold. NORM samples were collected from a Thailand mineral treatment plant and Philippine coal-fired thermal power plants for investigation. Some studies are initiated from a high background radiation area near Gopalpur of Orissa state in India. These NORM samples were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The radioactivity in case of Orissa soil samples is found to be mainly contributed from thorium. This study attempts to evaluate levels of thorium activity in NORM samples.

  11. Environmental and school influences on physical activity in South Asian children from low socio-economic backgrounds: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Emma Lisa Jane; Duncan, Michael J; Birch, Samantha L; Cox, Val

    2015-09-01

    South Asian (SA) children are less active but have enhanced metabolic risk factors. Physical activity (PA) is a modifiable risk factor for metabolic disease. Evidence suggests that environmental factors and socio-economic status influence PA behaviour. The purpose of this study was to understand PA environments, barriers and facilitators of PA in deprived environments for children from SA backgrounds. Focus groups were conducted with 5 groups of children aged 7-9 years (n = 33; male = 16, female = 17; SA = 17, White = 8 and Black = 8) from two schools in deprived wards of Coventry, England. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes and subthemes across all transcripts. From the results, emergent themes included school and home environment, outdoor activity, equipment, weather, parental constraints and safety. Ethnic differences were apparent for sources of beliefs and knowledge and religious practice as constraints for PA. The findings suggest that school provides a good foundation for PA attitude, knowledge and behaviour, especially for SA children. To increase PA, multi-component interventions are needed, which focus on changing the home environment (i.e. junk food and media time), encouraging outdoors activity, changing perceptions of safety and weather conditions, which provide parental constraints for children. Interventions also need to be considerate to religious practices that might constrain time.

  12. Social Support and Youth Physical Activity: The Role of Provider and Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Vogel, Randy; Forlaw, Loretta; Pitetti, Kenneth H.; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To examine provider and type variation in social support (SS) for activity. Methods: Three hundred sixty-three fifth to eighth-grade students completed a questionnaire assessing self-reported activity and social support (SS) from 3 providers: mom, dad, and peers. Important covariates of activity were included in the analysis: age, BMI,…

  13. Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dan M.

    2012-05-15

    The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

  14. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K(+) current.

    PubMed

    Lazarenko, Roman M; Fortuna, Michal G; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K; Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Guyenet, Patrice G; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2010-07-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO(2)/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of an Na(+)-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K(+) current. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis of dissociated green fluorescent protein-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (TWIK-related halothane-inhibited K(+) channel, K(2P)13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na(+), and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO(2) levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated primarily by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  15. Phase I Rinal Report: Ultra-Low Background Alpha Activity Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.

    2005-07-22

    signal processor we easily distinguish between these two risetimes and thereby count only alpha particles emitted by the sample. Alpha particles emitted from the sample tray are absorbed in the rear of the sample, so the tray's emissivity does not contribute to the background either. Extensions of the method to the counter's sidewalls similarly allow us to reject alpha particles emitted from the sidewalls. We can thus able obtain background rates over a factor of 1000 lower than in conventional instruments without active background rejection. Extending this principle to count at the 0.00001 alpha/cm{sup 2}/hour, level encounters difficulties because there will typically be only 2.4 alpha particles per square meter per day. Since about 6 counts are required to measure activity at the 95% confidence level, large sample areas are required to make measurements in reasonable times. Unfortunately, increasing the counter's anode area to a square meter raises its capacitance so much that the preamplifier noise levels swamp the alpha particle signals and make counting impossible. In this SBIR we worked to solve this dilemma by segmenting the single large area electrode into several smaller, lower capacitance electrodes that could still detect the alpha particles reliably. Each electrode would have its own electronic and we would capture signals from all of them in coincidence (since an alpha track might well deposit charge on more than one electrode), a technique in which XIA is experienced. Therefore, in Phase I we worked to show proof of principle by subdividing our original 1,800 cm{sup 2} electrode into 4 square segments, each 625 cm{sup 2} and demonstrating that signal noise on individual channels reduced as expected. Because the Phase II counter with a 1 m{sup 2} segmented anode would require 16 segments plus a segmented guard as well, we also designed low cost signal processing electronics to instrument it in Phase II. Our Phase I effort met our major proof of principle

  16. Steps for Improving Physical Activity Orientation Among Health-care Providers of Older Cardiovascular Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Attaining appropriate levels of physical activity can have many potential physiological and psychological benefits in older adults with cardiovascular disease. However, these individuals often report low levels of physical activity and high levels of sedentary behavior. Older adults encounter many potential “barriers” to physical activity, but numerous studies have demonstrated the ability to positively influence this important health behavior using well-established behavior change theories and models. The information provided in this review is directed at health-care providers who have the potential to impact physical activity behaviors during regular, often brief, clinical interactions. In addition to providing the latest physical activity recommendations, this update will provide a brief summary of some of the more widely used behavioral skills and strategies for promoting physical activity in older adults with cardiovascular disease. PMID:25396112

  17. Influence of Task Difficulty and Background Music on Working Memory Activity: Developmental Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaniel, Shlomo; Aram, Dorit

    1998-01-01

    A study of 300 children in kindergarten, grade 2, and grade 6 found that background music improved visual discrimination task performance at the youngest and middle ages and had no effect on the oldest participants. On a square identification task, background music had no influence on easy and difficult tasks but lowered performance on…

  18. Prediction of Solar Activity from Solar Background Magnetic Field Variations in Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V.

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  19. Mildly obscured active galaxies and the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, V.; Walter, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The diffuse cosmic X-ray background (CXB) is the sum of the emission of discrete sources, mostly massive black-holes accreting matter in active galactic nuclei (AGN). The CXB spectrum differs from the integration of the spectra of individual sources, calling for a large population, undetected so far, of strongly obscured Compton-thick AGN. Such objects are predicted by unified models, which attribute most of the AGN diversity to their inclination on the line of sight, and play an important role for the understanding of the growth of black holes in the early Universe. Aims: The percentage of strongly obscured Compton-thick AGN at low redshift can be derived from the observed CXB spectrum, if we assume AGN spectral templates and luminosity functions. Methods: We show that high signal-to-noise stacked hard X-ray spectra, derived from more than a billion seconds of effective exposure time with the Swift/BAT instrument, imply that mildly obscured Compton-thin AGN feature a strong reflection and contribute massively to the CXB. Results: A population of Compton-thick AGN larger than that which is effectively detected is not required to reproduce the CXB spectrum, since no more than 6% of the CXB flux can be attributed to them. The stronger reflection observed in mildly obscured AGN suggests that the covering factor of the gas and dust surrounding their central engines is a key factor in shaping their appearance. These mildly obscured AGN are easier to study at high redshift than Compton-thick sources are.

  20. Prediction of solar activity from solar background magnetic field variations in cycles 21-23

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Simon J.; Zharkov, Sergei I.; Zharkova, Valentina V. E-mail: s.zharkov@hull.ac.uk

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive spectral analysis of both the solar background magnetic field (SBMF) in cycles 21-23 and the sunspot magnetic field in cycle 23 reported in our recent paper showed the presence of two principal components (PCs) of SBMF having opposite polarity, e.g., originating in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Over a duration of one solar cycle, both waves are found to travel with an increasing phase shift toward the northern hemisphere in odd cycles 21 and 23 and to the southern hemisphere in even cycle 22. These waves were linked to solar dynamo waves assumed to form in different layers of the solar interior. In this paper, for the first time, the PCs of SBMF in cycles 21-23 are analyzed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles, allowing us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the SBMF presented by PCs and to extrapolate these PCs to cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 very closely fit (with an accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations in this cycle. This approach also predicts a strong reduction of the SBMF in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted PCs (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The variations of the modulus summary of the two PCs in SBMF reveals a remarkable resemblance to the average number of sunspots in cycles 21-24 and to predictions of reduced sunspot numbers compared to cycle 24: 80% in cycle 25 and 40% in cycle 26.

  1. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., for eligible students. (b) Conducting outreach activities to recruit priority students (identified in... eligible students. (d) Supporting the development or implementation of rigorous academic curricula, which... providing participating students access to rigorous core academic courses that reflect challenging...

  2. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., for eligible students. (b) Conducting outreach activities to recruit priority students (identified in... eligible students. (d) Supporting the development or implementation of rigorous academic curricula, which... providing participating students access to rigorous core academic courses that reflect challenging...

  3. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide the following services and activities: (1) Opportunities for research or other scholarly... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational... planning for postsecondary education. (2) Mentoring programs involving faculty members at institutions...

  4. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provide the following services and activities: (1) Opportunities for research or other scholarly... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational... planning for postsecondary education. (2) Mentoring programs involving faculty members at institutions...

  5. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provide the following services and activities: (1) Opportunities for research or other scholarly... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational... planning for postsecondary education. (2) Mentoring programs involving faculty members at institutions...

  6. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide the following services and activities: (1) Opportunities for research or other scholarly... effective preparation for doctoral study. (2) Summer internships. (3) Seminars and other educational... planning for postsecondary education. (2) Mentoring programs involving faculty members at institutions...

  7. Piecing together the X-ray background: bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the SMBH mass density related to the energy density due to accretion. A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, κ2-10keV, is a vital input into these studies, as it allows us to constrain the parameters of the accretion responsible for SMBH growth. Earlier studies assumed a constant bolometric correction for all AGN, and more recent work has suggested accounting for a dependence on AGN luminosity. Until recently, the variations in the disc emission in the ultraviolet (UV) have not been taken into account in this calculation; we show that such variations are important by construction of optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions for 54 AGN. In particular, we use Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disc emission as well as possible. We find evidence for very significant spread in the bolometric corrections, with no simple dependence on luminosity being evident. Populations of AGN such as narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei, radio-loud and X-ray-weak AGN may have bolometric corrections which differ systematically from the rest of the AGN population. We identify other sources of uncertainty including intrinsic extinction in the optical-UV, X-ray and UV variability and uncertainties in SMBH mass estimates. Our results suggest a more well-defined relationship between the bolometric correction and Eddington ratio in AGN, with a transitional region at an Eddington ratio of ~0.1, below which the bolometric correction is typically 15-25, and above which it is typically 40-70. We consider the potential-implied parallels with the low/hard and high/soft states in Galactic black hole (GBH) accretion, and present bolometric corrections for the GBH binary GX 339-4 for comparison. Our findings reinforce previous studies proposing a multistate description of AGN

  8. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  9. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  10. 30 CFR 550.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 550.208 Section 550.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT... least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development G&G activity (see §...

  11. Providing Education to Child Care Instructors: Matching Children's Learning Activities to Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Margaret M.

    Child care instructors and their aides at the Good Shepherd Day Care Center, Punta Gorda, Florida, were taught skills needed to develop classroom activities matching the cognitive development of 3- and 4-year-old children. Through a program of in-service activity in child growth and development, instruction was provided to enable teachers to more…

  12. 30 CFR 250.208 - If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If I conduct ancillary activities, what notices must I provide? 250.208 Section 250.208 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... notices must I provide? At least 30 calendar days before you conduct any G&G exploration or development...

  13. Providing Outreach to Families of Youth with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds by Working with Cultural Groups and Community Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tracey R.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored how informal community networks (i.e., faith based organizations, community cultural centers and service agencies) provided information to culturally and linguistically diverse families. The goals of this study were, first, to gain a better understanding of the methods the informal community networks used to…

  14. [Biologically active food supplements in comprehensive therapy of patients with ischemic heart disease and hypertension and the background of overweight].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, O I; Tutel'ian, V A; Pogozheva, A V; Askol'zina, S E; Lysenkova, S L

    2000-01-01

    The influence of anti-atherosclerotic diet with including some biologically active additives, with contain vitamins C, E, beta-carotene, Zn, Cr, Se was studied in 80 patients with ischemic heart disease, hypertension disease. The usage of biologically active additives during 4 weeks has promoted positive changes of clinical symptoms of diseases against a background of lowering of serum cholesterol, triglycerides and increasing of IgA, IgG, vitamins A, E, C.

  15. Inheritance of grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in multiple wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genetic backgrounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity can cause discoloration of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) food products. Five crosses (PI 117635/Antelope; Fielder/NW03681; Fielder/Antelope; NW07OR1070/Antelope; NW07OR1066/OR2050272H) were selected to study the genetic inheritance of PPO activity. STS marker...

  16. Hydrodynamic instabilities provide a generic route to spontaneous biomimetic oscillations in chemomechanically active filaments

    PubMed Central

    Laskar, Abhrajit; Singh, Rajeev; Ghose, Somdeb; Jayaraman, Gayathri; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2013-01-01

    Non-equilibrium processes which convert chemical energy into mechanical motion enable the motility of organisms. Bundles of inextensible filaments driven by energy transduction of molecular motors form essential components of micron-scale motility engines like cilia and flagella. The mimicry of cilia-like motion in recent experiments on synthetic active filaments supports the idea that generic physical mechanisms may be sufficient to generate such motion. Here we show, theoretically, that the competition between the destabilising effect of hydrodynamic interactions induced by force-free and torque-free chemomechanically active flows, and the stabilising effect of nonlinear elasticity, provides a generic route to spontaneous oscillations in active filaments. These oscillations, reminiscent of prokaryotic and eukaryotic flagellar motion, are obtained without having to invoke structural complexity or biochemical regulation. This minimality implies that biomimetic oscillations, previously observed only in complex bundles of active filaments, can be replicated in simple chains of generic chemomechanically active beads. PMID:23752497

  17. Hydrodynamic instabilities provide a generic route to spontaneous biomimetic oscillations in chemomechanically active filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Abhrajit; Singh, Rajeev; Ghose, Somdeb; Jayaraman, Gayathri; Kumar, P. B. Sunil; Adhikari, R.

    2013-06-01

    Non-equilibrium processes which convert chemical energy into mechanical motion enable the motility of organisms. Bundles of inextensible filaments driven by energy transduction of molecular motors form essential components of micron-scale motility engines like cilia and flagella. The mimicry of cilia-like motion in recent experiments on synthetic active filaments supports the idea that generic physical mechanisms may be sufficient to generate such motion. Here we show, theoretically, that the competition between the destabilising effect of hydrodynamic interactions induced by force-free and torque-free chemomechanically active flows, and the stabilising effect of nonlinear elasticity, provides a generic route to spontaneous oscillations in active filaments. These oscillations, reminiscent of prokaryotic and eukaryotic flagellar motion, are obtained without having to invoke structural complexity or biochemical regulation. This minimality implies that biomimetic oscillations, previously observed only in complex bundles of active filaments, can be replicated in simple chains of generic chemomechanically active beads.

  18. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide? 694.22 Section 694.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (CONTINUED) GAINING EARLY AWARENESS...

  19. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What activities and services does a project provide? 646.4 Section 646.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM General §...

  20. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What activities and services does a project provide? 646.4 Section 646.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES PROGRAM General §...

  1. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors.

  2. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity. PMID:19765013

  3. Disclosure to parents about everyday activities among american adolescents from mexican, chinese, and European backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Yau, Jenny P; Tasopoulos-Chan, Marina; Smetana, Judith G

    2009-01-01

    Disclosure to parents and reasons for not disclosing different activities were examined in 489 Chinese, Mexican, and European American adolescents (M = 16.37 years, SD = 0.77). With generational status controlled, Chinese American adolescents disclosed less to mothers about personal and multifaceted activities than European Americans and less about personal feelings than other youth, primarily because these acts were considered personal, not harmful, or because parents would not listen or understand. Disclosure regarding prudential behavior was lower among Mexican American than among European American adolescents, primarily due to concerns with parental disapproval. Multigroup path analyses indicated that greater closeness to parents is associated with more disclosure for all youth and activities; associations between family obligation and disclosure varied by domain and ethnicity.

  4. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  5. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Luke A.; Durrant, Benjamin P.; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J.; Gilbert, Robert J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3′ ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164–N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes—for example by the binding of protein co-factors—may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3′ termini of RNA molecules. PMID:25712096

  6. Structural plasticity of Cid1 provides a basis for its distributive RNA terminal uridylyl transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Yates, Luke A; Durrant, Benjamin P; Fleurdépine, Sophie; Harlos, Karl; Norbury, Chris J; Gilbert, Robert J C

    2015-03-11

    Terminal uridylyl transferases (TUTs) are responsible for the post-transcriptional addition of uridyl residues to RNA 3' ends, leading in some cases to altered stability. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe TUT Cid1 is a model enzyme that has been characterized structurally at moderate resolution and provides insights into the larger and more complex mammalian TUTs, ZCCHC6 and ZCCHC11. Here, we report a higher resolution (1.74 Å) crystal structure of Cid1 that provides detailed evidence for uracil selection via the dynamic flipping of a single histidine residue. We also describe a novel closed conformation of the enzyme that may represent an intermediate stage in a proposed product ejection mechanism. The structural insights gained, combined with normal mode analysis and biochemical studies, demonstrate that the plasticity of Cid1, particularly about a hinge region (N164-N165), is essential for catalytic activity, and provide an explanation for its distributive uridylyl transferase activity. We propose a model clarifying observed differences between the in vitro apparently processive activity and in vivo distributive monouridylylation activity of Cid1. We suggest that modulating the flexibility of such enzymes-for example by the binding of protein co-factors-may allow them alternatively to add single or multiple uridyl residues to the 3' termini of RNA molecules.

  7. ERP adaptation provides direct evidence for early mirror neuron activation in the inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Nicole; Brandt, Emily S L; Mohr, Bettina; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Andres H

    2014-10-01

    Mirror neuron systems are frequently investigated by assessing overlapping brain activity during observation and execution of actions; however, distinct neuronal subpopulations may be activated that fall below the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. This shortfall can be resolved using repetition suppression paradigms that identify physiological adaptation processes caused by repeated activation of identical neuronal circuits. Here, event-related potentials were used to investigate the time course of mirror neuron circuit activation using repetition suppression within and across action observation and action execution modalities. In a lip-reading and speech production paradigm, the N170 component indexed stimulus repetition by adapting to both cross-modal and intra-modal repetitions in the left hemisphere. Neuronal source localization revealed activation of the left inferior parietal lobule during cross-modal relative to intra-modal trials. These results provide support for the position that the same neuronal circuits are activated in perceiving and performing articulatory actions. Moreover, our data strongly suggest that inferior parietal lobule mirror neurons are activated relatively early in time, which indicates partly automatic processes of linguistic perception and mirroring. Repetition suppression paradigms therefore help to elucidate neuronal correlates of different cognitive processes and may serve as a starting point for advanced electrophysiological research on mirror neurons.

  8. ERP adaptation provides direct evidence for early mirror neuron activation in the inferior parietal lobule.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Nicole; Brandt, Emily S L; Mohr, Bettina; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Neuhaus, Andres H

    2014-10-01

    Mirror neuron systems are frequently investigated by assessing overlapping brain activity during observation and execution of actions; however, distinct neuronal subpopulations may be activated that fall below the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance techniques. This shortfall can be resolved using repetition suppression paradigms that identify physiological adaptation processes caused by repeated activation of identical neuronal circuits. Here, event-related potentials were used to investigate the time course of mirror neuron circuit activation using repetition suppression within and across action observation and action execution modalities. In a lip-reading and speech production paradigm, the N170 component indexed stimulus repetition by adapting to both cross-modal and intra-modal repetitions in the left hemisphere. Neuronal source localization revealed activation of the left inferior parietal lobule during cross-modal relative to intra-modal trials. These results provide support for the position that the same neuronal circuits are activated in perceiving and performing articulatory actions. Moreover, our data strongly suggest that inferior parietal lobule mirror neurons are activated relatively early in time, which indicates partly automatic processes of linguistic perception and mirroring. Repetition suppression paradigms therefore help to elucidate neuronal correlates of different cognitive processes and may serve as a starting point for advanced electrophysiological research on mirror neurons. PMID:25017963

  9. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  10. Providing a Background for British Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLuca, Diana Macintyre

    One consequence of teaching British literature far away from British shores is the loss of intimacy that comes from a shared culture. American teachers can help bring Britain into their classrooms by requesting audiovisual aids from the various museums and galleries in Britain that are willing to supply material. Among such sources are (1) Walton…

  11. Reducing background noise in near-infrared medical imaging: Routes to activated fluorescing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, Mary K.; Bandera, Yuriy; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Foulger, Stephen H.

    2016-03-01

    Activated fluorescence was achieved for nanoparticle based systems. One particulate system consisting of a poly(propargyl acrylate) (PA) core with covalently attached derivatized fluorescein and modified bovine serum albumin covalently conjugated to a cyanine 3 derivative was initially nonfluorescent. Upon trypsin addition and subsequent proteolytic digestion, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was induced. The other particulate system consisted of a PA core with covalently attached azide modified BSA, which was covalently attached to a silicon phthalocyanine derivative (PA/BSA/akSiPc600). Both systems were biocompatible. To investigate activated fluorescence with the PA/BSA/akSiPc600 system in cancer cells, human non-small cell lung cancer cells (A549 cell line) were used as a model system. The PA/BSA/akSiPc600 system was incubated with the cells at varying time points in an effort to see a fluorescence increase over time as the cells uptake the particles and as they digest the BSA, most probably, via endocytosis. It was seen, through live cell scanning confocal microscopy, that the fluorescence was activated in the cell.

  12. The Online GVP/USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report: Providing Timely Information About Worldwide Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, G. C.; Guffanti, M. C.; Luhr, J. F.; Venzke, E. A.; Wunderman, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    The awesome power and intricate inner workings of volcanoes have made them a popular subject with scientists and the general public alike. About 1500 known volcanoes have been active on Earth during the Holocene, approximately 50 of which erupt per year. With so much activity occurring around the world, often in remote locations, it can be difficult to find up-to-date information about current volcanism from a reliable source. To satisfy the desire for timely volcano-related information the Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey combined their strengths to create the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report. The Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) has developed a network of correspondents while reporting worldwide volcanism for over 30 years in their monthly Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network. The US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program studies and monitors volcanoes in the United States and responds (upon invitation) to selected volcanic crises in other countries. The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is one of the most popular sites on both organization's websites. The core of the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is the brief summaries of current volcanic activity around the world. In addition to discussing various types of volcanism, the summaries also describe precursory activity (e.g. volcanic seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions), secondary activity (e.g. debris flows, mass wasting, and rockfalls), volcanic ash hazards to aviation, and preventative measures. The summaries are supplemented by links to definitions of technical terms found in the USGS photoglossary of volcano terms, links to information sources, and background information about reported volcanoes. The site also includes maps that highlight the location of reported volcanoes, an archive of weekly reports sorted by volcano and date, and links to commonly used acronyms. Since the Weekly Volcanic Activity Report's inception in November 2000, activity has been reported at

  13. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  14. Effects of exogenous hydrogen sulphide on calcium signalling, background (TASK) K channel activity and mitochondrial function in chemoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Buckler, Keith J

    2012-04-01

    It has been proposed that endogenous H(2)S mediates oxygen sensing in chemoreceptors; this study investigates the mechanisms by which H(2)S excites carotid body type 1 cells. H(2)S caused a rapid reversible increase in intracellular calcium with EC(50) ≈ 6 μM. This [Ca(2+)](i) response was abolished in Ca-free Tyrode. In perforated patch current clamp recordings, H(2)S depolarised type 1 cells from -59 to -35 mV; this was accompanied by a robust increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Voltage clamping at the resting membrane potential abolished the H(2)S-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i). H(2)S inhibited background K(+) current in whole cell perforated patch and reduced background K(+) channel activity in cell-attached patch recordings. It is concluded that H(2)S excites type 1 cells through the inhibition of background (TASK) potassium channels leading to membrane depolarisation and voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry. These effects mimic those of hypoxia. H(2)S also inhibited mitochondrial function over a similar concentration range as assessed by NADH autofluorescence and measurement of intracellular magnesium (an index of decline in MgATP). Cyanide inhibited background K channels to a similar extent to H(2)S and prevented H(2)S exerting any further influence over channel activity. These data indicate that the effects of H(2)S on background K channels are a consequence of inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst this does not preclude a role for endogenous H(2)S in oxygen sensing via the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, the levels of H(2)S required raise questions as to the viability of such a mechanism.

  15. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  16. A background traffic activity analysis in a canonical NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) defense

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1989-04-01

    A canonical defense study in a NATO brigade sector on the northern flank of the US V Corps sector in the Federal Republic of Germany is wargamed to depict the expected vehicular movements during a 24 hour time period. All NATO and Warsaw Pact situations and forces played intentionally portray a ''normal'' battlefield situation, that is one in which events occur according to the established tactics and doctrines for both NATO and WP forces. Activity details which are almost always ignored in broader studies are included. The periodic displacement of high value units (e.g., artillery, air defense, headquarters and target acquisition) to preclude enemy fixing and targeting; the resupply down to company and occasionally platoon level of ammunition, petroleum, rations, etc.; the movement of commanders and staffs; the activity of combat engineers to include site preparation, construction and minefield emplacement; the action of reconnaissance and patrol units; the security of the rear area and POW processing; and the evacuation of casualties are analyzed. The resulting database records the position for every vehicle in both forces at each minute during the period of analysis and is thus an ideal framework for a variety of further studies, such as analyses of intelligence collection devices and modern ordinances. 9 refs., 30 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries. PMID:11326572

  18. Application of activity-based costing (ABC) for a Peruvian NGO healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Waters, H; Abdallah, H; Santillán, D

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the application of activity-based costing (ABC) to calculate the unit costs of the services for a health care provider in Peru. While traditional costing allocates overhead and indirect costs in proportion to production volume or to direct costs, ABC assigns costs through activities within an organization. ABC uses personnel interviews to determine principal activities and the distribution of individual's time among these activities. Indirect costs are linked to services through time allocation and other tracing methods, and the result is a more accurate estimate of unit costs. The study concludes that applying ABC in a developing country setting is feasible, yielding results that are directly applicable to pricing and management. ABC determines costs for individual clinics, departments and services according to the activities that originate these costs, showing where an organization spends its money. With this information, it is possible to identify services that are generating extra revenue and those operating at a loss, and to calculate cross subsidies across services. ABC also highlights areas in the health care process where efficiency improvements are possible. Conclusions about the ultimate impact of the methodology are not drawn here, since the study was not repeated and changes in utilization patterns and the addition of new clinics affected applicability of the results. A potential constraint to implementing ABC is the availability and organization of cost information. Applying ABC efficiently requires information to be readily available, by cost category and department, since the greatest benefits of ABC come from frequent, systematic application of the methodology in order to monitor efficiency and provide feedback for management. The article concludes with a discussion of the potential applications of ABC in the health sector in developing countries.

  19. Subway construction activity influence on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fine particles: Comparison with a background mountainous site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Li, Xuxu; Li, Qi; Yin, Yan; Li, Li; Chen, Kui; Liu, Dantong; Yuan, Liang; Pang, Xiaobing

    2015-07-01

    Intensive construction activities worsened the surrounding atmospheric environment in China. Eighteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fine particles (PM2.5) were collected at a subway construction site (SC) of Nanjing and compared with a regional background mountainous site (BM) to examine the influence of anthropogenic activities on concentrations, sources and health risks of PAHs. Average PAH concentrations at SC were higher than BM at a factor of about 5.9. All PAH species at SC were higher than BM, with the SC/BM ratios ranging from 1.3 (NaP) to 10.3 (BaP). PAH profiles differed for the two sites. The SC site had higher mass fractions of PAHs from coal combustion and vehicle emission, while the BM site held higher mass percentages of PAHs from long-range transported wood combustion and industrial activities. Lower temperature at BM may lead to the higher mass percentages of low ring PAHs. Coal combustion, traffic emissions and biomass burning were the common sources for PAHs at both SC and BM. Construction workers were exposed to higher BaPeq concentrations, nearly ten times of the background site and their lifetime cancer risk reached to 0.6 per 1,000,000 exposed worker, owing to the influence of coal combustion, vehicle emission and industrial activities at the surroundings of SC.

  20. Inhibition of Btk with CC-292 provides early pharmacodynamic assessment of activity in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Evans, Erica K; Tester, Richland; Aslanian, Sharon; Karp, Russell; Sheets, Michael; Labenski, Matthew T; Witowski, Steven R; Lounsbury, Heather; Chaturvedi, Prasoon; Mazdiyasni, Hormoz; Zhu, Zhendong; Nacht, Mariana; Freed, Martin I; Petter, Russell C; Dubrovskiy, Alex; Singh, Juswinder; Westlin, William F

    2013-08-01

    Targeted therapies that suppress B cell receptor (BCR) signaling have emerged as promising agents in autoimmune disease and B cell malignancies. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays a crucial role in B cell development and activation through the BCR signaling pathway and represents a new target for diseases characterized by inappropriate B cell activity. N-(3-(5-fluoro-2-(4-(2-methoxyethoxy)phenylamino)pyrimidin-4-ylamino)phenyl)acrylamide (CC-292) is a highly selective, covalent Btk inhibitor and a sensitive and quantitative assay that measures CC-292-Btk engagement has been developed. This translational pharmacodynamic assay has accompanied CC-292 through each step of drug discovery and development. These studies demonstrate the quantity of Btk bound by CC-292 correlates with the efficacy of CC-292 in vitro and in the collagen-induced arthritis model of autoimmune disease. Recently, CC-292 has entered human clinical trials with a trial design that has provided rapid insight into safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. This first-in-human healthy volunteer trial has demonstrated that a single oral dose of 2 mg/kg CC-292 consistently engaged all circulating Btk protein and provides the basis for rational dose selection in future clinical trials. This targeted covalent drug design approach has enabled the discovery and early clinical development of CC-292 and has provided support for Btk as a valuable drug target for B-cell mediated disorders.

  1. The Fidelity Index provides a systematic quantitation of star activity of DNA restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hua; Therrien, Caitlin; Blanchard, Aine; Guan, Shengxi; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Restriction endonucleases are the basic tools of molecular biology. Many restriction endonucleases show relaxed sequence recognition, called star activity, as an inherent property under various digestion conditions including the optimal ones. To quantify this property we propose the concept of the Fidelity Index (FI), which is defined as the ratio of the maximum enzyme amount showing no star activity to the minimum amount needed for complete digestion at the cognate recognition site for any particular restriction endonuclease. Fidelity indices for a large number of restriction endonucleases are reported here. The effects of reaction vessel, reaction volume, incubation mode, substrate differences, reaction time, reaction temperature and additional glycerol, DMSO, ethanol and Mn2+ on the FI are also investigated. The FI provides a practical guideline for the use of restriction endonucleases and defines a fundamental property by which restriction endonucleases can be characterized. PMID:18413342

  2. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  3. Emergency department syndromic surveillance providing early warning of seasonal respiratory activity in England.

    PubMed

    Hughes, H E; Morbey, R; Hughes, T C; Locker, T E; Pebody, R; Green, H K; Ellis, J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal respiratory infections place an increased burden on health services annually. We used a sentinel emergency department syndromic surveillance system to understand the factors driving respiratory attendances at emergency departments (EDs) in England. Trends in different respiratory indicators were observed to peak at different points during winter, with further variation observed in the distribution of attendances by age. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed acute respiratory infection and bronchitis/bronchiolitis ED attendances in patients aged 1-4 years were particularly sensitive indicators for increasing respiratory syncytial virus activity. Using near real-time surveillance of respiratory ED attendances may provide early warning of increased winter pressures in EDs, particularly driven by seasonal pathogens. This surveillance may provide additional intelligence about different categories of attendance, highlighting pressures in particular age groups, thereby aiding planning and preparation to respond to acute changes in EDs, and thus the health service in general.

  4. Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments of Home-Based Child Care: What Hispanic Providers Have to Say

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Noereem Z.; Risica, Patricia; Gorham, Gemma; Gans, Kim M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: It is important to understand the perceptions and beliefs of family child care providers (FCCPs) regarding which factors influence children's physical activity (PA), screen-time (ST), and dietary behaviors in order to develop and implement appropriate obesity prevention interventions. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the aforementioned perceptions and beliefs of FCCPs in Rhode Island. Methods: Four focus groups (n = 30) were held with FCCPs. Providers were female, Hispanic, and Spanish speaking. Providers were asked about different aspects of feeding, PA, and ST behaviors. Themes were coded using NVivo10 (QSR International Pty Ltd, Doncaster, Victoria, Australia). Content analysis was used to analyze final themes. Results: Providers understood the importance of providing opportunities for healthy eating and PA for the children they cared for, but there was room for improvement, especially with regard to certain feeding and ST practices. Several barriers were evident, including the lack of physical infrastructure for PA, cultural beliefs and practices related to child feeding, and difficulties working with parents to provide consistent messages across environments. Conclusions: Given that FCCPs are aware of the importance of healthy eating and PA, there is a need to address the specific barriers they face, and operationalize some of their knowledge into practical everyday actions. This formative work will inform the development of a culturally relevant, multicomponent intervention for ethnically diverse FCCPs to improve the food and PA environments of their homes, which should, in turn, improve the dietary, PA, and ST behaviors of the 2- to 5-year-old children they care for. PMID:26332455

  5. Multitargeting of selected prostanoid receptors provides agents with enhanced anti-inflammatory activity in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jenny W; Woodward, David F; Martos, Jose L; Cornell, Clive L; Carling, Robert W; Kingsley, Philip J; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    A polypharmacologic approach to prostanoid based anti-inflammatory therapeutics was undertaken in order to exploit both the anti- and proinflammatory properties attributed to the various prostanoid receptors. Multitargeting of selected prostanoid receptors yielded a prototype compound, compound 1 (AGN 211377), that antagonizes prostaglandin D2 receptors (DPs) DP1 (49) and DP2 (558), prostaglandin E2 receptors (EPs) EP1 (266) and EP4 (117), prostaglandin F2α receptor (FP) (61), and thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) (11) while sparing EP2, EP3, and prostaglandin I2 receptors (IPs); Kb values (in nanomoles) are given in parentheses. Compound 1 evoked a pronounced inhibition of cytokine/chemokine secretion from lipopolysaccharide or TNF-α stimulated primary human macrophages. These cytokine/chemokines included cluster of designation 40 receptor (CD40), epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating protein 78 (ENA-78), granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-8, IL-18, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2) (MCP-1), tissue plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). In contrast, the inhibitory effects of most antagonists selective for a single receptor were modest or absent, and selective EP2 receptor blockade increased cytokine release in some instances. Compound 1 also showed clear superiority to the cyclooxygenase inhibitors diclofenac and rofecoxib. These findings reveal that blockade of multiple prostanoid receptors, with absent antagonism of EP2 and IP, may provide more effective anti-inflammatory activity than global suppression of prostanoid synthesis or highly selective prostanoid receptor blockade. These investigations demonstrate the first working example of prostanoid receptor polypharmacology for potentially safer and more effective anti-inflammatory therapeutics by blocking multiple proinflammatory receptors while sparing

  6. The Feasibility of Using Nature-Based Settings for Physical Activity Programming: Views from Urban Youth and Program Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Jedediah E.; Oregon, Evelyn M.; Flett, M. Ryan; Gould, Daniel R.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the urgency to design programs to increase physical activity, especially to combat obesity in children, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions and opinions of a nature-based physical activity intervention designed for low-income urban adolescents. Methods: Four focus groups of adolescents,…

  7. Active site conformational changes of prostasin provide a new mechanism of protease regulation by divalent cations

    SciTech Connect

    Spraggon, Glen; Hornsby, Michael; Shipway, Aaron; Tully, David C.; Bursulaya, Badry; Danahay, Henry; Harris, Jennifer L.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2010-01-12

    Prostasin or human channel-activating protease 1 has been reported to play a critical role in the regulation of extracellular sodium ion transport via its activation of the epithelial cell sodium channel. Here, the structure of the extracellular portion of the membrane associated serine protease has been solved to high resolution in complex with a nonselective d-FFR chloromethyl ketone inhibitor, in an apo form, in a form where the apo crystal has been soaked with the covalent inhibitor camostat and in complex with the protein inhibitor aprotinin. It was also crystallized in the presence of the divalent cation Ca{sup +2}. Comparison of the structures with each other and with other members of the trypsin-like serine protease family reveals unique structural features of prostasin and a large degree of conformational variation within specificity determining loops. Of particular interest is the S1 subsite loop which opens and closes in response to basic residues or divalent ions, directly binding Ca{sup +2} cations. This induced fit active site provides a new possible mode of regulation of trypsin-like proteases adapted in particular to extracellular regions with variable ionic concentrations such as the outer membrane layer of the epithelial cell.

  8. Study provides data on active plate tectonics in southeast Asia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Rais, J.; Reigber, Ch.; Reinhart, E.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Le Pichon, X.; Kasser, M.; Suharto, P.; Majid, Dato'Abdul; Yaakub, Dato'Paduka Awang Haji Othman Bin Haji; Almeda, R.; Boonphakdee, C.

    A major geodynamic study has provided significant new information about the location of active plate boundaries in and around Southeast Asia, as well as deformation processes in the Sulawesi region of Indonesia and tectonic activity in the Philippine archipelago. Results also have confirmed the existence of the so-called Sunda Block, which appears to be rotating with respect to adjacent plates.The study, known as the Geodynamics of South and South-East Asia (GEODYSSEA) project, has been a joint venture of the European Commission and the Association of South- East Asian Nations. It began in 1991 and involved a large team of European and Asian scientists and technicians studying the complex geodynamic processes and natural hazards of the region from the Southeast Asia mainland to the Philippines to northern Australia. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, and tectonically induced landslides endanger the lives of millions of people in the region, and the tectonic activity behind these natural hazards results from the convergence and collision of the Eurasian, Philippine, and Indo-Australian Plates at relative velocities of up to 10 cm per year.

  9. Engineered Nanostructures of Antigen Provide an Effective Means for Regulating Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhao; Weng, I-Chun; Li, Jie-Ren; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Gang-yu

    2011-01-01

    Nanostructures containing 2,4-Dinitrophenyl (DNP) as antigen were designed and produced to investigate antibody-mediated activation of mast cells. The design consists of nanogrids of DNP termini inlaid in alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Using scanning probe-based nanografting, nanometer precision was attained for designed geometry, size and periodicity. Rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells exhibited high sensitivity to the geometry and local environment of DNP presented on these nanostructures. The impact included cellular adherence, spreading, membrane morphology, cytoskeleton structure, and activation. The highest level of spreading and activation was induced by nanogrids of 17 nm line width and 40 nm periodicity, with DNP haptens 1.4 nm above the surroundings. The high efficacy is attributed to two main factors. First, DNP sites in the nanostructure are highly accessible by anti-DNP-IgE during recognition. Second, the arrangement or geometry of DNP termini in nanostructures promotes clustering of FcεRI receptors that are pre-linked to IgE. The clustering effectively initiates Lyn-mediated signaling cascades, ultimately leading to the degranulation of RBL cells. This work demonstrates an important concept, that nanostructures of ligands provide new and effective cues for directing cellular signaling processes. PMID:21999491

  10. Atypical slow waves generated in gastric corpus provide dominant pacemaker activity in guinea pig stomach.

    PubMed

    Hashitani, Hikaru; Garcia-Londoño, A Pilar; Hirst, G David S; Edwards, Frank R

    2005-12-01

    When intracellular recordings were made from the circular layer of the intact muscular wall of the isolated guinea pig gastric corpus, an ongoing regular high frequency discharge of slow waves was detected even though this region lacked myenteric interstitial cells. When slow waves were recorded from preparations consisting of both the antrum and the corpus, slow waves of identical frequency, but with different shapes, were generated in the two regions. Corporal slow waves could be distinguished from antral slow waves by their time courses and amplitudes. Corporal slow waves, like antral slow waves, were abolished by buffering the internal concentration of calcium ions, [Ca2+]i, to low levels, or by caffeine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate or the chloride channel blocker DIDS. Corporal preparations demonstrated an ongoing discharge of unitary potentials, as has been found in all other tissues containing interstitial cells. The experiments show that the corpus provides the dominant pacemaker activity which entrains activity in other regions of the stomach and it is suggested that this activity is generated by corporal intramuscular interstitial cells.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling provides accurate calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters.

    PubMed

    Zagni, F; Cicoria, G; Lucconi, G; Infantino, A; Lodi, F; Marengo, M

    2014-12-01

    Accurate determination of calibration factors for radionuclide activity meters is crucial for quantitative studies and in the optimization step of radiation protection, as these detectors are widespread in radiopharmacy and nuclear medicine facilities. In this work we developed the Monte Carlo model of a widely used activity meter, using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. More precisely the "PENELOPE" EM physics models were employed. The model was validated by means of several certified sources, traceable to primary activity standards, and other sources locally standardized with spectrometry measurements, plus other experimental tests. Great care was taken in order to accurately reproduce the geometrical details of the gas chamber and the activity sources, each of which is different in shape and enclosed in a unique container. Both relative calibration factors and ionization current obtained with simulations were compared against experimental measurements; further tests were carried out, such as the comparison of the relative response of the chamber for a source placed at different positions. The results showed a satisfactory level of accuracy in the energy range of interest, with the discrepancies lower than 4% for all the tested parameters. This shows that an accurate Monte Carlo modeling of this type of detector is feasible using the low-energy physics models embedded in Geant4. The obtained Monte Carlo model establishes a powerful tool for first instance determination of new calibration factors for non-standard radionuclides, for custom containers, when a reference source is not available. Moreover, the model provides an experimental setup for further research and optimization with regards to materials and geometrical details of the measuring setup, such as the ionization chamber itself or the containers configuration.

  12. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data. PMID:12674203

  13. [GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM ACTIVITY IN RAT TISSUES UNDER PHENYLETHYL BIGUANIDE ACTION ON THE BACKGROUND OF EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION DEVELOPMENT].

    PubMed

    Safonova, O A; Popova, T N; Kryl'skii, D V

    2016-01-01

    It was studied the total antioxidant activity, content of primary lipid peroxidation (LPO) products and reduced glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase in rat tissues under phenylethyl biguanide (phenfor- min) action on the background of experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion development. It is stablished the analyzed parameters, increasing under ischemia/reperfusion conditions in the brain and blood serum of animals, exhibit a decrease upon the introduction of this biguanide derivative. The obtained data can be explained by a decrease in degree of mobilization of the antioxidant system--in particular, of its glutathione chain--in the pathologic state. Hence, there is a need in NADPH supply for the system functioning compared with the pathology. Thus, phenylethyl biguanide demonstrates its antioxidant and protective properties under oxidative stress development that is accompanied by accumulation of the products of free radical oxidation of biomolecules during the ischemic brain injury. PMID:27159954

  14. Genetic and epigenetic background and protein expression profiles in relation to telomerase activation in medullary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na; Kjellin, Hanna; Sofiadis, Anastasios; Fotouhi, Omid; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Bäckdahl, Martin; Zedenius, Jan; Xu, Dawei; Lehtiö, Janne; Larsson, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTCs) exhibit telomerase activation in strong association with shorter patient survival. To understand the background of telomerase activation we quantified TERT copy numbers and TERT promoter methylation in 42 MTCs and normal thyroid references. Gain of TERT was demonstrated by quantitative PCR in 5/39 sporadic MTC. Increased methylation index (MetI) for CpG methylation at the TERT promoter was found in sporadic MTCs (P < 0.0001) and in MEN 2 associated MTCs (P = 0.011) vs. normal thyroid tissues. MetI correlated positively with TERT gene expression (r = 0.432, P = 0.006) and negatively with telomere length (r = −0.343, P = 0.032). MTC cases with MetI above the median of 52% had shorter survival as compared to cases with lower MetI (P = 0.005 for overall survival and P = 0.007 for disease-related survival). Protein expression profiles obtained by mass spectrometry were then studied in relation to telomerase activation in MTCs. Comparing protein levels between tumors defined by telomerase activity status, 240 proteins were associated with telomerase activity. Among telomerase activation positive cases a set of proteins was found to discriminate between MTCs with high and low TERT gene expression with enrichment for proteins involved in telomerase regulation. XRCC5 mRNA expression was found increased in MTCs vs. normal thyroid (P = 0.007). In conclusion the findings suggest a role for TERT copy number gain, TERT promoter methylation and XRCC5 expression in telomerase activation and telomere maintenance of MTC. PMID:26870890

  15. 34 CFR 647.4 - What activities and services may a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the following services and activities: (a) Opportunities for research or other scholarly activities at... effective preparation for doctoral study. (b) Summer internships. (c) Seminars and other...

  16. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  17. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  18. Patient-Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegria, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project-Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients' participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were…

  19. [Zinc homeostasis and indicators of muscle activity in experimental graduated exercise on the background of zinc asparaginate].

    PubMed

    Skalny, A A; Tinkov, A A; Medvedeva, Yu S; Alchinova, I B; Bonitenko, E Yu; Karganov, M Yu; Nikonorov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a regular (for 7 and 14 days) 10-minute dosed exercise in isolation and on the background of intragastric administration of 5 and 15 mg/kg of zinc (II) asparaginate on the distribution of this metal in the organs and tissues of experimental animals and the indicators of muscle activity such as the level of lactate, creatinine and creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2.) serum were studied. It has been shown that exercise stress for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in homeostasis Zn, compared with 7 day, it is reflected in increased levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. It has been shown that graduated exercise for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in Zn homeostasis, compared with 7 day that expressed in increased its levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. Introduction zinc (II) asparaginate accompanied by an increase of its content in the liver, kidneys, hair and serum, but not skeletal and cardiac muscle. The combination of physical activity and the introduction of zinc positive effect on homeostasis of Zn, and the terms of muscle activity. The protective effect of zinc asparaginate with graduated exercise in the experiment was concluded. PMID:27116879

  20. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  1. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  2. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  3. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... its approved HIT planning advance planning document and health information technology...

  4. 42 CFR 495.364 - Review and assessment of administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation. 495.364... administrative activities and expenses of Medicaid provider health information technology adoption and operation... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD...

  5. Providing Physical Activity for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: The Motivate, Adapt, and Play Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathy; Hodson, Patricia; Zhang, Guili; Boswell, Boni; Decker, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that regular physical activity helps to prevent major health problems, such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. However, little research has been conducted on classroom-based physical activity programs for students with disabilities. In North Carolina, the Healthy Active Children Policy was implemented in 2006, requiring…

  6. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). II. Background A. General The offshore mineral and energy exploration and production industry... offshore. Because of this, we believe that the use of vessels providing accommodation service on the...

  7. GKTC ACTIVITIES TO PROVIDE NUCLEAR MATERIAL PHYSICAL PROTECTION, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING TRAINING FOR 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Romanova, Olena; Gavrilyuk, Victor I.; Kirischuk, Volodymyr; Gavrilyuk-Burakova, Anna; Diakov, Oleksii; Drapey, Sergiy; Proskurin, Dmitry; Dickman, Deborah A.; Ferguson, Ken

    2011-10-01

    The GKTC was created at the Kyiv Institute of Nuclear Research as a result of collaborative efforts between the United States and Ukraine. The GKTC has been designated by the Ukrainian Government to provide the MPC&A training and methodological assistance to nuclear facilities and nuclear specialists. In 2010 the GKTC has conducted the planned assessment of training needs of Ukrainian MPC&A specialists. The objective of this work is to acquire the detailed information about the number of MPC&A specialists and guard personnel, who in the coming years should receive the further advanced training. As a result of the performed training needs evaluation the GKTC has determined that in the coming years a number of new training courses need to be developed. Some training courses are already in the process of development. Also taking into account the specific of activity on the guarding of nuclear facilities, GKTC has begun to develop the specialized training courses for the guarding unit personnel. The evaluation of needs of training of Ukrainian specialists on the physical protection shows that without the technical base of learning is not possible to satisfy the needs of Ukrainian facilities, in particular, the need for further training of specialists who maintains physical protection technical means, provides vulnerability assessment and testing of technical means. To increase the training effectiveness and create the basis for specialized training courses holding the GKTC is now working on the construction of an Interior (non-classified) Physical Protection Training Site. The objective of this site is to simulate the actual conditions of the nuclear facility PP system including the complex of engineering and technical means that will help the GKTC training course participants to consolidate the knowledge and gain the practical skills in the work with PP system engineering and technical means for more effective performance of their official duties. This paper briefly

  8. Dendritic Slow Dynamics Enables Localized Cortical Activity to Switch between Mobile and Immobile Modes with Noisy Background Input

    PubMed Central

    Kurashige, Hiroki; Câteau, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mounting lines of evidence suggest the significant computational ability of a single neuron empowered by active dendritic dynamics. This motivates us to study what functionality can be acquired by a network of such neurons. The present paper studies how such rich single-neuron dendritic dynamics affects the network dynamics, a question which has scarcely been specifically studied to date. We simulate neurons with active dendrites networked locally like cortical pyramidal neurons, and find that naturally arising localized activity – called a bump – can be in two distinct modes, mobile or immobile. The mode can be switched back and forth by transient input to the cortical network. Interestingly, this functionality arises only if each neuron is equipped with the observed slow dendritic dynamics and with in vivo-like noisy background input. If the bump activity is considered to indicate a point of attention in the sensory areas or to indicate a representation of memory in the storage areas of the cortex, this would imply that the flexible mode switching would be of great potential use for the brain as an information processing device. We derive these conclusions using a natural extension of the conventional field model, which is defined by combining two distinct fields, one representing the somatic population and the other representing the dendritic population. With this tool, we analyze the spatial distribution of the degree of after-spike adaptation and explain how we can understand the presence of the two distinct modes and switching between the modes. We also discuss the possible functional impact of this mode-switching ability. PMID:21931635

  9. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... enrolling and maintaining active enrollment status in the Medicare program. 424.516 Section 424.516 Public... active enrollment status in the Medicare program. (a) Certifying compliance. CMS enrolls and maintains...

  10. 42 CFR 424.516 - Additional provider and supplier requirements for enrolling and maintaining active enrollment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the HHS Common Rule at 45 CFR part 76. (b) Reporting requirements Independent Diagnostic Testing... enrolling and maintaining active enrollment status in the Medicare program. 424.516 Section 424.516 Public... active enrollment status in the Medicare program. (a) Certifying compliance. CMS enrolls and maintains...

  11. 34 CFR 694.22 - What other activities may all GEAR UP projects provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... career plans, including career awareness and planning assistance as they relate to a rigorous academic curriculum. (f) Providing special programs or tutoring in science, technology, engineering, or...

  12. Physical activity when young provides lifelong benefits to cortical bone size and strength in men.

    PubMed

    Warden, Stuart J; Mantila Roosa, Sara M; Kersh, Mariana E; Hurd, Andrea L; Fleisig, Glenn S; Pandy, Marcus G; Fuchs, Robyn K

    2014-04-01

    The skeleton shows greatest plasticity to physical activity-related mechanical loads during youth but is more at risk for failure during aging. Do the skeletal benefits of physical activity during youth persist with aging? To address this question, we used a uniquely controlled cross-sectional study design in which we compared the throwing-to-nonthrowing arm differences in humeral diaphysis bone properties in professional baseball players at different stages of their careers (n = 103) with dominant-to-nondominant arm differences in controls (n = 94). Throwing-related physical activity introduced extreme loading to the humeral diaphysis and nearly doubled its strength. Once throwing activities ceased, the cortical bone mass, area, and thickness benefits of physical activity during youth were gradually lost because of greater medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. However, half of the bone size (total cross-sectional area) and one-third of the bone strength (polar moment of inertia) benefits of throwing-related physical activity during youth were maintained lifelong. In players who continued throwing during aging, some cortical bone mass and more strength benefits of the physical activity during youth were maintained as a result of less medullary expansion and cortical trabecularization. These data indicate that the old adage of "use it or lose it" is not entirely applicable to the skeleton and that physical activity during youth should be encouraged for lifelong bone health, with the focus being optimization of bone size and strength rather than the current paradigm of increasing mass. The data also indicate that physical activity should be encouraged during aging to reduce skeletal structural decay.

  13. Selective ligand behaviors provide new insights into agonist activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Christopher B; Rreza, Iva; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2014-05-16

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are a diverse set of ion channels that are essential to everyday brain function. Contemporary research studies selective activation of individual subtypes of receptors, with the hope of increasing our understanding of behavioral responses and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we aim to expand current binding models to help explain the specificity seen among three activators of α4β2 receptors: sazetidine-A, cytisine, and NS9283. Through mutational analysis, we can interchange the activation profiles of the stoichiometry-selective compounds sazetidine-A and cytisine. In addition, mutations render NS9283--currently identified as a positive allosteric modulator--into an agonist. These results lead to two conclusions: (1) occupation at each primary face of an α subunit is needed to activate the channel and (2) the complementary face of the adjacent subunit dictates the binding ability of the agonist.

  14. LL37:DNA complexes provide antimicrobial activity against intracellular bacteria in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Alexander; Batinica, Marina; Steiger, Julia; Hartmann, Pia; Zaucke, Frank; Bloch, Wilhelm; Fabri, Mario

    2016-08-01

    As part of the innate host response neutrophils release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), protein:DNA complexes that contain a number of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as cathelicidin. Human cathelicidin in its active form, LL37, has potent antimicrobial activity against bacteria. However, whether LL37 derived from NETs contributes to antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens remains unclear. Here, we report that NETs induced by mycobacteria contain cathelicidin. Human macrophages internalized NET-bound cathelicidin, which is transported to lysosomal compartments. Furthermore, using a model of in vitro-generated LL37:DNA complexes we found that LL37 derived from such complexes attacks mycobacteria in macrophage phagolysosomes resulting in antimicrobial activity. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanism by which LL37 in complex with DNA contributes to host defence against intracellular bacteria in human macrophages.

  15. Soil Microbial Activity Provides Insight to Carbon Cycling in Shrub Ecotones of Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, E.; Kashi, N. N.; Chen, J.; Hobbie, E. A.; Schwan, M. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Shrubs are expanding in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to rising atmospheric temperatures. Microbial activity increases as growing temperatures cause permafrost warming and subsequent thaw, leading to a greater resource of soil nutrients enabling shrub growth. Increased carbon inputs from shrubs is predicted to result in faster carbon turnover by microbial decomposition. Further understanding of microbial activity underneath shrubs could uncover how microbes and soil processes interact to promote shrub expansion and carbon cycling. To address how higher soil carbon input from shrubs influences decomposition, soil samples were taken across a heath, shrub, and forest ecotone gradient at two sites near Abikso, Sweden. Samples were analyzed for soluble carbon and nitrogen, microbial abundance, and microbial activity of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase to reflect organic matter decomposition and availability of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphate respectively. Chitinase activity positively correlated with shrub cover, suggesting microbial demands for nitrogen increase with higher shrub cover. Glucosidase activity negatively correlated with shrub cover and soluble carbon, suggesting decreased microbial demand for carbon as shrub cover and carbon stores increase. Lower glucosidase activity in areas with high carbon input from shrubs implies that microbes are decomposing carbon less readily than carbon is being put into the soil. Increasing soil carbon stores in shrub covered areas can lead to shrubs becoming a net carbon sink and a negative feedback to changing climate.

  16. A new background distribution-based active contour model for three-dimensional lesion segmentation in breast DCE-MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Yiping; Qiu, Tianshuang; Zhao, Zuowei; Zhang, Lina

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a computerized semiautomatic segmentation method for accurate extraction of three-dimensional lesions from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCE-MRIs) of the breast. Methods: The authors propose a new background distribution-based active contour model using level set (BDACMLS) to segment lesions in breast DCE-MRIs. The method starts with manual selection of a region of interest (ROI) that contains the entire lesion in a single slice where the lesion is enhanced. Then the lesion volume from the volume data of interest, which is captured automatically, is separated. The core idea of BDACMLS is a new signed pressure function which is based solely on the intensity distribution combined with pathophysiological basis. To compare the algorithm results, two experienced radiologists delineated all lesions jointly to obtain the ground truth. In addition, results generated by other different methods based on level set (LS) are also compared with the authors’ method. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated by several region-based metrics such as the overlap ratio. Results: Forty-two studies with 46 lesions that contain 29 benign and 17 malignant lesions are evaluated. The dataset includes various typical pathologies of the breast such as invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinomain situ, scar carcinoma, phyllodes tumor, breast cysts, fibroadenoma, etc. The overlap ratio for BDACMLS with respect to manual segmentation is 79.55% ± 12.60% (mean ± s.d.). Conclusions: A new active contour model method has been developed and shown to successfully segment breast DCE-MRI three-dimensional lesions. The results from this model correspond more closely to manual segmentation, solve the weak-edge-passed problem, and improve the robustness in segmenting different lesions.

  17. Star Power: Providing for the Gifted & Talented. Module 5. Enrichment Activities for the Gifted/Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallis, Jackie; Gilman, Sharlene

    The document presents Module 5, enrichment activities for the gifted/talented, of the Star Power modules developed for school personnel who have an interest in or a need to explore the area of gifted and talented education. It is explained in an introductory section that the modules can be used for independent study, for small group interaction,…

  18. Effects of providing a nutrition education program for teenagers: dietary and physical activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Yuen, Dorothy T W

    2009-06-01

    This study enhanced nutritional knowledge in an education program and encouraged healthy dietary habits and regular physical activity among teenagers. A total of 203 adolescents from a secondary school in Hong Kong took part in the study. Their Body Mass Index, dietary habits, and physical exercise pattern were recorded and examined before and after the health education program. The prevalence of overweight and obesity, together with the fat composition, were high among the participants before the nutrition education program. There was a marked gain in knowledge upon its completion. A follow-up action conducted 3 months later revealed positive outcomes in relation to the diet and physical activity level. The teenagers were able to take control of their health and requested the tuck shop to sell more healthy food and reduce the supply of unhealthy items. The educational initiatives in dietary habits and physical activities proved to be effective in encouraging the teenagers to eat more healthily and to adopt an active lifestyle.

  19. 34 CFR 646.4 - What activities and services does a project provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., writing, study skills, mathematics, science, and other subjects. (2) Advice and assistance in... services: (1) Individualized counseling for personal, career, and academic matters provided by assigned... project with the range of career options available to the students. (3) Exposure to cultural events...

  20. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in active droplets provides a generic route to motility

    PubMed Central

    Tjhung, Elsen; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    We explore a generic mechanism whereby a droplet of active matter acquires motility by the spontaneous breakdown of a discrete symmetry. The model we study offers a simple representation of a “cell extract” comprising, e.g., a droplet of actomyosin solution. (Such extracts are used experimentally to model the cytoskeleton). Actomyosin is an active gel whose polarity describes the mean sense of alignment of actin fibres. In the absence of polymerization and depolymerization processes (‘treadmilling’), the gel’s dynamics arises solely from the contractile motion of myosin motors; this should be unchanged when polarity is inverted. Our results suggest that motility can arise in the absence of treadmilling, by spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) of polarity inversion symmetry. Adapting our model to wall-bound cells in two dimensions, we find that as wall friction is reduced, treadmilling-induced motility falls but SSB-mediated motility rises. The latter might therefore be crucial in three dimensions where frictional forces are likely to be modest. At a supracellular level, the same generic mechanism can impart motility to aggregates of nonmotile but active bacteria; we show that SSB in this (extensile) case leads generically to rotational as well as translational motion. PMID:22797894

  1. Activity-based funding model provides foundation for province-wide best practices in renal care.

    PubMed

    Levin, Adeera; Lo, Clifford; Noel, Kevin; Djurdjev, Ogjnenka; Amano, Erlyn C

    2013-01-01

    British Columbia has a unique funding model for renal care in Canada. Patient care is delivered through six health authorities, while funding is administered by the Provincial Renal Agency using an activity-based funding model. The model allocates funding based on a schedule of costs for every element of renal care, excluding physician fees. Accountability, transparency of allocation and tracking of outcomes are key features that ensure successful implementation. The model supports province-wide best practices and equitable care and fosters innovation. Since its introduction, the outpatient renal services budget has grown less than the population, while maintaining or improving clinical outcomes. PMID:24485244

  2. The role of provider-patient communication and trust in online sources in Internet use for health-related activities.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jiran; Shim, Minsun

    2010-01-01

    Provider-patient communication is an important factor influencing patients' satisfaction and health outcomes. This study draws upon the uses and gratification theory to examine how individuals' perception of communication with healthcare providers is associated with their Internet use for health-related activities. Using the data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we found that as individuals perceived their communication with providers to be less patient-centered, they were more likely to engage in various types of online health activities, such as using websites for healthy lifestyles, searching for healthcare providers, and seeking health information. Trust in online health information was also found to be a significant predictor of online health activities. The results of this study emphasized the important role of provider-patient communication in motivating individuals to turn to the Internet for health purposes. PMID:21154093

  3. Mitochondrial function provides instructive signals for activation-induced B-cell fates.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung-Jin; Mano, Hiroto; Aoki, Koji; Hayashi, Tatsunari; Muto, Akihiko; Nambu, Yukiko; Takahashi, Katsu; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Taketani, Shigeru; Nutt, Stephen L; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Shimizu, Akira; Sugai, Manabu

    2015-04-10

    During immune reactions, functionally distinct B-cell subsets are generated by stochastic processes, including class-switch recombination (CSR) and plasma cell differentiation (PCD). In this study, we show a strong association between individual B-cell fates and mitochondrial functions. CSR occurs specifically in activated B cells with increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, which augment mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS), whereas PCD occurs in cells with decreased mitochondrial mass and potential. These events are consequences of initial slight changes in mROS in mitochondria(high) B-cell populations. In CSR-committed cells, mROS attenuates haeme synthesis by inhibiting ferrous ion addition to protoporphyrin IX, thereby maintaining Bach2 function. Reduced mROS then promotes PCD by increasing haeme synthesis. In PCD-committed cells, Blimp1 reduces mitochondrial mass, thereby reducing mROS levels. Identifying mROS as a haeme synthesis regulator increases the understanding of mechanisms regulating haeme homeostasis and cell fate determination after B-cell activation.

  4. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services that conform to the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the...

  5. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services that conform to the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... INVESTMENT ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the...

  6. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW...

  7. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... the use of funds for youth activities described in 20 CFR part 664. ... ACT The MSFW Youth Program § 669.680 What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW...

  8. Muscles provide protection during microbial infection by activating innate immune response pathways in Drosophila and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Arunita; Roy, Debasish; Patnaik, Esha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle contraction brings about movement and locomotion in animals. However, muscles have also been implicated in several atypical physiological processes including immune response. The role of muscles in immunity and the mechanism involved has not yet been deciphered. In this paper, using Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) as a model, we show that muscles are immune-responsive tissues. Flies with defective IFMs are incapable of mounting a potent humoral immune response. Upon immune challenge, the IFMs produce anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) through the activation of canonical signaling pathways, and these IFM-synthesized AMPs are essential for survival upon infection. The trunk muscles of zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, also possess the capacity to mount an immune response against bacterial infections, thus establishing that immune responsiveness of muscles is evolutionarily conserved. Our results suggest that physiologically fit muscles might boost the innate immune response of an individual. PMID:27101844

  9. Two Adaptation Processes in Auditory Hair Cells Together Can Provide an Active Amplifier

    PubMed Central

    Vilfan, Andrej; Duke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The hair cells of the vertebrate inner ear convert mechanical stimuli to electrical signals. Two adaptation mechanisms are known to modify the ionic current flowing through the transduction channels of the hair bundles: a rapid process involves Ca2+ ions binding to the channels; and a slower adaptation is associated with the movement of myosin motors. We present a mathematical model of the hair cell which demonstrates that the combination of these two mechanisms can produce “self-tuned critical oscillations”, i.e., maintain the hair bundle at the threshold of an oscillatory instability. The characteristic frequency depends on the geometry of the bundle and on the Ca2+ dynamics, but is independent of channel kinetics. Poised on the verge of vibrating, the hair bundle acts as an active amplifier. However, if the hair cell is sufficiently perturbed, other dynamical regimes can occur. These include slow relaxation oscillations which resemble the hair bundle motion observed in some experimental preparations. PMID:12829475

  10. The Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia by Different Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Venugopalan, B; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    We examined variations in dengue vector control costs and resource consumption between the District Health Departments (DHDs) and Local Authorities (LAs) to assist informed decision making as to the future roles of these agencies in the delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. Data were collected from the vector control units of DHDs and LAs in 8 selected districts. We captured costs and resource consumption in 2010 for premise inspection for mosquito breeding sites, fogging to destroy adult mosquitoes and larviciding of potential breeding sites. Overall, DHDs spent US$5.62 million or US$679 per case and LAs spent US$2.61 million or US$499 per case. The highest expenditure for both agencies was for fogging, 51.0% and 45.8% of costs for DHDs and LAs, respectively. The DHDs had higher resource costs for human personnel, vehicles, pesticides, and equipment. The findings provide some evidence to rationalize delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia.

  11. Does the survivorship of activated resting stages in toxic environments provide cues for ballast water treatment?

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Victor; Makrushin, Andrey; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2010-01-01

    The toxic effects of three inorganic metals (Cu, Cr, Hg), three organic (phenol, formalin, ammonium) chemicals, ozone-enriched water and peroxides (H2O2) on embryonic development were tested in 8 species from the Porifera, Bryozoa and Crustacea. Toxicants with lower molecular weight showed stronger negative impacts on post-diapause embryos than chemicals with higher molecular weight if related to the toxicity of the chemicals to active adult stages. Only few embryos of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa and none of the cladoceran Wlassicsia pannonica treated with peroxides at concentration 0.3% developed further. Ozone-enriched water had no significant effect on post-diapause embryonic development in cladocerans. Ammonium (the product of NH4OH dissociation) in concentration 100 mg/l and higher killed all embryos of M. macrocopa inside protective membranes. Peroxides and ammonium are suggested for the purification of ship ballast waters as effective, non-expensive and non-persistent toxic chemicals. Resting stages of invertebrates including at least Crustaceans, Porifera and Bryozoa seem to allow not only dispersal among toxic industrial environments such as ship ballast compartments, but may also endure serious pollution events common in seaports and estuaries. Artemia cysts due to their strong protection against different toxic substances are recommended as a model for studies of toxic effects in diapausing stages in polluted estuaries and marine environments. PMID:20356608

  12. Does the survivorship of activated resting stages in toxic environments provide cues for ballast water treatment?

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Victor; Makrushin, Andrey; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2010-01-01

    The toxic effects of three inorganic metals (Cu, Cr, Hg), three organic (phenol, formalin, ammonium) chemicals, ozone-enriched water and peroxides (H2O2) on embryonic development were tested in 8 species from the Porifera, Bryozoa and Crustacea. Toxicants with lower molecular weight showed stronger negative impacts on post-diapause embryos than chemicals with higher molecular weight if related to the toxicity of the chemicals to active adult stages. Only few embryos of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa and none of the cladoceran Wlassicsia pannonica treated with peroxides at concentration 0.3% developed further. Ozone-enriched water had no significant effect on post-diapause embryonic development in cladocerans. Ammonium (the product of NH4OH dissociation) in concentration 100 mg/l and higher killed all embryos of M. macrocopa inside protective membranes. Peroxides and ammonium are suggested for the purification of ship ballast waters as effective, non-expensive and non-persistent toxic chemicals. Resting stages of invertebrates including at least Crustaceans, Porifera and Bryozoa seem to allow not only dispersal among toxic industrial environments such as ship ballast compartments, but may also endure serious pollution events common in seaports and estuaries. Artemia cysts due to their strong protection against different toxic substances are recommended as a model for studies of toxic effects in diapausing stages in polluted estuaries and marine environments.

  13. Part II, Provider perspectives: should patients be activated to request evidence-based medicine? a qualitative study of the VA project to implement diuretics (VAPID)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend the use of thiazide diuretics as first-line therapy for uncomplicated hypertension, yet diuretics are under-prescribed, and hypertension is frequently inadequately treated. This qualitative evaluation of provider attitudes follows a randomized controlled trial of a patient activation strategy in which hypertensive patients received letters and incentives to discuss thiazides with their provider. The strategy prompted high discussion rates and enhanced thiazide-prescribing rates. Our objective was to interview providers to understand the effectiveness and acceptability of the intervention from their perspective, as well as the suitability of patient activation for more widespread guideline implementation. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 21 primary care providers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and reviewed by the interviewer before being analyzed for content. Interviews were coded, and relevant themes and specific responses were identified, grouped, and compared. Results Of the 21 providers interviewed, 20 (95%) had a positive opinion of the intervention, and 18 of 20 (90%) thought the strategy was suitable for wider use. In explaining their opinions of the intervention, many providers discussed a positive effect on treatment, but they more often focused on the process of patient activation itself, describing how the intervention facilitated discussions by informing patients and making them more pro-active. Regarding effectiveness, providers suggested the intervention worked like a reminder, highlighted oversights, or changed their approach to hypertension management. Many providers also explained that the intervention 'aligned' patients' objectives with theirs, or made patients more likely to accept a change in medications. Negative aspects were mentioned infrequently, but concerns about the use of financial incentives were most common. Relevant barriers to initiating thiazide treatment

  14. The Cost of Dengue Vector Control Activities in Malaysia by Different Service Providers.

    PubMed

    Packierisamy, P Raviwharmman; Ng, Chiu-Wan; Dahlui, Maznah; Venugopalan, B; Halasa, Yara A; Shepard, Donald S

    2015-11-01

    We examined variations in dengue vector control costs and resource consumption between the District Health Departments (DHDs) and Local Authorities (LAs) to assist informed decision making as to the future roles of these agencies in the delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. Data were collected from the vector control units of DHDs and LAs in 8 selected districts. We captured costs and resource consumption in 2010 for premise inspection for mosquito breeding sites, fogging to destroy adult mosquitoes and larviciding of potential breeding sites. Overall, DHDs spent US$5.62 million or US$679 per case and LAs spent US$2.61 million or US$499 per case. The highest expenditure for both agencies was for fogging, 51.0% and 45.8% of costs for DHDs and LAs, respectively. The DHDs had higher resource costs for human personnel, vehicles, pesticides, and equipment. The findings provide some evidence to rationalize delivery of dengue vector control services in Malaysia. PMID:26047628

  15. Hygroscopicity Behavior, Activation Properties and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosol at a Background Site in the Megacity Region of Peking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Nowak, Andreas; Mildenberger, Katrin; Göbel, Tina; Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of China suffer from heavy air pollution (both gaseous and particulate) caused by strong economic growth in the last two decades. However, knowledge concerning the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol particles populations, and their effects on the optical properties of the atmosphere, is still sparse. In the framework of the investigations presented here, comprehensive measurements concerning aerosol particle hygroscopicity, CCN ability, composition, and optical properties were performed. The investigations are part of the DFG-funded project HaChi (Haze in China) and are conducted in collaboration with the Peking University. A conclusive parameterization of aerosol hygroscopicity and activation data is aimed for, which will then be implemented in a meso-scale model to investigate aerosol-cloud-radiation and precipitation interactions. During two intensive measurements campaigns (March 2009 and July/ August 2009), in-situ aerosol measurements have been performed in an air-conditioned mobile laboratory next to the Wuqing Meteorological Station (39°23'8.53"N, 117°1'25.88"E), which is located between Bejing and Tijanjin and is thereby an ideal background site in a megacity region. The particle number size distribution (TDMPS), the particle optical properties (MAAP and nephelometer) and their hygroscopic properties at high RH (HH-TDMA, LACIS-mobile) were characterized as well as their cloud nucleating properties above supersaturation (DMT-CCNC). 24 h PM1 particle samples were continuously collected over the two campaigns in winter and summer using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). Additionally two 6h size-resolved samples (daytime and night-time) were collected each day applying an 11-stage Berner impactor. The size-selection of HH-TDMA, LACIS and the CCNC was synchronized with the Berner stages. Opening analysis of the winter campaign data showed that the HH-TDMA usually detected a hydrophobic and a hygroscopic mode, i.e., the

  16. Active Detection of Shielded Special Nuclear Material in the Presence of Variable High Backgrounds Using a Mixed Photon-Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philip N.; Clemett, Ceri D.; Hill, Cassie; O'Malley, John; Campbell, Ben

    This paper describes and compares two approaches to the analysis of active interrogation data containing high photon backgrounds associated with mixed photon-neutron source flash active interrogation. Results from liquid scintillation detectors (EJ301/EJ309) fielded at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in collaboration with the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), using the NRL Mercury Inductive Voltage Adder (IVA) operating in both a photon and mixed photon-neutron mode at a Depleted Uranium (DU) target are presented. The standard approach applying a Figure of Merit (FOM) consisting of background sigma above background is compared with an approach looking to fit only the time-decaying photon signal with standard delayed photon emission from ∼10-MeV end-point-energy Bremsstrahlung photofission of DU. Examples where each approach does well and less well are presented together with a discussion of the relative limitations of both approaches to the type of mixed photon-neutron flash active interrogation being considered.

  17. Isoflurane preconditioning provides neuroprotection against stroke by regulating the expression of the TLR4 signalling pathway to alleviate microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meiyan; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Xiaoyong; Gao, Changjun; Yang, Lu; Zhao, Hui; Yu, Daihua; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Lixian; Chen, Lei; Sun, Xude

    2015-01-01

    Excessive microglial activation often contributes to inflammation-mediated neurotoxicity in the ischemic penumbra during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation via the NF-κB pathway. Isoflurane preconditioning (IP) can provide neuroprotection and inhibit microglial activation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the TLR4 signalling pathway in IP to exert neuroprotection following ischemic stroke in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that 2% IP alleviated neurological deficits, reduced the infarct volume, attenuated apoptosis and weakened microglial activation in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, IP down-regulated the expression of HSP 60, TLR4 and MyD88 and up-regulated inhibitor of IκB-α expression compared with I/R group in vivo. In vitro, 2% IP and a specific inhibitor of TLR4, CLI-095, down-regulated the expression of TLR4, MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α and Bax, and up-regulated IκB-α and Bcl-2 expression compared with OGD group. Moreover, IP and CLI-095 attenuated microglial activation-induced neuronal apoptosis, and overexpression of the TLR4 gene reversed the neuroprotective effects of IP. In conclusion, IP provided neuroprotection by regulating TLR4 expression directly, alleviating microglial activation and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the activation of microglial activation via TLR4 may be a new avenue for stroke treatment. PMID:26086415

  18. Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Carter, Amy E; Guest, Maya; Collins, Clare E; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley K; Ashby, Samantha E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapists may have an impact on obesity prevention and treatment by providing nutrition and physical activity advice to overweight or obese clients; yet little is known about physiotherapists' beliefs and practices related to client weight management. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the practices, beliefs, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapists regarding the provision of weight management advice to overweight or obese clients. Physiotherapists (n = 65) working in multiple practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression determined factors associated with the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for weight management. The majority of physiotherapists (n = 53 [81.5%]) believed providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice, yet only a minority had received training during their professional entry level education (n = 13 [20%]) or through professional development (n = 7 [11%]). Most physiotherapists (n = 55 [84.6%]) provided physical activity advice for weight management, but a minority (n = 27 [41.5%]) provided dietary advice. Having received training in weight management during their professional entry level education was associated with providing dietary advice (Odds ratio 8.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0-38.9, p = 0.004). Training in weight management may increase the likelihood of physiotherapists providing dietary advice, improving physiotherapists' management of obesity.

  19. Usability and acceptability of a website that provides tailored advice on falls prevention activities for older people.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Samuel R; Yardley, Lucy

    2009-03-01

    This article presents the usability and acceptability of a website that provides older people with tailored advice to help motivate them to undertake physical activities that prevent falls. Views on the website from interviews with 16 older people and 26 sheltered housing wardens were analysed thematically. The website was well received with only one usability difficulty with the action plan calendar. The older people selected balance training activities out of interest or enjoyment, and appeared to carefully add them into their current routine. The wardens were motivated to promote the website to their residents, particularly those who owned a computer, had balance problems, or were physically active. However, the participants noted that currently a minority of older people use the Internet. Also, some older people underestimated how much activity was enough to improve balance, and others perceived themselves as too old for the activities.

  20. Enhancing Recognition of High Quality, Functional IFSP Outcomes: A Training Activity for Infant and Toddler Service Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Anne; Gillaspy, Kathi; Peters, Mary Louise; Hurth, Joicey

    2014-01-01

    This training activity was created to support participants' understanding of the criteria needed to develop and write high quality, participation-based Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) outcomes. The term "functional" is often used to describe what outcomes ought to be, yet many providers struggle to define what makes an outcome…

  1. A Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning Approach for Providing Instant Learning Support in Personal Computer Assembly Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ching-Kun; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Personal computer assembly courses have been recognized as being essential in helping students understand computer structure as well as the functionality of each computer component. In this study, a context-aware ubiquitous learning approach is proposed for providing instant assistance to individual students in the learning activity of a…

  2. Treatment with an activator of hypoxia-inducible factor 1, DMOG provides neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tanusree; Sen, Nilkantha

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major cause of morbidity and mortality and it affects more than 1.7 million people in the USA. A couple of regenerative pathways including activation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) are initiated to reduce cellular damage following TBI; however endogenous activation of these pathways is not enough to provide neuroprotection after TBI. Thus we aimed to see whether sustained activation of HIF-1α can provide neuroprotection and neurorepair following TBI. We found that chronic treatment with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) markedly increases the expression level of HIF-1α and mRNA levels of its downstream proteins such as Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 and 4 (PDK1, PDK4) and Erythropoietin (EPO). Treatment of DMOG activates a major cell survival protein kinase Akt and reduces both cell death and lesion volume following TBI. Moreover, administration of DMOG augments cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31) staining in pericontusional cortex after TBI, which suggests that DMOG stimulates angiogenesis after TBI. Treatment with DMOG also improves both memory and motor functions after TBI. Taken together our results suggest that sustained activation of HIF-1α provides significant neuroprotection following TBI. PMID:26970014

  3. The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program: Providing meaningful volunteer activity to residents in assisted living with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Resnick, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Volunteering-in-Place (VIP) Program was developed to provide individualized meaningful volunteer activities matched to interests and capabilities for older adults with MCI in assisted living. The purposes of this single-site pre-test/post-test pilot study were to (1) establish feasibility of the VIP Program based on treatment fidelity (design, treatment, delivery, enactment); and (2) evaluate preliminary efficacy via improvement in psychological health (depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience, and life satisfaction) and decreased sedentary activity (survey and Fitbit) at 3 and 6 months. Ten residents participated. The majority was white, female and educated, and on average 88 years old. The VIP Program was feasible and most participants continued to volunteer at 6 months. There were non-significant improvements in depressive symptoms, usefulness, purpose, resilience and recreational physical activity. The results of this study provide support for the feasibility of the VIP Program. Further study is necessary to examine efficacy.

  4. A qualitative study of women’s perceptions of provider advice about diet and physical activity during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Renée M.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moos, Merry-K.; Carrier, Kathryn S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this qualitative study was to gather insights into pregnant women’s experiences with provider advice about diet and physical activity. METHODS We conducted a series of 13 focus groups with a total of 58 pregnant African American, Caucasian, and Hispanic women of varying body sizes. Statements were independently coded, reduced, and then reconstructed to identify overarching themes with the assistance of ATLAS/ti software. RESULTS Mean gestational age at the time of the focus groups was 30 weeks. Women commonly reported overwhelming and confusing diet advice and a paucity of physical activity advice that was largely limited to walking. Many reported following advice; when advice was not followed, it was because women disagreed with it or simply did not want to do it. CONCLUSION Women would benefit from more clear guidance from physicians and other providers regarding dietary choices and physical activity in pregnancy. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS Providers should make dietary and physical activity advice in pregnancy more clear and individualized and offer such guidance multiple times throughout pregnancy. PMID:23399436

  5. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes.

  6. Historical background.

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, M A

    2001-01-01

    The persisting ancient view of cancer as a contagious disease ended with 19th century scientific investigations which seemed to show it was not. The resulting dogma against an infectious cause for cancer produced great prejudice in the scientific community against the first report of an oncogenic virus by Rous early in the 20th century and, even in the 1950s, against Gross's finding of a murine leukaemia virus and a murine virus causing solid tumours. The Lucké frog renal carcinoma virus was the first cancer-associated herpesvirus. Intriguingly, an environmental factor, ambient temperature, determines virus genome expression in the poikilothermic frog cells. Although an alpha-herpesvirus, Marek's disease virus of chickens shares some aspects of biological behaviour with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) of man. Very significantly, its lymphomas are the first naturally occurring malignancy to be controlled by an antiviral vaccine, with implications for human virus-associated cancers. The circumstances and climate of opinion in which successive gamma-herpesviruses were discovered are described. The identification of EBV involved two unconventionalities: its finding in cultured Burkitt's lymphoma cells when no human lymphoid cell had ever been maintained in vitro, and its recognition in the absence of biological activity by the then new technique of electron microscopy. These factors engendered hostility to its acceptance as a new human tumour-associated virus. The EBV-like agents of Old World apes and monkeys and the T-lymphotropic gamma-herpesviruses of New World monkeys were found at about the same time, not long after the discovery of EBV. For many years these were thought to be the only gamma-herpesviruses of non-human primates; however, very recently B-lymphotropic EBV-like agents have been identified in New World species as well. Mouse herpesvirus 68 came to light by chance during a search for arboviruses and has become important as a laboratory model because of its

  7. Activation energy associated with the electromigration of oligosaccharides through viscosity modifier and polymeric additive containing background electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kerékgyártó, Márta; Járvás, Gábor; Novák, Levente; Guttman, András

    2016-02-01

    The activation energy related to the electromigration of oligosaccharides can be determined from their measured electrophoretic mobilities at different temperatures. The effects of a viscosity modifier (ethylene glycol) and a polymeric additive (linear polyacrylamide) on the electrophoretic mobility of linear sugar oligomers with α1-4 linked glucose units (maltooligosaccharides) were studied in CE using the activation energy concept. The electrophoretic separations of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate-labeled maltooligosaccharides were monitored by LIF detection in the temperature range of 20-50°C, using either 0-60% ethylene glycol (viscosity modifier) or 0-3% linear polyacrylamide (polymeric additive) containing BGEs. Activation energy curves were constructed based on the slopes of the Arrhenius plots. With the use of linear polyacrylamide additive, solute size-dependent activation energy variations were found for the maltooligosaccharides with polymerization degrees below and above maltoheptaose (DP 7), probably due to molecular conformation changes and possible matrix interaction effects.

  8. [Post-marketing clinical safety assessment of Shenmai injection based on active monitoring and passive monitoring in large data background].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Ai, Qing-hua; Song, Nian-bin

    2015-12-01

    This paper adopted a series of related analysis methods to comprehensively analyze post-marketing clinical safety data of Shenmai injection from 4,220 cases of SRS and 32,358 cases of multicenter, prospective, registered hospital centralized monitoring in large data background, calculated ADR incidence rate was 0.93 per 1,000, main symptoms of ADR includes chest pain, chills, skin itching, palpitations, fever, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, flushing, numbness, allergic reaction, cyanosis, rash, low back pain, and "breath", "anaphylactoid reaction" and "flush" were the safety warning signals of Shenmai injection. Primary disease for chronic pulmonary heart disease, thyroid disease, and combined with cerebral vascular disease, prior to the injection and continuous use of alprostadil, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, combined with quinolones, penicillins were suspicious influence factors of ADR of Shenmai injection, these promot the clinical safety. PMID:27245017

  9. Differential correlates of physical activity in urban and rural adults of various socioeconomic backgrounds in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Parks, S; Housemann, R; Brownson, R

    2003-01-01

    Study objectives: Few studies have analysed the rates and correlates of physical activity in economically and geographically diverse populations. Objectives were to examine: (1) urban-rural differences in physical activity by several demographic, geographical, environmental, and psychosocial variables, (2) patterns in environmental and policy factors across urban-rural setting and socioeconomic groups, (3) socioeconomic differences in physical activity across the same set of variables, and (4) possible correlations of these patterns with meeting of physical activity recommendations. Design: A cross sectional study with an over sampling of lower income adults was conducted in 1999–2000. Setting: United States. Participants: 1818 United States adults. Main results: Lower income residents were less likely than higher income residents to meet physical activity recommendations. Rural residents were least likely to meet recommendations; suburban residents were most likely to meet recommendations. Suburban, higher income residents were more than twice as likely to meet recommendations than rural, lower income residents. Significant differences across income levels and urban/rural areas were found for those reporting neighbourhood streets, parks, and malls as places to exercise; fear of injury, being in poor health, or dislike as barriers to exercise and those reporting encouragement from relatives as social support for exercise. Evidence of a positive dose-response relation emerged between number of places to exercise and likelihood to meet recommendations for physical activity. Conclusions: Both income level and urban rural status were important predictors of adults' likelihood to meet physical activity recommendations. In addition, environmental variables vary in importance across socioeconomic status and urban-rural areas. PMID:12490645

  10. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Taian M; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  11. Young, Healthy Subjects Can Reduce the Activity of Calf Muscles When Provided with EMG Biofeedback in Upright Stance

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Taian M.; Baudry, Stéphane; Botter, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests the minimization of muscular effort rather than of the size of bodily sway may be the primary, nervous system goal when regulating the human, standing posture. Different programs have been proposed for balance training; none however has been focused on the activation of postural muscles during standing. In this study we investigated the possibility of minimizing the activation of the calf muscles during standing through biofeedback. By providing subjects with an audio signal that varied in amplitude and frequency with the amplitude of surface electromyograms (EMG) recorded from different regions of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, we expected them to be able to minimize the level of muscle activation during standing without increasing the excursion of the center of pressure (CoP). CoP data and surface EMG from gastrocnemii, soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were obtained from 10 healthy participants while standing at ease and while standing with EMG biofeedback. Four sensitivities were used to test subjects' responsiveness to the EMG biofeedback. Compared with standing at ease, the two most sensitive feedback conditions induced a decrease in plantar flexor activity (~15%; P < 0.05) and an increase in tibialis anterior EMG (~10%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, CoP mean position significantly shifted backward (~30 mm). In contrast, the use of less sensitive EMG biofeedback resulted in a significant decrease in EMG activity of ankle plantar flexors with a marginal increase in TA activity compared with standing at ease. These changes were not accompanied by greater CoP displacements or significant changes in mean CoP position. Key results revealed subjects were able to keep standing stability while reducing the activity of gastrocnemius and soleus without loading their tibialis anterior muscle when standing with EMG biofeedback. These results may therefore posit the basis for the development of training protocols aimed at assisting subjects in

  12. Family Background, School-Age Trajectories of Activity Participation, and Academic Achievement at the Start of High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert; Smith, Chelsea; Leventhal, Tama

    2015-01-01

    Applying latent class and regression techniques to data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 997), this study explored the potential academic advantages of time spent in out-of-school activities. Of particular interest was how these potential advantages played out in relation to the timing and duration of activity…

  13. Mutational activation of niche-specific genes provides insight into regulatory networks and bacterial function in a complex environment

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, Stephen R.; Jackson, Robert W.; Moon, Christina D.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Gehrig, Stefanie M.; Rainey, Paul B.

    2007-01-01

    The genome of the plant-colonizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 harbors a subset of genes that are expressed specifically on plant surfaces. The function of these genes is central to the ecological success of SBW25, but their study poses significant challenges because no phenotype is discernable in vitro. Here, we describe a genetic strategy with general utility that combines suppressor analysis with IVET (SPyVET) and provides a means of identifying regulators of niche-specific genes. Central to this strategy are strains carrying operon fusions between plant environment-induced loci (EIL) and promoterless ′dapB. These strains are prototrophic in the plant environment but auxotrophic on laboratory minimal medium. Regulatory elements were identified by transposon mutagenesis and selection for prototrophs on minimal medium. Approximately 106 mutants were screened for each of 27 strains carrying ′dapB fusions to plant EIL and the insertion point for the transposon determined in approximately 2,000 putative regulator mutants. Regulators were functionally characterized and used to provide insight into EIL phenotypes. For one strain carrying a fusion to the cellulose-encoding wss operon, five different regulators were identified including a diguanylate cyclase, the flagella activator, FleQ, and alginate activator, AmrZ (AlgZ). Further rounds of suppressor analysis, possible by virtue of the SPyVET strategy, revealed an additional two regulators including the activator AlgR, and allowed the regulatory connections to be determined. PMID:17989226

  14. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo.

  15. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases.

    PubMed

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard; Rompel, Annette

    2016-03-29

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze theo-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme's interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate-enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO's acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their--so far unknown--natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  16. Aurone synthase is a catechol oxidase with hydroxylase activity and provides insights into the mechanism of plant polyphenol oxidases

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, Christian; Mauracher, Stephan Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinases and catechol oxidases belong to the family of polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). Tyrosinases catalyze the o-hydroxylation and oxidation of phenolic compounds, whereas catechol oxidases were so far defined to lack the hydroxylation activity and catalyze solely the oxidation of o-diphenolic compounds. Aurone synthase from Coreopsis grandiflora (AUS1) is a specialized plant PPO involved in the anabolic pathway of aurones. We present, to our knowledge, the first crystal structures of a latent plant PPO, its mature active and inactive form, caused by a sulfation of a copper binding histidine. Analysis of the latent proenzyme’s interface between the shielding C-terminal domain and the main core provides insights into its activation mechanisms. As AUS1 did not accept common tyrosinase substrates (tyrosine and tyramine), the enzyme is classified as a catechol oxidase. However, AUS1 showed hydroxylase activity toward its natural substrate (isoliquiritigenin), revealing that the hydroxylase activity is not correlated with the acceptance of common tyrosinase substrates. Therefore, we propose that the hydroxylase reaction is a general functionality of PPOs. Molecular dynamics simulations of docked substrate–enzyme complexes were performed, and a key residue was identified that influences the plant PPO’s acceptance or rejection of tyramine. Based on the evidenced hydroxylase activity and the interactions of specific residues with the substrates during the molecular dynamics simulations, a novel catalytic reaction mechanism for plant PPOs is proposed. The presented results strongly suggest that the physiological role of plant catechol oxidases were previously underestimated, as they might hydroxylate their—so far unknown—natural substrates in vivo. PMID:26976571

  17. Properdin can initiate complement activation by binding specific target surfaces and providing a platform for de novo convertase assembly.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Dirk; Mitchell, Lynne M; Atkinson, John P; Hourcade, Dennis E

    2007-08-15

    Complement promotes the rapid recognition and elimination of pathogens, infected cells, and immune complexes. The biochemical basis for its target specificity is incompletely understood. In this report, we demonstrate that properdin can directly bind to microbial targets and provide a platform for the in situ assembly and function of the alternative pathway C3 convertases. This mechanism differs from the standard model wherein nascent C3b generated in the fluid phase attaches nonspecifically to its targets. Properdin-directed complement activation occurred on yeast cell walls (zymosan) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Properdin did not bind wild-type Escherichia coli, but it readily bound E. coli LPS mutants, and the properdin-binding capacity of each strain correlated with its respective serum-dependent AP activation rate. Moreover, properdin:single-chain Ab constructs were used to direct serum-dependent complement activation to novel targets. We conclude properdin participates in two distinct complement activation pathways: one that occurs by the standard model and one that proceeds by the properdin-directed model. The properdin-directed model is consistent with a proposal made by Pillemer and his colleagues >50 years ago. PMID:17675523

  18. Specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms as predictors of activities of daily living in older adults with heterogeneous cognitive backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Jonas J.; Diniz, Breno S.; Bicalho, Maria A.; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Nicolato, Rodrigo; de Moraes, Edgar N.; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro F.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive functioning influences activities of daily living (ADL). However, studies reporting the association between ADL and neuropsychological performance show inconsistent results regarding what specific cognitive domains are related to each specific functional domains. Additionally, whether depressive symptoms are associated with a worse functional performance in older adults is still under explored. We investigated if specific cognitive domains and depressive symptoms would affect different aspects of ADL. Participants were 274 older adults (96 normal aging participants, 85 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 93 patients probable with mild Alzheimer’s disease dementia) with low formal education (∼4 years). Measures of ADL included three complexity levels: Self-care, Instrumental-Domestic, and Instrumental-Complex. The specific cognitive functions were evaluated through a factorial strategy resulting in four cognitive domains: Executive Functions, Language/Semantic Memory, Episodic Memory, and Visuospatial Abilities. The Geriatric Depression Scale measured depressive symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis showed executive functions and episodic memory as significant predictors of Instrumental-Domestic ADL, and executive functions, episodic memory and language/semantic memory as predictors of Instrumental-Complex ADL (22 and 28% of explained variance, respectively). Ordinal regression analysis showed the influence of specific cognitive functions and depressive symptoms on each one of the instrumental ADL. We observed a heterogeneous pattern of association with explained variance ranging from 22 to 38%. Different instrumental ADL had specific cognitive predictors and depressive symptoms were predictive of ADL involving social contact. Our results suggest a specific pattern of influence depending on the specific instrumental daily living activity. PMID:26257644

  19. 20 CFR 645.225 - How do Welfare-to-Work activities relate to activities provided through TANF and other related...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS... coordinated effectively at the State and local levels with activities being provided through TANF (section 403... unsubsidized employment in place for each participant which takes into account participant...

  20. Foregrounding the Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Argues that when introductory activities to the classics begin with background information, it can upstage or confine the life of the story, and shows little faith in the students as readers or in the literature itself. Suggests sometimes letting the literature begin, and then helping students make sense of it. Discusses examples from "To Kill a…

  1. Increasing background seismicity and dynamic triggering behaviors with nearby mining activities around Fangshan Pluton in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijun; Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang; Chen, Qi-Fu; Liu, Ning

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic triggering in western Fangshan Pluton, Beijing, China, has been repeatedly identified, but previous studies are limited by sparse seismic station coverage. Here we systematically analyze continuous waveforms recorded by both permanent stations and a temporary seismic network 40 days before and after the 11 March 2011 Mw 9.1 Tohoku-Oki and the 14 April 2012 Mw 8.6 Indian Ocean earthquakes. We first build a template database using a short-term average to long-term average method. Next, we apply the matched filter technique that cross correlates the template waveforms with continuous data to detect additional seismic events. Overall, we detect 1956 and 950 seismic events around the Tohoku-Oki and Indian Ocean main shocks, respectively. Most detected events are shallow (<5 km) and clustered at Beiling Syncline in western Fangshan Pluton, which is adjacent to a running coalmine. Seven and 10 events are detected during the large-amplitude surface waves of the two main shocks, respectively, but no similar burst is detected following their major foreshock and aftershocks. Multiple statistical tests indicate that the short-term bursts after the two main shocks are dynamically triggered. We suggest that mining-related activities may perturb the subsurface stress conditions and hence make the region more susceptible for dynamic triggering than other places.

  2. Heartbeat Of the Sun Derived With PCA From Solar Background Magnetic Field And Its Use For Prediction Of the Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Shepherd, S.; Popova, H.; Zharkov, S.

    2014-12-01

    We report the principal components derived from the solar background magnetic field (SBMF in cycles 21-23) in a form of pairs of magnetic waves travelling with a phase shift from one hemisphere to another and analysed with the symbolic regression technique using Hamiltonian principles. This analysis allowed us to uncover the underlying mathematical laws governing these complex waves in the solar background magnetic field and to extrapolate these PCs to the cycles 24-26. The PCs predicted for cycle 24 fit very closely (with accuracy better than 98%) the PCs derived from the SBMF observations. This approach predicts a strong reduction of the solar background magnetic field in cycles 25 and 26 and, thus, a reduction of the resulting solar activity. This decrease is accompanied by an increasing phase shift between the two predicted principal components (magnetic waves) in cycle 25 leading to their full separation into the opposite hemispheres in cycle 26. The derived mathematical laws in PCs are also used to predict the dynamics of solar magnetic waves on larger temporal scales of centuries. The derived variations of PCs in SBMF are probed by the modified two layers Parker's dynamo model allowing us to predict on the similar temporal scale the evolution of the solar activity which reveal a remarkable close fit to the observations.

  3. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Debra M; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C; Wirth, Christopher K; Kraus, Caroline; Venezia, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  4. Let's Wiggle with 5-2-1-0: Curriculum Development for Training Childcare Providers to Promote Activity in Childcare Settings

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, Alexandra P.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in preschool children in the US. Policy, systems, and environmental change interventions in childcare settings can improve obesity-related behaviors. The aim of this study was to develop and pilot an intervention to train childcare providers to promote physical activity (PA) in childcare classrooms. An evidence scan, key informant (n = 34) and focus group (n = 20) interviews with childcare directors and staff, and environmental self-assessment of childcare facilities (n = 22) informed the design of the training curriculum. Feedback from the interviews indicated that childcare providers believed in the importance of teaching children about PA and were supportive of training teachers to incorporate PA into classroom settings. The Promoting Physical Activity in Childcare Setting Curriculum was developed and training was implemented with 16 teachers. Participants reported a positive experience with the hands-on training and reported acquiring new knowledge that they intended to implement in their childcare settings. Our findings highlight the feasibility of working with childcare staff to develop PA training and curriculum. Next steps include evaluating the curriculum in additional childcare settings and childcare staff implementation of the curriculum to understand the effectiveness of the training on PA levels of children. PMID:27462468

  5. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Two-level statistical modeling of background exposure and time-activity patterns during three seasons.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Pitz, Mike; Cyrys, Josef; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Gu, Jianwei; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Personal exposure to air pollution is associated with time- and location-specific factors including indoor and outdoor air pollution, meteorology and time activities. Our investigation aims at the description and identification of factors determining personal exposure to particle number concentration (PNC) in everyday situations. Ten volunteers recorded their personal exposure to PNC and kept an activity diary in three different seasons besides stationary measurements of ambient air pollution and meteorology. Background exposure to PNC was modelled using the most predictive variables. In a second step, the effects of the activities were calculated adjusted for the background exposure. The average personal PNC level was highest in winter and was three times higher than the mean stationary PNC level while staying indoors and two times higher while staying outdoors. Personal indoor PNC levels were significantly increased during the use of candles, cooking and the occurrence of smell of food. High stationary outdoor PNC levels and low dew point temperatures were associated with increased personal outdoor PNC levels. Times spent in public transport were associated with lower personal PNC levels than other times spent in transportation. Personal PNC levels in everyday situations exhibited a large variability because of seasonal, microenvironment-specific and activity-specific influences.

  6. Fluorogen-activating proteins provide tunable labeling densities for tracking FcεRI independent of IgE.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Samantha L; Yan, Qi; Telmer, Cheryl A; Lidke, Keith A; Bruchez, Marcel P; Lidke, Diane S

    2015-02-20

    Crosslinking of IgE bound FcεRI on mast cells and basophils by multivalent antigen leads to degranulation and the release of key inflammatory mediators that stimulate the allergic response. Here, we present and characterize the use of fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs) for single particle tracking of FcεRI to investigate how receptor mobility is influenced after IgE-induced changes in mast cell behavior. FAPs are genetically encoded tags that bind a fluorogen dye and increase its brightness upon binding up to 20,000-fold. We demonstrate that, by titrating fluorogen concentration, labeling densities from ensemble to single particle can be achieved, independent of expression level and without the need for wash steps or photobleaching. The FcεRI γ-subunit fused to a FAP (FAP-γ) provides, for the first time, an IgE-independent probe for tracking this signaling subunit of FcεRI at the single molecule level. We show that the FcεRI γ-subunit dynamics are controlled by the IgE-binding α-subunit and that the cytokinergic IgE, SPE-7, induces mast cell activation without altering FcεRI mobility or promoting internalization. We take advantage of the far-red emission of the malachite green (MG) fluorogen to track FcεRI relative to dynamin-GFP and find that immobilized receptors readily correlate with locations of dynamin recruitment only under conditions that promote rapid endocytosis. These studies demonstrate the usefulness of the FAP system for single molecule studies and have provided new insights into the relationship among FcεRI structure, activity, and mobility. PMID:25343439

  7. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  8. Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, G.B.; Franklin, J.F.; Kohler, A.; Croze, H.; Boelcke, C.

    1986-12-01

    One of the more significant problems when trying to determine what impact is having on global cycles is not knowing what ''natural'' levels should be for both abiotic (gases, trace elements) and biotic (ecosystem functions) processes. The authors believe that a well designed, coordinated network of baseline stations in remote areas around the world can provide a data base will allow best current estimates to be made of biotic and abiotic baseline conditions. These baseline conditions will then help us make better comparisons with more impacted areas, and thus help us more fully understand the impact man is having on his world. This paper examines the history of background pollution monitoring at the international level, describes current activities in the field of ''integrated'' background monitoring, and proposes criteria for the development of a global network of baseline stations to coordinate background monitoring for the presence, accumulation and behavior of pollutants in remote ecosystems. In this paper, this network is called the Integrated Global Background Monitoring Network.

  9. Polarised skylight and the landmark panorama provide night-active bull ants with compass information during route following.

    PubMed

    Reid, Samuel F; Narendra, Ajay; Hemmi, Jan M; Zeil, Jochen

    2011-02-01

    Navigating animals are known to use a number of celestial and terrestrial compass cues that allow them to determine and control their direction of travel. Which of the cues dominate appears to depend on their salience. Here we show that night-active bull ants attend to both the pattern of polarised skylight and the landmark panorama in their familiar habitat. When the two directional cues are in conflict, ants choose a compromise direction. However, landmark guidance appears to be the primary mechanism of navigation used by forager ants, with those cues in the direction of heading having the greatest influence on navigation. Different colonies respond to the removal of these cues to different degrees, depending on the directional information provided by the local landmark panorama. Interestingly, other parts of the surrounding panorama also influence foraging speed and accuracy, suggesting that they too play a role in navigation.

  10. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced.

  11. Gamma-Irradiated Influenza A Virus Provides Adjuvant Activity to a Co-Administered Poorly Immunogenic SFV Vaccine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Babb, Rachelle; Chan, Jennifer; Khairat, Jasmine E.; Furuya, Yoichi; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Many currently available inactivated vaccines require “adjuvants” to maximize the protective immune responses generated against the antigens of interest. Recent studies in mice with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus (γ-FLU) have shown its superior efficacy compared to other forms of inactivated FLU vaccines and its ability to induce both potent interferon type-I (IFN-I) responses and the IFN-I-associated partial lymphocyte activation. Commonly, IFN-I responses induced by adjuvants, combined in vaccine preparations, have been shown to effectively enhance the immunogenicity of the antigens of interest. Therefore, we investigated the potential adjuvant activity of γ-FLU and the possible effect on antibody responses against co-administrated antigens, using gamma-irradiated Semliki Forest virus (γ-SFV) as the experimental vaccine in mice. Our data show that co-vaccination with γ-FLU and γ-SFV resulted in enhanced SFV-specific antibody responses in terms of increased titers by sixfold and greater neutralization efficacy, when compared to vaccination with γ-SFV alone. This study provides promising evidence related to the possible use of γ-FLU as an adjuvant to poorly immunogenic vaccines without compromising the vaccine efficacy of γ-FLU. PMID:24959166

  12. Regulation of Sufu activity by p66β and Mycbp provides new insight into vertebrate Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuwen; Yao, Erica; Wang, Kevin; Nozawa, Yoko; Shimizu, Hirohito; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Jau-Nian; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    Control of Gli function by Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), a major negative regulator, is a key step in mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, but how this is achieved in the nucleus is unknown. We found that Hh signaling results in reduced Sufu protein levels and Sufu dissociation from Gli proteins in the nucleus, highlighting critical functions of Sufu in the nucleus. Through a proteomic approach, we identified several Sufu-interacting proteins, including p66β (a member of the NuRD [nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase] repressor complex) and Mycbp (a Myc-binding protein). p66β negatively and Mycbp positively regulate Hh signaling in cell-based assays and zebrafish. They function downstream from the membrane receptors, Patched and Smoothened, and the primary cilium. Sufu, p66β, Mycbp, and Gli are also detected on the promoters of Hh targets in a dynamic manner. Our results support a new model of Hh signaling in the nucleus. Sufu recruits p66β to block Gli-mediated Hh target gene expression. Meanwhile, Mycbp forms a complex with Gli and Sufu without Hh stimulation but remains inactive. Hh pathway activation leads to dissociation of Sufu/p66β from Gli, enabling Mycbp to promote Gli protein activity and Hh target gene expression. These studies provide novel insight into how Sufu controls Hh signaling in the nucleus. PMID:25403183

  13. MRI active guidewire with an embedded temperature probe and providing a distinct tip signal to enhance clinical safety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The field of interventional cardiovascular MRI is hampered by the unavailability of active guidewires that are both safe and conspicuous. Heating of conductive guidewires is difficult to predict in vivo and disruptive to measure using external probes. We describe a clinical-grade 0.035” (0.89 mm) guidewire for MRI right and left heart catheterization at 1.5 T that has an internal probe to monitor temperature in real-time, and that has both tip and shaft visibility as well as suitable flexibility. Methods The design has an internal fiberoptic temperature probe, as well as a distal solenoid to enhance tip visibility on a loopless antenna. We tested different tip-solenoid configurations to balance heating and signal profiles. We tested mechanical performance in vitro and in vivo in comparison with a popular clinical nitinol guidewire. Results The solenoid displaced the point of maximal heating (“hot spot”) from the tip to a more proximal location where it can be measured without impairing guidewire flexion. Probe pullback allowed creation of lengthwise guidewire temperature maps that allowed rapid evaluation of design prototypes. Distal-only solenoid attachment offered the best compromise between tip visibility and heating among design candidates. When fixed at the hot spot, the internal probe consistently reflected the maximum temperature compared external probes. Real-time temperature monitoring was performed during porcine left heart catheterization. Heating was negligible using normal operating parameters (flip angle, 45°; SAR, 1.01 W/kg); the temperature increased by 4.2°C only during high RF power mode (flip angle, 90°; SAR, 3.96 W/kg) and only when the guidewire was isolated from blood cooling effects by an introducer sheath. The tip flexibility and in vivo performance of the final guidewire design were similar to a popular commercial guidewire. Conclusions We integrated a fiberoptic temperature probe inside a 0.035” MRI guidewire

  14. [NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity in the liver of rats with acetaminophen-induced toxic hepatitis on the background of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kopylchuk, G P; Voloshchuk, O M

    2015-01-01

    The ratio between the redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes and key enzymatic activity of the I and II respiratory chain complexes in the liver cells mitochondria of rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis under the conditions of alimentary deprivation of protein was studied. It was estimated, that under the conditions of acute acetaminophen-induced hepatitis of rats kept on a low-protein diet during 4 weeks a significant decrease of the NADH:ubiquinone reductase and succinate dehydrogenase activity with simultaneous increase of the ratio between redox forms of the nicotinamide coenzymes (NAD+/NADH) is observed compared to the same indices in the liver cells of animals with experimental hepatitis kept on the ration balanced by all nutrients. Results of research may become basic ones for the biochemical rationale for the approaches directed to the correction and elimination of the consequences of energy exchange in the toxic hepatitis, induced on the background of protein deficiency. PMID:26036138

  15. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine. PMID

  16. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  17. The assessment of cytotoxic T cell and natural killer cells activity in residents of high and ordinary background radiation areas of Ramsar-Iran.

    PubMed

    Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Abediankenari, Saeid; Mostafazadeh, Amrollah

    2013-01-01

    The effective radiation dose of human from natural sources is about 2.4 mSv/y and the dose limit for radiation workers is 20 mSv/y. Ramsar, a city in Iran, has been the subject of concern in the last forty years for a high level of radiation measured in some spots as high as 260 mSv/y. Carcinogenesis is one of the most studied effects of radiation especially in high doses. Recent studies showed that the high level of natural radiation received by inhabitants of this area, paradoxically don't have significant health effect. Natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T cells are the most important cells in tumor immune surveillance and CD107a is a widely expressed intracellular protein located in the lysosomal/endosomal membrane. CD107a transiently located on the cell membrane can be used as a marker of CD8 + T cell degranulation following stimulation. It is also expressed, to a lower extent, on activated NK cells. In this study, 60 healthy people were selected randomly and their consent obtained and confounding factors such as sex, age, life-styles was matched then the count of activated NK and CD8 + cells was compared in high and normal background radiation areas inhabitants of Ramsar. After filling the questionnaire and measurement of background radiation, blood samples of 30 healthy people from each region were analyzed immediately by means of flowcytometry. The leukocytes and their subsets were not significantly different between two groups and the count of active cells was higher in control group. The result shows that the changes in immune system occur due to radiation and maybe it is as a result of higher radiosensitivity of activated cells. PMID:23531635

  18. Derivatives of Z-bisdehydrodoisynolic acid provide a new description of the binding-activity paradox and selective estrogen receptor modulator activity.

    PubMed

    Adler, Molly; Hou, Yuqing; Sandrock, Paul; Meyers, Cal Y; Winters, Todd A; Banz, William J; Adler, Stuart

    2006-08-01

    Z-Bisdehydrodoisynolic acid [(+/-)-Z-BDDA], an estrogenic carboxylic acid, is highly active in vivo yet binds poorly to estrogen receptors (ERs). Studies of Z-BDDA and its enantiomers demonstrate therapeutic potential as selective ER modulators; however, the activity vs. binding paradox has remained. One possible explanation is that the carboxylic acid group of Z-BDDA may be modified in vivo to an ester or amide. Synthesis of these derivatives showed the relative binding affinity (RBA) of the methyl ester for ERalpha and ERbeta was increased approximately 14- and 20-fold, respectively, relative to the parent compound. Yet, this increased affinity did not result in increased reporter gene expression. In contrast, the amide showed an unexpected approximately 4-fold decrease in RBA to both ERs compared with the parent. The relationship among the RBAs of ester, acid, and amide is consistent with their predicted polarity, suggesting the carboxylic acid, and not the carboxylate of BDDA, binds to ERs. Studies at pH 6.5, 7.4, and 8.0 were consistent with a simple acid-base equilibrium model, with BDDA binding as the undissociated acid and with affinity equal to or exceeding that of estradiol, consistent with high in vivo potency. Furthermore, the alcohol BDD-OH also demonstrated high affinity and increased activity in gene expression assays. In addition to suggesting a resolution to the decades-old binding/activity paradox, these studies may provide a direction for definitive in vivo metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies and provide additional insight into the chemical and metabolic determinants of BBDA's unique tissue selectivity and selective ER modulator activities.

  19. T cell Ig and mucin 1 (TIM-1) is expressed on in vivo-activated T cells and provides a costimulatory signal for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Anjali J; Oriss, Timothy B; O'malley, Katherine J; Ray, Anuradha; Kane, Lawrence P

    2005-11-22

    Polymorphisms in TIM-1, a member of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) domain family, are associated with relative susceptibility to the development of T helper 2-dominated immune responses such as in allergic asthma. Recent data have also suggested that ligation of TIM-1 can augment T cell activation. We have found that the TIM-1 protein is expressed on CD4(+) T cells in vivo after intranasal immunization. Ectopic expression of TIM-1 during T cell differentiation results in a significant increase in the number of cells producing IL-4 but not IFN-gamma. Furthermore, TIM-1 expression provides a costimulatory signal that increases transcription from the IL-4 promoter and from isolated nuclear factor of activated T cells/activating protein-1 (NFAT/AP-1) elements. Finally, we provide evidence that TIM-1 can be phosphorylated on tyrosine and that TIM-1 costimulation requires its cytoplasmic tail and the conserved tyrosine within that domain. These results constitute evidence that TIM-1 directly couples to phosphotyrosine-dependent intracellular signaling pathways.

  20. Brief Report: Understanding Intention to Be Physically Active and Physical Activity Behaviour in Adolescents from a Low Socio-Economic Status Background: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Michael J.; Rivis, Amanda; Jordan, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this brief report is to report on the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for predicting the physical activity intentions and behaviour of British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. A prospective questionnaire design was employed with 197, 13-14 year olds (76 males, 121 females). At time 1…

  1. Plutonium and Uranium Atom Ratios and Activity Levels in Cochiti Lake Bottom Sediments Provided by Pueblo de Cochiti

    SciTech Connect

    Gallaher, B.M.; Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.; Benjamin, T.M.

    1999-05-01

    Historical operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory have contaminated stream sediments with plutonium and other radionuclides. A small portion of these contaminated sediments has been carried by floods into the Rio Grande drainage system, eventually to be trapped by Cochiti Lake located on Pueblo de Cochiti lands approximately 8 km downstream of the Laboratory. In this study, lake bottom sediment samples provided by the Pueblo de Cochiti were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to determine plutonium and uranium activity levels and isotopic atom ratios. This specialized analytical method allows us to take isotopic fingerprints of radionuclides found in the sediment and to determine how much plutonium and uranium came from the Laboratory and how much was deposited by worldwide fallout or is natural. Two distinct types of samples were processed: segments of a continuous vertical core of the entire accumulated sediment sequence and other samples from across the lake bottom at the water/sediment interface. Based on measurement of the {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio, Laboratory-derived plutonium is present in eight of nine samples at the core site. On a depth-weighted basis, approximately one-half of the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu came from early operations at the Laboratory; the remaining plutonium came from fallout dispersed by above-ground nuclear tests. In contrast to the core site, the samples from the other locations showed little or no evidence of Laboratory-derived plutonium, with more than 90 percent of the plutonium attributable to fallout. The overall amount of plutonium in all the samples is of the same magnitude as other reservoirs in the region. The net increase in plutonium over upstream reservoirs unaffected by Laboratory activities is a maximum of 0.014 pCi/g or 3.5 times. All of the samples reflect natural uranium compositions. Laboratory-derived uranium is not identifiable, presumably because the sediment contains abundant

  2. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  3. Low background screening capability in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-01

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  4. A new UK Greenhouse Gas measurement network providing ultra high-frequency measurements of key radiatively active trace gases taken from a network of tall towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, A.; O'Doherty, S.; Manning, A. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Derwent, R. G.; Moncrieff, J. B.; Sturges, W. T.

    2012-04-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric concentrations of gases is important in assessing the impact of international policies related to the atmospheric environment. The effects of control measures on greenhouse gases introduced under the Montreal and Kyoto Protocols are now being observed. Continued monitoring is required to assess the overall success of the Protocols. For over 15 years the UK Government have funded high-frequency measurements of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting gases at Mace Head, a global background measurement station on the west coast of Ireland. These continuous, high-frequency, high-precision measurements are used to estimate regional (country-scale) emissions of greenhouse gases across the UK using an inversion methodology (NAME-Inversion) that links the Met Office atmospheric dispersion model (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment - NAME) with the Mace Head observations. This unique inversion method acts to independently verify bottom up emission estimates of radiatively active and ozone-depleting trace gases. In 2011 the UK government (DECC) funded the establishment and integration of three new tall tower measurements stations in the UK, to provide enhanced resolution emission maps and decrease uncertainty of regional emission estimates produced using the NAME-Inversion. One station included in this new UK network was already established in Scotland and was used in collaboration with Edinburgh University. The two other new stations are in England and were set-up early in 2012, they contain brand new instrumentation for measurements of greenhouse gases. All three additional stations provide ultra high-frequency (1 sec) data of CO2 and CH4 using the Picarro© Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer and high frequency (20 min) measurements of N2O and SF6 from custom built sample modules with GC-ECD. We will present the new tall tower UK measurement network in detail. Using high-frequency measurements at new operational sites, including Mace

  5. Cooperative DNA-binding by Bicoid provides a mechanism for threshold-dependent gene activation in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Burz, D S; Rivera-Pomar, R; Jäckle, H; Hanes, S D

    1998-01-01

    The Bicoid morphogen directs pattern formation along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis of the Drosophila embryo. Bicoid is distributed in a concentration gradient that decreases exponentially from the anterior pole, however, it transcribes target genes such as hunchback in a step-function-like pattern; the expression domain is uniform and has a sharply defined posterior boundary. A 'gradient-affinity' model proposed to explain Bicoid action states that (i) cooperative gene activation by Bicoid generates the sharp on/off switch for target gene transcription and (ii) target genes with different affinities for Bicoid are expressed at different positions along the A-P axis. Using an in vivo yeast assay and in vitro methods, we show that Bicoid binds DNA with pairwise cooperativity; Bicoid bound to a strong site helps Bicoid bind to a weak site. These results support the first aspect of the model, providing a mechanism by which Bicoid generates sharp boundaries of gene expression. However, contrary to the second aspect of the model, we find no significant difference between the affinity of Bicoid for the anterior gene hunchback and the posterior gene knirps. We propose, instead, that the arrangement of Bicoids bound to the target gene presents a unique signature to the transcription machinery that, in combination with overall affinity, regulates the extent of gene transcription along the A-P axis. PMID:9774343

  6. Active fiber-based retroreflector providing phase-retracing anti-parallel laser beams for precision spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Maisenbacher, L; Matveev, A; Pohl, R; Khabarova, K; Chang, Y; Grinin, A; Lamour, T; Shi, T; Yost, D C; Udem, Th; Hänsch, T W; Kolachevsky, N

    2016-07-25

    We present an active fiber-based retroreflector providing high quality phase-retracing anti-parallel Gaussian laser beams for precision spectroscopy of Doppler sensitive transitions. Our design is well-suited for a number of applications where implementing optical cavities is technically challenging and corner cubes fail to match the demanded requirements, most importantly retracing wavefronts and preservation of the laser polarization. To illustrate the performance of the system, we use it for spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen and demonstrate an average suppression of the first order Doppler shift to 4 parts in 106 of the full collinear shift. This high degree of cancellation combined with our cryogenic source of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state is sufficient to enable determinations of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius with competitive uncertainties. Advantages over the usual Doppler cancellation based on corner cube type retroreflectors are discussed as well as an alternative method using a high finesse cavity. PMID:27464193

  7. One RNA plays three roles to provide catalytic activity to a group I intron lacking an endogenous internal guide sequence.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Nilesh; Lehman, Niles

    2009-07-01

    Catalytic RNA molecules possess simultaneously a genotype and a phenotype. However, a single RNA genotype has the potential to adopt two or perhaps more distinct phenotypes as a result of differential folding and/or catalytic activity. Such multifunctionality would be particularly significant if the phenotypes were functionally inter-related in a common biochemical pathway. Here, this phenomenon is demonstrated by the ability of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme to function when its canonical internal guide sequence (GUG) has been removed from the 5' end of the molecule, and added back exogenously in trans. The presence of GUG triplets in non-covalent fragments of the ribozyme allow trans-splicing to occur in both a reverse splicing assay and a covalent self-assembly assay in which the internal guide sequence (IGS)-less ribozyme can put itself together from two of its component pieces. Analysis of these reactions indicates that a single RNA fragment can perform up to three distinct roles in a reaction: behaving as a portion of a catalyst, behaving as a substrate, and providing an exogenous IGS. This property of RNA to be multifunctional in a single reaction pathway bolsters the probability that a system of self-replicating molecules could have existed in an RNA world during the origins of life on the Earth. PMID:19406926

  8. Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Active-Duty Military Personnel: Utilization of Chaplains and Other Mental Health Service Providers

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica Kelley; Hourani, Laurel; Lane, Marian E.; Tueller, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Military chaplains not only conduct religious services, but also provide counseling and spiritual support to military service members, operating as liaisons between soldiers and mental health professionals. In this study, active-duty soldiers (N = 889) reported help-seeking behaviors and mental health. Using logistic regressions, we describe the issues for which soldiers reported seeking help, then outline the characteristics of those who are most likely to seek help from a chaplain. Of the soldiers who sought help from a chaplain within the previous year, 29.9% reported high levels of combat exposure, 50.8% screened positive for depression, 39.1% had probable PTSD, and 26.6% screened positive for generalized anxiety disorder. The participant’s unit firing on the enemy, personally firing on the enemy, and seeing dead bodies or human remains predicted seeing a chaplain. Future research should examine ways to engage soldiers who have had more combat experiences with the chaplain community to address spiritual issues. PMID:27191375

  9. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task.

    PubMed

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F

    2013-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making.

  10. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task.

    PubMed

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F

    2013-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making. PMID:24478664

  11. Frontopolar cortex and decision-making efficiency: comparing brain activity of experts with different professional background during an exploration-exploitation task

    PubMed Central

    Laureiro-Martínez, Daniella; Canessa, Nicola; Brusoni, Stefano; Zollo, Maurizio; Hare, Todd; Alemanno, Federica; Cappa, Stefano F.

    2014-01-01

    An optimal balance between efficient exploitation of available resources and creative exploration of alternatives is critical for adaptation and survival. Previous studies associated these behavioral drives with, respectively, the dopaminergic mesocorticolimbic system and frontopolar-intraparietal networks. We study the activation of these systems in two age and gender-matched groups of experienced decision-makers differing in prior professional background, with the aim to understand the neural bases of individual differences in decision-making efficiency (performance divided by response time). We compare brain activity of entrepreneurs (who currently manage the organization they founded based on their venture idea) and managers (who are constantly involved in making strategic decisions but have no venture experience) engaged in a gambling-task assessing exploitative vs. explorative decision-making. Compared with managers, entrepreneurs showed higher decision-making efficiency, and a stronger activation in regions of frontopolar cortex (FPC) previously associated with explorative choice. Moreover, activity across a network of regions previously linked to explore/exploit tradeoffs explained individual differences in choice efficiency. These results suggest new avenues for the study of individual differences in the neural antecedents of efficient decision-making. PMID:24478664

  12. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    The authors have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  13. A unique horizontal gene transfer event has provided the octocoral mitochondrial genome with an active mismatch repair gene that has potential for an unusual self-contained function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial genome of the Octocorallia has several characteristics atypical for metazoans, including a novel gene suggested to function in DNA repair. This mtMutS gene is favored for octocoral molecular systematics, due to its high information content. Several hypotheses concerning the origins of mtMutS have been proposed, and remain equivocal, although current weight of support is for a horizontal gene transfer from either an epsilonproteobacterium or a large DNA virus. Here we present new and compelling evidence on the evolutionary origin of mtMutS, and provide the very first data on its activity, functional capacity and stability within the octocoral mitochondrial genome. Results The mtMutS gene has the expected conserved amino acids, protein domains and predicted tertiary protein structure. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that mtMutS is not a member of the MSH family and therefore not of eukaryotic origin. MtMutS clusters closely with representatives of the MutS7 lineage; further support for this relationship derives from the sharing of a C-terminal endonuclease domain that confers a self-contained mismatch repair function. Gene expression analyses confirm that mtMutS is actively transcribed in octocorals. Rates of mitochondrial gene evolution in mtMutS-containing octocorals are lower than in their hexacoral sister-group, which lacks the gene, although paradoxically the mtMutS gene itself has higher rates of mutation than other octocoral mitochondrial genes. Conclusions The octocoral mtMutS gene is active and codes for a protein with all the necessary components for DNA mismatch repair. A lower rate of mitochondrial evolution, and the presence of a nicking endonuclease domain, both indirectly support a theory of self-sufficient DNA mismatch repair within the octocoral mitochondrion. The ancestral affinity of mtMutS to non-eukaryotic MutS7 provides compelling support for an origin by horizontal gene transfer. The immediate vector of transmission

  14. Differences in the Influence of Family Background and Social Activities on Smoking of Minority and White High School Seniors, 1976–2004

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.

    2009-01-01

    This population-based study of high school seniors examines differences in the influence of several important determinants of smoking among white, African-American, Hispanic, and other teens. With national survey data for each year from 1976 to 2004, logistic regression is used to test for differences across race and ethnic groups (averaged over all years) in the effects on daily smoking of background factors such as living arrangements and parents’ education and social activities such as academic performance and religiosity. The results show similarity in effects across racial categories, but some determinants have weaker or reversed effects for African-American and Hispanic youth than for white youth. For example, high parents’ education increases smoking among Hispanic youth, has little influence among African Americans, and decreases smoking among whites. These results suggest that smoking patterns of minority teens differ in some ways from those of white teens. PMID:18401717

  15. The influence of providing perches and string on activity levels, fearfulness and leg health in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailie, C L; O'Connell, N E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of providing environmental enrichment in the form of perches and string on the behaviour and welfare of commercial broiler chickens. Houses containing ~23 000 broiler chickens were assigned to one of four treatments in a 2×2 factorial design. Treatments involved two levels of access to perches (P) (present (24/house) '+P' or absent '-P') and two levels of access to string (S) (present (24/house) '+S' or absent '-S'). All houses contained windows, and 30 straw bales were provided from day 10 of the rearing cycle. Treatments were applied in one of four houses on a single farm, and were replicated over four production cycles. Behaviour and leg health were observed in weeks 3 to 5 of the rearing cycle. Production performance and environmental parameters were also measured. There was an interaction between perches and age in the percentage of birds observed lying, with higher percentages of birds observed lying in the +P treatment than in the -P treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also a significant interaction between string and age in the percentage of birds observed in locomotion, with higher percentages observed in locomotion in the -S treatment than in the +S treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also an interaction between string and age in average gait scores, with lower gait scores in the +S treatment than in the -S treatment during weeks 3 and 5 but not within week 4. Daytime observations showed that perches and strings were used frequently, with one bout of perching occurring approximately every 80 s/perch, and one bout of pecking at string occurring every 78 s/string on average. There was a significant effect of age on use of perches (P<0.001) and string (P<0.001), with perching peaking during week 5 and string pecking peaking during week 3. We conclude that commercial broilers in windowed houses with access to straw bales display an interest in additional enrichment stimuli in the form of perches and

  16. The influence of providing perches and string on activity levels, fearfulness and leg health in commercial broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Bailie, C L; O'Connell, N E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of providing environmental enrichment in the form of perches and string on the behaviour and welfare of commercial broiler chickens. Houses containing ~23 000 broiler chickens were assigned to one of four treatments in a 2×2 factorial design. Treatments involved two levels of access to perches (P) (present (24/house) '+P' or absent '-P') and two levels of access to string (S) (present (24/house) '+S' or absent '-S'). All houses contained windows, and 30 straw bales were provided from day 10 of the rearing cycle. Treatments were applied in one of four houses on a single farm, and were replicated over four production cycles. Behaviour and leg health were observed in weeks 3 to 5 of the rearing cycle. Production performance and environmental parameters were also measured. There was an interaction between perches and age in the percentage of birds observed lying, with higher percentages of birds observed lying in the +P treatment than in the -P treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also a significant interaction between string and age in the percentage of birds observed in locomotion, with higher percentages observed in locomotion in the -S treatment than in the +S treatment during weeks 4 and 5. There was also an interaction between string and age in average gait scores, with lower gait scores in the +S treatment than in the -S treatment during weeks 3 and 5 but not within week 4. Daytime observations showed that perches and strings were used frequently, with one bout of perching occurring approximately every 80 s/perch, and one bout of pecking at string occurring every 78 s/string on average. There was a significant effect of age on use of perches (P<0.001) and string (P<0.001), with perching peaking during week 5 and string pecking peaking during week 3. We conclude that commercial broilers in windowed houses with access to straw bales display an interest in additional enrichment stimuli in the form of perches and

  17. Background level care.

    PubMed

    Pitts, N B

    2009-01-01

    The framework enabled by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System to allow appropriate, patient-centred caries management includes a frequently encountered scenario in which a comprehensive assessment of the teeth and the patient reveals no lesions in need of active preventive or operative care. The issue addressed here is: what background care is appropriate for patients attending a dental practice for routine caries care who, at present, appear to have no active or progressing caries lesions? It is proposed that, in addition to the use of criteria for lesion extent, treatment planning systems should also express the results of lesion assessments in terms of background level care (BLC), preventive treatment options and operative treatment options. The specific treatment options recommended for specific lesions and patients will depend upon a variety of other factors, including lesion activity, monitoring lesion behaviour over time and a range of other prognostic factors. Over recent decades, there has been comparatively little focus on appropriate BLC in a general practice setting. There are a range of issues around the need to support caries prevention and health maintenance from a behavioural and patient-focussed perspective. Even if a patient is deemed to be at low risk of future caries at a particular examination, there is a need for maintenance care. Intrinsic issues which need to be managed for both patients and their caries lesions in this patient group are: (1) the possibility of a change in caries risk status and (2) the impact of incorrect lesion assessments/diagnoses.

  18. Structure-Function Analysis of the Drosophila melanogaster Caudal Transcription Factor Provides Insights into Core Promoter-preferential Activation.

    PubMed

    Shir-Shapira, Hila; Sharabany, Julia; Filderman, Matan; Ideses, Diana; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Mannervik, Mattias; Juven-Gershon, Tamar

    2015-07-10

    Regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription is critical for the proper development, differentiation, and growth of an organism. The RNA polymerase II core promoter is the ultimate target of a multitude of transcription factors that control transcription initiation. Core promoters encompass the RNA start site and consist of functional elements such as the TATA box, initiator, and downstream core promoter element (DPE), which confer specific properties to the core promoter. We have previously discovered that Drosophila Caudal, which is a master regulator of genes involved in development and differentiation, is a DPE-specific transcriptional activator. Here, we show that the mouse Caudal-related homeobox (Cdx) proteins (mCdx1, mCdx2, and mCdx4) are also preferential core promoter transcriptional activators. To elucidate the mechanism that enables Caudal to preferentially activate DPE transcription, we performed structure-function analysis. Using a systematic series of deletion mutants (all containing the intact DNA-binding homeodomain) we discovered that the C-terminal region of Caudal contributes to the preferential activation of the fushi tarazu (ftz) Caudal target gene. Furthermore, the region containing both the homeodomain and the C terminus of Caudal was sufficient to confer core promoter-preferential activation to the heterologous GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Importantly, we discovered that Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a co-activator for Caudal-regulated activation of ftz. Strikingly, dCBP conferred the ability to preferentially activate the DPE-dependent ftz reporter to mini-Caudal proteins that were unable to preferentially activate ftz transcription themselves. Taken together, it is the unique combination of dCBP and Caudal that enables the co-activation of ftz in a core promoter-preferential manner.

  19. Brief report: understanding intention to be physically active and physical activity behaviour in adolescents from a low socio-economic status background: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Rivis, Amanda; Jordan, Caroline

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this brief report is to report on the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for predicting the physical activity intentions and behaviour of British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. A prospective questionnaire design was employed with 197, 13-14 year olds (76 males, 121 females). At time 1 participant completed standard measures of TPB variables. One week later (Time 2), participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A) as a measure of physical activity behaviour. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that attitude and perceived behavioural control jointly accounted for 25% of the variance in intention (p = 0.0001). Perceived behavioural control emerged as the only significant predictor of physical activity behaviour and explained 3.7% of the variance (p = 0.001). Therefore, attitude and PBC successfully predicts intention towards physical activity and PBC predicts physical activity behaviour in British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds.

  20. Brief report: understanding intention to be physically active and physical activity behaviour in adolescents from a low socio-economic status background: an application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Rivis, Amanda; Jordan, Caroline

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this brief report is to report on the utility of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) for predicting the physical activity intentions and behaviour of British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. A prospective questionnaire design was employed with 197, 13-14 year olds (76 males, 121 females). At time 1 participant completed standard measures of TPB variables. One week later (Time 2), participants completed the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents (PAQ-A) as a measure of physical activity behaviour. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that attitude and perceived behavioural control jointly accounted for 25% of the variance in intention (p = 0.0001). Perceived behavioural control emerged as the only significant predictor of physical activity behaviour and explained 3.7% of the variance (p = 0.001). Therefore, attitude and PBC successfully predicts intention towards physical activity and PBC predicts physical activity behaviour in British adolescents from lower-than-average socio-economic backgrounds. PMID:21820730

  1. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  2. Cosmic microwave background images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, D.; Vielva, P.

    2010-01-01

    Cosmology concerns itself with the fundamental questions about the formation, structure, and evolution of the Universe as a whole. Cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is one of the foremost pillars of physical cosmology. Joint analyses of CMB and other astronomical observations are able to determine with ever increasing precision the value of the fundamental cosmological parameters and to provide us with valuable insight about the dynamics of the Universe in evolution. The CMB radiation is a relic of the hot and dense first moments of the Universe: a extraordinarily homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation, which shows small temperature anisotropies that are the key for understanding the conditions of the primitive Universe, testing cosmological models and probing fundamental physics at the very dawn of time. CMB observations are obtained by imaging of the sky at microwave wavelengths. However, the CMB signal is mixed with other astrophysical signals of both Galactic and extragalactic origin. To properly exploit the cosmological information contained in CMB images, they must be cleansed of these other astrophysical emissions first. Blind source separation (BSS) has been a very active field in the last few years. Conversely, the term "compact sources" is often used in the CMB literature referring to spatially bounded, small features in the images, such as galaxies and galaxy clusters. Compact sources and diffuse sources are usually treated separately in CMB image processing. We devote this tutorial to the case of compact sources. Many of the compact source-detection techniques that are widespread inmost fields of astronomy are not easily applicable to CMB images. In this tutorial, we present an overview of the fundamentals of compact object detection theory keeping in mind at every moment these particularities. Throughout the article, we briefly consider Bayesian object detection, model selection, optimal linear filtering, nonlinear filtering, and

  3. Pathway activation profiling reveals new insights into age-related macular degeneration and provides avenues for therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Makarev, Evgeny; Cantor, Charles; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander; Csoka, Anotonei Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of blindness in older people and is caused by loss of the central region of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Conventional methods of gene expression analysis have yielded important insights into AMD pathogenesis, but the precise molecular pathway alterations are still poorly understood. Therefore we developed a new software program, "AMD Medicine", and discovered differential pathway activation profiles in samples of human RPE/choroid from AMD patients and controls. We identified 29 pathways in RPE-choroid AMD phenotypes: 27 pathways were activated in AMD compared to controls, and 2 pathways were activated in controls compared to AMD. In AMD, we identified a graded activation of pathways related to wound response, complement cascade, and cell survival. Also, there was downregulation of two pathways responsible for apoptosis. Furthermore, significant activation of pro-mitotic pathways is consistent with dedifferentiation and cell proliferation events, which occur early in the pathogenesis of AMD. Significantly, we discovered new global pathway activation signatures of AMD involved in the cell-based inflammatory response: IL-2, STAT3, and ERK. The ultimate aim of our research is to achieve a better understanding of signaling pathways involved in AMD pathology, which will eventually lead to better treatments. PMID:25543336

  4. Background and stimulus-induced patterns of high metabolic activity in the visual cortex (area 17) of the squirrel and macaque monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, A.L.; Hendrickson, A.E.

    1983-02-01

    We have used 2-deoxy-D-(/sup 14/C)glucose (2-DG) autoradiography and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry to examine background and stimulus-induced patterns of metabolic activity in monkey striate cortex. In squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) that binocularly or monocularly viewed diffuse white light or binocularly viewed bars of many orientations and spatial frequencies, 2-DG consumption was not uniform across the cortex but consisted of regularly spaced radial zones of high uptake. The zones extended through all laminae except IVc beta and, when viewed tangentially, formed separate patches 500 microns apart. The cytochrome oxidase stain in these animals also revealed patches of high metabolism which coincided with the 2-DG patches. Squirrel monkeys binocularly viewing vertical stripes showed parallel bands of increased 2-DG uptake in the cortex, while the cytochrome label in these animals remained patchy. When monkeys were kept in the dark during 2-DG exposure, 2-DG-labeled patches were not seen but cytochrome oxidase-positive patches remained. In macaque (Macaca nemestrina) monkeys, binocular stimulation with many orientations and spatial frequencies produced radial zones of high 2-DG uptake in layers I to IVa and VI. When viewed tangentially, these zones formed a dots-in-rows pattern with a spacing of 350 X 500 microns; cytochrome oxidase staining produced an identical pattern. Macaca differed from Saimiri in that monocular stimulation labeled alternate rows. These results indicate that there are radial zones of high background metabolism across squirrel and macaque monkey striate cortex. In Saimiri these zones do not appear to be related to an eye dominance system, while in Macaca they do. The presence of these zones of high metabolism may complicate the interpretation of 2-DG autoradiographs that result from specific visual stimuli.

  5. The 60-μm extragalactic background radiation intensity, dust-enshrouded active galactic nuclei and the assembly of groups and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, A. W.; Phillips, T. G.

    2002-06-01

    Submillimetre- (submm-) wave observations have revealed a cosmologically significant population of high-redshift dust-enshrouded galaxies. The form of evolution inferred for this population can be reconciled easily with COBE FIRAS and DIRBE measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) intensity at wavelengths longer than ~100μm. At shorter wavelengths, however, the 60-μm CBR intensity reported by Finkbeiner, Davis & Schlegel is less easily accounted for. Lagache et al. have proposed that this excess CBR emission is a warm Galactic component, and the detection of the highest-energy γ-rays from blazars limits the CBR intensity at these wavelengths, but here we investigate possible sources of this excess CBR emission, assuming that it has a genuine extragalactic origin. We propose and test three explanations, each involving additional populations of luminous, evolving galaxies not readily detected in existing submm-wave surveys. First, an additional population of dust-enshrouded galaxies with hot dust temperatures, perhaps dust-enshrouded, Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN) as suggested by recent deep Chandra surveys. Secondly, a population of dusty galaxies with temperatures more typical of the existing submm-selected galaxies, but at relatively low redshifts. These could plausibly be associated with the assembly of groups and clusters of galaxies. Thirdly, a population of low-luminosity, cool, quiescent spiral galaxies. Hot AGN sources and the assembly of galaxy groups can account for the excess 60-μm background. There are significant problems with the cluster assembly scenario, in which too many bright 60-μm IRAS sources are predicted. Spiral galaxies have the wrong spectral energy distributions to account for the excess. Future wide-field far-infrared (IR) surveys at wavelengths of 70 and 250μm using the SIRTF and Herschel space missions will sample representative volumes of the distant Universe, allowing any hot population of dusty AGNs and

  6. Human C3 mutation reveals a mechanism of dense deposit disease pathogenesis and provides insights into complement activation and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Heurich, Meike; Valdes-Cañedo, Francisco; Vazquez-Martul, Eduardo; Torreira, Eva; Montes, Tamara; Tortajada, Agustín; Pinto, Sheila; Lopez-Trascasa, Margarita; Morgan, B. Paul; Llorca, Oscar; Harris, Claire L.; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is a severe renal disease characterized by accumulation of electron-dense material in the mesangium and glomerular basement membrane. Previously, DDD has been associated with deficiency of factor H (fH), a plasma regulator of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation, and studies in animal models have linked pathogenesis to the massive complement factor 3 (C3) activation caused by this deficiency. Here, we identified a unique DDD pedigree that associates disease with a mutation in the C3 gene. Mutant C3923ΔDG, which lacks 2 amino acids, could not be cleaved to C3b by the AP C3-convertase and was therefore the predominant circulating C3 protein in the patients. However, upon activation to C3b by proteases, or to C3(H2O) by spontaneous thioester hydrolysis, C3923ΔDG generated an active AP C3-convertase that was regulated normally by decay accelerating factor (DAF) but was resistant to decay by fH. Moreover, activated C3b923ΔDG and C3(H2O)923ΔDG were resistant to proteolysis by factor I (fI) in the presence of fH, but were efficiently inactivated in the presence of membrane cofactor protein (MCP). These characteristics cause a fluid phase–restricted AP dysregulation in the patients that continuously activated and consumed C3 produced by the normal C3 allele. These findings expose structural requirements in C3 that are critical for recognition of the substrate C3 by the AP C3-convertase and for the regulatory activities of fH, DAF, and MCP, all of which have implications for therapeutic developments. PMID:20852386

  7. 20 CFR 665.300 - What are rapid response activities and who is responsible for providing them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... natural or other disaster resulting in a mass job dislocation. (b) The State is responsible for providing... substantially increase the number of unemployed individuals. (c) States must establish a rapid...

  8. 20 CFR 669.680 - What activities and services may be provided under the MSFW youth program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... under the MSFW youth program? 669.680 Section 669.680 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... youth program? (a) Based on an evaluation and assessment of the needs of MSFW youth participants... training services, as described in §§ 669.400 and 669.410; (2) Life skills activities which may...

  9. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts

    PubMed Central

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance. PMID:25824278

  10. Induction of lcc2 expression and activity by Agaricus bisporus provides defence against Trichoderma aggressivum toxic extracts.

    PubMed

    Sjaarda, Calvin P; Abubaker, Kamal S; Castle, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Laccases are used by fungi for several functions including defence responses to stresses associated with attack by other fungi. Laccase activity changes and the induction of two laccase genes, lcc1 and lcc2, in Agaricus bisporus were measured in response to toxic extracts of medium in which Trichoderma aggressivum, the cause of green mould disease, was grown. A strain of A. bisporus that shows resistance to the extracts showed higher basal levels and greater enzymatic activity after extract exposure than did a sensitive strain. Furthermore, pre-incubation of T. aggressivum extract with laccases reduced toxicity. Faster induction and greater numbers of lcc2 transcripts in response to the extract were noted in the resistant strain than in the sensitive strain. The timing and increase in lcc2 transcript abundance mirrored changes in total laccase activity. No correlation between resistance and lcc1 transcription was apparent. Transcript abundance in transformants with a siRNA construct homologous to both genes varied widely. A strong negative correlation between transcript abundance and sensitivity of the transformant to toxic extract was observed in plate assays. These results indicated that laccase activity and in particular that encoded by lcc2 contributes to toxin metabolism and by extension green mould disease resistance.

  11. The soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) mission: How we got here and what it will provide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  12. Domain organization of DNase from Thioalkalivibrio sp. provides insights into retention of activity in high salt environments.

    PubMed

    Alzbutas, Gediminas; Kaniusaite, Milda; Grybauskas, Algirdas; Lagunavicius, Arunas

    2015-01-01

    Our study indicates that DNA binding domains are common in many halophilic or halotolerant bacterial DNases and they are potential activators of enzymatic activity at high ionic strength. Usually, proteins adapt to high ionic strength by increasing the number of negatively charged residues on the surface. However, in DNases such adaptation would hinder the binding to negatively charged DNA, a step critical for catalysis. In our study we demonstrate how evolution has solved this dilemma by engaging the DNA binding domain. We propose a mechanism, which enables the enzyme activity at salt concentrations as high as 4 M of sodium chloride, based on collected experimental data and domain structure analysis of a secreted bacterial DNase from the extremely halotolerant bacterium Thioalkalivibrio sp. K90mix. The enzyme harbors two domains: an N-terminal domain, that exhibits DNase activity, and a C-terminal domain, comprising a duplicate DNA binding helix-hairpin-helix motif. Here we present experimental data demonstrating that the C-terminal domain is responsible for the enzyme's resistance to high ionic strength. PMID:26191053

  13. Physical Activity for Young Children: A Quantitative Study of Child Care Providers' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Health Promotion Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Many preschool children fail to achieve the National Association for Sport and Physical Education physical activity recommendations placing themselves at increased risk of overweight and its associated health consequences. The early learning and care system is well positioned to intervene. Yet few child obesity prevention efforts have focused on…

  14. Activities of Secreted Aryl Alcohol Quinone Oxidoreductases from Pycnoporus cinnabarinus Provide Insights into Fungal Degradation of Plant Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Piumi, Francois; Valli, Richard; Aramburu, Juan Carro; Ferreira, Patricia; Faulds, Craig B.; Record, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Auxiliary activities family 3 subfamily 2 (AA3_2) from the CAZy database comprises various functions related to ligninolytic enzymes, such as fungal aryl alcohol oxidases (AAO) and glucose oxidases, both of which are flavoenzymes. The recent study of the Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CIRM BRFM 137 genome combined with its secretome revealed that four AA3_2 enzymes are secreted during biomass degradation. One of these AA3_2 enzymes, scf184803.g17, has recently been produced heterologously in Aspergillus niger. Based on the enzyme's activity and specificity, it was assigned to the glucose dehydrogenases (P. cinnabarinus GDH [PcGDH]). Here, we analyze the distribution of the other three AA3_2 enzymes (scf185002.g8, scf184611.g7, and scf184746.g13) to assess their putative functions. These proteins showed the highest homology with aryl alcohol oxidase from Pleurotus eryngii. Biochemical characterization demonstrated that they were also flavoenzymes harboring flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as a cofactor and able to oxidize a wide variety of phenolic and nonphenolic aryl alcohols and one aliphatic polyunsaturated primary alcohol. Though presenting homology with fungal AAOs, these enzymes exhibited greater efficiency in reducing electron acceptors (quinones and one artificial acceptor) than molecular oxygen and so were defined as aryl-alcohol:quinone oxidoreductases (AAQOs) with two enzymes possessing residual oxidase activity (PcAAQO2 and PcAAQO3). Structural comparison of PcAAQO homology models with P. eryngii AAO demonstrated a wider substrate access channel connecting the active-site cavity to the solvent, explaining the absence of activity with molecular oxygen. Finally, the ability of PcAAQOs to reduce radical intermediates generated by laccase from P. cinnabarinus was demonstrated, shedding light on the ligninolytic system of this fungus. PMID:26873317

  15. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  16. Revealing the Whiteboard to Blind Students: An Inclusive Approach to Provide Mediation in Synchronous E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Andre P.; Linhalis, Flavia; Bianchini, Sandro L.; Fortes, Renata P. M.; Pimentel, Maria de Graca C.

    2010-01-01

    Promoting the inclusion of students with disabilities in e-learning systems has brought many challenges for researchers and educators. The use of synchronous communication tools such as interactive whiteboards has been regarded as an obstacle for inclusive education. In this paper, we present the proposal of an inclusive approach to provide blind…

  17. The Role of Security Concerns in Determining Information Systems/Technology Activities Outsourced to Offshore Service Providers in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocholi, Smart

    2012-01-01

    Based on research studies, the Information System/Technology (IS/T) outsourcing industry in India is reasoned to maintain the status quo of providing IS/T services at the lower level of the IS/T value chain. The 2006 study conducted by Walsh supported the 2001 findings by Arora, Arunachalam, Asundi, and Fernandes that India-based IS /T service…

  18. Heat switches providing low-activation power and quick-switching time for use in cryogenic multi-stage refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Mark Oliver; Shirron, P.

    2012-06-01

    An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is a solid-state cooler capable of achieving sub-Kelvin temperatures. It neither requires moving parts nor a density gradient in a working fluid making it ideal for use in space-based instruments. The flow of energy through the cooler is controlled by heat switches that allow heat transfer when on and isolate portions of the cooler when off. One type of switch uses helium gas as the switching medium. In the off state the gas is adsorbed in a getter thus breaking the thermal path through the switch. To activate the switch, the getter is heated to release helium into the switch body allowing it to complete the thermal path. A getter that has a small heat capacity and low thermal conductance to the body of the switch requires low-activation power. The cooler benefits from this in two ways: shorter recycle times and higher efficiency.We describe such a design here.

  19. Activity-Dependent and Experience-Driven Myelination Provide New Directions for the Management of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Samuel K; Yong, V Wee

    2016-06-01

    Despite an appreciation of the importance of myelination and the consequences of pathological demyelination, the fundamental mechanisms regulating myelination are only now being resolved. Neuronal activity has long been considered a plausible regulatory signal for myelination. However, controversy surrounding its dispensability in certain contexts and the difficulty in determining to what degree it influences myelination has limited its widespread acceptance. Recent studies have shed new light on the role of neuronal activity in regulating oligodendrogenesis and myelination. Further, the dynamics of myelin in adulthood and the association between skilled learning and myelination have become increasingly well characterized. These advances present new considerations for the management of multiple sclerosis and open up new approaches to facilitate remyelination following pathological demyelination.

  20. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%.

  1. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    PubMed

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%. PMID:27154827

  2. Structures of almond hydroxynitrile lyase isoenzyme 5 provide a rationale for the lack of oxidoreductase activity in flavin dependent HNLs.

    PubMed

    Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Bakhuis, Janny; Steinkellner, Georg; Jolink, Fenneke; Keijmel, Esther; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Gruber, Karl

    2016-10-10

    Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) catalyze the asymmetric addition of HCN to aldehydes producing enantiomerically pure cyanohydrins. These enzymes can be heterologously expressed in large quantities making them interesting candidates for industrial applications. The HNLs from Rosaceae evolved from flavin dependent dehydrogenase/oxidase structures. Here we report the high resolution X-ray structure of the highly glycosylated Prunus amygdalus HNL isoenzyme5 (PaHNL5 V317A) expressed in Aspergillus niger and its complex with benzyl alcohol. A comparison with the structure of isoenzyme PaHNL1 indicates a higher accessibility to the active site and a larger cavity for PaHNL5. Additionally, the PaHNL5 complex structure with benzyl alcohol was compared with the structurally related aryl-alcohol oxidase (AAO). Even though both enzymes contain an FAD-cofactor and histidine residues at crucial positions in the active site, PaHNL5 lacks the oxidoreductase activity. The structures indicate that in PaHNLs benzyl alcohol is bound too far away from the FAD cofactor in order to be oxidized. PMID:27067080

  3. Genetic reconstruction of protozoan rRNA decoding sites provides a rationale for paromomycin activity against Leishmania and Trypanosoma.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Sven N; Kaiser, Marcel; Schmidt, Sebastian; Shcherbakov, Dmitri; Janusic, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Böttger, Erik C

    2011-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics target the ribosomal decoding A-site and are active against a broad spectrum of bacteria. These compounds bind to a highly conserved stem-loop-stem structure in helix 44 of bacterial 16S rRNA. One particular aminoglycoside, paromomycin, also shows potent antiprotozoal activity and is used for the treatment of parasitic infections, e.g. by Leishmania spp. The precise drug target is, however, unclear; in particular whether aminoglycoside antibiotics target the cytosolic and/or the mitochondrial protozoan ribosome. To establish an experimental model for the study of protozoan decoding-site function, we constructed bacterial chimeric ribosomes where the central part of bacterial 16S rRNA helix 44 has been replaced by the corresponding Leishmania and Trypanosoma rRNA sequences. Relating the results from in-vitro ribosomal assays to that of in-vivo aminoglycoside activity against Trypanosoma brucei, as assessed in cell cultures and in a mouse model of infection, we conclude that aminoglycosides affect cytosolic translation while the mitochondrial ribosome of trypanosomes is not a target for aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  4. The active site of hydroxynitrile lyase from Prunus amygdalus: modeling studies provide new insights into the mechanism of cyanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dreveny, Ingrid; Kratky, Christoph; Gruber, Karl

    2002-02-01

    The FAD-dependent hydroxynitrile lyase from almond (Prunus amygdalus, PaHNL) catalyzes the cleavage of R-mandelonitrile into benzaldehyde and hydrocyanic acid. Catalysis of the reverse reaction-the enantiospecific formation of alpha-hydroxynitriles--is now widely utilized in organic syntheses as one of the few industrially relevant examples of enzyme-mediated C-C bond formation. Starting from the recently determined X-ray crystal structure, systematic docking calculations with the natural substrate were used to locate the active site of the enzyme and to identify amino acid residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis. Analysis of the modeled substrate complexes supports an enzymatic mechanism that includes the flavin cofactor as a mere "spectator" of the reaction and relies on general acid/base catalysis by the conserved His-497. Stabilization of the negative charge of the cyanide ion is accomplished by a pronounced positive electrostatic potential at the binding site. PaHNL activity requires the FAD cofactor to be bound in its oxidized form, and calculations of the pKa of enzyme-bound HCN showed that the observed inactivation upon cofactor reduction is largely caused by the reversal of the electrostatic potential within the active site. The suggested mechanism closely resembles the one proposed for the FAD-independent, and structurally unrelated HNL from Hevea brasiliensis. Although the actual amino acid residues involved in the catalytic cycle are completely different in the two enzymes, a common motif for the mechanism of cyanogenesis (general acid/base catalysis plus electrostatic stabilization of the cyanide ion) becomes evident. PMID:11790839

  5. Dynamic QTLs for sugars and enzyme activities provide an overview of genetic control of sugar metabolism during peach fruit development

    PubMed Central

    Desnoues, Elsa; Baldazzi, Valentina; Génard, Michel; Mauroux, Jehan-Baptiste; Lambert, Patrick; Confolent, Carole; Quilot-Turion, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic control of sugar metabolism is essential to enhance fruit quality and promote fruit consumption. The sugar content and composition of fruits varies with species, cultivar and stage of development, and is controlled by multiple enzymes. A QTL (quantitative trait locus) study was performed on peach fruit [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch], the model species for Prunus. Progeny derived from an interspecific cross between P. persica cultivars and P. davidiana was used. Dynamic QTLs for fresh weight, sugars, acids, and enzyme activities related to sugar metabolism were detected at different stages during fruit development. Changing effects of alleles during fruit growth were observed, including inversions close to maturity. This QTL analysis was supplemented by the identification of genes annotated on the peach genome as enzymes linked to sugar metabolism or sugar transporters. Several cases of co-locations between annotated genes, QTLs for enzyme activities and QTLs controlling metabolite concentrations were observed and discussed. These co-locations raise hypotheses regarding the functional regulation of sugar metabolism and pave the way for further analyses to enable the identification of the underlying genes. In conclusion, we identified the potential impact on fruit breeding of the modification of QTL effect close to maturity. PMID:27117339

  6. A forced damped oscillation framework for undulatory swimming provides new insights into how propulsion arises in active and passive swimming.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions ("active" swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid ("passive" swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  7. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2). (b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320...) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does...

  8. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320 Section 664.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF...

  9. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... administrative purposes under 20 CFR 667.210(a)(2). (b) Although it is not necessary to ensure that 30 percent of... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320...) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Out-of-School Youth § 664.320 Does...

  10. A single-label phenylpyrrolocytidine provides a molecular beacon-like response reporting HIV-1 RT RNase H activity.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Alexander S; Esmaeili, Abbasali; Damha, Masad J; Hudson, Robert H E

    2010-01-01

    6-Phenylpyrrolocytidine (PhpC), a structurally conservative and highly fluorescent cytidine analog, was incorporated into oligoribonucleotides. The PhpC-containing RNA formed native-like duplex structures with complementary DNA or RNA. The PhpC-modification was found to act as a sensitive reporter group being non-disruptive to structure and the enzymatic activity of RNase H. A RNA/DNA hybrid possessing a single PhpC insert was an excellent substrate for HIV-1 RT Ribonuclease H and rapidly reported cleavage of the RNA strand with a 14-fold increase in fluorescence intensity. The PhpC-based assay for RNase H was superior to the traditional molecular beacon approach in terms of responsiveness, rapidity and ease (single label versus dual). Furthermore, the PhpC-based assay is amenable to high-throughput microplate assay format and may form the basis for a new screen for inhibitors of HIV-RT RNase H.

  11. Activation of the Albino Sterlet Acipenser ruthenus Eggs by UV-Irradiated Bester Hybrid Spermatozoa to Provide Gynogenetic Progeny.

    PubMed

    Fopp-Bayat, D; Ocalewicz, K

    2015-08-01

    Meiotic gynogenesis was induced in the albino form of sterlet Acipenser ruthenus by activation of eggs with UV-irradiated bester (Huso huso x Acipenser ruthenus) spermatozoa followed by inhibition of the second meiotic division performed by a heat shock. Obtained putative gynogenetic progeny were all albinos. The genetic verification based on three microsatellite DNA markers confirmed the only maternal inheritance of the progeny from the gynogenetic experimental groups. Cytogenetic analysis proved the gynogenetic sterlets were diploids. Application of the albino phenotype together with the molecular and the cytogenetic diagnostic approaches enabled to evaluate the efficiency of the spermatozoa irradiation and application of the heat shock to restore diploid state in the gynogenetic zygotes. PMID:25858073

  12. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  13. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew P; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca(2+) However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca(2+) it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca(2+) binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its 'c' conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca(2+)]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore.

  14. Acid rain: a background report

    SciTech Connect

    Glustrom, L.; Stolzenberg, J.

    1982-07-08

    This Staff Brief was prepared for the Wisconsin Legislative Council's Special Committee on Acid Rain to provide an introduction to the issue of acid rain. It is divided into four parts. Part I provides an overview on the controversies surrounding the measurement, formation and effects of acid rain. As described in Part I, the term acid rain is used to describe the deposition of acidic components through both wet deposition (e.g., rain or snow) and dry deposition (e.g., direct contact between atmospheric constituents and the land, water or vegetation of the earth). Part II presents background information on state agency activities relating to acid rain in Wisconsin, describes what is known about the occurrence of, susceptibility to and effects of acid rain in Wisconsin, and provides information related to man-made sources of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in Wisconsin. Part III describes major policies and regulations relating to acid rain which have been or are being developed jointly by the United States and Canadian governments, by the United States government and by the State of Wisconsin. Part IV briefly discusses possible areas for Committee action.

  15. Providers issue brief: alternative providers.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M

    1999-06-29

    Access by managed care plan enrollees, scope of practice issues and fee reimbursement by Medicaid and third parties such as insurance carriers is the engine that drives legislation recognizing alternative health care providers--chiropractors, acupuncturists, physical therapists, naturopaths, massage therapists, homeopaths, and dietitians and nutritionists. PMID:11073386

  16. Solid-state NMR and SAXS studies provide a structural basis for the activation of αB-crystallin oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Stefan; Rajagopal, Ponni; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Markovic, Stefan; Kühne, Ronald; Stout, Joseph R; Higman, Victoria A; Klevit, Rachel E; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    The small heat shock protein αB-crystallin (αB) contributes to cellular protection against stress. For decades, high-resolution structural studies on oligomeric αB have been confounded by its polydisperse nature. Here, we present a structural basis of oligomer assembly and activation of the chaperone using solid-state NMR and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The basic building block is a curved dimer, with an angle of ~121° between the planes of the β-sandwich formed by α-crystallin domains. The highly conserved IXI motif covers a substrate binding site at pH 7.5. We observe a pH-dependent modulation of the interaction of the IXI motif with β4 and β8, consistent with a pH-dependent regulation of the chaperone function. N-terminal region residues Ser59-Trp60-Phe61 are involved in intermolecular interaction with β3. Intermolecular restraints from NMR and volumetric restraints from SAXS were combined to calculate a model of a 24-subunit αB oligomer with tetrahedral symmetry. PMID:20802487

  17. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  18. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  19. Second-generation Notch1 activity-trap mouse line (N1IP::CreHI) provides a more comprehensive map of cells experiencing Notch1 activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brunskill, Eric; Boyle, Scott; Chen, Shuang; Turkoz, Mustafa; Guo, Yuxuan; Grant, Rachel; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-03-15

    We have previously described the creation and analysis of a Notch1 activity-trap mouse line, Notch1 intramembrane proteolysis-Cre6MT or N1IP::Cre(LO), that marked cells experiencing relatively high levels of Notch1 activation. Here, we report and characterize a second line with improved sensitivity (N1IP::Cre(HI)) to mark cells experiencing lower levels of Notch1 activation. This improvement was achieved by increasing transcript stability and by restoring the native carboxy terminus of Cre, resulting in a five- to tenfold increase in Cre activity. The magnitude of this effect probably impacts Cre activity in strains with carboxy-terminal Ert2 fusion. These two trap lines and the related line N1IP::Cre(ERT2) form a complementary mapping tool kit to identify changes in Notch1 activation patterns in vivo as the consequence of genetic or pharmaceutical intervention, and illustrate the variation in Notch1 signal strength from one tissue to the next and across developmental time. PMID:25725069

  20. Second-generation Notch1 activity-trap mouse line (N1IP::CreHI) provides a more comprehensive map of cells experiencing Notch1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brunskill, Eric; Boyle, Scott; Chen, Shuang; Turkoz, Mustafa; Guo, Yuxuan; Grant, Rachel; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described the creation and analysis of a Notch1 activity-trap mouse line, Notch1 intramembrane proteolysis-Cre6MT or N1IP::CreLO, that marked cells experiencing relatively high levels of Notch1 activation. Here, we report and characterize a second line with improved sensitivity (N1IP::CreHI) to mark cells experiencing lower levels of Notch1 activation. This improvement was achieved by increasing transcript stability and by restoring the native carboxy terminus of Cre, resulting in a five- to tenfold increase in Cre activity. The magnitude of this effect probably impacts Cre activity in strains with carboxy-terminal Ert2 fusion. These two trap lines and the related line N1IP::CreERT2 form a complementary mapping tool kit to identify changes in Notch1 activation patterns in vivo as the consequence of genetic or pharmaceutical intervention, and illustrate the variation in Notch1 signal strength from one tissue to the next and across developmental time. PMID:25725069

  1. Private Training Providers in Australia: Their Characteristics and Training Activities. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Roger; Simons, Michele; McCarthy, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the training activity of private registered training organisations (RTOs) offered to Australian students in 2003, based on data from a national sample of 330 RTOs. The study also provides estimates of the private sector's overall contribution to the total vocational education and training (VET) effort in Australia…

  2. The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]): A Program Activity to Provide Group Facilitators Insight into Teen Sexual Behaviors and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sclafane, Jamie Heather; Merves, Marni Loiacono; Rivera, Angelic; Long, Laura; Wilson, Ken; Bauman, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    The Turn the Tables Technique (T[cube]) is an activity designed to provide group facilitators who lead HIV/STI prevention and sexual health promotion programs with detailed and current information on teenagers' sexual behaviors and beliefs. This information can be used throughout a program to tailor content. Included is a detailed lesson plan of…

  3. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320 Section 664.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH... such funds spent on summer employment opportunities (or any other particular element of the...

  4. 20 CFR 664.320 - Does the requirement that at least 30 percent of youth funds be used to provide activities to out...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of youth funds be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth apply to all youth funds? 664.320 Section 664.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR YOUTH... such funds spent on summer employment opportunities (or any other particular element of the...

  5. Children with Special Needs in Family Day Care Homes: A Handbook of Approaches and Activities for Family Day Care Home Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Brosse, Beatrice

    Practical information and sample teaching activities for child caregivers who work with young developmentally disabled children in family day care settings are provided in this manual. Each chapter shares a typical experience a caregiver may have with a particular child. Chapter 1 focuses on getting to know a new child, initial expectations, and…

  6. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  7. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  8. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  9. Murine B7 antigen provides an efficient costimulatory signal for activation of murine T lymphocytes via the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Freeman, G J; Razi-Wolf, Z; Gimmi, C D; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L M

    1992-01-01

    We demonstrate that the murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the activation of resting murine CD4+ T cells through the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex. Stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, but not vector-transfected controls, synergize with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and Con A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in proliferation. mB7 exerted its effect by inducing production of interleukin 2 and expression of the interleukin 2 receptor. Thus, mB7 costimulates T-cell activation through the TCR/CD3 complex by positively modulating the normal pathway of T-cell expansion. In contrast to the pronounced effect of mB7 on the activation of T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex, the mB7-transfected CHO cell line costimulated T-cell activation via the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Thy-1 and Ly-6A.2 only inefficiently. Finally, the combination of a calcium ionophore and mB7 is not sufficient to cause T-cell proliferation, while the combination of a calcium ionophore and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulates T cells efficiently. The signals that mB7 and PMA provide for murine T lymphocyte activation are therefore not interchangeable, although both costimulate activation through the TCR/CD3 complex. Images PMID:1370349

  10. Atmospheric Neutrinos: Background and Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Mocioiu, Irina

    2010-11-24

    We discuss a brief history of atmospheric neutrinos, from background to proton decay searches to proving neutrino oscillations. We then discuss how high statistics atmospheric neutrino measurements in the IceCube Deep Core Array can provide useful information about neutrino oscillation parameters and other neutrino properties.

  11. Regional Background Fine Particulate Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling system composed of the global model GEOS-Chem providing hourly lateral boundary conditions to the regional model CMAQ was used to calculate the policy relevant background level of fine particulate: matter. Simulations were performed for the full year of 2004 over the d...

  12. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  13. High-energy photon activation tandem mass spectrometry provides unprecedented insights into the structure of highly sulfated oligosaccharides extracted from macroalgal cell walls.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Giuliani, Alexandre; Hervé, Cécile; Geairon, Audrey; Jam, Murielle; Czjzek, Mirjam; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2015-01-20

    Extreme ultraviolet photon activation tandem mass spectrometry (MS) at 69 nm (18 eV) was used to characterize mixtures of oligo-porphyrans, a class of highly sulfated oligosaccharides. Porphyrans, hybrid polymers whose structures are far from known, continue to provide a challenge for analytical method development. Activation by 18 eV photons led to a rich fragmentation of the oligo-porphyrans, with many cross-ring and glycosidic cleavages. In contrast to multistage MSn strategies such as activated electron photodetachment dissociation, a single step of irradiation by energetic UV of multiply charged anions led to a complete fragmentation of the oligo-porphyrans. In both ionization modes, the sulfate groups were retained on the backbone, which allowed the pattern of these modifications along the porphyran backbone to be described in unprecedented detail. Many structures released by the enzymatic degradation of the porphyran were completely resolved, including isomers. This work extends the existing knowledge of the structure of porphyrans. In addition, it provides a new demonstration of the potential of activation by high-energy photons for the structural analysis of oligosaccharides, even in unseparated mixtures, with a particular focus on sulfated compounds.

  14. Relative Preservation of Advanced Activities in Daily Living among Patients with Mild-to-Moderate Dementia in the Community and Overview of Support Provided by Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Takechi, Hajime; Kokuryu, Atsuko; Kubota, Tomoko; Yamada, Hiroko

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the extent to which advanced activities of daily living among patients with dementia are preserved and how family caregivers of these patients support them in the community. In this cross-sectional assessment of pairs of patients with dementia and their family caregivers, we evaluated basic, instrumental, and advanced activities of daily living by comparing past and present status observed by caregivers with subjective estimations by patients with dementia. We also asked about ways in which support was provided by family caregivers. Thirty-nine pairs of patients with dementia and caregivers who presented to our memory clinic were interviewed. The mean age of patients with dementia was 75.3 ± 7.0 years, and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were 22.3 ± 3.4. We found relative preservation of advanced activities of daily living compared with instrumental activities of daily living. Caregivers provided instrumental, informational, and reminding support to patients with dementia. These findings may reinforce the concept of person-centered support of patients with dementia in the community. PMID:22811947

  15. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-27

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  16. Part I, Patient perspective: activating patients to engage their providers in the use of evidence-based medicine: a qualitative evaluation of the VA Project to Implement Diuretics (VAPID)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This qualitative evaluation follows a randomized-control trial of a patient activation intervention in which hypertensive patients received a letter in the mail asking them to discuss thiazide diuretics with their provider. Results of the parent study indicated that the intervention was effective at facilitating discussions between patients and providers and enhancing thiazide prescribing rates. In the research presented here, our objective was to interview patients to determine their receptivity to patient activation, a potential leverage point for implementing interventions. Methods Semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with 54 patients, purposefully sampled from a randomized controlled trial of a patient activation intervention. All subjects had a history of hypertension and received primary care from one of twelve Veterans Affairs primary care clinics. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and reviewed by the interviewer. Interviews were independently coded by three qualitative researchers until consensus was attained, and relevant themes and responses were identified, grouped, and compared. NVivo 8.0 was used for data management and analysis. Results Data from this qualitative study revealed that most participants held favorable opinions toward the patient activation intervention used in the clinical trial. Most (82%) stated they had a positive reaction. Patients emphasized they liked the intervention because it was straightforward and encouraged them to initiate discussions with their provider. Also, by being active participants in their healthcare, patients felt more invested. Of the few patients offering negative feedback (11%), their main concern was discomfort with possibly challenging their providers' healthcare practices. Another outcome of interest was the patients' perceptions of why they were or were not prescribed a thiazide diuretic, for which several clinically relevant reasons were provided. Conclusion Patients

  17. Thermal Pollution: Background Material for a Mock Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David G.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary teachers can involve students in a mock trial based on a 1975 New Jersey Superior Court case involving "thermal pollution." Article provides teachers' instructions; background data for plaintiff, defense, and witnesses; debriefing questions; and capstone activity. Available from: Law in American Society Foundation, 33 North LaSalle…

  18. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  19. Metabolic activation of clopidogrel: in vitro data provide conflicting evidence for the contributions of CYP2C19 and PON1.

    PubMed

    Polasek, Thomas M; Doogue, Matthew P; Miners, John O

    2011-12-01

    The recent report that clopidogrel efficacy may be more dependent on paraoxonase-1 (PON1) than on cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) activity raises questions about the roles of these and other enzymes in clopidogrel activation. To provide insight into the emerging PON1 versus CYP2C19 debate, this commentary summarizes the clinical evidence on the pharmacokinetic determinants of clopidogrel efficacy. We then review the in vitro studies investigating the enzymes involved in clopidogrel activation, and comment on their strengths and limitations. There is agreement amongst in vitro studies regarding the involvement of CYP1A2 and CYP2B6 in the metabolism of clopidogrel to 2-oxo-clopidogrel. However, the evidence for other CYP enzymes in the first activation step (e.g. CYP2C19 and CYP3A4) is inconsistent and dependent on the in vitro test system and laboratory. All major drug metabolizing CYP enzymes are capable of converting 2-oxo-clopidogrel to sulfenic acid intermediates that subsequently form the active thiol metabolite. However, the extent of CYP involvement in this second step has been challenged, and new evidence suggests that CYP-independent hydrolytic cleavage of the thioester bond may be more important than oxidative metabolism.

  20. trans-dominant mutants of E1A provide genetic evidence that the zinc finger of the trans-activating domain binds a transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L C; Ricciardi, R P

    1991-01-01

    The 289R E1A protein of adenovirus stimulates transcription of early viral and certain cellular genes. trans-Activation requires residues 140 to 188, which encompass a zinc finger. Several studies have indicated that trans-activation by E1A is mediated through cellular transcription factors. In particular, the ability of the trans-dominant E1A point mutant hr5 (Ser-185 to Asn) to inhibit wild-type E1A trans-activation was proposed to result from the sequestration of a cellular factor. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we individually replaced every residue within and flanking the trans-activating domain with a conservative amino acid, revealing 16 critical residues. Six of the individual substitutions lying in a contiguous stretch C terminal to the zinc finger (carboxyl region183-188) imparted a trans-dominant phenotype. trans-Dominance was even produced by deletion of the entire carboxyl region183-188. Conversely, an intact finger region147-177 was absolutely required for trans-dominance, since second-site substitution of every critical residue in this region abrogated the trans-dominant phenotype of the hr5 protein. These data indicate that the finger region147-177 bind a limiting cellular transcription factor and that the carboxyl region183-188 provides a separate and essential function. In addition, we show that four negatively charged residues within the trans-activating domain do not comprise a distinct acidic activating region. We present a model in which the trans-activating domain of E1A binds to two different cellular protein targets through the finger and carboxyl regions. Images PMID:1831535

  1. The CD3 gamma epsilon/delta epsilon signaling module provides normal T cell functions in the absence of the TCR zeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Lisa A; Mathis, Meredith A; Young, Jennifer A; DeFord, Laura M; Purtic, Bozidar; Wulfing, Christoph; van Oers, Nicolai S C

    2005-12-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction is mediated by the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM). The ten ITAM in the TCR complex are distributed in two distinct signaling modules termed TCR zetazeta and CD3 gammaepsilon/deltaepsilon. To delineate the specific role of the zeta ITAM in T cell development and TCR signal transmission, we compared the properties of T cells from different TCR zeta-transgenic lines wherein tyrosine-to-phenylalanine substitutions had been introduced in the zeta subunit. These lines lack selected phosphorylated forms of TCR zeta including just p23, both p21 and p23, or all phospho-zeta derivatives. We report herein that the efficiency of positive selection in HY TCR-transgenic female mice was directly related to the number of zeta ITAM in the TCR. In contrast, TCR-mediated signal transmission and T cell proliferative responses following agonist peptide stimulation were similar and independent of the zeta ITAM. Only the duration of MAPK activation was affected by multiple zeta ITAM substitutions. These results strongly suggest that the ITAM in the CD3 gammaepsilon/deltaepsilon module can provide normal TCR signal transmission, with zeta ITAM providing a secondary function facilitating MAPK activation and positive selection.

  2. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Van Kanegan, Michael J.; Dunn, Denise E.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D.; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H.; Newman, Robert A.; Lo, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0–4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0–4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD. PMID:27172999

  3. [A comparative analysis of the neurophysiological mechanisms of hearing disorders of different origins by the indices of the background and evoked bioelectrical activity of the brain].

    PubMed

    Kozak, N S

    1999-07-01

    The hearing function was studied as was the bioelectrical activity of the brain in workers exposed to noise in their occupations and in those persons coming into contact with ionizing radiation with normal and disordered hearing. The studies made showed that those persons under exposure to ionizing radiation exhibited more pronounced disturbances in the brain stem structures of the acoustic analyzer than those exposed to noise even if they were early in the course of the ear disorder. We consider it expedient to undertake studies on bioelectrical activity of the brain to gain further insights into the mechanisms of sensorineural hearing loss.

  4. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  5. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Recent limits on spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The various backgrounds are described, and the theoretical implications are assessed. Constraints on inflationary cosmology dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) and on open cosmological models dominated by baryonic dark matter (BDM), with, respectively, primordial random phase scale-invariant curvature fluctuations or non-gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are described. More exotic theories are addressed, and I conclude with the 'bottom line': what theorists expect experimentalists to be measuring within the next two to three years without having to abandon their most cherished theories.

  6. [Standardization of measurement of catalytic activity concentration of enzymes--current situation regarding the external quality assessment program provided by the Japan Medical Association].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of the catalytic activity concentration of enzymes has been standardized using a traceability chain, consisting a reference measurement system for enzyme catalytic activity and reference standard-JSCC enzyme. The Japan Medical Association (JMA) has provided an external quality assessment (EQA) survey program for clinical laboratory testing. More than 3,100 clinical laboratories participated in 2008. The EQA program indicated that standardization of the measurement of the catalytic activity concentration of enzymes has been completed for AST, ALT, LD, ALP, gammaGT, and CK in more than 90% laboratories, and for Amy and ChE in nearly 80% of laboratories. Because such a large survey program must use artificial specimens, a matrix effect cannot be avoided, especially in dry chemistry. However, the bias produced by a matrix effect usually has a predictable tendency: it can be corrected. Next, after standardization of the measurement of the catalytic activity concentration of enzymes, we should develop and use common reference intervals. On completing the standardization, we can make standard medical decisions using reference measurement systems and rules.

  7. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of a monofloral honey of Mimosa scabrella provided by Melipona marginata during winter in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borsato, Débora M; Prudente, Arthur S; Döll-Boscardin, Patrícia M; Borsato, Aurélio V; Luz, Cynthia F P; Maia, Beatriz H L N S; Cabrini, Daniela A; Otuki, Michel F; Miguel, Marilis D; Farago, Paulo V; Miguel, Obdulio G

    2014-07-01

    Melipona marginata is an endangered species of stingless bee from Brazil that produces honey with particular physicochemical features and a remarkable exotic flavor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report devoted to exploring the medicinal potential of this honey. Thus, the aim of this paper was to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory activity of honey extract from M. marginata on skin inflammation. The honey sample was classified as a monofloral honey of Mimosa scabrella. The presence of 11 phenolic compounds as kaempferol and caffeic acid was detected using the high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV-ESI-MS) method. The anti-inflammatory activity was measured using a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced ear edema model of inflammation in mice. The topical application of the M. marginata honey extract (1.0 mg/ear) was able to reduce ear edema with an inhibitory effect of 54 ± 5%. This extract decreased the myeloperoxidase activity in 75 ± 3%, which suggests a lower leucocyte infiltration that was confirmed by histological analysis. This extract also provided a reduction of 55 ± 14% in the production of reactive oxygen species. This anti-inflammatory activity could be due to a synergic effect of the phenolic compounds identified in the honey sample. Taken together, these results open up new possibilities for the use of M. marginata honey extract in skin disorders.

  8. Enhancement of Experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis by Leishmania Molecules Is Dependent on Interleukin-4, Serine Protease/Esterase Activity, and Parasite and Host Genetic Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Virgínia M. G.; Larangeira, Daniela F.; Oliveira, Pablo R. S.; Sampaio, Romina B.; Suzart, Paula; Nihei, Jorge S.; Teixeira, Márcia C. A.; Mengel, José O.; dos-Santos, Washington L. C.; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2011-01-01

    Most inbred strains of mice, like the BALB/c strain, are susceptible to Leishmania amazonensis infections and resistant to Leishmania braziliensis infections. This parasite-related difference could result from the activity of an L. amazonensis-specific virulence factor. In agreement with this hypothesis, it is shown here that the intravenous injection of BALB/c mice with L. amazonensis amastigote extract (LaE) but not the L. braziliensis extract confers susceptibility to L. braziliensis infection. This effect was associated with high circulating levels of IgG1 anti-L. amazonensis antibodies and with an increase in interleukin-4 (IL-4) production and a decrease in gamma interferon production by draining lymph node cells. Moreover, the effect was absent in IL-4-knockout mice. The biological activity in the LaE was not mediated by amphiphilic molecules and was inhibited by pretreatment of the extract with irreversible serine protease inhibitors. These findings indicate that the LaE contains a virulence-related factor that (i) enhances the Leishmania infection by promoting Th2-type immune responses, (ii) is not one of the immunomodulatory Leishmania molecules described so far, and (iii) is either a serine protease or has an effect that depends on that protease activity. In addition to being Leishmania species specific, the infection-enhancing activity was also shown to depend on the host genetic makeup, as LaE injections did not affect the susceptibility of C57BL/6 mice to L. braziliensis infection. The identification of Leishmania molecules with infection-enhancing activity could be important for the development of a vaccine, since the up- or downmodulation of the immune response against a virulence factor could well contribute to controlling the infection. PMID:21173308

  9. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  10. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  11. School Law: Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splitt, David A.

    1988-01-01

    In an Oklahoma case, the district court ruled that the school district had failed to investigate the background of a teacher convicted of a second sexual abuse charge. School districts should examine personnel polices and practices, and the school lawyer should review state laws, regulations, and court cases. (MLF)

  12. Thermal background noise limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  13. Activity concentrations of 226Ra, 228Th, and 40K in different food crops from a high background radiation area in Bitsichi, Jos Plateau, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Jibiri, N N; Farai, I P; Alausa, S K

    2007-03-01

    One of the three goals of the United Nations for sustainable food security is to ensure that all people have access to sufficient, nutritionally adequate, and safe food. Decades of tin mining in the Bitsichi area of the Jos Plateau, Nigeria, have left a legacy of polluted water supplies, impoverished agricultural land, and soil containing abnormally high levels of naturally occurring radioactive elements. In order to ascertain the radiological food safety of the population, different crops that constitute the major food nutritive requirements were collected directly across farmlands in the area. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (228)Th, and (40)K were determined in the food and soil samples using gamma-ray spectrometry. Additionally, in situ gamma dose rate measurements were performed on the farms using a pre-calibrated survey meter. The corresponding activity concentrations in the food crops ranged from below detection limit (BDL) to 684.5 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, from BDL to 83.5 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, and from BDL to 89.8 Bq kg(-1) for (228)Th. Activity concentrations of these radionuclides were found to be lower in cereals than in tubers and vegetables. As for the soil samples, activity concentrations of these radionuclides varied from BDL to 166.4 Bq kg(-1), from 10.9 to 470.6 Bq kg(-1), and from 122.7 to 2,189.5 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, (226)Ra, and (228)Th, respectively. Average external gamma dose rates were found to vary across the farms from 0.50 +/- 0.01 to 1.47 +/- 0.04 microSv h(-1). Due to past mining activities, the soil radioactivity in the area has been modified and the concentration level of the investigated natural radionuclides in the food crops has also been enhanced. However, the values obtained suggest that the dose from intake of these radionuclides by the food crops is low and that harmful health effects are not expected. PMID:17211656

  14. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  15. Diffuse UV Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conn Henry, Richard; Murthy, J.

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse UV sky is expected to glow with significant amounts of starlight that is scattered from the interstellar dust. The albedo and scattering pattern of the dust in the ultraviolet are both well established, and are both fairly independent of wavelength from 912 Å to 3000 Å. We present 1943 Voyager spectra of the diffuse cosmic background radiation from 500 Å to 1200 Å, and we compare their brightnesses, and their distribution on the sky, to those observed (Murthy et al., ApJ 724, 1389, 2010) from the GALEX mission at longer wavelengths (1530 Å). Significant differences appear, suggesting that background radiation components in addition to dust-scattered starlight may be present in both spectral regions.

  16. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are reviewed. Particular attention is given to spectral distortions and CMBR temperature anisotropies at large, intermediate, and small angular scales. The implications of the observations for inflationary cosmological models with curvature fluctuation are explored, and it is shown that the limits determined for intermediate-scale CMBR anisotropy almost rule out a baryon-dominated cosmology.

  17. Executive Summary: Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Background information on, and the objectives of, the NASA Global Biology Research Program are given. The following issues were addressed: (1) geographic distribution of wetland parameters, (2) the processes of wetland material fluxes, and (3) the relation of local fluxes with global processes. Wetland inventorying and categorizing, gas-phase exchanges with the atmosphere, material exchange with the aquatic environment, and material storage in wetland sediments were identified as topics requiring further research.

  18. Cutaneous activation of the inhibitory L30 interneurons provides a mechanism for regulating adaptive gain control in the siphon withdrawal reflex of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fischer, T M; Carew, T J

    1995-01-01

    The functional role of inhibition in the neural network underlying the siphon withdrawal response (SWR) of Aplysia was assessed by examining a recurrent circuit comprised of identified inhibitory interneurons (L30s), and excitatory interneurons (L29s). We previously showed that activity-dependent potentiation of the L30 inhibitory synapse onto L29 can regulate the net excitatory input elicited by tactile siphon stimulation onto siphon motor neurons (LFS cells) (Fischer and Carew, 1993a). To explore the functional significance of L30 potentiated inhibition, we have examined how a behaviorally relevant stimulus that activates the L30 interneurons modulates the SWR circuit. Utilizing a reduced preparation, we show that weak tactile stimulation of the tail strongly activates the L30s, and leads to significant potentiation of the L30 synapse. Next, we demonstrate that similar weak tail stimulation produces significant inhibition of siphon tap-evoked responses in both L29 interneurons and LFS motor neurons. We further show that this form of inhibition is transient, having a time course of approximately 60 sec. Finally, we directly tested the role of the L30s in mediating this form of inhibition by hyperpolarizing two (of three) L30 interneurons during tail stimulation. L30 inactivation significantly attenuated tail stimulation-induced inhibition of siphon-evoked input to both L29 interneurons and LFS motor neurons. Based on these results, we suggest that L30-potentiated inhibition may have an important adaptive role in optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio for activation of the SWR circuit by providing stabilization of SWR responsiveness under a wide range of environmental conditions.

  19. Vision Therapy News Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    The booklet provides an overview on vision therapy to aid writers, editors, and broadcasters help parents, teachers, older adults, and all consumers learn more about vision therapy. Following a description of vision therapy or vision training, information is provided on how and why vision therapy works. Additional sections address providers of…

  20. Seismicity at Uturuncu Volcano, Bolivia: Volcano-Tectonic Earthquake Swarms Triggered by the 2010 Maule, Chile Earthquake and Non-Triggered Background Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, D. H.; Chartrand, Z. A.; Jay, J.; Pritchard, M. E.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We find that the 270 ky dormant Uturuncu Volcano in SW Bolivia exhibits relatively high rates of shallow, volcano-tectonic seismicity that is dominated by swarm-like activity. We also document that the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake triggered an exceptionally high rate of seismicity in the seconds to days following the main event. Although dormant, Uturuncu is currently being studied due to its large-scale deformation rate of 1-2 cm/yr uplift as revealed by InSAR. As part of the NASA-funded Andivolc project to investigate seismicity of volcanoes in the central Andes, a seismic network of 15 stations (9 Mark Products L22 short period and 6 Guralp CMG40T intermediate period sensors) with an average spacing of about 10 km was installed at Uturuncu from April 2009 to April 2010. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur at an average rate of about 3-4 per day, and swarms of 5-60 events within a span of minutes to hours occur a few times per month. Most of these earthquakes are located close to the summit at depths near and above sea level. The largest swarm occurred on 28 September 2009 and consisted of 60 locatable events over a time span of 28 hours. The locations of volcano-tectonic earthquakes at Uturuncu are oriented in a NW-SE trend, which matches the dominant orientation of regional faults and suggests a relationship between the fault system at Uturuncu and the regional tectonics of the area; a NW-SE trending fault beneath Uturuncu may serve to localize stresses that are accumulating over the broad area of uplift. Based on automated locations, the maximum local magnitude of these events is approximately M = 4 and the average magnitude is approximately M = 2. An initial estimate of the b-value is about b = 1.2. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake on 27 February 2010 triggered hundreds of local volcano-tectonic events at Uturuncu. High-pass filtering of the long period surface waves reveals that the first triggered events occurred with the onset of the Rayleigh

  1. WFC3/UVIS Sky Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia; Anderson, Jay

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the on-orbit background levels present in WFC3/UVIS full-frame images. The results are based on nearly all standard readout images taken since the installation of WFC3 on HST in May 2009, with a relatively small number of exclusions e.g. images with obvious anomalous backgrounds (such as extended targets filling the field of view) or those taken with the quad filters (different bandpass in each amp). Comparisons are provided to estimates from the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC). We anticipate these results to be helpful in fine-tuning the level of post-flash required to achieve the optimum balance of charge transfter efficiency (CTE) loss mitigation versus noise penalty. Observers considering the use of post-flash should refer to the White Paper (MacKenty & Smith 2012) on the CTE WWW page (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/ins_performance/CTE/).

  2. Structure and Activity Analyses of Escherichia coli K-12 NagD Provide Insight into the Evolution of Biochemical Function in the Haloakanoic Acid Dehlogenase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay,L.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2006-01-01

    The HAD superfamily is a large superfamily of proteins which share a conserved core domain that provides those active site residues responsible for the chemistry common to all family members. The superfamily is further divided into the four subfamilies I, IIA, IIB, and III, based on the topology and insertion site of a cap domain that provides substrate specificity. This structural and functional division implies that members of a given HAD structural subclass may target substrates that have similar structural characteristics. To understand the structure/function relationships in all of the subfamilies, a type IIA subfamily member, NagD from Escherichia coli K-12, was selected (type I, IIB, and III members have been more extensively studied). The structure of the NagD protein was solved to 1.80 Angstroms with R{sub work} = 19.8% and R{sub free} = 21.8%. Substrate screening and kinetic analysis showed NagD to have high specificity for nucleotide monophosphates with kcat/Km = 3.12 x 10{sup 4} and 1.28 x 10{sup 4} {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for UMP and GMP, respectively. This specificity is consistent with the presence of analogues of NagD that exist as fusion proteins with a nucleotide pyrophosphatase from the Nudix family. Docking of the nucleoside substrate in the active site brings it in contact with conserved residues from the cap domain that can act as a substrate specificity loop (NagD residues 144-149) in the type IIA subfamily. NagD and other subfamily IIA and IIB members show the common trait that substrate specificity and catalytic efficiencies (k{sub cat}/K{sub m}) are low (1 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and the boundaries defining physiological substrates are somewhat overlapping. The ability to catabolize other related secondary metabolites indicates that there is regulation at the genetic level.

  3. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces direct activation of natural killer cells and provides a novel approach for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guozi; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Guanjun; Jin, Haofan; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Dehai; Niu, Chao; Han, Wei; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that limited availability and cytotoxicity have restricted the development of natural killer (NK) cells in adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI). While it has been reported that low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) could enhance the immune response in animal studies, the influence of LDIR at the cellular level has been less well defined. In this study, the authors aim to investigate the direct effects of LDIR on NK cells and the potential mechanism, and explore the application of activation and expansion of NK cells by LDIR in ACI. The authors found that expansion and cytotoxicity of NK cells were markedly augmented by LDIR. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in the supernatants of cultured NK cells were significantly increased after LDIR. Additionally, the effect of the P38 inhibitor (SB203580) significantly decreased the expanded NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine levels, and expression levels of FasL and perforin. These findings indicate that LDIR induces a direct expansion and activation of NK cells through possibly the P38-MAPK pathway, which provides a potential mechanism for stimulation of NK cells by LDIR and a novel but simplified approach for ACI.

  4. China takes an active role in combating an Ebola outbreak: On-site observations and reflections from a Chinese healthcare provider

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Summary As one of the active participants in the global fight against the 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, China supplied many resources, including medical experts and scientists as well as medical supplies, to the affected countries. A member of the first contingent of Chinese public health experts who worked in Sierra Leone for 65 days, I am pleased to have this opportunity to review the major work done by our team to help deal with the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. This is the first time that a Chinese public health training team has worked in West Africa. The team provides trainings for people from local communities in an effort to encourage local residents to get involved in the war against Ebola. However, the implementation of active measures against Ebola in West Africa was hampered somewhat by certain drawbacks in the area in terms of the health system, the shortage of medical resources, the high illiteracy rate, unhealthy lifestyles, and traditional funeral rites. All of these aspects need to be gradually improved in the aftermath of Ebola, and I believe that this is an area in which the Chinese public health system can play an important role. PMID:26668785

  5. China takes an active role in combating an Ebola outbreak: On-site observations and reflections from a Chinese healthcare provider.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-11-01

    As one of the active participants in the global fight against the 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, China supplied many resources, including medical experts and scientists as well as medical supplies, to the affected countries. A member of the first contingent of Chinese public health experts who worked in Sierra Leone for 65 days, I am pleased to have this opportunity to review the major work done by our team to help deal with the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone. This is the first time that a Chinese public health training team has worked in West Africa. The team provides trainings for people from local communities in an effort to encourage local residents to get involved in the war against Ebola. However, the implementation of active measures against Ebola in West Africa was hampered somewhat by certain drawbacks in the area in terms of the health system, the shortage of medical resources, the high illiteracy rate, unhealthy lifestyles, and traditional funeral rites. All of these aspects need to be gradually improved in the aftermath of Ebola, and I believe that this is an area in which the Chinese public health system can play an important role.

  6. Promotion of health-enhancing physical activity in rheumatoid arthritis: a comparative study on healthcare providers in Italy, The Netherlands and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Nina; Hurkmans, Emalie; DiMatteo, Luigi; Nava, Tiziana; Vliet Vlieland, Thea; Opava, Christina H

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare attitudes, practice of advice, perceived competencies and educational needs related to health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) among Dutch, Italian and Swedish healthcare providers (HCP) and to explore associations between these factors and age, gender and HEPA levels of HCP. Questionnaires were sent to 2939 HCP, members of their national rheumatology organizations. HEPA was assessed with the Short Questionnaire to Assess Health-Enhancing Physical Activity or the International Physical Activity Questionnaire; attitudes, practice of advice, perceived competencies and educational needs with a 23-item questionnaire. Overall response rate was 33 %. Ninety-five percent of HCP agreed that HEPA is an important health goal in RA. More Swedish HCP had positive attitudes to the attainability and safety of HEPA in RA. There were no differences between countries in practice of advice on HEPA to patients with RA in general or to those with recent onset disease, but more Italian HCP were reluctant to advise HEPA to patients with established disease. Of the total HCP, 36 to 60 % used public health guidelines to advise on HEPA, with Dutch HCP taking less advantage. Still they estimated a higher proportion of patients with RA to follow such advice. Italian HCP perceived their competencies the highest, but were also more interested in education to promote HEPA. Gender, age and HEPA performance had no association with attitudes toward HEPA, while a number of associations were found between these factors and practice of advice and perceived competencies. The differences found between HCP in the three countries might indicate the need for educational initiatives to improve HEPA promotion.

  7. The structure of Clostridium difficile toxin A glucosyltransferase domain bound to Mn2+ and UDP provides insights into glucosyltransferase activity and product release.

    PubMed

    D'Urzo, Nunzia; Malito, Enrico; Biancucci, Marco; Bottomley, Matthew J; Maione, Domenico; Scarselli, Maria; Martinelli, Manuele

    2012-09-01

    Clostridiumdifficile toxin A (TcdA) is a member of the large clostridial toxin family, and is responsible, together with C. difficile toxin B (TcdB), for many clinical symptoms d ring human infections. Like other large clostridial toxins, TcdA catalyzes the glucosylation of GTPases, and is able to inactivate small GTPases within the host cell. Here, we report the crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain (TcdA-GT) in the apo form and in the presence of Mn(2+) and hydrolyzed UDP-glucose. These structures, together with the recently reported crystal structure of TcdA-GT bound to UDP-glucose, provide a detailed understanding of the conformational changes of TcdA that occur during the catalytic cycle. Indeed, we present a new intermediate conformation of a so-called 'lid' loop (residues 510-522 in TcdA), concomitant with the absence of glucose in the catalytic domain. The recombinant TcdA was expressed in Brevibacillus in the inactive apo form. High thermal stability of wild-type TcdA was observed only after the addition of both Mn(2+) and UDP-glucose. The glucosylhydrolase activity, which is readily restored after reconstitution with both these cofactors, was similar to that reported for TcdB. Interestingly, we found that ammonium, like K(+) , is able to activate the UDP-glucose hydrolase activities of TcdA. Consequently, the presence of ammonium in the crystallization buffer enabled us to obtain the first crystal structure of TcdA-GT bound to the hydrolysis product UDP.

  8. An active site mutant of Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase forms new non-natural fatty acids providing insights on the mechanism of the enzymatic reaction.

    PubMed

    E, Guangqi; Drujon, Thierry; Correia, Isabelle; Ploux, Olivier; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2013-12-01

    We have produced and purified an active site mutant of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase (CFAS) by replacing the strictly conserved G236 within cyclopropane synthases, by a glutamate residue, which corresponds to E146 of the homologous mycolic acid methyltransferase, Hma, producing hydroxymethyl mycolic acids. The G236E CFAS mutant had less than 1% of the in vitro activity of the wild type enzyme. We expressed the G236E CFAS mutant in an E. coli (DE3) strain in which the chromosomal cfa gene had been deleted. After extraction of phospholipids and conversion into the corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), we observed the formation of cyclopropanated FAMEs suggesting that the mutant retained some of the normal activity in vivo. However, we also observed the formation of new C17 methyl-branched unsaturated FAMEs whose structures were determined using GC/MS and NMR analyses. The double bond was located at different positions 8, 9 or 10, and the methyl group at position 10 or 9. Thus, this new FAMEs are likely arising from a 16:1 acyl chain of a phospholipid that had been transformed by the G236E CFAS mutant in vivo. The reaction catalyzed by this G236E CFAS mutant thus starts by the methylation of the unsaturated acyl chain at position 10 or 9 yielding a carbocation at position 9 or 10 respectively. It follows then two competing steps, a normal cyclopropanation or hydride shift/elimination events giving different combinations of alkenes. This study not only provides further evidence that cyclopropane synthases (CSs) form a carbocationic intermediate but also opens the way to CSs engineering for the synthesis of non-natural fatty acids.

  9. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  10. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  11. 21. Providence & Worchester RR: Freight house. Providence, Providence Co., ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Providence & Worchester RR: Freight house. Providence, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4119, mp 185.66 (See HAER no. RI-3 for further documentation on this site.) - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  12. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  13. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  14. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  15. 16 CFR 1031.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Background. 1031.2 Section 1031.2 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION PARTICIPATION AND COMMISSION EMPLOYEE INVOLVEMENT IN VOLUNTARY STANDARDS ACTIVITIES General Policies § 1031.2 Background. (a) Congress enacted the Consumer Product Safety Act in 1972...

  16. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  17. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  18. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Background. 1292.3 Section 1292.3 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of...

  19. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Background. 23.2 Section 23.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... of intelligence data necessary to support control of serious criminal activity may...

  20. Genome-scale metabolic modeling to provide insight into the production of storage compounds during feast-famine cycles of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Tajparast, Mohammad; Frigon, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    Studying storage metabolism during feast-famine cycles of activated sludge treatment systems provides profound insight in terms of both operational issues (e.g., foaming and bulking) and process optimization for the production of value added by-products (e.g., bioplastics). We examined the storage metabolism (including poly-β-hydroxybutyrate [PHB], glycogen, and triacylglycerols [TAGs]) during feast-famine cycles using two genome-scale metabolic models: Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 (iMT1174) and Escherichia coli K-12 (iAF1260) for growth on glucose, acetate, and succinate. The goal was to develop the proper objective function (OF) for the prediction of the main storage compound produced in activated sludge for given feast-famine cycle conditions. For the flux balance analysis, combinations of three OFs were tested. For all of them, the main OF was to maximize growth rates. Two additional sub-OFs were used: (1) minimization of biochemical fluxes, and (2) minimization of metabolic adjustments (MoMA) between the feast and famine periods. All (sub-)OFs predicted identical substrate-storage associations for the feast-famine growth of the above-mentioned metabolic models on a given substrate when glucose and acetate were set as sole carbon sources (i.e., glucose-glycogen and acetate-PHB), in agreement with experimental observations. However, in the case of succinate as substrate, the predictions depended on the network structure of the metabolic models such that the E. coli model predicted glycogen accumulation and the R. jostii model predicted PHB accumulation. While the accumulation of both PHB and glycogen was observed experimentally, PHB showed higher dynamics during an activated sludge feast-famine growth cycle with succinate as substrate. These results suggest that new modeling insights between metabolic predictions and population ecology will be necessary to properly predict metabolisms likely to emerge within the niches of activated sludge communities. Nonetheless

  1. Plutonium measurements near background levels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of a nationwide nuclear weapons research, development, and production complex administered by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Low-levels of environmental Plutonium occurs in and about RFP as a result of plant operations. Plutonium is a key element in remediation investigations and surface water discharge limits. Most of the plutonium analyses at RFP measure concentrations at or near background levels. Measurements often show little, if any, plutonium in the media being sampled, except at known contamination sites. Many plutonium results are less than the calculated minimum detectable-level (MDL). (MDL is an a priori estimate of the activity concentration that can be practically achieved under a specified set of typical measurement conditions.) This paper investigates the relationship between plutonium concentrations and the counting uncertainty when measurements are near background, and suggests why the MDL should not be used as a criteria for limiting data. Issues with defining site background and determining attainment of standards are presented.

  2. Plutonium measurements near background levels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is part of a nationwide nuclear weapons research, development, and production complex administered by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). Low-levels of environmental Plutonium occurs in and about RFP as a result of plant operations. Plutonium is a key element in remediation investigations and surface water discharge limits. Most of the plutonium analyses at RFP measure concentrations at or near background levels. Measurements often show little, if any, plutonium in the media being sampled, except at known contamination sites. Many plutonium results are less than the calculated minimum detectable-level (MDL). (MDL is an a priori estimate of the activity concentration that can be practically achieved under a specified set of typical measurement conditions.) This paper investigates the relationship between plutonium concentrations and the counting uncertainty when measurements are near background, and suggests why the MDL should not be used as a criteria for limiting data. Issues with defining site background and determining attainment of standards are presented.

  3. Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, R. C.; Murthy, J.

    1993-12-01

    The UVX experiment was carried on the Space Shuttle Columbia between 1986 January 12 and 19 (STS-61C). Several ultraviolet spectrometers were used to obtain measurements of the diffuse ultraviolet background at 8 locations in the sky. We have reanalysed the UVX measurements of the surface brightness of the diffuse ultraviolet background above b = 40 using the dust-scattering model of Onaka & Kodaira (1991), which explicitly takes into account the variation of the source function with galactic longitude. The range of allowed values of interstellar grain albedoJa, and scattering asymmetry parameter g, is considerably expanded over those of a previous analysis. The new chi square probability contours come close to, but do not include, the values of a and g found for the interstellar grains by Witt et al. (1992) using the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) on the Astro mission. If we hypothesize in additon to the dust-scattered light an extragalactic component, of 300 1 100 photons cm-2 s-1 sr-1 A-1, attenuated by a cosecant b law, the new reduction of the UVX data gives complete consistency with the Witt et al. determination of the optical parameters of the grains in the ultraviolet. This work was supported by United States Air Force Contract F19628-93-K-0004, and by National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant NASA NAG5-619. We are grateful for the encouragement of Dr. Stephan Price, and we thank Dr. L. Danly for information. Onaka, T., & Kodaira, K. 1991, ApJ, 379, 532 Witt, A. N., Petersohn, J. K., Bohlin, R. C., O'Connell, R. W., Roberts, M. S., Smith, A. M., & Stecher, T. P. 1992, ApJ, 395, L5

  4. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  5. The isotropic radio background revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Lineros, Roberto A.

    2014-04-01

    We present an extensive analysis on the determination of the isotropic radio background. We consider six different radio maps, ranging from 22 MHz to 2.3 GHz and covering a large fraction of the sky. The large scale emission is modeled as a linear combination of an isotropic component plus the Galactic synchrotron radiation and thermal bremsstrahlung. Point-like and extended sources are either masked or accounted for by means of a template. We find a robust estimate of the isotropic radio background, with limited scatter among different Galactic models. The level of the isotropic background lies significantly above the contribution obtained by integrating the number counts of observed extragalactic sources. Since the isotropic component dominates at high latitudes, thus making the profile of the total emission flat, a Galactic origin for such excess appears unlikely. We conclude that, unless a systematic offset is present in the maps, and provided that our current understanding of the Galactic synchrotron emission is reasonable, extragalactic sources well below the current experimental threshold seem to account for the majority of the brightness of the extragalactic radio sky.

  6. A genomic region encompassing a newly identified exon provides enhancing activity sufficient for normal myo7aa expression in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Sylvain; Rosa, Frédéric M

    2015-09-01

    MYO7A is an unconventional myosin involved in the structural organization of hair bundles at the apex of sensory hair cells (SHCs) where it serves mechanotransduction in the process of hearing and balance. Mutations of MYO7A are responsible for abnormal shaping of hair bundles, resulting in human deafness and murine deafness/circling behavior. Myo7aa, expressed in SHCs of the inner ear and lateral line of zebrafish, causes circling behavior and abnormal hair cell function when deficient in mariner mutant. This work identifies a new hair cell-specific enhancer, highly conserved between species, located within Intron 2-3 of zebrafish myosin 7a (myo7aa) gene. This enhancer is contained within a 761-bp DNA fragment that encompasses a newly identified Exon of myo7aa and whose activity does not depend on orientation. Compensation of mariner mutation by expression of mCherry-Myo7aa fusion protein under the control of this 761-bp DNA fragment results in recovery of balance, normal hair bundle shape and restored hair cell function. Two smaller adjacent fragments (344-bp and 431-bp), extracted from the 761-bp fragment, both show hair cell-specific enhancing activity, with apparently reduced intensity and coverage. These data should help understand the role of Myo7aa in sensory hair cell differentiation and function. They provide tools to decipher how myo7aa gene is expressed and regulated in SHCs by allowing the identification of potential transcription factors involved in this process. The discovered enhancer could represent a new target for the identification of deafness-causing mutations affecting human MYO7A.

  7. A genomic region encompassing a newly identified exon provides enhancing activity sufficient for normal myo7aa expression in zebrafish sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Sylvain; Rosa, Frédéric M

    2015-09-01

    MYO7A is an unconventional myosin involved in the structural organization of hair bundles at the apex of sensory hair cells (SHCs) where it serves mechanotransduction in the process of hearing and balance. Mutations of MYO7A are responsible for abnormal shaping of hair bundles, resulting in human deafness and murine deafness/circling behavior. Myo7aa, expressed in SHCs of the inner ear and lateral line of zebrafish, causes circling behavior and abnormal hair cell function when deficient in mariner mutant. This work identifies a new hair cell-specific enhancer, highly conserved between species, located within Intron 2-3 of zebrafish myosin 7a (myo7aa) gene. This enhancer is contained within a 761-bp DNA fragment that encompasses a newly identified Exon of myo7aa and whose activity does not depend on orientation. Compensation of mariner mutation by expression of mCherry-Myo7aa fusion protein under the control of this 761-bp DNA fragment results in recovery of balance, normal hair bundle shape and restored hair cell function. Two smaller adjacent fragments (344-bp and 431-bp), extracted from the 761-bp fragment, both show hair cell-specific enhancing activity, with apparently reduced intensity and coverage. These data should help understand the role of Myo7aa in sensory hair cell differentiation and function. They provide tools to decipher how myo7aa gene is expressed and regulated in SHCs by allowing the identification of potential transcription factors involved in this process. The discovered enhancer could represent a new target for the identification of deafness-causing mutations affecting human MYO7A. PMID:25556989

  8. Cotransformation of Trichoderma harzianum with β-Glucuronidase and Green Fluorescent Protein Genes Provides a Useful Tool for Monitoring Fungal Growth and Activity in Natural Soils†

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Yeoung-Seuk; Knudsen, Guy R.

    2000-01-01

    Trichoderma harzianum was cotransformed with genes encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), β-glucuronidase (GUS), and hygromycin B (hygB) resistance, using polyethylene glycol-mediated transformation. One cotransformant (ThzID1-M3) was mitotically stable for 6 months despite successive subculturing without selection pressure. ThzID1-M3 morphology was similar to that of the wild type; however, the mycelial growth rate on agar was reduced. ThzID1-M3 was formed into calcium alginate pellets and placed onto buried glass slides in a nonsterile soil, and its ability to grow, sporulate, and colonize sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was compared with that of the wild-type strain. Wild-type and transformant strains both colonized sclerotia at levels above those of indigenous Trichoderma spp. in untreated controls. There were no significant differences in colonization levels between wild-type and cotransformant strains; however, the presence of the GFP and GUS marker genes permitted differentiation of introduced Trichoderma from indigenous strains. GFP activity was a useful tool for nondestructive monitoring of the hyphal growth of the transformant in a natural soil. The green color of cotransformant hyphae was clearly visible with a UV epifluorescence microscope, while indigenous fungi in the same samples were barely visible. Green-fluorescing conidiophores and conidia were observed within the first 3 days of incubation in soil, and this was followed by the formation of terminal and intercalary chlamydospores and subsequent disintegration of older hyphal segments. Addition of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-glucuronic acid (X-Gluc) substrate to recovered glass slides confirmed the activity of GUS as well as GFP in soil. Our results suggest that cotransformation with GFP and GUS can provide a valuable tool for the detection and monitoring of specific strains of T. harzianum released into the soil. PMID:10653755

  9. Child Care: State Requirements for Background Checks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagnoni, Cynthia

    Background checks involve gathering information from state and federal databases to determine if child care providers have a history of child abuse or other criminal convictions that would make them unacceptable for working with children. Background checks include state criminal history checks, state child abuse registry checks, and Federal Bureau…

  10. IscS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has no desulfurase activity but may provide a cysteine ligand for [Fe2S2] cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2015-06-01

    Iron sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters are essential prosthetic groups involved in fundamental cell processes such as gene expression regulation, electron transfer and Lewis acid base chemistry. Central components of their biogenesis are pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent l-cysteine desulfurases, which provide the necessary S atoms for [Fe-S] cluster assembly. The archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Af) has two ORFs, which although annotated as l-cysteine desulfurases of the ISC type (IscS), lack the essential Lys residue (K199 in Af) that forms a Schiff base with PLP. We have previously determined the structure of an Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and found it to contain a [Fe2S2] cluster. In order to understand the origin of sulfide in that structure we have performed a series of functional tests using wild type and mutated forms of AfIscS. In addition, we have determined the crystal structure of an AfIscS-D199K mutant. From these studies we conclude that: i) AfIscS has no desulfurase activity; ii) in our in vitro [Fe2S2] cluster assembly experiments, sulfide ions are non-enzymatically generated by a mixture of iron, l-cysteine and PLP and iii) the physiological role of AfIscS may be to provide a cysteine ligand to the nascent cluster as observed in the [Fe2S2]-Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  11. Linking the SASSCAL WeatherNet and data management/rescue activities to provide consistent information for climate change assessments in Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmschrot, J.; Kaspar, F.; Muche, G.; Hillmann, T.; Kanyanga, J.; Butale, M.; Nascimento, D.; Josenhans, K.; Falanga, E.; Neto, F. O. S.; Kruger, S.; Juergens, N.

    2014-12-01

    Many countries of Southern Africa face inadequate weather monitoring networks to provide reliable and consistent information for the development of efficient management strategies for sustainable water and land resources management, drought and flood risk analysis and forecasts as well as climate change impacts assessments. In addition, some existing networks are characterized by station data showing notable gaps in long-term observations. On the other hand, useful climate information is saved in historical documents and archives, but only barely explored up to now. Such documents are also available in archives of European meteorological services, partly also not yet in digital format. A main aim of the SASSCAL Initiative (Southern African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management; www.sasscal.org) is to improve the availability of reliable meteorological baseline data along with a set of analytical methods to strengthen the research capacities in the SASSCAL region including Angola, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia, and therewith to support and integrate information of existing national monitoring networks of the Southern African region. In close cooperation with the national weather authorities and various research institutions of the SASSCAL region, the above mentioned deficits are specifically addressed by i) extending the existing national monitoring networks through additional automatic weather stations and their integration in the SASSCAL WeatherNet which in near future hosts about 130 stations, ii) contributing to the development of Climate Data Management Systems (CDMS) at the national weather authorities in Angola, Botswana and Zambia and iii) the provision of additional time series of climate data based on the historic documents from various archives in all countries. The paper presents first results and shows how these efforts are linked to provide consistent climate information for Southern Africa in order to

  12. Expression analysis of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinases in maize provides a key link between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Hao; Wang, Juan; Sun, Hong Wei; Yang, Shu Ke; Sang, Ya Lin; Lu, Xing Bo; Xu, Xiao Hui

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play important roles in stress responses and development in plants. Maize (Zea mays), an important cereal crop, is a model plant species for molecular studies. In the last decade, several MAPKs have been identified in maize; however, their functions have not been studied extensively. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of maize MAPK genes could provide valuable information for understanding their functions. In this study, 20 non-redundant maize MAPK genes (ZmMPKs) were identified via a genome-wide survey. Phylogenetic analysis of MAPKs from maize, rice (Oryza sativa), Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), poplar (Populus trichocarpa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) classified them into four major classes. ZmMPKs in the same class had similar domains, motifs, and genomic structures. Gene duplication investigations suggested that segmental duplications made a large contribution to the expansion of ZmMPKs. A number of cis-acting elements related to plant development and response to stress and hormones were identified in the promoter regions of ZmMPKs. Furthermore, transcript profile analysis in eight tissues and organs at various developmental stages demonstrated that most ZmMPKs were preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues and organs. The transcript abundance of most ZmMPKs changed significantly under salt, drought, cold, or abscisic acid (ABA) treatments, implying that they might participate in abiotic stress and ABA signaling. These expression analyses indicated that ZmMPKs might serve as linkers between abiotic stress signaling and plant reproduction. Our data will deepen our understanding of the complexity of the maize MAPK gene family and provide new clues to investigate their functions.

  13. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  14. Background Information for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Mercury is a naturally occurring and widely used element that can cause health and ecological problems when released to the environment through human activities. Though a national and even international issue, the health and environmental impacts of mercury are best understood when studied at the local level. "Mercury: An Educator's Toolkit"…

  15. El Niño-Southern Oscillation influence on the dust storm activity in Australia: Can the past provide a key to the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudmenzky, C.; Stone, R.; Allan, R.; Butler, H.

    2011-12-01

    impacts on rural communities. All major continental scale dust storm events have occurred after periods of prolonged drought. The reconstruction of the ENSO history using longer-term meteorological data, historical records, and other proxy data that may otherwise have been available provides a far more lengthy and detailed global picture of past ENSO and other climate variability thereby allowing recent climate variability to be assessed from a long-term "multi-proxy" perspective. The resulting dataset can be used to better understand the range of past, present and future climate variability and the influence these have on the dust storm activity in Australia. In addition the information gained can provide an independent means of verifying climate model simulations. The scientific community is well aware that climate change is happening to some degree and Australia is already starting to experience the effects. In order to employ adaptation and mitigating measures it is necessary to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for climate change.

  16. Genetical background of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  17. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  18. Background sources in optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characterization and measurement of background radiation relevant to optical communications system performance is addressed. The necessary optical receiver parameters are described, and radiometric concepts required for the calculation of collected background power are developed. The most important components of optical background power are discussed, and their contribution to the total collected background power in various communications scenarios is examined.

  19. The Provident Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, David H.

    1988-09-01

    The Provident Sea describes the history of fish stock management (including whales and seals). The book traces, on the basis of the original scientific material, the history of the management of "the provident sea" up to recent times when problems of over-exploitation have had dramatic effects upon stocks. The need for management arose mainly from the increasing industrialization of capture. Hence the preindustrial fisheries are covered, in particular the old cod fishery on the Grand Bank and the herring fishery in the North Sea, as an essential background to current problems. The origins of fisheries and whaling science are described, as is the development up to 1965 of the science and institution in fisheries, whaling, and sealing. In the sixties and seventies, certain major fishing nations took a heavy harvest of fish stocks using sophisticated and efficient gathering methods. This in turn led to conflict and one consequence was the "Law of the Sea" conference set up to try and resolve these issues.

  20. Galileons on cosmological backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goon, Garrett; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Trodden, Mark E-mail: kurthi@physics.upenn.edu

    2011-12-01

    We construct four-dimensional effective field theories of a generalized DBI galileon field, the dynamics of which naturally take place on a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime. The theories are invariant under non-linear symmetry transformations, which can be thought of as being inherited from five-dimensional bulk Killing symmetries via the probe brane technique through which they are constructed. The resulting model provides a framework in which to explore the cosmological role that galileons may play as the universe evolves.

  1. Low background aspects of GERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Simgen, Hardy

    2011-04-27

    The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in {sup 76}Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio-impurities coming from the liquid argon, the stainless steel cryostat and the front-end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from {sup 222}Rn. The main source of {sup 222}Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio-pure components for front-end electronics resulted in the development of a pre-amplifier with a total activity of less than 1 mBq {sup 228}Th.

  2. Historical Background and Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude

    Forty and twenty years after the two books published by Einar Tandberg-Hanssen (Solar prominences (Geophysics and astrophysics monographs), Vol. 12. Dordrecht: D. Reidel Publishing Co., 1974; The nature of solar prominences, astrophysics and space science library, Vol. 199. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995) on solar prominences, it is time to update our knowledge and understanding of these fascinating solar structures. After a brief history which overviews first eclipse observations (drawings and then photography), spectrographic, coronagraphic and later on polarimetric measurements, the chapter presents samples of the most spectacular results of the last two decades, obtained whether from space or on the ground. It discusses the contents of the book in order to encourage the reader to dip into the following 17 chapters which provide comprehensive and detailed observations, information about the methods used, and interpretation of the results on the basis of the latest theoretical and modelling works.

  3. Color gradient background oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Background oriented schlieren (BOS) imaging is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances through the comparison of digital images. By comparing images with and without a refractive disturbance visualizations can be achieved via a range of image processing methods. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high contrast speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern. Here a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative. The gradient background eliminates the need to perform an image correlation between the two digital images, as simple image subtraction can be used to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. This allows for quicker processing. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are shown. The gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data limited only by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Additional results include the use of a computer screen as a background.

  4. Color gradient background-oriented schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mier, Frank Austin; Hargather, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Background-oriented schlieren is a method of visualizing refractive disturbances by comparing digital images with and without a refractive disturbance distorting a background pattern. Traditionally, backgrounds consist of random distributions of high-contrast color transitions or speckle patterns. To image a refractive disturbance, a digital image correlation algorithm is used to identify the location and magnitude of apparent pixel shifts in the background pattern between the two images. Here, a novel method of using color gradient backgrounds is explored as an alternative that eliminates the need to perform a complex image correlation between the digital images. A simple image subtraction can be used instead to identify the location, magnitude, and direction of the image distortions. Gradient backgrounds are demonstrated to provide quantitative data only limited by the camera's pixel resolution, whereas speckle backgrounds limit resolution to the size of the random pattern features and image correlation window size. Quantitative measurement of density in a thermal boundary layer is presented. Two-dimensional gradient backgrounds using multiple colors are demonstrated to allow measurement of two-dimensional refractions. A computer screen is used as the background, which allows for rapid modification of the gradient to tune sensitivity for a particular application.

  5. 28 CFR 23.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.2 Background. It is... participants over a broad geographical area. The exposure of such ongoing networks of criminal activity can be aided by the pooling of information about such activities. However, because the collection and...

  6. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of 1950... designates military commanders of Army, Navy, Air Force, and Defense Agency activities as having authority...

  7. 32 CFR 1292.3 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY OF DLA ACTIVITIES AND RESOURCES § 1292.3 Background. Section 21 of the Internal Security Act of 1950... designates military commanders of Army, Navy, Air Force, and Defense Agency activities as having authority...

  8. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  9. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  10. Conceptual Background to Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponsonby, J. E. B.

    2004-06-01

    The International Telecommunications Union (ITU) conceives the radio spectrum as primarily a resource for telecommunications. Indeed most applications of radio are for communications and other radio services, particularly the Radio Astronomy Service, are deemed to be `pretend'communication serviceas for spectrum amnagement purposes. The language of Radio Spectrum Management is permeated by the terminology ofcommunications, some derived from the physics of radio and some from aspects of information theory. This contribution touches on all the essential concepts of radiocommunications which the author thinks should be the common mental equipment of the Spectrum Manager. The fundamental capacity of a communication channel is discussed in terms of the degrees of freedom and bandwidth of a signal, and the signal to noise ratio. It is emphasized that an information bearing signal is inherently unpredictable, and must, at some level, be discontinuous. This has important consequences for the form of its power spectrum. The effect of inserting filters is discussed particularly with regard to constant amplitude signals and, in the context of non-linear power amplifiers, the phenomenon of`sideband recovery'. All the common generic forms of modulation are discussed including the very different case of `no-modulation' which applies in all forms of passive remote sensing. Whilst all are agreed that the radio spectrum should be used `efficiently', there is no quantitative measure of spectral efficiency which embraces all relevant aspects of spectral usage. These various aspects are dicussed. Finally a brief outline of some aspects of antennae are reviewed. It is pointed out that the recent introduction of so-called `active antennnae', which have properties unlike traditional passive antennae, has confused the interpretation of those ITU Radio Regulations which refer to antennae.

  11. Home Learning Activities Designed to Provide Educational Experiences for Children and Parents: A Home Preschool Program Designed for the Siblings of the Children in the Follow Through Program in the Richmond Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond Public Schools, VA.

    This handbook of home preschool activities is designed to be used with the siblings of the children in Project Follow Through. The suggested activities are to be used by parents in the home to provide learning experiences for their young children and to reinforce concepts being taught in Project Follow Through. Most of the activities were adapted…

  12. Background matrix subtraction (BMS): A novel background removal algorithm for GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Mohamed; Harbi, Hussein

    2014-07-01

    Background noise is a common type of coherent noise that severely compromises the integrity of the high-resolution images provided by ground penetrating radar survey. Several existing techniques employ different approaches to attenuate background noise. In this study, we present the background matrix subtraction (BMS) as an alternative technique to remove horizontal background noise and we compare its efficiency to that of the conventional background removal technique. Instead of calculating an average trace that is subtracted from the GPR data in the conventional background removal methods, the BMS technique is based on calculating a complete background matrix of the same size of the GPR section. The background matrix is created through a series of windowing, sample exclusion, weighting, and iteration. This series of processes guarantees that the background matrix is least affected by target response and is composed purely of horizontal background noise. The computed background matrix is then subtracted from the GPR data to remove horizontal events. Results of experiments conducted on both synthetic and real GPR data show that the BMS technique yields better results than the commonly used background removal technique.

  13. Logistics background study: underground mining

    SciTech Connect

    Hanslovan, J. J.; Visovsky, R. G.

    1982-02-01

    Logistical functions that are normally associated with US underground coal mining are investigated and analyzed. These functions imply all activities and services that support the producing sections of the mine. The report provides a better understanding of how these functions impact coal production in terms of time, cost, and safety. Major underground logistics activities are analyzed and include: transportation and personnel, supplies and equipment; transportation of coal and rock; electrical distribution and communications systems; water handling; hydraulics; and ventilation systems. Recommended areas for future research are identified and prioritized.

  14. Field and Laboratory Studies Provide Insights into the Meaning of Day-Time Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tomotani, Barbara M.; Flores, Danilo E. F. L.; Tachinardi, Patrícia; Paliza, José D.; Oda, Gisele A.; Valentinuzzi, Verônica S.

    2012-01-01

    South American subterranean rodents (Ctenomys aff. knighti), commonly known as tuco-tucos, display nocturnal, wheel-running behavior under light-dark (LD) conditions, and free-running periods >24 h in constant darkness (DD). However, several reports in the field suggested that a substantial amount of activity occurs during daylight hours, leading us to question whether circadian entrainment in the laboratory accurately reflects behavior in natural conditions. We compared circadian patterns of locomotor activity in DD of animals previously entrained to full laboratory LD cycles (LD12∶12) with those of animals that were trapped directly from the field. In both cases, activity onsets in DD immediately reflected the previous dark onset or sundown. Furthermore, freerunning periods upon release into DD were close to 24 h indicating aftereffects of prior entrainment, similarly in both conditions. No difference was detected in the phase of activity measured with and without access to a running wheel. However, when individuals were observed continuously during daylight hours in a semi-natural enclosure, they emerged above-ground on a daily basis. These day-time activities consisted of foraging and burrow maintenance, suggesting that the designation of this species as nocturnal might be inaccurate in the field. Our study of a solitary subterranean species suggests that the circadian clock is entrained similarly under field and laboratory conditions and that day-time activity expressed only in the field is required for foraging and may not be time-dictated by the circadian pacemaker. PMID:22649565

  15. Beam induced backgrounds: CDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    We summarize the experiences of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment in the presence of backgrounds originating from the counter circulating beams in the Fermilab Tevatron. These backgrounds are measured and their sources identified. Finally, we outline the strategies employed to reduce the effects of these backgrounds on the experiment.

  16. TAK-063, a PDE10A Inhibitor with Balanced Activation of Direct and Indirect Pathways, Provides Potent Antipsychotic-Like Effects in Multiple Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Harada, Akina; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Miyamoto, Maki; Kimura, Haruhide

    2016-08-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) inhibitors are expected to be novel drugs for schizophrenia through activation of both direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons. However, excess activation of the direct pathway by a dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF82958 canceled antipsychotic-like effects of a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in methamphetamine (METH)-induced hyperactivity in rats. Thus, balanced activation of these pathways may be critical for PDE10A inhibitors. Current antipsychotics and the novel PDE10A inhibitor TAK-063, but not the selective PDE10A inhibitor MP-10, produced dose-dependent antipsychotic-like effects in METH-induced hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition in rodents. TAK-063 and MP-10 activated the indirect pathway to a similar extent; however, MP-10 caused greater activation of the direct pathway than did TAK-063. Interestingly, the off-rate of TAK-063 from PDE10A in rat brain sections was faster than that of MP-10, and a slower off-rate PDE10A inhibitor with TAK-063-like chemical structure showed an MP-10-like pharmacological profile. In general, faster off-rate enzyme inhibitors are more sensitive than slower off-rate inhibitors to binding inhibition by enzyme substrates. As expected, TAK-063 was more sensitive than MP-10 to binding inhibition by cyclic nucleotides. Moreover, an immunohistochemistry study suggested that cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the direct pathway were higher than those in the indirect pathway. These data can explain why TAK-063 showed partial activation of the direct pathway compared with MP-10. The findings presented here suggest that TAK-063's antipsychotic-like efficacy may be attributable to its unique pharmacological properties, resulting in balanced activation of the direct and indirect striatal pathways. PMID:26849714

  17. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks.

  18. Digestive enzyme activities in the guts of bonnethead sharks (Sphyrna tiburo) provide insight into their digestive strategy and evidence for microbial digestion in their hindguts.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Parth; Papastamatiou, Yannis P; German, Donovan P

    2015-11-01

    Few investigations have studied digestive enzyme activities in the alimentary tracts of sharks to gain insight into how these organisms digest their meals. In this study, we examined the activity levels of proteases, carbohydrases, and lipase in the pancreas, and along the anterior intestine, spiral intestine, and colon of the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We then interpreted our data in the context of a rate-yield continuum to discern this shark's digestive strategy. Our data show anticipated decreasing patterns in the activities of pancreatic enzymes moving posteriorly along the gut, but also show mid spiral intestine peaks in aminopeptidase and lipase activities, which support the spiral intestine as the main site of absorption in bonnetheads. Interestingly, we observed spikes in the activity levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase in the bonnethead colon, and these chitin- and cellulose-degrading enzymes, respectively, are likely of microbial origin in this distal gut region. Taken in the context of intake and relatively long transit times of food through the gut, the colonic spikes in N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and β-glucosidase activities suggest that bonnetheads take a yield-maximizing strategy to the digestive process, with some reliance on microbial digestion in their hindguts. This is one of the first studies to examine digestive enzyme activities along the gut of any shark, and importantly, the data match with previous observations that sharks take an extended time to digest their meals (consistent with a yield-maximizing digestive strategy) and that the spiral intestine is the primary site of absorption in sharks. PMID:26239220

  19. Remarkable Reproducibility of Enzyme Activity Profiles in Tomato Fruits Grown under Contrasting Environments Provides a Roadmap for Studies of Fruit Metabolism1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Biais, Benoît; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-01-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum ‘Moneymaker’) plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels. PMID:24474652

  20. Remarkable reproducibility of enzyme activity profiles in tomato fruits grown under contrasting environments provides a roadmap for studies of fruit metabolism.

    PubMed

    Biais, Benot; Bénard, Camille; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Colombié, Sophie; Prodhomme, Duyên; Ménard, Guillaume; Bernillon, Stéphane; Gehl, Bernadette; Gautier, Hélène; Ballias, Patricia; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Sweetlove, Lee; Génard, Michel; Gibon, Yves

    2014-03-01

    To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Moneymaker') plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels.

  1. Phosphorylation- and nucleotide-binding-induced changes to the stability and hydrogen exchange patterns of JNK1β1 provide insight into its mechanisms of activation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Gavin R; Stoychev, Stoyan; Achilonu, Ikechukwu; Dirr, Heini W

    2014-10-23

    Many studies have characterized how changes to the stability and internal motions of a protein during activation can contribute to their catalytic function, even when structural changes cannot be observed. Here, unfolding studies and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HX) mass spectrometry were used to investigate the changes to the stability and conformation/conformational dynamics of JNK1β1 induced by phosphorylative activation. Equivalent studies were also employed to determine the effects of nucleotide binding on both inactive and active JNK1β1 using the ATP analogue, 5'-adenylyl-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). JNK1β1 phosphorylation alters HX in regions involved in catalysis and substrate binding, changes that can be ascribed to functional modifications in either structure and/or backbone flexibility. Increased HX in the hinge between the N- and C-terminal domains implied that it acquires enhanced flexibility upon phosphorylation that may be a prerequisite for interdomain closure. In combination with the finding that nucleotide binding destabilizes the kinase, the patterns of solvent protection by AMP-PNP were consistent with a novel mode of nucleotide binding to the C-terminal domain of a destabilized and open domain conformation of inactive JNK1β1. Solvent protection by AMP-PNP of both N- and C-terminal domains in active JNK1β1 revealed that the domains close around nucleotide upon phosphorylation, concomitantly stabilizing the kinase. This suggests that phosphorylation activates JNK1β1 in part by increasing hinge flexibility to facilitate interdomain closure and the creation of a functional active site. By uncovering the complex interplay that occurs between nucleotide binding and phosphorylation, we present new insight into the unique mechanisms by which JNK1β1 is regulated.

  2. Background issues for defensive interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    Mean nuclear backgrounds are large, but are arguably amenable to frame-to-frame subtraction. Striated backgrounds on the sensors for defensive interceptors could, however, cause clutter leak-through, which could make detection and track difficult. Nominal motions and backgrounds give signal to clutter ratios too low to be useful. Clutter leakage due to line-of-sight drift can be reduced by stabilizing the line of sight around the background clutter itself. Current interceptors have detector arrays large enough for operation independent of nuclear backgrounds in their fields of view. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Background sounds contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Raluca; Pandya, Pritesh K; Engineer, Navzer D; Rathbun, Daniel L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2005-05-01

    The mammalian auditory system evolved to extract meaningful information from complex acoustic environments. Spectrotemporal selectivity of auditory neurons provides a potential mechanism to represent natural sounds. Experience-dependent plasticity mechanisms can remodel the spectrotemporal selectivity of neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1). Electrical stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) enables plasticity in A1 that parallels natural learning and is specific to acoustic features associated with NB activity. In this study, we used NB stimulation to explore how cortical networks reorganize after experience with frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps, and how background stimuli contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in rat auditory cortex. Pairing an 8-4 kHz FM sweep with NB stimulation 300 times per day for 20 days decreased tone thresholds, frequency selectivity, and response latency of A1 neurons in the region of the tonotopic map activated by the sound. In an attempt to modify neuronal response properties across all of A1 the same NB activation was paired in a second group of rats with five downward FM sweeps, each spanning a different octave. No changes in FM selectivity or receptive field (RF) structure were observed when the neural activation was distributed across the cortical surface. However, the addition of unpaired background sweeps of different rates or direction was sufficient to alter RF characteristics across the tonotopic map in a third group of rats. These results extend earlier observations that cortical neurons can develop stimulus specific plasticity and indicate that background conditions can strongly influence cortical plasticity.

  4. Spatial variations of groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Yunjung; Lee, Soojae

    2014-05-01

    In coastal aquifers the mixing between fresh terrestrial water and seawater occurs, which influences groundwater quality. Due to mixing elevated chloride concentrations are often observed in coastal aquifers. In coastal areas terrestrial water-seawater mixing can be caused by anthropogenic activities or natural factors such as tides and sea level changes. Therefore, it is difficult or even impossible to characterize groundwater background concentrations in coastal aquifers. Although it is usual to exclude coastal aquifer when characterizing background concentrations, it is essential to accurately characterize naturally-affected groundwater quality in coastal areas because groundwater is a major water resource for potable, irrigation, domestic uses. So in this work we define groundwater background concentrations as naturally occurring ambient concentrations with excluding groundwater abstraction. Based on this definition, we evaluate groundwater background concentrations in various geologic formations and analyze characteristics of groundwater quality in coastal aquifers by utilizing Groundwater Quality Monitoring System (GQMS) data. The results show that high concentrations of chloride are observed in some coastal areas but not always. Tidal effects and topographical characteristics are thought to be as factors affecting such spatial variations. In some coastal areas high concentrations of chloride are observed with high nitrate concentrations. This means that agricultural practices can attribute to anthropogenic background, leading to elevated concentrations of nitrate. These results provide some essential information for groundwater resources management in coastal areas. Further data collection and analysis is required for evaluating the effect of tide and sea level changes on groundwater quality.

  5. AUTOFLUORESCENCE IN PRIMARY RAINBOW TROUT HEPATOCYTES INTERFERES WITH MEASUREMENT OF OXIDATIVE ACTIVITY VIA THE EXOGENOUS PROBE, DCF, BUT PROVIDES INTRINSIC MEASURE OF CELLULAR OXIDATIVE STATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The compound 2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluoroscein diacetate is a probe commonly used to detect oxidative activity in live cells. Studies were undertaken to measure reactive oxygen species generated in freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes exposed to a variety of redox cycling c...

  6. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  7. Mutagenic and chemical analyses provide new insight into enzyme activation and mechanism of the type 2 iron-sulfur l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2016-04-15

    The crystal structure of the Type 2 l-serine dehydratase from Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD), revealed a "tail-in-mouth" configuration where the C-terminal residue acts as an intrinsic competitive inhibitor. This pre-catalytic structure undergoes an activation step prior to catalytic turnover. Mutagenic analysis of residues at or near the active site cleft is consistent with stabilization of substrate binding by many of the same residues that interact with the C-terminal cysteine and highlight the critical role of certain tail residues in activity. pH-rate profiles show that a residue with pK of 5.9 must be deprotonated and a residue with a pK of 8.5 must be protonated for activity. This supports an earlier suggestion that His 61 is the likely catalytic base. An additional residue with a pK of 8.5-9 increases cooperativity when it is deprotonated. This investigation also demonstrates that the Fe-S dehydratases convert the enamine/imine intermediates of the catalytic reaction to products on the enzyme prior to release. This is in contrast to pyridoxyl 5' phosphate based dehydratases that release an enamine/imine intermediate into solution, which then hydrolyzes to produce the ketoamine product.

  8. Two novel monothiol glutaredoxins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae provide further insight into iron-sulfur cluster binding, oligomerization, and enzymatic activity of glutaredoxins.

    PubMed

    Mesecke, Nikola; Mittler, Sarah; Eckers, Elisabeth; Herrmann, Johannes M; Deponte, Marcel

    2008-02-01

    Two novel monothiol glutaredoxins from yeast (ScGrx6 and ScGrx7) were identified and analyzed in vitro. Both proteins are highly suited to study structure-function relationships of glutaredoxin subclasses because they differ from all monothiol glutaredoxins investigated so far and share features with dithiol glutaredoxins. ScGrx6 and ScGrx7 are, for example, the first monothiol glutaredoxins showing an activity in the standard glutaredoxin transhydrogenase assay with glutathione and bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-disulfide. Steady-state kinetics of ScGrx7 with glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide are similar to dithiol glutaredoxins and are consistent with a ping-pong mechanism. In contrast to most other glutaredoxins, ScGrx7 and ScGrx6 are able to dimerize noncovalently. Furthermore, ScGrx6 is the first monothiol glutaredoxin shown to directly bind an iron-sulfur cluster. The cluster can be stabilized by reduced glutathione, and its loss results in the conversion of tetramers to dimers. ScGrx7 does not bind metal ions but can be covalently modified in Escherichia coli leading to a mass shift of 1090 +/- 14 Da. What might be the structural requirements that cause the different properties? We hypothesize that a G(S/T)x3 insertion between a highly conserved lysine residue and the active site cysteine residue could be responsible for the abrogated transhydrogenase activity of many monothiol glutaredoxins. In addition, we suggest an active site motif without proline residues that could lead to the identification of further metal binding glutaredoxins. Such different properties presumably reflect diverse functions in vivo and might therefore explain why there are at least seven glutaredoxins in yeast. PMID:18171082

  9. [Physical activity can influence the course of early arthritis. Both strength training and aerobic exercise provide pain relief and functional improvement].

    PubMed

    Roos, Ewa

    2002-11-01

    There is no causal treatment for osteoarthritis. Instead treatment is aimed at decreasing pain and improving function. The base of osteoarthritis treatment is education and exercise. Exercise, both aerobic exercise and muscular strength training, have positive effects on pain and function. The minimum recommendations of exercise are equivalent to the recommendations of physical activity to obtain or maintain a good general health. Acupuncture is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritis pain. However, function is not automatically improved when pain is relieved.

  10. NMR Localization of Divalent Cations at the Active Site of the Neurospora VS Ribozyme Provides Insights into RNA–Metal-Ion Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Metal cations represent key elements of RNA structure and function. In the Neurospora VS ribozyme, metal cations play diverse roles; they are important for substrate recognition, formation of the active site, and shifting the pKa’s of two key nucleobases that contribute to the general acid–base mechanism. Recently, we determined the NMR structure of the A730 loop of the VS ribozyme active site (SLVI) that contributes the general acid (A756) in the enzymatic mechanism of the cleavage reaction. Our studies showed that magnesium (Mg2+) ions are essential to stabilize the formation of the S-turn motif within the A730 loop that exposes the A756 nucleobase for catalysis. In this article, we extend these NMR investigations by precisely mapping the Mg2+-ion binding sites using manganese-induced paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and cadmium-induced chemical-shift perturbation of phosphorothioate RNAs. These experiments identify five Mg2+-ion binding sites within SLVI. Four Mg2+ ions in SLVI are associated with known RNA structural motifs, including the G–U wobble pair and the GNRA tetraloop, and our studies reveal novel insights about Mg2+ ion binding to these RNA motifs. Interestingly, one Mg2+ ion is specifically associated with the S-turn motif, confirming its structural role in the folding of the A730 loop. This Mg2+ ion is likely important for formation of the active site and may play an indirect role in catalysis. PMID:24364590

  11. Fatty acid synthase plays a role in cancer metabolism beyond providing fatty acids for phospholipid synthesis or sustaining elevations in glycolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hopperton, Kathryn E.; Duncan, Robin E.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Archer, Michael C.

    2014-01-15

    Fatty acid synthase is over-expressed in many cancers and its activity is required for cancer cell survival, but the role of endogenously synthesized fatty acids in cancer is unknown. It has been suggested that endogenous fatty acid synthesis is either needed to support the growth of rapidly dividing cells, or to maintain elevated glycolysis (the Warburg effect) that is characteristic of cancer cells. Here, we investigate both hypotheses. First, we compared utilization of fatty acids synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-labeled acetate to those supplied exogenously as {sup 14}C-labeled palmitate in the culture medium in human breast cancer (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and untransformed breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). We found that cancer cells do not produce fatty acids that are different from those derived from exogenous palmitate, that these fatty acids are esterified to the same lipid and phospholipid classes in the same proportions, and that their distribution within neutral lipids is not different from untransformed cells. These results suggest that endogenously synthesized fatty acids do not fulfill a specific function in cancer cells. Furthermore, we observed that cancer cells excrete endogenously synthesized fatty acids, suggesting that they are produced in excess of requirements. We next investigated whether lipogenic activity is involved in the maintenance of high glycolytic activity by culturing both cancer and non-transformed cells under anoxic conditions. Although anoxia increased glycolysis 2–3 fold, we observed no concomitant increase in lipogenesis. Our results indicate that breast cancer cells do not have a specific qualitative or quantitative requirement for endogenously synthesized fatty acids and that increased de novo lipogenesis is not required to sustain elevations in glycolytic activity induced by anoxia in these cells. - Highlights: • Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is over-expressed in cancer but its function is unknown. • We compare

  12. Expected background in the LZ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2015-08-17

    The LZ experiment, featuring a 7-tonne active liquid xenon target, is aimed at achieving unprecedented sensitivity to WIMPs with the background expected to be dominated by astrophysical neutrinos. To reach this goal, extensive simulations are carried out to accurately calculate the electron recoil and nuclear recoil rates in the detector. Both internal (from target material) and external (from detector components and surrounding environment) backgrounds are considered. A very efficient suppression of background rate is achieved with an outer liquid scintillator veto, liquid xenon skin and fiducialisation. Based on the current measurements of radioactivity of different materials, it is shown that LZ can achieve the reduction of a total background for a WIMP search down to about 2 events in 1000 live days for 5.6 tonne fiducial mass.

  13. Holographic thermalization in a quark confining background

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, D. S. Aref’eva, I. Ya.

    2015-03-15

    We study holographic thermalization of a strongly coupled theory inspired by two colliding shock waves in a vacuum confining background. Holographic thermalization means a black hole formation, in fact, a trapped surface formation. As the vacuum confining background, we considered the well-know bottom-up AdS/QCD model that provides the Cornell potential and reproduces the QCD β-function. We perturb the vacuum background by colliding domain shock waves that are assumed to be holographically dual to heavy ions collisions. Our main physical assumption is that we can make a restriction on the time of trapped surface formation, which results in a natural limitation on the size of the domain where the trapped surface is produced. This limits the intermediate domain where the main part of the entropy is produced. In this domain, we can use an intermediate vacuum background as an approximation to the full confining background. We find that the dependence of the multiplicity on energy for the intermediate background has an asymptotic expansion whose first term depends on energy as E{sup 1/3}, which is very similar to the experimental dependence of particle multiplicities on the colliding ion energy obtained from the RHIC and LHC. However, this first term, at the energies where the approximation of the confining metric by the intermediate background works, does not saturate the exact answer, and we have to take the nonleading terms into account.

  14. Atorvastatin acts synergistically with N-acetyl cysteine to provide therapeutic advantage against Fas-activated erythrocyte apoptosis during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Sarkar, Avik; Biswas, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant that reduces the lifespan of circulating erythrocytes during chronic exposure. Our previous studies had indicated involvement of hypercholesterolemia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arsenic-induced apoptotic death of erythrocytes. In this study, we have shown an effective recovery from arsenic-induced death signaling in erythrocytes in response to treatment with atorvastatin (ATV) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in rats. Our results emphasized on the importance of cholesterol in the promotion of ROS-mediated Fas signaling in red cells. Arsenic-induced activation of caspase 3 was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure on the cell surface and microvesiculation of erythrocyte membrane. Administration of NAC in combination with ATV, proved to be more effective than either of the drugs alone towards the rectification of arsenic-mediated disorganization of membrane structural integrity, and this could be linked with decreased ROS accumulation through reduced glutathione (GSH) repletion along with cholesterol depletion. Moreover, activation of caspase 3 was capable of promoting aggregation of band 3 with subsequent binding of autologous IgG and opsonization by C3b that led to phagocytosis of the exposed cells by the macrophages. NAC-ATV treatment successfully amended these events and restored lifespan of erythrocytes from the exposed animals almost to the control level. This work helped us to identify intracellular membrane cholesterol enrichment and GSH depletion as the key regulatory points in arsenic-mediated erythrocyte destruction and suggested a therapeutic strategy against Fas-activated cell death related to enhanced cholesterol and accumulation of ROS.

  15. Identification of a β-galactosidase transgene that provides a live-cell marker of transcriptional activity in growing oocytes and embryos.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nicole; Farookhi, Riaz; Clarke, Hugh J

    2015-07-01

    Identifying the events and molecular mechanisms that regulate oocyte growth has emerged as a key objective of research in human fertility, fuelled by evidence from human and animal studies indicating that disease and environmental factors can act on oocytes to affect the health of the resulting individual and by efforts to grow oocytes in vitro to enable fertility preservation of cancer survivors. Techniques that monitor the development of growing oocytes would be valuable tools to assess the progression of growth under different conditions. Most methods used to assess oocytes grown in vitro are indirect, however, relying on characteristics of the somatic compartment of the follicle, or compromise the oocyte, preventing its subsequent culture or fertilization. We investigated the utility of T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/Lef)-LacZ transgene expression as a predictor of global transcriptional activity in oocytes and early embryos. Using a fluorescent β-galactosidase substrate combined with live-cell imaging, we show that TCF/Lef-LacZ transgene expression is detectable in growing oocytes, lost in fully grown oocytes and resumes in late two-cell embryos. Transgene expression is likely regulated by a Wnt-independent mechanism. Using chromatin analysis, LacZ expression and methods to monitor and inhibit transcription, we show that TCF/Lef-LacZ expression mirrors transcriptional activity in oocytes and preimplantation embryos. Oocytes and preimplantation embryos that undergo live-cell imaging for TCF/Lef-LacZ expression are able to continue development in vitro. TCF/Lef-LacZ reporter expression in living oocytes and early embryos is thus a sensitive and faithful marker of transcriptional activity that can be used to monitor and optimize conditions for oocyte growth.

  16. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Dimethylglycine Sodium Salt and Its Role in Providing Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingfei; Kou, Tao; Niu, Yu; Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the free radical scavenging activities (against 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), 2,2'-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6- sulphonate) (ABTS+), Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)) of dimethylglycine sodium salt (DMG-Na) were measured and compared with those of Trolox (6-hydroxy-2, 5, 7, 8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a commonly used antioxidant. The radical scavenging activities of DMG-Na were found to be the highest at 40 mg/ml. In Experiment 2, gastric intubation in mice with 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution significantly increased (P < 0.05) the body weight (BW) (28 d), organ proportion (liver and spleen), and antioxidant capacity in serum and the liver (Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Hydrogen peroxidase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)), and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the activities of serum Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and Glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (AST) and Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) contents in the serum and liver. Specifically, the effect of 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution, which showed the highest antioxidant capacity, was further studied using a mice model. In Experiment 3, the mice CL (CON+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the serum ALT and AST content; hepatic mitochondrial antioxidant capacity (Manganese Superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione reductase (GR), GPx, Glutathione (GSH)); MDA and Protein carbonyl (PC) content; Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) level, and expression of liver antioxidant genes (Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)) relative to the mice CS (CON+ sterile saline) group. The DL (DMG+LPS) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in serum ALT and AST content, ROS level, and expression of liver

  17. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Dimethylglycine Sodium Salt and Its Role in Providing Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bai, Kaiwen; Xu, Wen; Zhang, Jingfei; Kou, Tao; Niu, Yu; Wan, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Chao; Wang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the free radical scavenging activities (against 1,1-diphenyl-2-pierylhydrazy (DPPH), 2,2'-Azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6- sulphonate) (ABTS+), Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)) of dimethylglycine sodium salt (DMG-Na) were measured and compared with those of Trolox (6-hydroxy-2, 5, 7, 8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a commonly used antioxidant. The radical scavenging activities of DMG-Na were found to be the highest at 40 mg/ml. In Experiment 2, gastric intubation in mice with 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution significantly increased (P < 0.05) the body weight (BW) (28 d), organ proportion (liver and spleen), and antioxidant capacity in serum and the liver (Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Hydrogen peroxidase (CAT), Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)), and significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the activities of serum Glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (ALT) and Glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (AST) and Methane Dicarboxylic Aldehyde (MDA) contents in the serum and liver. Specifically, the effect of 12 mg DMG-Na/0.3 ml sterile saline solution, which showed the highest antioxidant capacity, was further studied using a mice model. In Experiment 3, the mice CL (CON+ lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in the serum ALT and AST content; hepatic mitochondrial antioxidant capacity (Manganese Superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione reductase (GR), GPx, Glutathione (GSH)); MDA and Protein carbonyl (PC) content; Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) level, and expression of liver antioxidant genes (Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1), Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1)) relative to the mice CS (CON+ sterile saline) group. The DL (DMG+LPS) group showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in serum ALT and AST content, ROS level, and expression of liver

  18. Interpretation of observed cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollaine, S.

    1978-01-01

    The Alfven and Mendis (1977) conclusion that dust grains in galaxies render the universe opaque to cosmic microwave background at a red shift ratio equal to 40 is challenged by a calculation of the opacity of galactic dust grains to the microwave background radiation from the time of decoupling at emission red shift ratio equal to 1500 to the present in the standard big bang model. In the present calculation, evolutionary effects on grain opacity and abundance are estimated. At wavelengths used in studying the microwave background, the optical depth of the grains is found to be 0.18 when the deceleration parameter equals 0.03, and 0.05 when the deceleration parameter equals 0.5. The results indicate that microwave background can provide information on an early dense phase of the universe.

  19. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    PubMed

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site. PMID:26208466

  20. Chimpanzees' context-dependent tool use provides evidence for separable representations of hand and tool even during active use within peripersonal space.

    PubMed

    Povinelli, Daniel J; Reaux, James E; Frey, Scott H

    2010-01-01

    Considerable attention has been devoted to behaviors in which tools are used to perform actions in extrapersonal space by extending the reach. Evidence suggests that these behaviors result in an expansion of the body schema and peripersonal space. However, humans often use tools to perform tasks within peripersonal space that cannot be accomplished with the hands. In some of these instances (e.g., cooking), a tool is used as a substitute for the hand in order to pursue actions that would otherwise be hazardous. These behaviors suggest that even during the active use of tools, we maintain non-isomorphic representations that distinguish between our hands and handheld tools. Understanding whether such representations are a human specialization is of potentially great relevance to understand the evolutionary history of technological behaviors including the controlled use of fire. We tested six captive adult chimpanzees to determine whether they would elect to use a tool, rather than their hands, when acting in potentially hazardous vs. nonhazardous circumstances located within reach. Their behavior suggests that, like humans, chimpanzees represent the distinction between the hand vs. tool even during active use. We discuss the implications of this evidence for our understanding of tool use and its evolution.

  1. In vitro antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and protective effect against DNA damage provided by leaves, stems and flowers of Portulaca oleracea (Purslane).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rúben; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the antioxidant properties of Portulaca oleracea L., known as purslane. The samples (leaves, flowers and stems) were collected at two different locations in Portugal: Tavira (L1) and Vendas Novas (L2). Assays for total antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and ferric-reducing antioxidant power were conducted and, for both locations, significantly higher values (P < 0.05) were observed for stems (508.8 and 982.3 mg AAE/100 g DW, 1008.6 and 2285.5 mg GAE/100 g DW, 121.0 and 166.3 mg TE/100 g DW, respectively for each location), than in leaves or flowers. In the DPPH assay, the three-plant parts from L2 reached the 50% inhibition rate in lower concentrations than plants from L1. On the other hand, higher concentrations of total monomeric anthocyanins were found in samples from L1 (95.5, 88.8 and 86.0 mg/L) than in samples from L2 (81.7, 70.5 and 59.8 mg/L). The same was true for phenolic acids, estimated by liquid-chromatography, where methanol extracts were used. Phenolic extracts from all three-plant parts from both locations showed protective effects on DNA against hydroxyl radicals. This work suggests the possibility of benefit to human health from its consumption, related to the high antioxidant activity of purslane, even the stems, usually discarded in daily consumption.

  2. The crystal structure of Erwinia amylovora levansucrase provides a snapshot of the products of sucrose hydrolysis trapped into the active site.

    PubMed

    Wuerges, Jochen; Caputi, Lorenzo; Cianci, Michele; Boivin, Stephane; Meijers, Rob; Benini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Levansucrases are members of the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyse both the hydrolysis of the substrate sucrose and the transfer of fructosyl units to acceptor molecules. In the presence of sufficient sucrose, this may either lead to the production of fructooligosaccharides or fructose polymers. Aim of this study is to rationalise the differences in the polymerisation properties of bacterial levansucrases and in particular to identify structural features that determine different product spectrum in the levansucrase of the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora (Ea Lsc, EC 2.4.1.10) as compared to Gram-positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis levansucrase. Ea is an enterobacterial pathogen responsible for the Fire Blight disease in rosaceous plants (e.g., apple and pear) with considerable interest for the agricultural industry. The crystal structure of Ea Lsc was solved at 2.77 Å resolution and compared to those of other fructosyltransferases from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We propose the structural features, determining the different reaction products, to reside in just a few loops at the rim of the active site funnel. Moreover we propose that loop 8 may have a role in product length determination in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus LsdA and Microbacterium saccharophilum FFase. The Ea Lsc structure shows for the first time the products of sucrose hydrolysis still bound in the active site.

  3. In vitro antioxidant activity, phenolic compounds and protective effect against DNA damage provided by leaves, stems and flowers of Portulaca oleracea (Purslane).

    PubMed

    Silva, Rúben; Carvalho, Isabel S

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzed the antioxidant properties of Portulaca oleracea L., known as purslane. The samples (leaves, flowers and stems) were collected at two different locations in Portugal: Tavira (L1) and Vendas Novas (L2). Assays for total antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and ferric-reducing antioxidant power were conducted and, for both locations, significantly higher values (P < 0.05) were observed for stems (508.8 and 982.3 mg AAE/100 g DW, 1008.6 and 2285.5 mg GAE/100 g DW, 121.0 and 166.3 mg TE/100 g DW, respectively for each location), than in leaves or flowers. In the DPPH assay, the three-plant parts from L2 reached the 50% inhibition rate in lower concentrations than plants from L1. On the other hand, higher concentrations of total monomeric anthocyanins were found in samples from L1 (95.5, 88.8 and 86.0 mg/L) than in samples from L2 (81.7, 70.5 and 59.8 mg/L). The same was true for phenolic acids, estimated by liquid-chromatography, where methanol extracts were used. Phenolic extracts from all three-plant parts from both locations showed protective effects on DNA against hydroxyl radicals. This work suggests the possibility of benefit to human health from its consumption, related to the high antioxidant activity of purslane, even the stems, usually discarded in daily consumption. PMID:24660460

  4. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  5. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  6. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB.

  7. Overlaps in the Transcriptional Profiles of Medicago truncatula Roots Inoculated with Two Different Glomus Fungi Provide Insights into the Genetic Program Activated during Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1[w

    PubMed Central

    Hohnjec, Natalija; Vieweg, Martin F.; Pühler, Alfred; Becker, Anke; Küster, Helge

    2005-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is a widespread symbiotic association between plants and fungal microsymbionts that supports plant development under nutrient-limiting and various stress conditions. In this study, we focused on the overlapping genetic program activated by two commonly studied microsymbionts in addition to identifying AM-related genes. We thus applied 16,086 probe microarrays to profile the transcriptome of the model legume Medicago truncatula during interactions with Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices and specified a total of 201 plant genes as significantly coinduced at least 2-fold, with more than 160 being reported as AM induced for the first time. Several hundred genes were additionally up-regulated during a sole interaction, indicating that the plant genetic program activated in AM to some extent depends on the colonizing microsymbiont. Genes induced during both interactions specified AM-related nitrate, ion, and sugar transporters, enzymes involved in secondary metabolism, proteases, and Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Furthermore, coinduced genes encoded receptor kinases and other components of signal transduction pathways as well as AM-induced transcriptional regulators, thus reflecting changes in signaling. By the use of reporter gene expression, we demonstrated that one member of the AM-induced gene family encoding blue copper binding proteins (MtBcp1) was both specifically and strongly up-regulated in arbuscule-containing regions of mycorrhizal roots. A comparison of the AM expression profiles to those of nitrogen-fixing root nodules suggested only a limited overlap between the genetic programs orchestrating root endosymbioses. PMID:15778460

  8. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains.

  9. Dexras1 a unique ras-GTPase interacts with NMDA receptor activity and provides a novel dissociation between anxiety, working memory and sensory gating.

    PubMed

    Carlson, G C; Lin, R E; Chen, Y; Brookshire, B R; White, R S; Lucki, I; Siegel, S J; Kim, S F

    2016-05-13

    Dexras1 is a novel GTPase that acts at a confluence of signaling mechanisms associated with psychiatric and neurological disease including NMDA receptors, NOS1AP and nNOS. Recent work has shown that Dexras1 mediates iron trafficking and NMDA-dependent neurodegeneration but a role for Dexras1 in normal brain function or psychiatric disease has not been studied. To test for such a role, mice with germline knockout (KO) of Dexras1 were assayed for behavioral abnormalities as well as changes in NMDA receptor subunit protein expression. Because Dexras1 is up-regulated during stress or by dexamethasone treatment, we included measures associated with emotion including anxiety and depression. Baseline anxiety-like measures (open field and zero maze) were not altered, nor were depression-like behavior (tail suspension). Measures of memory function yielded mixed results, with no changes in episodic memory (novel object recognition) but a significant decrement on working memory (T-maze). Alternatively, there was an increase in pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), without concomitant changes in either startle amplitude or locomotor activity. PPI data are consistent with the direction of change seen following exposure to dopamine D2 antagonists. An examination of NMDA subunit expression levels revealed an increased expression of the NR2A subunit, contrary to previous studies demonstrating down-regulation of the receptor following antipsychotic exposure (Schmitt et al., 2003) and up-regulation after exposure to isolation rearing (Turnock-Jones et al., 2009). These findings suggest a potential role for Dexras1 in modulating a selective subset of psychiatric symptoms, possibly via its interaction with NMDARs and/or other disease-related binding-partners. Furthermore, data suggest that modulating Dexras1 activity has contrasting effects on emotional, sensory and cognitive domains. PMID:26946266

  10. HIMSS Venture+ Forum and HX360 Provide Industry View of Health Technology Innovation, Startup and Investment Activity; Advancing the New Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Burde, Howard A; Scarfo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Presented by HIMSS, the Venture+ Forum program and pitch competition provides a 360-degree view on health technology investing and today's top innovative companies. It features exciting 3-minute pitch presentations from emerging and growth-stage companies, investor panels and a networking reception. Recent Venture+ Forum winners include TowerView Health, Prima-Temp, ActuaiMeds and M3 Clinician. As an industry catalyst for health IT innovation and business-building resource for growing companies and emerging technology solutions, HIMSS has co-developed with A VIA, a new initiative that addresses how emerging technologies, health system business model changes and investment will transform the delivery of care. HX360 engages senior healthcare leaders, innovation teams, investors and entrepreneurs around the vision of transforming healthcare delivery by leveraging technology, process and structure.

  11. HIMSS Venture+ Forum and HX360 Provide Industry View of Health Technology Innovation, Startup and Investment Activity; Advancing the New Model of Care.

    PubMed

    Burde, Howard A; Scarfo, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Presented by HIMSS, the Venture+ Forum program and pitch competition provides a 360-degree view on health technology investing and today's top innovative companies. It features exciting 3-minute pitch presentations from emerging and growth-stage companies, investor panels and a networking reception. Recent Venture+ Forum winners include TowerView Health, Prima-Temp, ActuaiMeds and M3 Clinician. As an industry catalyst for health IT innovation and business-building resource for growing companies and emerging technology solutions, HIMSS has co-developed with A VIA, a new initiative that addresses how emerging technologies, health system business model changes and investment will transform the delivery of care. HX360 engages senior healthcare leaders, innovation teams, investors and entrepreneurs around the vision of transforming healthcare delivery by leveraging technology, process and structure. PMID:26571634

  12. Background Reduction in Cryogenic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.

    2005-09-08

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  13. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  14. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  15. Background Television and Reading Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, G. Blake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Tests G. Armstrong's and B. Greenberg's model of the effect of background television on cognitive performance, applied to reading comprehension and memory. Finds significant deleterious effects of background television, stronger and more consistent effects when testing immediately after reading, and more consistently negative effects resulting…

  16. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  17. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  18. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells.

    PubMed

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells.

  19. Macromolecular prodrug that provides the irinotecan (CPT-11) active-metabolite SN-38 with ultralong half-life, low C(max), and low glucuronide formation.

    PubMed

    Santi, Daniel V; Schneider, Eric L; Ashley, Gary W

    2014-03-27

    We have recently reported a chemical approach for half-life extension that utilizes β-eliminative linkers to attach amine-containing drugs or prodrugs to macromolecules. The linkers release free drug or prodrug over periods ranging from a few hours to over 1 year. We adapted these linkers for use with phenol-containing drugs. Here, we prepared PEG conjugates of the irinotecan (CPT-11) active metabolite SN-38 via a phenyl ether that release the drug with predictable long half-lives. Pharmacokinetic studies in the rat indicate that, in contrast to other SN-38 prodrugs, the slowly released SN-38 shows a very low C(max), is kept above target concentrations for extended periods, and forms very little SN-38 glucuronide (the precursor of enterotoxic SN-38). The low SN-38 glucuronide is attributed to low hepatic uptake of SN-38. These macromolecular prodrugs have unique pharmacokinetic profiles that may translate to less intestinal toxicity and interpatient variability than the SN-38 prodrugs thus far studied.

  20. Co-inoculating ruminal content neither provides active hydrolytic microbes nor improves methanization of ¹³C-cellulose in batch digesters.

    PubMed

    Chapleur, Olivier; Bize, Ariane; Serain, Thibaut; Mazéas, Laurent; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-03-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis often limits the kinetics and efficiency of anaerobic degradation in industrial digesters. In animal digestive systems, specialized microorganisms enable cellulose biodegradation at significantly higher rates. This study aims to assess the potential of ruminal microbial communities to settle and to express their cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters. Cellulose-degrading batch incubations were co-inoculated with municipal solid waste digester sludge and ruminal content. ¹³C-labeled cellulose degradation was described over time with Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry. Results were linked to the identification of the microorganisms assimilating ¹³C and to the monitoring of their relative dynamics. Cellulose degradation in co-inoculated incubations was efficient but not significantly improved. Transient disturbances in degradation pathways occurred, as revealed by propionate accumulation. Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis dynamics and pyrosequencing revealed that expected classes of Bacteria and Archaea were active and degraded cellulose. However, despite the favorable co-inoculation conditions, molecular tools also revealed that no ruminal species settled in the bioreactors. Other specific parameters were probably needed for this to happen. This study shows that exploiting the rumen's cellulolytic properties in anaerobic digesters is not straightforward. Co-inoculation can only be successful if ruminal microorganisms manage to thrive in the anaerobic digester and outcompete native microorganisms, which requires specific nutritional and environmental parameters, and a meticulous reproduction of the selection pressure encountered in the rumen.

  1. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  2. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  3. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    PubMed

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  4. A seismic sequence from Northern Apennines (Italy) provides new insight on the role of fluids in the active tectonics of accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderoni, Giovanna; Di Giovambattista, Rita; Burrato, Pierfrancesco; Ventura, Guido

    2009-04-01

    We analyze a seismic sequence which occurred in 2000 along the Northern Apennines accretionary wedge (Italy). The sequence developed within the Cretaceous-Triassic limestones of the tectonic wedge, where methane-rich and oil reservoirs are stored. Ruptures mainly developed on WNW-ESE striking thrusts. The compressive stress field is consistent with that acting at regional scale in Northern Apennines. Seismic parameters indicate that fluids are involved in the seismogenic process. The amplitudes of the P and S phases and data from some stations evidence a P to S conversion within Vp/ Vs = 2.1 layer. The attenuation properties of crust show a higher attenuation zone located west of the epicentral cloud. Eight hundred aftershocks delineate a sub-vertical cloud of events between 7 and 14 km depth. The space-time evolution of the aftershocks is consistent with a diffusive spreading (diffusivity = 1.9 m 2/s) along vertically superimposed thrusts. Diffusion also controls the time evolution of the sequence. Fluid pressure is estimated to be roughly equal to the vertical, lithostatic stress. The overpressure within reservoirs develops by tectonic compaction processes. The fluids upraise along sub-vertical fractures related to the shortening of the wedge. The 2000 sequence occurred in an area that separates a thermal and deeper petroleum system from a shallower biogenic system. The divider of these systems controls the attenuation properties of the crust. The fluid-rock interaction at seismogenetic depth is related to hydrothermal processes more than to compaction. In accretionary wedges, seismicity activating superimposed thrusts may drive methane and oil upraising from the upper crust.

  5. Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information

    SciTech Connect

    Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

  6. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  7. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  8. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  9. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  10. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  11. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  12. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  13. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  14. 14 CFR 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Background. 1217.102 Section 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES §...

  15. 14 CFR § 1214.302 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... developed to expand the Nation's capabilities to utilize the unique environment of space. It provides... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background. § 1214.302 Section § 1214.302 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Payload Specialists for...

  16. Ultra-Low-Background Copper Production and Clean Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, C.E.; Brodzinski, R.L.; Farmer, O.T.; Hoppe, E.W.; Hossbach, T.W.; Miley, H.S.; Reeves, J.H.

    2005-09-08

    Commercial high-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. When even higher purity is desired, additional electrolytic and chemical purification can be combined with the final fabrication step. This process results in 'electroformed' copper parts of extreme purity. Copper electroforming can be done underground, providing a way to eliminate cosmogenic activation products seen in copper that has had above-ground exposure. A brief summary of the history, cosmogenics, process chemistry, cleaning, and passivation of this material is given. Examples of finished parts illustrate the method. The required infrastructure is summarized.

  17. Ultra-Low-Background Copper Production and Clean Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Farmer, O T.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Miley, Harry S.; Reeves, James H.

    2005-11-01

    Commercial high-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. When even higher purity is desired, additional electrolytic and chemical purification can be combined with the final fabrication step. This process results in ''electroformed'' copper parts of extreme purity. Copper electroforming can be done underground, providing a way to eliminate cosmogenic activation products seen in copper that has had above-ground exposure. A brief summary of the history, cosmogenics, process chemistry, cleaning, and passivation of this material is given. Examples of finished parts illustrate the method. The required infrastructure is summarized.

  18. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    that the highest power fluctuations occur at scales of about one degree. A number of ground-based interferometers provided measurements of the fluctuations with higher accuracy over the next three years, including the Very Small Array [16], Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) [61], and the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) [78]. DASI was the first to detect the polarization of the CMB and the CBI provided the first E-mode polarization spectrum with compelling evidence that it is out of phase with the T-mode spectrum. In June 2001, NASA launched its second CMB mission (after COBE), Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Explorer (WMAP) [44], to make much more precise measurements of the CMB sky. WMAP measured the differences in the CMB temperature across the sky creating a full-sky map of the CMB in five different frequency bands. The mission also measured the CMB's E-mode and the foreground polarization. As of October 2010, the WMAP spacecraft has ended its mission after nine years of operation. Although WMAP provided very accurate measurements of the large angular-scale fluctuations in the CMB, it did not have the angular resolution to cover the smaller-scale fluctuations that had been observed by previous ground-based interferometers. A third space mission, the Planck Surveyor [1], was launched by ESA* in May 2009 to measure the CMB on smaller scales than WMAP, as well as making precise measurements of the polarization of CMB. Planck represents an advance over WMAP in several respects: it observes in higher resolution, hence allowing one to probe the CMB power spectrum to smaller scales; it has a higher sensitivity and observes in nine frequency bands rather than five, hence improving the astrophysical foreground models. The mission has a wide variety of scientific aims, including: (1) detecting the total intensity/polarization of the primordial CMB anisotropies; (2) creating a galaxy-cluster catalogue through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect [93]; (3) observing the

  19. Low background techniques in XMASS

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsushi

    2011-04-27

    The XMASS project aims to detect pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, neutrino-less double beta decay, and dark matter searches using ultra-pure liquid xenon. The first stage of XMASS project is concentrated on dark matter searches using 800 kg liquid xenon detector which requires low background and low threshold. Several techniques applied to XMASS detector for low background will be presented.

  20. The Dortmund Low Background Facility - Low-background gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden.

    PubMed

    Gastrich, Holger; Gößling, Claus; Klingenberg, Reiner; Kröninger, Kevin; Neddermann, Till; Nitsch, Christian; Quante, Thomas; Zuber, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The Dortmund Low Background Facility is an instrument for low-level gamma ray spectrometry with an artificial overburden of ten meters of water equivalent, an inner shielding, featuring a neutron absorber, and an active muon veto. An integral background count rate between 40keV and 2700keV of (2.528±0.004)counts/(kgmin) enables low-background gamma ray spectrometry with sensitivities in the range of some 10mBq/kg within a week of measurement time. PMID:27082973

  1. Background-oriented schlieren (BOS) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffel, Markus

    2015-03-01

    This article gives an overview of the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique, typical applications and literature in the field. BOS is an optical density visualization technique, belonging to the same family as schlieren photography, shadowgraphy or interferometry. In contrast to these older techniques, BOS uses correlation techniques on a background dot pattern to quantitatively characterize compressible and thermal flows with good spatial and temporal resolution. The main advantages of this technique, the experimental simplicity and the robustness of correlation-based digital analysis, mean that it is widely used, and variant versions are reviewed in the article. The advantages of each variant are reviewed, and further literature is provided for the reader.

  2. Toward the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background: Evolution of X-ray luminosity and absorption functions of active galactic nuclei including Compton-thick populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Hasinger, Günther; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Watson, Michael G.

    2014-05-10

    We present the most up to date X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and absorption function of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) over the redshift range from 0 to 5, utilizing the largest, highly complete sample ever available obtained from surveys performed with Swift/BAT, MAXI, ASCA, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT. The combined sample, including that of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey, consists of 4039 detections in the soft (0.5-2 keV) and/or hard (>2 keV) band. We utilize a maximum likelihood method to reproduce the count rate versus redshift distribution for each survey, by taking into account the evolution of the absorbed fraction, the contribution from Compton-thick (CTK) AGNs, and broadband spectra of AGNs, including reflection components from tori based on the luminosity- and redshift-dependent unified scheme. We find that the shape of the XLF at z ∼ 1-3 is significantly different from that in the local universe, for which the luminosity-dependent density evolution model gives much better description than the luminosity and density evolution model. These results establish the standard population synthesis model of the X-ray background (XRB), which well reproduces the source counts, the observed fractions of CTK AGNs, and the spectrum of the hard XRB. The number ratio of CTK AGNs to the absorbed Compton-thin (CTN) AGNs is constrained to be ≈0.5-1.6 to produce the 20-50 keV XRB intensity within present uncertainties, by assuming that they follow the same evolution as CTN AGNs. The growth history of supermassive black holes is discussed based on the new AGN bolometric luminosity function.

  3. Background reduction in the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segui, L.

    2015-08-01

    SNO+ is a large multi-purpose liquid scintillator experiment, which first aim is to detect the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. It is placed at SNOLAB, at 6000 m.w.e. and it is based on the SNO infrastructure. SNO+ will contain approximately 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator, loaded with 130Te inside an acrylic vessel (AV) with an external volume of ultra pure water to reduce the external backgrounds. Light produced in the scintillator by the interaction of particles will be detected with about 9,000 photomultiplier's. For the neutrinoless double beta decay phase, due to its the extremely low rate expected, the control, knowledge and reduction of the background is essential. Moreover, it will also benefit other phases of the experiment focused on the study of solar neutrinos, nucleon decay, geoneutrinos and supernovae. In order to reduce the internal background level, a novel purification technique for tellurium loaded scintillators has been developed by the collaboration that reduces the U/Th concentration and several cosmic-activated isotopes by at least a factor 102 -103 in a single pass. In addition, different rejection techniques have been developed for the remaining internal backgrounds based on Monte-Carlo simulations. In this work, the scintillator purification technique and the levels obtained with it will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview of the different backgrounds for the double-beta phase will be presented, highlighting some of the techniques developed to reject the remained decays based on their expected timing differences.

  4. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  5. A sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, J.D.; Ruck, F.A.; LeGore, T.; Thompson, K.M.

    1993-10-01

    A Sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background has been developed for use in environmental restoration activities on the Hanford Site. Sitewide background more accurately represents the range of background compositions that exist in soil and groundwater at the over 140 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 operable units, and provides a more consistent, credible, integrated, and efficient basis for identifying and evaluating contamination in these media than using unit-specific backgrounds.

  6. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

  7. Geodesic Dome Activity Provides Serious Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard

    2009-01-01

    After the author's class completed last year's 44'-long timber-framed covered bridge project, he was pondering what other learning challenge he could pose to his students. He came across an article on geodesic dome construction in the September 2007 issue of "Tech Directions" and, he had his answer. In this article, the author and his students…

  8. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  9. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.

  10. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries. PMID:20867363

  11. Background sounds contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Moucha, Raluca; Pandya, Pritesh K.; Engineer, Navzer D.; Rathbun, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian auditory system evolved to extract meaningful information from complex acoustic environments. Spectrotemporal selectivity of auditory neurons provides a potential mechanism to represent natural sounds. Experience-dependent plasticity mechanisms can remodel the spectrotemporal selectivity of neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1). Electrical stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis (NB) enables plasticity in A1 that parallels natural learning and is specific to acoustic features associated with NB activity. In this study, we used NB stimulation to explore how cortical networks reorganize after experience with frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps, and how background stimuli contribute to spectrotemporal plasticity in rat auditory cortex. Pairing an 8–4 kHz FM sweep with NB stimulation 300 times per day for 20 days decreased tone thresholds, frequency selectivity, and response latency of A1 neurons in the region of the tonotopic map activated by the sound. In an attempt to modify neuronal response properties across all of A1 the same NB activation was paired in a second group of rats with five downward FM sweeps, each spanning a different octave. No changes in FM selectivity or receptive field (RF) structure were observed when the neural activation was distributed across the cortical surface. However, the addition of unpaired background sweeps of different rates or direction was sufficient to alter RF characteristics across the tonotopic map in a third group of rats. These results extend earlier observations that cortical neurons can develop stimulus specific plasticity and indicate that background conditions can strongly influence cortical plasticity PMID:15616812

  12. Background'' soil concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Burlington, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.L.; Sparks, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) were identified in soils from waterfront industrial land in Burlington prior to conversion to a park. PAH's ranged from 2,457 to 16,005 ppb. As a result, this area was placed on the Vt. DEC list of active'' hazardous sites. The few studies available regarding background concentrations of PAH's (i.e. ATSDR, 1990), suggested that the waterfront PAH values were low for urban soils. To provide a context for evaluating the waterfront PAH concentrations, a background study of soils in the City of Burlington was conducted. Twelve composite soil samples were collected from within a 1-mile radius of the proposed park; an area that encompasses a large portion of the City. To correlate PAH concentrations with land-uses, three samples were collected from each of four zones: industrial, mixed commercial-residential, residential and recreational. Samples (and one field blank) were analyzed via EPA method 8100. Total PAH's from the study ranged from 105.7 to 122,035 ppb. The minimum value was from a baseball field; the maximum value from a residential lawn. The arithmetic mean for the Burlington study was 19,380 ppb (compared to 10,530 ppb for the waterfront). The background'' values indicate that the waterfront park soils are below the study background'' mean. It is difficult to assess the origin of the elevated PAH values because of the numerous contributors of environmental PAH. One common element that appears to characterize soils with the highest background'' PAH values is linkage to recent or historic building fires. In many instances building combustion may be a dominant local source of soil PAH's.

  13. BLAST: RESOLVING THE COSMIC SUBMILLIMETER BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, Gaelen; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Ngo, Henry; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Magnelli, Benjamin; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has made 1 deg{sup 2}, deep, confusion-limited maps at three different bands, centered on the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South Field. By calculating the covariance of these maps with catalogs of 24 mum sources from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we have determined that the total submillimeter intensities are 8.60 +- 0.59, 4.93 +- 0.34, and 2.27 +- 0.20 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. These numbers are more precise than previous estimates of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and are consistent with 24 mum-selected galaxies generating the full intensity of the CIB. We find that the fraction of the CIB that originates from sources at z >= 1.2 increases with wavelength, with 60% from high-redshift sources at 500 mum. At all BLAST wavelengths, the relative intensity of high-z sources is higher for 24 mum-faint sources than that for 24 mum-bright sources. Galaxies identified as active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by their Infrared Array Camera colors are 1.6-2.6 times brighter than the average population at 250-500 mum, consistent with what is found for X-ray-selected AGNs. BzK-selected galaxies are found to be moderately brighter than typical 24 mum-selected galaxies in the BLAST bands. These data provide high-precision constraints for models of the evolution of the number density and intensity of star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

  14. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE): Emergency support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, R.; Mattson, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Mission will measure the diffuse radiation from the universe in the wavelength band 1 micron to 9.6 mm. The band includes the 3 K cosmic background radiation, the known relic of the primeval cosmic explosion. The COBE satellite will be launched from the Western Space and Missile Center (EWSMC) via a Delta launch vehicle into a circular parking orbit of about 300 km. COBE will be placed into a 900-km altitude circular orbit. Coverage will be provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN) for COBE emergencies that would prevent communications via the normal channels of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Emergency support will be provided by the DSN 26-m subnetwork. Information is given in tabular form for DSN network support, frequency assignments, telemetry, and command.

  15. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Iida, T.; Kishimoto, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Fushimi, K.; Hazama, R.; Naktani, N.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-08-01

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using 48Ca in CaF2 crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  16. Educational Choice. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This paper addresses school choice, one proposal to address parental involvement concerns, focusing on historical background, definitions, rationale for advocating choice, implementation strategies, and implications for minorities and low-income families. In the past, transfer payment programs such as tuition tax credits and vouchers were…

  17. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  18. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  19. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  20. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  1. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  2. 14 CFR § 1217.102 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... exploration and use of space, section 116 of Public Law 97-446 provided for the duty-free entry into the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Background. § 1217.102 Section § 1217.102 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION DUTY-FREE ENTRY OF SPACE ARTICLES...

  3. Improved Background Corrections for Uranium Holdup Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R.B.; Gunn, C.A.; Chiang, L.G.

    2004-06-21

    In the original Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) model, all holdup deposits were modeled as points, lines, and areas[1, 5]. Two improvements[4] were recently made to the GGH model and are currently in use at the Y-12 National Security Complex. These two improvements are the finite-source correction CF{sub g} and the self-attenuation correction. The finite-source correction corrects the average detector response for the width of point and line geometries which in effect, converts points and lines into areas. The result of a holdup measurement of an area deposit is a density-thickness which is converted to mass by multiplying it by the area of the deposit. From the measured density-thickness, the true density-thickness can be calculated by correcting for the material self-attenuation. Therefore the self-attenuation correction is applied to finite point and line deposits as well as areas. This report demonstrates that the finite-source and self-attenuation corrections also provide a means to better separate the gamma rays emitted by the material from the gamma rays emitted by background sources for an improved background correction. Currently, the measured background radiation is attenuated for equipment walls in the case of area deposits but not for line and point sources. The measured background radiation is not corrected for attenuation by the uranium material. For all of these cases, the background is overestimated which causes a negative bias in the measurement. The finite-source correction and the self-attenuation correction will allow the correction of the measured background radiation for both the equipment attenuation and material attenuation for area sources as well as point and line sources.

  4. Arizona's Application Service Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Darla

    2002-01-01

    Describes the U.S.'s first statewide K-12 application service provider (ASP). The ASP, implemented by the Arizona School Facilities Board, provides access to productivity, communications, and education software programs from any Internet-enabled device, whether in the classroom or home. (EV)

  5. Elevated Background Noise in Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Is Associated with Inattention

    PubMed Central

    Bubl, Emanuel; Dörr, Michael; Riedel, Andreas; Ebert, Dieter; Philipsen, Alexandra; Bach, Michael; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Background Inattention and distractibility are core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Still the neuronal organization is largely unknown. Previously we studied the electrophysiological activity of a distinct neuronal network—the retina—and found no change in stimulus-driven neural activity in patients with ADHD. However there is growing evidence for an elevated non stimulus-driven neural activity, or neuronal background noise, as underlying pathophysiological correlate. To further examine the biological bases that might underlie ADHD and problems with inattention, we performed a new analysis to test the hypothesis of an elevated background noise as underlying neuronal correlate for ADHD and problems with inattention in humans. A direct measure of background noise in patients with ADHD has not been described yet. Methods The retinal background noise was assessed based on pattern electroretinogram (PERG) data in 20 unmedicated ADHD patients and 20 healthy controls. The PERG is an electrophysiological measure for retinal ganglion cell function. ADHD severity was assessed by interview and questionnaire. Results Noise amplitude was significantly higher (138%) in patients with ADHD compared to the control group (p = 0.0047). Noise amplitude correlated significantly with psychometric measures for ADHD (CAARS) especially inattention (r = 0.44, p = 0.004). Conclusions The data provide evidence that an elevated background noise is associated with symptoms of inattention in ADHD and support the use of therapeutic interventions that reduce noise and distraction in patients with ADHD. PMID:25693192

  6. Teaching Evidence, Proof, and Facts: Providing a Background in Factual Analysis and Case Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter W.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a model for a law school class in factual analysis and case evaluation. The class does not follow the contemporary law school model dealing with the law and rules of evidence, but rather explores the science and philosophy of evidence, thereby exposing students to the mechanics of judicial reasoning about facts. (EV)

  7. Physiologic correlates to background noise acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampas, Joanna; Harkrider, Ashley; Nabelek, Anna

    2001-05-01

    Acceptance of background noise can be evaluated by having listeners indicate the highest background noise level (BNL) they are willing to accept while following the words of a story presented at their most comfortable listening level (MCL). The difference between the selected MCL and BNL is termed the acceptable noise level (ANL). One of the consistent findings in previous studies of ANL is large intersubject variability in acceptance of background noise. This variability is not related to age, gender, hearing sensitivity, personality, type of background noise, or speech perception in noise performance. The purpose of the current experiment was to determine if individual differences in physiological activity measured from the peripheral and central auditory systems of young female adults with normal hearing can account for the variability observed in ANL. Correlations between ANL and various physiological responses, including spontaneous, click-evoked, and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem and middle latency evoked potentials, and electroencephalography will be presented. Results may increase understanding of the regions of the auditory system that contribute to individual noise acceptance.

  8. An Examination of the Differences in Background, Special Needs, Extra-Curricular Activities, and Special Ability Areas of Black and White Freshman Applicants to a Predominantly White University. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichard, Donald J.; And Others

    Differences in selected characteristics of black and white freshman applicants to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, a predominantly white university, were examined using data from the Student Descriptive Questionnaire developed by the College Entrance Examination Board. Background characteristics, special needs, extracurricular…

  9. General Aviation in Nebraska: Nebraska SATS Project Background Paper No. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Russell; Wachal, Jocelyn

    2000-01-01

    The Nebraska SATS project is a state-level component of NASA's Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS). During the next several years the project will examine several different factors affecting SATS implementation in Nebraska. These include economic and taxation issues, public policy issues, airport planning processes, information dissemination strategies, and systemic change factors. This background paper profiles the general aviation system in Nebraska. It is written to provide information about the "context" within which SATS will be pursued. The primary focus is thus on describing and providing background information about the current situation. A secondary focus is on drawing general conclusions about the ability of the current system to incorporate the types of changes implied by SATS. First, some brief information on the U.S. aviation system is provided. The next two sections profile the current general aviation aircraft and pilot base. Nebraska's system of general aviation airports is then described. Within this section of the paper, information is provided on the different types of general aviation airports in Nebraska, airport activity levels and current infrastructure. The fourth major section of the background paper looks at Nebraska's local airport authorities. These special purpose local governments oversee the majority of the general aviation airports in the state. Among the items examined are total expenditures, capital expenditures and planning activities. Next, the paper provides background information on the Nebraska Department of Aeronautics (NDA) and recent Federal funding for general aviation in Nebraska. The final section presents summary conclusions.

  10. Background stratospheric aerosol reference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, P.

    1989-01-01

    In this analysis, a reference background stratospheric aerosol optical model is developed based on the nearly global SAGE 1 satellite observations in the non-volcanic period from March 1979 to February 1980. Zonally averaged profiles of the 1.0 micron aerosol extinction for the tropics and the mid- and high-altitudes for both hemispheres are obtained and presented in graphical and tabulated form for the different seasons. In addition, analytic expressions for these seasonal global zonal means, as well as the yearly global mean, are determined according to a third order polynomial fit to the vertical profile data set. This proposed background stratospheric aerosol model can be useful in modeling studies of stratospheric aerosols and for simulations of atmospheric radiative transfer and radiance calculations in atmospheric remote sensing.

  11. Polarimetric Imaging of the Cosmic Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsieck, K. H.; Bershady, M. A.; Harris, W.

    1999-05-01

    The nature of (and even the existence of) the ultraviolet cosmic background is controversial, because of the uncertain contribution of light from bright UV stars scattered by dust within our Galaxy (the UV Diffuse Galactic Light, or "DGL"). Because the DGL consists of light scattered at large angles from a small number of stars, it should be highly polarized, while most proposed sources of extragalactic UV background would be unpolarized, providing a potential way of disentangling the two components. We will discuss such an experiment: an existing sounding rocket payload, the Wide-Field Imaging Survey Polarimeter ("WISP"), and a proposed payload, the Cosmic Ultraviolet Polarimetric Imaging Device ("CUPID"), which would have 20 times the sensitivity of WISP. WISP, a 20 cm off-axis Schmidt telescope with a stressed CaF2 waveplate and a Brewster-angle polarizer, has a 2x4 degree field of view with 1 arcmin resolution at 1700 Ang. The first DGL target for WISP is the "Sandage Region" near M81/M82, an area observed (with different results) by both the UC Berkeley and the JHU UVX UV background experiments. It has known visible-wavelength and IRAS-wavelength "cirrus" which has been identified with DGL. WISP should be able to measure the polarization of any UV cirrus and establish the presence of an unpolarized background. Preliminary data from this target may be available, depending on the actual launch time. CUPID, a 50 cm Paul Baker telescope using reflective filter coatings, should have adequate precision to perform a pixel-by-pixel separation of polarized UV cirrus from any unpolarized background, and its very much improved stray light rejection should allow an accurate zero-point for this putative extragalactic background. Thus the detailed structure of the cosmic background from 15 arcsec to degrees will be determined. We will discuss how such a measurement may be used to confirm or eliminate several possible sources of UV cosmic background. WISP is supported by

  12. Quantum chromodynamics in background fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Zheng

    1989-02-01

    We try to build a framework for quantum chromodynamics in background fields. The nonvanishing vacuum condensates are described by the classical fields, while the corresponding quantum fields are quantized in the Furry representation and the physical states are defined in the physical QCD vacuum. The complete quark and gluon propagators are discussed in this framework and running condensate parameters are introduced by the renormalization requirement. A modified Callan-Symanzik equation is derived by taking account of the nonperturbative corrections.

  13. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  14. Background reduction in the SNO+ experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Segui, L.

    2015-08-17

    SNO+ is a large multi-purpose liquid scintillator experiment, which first aim is to detect the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 130}Te. It is placed at SNOLAB, at 6000 m.w.e. and it is based on the SNO infrastructure. SNO+ will contain approximately 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator, loaded with {sup 130}Te inside an acrylic vessel (AV) with an external volume of ultra pure water to reduce the external backgrounds. Light produced in the scintillator by the interaction of particles will be detected with about 9,000 photomultiplier’s. For the neutrinoless double beta decay phase, due to its the extremely low rate expected, the control, knowledge and reduction of the background is essential. Moreover, it will also benefit other phases of the experiment focused on the study of solar neutrinos, nucleon decay, geoneutrinos and supernovae. In order to reduce the internal background level, a novel purification technique for tellurium loaded scintillators has been developed by the collaboration that reduces the U/Th concentration and several cosmic-activated isotopes by at least a factor 10{sup 2} -10{sup 3} in a single pass. In addition, different rejection techniques have been developed for the remaining internal backgrounds based on Monte-Carlo simulations. In this work, the scintillator purification technique and the levels obtained with it will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview of the different backgrounds for the double-beta phase will be presented, highlighting some of the techniques developed to reject the remained decays based on their expected timing differences.

  15. Using a web-based patient-provider messaging system to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty sailors and Marines seen in the psychiatric outpatient clinic: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Abanes, Jane J; Adams, Susie

    2014-03-01

    Patient satisfaction is imperative in providing safe, effective, and quality patient care. Several articles have examined the effect of a secure on-line communication system in the primary care setting to improve the delivery of patient care. This article describes the use of an asynchronous Web-based messaging system in the psychiatric outpatient setting to enhance patient satisfaction among active duty military service members.

  16. Trial SNAPSHOT: measurements for terrain background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Marilyn A.; Mitchell, Alistair A.; Bell, Christopher R.; Thomas, David J.; Evans, Roger

    2000-07-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of targets and backgrounds must be known and understood for a wide variety of reasons such as: synthetic scene simulation and validation; target description for modelling; in- service target material characterisation and background variability assessment. Without this information it will be impossible to design effective camouflage systems and to maximise the capabilities of new sensors. Laboratory measurements of background materials are insufficient to provide the data required. A series of trials are being undertaken in the UK to quantify both diurnal and seasonal changes of a terrain background, as well as the statistical variability within a scene. These trials are part of a collaborative effort between the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (UK), Defence Clothing and Textile Agency (UK) and the T.A.C.O.M., USA). Data are being gathered at a single site consisting primarily of south facing mixed coniferous and deciduous woodland, but also containing uncultivated grassland and tracks. Ideally each point in the scene needs to be characterized at all relevant wavelengths but his is unrealistic. In addition there are a number of important environmental variables that are required. The goal of the measurement programme is to acquire data across the spectrum from 0.4 - 14 microns. Sensors used to include visible band imaging spectroradiometers, telespectroradiometers (visual, NIR, SWIR and LWIR), calibrate colour cameras, broad band SWIR and LWIR imagers and contact reflectance measurement equipment. Targets consist of painted panels with known material properties and a wheeled vehicle, which is in some cases covered with camouflage netting. Measurements have bene made of the background with and without the man- made objects present. This paper will review the results to date and present an analysis of the spectral characteristics fo different surfaces. In addition some consideration will be given to the implications of

  17. Anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical predictions of the angular anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation on both small and large angular scales are presented, and the effect of massive neutrinos on both the background radiation anisotropy and on the galaxy correlation function over very large scales is reviewed. Current observations show that the quadrupole anisotropy provides the greatest constraint on theory, and the values for the gravitational potential fluctuations indicate that small amplitude but sufficiently large-scale density fluctuations, both at the present epoch and on the surface of last scattering, can produce significant large angular scale variations in the radiation temperature. Most importantly, it is proposed that the quadrupole moment is most simply and elegantly interpreted in terms of the density fluctuations on very large scales whose presence is inferred from the requirement that an initial fluctuation spectrum is required in order for structure to develop.

  18. The Provident Principal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, John R.

    This monograph offers leadership approaches for school principals. Discussion applies the business leadership theory of Warren Bennis and Burt Nanus to the role of the principal. Each of the booklet's three parts concludes with discussion questions. Part 1, "Visions and Values for the Provident Principal," demonstrates the importance of…

  19. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  20. [Toothache with a neuropathic background].

    PubMed

    Khatchaturian, V; de Wijer, A; Kalaykova, S I; Steenks, M H

    2015-03-01

    A 48-year old woman in good general health was referred to the orofacial pain clinic in a centre for special dentistry with a toothache in the premolar region of the left maxillary quadrant. The complaints had existed for 15 years and various dental treatments, including endodontic treatments, apical surgery, extraction and splint therapy, had not helped to alleviate the complaints. As a result of the fact that anti-epileptic drugs were able to reduce the pain it was concluded that this 'toothache' satisfied the criteria of an atypical odontalgia: 'toothache' with a neuropathic background. PMID:26181392

  1. Computerized background-oriented schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, G. E. A.

    2002-06-01

    A schlieren measurement technique based on computer evaluation of image variations due to refractive index variations in the propagation medium is presented; in what follows, this concept is referred to as the "background-oriented schlieren" (BOS) method. The differences between BOS and other optical techniques for refractive index measurement are the governing role of numerical methods, the extremely small amount of optical equipment, the high accuracy, the bidirectional sensitivity, the fast evaluation, and the missing field limitations. The principle of the method is the numerical comparison of a schlieren distorted and an undistorted image of a deliberate background. The method has become usable in practice owing to the immense progress in computing power and to newly developed fast-correlation algorithms. The extension of this method to space resolving techniques is possible. Some experimental studies show the applicability. Examples are a mixing turbulent jet, a supersonic jet, a shed vortex, and the sound wave of a gun shot. These few results underline the encouraging prospect for the future applicability of this technique. The BOS method offers not only the possibility of qualitative and quantitative schlieren investigations but also has the potential to determine density fields by integration of the measured gradient fields.

  2. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  3. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  4. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  5. Achieving Provider Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  6. Provider panel presentations.

    PubMed

    Buckelew, Larry C; Harvey, Deborah; Mello, Joe

    2003-08-01

    To wrap up the three big items--attracting talent, the professional nurse role, and our structural disadvantages--I would offer the following take-away thoughts: We ought to do what we can to get our disproportionate share of RNs out of the health care system to work in dialysis. If we work together, we have a shot at making that happen. As an industry, we must exploit our strengths. We have to exploit the pride that comes in the services and the care that we provide. We need to create in a very visual way that difference for nurses who are considering which area of specialty to go into and where to create their careers. We, as providers, have a huge opportunity to create the right environment for our nurses. That's something we own. We have to fix it. We have to create a better place to work for nurses than any place else. We must create a more enriching place for nurses than anywhere else. That's up to us. I know a lot of us on the provider side are doing tons of things to make that happen and we need to keep driving that. We need a level playing field. We've proven the fact that we can deliver clinical outcomes with the best. Now we need help from our biggest customer to make sure we can compete for the resources that are necessary to sustain and improve those clinical outcomes on an ongoing basis. PMID:14533522

  7. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  8. Neutron background in underground particle astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2007-03-28

    Neutron background for the high-sensitivity underground particle astrophysics experiments, such as dark matter searches, double-beta decay detectors, low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics, is discussed. Neutron production via spontaneous fission and ({alpha},n) reactions from U and Th, and by cosmic-ray muons is considered. We describe the method of calculating neutron spectra from radioactivity and effects produced in the detectors. The requirements for passive neutron shielding are given and the efficiency of an active veto system is discussed. It is shown that muon-induced neutrons require complex and accurate simulations where any simplification may lead to a significant error in the result.

  9. Empirical Confirmation of the Critical Level for Zero and Near Zero Background Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Simpson, T

    2001-06-01

    The alpha spectroscopy system of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Hazards Control Department evaluates electroplated samples, typically urine and feces, for alpha emitting radionuclides. Most of the samples processed by the alpha spectroscopy system are evaluated for Plutonium-239 (Pu-239), an important radionuclide used in research. This paper evaluates the Pu-239 background response of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hazards Control Department's alpha spectroscopy system. Background measurements of the alpha spectroscopy system have been studied to determine an appropriate method for establishing the a postori critical level for detection of plutonium alpha activity. Several methods of establishing the 95% confidence interval for over 4,900 background measurements were evaluated. Two methods appear to provide reasonable results so as to assure an appropriate 95% confidence interval. This report provides the results of this evaluation and the comparison of the various methods tested to establish an empirical evaluation of the critical level using a commercially available analysis program.

  10. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  11. Cosmic gamma-ray background from structure formation in the intergalactic medium

    PubMed

    Loeb; Waxman

    2000-05-11

    The Universe is filled with a diffuse background of gamma-ray radiation, the origin of which remains one of the unsolved puzzles of cosmology. Less than one-quarter of the gamma-ray flux can be attributed to unresolved discrete sources, such as active galactic nuclei; the remainder appears to constitute a truly diffuse background. Here we show that the shock waves induced by gravity in the gas of the intergalactic medium, during the formation of large-scale structures like filaments and sheets of galaxies, produce a population of highly relativistic electrons. These electrons scatter a small fraction of the cosmic microwave background photons in the local Universe up to gamma-ray energies, thereby providing the gamma-ray background. The predicted diffuse flux agrees with the observed background across more than four orders of magnitude in photon energy, and the model predicts that the gamma-ray background, though generated locally, is isotropic to better than five per cent on angular scales larger than a degree. Moreover, the agreement between the predicted and observed background fluxes implies a mean cosmological density of baryons that is consistent with Big Bang nucleosynthesis.

  12. Providing Contraception to Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Raidoo, Shandhini; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2015-12-01

    Adolescents have high rates of unintended pregnancy and face unique reproductive health challenges. Providing confidential contraceptive services to adolescents is important in reducing the rate of unintended pregnancy. Long-acting contraception such as the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant are recommended as first-line contraceptives for adolescents because they are highly effective with few side effects. The use of barrier methods to prevent sexually transmitted infections should be encouraged. Adolescents have limited knowledge of reproductive health and contraceptive options, and their sources of information are often unreliable. Access to contraception is available through a variety of resources that continue to expand.

  13. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1981-01-01

    Because angular anisotropies and spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background radiation are judged to be inevitable at some level, in a realistic cosmological model, the evidence for spectral distortions and its theoretical implications are described. The evidence for anisotropy is then discussed, and theoretical predictions of radiation anisotropy are summarized and compared with the data available. It is found that spectral distortions at the 3-sigma level near the peak of the blackbody spectrum, although inconsistent with the predicted distortions due to Compton scattering in the early universe, are elegantly interpreted in terms of radiation from an early, pregalactic generation of massive stars which had been thermalized by a modest amount of dust at high redshift. The quadrupole anisotropy at the 4-sigma level is most simply interpreted in terms of the large-scale structure of the universe.

  14. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Low Background Counting At SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Ian; Cleveland, Bruce

    2011-04-27

    It is a continuous and ongoing effort to maintain radioactivity in materials and in the environment surrounding most underground experiments at very low levels. These low levels are required so that experiments can achieve the required detection sensitivities for the detection of low-energy neutrinos, searches for dark matter and neutrinoless double-beta decay. SNOLAB has several facilities which are used to determine these low background levels in the materials and the underground environment. This proceedings will describe the SNOLAB High Purity Germanium Detector which has been in continuous use for the past five years and give results of many of the items that have been counted over that period. Brief descriptions of SNOLAB's alpha-beta and electrostatic counters will be given, and the radon levels at SNOLAB will be discussed.

  16. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  17. A method for the background reduction of solid state detectors during low-flux periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtonen, E.

    The pulse height analysis of the signals in traditional energetic particle telescopes provides a tool to separate a background arising from various factors from "genuine" particles. Commonly used methods, however, prove unsatisfactory at low intensity levels. A method based on the distribution of pulse heights of coincident signals in two detectors, approximating them by a 5-parameter function, is suggested. The method can effectively reduce the background at low-flux times as demonstrated for energetic particle intensity measurements by ERNE and EPHIN aboard SOHO during the recent solar activity minimum.

  18. The microwave background anisotropies: observations.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, D

    1998-01-01

    Most cosmologists now believe that we live in an evolving universe that has been expanding and cooling since its origin about 15 billion years ago. Strong evidence for this standard cosmological model comes from studies of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), the remnant heat from the initial fireball. The CMBR spectrum is blackbody, as predicted from the hot Big Bang model before the discovery of the remnant radiation in 1964. In 1992 the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite finally detected the anisotropy of the radiation-fingerprints left by tiny temperature fluctuations in the initial bang. Careful design of the COBE satellite, and a bit of luck, allowed the 30 microK fluctuations in the CMBR temperature (2.73 K) to be pulled out of instrument noise and spurious foreground emissions. Further advances in detector technology and experiment design are allowing current CMBR experiments to search for predicted features in the anisotropy power spectrum at angular scales of 1 degrees and smaller. If they exist, these features were formed at an important epoch in the evolution of the universe--the decoupling of matter and radiation at a temperature of about 4,000 K and a time about 300,000 years after the bang. CMBR anisotropy measurements probe directly some detailed physics of the early universe. Also, parameters of the cosmological model can be measured because the anisotropy power spectrum depends on constituent densities and the horizon scale at a known cosmological epoch. As sophisticated experiments on the ground and on balloons pursue these measurements, two CMBR anisotropy satellite missions are being prepared for launch early in the next century.

  19. Signatures of a hidden cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2008-09-26

    If there is a light Abelian gauge boson gamma' in the hidden sector its kinetic mixing with the photon can produce a hidden cosmic microwave background (HCMB). For meV masses, resonant oscillations gamma<-->gamma' happen after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) but before CMB decoupling, increasing the effective number of neutrinos Nnu(eff) and the baryon to photon ratio, and distorting the CMB blackbody spectrum. The agreement between BBN and CMB data provides new constraints. However, including Lyman-alpha data, Nnu(eff) > 3 is preferred. It is tempting to attribute this effect to the HCMB. The interesting parameter range will be tested in upcoming laboratory experiments. PMID:18851438

  20. University Student Access and Success. Go8 Backgrounder 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Group of Eight (Go8) universities currently provide a wide range of services and programs to facilitate access and support for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. However, Go8 Vice-Chancellors have also agreed to develop jointly a coordinated equity strategy to increase the participation and success of students from disadvantaged backgrounds.…

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  2. Evaluation of Background Mercury Concentrations in the SRS Groundwater System

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.

    1999-03-03

    Mercury analyses associated with the A-01 Outfall have highlighted the importance of developing an understanding of mercury in the Savannah River Site groundwater system and associated surface water streams. This activity is critical based upon the fact that the EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for this constituent is 0.012mg/L, a level that is well below conventional detection limits of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/L. A first step in this process is obtained by utilizing the existing investment in groundwater mercury concentrations (20,242 records) maintained in the SRS geographical information management system (GIMS) database. Careful use of these data provides a technically defensible initial estimate for total recoverable mercury in background and contaminated SRS wells.

  3. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffroni, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including -ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  4. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  5. What HERA May Provide?

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hannes; De Roeck, Albert; Bartels, Jochen; Behnke, Olaf; Blumlein, Johannes; Brodsky, Stanley; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Deak, Michal; Devenish, Robin; Diehl, Markus; Gehrmann, Thomas; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gustafson, Gosta; Khoze, Valery; Knutsson, Albert; Klein, Max; Krauss, Frank; Kutak, Krzysztof; Laenen, Eric; Lonnblad, Leif; Motyka, Leszek; /Hamburg U., Inst. Theor. Phys. II /Birmingham U. /Southern Methodist U. /DESY /Piemonte Orientale U., Novara /CERN /Paris, LPTHE /Hamburg U. /Penn State U.

    2011-11-10

    More than 100 people participated in a discussion session at the DIS08 workshop on the topic What HERA may provide. A summary of the discussion with a structured outlook and list of desirable measurements and theory calculations is given. The HERA accelerator and the HERA experiments H1, HERMES and ZEUS stopped running in the end of June 2007. This was after 15 years of very successful operation since the first collisions in 1992. A total luminosity of {approx} 500 pb{sup -1} has been accumulated by each of the collider experiments H1 and ZEUS. During the years the increasingly better understood and upgraded detectors and HERA accelerator have contributed significantly to this success. The physics program remains in full swing and plenty of new results were presented at DIS08 which are approaching the anticipated final precision, fulfilling and exceeding the physics plans and the previsions of the upgrade program. Most of the analyses presented at DIS08 were still based on the so called HERA I data sample, i.e. data taken until 2000, before the shutdown for the luminosity upgrade. This sample has an integrated luminosity of {approx} 100 pb{sup -1}, and the four times larger statistics sample from HERA II is still in the process of being analyzed.

  6. The Diffuse Extreme Ultraviolet Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, John; Slavin, Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the diffuse EUV background towards 138 different directions using the spectrometers aboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite (EUVE) have been combined into a spectrum from 150A to 730A and represent an effective exposure of 18 million seconds. There is no significant evidence of any non-local line flux in the resultant spectrum such as that from a hot coronal plasma. These results are inconsistent with the Wisconsin C and B broad-band surveys assuming the source is a logT = 5.8 - 6.1 hot plasma in ionization equilibrium with solar abundances, confirming the previous result of Jelinksy, Vallerga and Edelstein) (hereafter Paper 1) using an observation along the ecliptic with the same instrument. To make these results consistent with the previous broad-band surveys, the plasma responsible for the emission must either be depleted in Fe by a factor of approximately 6, be behind an absorbing slab of neutral H with a column of 2 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm, or not be in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE). One such non-CIE model (Breitswerdt and Schmutzier) that explains the soft x-ray results is also inconsistent with this EUV data.

  7. DarkLight radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantarians, Narbe

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-on, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW CW beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, field emission inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation.

  8. International. Go8 Backgrounder 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    International education, particularly study in Australia, provides significant economic benefits for Australia. It is both a major export industry and a source of domestic economic growth. If Australia can attract talented international students through scholarships and a reputation for quality, they will return to their home countries to become…

  9. Solar Concepts: A Background Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Jonathan W.

    This text is designed to provide teachers, students, and the general public with an overview of key solar energy concepts. Various energy terms are defined and explained. Basic thermodynamic laws are discussed. Alternative energy production is described in the context of the present energy situation. Described are the principal contemporary solar…

  10. Contract Education: A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Academic Senate.

    Today contract education is generally thought of as a program or course for which an employer is paying the full cost of instruction for customized training. Contract education can help faculty remain current, encourage industry to make equipment available to the college that might otherwise be too expensive, and provide employment opportunities…

  11. Cuba: Background to a Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Fuente, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    Provides historical information on Cuba. Addresses early colonization, the advent of plantation agriculture, the role and presence of the United States in the Caribbean and Cuba, and the social and economic developments in Cuba after the revolution in 1959 led by Fidel Castro. (CMK)

  12. Toward an automated background oriented schlieren (BOS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

    2011-11-01

    The background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique is a useful method for visualizing refractive disturbances in a wide range of experimental settings. The technique visualizes refractive disturbances via their distortion of a distant background pattern (typically a speckle pattern). A cross-correlation computer algorithm is typically used to identify and measure distortions of the background pattern, thus revealing the refractive disturbance changes between images and producing a schlieren image. The cross-correlation algorithm, however, can be time-consuming and prevents an instantaneous schlieren image from being observed, thus hampering some potential BOS applications. Here a novel background patterning approach is presented which eliminates the need for the cross-correlation algorithm. Results are presented showing the sensitivity of the new background pattern and its potential application for providing instantaneous BOS images. Background pattern characteristics are explored for high- and low-speed fluid-dynamic applications. Gas Dynamics Laboratory, Penn State University.

  13. Optical design of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. S.; Evans, D. C.; Moseley, H.; Ludwig, U. W.

    1982-01-01

    The conceptual design for a ten-band absolute filter photometer (the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment) to operate at 2 K and measure galactic and extragalactic infrared radiation in the 1 to 300-micron range and polarization in the 1 to 3.5-micron range is presented, as part of the NASA Cosmic Background Explorer. The telescope optical design, a Gregorian design incorporating bafffles and shades to provide high stray-light rejection, is described. Pupil nonuniformity in the detector-assembly optical design has been limited. It is determined that detector sensitiity requirements can be met, and that the problem of radiation-induced responsivity variations can be solved by minimizing detector-assembly size, providing for in situ thermal annealing, and allowing for frequent detector calibration. Limitations on mirror performance are to be met by fabricating mirrors and structure from the same aluminum 6061 ingot.

  14. A Novel Class of Succinimide-Derived Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 1 Provides Insight into a Disconnect in Activity between the Rat and Human Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in the discovery of mGlu1 allosteric modulators has suggested the modulation of mGlu1 could offer possible treatment for a number of central nervous system disorders; however, the available chemotypes are inadequate to fully investigate the therapeutic potential of mGlu1 modulation. To address this issue, we used a fluorescence-based high-throughput screening assay to screen an allosteric modulator-biased library of compounds to generate structurally diverse mGlu1 negative allosteric modulator hits for chemical optimization. Herein, we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel mGlu1 chemotype. This series of succinimide negative allosteric modulators, exemplified by VU0410425, exhibited potent inhibitory activity at rat mGlu1 but was, surprisingly, inactive at human mGlu1. VU0410425 and a set of chemically diverse mGlu1 negative allosteric modulators previously reported in the literature were utilized to examine this species disconnect between rat and human mGlu1 activity. Mutation of the key transmembrane domain residue 757 and functional screening of VU0410425 and the literature compounds suggests that amino acid 757 plays a role in the activity of these compounds, but the contribution of the residue is scaffold specific, ranging from critical to minor. The operational model of allosterism was used to estimate the binding affinities of each compound to compare to functional data. This novel series of mGlu1 negative allosteric modulators provides valuable insight into the pharmacology underlying the disconnect between rat and human mGlu1 activity, an issue that must be understood to progress the therapeutic potential of allosteric modulators of mGlu1. PMID:24798819

  15. CALDER: Cryogenic light detectors for background-free searches

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Di Domizio, S.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-17

    The development of background-free detectors is essential for experiments searching for rare events. Bolometers, that are among the most competitive devices for the study of neutrino-less double beta decay (0νDBD) and Dark Matter interactions, suffer from the absence of techniques that allow to identify the nature of the interacting particles. This limit can be overcome by coupling the bolometer to an independent device for the measurement of the light emitted by interactions, as the combined read-out of the bolometric and light signals allows to identify and reject particles different from those of interest. CUORE, the most advanced bolometric experiment for 0νDBD searches, could disentangle the electrons produced by 0νDBD from the dangerous background due to α particles, by measuring the (tiny) Cherenkov light emitted by electrons and not by α’s. LUCIFER, a project based on ZnSe scintillating bolometers for the study of {sup 82}Se 0νDBD, would be competitive also in the search of Dark Matter interactions if equipped with light detectors that allow to distinguish and reject the background due to electrons and γ’s. These advances require cryogenic detectors characterized by noise lower than 20 eV, large active area, wide temperature range of operation, high radio-purity and ease in fabricating hundreds of channels. The CALDER collaboration aims to develop such detectors by exploiting the superb energy resolution and natural multiplexed read-out provided by Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  16. CdZnTe Background Measurements at Balloon Altitudes with PoRTIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Gehrels, N.; Naya, J.; Stahle, C. M.; Tueller, J.; Teegarden, B.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the CdZnTe internal background at balloon altitudes are essential to determine which physical processes make the most important background contributions. We present results from CdZnTe background measurements made by PoRTIA, a small CdZnTe balloon instrument that was flown three times in three different shielding configurations. PoRTIA was passively shielded during its first flight from Palestine, Texas and actively shielded as a piggyback instrument on the GRIS balloon experiment during its second and third flights from Alice Springs, Australia, using the thick GRIS Nal anticoincidence shield. A significant CdZnTe background reduction was achieved during the third flight with PoRTIA placed completely inside the GRIS shield and blocking crystal, and thus completely surrounded by 15 cm of Nal. A unique balloon altitude background data set is provided by CdZnTe and Ge detectors simultaneously surrounded by the same thick anticoincidence shield; the presence of a single coxial Ge detector inside the shield next to PoRTIA allowed a measurement of the ambient neutron flux inside the shield throughout the flight. These neutrons interact with the detector material to produce isomeric states of the Cd, Zn and Te nuclei that radiatively decay; calculations are presented that indicate that these decays may explain most of the fully shielded CdZnTe background.

  17. Geology of magma systems: background and review

    SciTech Connect

    Peterfreund, A.R.

    1981-03-01

    A review of basic concepts and current models of igneous geology is presented. Emphasis is centered on studies of magma generation, ascent, emplacement, evolution, and surface or near-surface activity. An indexed reference list is also provided to facilitate future investigations.

  18. Activities Handbook for Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Alfred; Krockover, Gerald H.

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information about energy and to translate this information into learning activities for children. Chapter 1, "Energy: A Delicate Dilemma," presents activities intended to provide an introduction to energy and energy usage. Chapter 2, "What are the Sources of Energy?" provides background information and…

  19. Background Characterization Techniques For Pattern Recognition Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Meg A.; Noah, Paul V.; Schroeder, John W.; Kessler, Bernard V.; Chernick, Julian A.

    1989-08-01

    The Department of Defense has a requirement to investigate technologies for the detection of air and ground vehicles in a clutter environment. The use of autonomous systems using infrared, visible, and millimeter wave detectors has the potential to meet DOD's needs. In general, however, the hard-ware technology (large detector arrays with high sensitivity) has outpaced the development of processing techniques and software. In a complex background scene the "problem" is as much one of clutter rejection as it is target detection. The work described in this paper has investigated a new, and innovative, methodology for background clutter characterization, target detection and target identification. The approach uses multivariate statistical analysis to evaluate a set of image metrics applied to infrared cloud imagery and terrain clutter scenes. The techniques are applied to two distinct problems: the characterization of atmospheric water vapor cloud scenes for the Navy's Infrared Search and Track (IRST) applications to support the Infrared Modeling Measurement and Analysis Program (IRAMMP); and the detection of ground vehicles for the Army's Autonomous Homing Munitions (AHM) problems. This work was sponsored under two separate Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), White Oak MD, and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity at Aberdeen Proving Ground MD. The software described in this paper will be available from the respective contract technical representatives.

  20. Background to plastic media blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry

    1995-04-01

    Chemical strippers based on active phenolic components in a chlorinated solvent have been the traditional method for removing of paints and coatings from aircraft. With the recent recognition of the environmental and health concerns of chlorinated solvents and the problem disposing of phenols there have been some major developments in paint removal technology. One of the first techniques developed to replace chemical strippers and now one of the most widely used techniques for paint removal from aircraft was plastic media blasting (PMB). The PMB technique is similar to traditional grit blasting (slag, sand alumina or carborundum) techniques used on steel and other metals (based on grits) but using polymer based media that are softer and less aggressive. Plastic media are ranked by hardness and density as well as chemical composition.