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Sample records for activities recombinant dna

  1. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines...: The NIH Guidelines currently require that recombinant DNA experiments designed to create...

  2. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... transgenic rodents by recombinant DNA technology must be registered with the Institutional...

  3. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... recombinant DNA research. OBA is also specifying the risk group for several viruses not previously listed...

  4. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... ] under Section III-A-1 of the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH... the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee has been deferred at the request of the...

  5. 76 FR 44339 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... attenuated strains of bacteria and viruses that are frequently used in recombinant DNA research. OBA is...

  6. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) ACTION: Notice of consideration of proposed...- vector system may be certified only after review by the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)...

  7. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines... Kluyveromyces lactis as a host-vector 1 system has been reviewed by the NIH ] Recombinant DNA Advisory...

  8. Structural snapshots of Xer recombination reveal activation by synaptic complex remodeling and DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Bebel, Aleksandra; Karaca, Ezgi; Kumar, Banushree; Stark, W Marshall; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Xer site-specific recombinases play an essential genome maintenance role by unlinking chromosome multimers, but their mechanism of action has remained structurally uncharacterized. Here, we present two high-resolution structures of Helicobacter pylori XerH with its recombination site DNA difH, representing pre-cleavage and post-cleavage synaptic intermediates in the recombination pathway. The structures reveal that activation of DNA strand cleavage and rejoining involves large conformational changes and DNA bending, suggesting how interaction with the cell division protein FtsK may license recombination at the septum. Together with biochemical and in vivo analysis, our structures also reveal how a small sequence asymmetry in difH defines protein conformation in the synaptic complex and orchestrates the order of DNA strand exchanges. Our results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of Xer recombination and a model for regulation of recombination activity during cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19706.001 PMID:28009253

  9. Cre-dependent DNA recombination activates a STING-dependent innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Pépin, Geneviève; Ferrand, Jonathan; Höning, Klara; Jayasekara, W. Samantha N.; Cain, Jason E.; Behlke, Mark A.; Gough, Daniel J.; G. Williams, Bryan R.; Hornung, Veit; Gantier, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-recombinase technologies, such as Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination, are important tools in the study of gene function, but have potential side effects due to damaging activity on DNA. Here we show that DNA recombination by Cre instigates a robust antiviral response in mammalian cells, independent of legitimate loxP recombination. This is due to the recruitment of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, concurrent with Cre-dependent DNA damage and the accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA. Importantly, we establish a direct interplay between this antiviral response and cell–cell interactions, indicating that low cell densities in vitro could be useful to help mitigate these effects of Cre. Taking into account the wide range of interferon stimulated genes that may be induced by the STING pathway, these results have broad implications in fields such as immunology, cancer biology, metabolism and stem cell research. Further, this study sets a precedent in the field of gene-engineering, possibly applicable to other enzymatic-based genome editing technologies. PMID:27166376

  10. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  11. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  12. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  13. The OECD Blue Book on Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations: it's influence on ISBR and EFSA activities.

    PubMed

    Schiemann, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Biosafety regulatory frameworks are intended to serve as mechanisms for ensuring the safe use of biotechnology products without imposing unacceptable risk to human health or the environment, or unintended constraints to technology transfer. The OECD Blue Book on "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations", setting out principles and concepts for handling genetically modified organisms safely outside of contained laboratory conditions, was a milestone in the history of biotechnology. The "Recombinant DNA Safety Considerations" definitively became the major resource for the formulation of national regulatory frameworks and international regulations, including the Cartagena Protocol.

  14. Cloning of habutobin cDNA and antithrombotic activity of recombinant protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sunagawa, Masanori Nakamura, Mariko; Kosugi, Tadayoshi

    2007-11-03

    The habutobin cDNA was cloned from total RNA extracted from venom glands of Trimeresurus flavoviridis (the habu snake). The conceptual translation of 1539 bp of habutobin cDNA consists of 236 amino acids and its molecular weight is 25.7 kDa. Histidine (His)-tagged recombinant habutobin fusion protein, pET-r-habutobin and AcNPV-r-habutobin, was purified by bacterial system and baculoviral system, respectively. After refolding pET-r-habutobin, there were two protein bands at about 32 kDa and 65 kDa, indicating that habutobin might be produced as a monomer protein and processed to form two concatenated protein. Purified AcNPV-r-habutobin dose-dependently increased fibrin forming activity and inhibited collagen-induced aggregation of rabbit washed platelets. Thus, AcNPV-r-habutobin produced by baculoviral system is very useful for study on structure-function relationship, which is necessary for developing an antithrombotic drug from habutobin.

  15. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  16. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  17. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Klesius, Phillip H; Dominowski, Paul J; Yancey, Robert J; Kievit, Michele S

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (CC-Lys-g) produced in Escherichia coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme-g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect channel catfish against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Recombinant CC-Lys-g produced in E. coli expression system exhibited significant (P < 0.05) lytic activity against Gram-positive Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Gram-negative A. hydrophila. When pcDNA3.2-vectored recombinant channel catfish lysozyme-g (pcDNA-Lys-g) was transfected in channel catfish gill cells G1B, the over-expression of pcDNA-Lys-g offered significant (P < 0.05) protection to G1B cells against A. hydrophila infection. When channel catfish were intraperitoneally injected with pcDNA-Lys-g along with an adjuvant QCDCR, the transcriptional level of Lys-g was significantly (P < 0.05) increased. When pcDNA-Lys-g injected fish was challenged with a highly virulent A. hydrophila strain AL-09-71, pcDNA-Lys-g offered 100% protection to channel catfish at two days post DNA injection. Macrophages of fish injected with pcDNA-Lys-g produced significantly (P < 0.05) higher amounts of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide than that of fish injected with pcDNA vector alone at two days post DNA injection. Taken together, our results suggest that pcDNA-Lys-g could be used as a novel immunostimulant to offer immediate protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection.

  18. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Saikat; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1’s Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its activities are dependent on its ability to hydrolyse ATP. Both Fml1K99R and Fml1D196N are proficient for DNA binding but totally deficient in DNA unwinding and ATP hydrolysis. In vivo both mutants exhibit a similar reduction in recombination at blocked replication forks as a fml1Δ mutant indicating that Fml1’s motor activity, fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, is essential for its pro-recombinogenic role. Intriguingly, both fml1K99R and fml1D196N mutants exhibit greater sensitivity to genotoxins and higher levels of crossing over during DSB repair than a fml1Δ strain. These data suggest that without its motor activity, the binding of Fml1 to its DNA substrate can impede alternative mechanisms of repair and crossover avoidance. PMID:22844101

  19. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  20. Three Decades of Recombinant DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jackie

    1985-01-01

    Discusses highlights in the development of genetic engineering, examining techniques with recombinant DNA, legal and ethical issues, GenBank (a national database of nucleic acid sequences), and other topics. (JN)

  1. Activation of homologous recombination DNA repair in human skin fibroblasts continuously exposed to X-ray radiation

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Andreyan N.; Grekhova, Anna; Pustovalova, Margarita; Ozerov, Ivan V.; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Lazareva, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular responses to protracted ionizing radiation exposures are poorly understood. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we studied the kinetics of DNA repair foci formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to X-rays at a dose rate of 4.5 mGy/min for up to 6 h. We showed that both the number of γH2AX foci and their integral fluorescence intensity grew linearly with time of irradiation up to 2 h. A plateau was observed between 2 and 6 h of exposure, indicating a state of balance between formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, the number and intensity of foci formed by homologous recombination protein RAD51 demonstrated a continuous increase during 6 h of irradiation. We further showed that the enhancement of the homologous recombination repair was not due to redistribution of cell cycle phases. Our results indicate that continuous irradiation of normal human cells triggers DNA repair responses that are different from those elicited after acute irradiation. The observed activation of the error-free homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair pathway suggests compensatory adaptive mechanisms that may help alleviate long-term biological consequences and could potentially be utilized both in radiation protection and medical practices. PMID:26337087

  2. Reconstitution of recombinant human replication factor C (RFC) and identification of an RFC subcomplex possessing DNA-dependent ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Ellison, V; Stillman, B

    1998-03-06

    Replication factor C (RFC) is a five-subunit protein complex required for coordinate leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis during S phase and DNA repair in eukaryotic cells. It functions to load the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a processivity factor for polymerases delta and epsilon, onto primed DNA templates. This process, which is ATP-dependent, is carried out by 1) recognition of the primer terminus by RFC () binding to and disruption of the PCNA trimer, and then 3) topologically linking the PCNA to the DNA. In this report, we describe the purification and properties of recombinant human RFC expressed in Sf9 cells from baculovirus expression vectors. Like native RFC derived from 293 cells, recombinant RFC was found to support SV40 DNA synthesis and polymerase delta DNA synthesis in vitro and to possess an ATPase activity that was highly stimulated by DNA and further augmented by PCNA. Assembly of RFC was observed to involve distinct subunit interactions in which both the 36- and 38-kDa subunits interacted with the 37-kDa subunit, and the 40-kDa subunit interacted with the 36-kDa subunit-37-kDa subunit subcomplex. The 140-kDa subunit was found to require interactions primarily with the 38- and 40-kDa subunits for incorporation into the complex. In addition, a stable subcomplex lacking the 140-kDa subunit, although defective for DNA replication, was found to possess DNA-dependent ATPase activity that was not responsive to the addition of PCNA.

  3. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  4. Recombinant DNA: History of the Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigue, Charles L.; Stanziale, William G.

    1979-01-01

    The hazards associated with recombinant DNA research are presented along with some social implications and the development of recombinant DNA research guidelines by the National Institutes of Health. (SA)

  5. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... receive NIH funding for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research, then these sites should already... not receive NIH funding for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research. In this situation, because... the site does not receive funding from NIH for recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid research....

  6. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase is essential and plays a role in promoting virus genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Gammon, Don B; Evans, David H

    2009-05-01

    Poxviruses are subjected to extraordinarily high levels of genetic recombination during infection, although the enzymes catalyzing these reactions have never been identified. However, it is clear that virus-encoded DNA polymerases play some unknown yet critical role in virus recombination. Using a novel, antiviral-drug-based strategy to dissect recombination and replication reactions, we now show that the 3'-to-5' proofreading exonuclease activity of the viral DNA polymerase plays a key role in promoting recombination reactions. Linear DNA substrates were prepared containing the dCMP analog cidofovir (CDV) incorporated into the 3' ends of the molecules. The drug blocked the formation of concatemeric recombinant molecules in vitro in a process that was catalyzed by the proofreading activity of vaccinia virus DNA polymerase. Recombinant formation was also blocked when CDV-containing recombination substrates were transfected into cells infected with wild-type vaccinia virus. These inhibitory effects could be overcome if CDV-containing substrates were transfected into cells infected with CDV-resistant (CDV(r)) viruses, but only when resistance was linked to an A314T substitution mutation mapping within the 3'-to-5' exonuclease domain of the viral polymerase. Viruses encoding a CDV(r) mutation in the polymerase domain still exhibited a CDV-induced recombination deficiency. The A314T substitution also enhanced the enzyme's capacity to excise CDV molecules from the 3' ends of duplex DNA and to recombine these DNAs in vitro, as judged from experiments using purified mutant DNA polymerase. The 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity appears to be an essential virus function, and our results suggest that this might be because poxviruses use it to promote genetic exchange.

  7. Novel insights into RAD51 activity and regulation during homologous recombination and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Sullivan, Meghan R.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    In this review we focus on new insights that challenge our understanding of homologous recombination (HR) and Rad51 regulation. Recent advances using high resolution microscopy and single molecule techniques have broadened our knowledge of Rad51 filament formation and strand invasion at double-strand break (DSB) sites and at replication forks, which are one of most physiologically relevant forms of HR from yeast to humans. Rad51 filament formation and strand invasion is regulated by many mediator proteins such as the Rad51 paralogues and the Shu complex, consisting of a Shu2/SWS1 family member and additional Rad51 paralogues. Importantly, a novel RAD-51 paralogue was discovered in C. elegans and its in vitro characterization has demonstrated a new function for the worm RAD-51 paralogues during HR. Conservation of the human RAD51 paralogues function during HR and repair of replicative damage demonstrate how the RAD51 mediators play a critical role in human health and genomic integrity. Together, these new findings provide a framework for understanding RAD51 and its mediators in DNA repair during multiple cellular contexts. PMID:27224545

  8. Recombinant DNA technology in apple.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Cesare; Patocchi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    This review summarizes the achievements of almost 20 years of recombinant DNA technology applied to apple, grouping the research results into the sections: developing the technology, insect resistance, fungal disease resistance, self-incompatibility, herbicide resistance, fire blight resistance, fruit ripening, allergens, rooting ability, and acceptance and risk assessment. The diseases fire blight, caused by Erwinia amylovora, and scab, caused by Venturia inaequalis, were and still are the prime targets. Shelf life improvement and rooting ability of rootstocks are also relevant research areas. The tools to create genetically modified apples of added value to producers, consumers, and the environment are now available.

  9. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  10. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  11. Human Insulin from Recombinant DNA Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Irving S.

    1983-02-01

    Human insulin produced by recombinant DNA technology is the first commercial health care product derived from this technology. Work on this product was initiated before there were federal guidelines for large-scale recombinant DNA work or commercial development of recombinant DNA products. The steps taken to facilitate acceptance of large-scale work and proof of the identity and safety of such a product are described. While basic studies in recombinant DNA technology will continue to have a profound impact on research in the life sciences, commercial applications may well be controlled by economic conditions and the availability of investment capital.

  12. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, J.; Piddington, C.S.; Kovacevich, B.R.; Young, K.D.; Denome, S.A.

    1994-10-18

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous. 13 figs.

  13. Recombinant DNA encoding a desulfurization biocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Rambosek, John; Piddington, Chris S.; Kovacevich, Brian R.; Young, Kevin D.; Denome, Sylvia A.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes which encode a biocatalyst capable of desulfurizing a fossil fuel which contains organic sulfur molecules. For example, the present invention encompasses a recombinant DNA molecule containing a gene or genes of a strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous.

  14. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  15. [HPV DNA vaccines expressing recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 fusion protein inhibit tumor growth and angiogenic activity].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Ke-Jia; Zhu, Ke-Jian; Zhang, Xing

    2007-11-01

    This paper was to study the angiogenic inhibitory effect and the potential antitumor effect of the constructed recombinant DNA vaccine CRT/HPV6bE7 in vivo. The C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated respectively with recombinant CRT/HPV6bE7 DNA plamids. The inhibitory effects on angiogenesis of generated vaccines in vivo were evaluated by a bFGF-induced angiogenesis assay using the Matrigel kit. To investigate the potential antitumor effect, the mean tumor weights, sizes and tumor appearing times were measured in C57BL/6 mice treated with HPV6bE7-expressing B16 cells. The results indicated that the recombinants CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 showed strong anti-angiogenic effects in bFGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. Moreover, CRT180/HPV6bE7 and CRT180 DNA vaccines could significantly inhibit the tumor growth in tumor challenge experiment, and CRT180/HPV6bE7 was superior to other vaccines in delaying tumor formation time, limiting tumor size and weight in tumor protection experiment. In conclusion, recombinant CRT180/HPV6bE7 DNA could elicit a most efficient anti-angiogenic effect and inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with DNA vaccines. The antiangiogenic activity of CRT were suggested residing in a domain between CRT 120-180 aa.

  16. Activation of an alternative, rec12 (spo11)-independent pathway of fission yeast meiotic recombination in the absence of a DNA flap endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Farah, Joseph A; Cromie, Gareth; Davis, Luther; Steiner, Walter W; Smith, Gerald R

    2005-12-01

    Spo11 or a homologous protein appears to be essential for meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and recombination in all organisms tested. We report here the first example of an alternative, mutationally activated pathway for meiotic recombination in the absence of Rec12, the Spo11 homolog of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Rad2, a FEN-1 flap endonuclease homolog, is involved in processing Okazaki fragments. In its absence, meiotic recombination and proper segregation of chromosomes were restored in rec12Delta mutants to nearly wild-type levels. Although readily detectable in wild-type strains, meiosis-specific DSBs were undetectable in recombination-proficient rad2Delta rec12Delta strains. On the basis of the biochemical properties of Rad2, we propose that meiotic recombination by this alternative (Rec*) pathway can be initiated by non-DSB lesions, such as nicks and gaps, which accumulate during premeiotic DNA replication in the absence of Okazaki fragment processing. We compare the Rec* pathway to alternative pathways of homologous recombination in other organisms.

  17. Strategies for RNA-Guided DNA Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeleska, Angela; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Landweber, Laura F.

    We present a model for homologous DNA recombination events guided by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) templates, and apply this model to DNA rearrangements in some groups of ciliates, such as Stylonychia or Oxytricha. In these organisms, differentiation of a somatic macronucleus from a germline micronucleus involves extensive gene rearrangement, which can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA, with the template-guided alignment proceeding through DNA branch migration. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  18. Disease diagnosis by recombinant DNA methods

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, C.T.

    1987-06-05

    Recombinant DNA procedures have now been applied to the problem of the identification of molecular defects in man that account for heritable diseases, somatic mutations associated with neoplasia, and acquired infectious disease. Thus, recombinant DNA technology has rapidly expanded the ability to diagnose disease. Substantial advances in the simplification of procedures for diagnostic purposes have been made, and the informed physician has gained in diagnostic accuracy as a consequence of these developments. The wide application of recombinant DNA diagnostics will depend on simplicity, speed of results, and cost containment. 66 references, 7 figures.

  19. Recombination in Eukaryotic Single Stranded DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Darren P.; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution. PMID:21994803

  20. Recombination in eukaryotic single stranded DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Darren P; Biagini, Philippe; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Golden, Michael; Roumagnac, Philippe; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-09-01

    Although single stranded (ss) DNA viruses that infect humans and their domesticated animals do not generally cause major diseases, the arthropod borne ssDNA viruses of plants do, and as a result seriously constrain food production in most temperate regions of the world. Besides the well known plant and animal-infecting ssDNA viruses, it has recently become apparent through metagenomic surveys of ssDNA molecules that there also exist large numbers of other diverse ssDNA viruses within almost all terrestrial and aquatic environments. The host ranges of these viruses probably span the tree of life and they are likely to be important components of global ecosystems. Various lines of evidence suggest that a pivotal evolutionary process during the generation of this global ssDNA virus diversity has probably been genetic recombination. High rates of homologous recombination, non-homologous recombination and genome component reassortment are known to occur within and between various different ssDNA virus species and we look here at the various roles that these different types of recombination may play, both in the day-to-day biology, and in the longer term evolution, of these viruses. We specifically focus on the ecological, biochemical and selective factors underlying patterns of genetic exchange detectable amongst the ssDNA viruses and discuss how these should all be considered when assessing the adaptive value of recombination during ssDNA virus evolution.

  1. DNA recombination. Recombination initiation maps of individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Pratto, Florencia; Brick, Kevin; Khil, Pavel; Smagulova, Fatima; Petukhova, Galina V; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel

    2014-11-14

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are introduced in meiosis to initiate recombination and generate crossovers, the reciprocal exchanges of genetic material between parental chromosomes. Here, we present high-resolution maps of meiotic DSBs in individual human genomes. Comparing DSB maps between individuals shows that along with DNA binding by PRDM9, additional factors may dictate the efficiency of DSB formation. We find evidence for both GC-biased gene conversion and mutagenesis around meiotic DSB hotspots, while frequent colocalization of DSB hotspots with chromosome rearrangement breakpoints implicates the aberrant repair of meiotic DSBs in genomic disorders. Furthermore, our data indicate that DSB frequency is a major determinant of crossover rate. These maps provide new insights into the regulation of meiotic recombination and the impact of meiotic recombination on genome function.

  2. Defining the roles of the N-terminal region and the helicase activity of RECQ4A in DNA repair and homologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Schröpfer, Susan; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2014-02-01

    RecQ helicases are critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. The Arabidopsis RecQ helicase RECQ4A is the functional counterpart of human BLM, which is mutated in the genetic disorder Bloom's syndrome. RECQ4A performs critical roles in regulation of homologous recombination (HR) and DNA repair. Loss of RECQ4A leads to elevated HR frequencies and hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents. Through complementation studies, we were now able to demonstrate that the N-terminal region and the helicase activity of RECQ4A are both essential for the cellular response to replicative stress induced by methyl methanesulfonate and cisplatin. In contrast, loss of helicase activity or deletion of the N-terminus only partially complemented the mutant hyper-recombination phenotype. Furthermore, the helicase-deficient protein lacking its N-terminus did not complement the hyper-recombination phenotype at all. Therefore, RECQ4A seems to possess at least two different and independent sub-functions involved in the suppression of HR. By in vitro analysis, we showed that the helicase core was able to regress an artificial replication fork. Swapping of the terminal regions of RECQ4A with the closely related but functionally distinct helicase RECQ4B indicated that in contrast to the C-terminus, the N-terminus of RECQ4A was required for its specific functions in DNA repair and recombination.

  3. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Fabio; Fumasoni, Marco; Szakal, Barnabas; Maloisel, Laurent; Branzei, Dana

    2010-11-11

    Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different players contribute to

  4. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  5. Characterization of recombinant malarial RecQ DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Suntornthiticharoen, Pattra; Srila, Witsanu; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Limudomporn, Paviga; Yamabhai, Montarop

    2014-08-01

    RecQ DNA gene of multi-drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 (PfRecQ1) was cloned, and the recombinant C-terminal-decahistidine-tagged PfRecQ1 was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme could efficiently unwind partial duplex DNA substrate in a 3' to 5' direction. The malarial RecQ1 could not unwind substrates with both 5' and 3' overhangs, those with a 5' overhang, or blunt-ended DNA duplexes. Unwinding of DNA helicase activity was driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. The drug inhibitory effects of six compounds indicated that only doxorubicin and daunorubicin could inhibit the unwinding activity.

  6. Transcription and Recombination: When RNA Meets DNA

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription–replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. PMID:25085910

  7. Recombinant DNA: Scientific and Social Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandegrift, Vaughn

    1979-01-01

    This article is designed to inform chemical educators not engaged in this technology as to the nature and methods used in the technology, the reasons for scientific and social concern, and the attempts made to assuage concerns involving recombinant DNA research. (author/BB)

  8. Vaccine development using recombinant DNA technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccines induce an immune response in the host that subsequently recognizes infectious agents and helps fight off the disease; vaccines must do this without causing the disease. This paper reviews the development of recombinant DNA technologies as a means of providing new ways for attenuating diseas...

  9. Science: The Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Reports on the status of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and attempts to rationalize Suburban Highway Policy. Effective communication among members of the RAC is a current problem facing the committee. A federal transportation priority spending policy is suggested during these times of money and fuel shortages. (MA)

  10. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Luciana; Kmiec, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anticancer drug that promotes DNA breakage at replication forks and the formation of lesions that activate the processes of homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining. We have taken advantage of the CPT-induced damage response by coupling it to gene repair directed by synthetic oligonucleotides, a process in which a mutant base pair is converted into a wild-type one. Here, we show that pretreating DLD-1 cells with CPT leads to a significant stimulation in the frequency of correction of an integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. The stimulation is dose-dependent and coincident with the formation of double-strand DNA breaks. Caffeine, but not vanillin, blocks the enhancement of gene repair suggesting that, in this system, HR is the pathway most responsible for elevating the frequency of correction. The involvement of HR is further proven by studies in which wortmannin was seen to inhibit gene repair at high concentrations but not at lower levels that are known to inhibit DNA-PK activity. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA damage induced by CPT activates a cellular response that stimulates gene repair in mammalian cells.

  11. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  12. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  13. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  14. A high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) gene from Chlamys farreri and the DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Zhi; Yi, Qilin; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a highly conserved DNA binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. In the present research, a cDNA of 1268 bp for the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri HMGB1 (designed as CfHMGB1) was cloned via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expression sequence tag (EST) analysis. The complete cDNA sequence of CfHMGB1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 648 bp, which encoded a protein of 215 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1 shared 53-57% similarity with other identified HMGB1s. There were two HMG domains, two low complexity regions and a conserved acidic tail in the amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1. The mRNA transcripts of CfHMGB1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas, kidney and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression profiles of CfHMGB1 in haemocytes after the stimulation with different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and glucan (Glu), were similar with an up-regulation in the early stage and then recovered to the original level. The recombinant CfHMGB1 protein could bind double-stranded DNA and induce the release of TNF-α activity in mixed primary culture of scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfHMGB1, with DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity, could play an important role in the immune response of scallops.

  15. Recombination hotspots and single-stranded DNA binding proteins couple DNA translocation to DNA unwinding by the AddAB helicase-nuclease.

    PubMed

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; van Aelst, Kara; Dillingham, Mark S; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2011-06-24

    AddAB is a helicase-nuclease that processes double-stranded DNA breaks for repair by homologous recombination. This process is modulated by Chi recombination hotspots: specific DNA sequences that attenuate the nuclease activity of the translocating AddAB complex to promote downstream recombination. Using a combination of kinetic and imaging techniques, we show that AddAB translocation is not coupled to DNA unwinding in the absence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins because nascent single-stranded DNA immediately re-anneals behind the moving enzyme. However, recognition of recombination hotspot sequences during translocation activates unwinding by coupling these activities, thereby ensuring the downstream formation of single-stranded DNA that is required for RecA-mediated recombinational repair. In addition to their implications for the mechanism of double-stranded DNA break repair, these observations may affect our implementation and interpretation of helicase assays and our understanding of helicase mechanisms in general.

  16. Stable DNA replication: interplay between DNA replication, homologous recombination, and transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Kogoma, T

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at oriC, the origin of chromosome replication. E. coli cells possess at least three additional initiation systems for chromosome replication that are normally repressed but can be activated under certain specific conditions. These are termed the stable DNA replication systems. Inducible stable DNA replication (iSDR), which is activated by SOS induction, is proposed to be initiated from a D-loop, an early intermediate in homologous recombination. Thus, iSDR is a form of recombination-dependent DNA replication (RDR). Analysis of iSDR and RDR has led to the proposal that homologous recombination and double-strand break repair involve extensive semiconservative DNA replication. RDR is proposed to play crucial roles in homologous recombination, double-strand break repair, restoration of collapsed replication forks, and adaptive mutation. Constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR) is activated in mhA mutants deficient in RNase HI or in recG mutants deficient in RecG helicase. cSDR is proposed to be initiated from an R-loop that can be formed by the invasion of duplex DNA by an RNA transcript, which most probably is catalyzed by RecA protein. The third form of SDR is nSDR, which can be transiently activated in wild-type cells when rapidly growing cells enter the stationary phase. This article describes the characteristics of these alternative DNA replication forms and reviews evidence that has led to the formulation of the proposed models for SDR initiation mechanisms. The possible interplay between DNA replication, homologous recombination, DNA repair, and transcription is explored. PMID:9184011

  17. Modulation of meiotic homologous recombination by DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander

    2016-12-08

    DNA helicases are ATP-driven motor proteins which translocate along DNA capable of dismantling DNA-DNA interactions and/or removing proteins bound to DNA. These biochemical capabilities make DNA helicases main regulators of crucial DNA metabolic processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, and genetic recombination. This budding topic will focus on reviewing the function of DNA helicases important for homologous recombination during meiosis, and discuss recent advances in how these modulators of meiotic recombination are themselves regulated. The emphasis is placed on work in the two model yeasts, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has vastly expanded our understanding of meiotic homologous recombination, a process whose correct execution is instrumental for healthy gamete formation, and thus functioning sexual reproduction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Single-Stranded DNA Curtains for Studying Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Ma, C J; Steinfeld, J B; Greene, E C

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Genetic studies form the foundation of our knowledge on homologous recombination. Significant progress has also been made toward understanding the biochemical and biophysical properties of the proteins, complexes, and reaction intermediates involved in this essential DNA repair pathway. However, heterogeneous or transient recombination intermediates remain extremely difficult to assess through traditional ensemble methods, leaving an incomplete mechanistic picture of many steps that take place during homologous recombination. To help overcome some of these limitations, we have established DNA curtain methodologies as an experimental platform for studying homologous DNA recombination in real-time at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a detailed overview describing the preparation and use of single-stranded DNA curtains in applications related to the study of homologous DNA recombination with emphasis on recent work related to the study of the eukaryotic recombinase Rad51.

  19. Prevention of DNA Rereplication Through a Meiotic Recombination Checkpoint Response

    PubMed Central

    Najor, Nicole A.; Weatherford, Layne; Brush, George S.

    2016-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unnatural stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 during meiosis can trigger extra rounds of DNA replication. When programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated but not repaired due to absence of DMC1, a pathway involving the checkpoint gene RAD17 prevents this DNA rereplication. Further genetic analysis has now revealed that prevention of DNA rereplication also requires MEC1, which encodes a protein kinase that serves as a central checkpoint regulator in several pathways including the meiotic recombination checkpoint response. Downstream of MEC1, MEK1 is required through its function to inhibit repair between sister chromatids. By contrast, meiotic recombination checkpoint effectors that regulate gene expression and cyclin-dependent kinase activity are not necessary. Phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is catalyzed by Mec1 and the related Tel1 protein kinase in response to DSBs, and can help coordinate activation of the Rad53 checkpoint protein kinase in the mitotic cell cycle, is required for the full checkpoint response. Phosphorylation sites that are targeted by Rad53 in a mitotic S phase checkpoint response are also involved, based on the behavior of cells containing mutations in the DBF4 and SLD3 DNA replication genes. However, RAD53 does not appear to be required, nor does RAD9, which encodes a mediator of Rad53, consistent with their lack of function in the recombination checkpoint pathway that prevents meiotic progression. While this response is similar to a checkpoint mechanism that inhibits initiation of DNA replication in the mitotic cell cycle, the evidence points to a new variation on DNA replication control. PMID:27678521

  20. Bacterial DNA repair genes and their eukaryotic homologues: 5. The role of recombination in DNA repair and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta

    2007-01-01

    Recombinational repair is a well conserved DNA repair mechanism present in all living organisms. Repair by homologous recombination is generally accurate as it uses undamaged homologous DNA molecule as a repair template. In Escherichia coli homologous recombination repairs both the double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA. DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) can be induced upon exposure to exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation or endogenous DNA-damaging agents including reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as during natural biological processes like conjugation. However, the bulk of double strand breaks are formed during replication fork collapse encountering an unrepaired single strand gap in DNA. Under such circumstances DNA replication on the damaged template can be resumed only if supported by homologous recombination. This functional cooperation of homologous recombination with replication machinery enables successful completion of genome duplication and faithful transmission of genetic material to a daughter cell. In eukaryotes, homologous recombination is also involved in essential biological processes such as preservation of genome integrity, DNA damage checkpoint activation, DNA damage repair, DNA replication, mating type switching, transposition, immune system development and meiosis. When unregulated, recombination can lead to genome instability and carcinogenesis.

  1. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Daniele G.; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Henriques, João A. P.; Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre E.

    2016-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors. PMID:27029031

  2. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Lima, Michelle; Bouzid, Hana; Soares, Daniele G; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M; Henriques, João A P; Larsen, Annette K; Escargueil, Alexandre E

    2016-05-03

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors.

  3. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3′ processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3′-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5′-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3′ processing, and the viral DNA 3′-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  4. Reflections: ethics and the recombinant DNA debate.

    PubMed

    Robb, J W

    1982-01-01

    This essay is an attempt to apply a mode of ethical reflection to questions related to the recombinant DNA debate. The author suggests that adequate ethical analysis must include at least five aspects of a moral situation 1) the nature of the act itself; 2) consequences that result from an action or decision; 3) civil and criminal laws; 4) moral principles; and 5) motivation or intention. This paradigm for analysis is applied to the recombinant DNA scene, particularly as these factors relate to 1) risks vs benefits; 2) laws and regulations; 3) the marketplace; and 4) human genetic intervention. The analysis does not provide answers to these vexing questions, but attempts to raise the consciousness level of the reader concerning significant ethical issues. Undergirding the discussion is the humanistic theme of the primacy of the concern for the public good, and that freedom of inquiry can only survive in a socially conscious context. Fear of the unknown is no reason for prohibiting DNA research, but since the stakes are high as new developments emerge that pertain to the genetic restructuring of the human species, the author suggests that caution and responsible judgment are mandatory. Since ethics is concerned with ideal moral judgments, and applied ethics relates to the real world in which we function, the demand for clear and careful thought concerning the short-term and long-term consequences of our work is a primary ingredient of what it means to be responsible. In the final analysis, ethical responsibility rests on the individual; without a sense of personal integrity and what that implies about oneself and society, blatant opportunism can easily become the generally accepted mode of behavior and decision. If this occurs, traditional ethical concerns become irrelevant.

  5. Recombinational Repair of DNA Damage in Escherichia coli and Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    1999-01-01

    Although homologous recombination and DNA repair phenomena in bacteria were initially extensively studied without regard to any relationship between the two, it is now appreciated that DNA repair and homologous recombination are related through DNA replication. In Escherichia coli, two-strand DNA damage, generated mostly during replication on a template DNA containing one-strand damage, is repaired by recombination with a homologous intact duplex, usually the sister chromosome. The two major types of two-strand DNA lesions are channeled into two distinct pathways of recombinational repair: daughter-strand gaps are closed by the RecF pathway, while disintegrated replication forks are reestablished by the RecBCD pathway. The phage λ recombination system is simpler in that its major reaction is to link two double-stranded DNA ends by using overlapping homologous sequences. The remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms of recombinational repair in E. coli over the last decade is due to the in vitro characterization of the activities of individual recombination proteins. Putting our knowledge about recombinational repair in the broader context of DNA replication will guide future experimentation. PMID:10585965

  6. Molecular cloning, expression of orange-spotted grouper goose-type lysozyme cDNA, and lytic activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhi-Xin; He, Jian-Guo; Deng, Wei-Xin; Chan, Siu-Ming

    2003-07-08

    Lysozyme acts as a non-specific innate-immunity molecule against the invasion of bacteria pathogens. A leukocyte cDNA library of orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides was constructed and the goose-type (g-type) lysozyme cDNA was isolated. The complete cDNA consists of an open reading frame of 585 bp encoding a protein of 194 amino acids. This protein shows a 72.2% amino acid sequence identity with the flounder g-type lysozyme. Similar to most other species, the glu catalytic residue in g-type lysozymes of the grouper is conserved. Furthermore, like the flounder and carp, the 4 conserved cysteine residues identified in avian and mammalian g-type lysozymes were also absent from the grouper. Northern blot analysis indicated that the g-type lysozyme was expressed in intestine, liver, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, gill, muscle and leukocytes. In addition, RT-PCR analysis detected the g-type lysozyme transcripts in the stomach, brain and ovary. When an orange-spotted grouper was injected with Vibrio alginolyticus, the number of lysozyme mRNA transcripts detected in the stomach, spleen, anterior kidney, posterior kidney, heart, brain and leucocytes increased 72 h after injection. Recombinant grouper g-type lysozyme produced in the Escherichia coli expression system showed lytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus, V. alginolyticus from Epinephelus fario, V. vulnificus from culture water, Aeromonas hydrophila from soft-shell turtle, A. hydrophila from goldfish and V. parahaemolyticus, Pseudomonas fluorescens and V. fluvialis from culture water.

  7. Recombination at the DNA level. Abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of papers in the following areas are presented: (1) chromosome mechanics; (2) yeast systems; (3) mammalian homologous recombination; (4) transposons; (5) Mu; (6) plant transposons/T4 recombination; (7) topoisomerase, resolvase, and gyrase; (8) Escherichia coli general recombination; (9) recA; (10) repair; (11) eucaryotic enzymes; (12) integration and excision of bacteriophage; (13) site-specific recombination; and (14) recombination in vitro. (ACR)

  8. DNA induces conformational changes in a recombinant human minichromosome maintenance complex.

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Emma L; Parker-Manuel, Richard P; Chaban, Yuriy; Satti, Rabab; Coverley, Dawn; Orlova, Elena V; Chong, James P J

    2015-03-20

    ATP-dependent DNA unwinding activity has been demonstrated for recombinant archaeal homohexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complexes and their yeast heterohexameric counterparts, but in higher eukaryotes such as Drosophila, MCM-associated DNA helicase activity has been observed only in the context of a co-purified Cdc45-MCM-GINS complex. Here, we describe the production of the recombinant human MCM (hMCM) complex in Escherichia coli. This protein displays ATP hydrolysis activity and is capable of unwinding duplex DNA. Using single-particle asymmetric EM reconstruction, we demonstrate that recombinant hMCM forms a hexamer that undergoes a conformational change when bound to DNA. Recombinant hMCM produced without post-translational modifications is functional in vitro and provides an important tool for biochemical reconstitution of the human replicative helicase.

  9. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair.

  10. Linearization of baculovirus DNA enhances the recovery of recombinant virus expression vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Kitts, P A; Ayres, M D; Possee, R D

    1990-01-01

    Engineered derivatives of Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) possessing a unique restriction site provide a source of viral DNA that can be linearized by digestion with a specific endonuclease. Circular or linearized DNA from two such viruses were compared in terms of their infectivity and recombinogenic activities. The linear forms were 15- to 150-fold less infectious than the corresponding circular forms, when transfected into Spodoptera frugiperda cells using the calcium phosphate method. Linear viral DNA was, however, proficient at recombination on co-transfection with an appropriate transfer vector. Up to 30% of the progeny viruses were recombinant, a 10-fold higher fraction of recombinants than was obtained from co-transfections with circular AcMNPV DNA. The isolation of a recombinant baculovirus expression vector from any of the AcMNPV transfer vectors currently in use can thus be facilitated by linearization of the viral DNA at the appropriate location. Images PMID:2216760

  11. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  12. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period.

  13. Regulation of DNA strand exchange in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Holthausen, J Thomas; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2010-12-10

    Homologous recombination, the exchange of DNA strands between homologous DNA molecules, is involved in repair of many structural diverse DNA lesions. This versatility stems from multiple ways in which homologous DNA strands can be rearranged. At the core of homologous recombination are recombinase proteins such as RecA and RAD51 that mediate homology recognition and DNA strand exchange through formation of a dynamic nucleoprotein filament. Four stages in the life cycle of nucleoprotein filaments are filament nucleation, filament growth, homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, and filament dissociation. Progression through this cycle requires a sequence of recombinase-DNA and recombinase protein-protein interactions coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis. The function of recombinases is controlled by accessory proteins that allow coordination of strand exchange with other steps of homologous recombination and that tailor to the needs of specific aberrant DNA structures undergoing recombination. Accessory proteins are also able to reverse filament formation thereby guarding against inappropriate DNA rearrangements. The dynamic instability of the recombinase-DNA interactions allows both positive and negative action of accessory proteins thereby ensuring that genome maintenance by homologous recombination is not only flexible and versatile, but also accurate.

  14. Transcript-RNA-templated DNA recombination and repair.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Havva; Shen, Ying; Huang, Fei; Patel, Mikir; Yang, Taehwan; Ashley, Katie; Mazin, Alexander V; Storici, Francesca

    2014-11-20

    Homologous recombination is a molecular process that has multiple important roles in DNA metabolism, both for DNA repair and genetic variation in all forms of life. Generally, homologous recombination involves the exchange of genetic information between two identical or nearly identical DNA molecules; however, homologous recombination can also occur between RNA molecules, as shown for RNA viruses. Previous research showed that synthetic RNA oligonucleotides can act as templates for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in yeast and human cells, and artificial long RNA templates injected in ciliate cells can guide genomic rearrangements. Here we report that endogenous transcript RNA mediates homologous recombination with chromosomal DNA in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a system to detect the events of homologous recombination initiated by transcript RNA following the repair of a chromosomal DSB occurring either in a homologous but remote locus, or in the same transcript-generating locus in reverse-transcription-defective yeast strains. We found that RNA-DNA recombination is blocked by ribonucleases H1 and H2. In the presence of H-type ribonucleases, DSB repair proceeds through a complementary DNA intermediate, whereas in their absence, it proceeds directly through RNA. The proximity of the transcript to its chromosomal DNA partner in the same locus facilitates Rad52-driven homologous recombination during DSB repair. We demonstrate that yeast and human Rad52 proteins efficiently catalyse annealing of RNA to a DSB-like DNA end in vitro. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of homologous recombination and DNA repair in which transcript RNA is used as a template for DSB repair. Thus, considering the abundance of RNA transcripts in cells, RNA may have a marked impact on genomic stability and plasticity.

  15. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  16. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-01-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks. PMID:24119078

  17. Recombinant DNA production of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Tokareva, Olena; Michalczechen-Lacerda, Valquíria A; Rech, Elíbio L; Kaplan, David L

    2013-11-01

    Spider dragline silk is considered to be the toughest biopolymer on Earth due to an extraordinary combination of strength and elasticity. Moreover, silks are biocompatible and biodegradable protein-based materials. Recent advances in genetic engineering make it possible to produce recombinant silks in heterologous hosts, opening up opportunities for large-scale production of recombinant silks for various biomedical and material science applications. We review the current strategies to produce recombinant spider silks.

  18. DNA-dependent protein kinase mediates V(D)J recombination via RAG2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Hah, Young-Sool; Lee, Jung Hwa; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2007-05-31

    V(D)J recombination, a site-specific gene rearrangement process occurring during the lymphocyte development, begins with DNA double strand breaks by two recombination activating gene products (RAG1/2) and finishes with the repair process by several proteins including DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). In this report, we found that RAG2 was specifically phosphorylated by DNA-PK at the 365(th) serine residue, and this phosphorylated RAG2 affected the V(D)J recombination activity in cells in the GFP expression-based assay. While the V(D)J recombination activity between wild-type RAG2 and mutant S365A RAG2 in the assay using a signal joint substrate was undistinguishable in DNA-PK deficient cells (M059J), the activity with wild-type RAG2 was largely increased in DNA-PK proficient cells (M059K) in comparison with mutant RAG2, suggesting that RAG2 phosphorylation by DNA-PK plays a crucial role in the signal joint formation during V(D)J recombination.

  19. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries.

  20. Involvement of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a recA-independent pathway of genetic recombination in Escheria coli.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Kobayashi, I

    1977-09-01

    Recombinant DNA molecule of phage lambda formed in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol and/or rifampin can be assayed by their biological activity. recA- cells were found to be capable of forming recombinant lambda phage DNA in the presence of chloramphenicol. The relatively high recA-independent recombination observed in this system contrasts with the relatively low recA-independent recombination when recombinant phage particles rather than recombinant DNA are titrated. Formation of the recombinant DNA was suppressed by the the addition of rifampin. The introduction of the rif-r mutation into host bacteria made their recombination activity rifampin-resistant. These results show that DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) is involved in this recA-independent pathway of recombination, which is named the "Rpo pathway." This is distinct from Red, Int, RecBC, RecE, or Der pathways of recombination. Crossover was much more frequent in the N-PL-cI and cI-PR-O regions than in the A-D and O-S regions. The crossover seems to occur in the regions that are transcribed actively. Some local change of DNA structure caused by transcription might be required for the Rpo pathway of recombination.

  1. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  2. Evidence for Recombination of Mitochondrial DNA in Triploid Crucian Carp

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinhong; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of the allotetraploid and triploid crucian carp and compare the complete mtDNA sequences between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp and between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid. Our results indicate that the complete mtDNA nucleotide identity (98%) between the triploid crucian carp and its male parent allotetraploid was higher than that (93%) between the triploid crucian carp and its female parent Japanese crucian carp. Moreover, the presence of a pattern of identity and difference at synonymous sites of mitochondrial genomes between the triploid crucian carp and its parents provides direct evidence that triploid crucian carp possessed the recombination mtDNA fragment (12,759 bp) derived from the paternal fish. These results suggest that mtDNA recombination was derived from the fusion of the maternal and paternal mtDNAs. Compared with the haploid egg with one set of genome from the Japanese crucian carp, the diploid sperm with two sets of genomes from the allotetraploid could more easily make its mtDNA fuse with the mtDNA of the haploid egg. In addition, the triple hybrid nature of the triploid crucian carp probably allowed its better mtDNA recombination. In summary, our results provide the first evidence of mtDNA combination in polyploid fish. PMID:16322508

  3. The impact of sequence divergence and DNA mismatch repair on homeologous recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2006-03-01

    We examined the effects of substrate divergence and DNA mismatch repair (MMR) on recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana. Relative to the frequency observed in plants with a homologous construct (0% divergence), recombination was decreased 4.1-, 9.6-, 11.7- or 20.3-fold, respectively, in lines with constructs containing 0.5%, 2%, 4% or 9% divergence between the recombination substrates. To evaluate the contribution of the MMR system in this decrease, 12 independent reporter lines (two or three lines per reporter construct) were crossed to an AtMSH2 T-DNA insertional mutant. We examined the recombination frequency in progeny homozygous for a reporter T-DNA and homozygous either for the wild type or the mutant allele of AtMSH2. The loss of MMR activity led to a two- to ninefold increase in homeologous recombination and the size of the increase did not seem to correlate with the amount of divergence. Inversely, complementation of the insertional mutant with a wild-type cDNA of AtMSH2 reduced recombination. Our results demonstrate clearly that sequence divergence can dramatically reduce the recombination frequency in plants and that the MMR system plays a part in this decrease.

  4. Historical perspectives pertaining to the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee.

    PubMed

    Wivel, Nelson A

    2014-01-01

    Science is host to a constantly emerging series of new paradigms, and it is this characteristic that makes science both interesting and dynamic. As a part of this continuum, it became possible to create recombinant DNA molecules. Immediately it was recognized that there was a potential for serious adverse events associated with this new technology. Following two scientific conferences at Asilomar, California, the National Institutes of Health moved quickly to create the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC). For approximately 38 years the RAC has served as an open forum for review of various recombinant DNA experiments, and for the last 23 years it has played a pivotal role in the oversight of human gene therapy. The RAC's existence obviated the need for more restrictive governmental legislation and has supported the development of genetic interventions that are leading to actual human therapies.

  5. Single Molecule Study of DNA Organization and Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Botao

    We have studied five projects related to DNA organization and recombination using mainly single molecule force-spectroscopy and statistical tools. First, HU is one of the most abundant DNA-organizing proteins in bacterial chromosomes and participates in gene regulation. We report experiments that study the dependence of DNA condensation by HU on force, salt and HU concentration. A first important result is that at physiological salt levels, HU only bends DNA, resolving a previous paradox of why a chromosome-compacting protein should have a DNA-stiffening function. A second major result is quantitative demonstration of strong dependencies of HU-DNA dissociation on both salt concentration and force. Second, we have used a thermodynamic Maxwell relation to count proteins driven off large DNAs by tension, an effect important to understanding DNA organization. Our results compare well with estimates of numbers of proteins HU and Fis in previous studies. We have also shown that a semi-flexible polymer model describes our HU experimental data well. The force-dependent binding suggests mechano-chemical mechanisms for gene regulation. Third, the elusive role of protein H1 in chromatin has been clarified with purified H1 and Xenopus extracts. We find that H1 compacts DNA by both bending and looping. Addition of H1 enhances chromatin formation and maintains the plasticity of the chromatin. Fourth, the topology and mechanics of DNA twisting are critical to DNA organization and recombination. We have systematically measured DNA extension as a function of linking number density from 0.08 to -2 with holding forces from 0.2 to 2.4 pN. Unlike previous proposals, the DNA extension decreases with negative linking number. Finally, DNA recombination is a dynamic process starting from enzyme-DNA binding. We report that the Int-DBD domain of lambda integrase binds to DNA without compaction at low Int-DBD concentration. High concentration of Int-DBD loops DNA below a threshold force

  6. A simplified method for purification of recombinant soluble DnaA proteins.

    PubMed

    Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna M; Kois, Agnieszka; Zakrzewska-Czerwinska, Jolanta

    2006-07-01

    An improved, simplified method for the purification of recombinant, tagged DnaA proteins is described. The presented protocol allowed us to purify soluble DnaA proteins from two different bacterial species: Helicobacter pylori and Streptomyces coelicolor, but it can most likely also be used for the isolation of DnaA proteins from other bacteria, as it was adapted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DnaA. The isolation procedure consists of protein precipitation with ammonium sulphate followed by affinity chromatography. The composition of the buffers used at each purification step is crucial for the successful isolation of the recombinant DnaA proteins. The universality of the method in terms of its application to differently tagged proteins (His-tagged or GST-tagged) as well as different properties of purified proteins (e.g., highly aggregating truncated forms) makes the protocol highly useful for all studies requiring purified and active DnaA proteins.

  7. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  8. Waste recombinant DNA: effectiveness of thermo-treatment to manage potential gene pollution.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaohua; Li, Mengnan; Zheng, Guanghong; Le, Yiquan; Wang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating wastewater containing recombinant DNA in many bio-laboratories in China. In this experiment, plasmid pET-28b was used to investigate decay efficiency of waste recombinant DNA during thermo-treatment. The results showed that the decay half-life of the plasmid was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment, and even heating for 30 min the plasmids still retained some transforming activity. Low pH promoted the decay of recombinant DNA, but NaCl, bovine serum albumin and EDTA, which existed in the most wastewater from bio-laboratories, protected DNA from degradation. Thus, the decay half-life of plasmid DNA may be longer than 2.7-4.0 min practically. These results suggest that the effectiveness of heating at 100 degrees C for treating waste recombinant DNA is low and a gene pollution risk remains when those thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the environment. Therefore other simple and effective methods should be developed.

  9. Genome-Wide Analyses of Recombination Prone Regions Predict Role of DNA Structural Motif in Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2009-01-01

    HapMap findings reveal surprisingly asymmetric distribution of recombinogenic regions. Short recombinogenic regions (hotspots) are interspersed between large relatively non-recombinogenic regions. This raises the interesting possibility of DNA sequence and/or other cis- elements as determinants of recombination. We hypothesized the involvement of non-canonical sequences that can result in local non-B DNA structures and tested this using the G-quadruplex DNA as a model. G-quadruplex or G4 DNA is a unique form of four-stranded non-B DNA structure that engages certain G-rich sequences, presence of such motifs has been noted within telomeres. In support of this hypothesis, genome-wide computational analyses presented here reveal enrichment of potential G4 (PG4) DNA forming sequences within 25618 human hotspots relative to 9290 coldspots (p<0.0001). Furthermore, co-occurrence of PG4 DNA within several short sequence elements that are associated with recombinogenic regions was found to be significantly more than randomly expected. Interestingly, analyses of more than 50 DNA binding factors revealed that co-occurrence of PG4 DNA with target DNA binding sites of transcription factors c-Rel, NF-kappa B (p50 and p65) and Evi-1 was significantly enriched in recombination-prone regions. These observations support involvement of G4 DNA in recombination, predicting a functional model that is consistent with duplex-strand separation induced by formation of G4 motifs in supercoiled DNA and/or when assisted by other cellular factors. PMID:19198658

  10. A novel DNA selection and direct extraction process and its application in DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Bang; Cheng, Chia-Wei; Lin, I-Chun; Lu, Fei-Yau; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lin, Chiu-Chun; Yang, Chun-Hui; Pan, Po-Ting; Kuan, Chen-Chi; Chen, Yen-Chih; Lin, Yi-Wei; Chang, Chih-Ning; Wu, Yi-Hung; Kurniawan, Tetuko; Lin, Chii-Wann; Wo, Andrew M; Chen, Lin-Chi

    2011-02-01

    In the conventional bench-top approach, the DNA recombination process is time- and effort-consuming due to laborious procedures lasting from several hours to a day. A novel DNA selection and direct extraction process has been proposed, integrated and tested on chip. The integrative microfluidic chip can perform the whole procedure of DNA recombination, including DNA digestion, gel electrophoresis, DNA extraction and insert-vector ligation within 1 h. In this high-throughput design, the manual gel cutting was replaced by an automatic processing system that performed high-quality and high-recovery efficiency in DNA extraction process. With no need of gel-dissolving reagents and manipulation, the application of selection and direct extraction process could significantly eliminate the risks from UV and EtBr and also facilitate DNA recombination. Reliable output with high success rate of cloning has been achieved with a significant reduction in operational hazards, required materials, efforts and time.

  11. Involvement of residues Asp8, Asn13, Glu145, Asp168, and Thr173 in the chaperone activity of a recombinant DnaK from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min-Guan; Liang, Wan-Chi; Chen, Bo-En; Chou, Wei-Mou; Lin, Long-Liu

    2011-01-01

    Based on the sequence homology, we have modeled the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus licheniformis DnaK (BlDnaK), a counterpart of Hsp70, and identified five different amino acids that might be responsible for maintaining ADP-Mg(2+)-Pi in the correct configuration at the ATP-binding cleft of the protein. As compared with wild-type BlDnaK, site-directed mutant proteins D8A, N13D, E145A, D168A, and T173A had a dramatic reduction in their chaperone activities. Complementation test revealed that the mutant proteins lost completely the ability to rescue the temperature-sensitive growth defect of Escherichia colidnaK756-ts. Wild-type BlDnak assisted the refolding of denatured firefly luciferase, whereas a significant decrease in this ability was observed for the mutant proteins. Simultaneous addition of B. licheniformis DnaJ, BlGrpE, and NR-peptide, did not synergistically stimulate the ATPase activity of D8A, E145A, D168A and T173A. Circular dichroism spectra were nearly identical for wild-type and mutant proteins, and they, except D8A, also exhibited a similar sensitivity towards temperature-induced denaturation. These results suggest that the selected residues are critical for the proper function of BlDnaK.

  12. Preferential recombination between GC clusters in yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, C L; Gandy, B

    1987-01-01

    Yeast mitochondrial DNA molecules have long, AT-rich intergenic spacers punctuated by short GC clusters. GC-rich elements have previously been characterized by others as preferred sites for intramolecular recombination leading to the formation of subgenomic petite molecules. In the present study we show that GC clusters are favored sites for intermolecular recombination between a petite and the wild-type grande genome. The petite studied retains 6.5 kb of mitochondrial DNA reiterated tandemly to form molecules consisting of repeated units. Genetic selection for integration of tandem 6.5 kb repeats of the petite into the grande genome yielded a novel recombination event. One of two crossovers in a double exchange event occurred as expected in the 6.5 kb of matching sequence between the genomes, whereas the second exchange involved a 44 bp GC cluster in the petite and another 44 bp GC cluster in the grande genome 700 bp proximal to the region of homology. Creation of a mitochondrial DNA molecule with a repetitive region led to secondary recombination events that generated a family of molecules with zero to several petite units. The finding that 44 bp GC clusters are preferred as sites for intermolecular exchange adds to the data on petite excision implicating these elements as recombinational hotspots in the yeast mitochondrial genome. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3327690

  13. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  14. The Evolution of Tandemly Repetitive DNA: Recombination Rules

    PubMed Central

    Harding, R. M.; Boyce, A. J.; Clegg, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs), which include hypervariable regions, minisatellites and microsatellites, can be assigned together with satellite DNAs to define a class of noncoding tandemly repetitive DNA (TR-DNA). The evolution of TR-DNA is assumed to be driven by an unbiased recombinational process. A simulation model of unequal exchange is presented and used to investigate the evolutionary persistence of single TR-DNA lineages. Three different recombination rules are specified to govern the expansion and contraction of a TR-DNA lineage from an initial array of two repeats to, finally, a single repeat allele, which cannot participate in a misalignment and exchange process. In the absence of amplification or selection acting to bias array evolution toward expansion, the probability of attaining a target array size is a function only of the initial number of repeats. We show that the proportions of lineages attaining a targeted array size are the same irrespective of recombination rule and rate, demonstrating that our simulation model is well behaved. The time taken to attain a target array size, the persistence of the target array, and the total persistence time of repetitive array structure, are functions of the initial number of repeats, the rate of recombination, and the rules of misalignment preceding recombinational exchange. These relationships are investigated using our simulation model. While misalignment contraint is probably greatest for satellite DNA it also seems important in accounting for the evolution of VNTR loci including minisatellites. This conclusion is consistent with the observed nonrandom distributions of VNTRs and other TR-DNAs in the human genome. PMID:1468634

  15. Switch recombination breakpoints are strictly correlated with DNA recognition motifs for immunoglobulin S gamma 3 DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The deletion looping out model of switch (S) recombination predicts that the intervening DNA between switch regions will be excised as a circle. Circular excision products of immunoglobulin switch recombination have been recently isolated from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- stimulated spleen cells. The recombination breakpoints in these large circles were found to fall within switch regions. Since switch recombination is clearly focused on switch regions, we hypothesized that some DNA-binding protein factor might be involved in specifically recognizing and facilitating the alignment of switch regions before recombination. Two DNA-binding proteins that specifically interact with two discrete regions of the S gamma 3 tandem repeat have been identified in crude and partially purified nuclear extracts derived from LPS- and dextran sulfate (DxS)-activated splenic B cells. The first factor has been found indistinguishable from NF-kappa B by mobility shift assays, methylation interference, competition binding studies, and supershift analysis using an antiserum specific for the p50 component. The second appears to be composed of two closely traveling mobilities that do not separate upon partial purification. This second complex is unique and specific for S gamma 3 by methylation interference assays and competition-binding analysis. The sites at which recombination occurs in the S gamma 3 switch region have been analyzed and found to strictly correlate with the binding sites of the S gamma 3 switch binding proteins. PMID:1500850

  16. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  17. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. A Collaborative, Investigative Recombinant DNA Technology Course with Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzementi, Leo; Johnson, Joy F.

    2002-01-01

    A recombinant DNA technology course was designed to promote contextual, collaborative, inquiry-based learning of science where students learn from one another and have a sense of ownership of their education. The class stressed group presentations and critical reading and discussion of scientific articles. The laboratory consisted of two research…

  19. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. DNA sequence and structure requirements for cleavage of V(D)J recombination signal sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, C A; Mundy, C L; Oettinger, M A

    1996-01-01

    Purified RAG1 and RAG2 proteins can cleave DNA at V(D)J recombination signals. In dissecting the DNA sequence and structural requirements for cleavage, we find that the heptamer and nonamer motifs of the recombination signal sequence can independently direct both steps of the cleavage reaction. Proper helical spacing between these two elements greatly enhances the efficiency of cleavage, whereas improper spacing can lead to interference between the two elements. The signal sequences are surprisingly tolerant of structural variation and function efficiently when nicks, gaps, and mismatched bases are introduced or even when the signal sequence is completely single stranded. Sequence alterations that facilitate unpairing of the bases at the signal/coding border activate the cleavage reaction, suggesting that DNA distortion is critical for V(D)J recombination. PMID:8816481

  1. An inhibitor of DNA recombination blocks memory consolidation, but not reconsolidation, in context fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Colón-Cesario, Melissa; Wang, Jianpeng; Ramos, Xiomara; García, Hermes G; Dávila, Jorge J; Laguna, Jessenia; Rosado, Claribel; Peña de Ortiz, Sandra

    2006-05-17

    Genomic recombination requires cutting, processing, and rejoining of DNA by endonucleases, polymerases, and ligases, among other factors. We have proposed that DNA recombination mechanisms may contribute to long-term memory (LTM) formation in the brain. Our previous studies with the nucleoside analog 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine triphosphate (ara-CTP), a known inhibitor of DNA ligases and polymerases, showed that this agent blocked consolidation of conditioned taste aversion without interfering with short-term memory (STM). However, because polymerases and ligases are also essential for DNA replication, it remained unclear whether the effects of this drug on consolidation were attributable to interference with DNA recombination or neurogenesis. Here we show, using C57BL/6 mice, that ara-CTP specifically blocks consolidation but not STM of context fear conditioning, a task previously shown not to require neurogenesis. The effects of a single systemic dose of cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) on LTM were evident as early as 6 h after training. In addition, although ara-C impaired LTM, it did not impair general locomotor activity nor induce brain neurotoxicity. Importantly, hippocampal, but not insular cortex, infusions of ara-C also blocked consolidation of context fear conditioning. Separate studies revealed that context fear conditioning training significantly induced nonhomologous DNA end joining activity indicative of DNA ligase-dependent recombination in hippocampal, but not cortex, protein extracts. Finally, unlike inhibition of protein synthesis, systemic ara-C did not block reconsolidation of context fear conditioning. Our results support the idea that DNA recombination is a process specific to consolidation that is not involved in the postreactivation editing of memories.

  2. Role of Recombinant DNA Technology to Improve Life

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Suliman; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Siddique, Rabeea; Nabi, Ghulam; Manan, Sehrish; Yousaf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. However, in recent era, this field has demonstrated unique impacts in bringing advancement in human life. By virtue of this technology, crucial proteins required for health problems and dietary purposes can be produced safely, affordably, and sufficiently. This technology has multidisciplinary applications and potential to deal with important aspects of life, for instance, improving health, enhancing food resources, and resistance to divergent adverse environmental effects. Particularly in agriculture, the genetically modified plants have augmented resistance to harmful agents, enhanced product yield, and shown increased adaptability for better survival. Moreover, recombinant pharmaceuticals are now being used confidently and rapidly attaining commercial approvals. Techniques of recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, and genetic modifications are also widely used for the purpose of bioremediation and treating serious diseases. Due to tremendous advancement and broad range of application in the field of recombinant DNA technology, this review article mainly focuses on its importance and the possible applications in daily life. PMID:28053975

  3. Role of Recombinant DNA Technology to Improve Life.

    PubMed

    Khan, Suliman; Ullah, Muhammad Wajid; Siddique, Rabeea; Nabi, Ghulam; Manan, Sehrish; Yousaf, Muhammad; Hou, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. However, in recent era, this field has demonstrated unique impacts in bringing advancement in human life. By virtue of this technology, crucial proteins required for health problems and dietary purposes can be produced safely, affordably, and sufficiently. This technology has multidisciplinary applications and potential to deal with important aspects of life, for instance, improving health, enhancing food resources, and resistance to divergent adverse environmental effects. Particularly in agriculture, the genetically modified plants have augmented resistance to harmful agents, enhanced product yield, and shown increased adaptability for better survival. Moreover, recombinant pharmaceuticals are now being used confidently and rapidly attaining commercial approvals. Techniques of recombinant DNA technology, gene therapy, and genetic modifications are also widely used for the purpose of bioremediation and treating serious diseases. Due to tremendous advancement and broad range of application in the field of recombinant DNA technology, this review article mainly focuses on its importance and the possible applications in daily life.

  4. Recombination between DNA repeats in yeast hpr1delta cells is linked to transcription elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Prado, F; Piruat, J I; Aguilera, A

    1997-01-01

    The induction of recombination by transcription activation has been documented in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Unwinding of the DNA duplex, disruption of chromatin structure or changes in local supercoiling associated with transcription can be indirectly responsible for the stimulation of recombination. Here we provide genetic and molecular evidence for a specific mechanism of stimulation of recombination by transcription. We show that the induction of deletions between repeats in hpr1delta cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is linked to transcription elongation. Molecular analysis of different direct repeat constructs reveals that deletions induced by hpr1delta are specific for repeat constructs in which transcription initiating at an external promoter traverses particular regions of the DNA flanked by the repeats. Transcription becomes HPR1 dependent when elongating through such regions. Both the induction of deletions and the HPR1 dependence of transcription were abolished when a strong terminator was used to prevent transcription from proceeding through the DNA region flanked by the repeats. In contrast to previously reported cases of transcription-induced recombination, there was no correlation between high levels of transcripts and high levels of recombination. Our study provides evidence that direct repeat recombination can be induced by transcriptional elongation. PMID:9184227

  5. Direct facile screening of recombinant DNA vector constructs.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Challa, Rushi; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Raman, Venu

    2014-04-01

    Direct efficient facile screening of bacterial transformants with the goal of selecting, retrieving, and using recombinant DNA is exemplified by simple visual-based colorimetric inspections or fluorescent protein-based assays. We describe pRedScript, which introduces the constitutive expression of a very bright red fluorescent protein into transformants. On agar plates, red colonies are simply visualized in ambient white light in stark contrast to recombinant transformants that are white. In addition, the bright red fluorescence of the reporter protein can also be harnessed as a sensitive signal for screening bacterial promoters during the development of optimized fermentation conditions.

  6. Endonucleases involved in repair and recombination of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    When our DOE support began as a contract in 1970, from the AEC, it was our intent to begin to understand how several enzymes which we had detected in E. coli might be involved in DNA recombination and repair. These studies led to our characterization of the recBC DNase (exonuclease 5) as well as endonucleases 3 and 5. As research supported by that contract progressed, we expanded our interests to include mammalian enzymes involved in base excision repair, most notably AP endonucleases, DNA glycosylases and DNA purine insertase. A logical next step involved the inclusion of DNA polymerases into our studies of repair. Current progress includes research on: isolation of xeroderma pigmentosum correction factors; isolation of ultraviolet (UV) endonucleases; mitochondrial repair enzymes; alkylation damage repair; comparisons of repair in normal diploid, transformed, and non-mitotic cells; and repair reactions by DNA polymerases.

  7. Protection of mice against the highly pathogenic VVIHD-J by DNA and fowlpox recombinant vaccines, administered by electroporation and intranasal routes, correlates with serum neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Bissa, Massimiliano; Quaglino, Elena; Zanotto, Carlo; Illiano, Elena; Rolih, Valeria; Pacchioni, Sole; Cavallo, Federica; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Radaelli, Antonia

    2016-10-01

    The control of smallpox was achieved using live vaccinia virus (VV) vaccine, which successfully eradicated the disease worldwide. As the variola virus no longer exists as a natural infection agent, mass vaccination was discontinued after 1980. However, emergence of smallpox outbreaks caused by accidental or deliberate release of variola virus has stimulated new research for second-generation vaccine development based on attenuated VV strains. Considering the closely related animal poxviruses that also arise as zoonoses, and the increasing number of unvaccinated or immunocompromised people, a safer and more effective vaccine is still required. With this aim, new vectors based on avian poxviruses that cannot replicate in mammals should improve the safety of conventional vaccines, and protect from zoonotic orthopoxvirus diseases, such as cowpox and monkeypox. In this study, DNA and fowlpox (FP) recombinants that expressed the VV L1R, A27L, A33R, and B5R genes were generated (4DNAmix, 4FPmix, respectively) and tested in mice using novel administration routes. Mice were primed with 4DNAmix by electroporation, and boosted with 4FPmix applied intranasally. The lethal VVIHD-J strain was then administered by intranasal challenge. All of the mice receiving 4DNAmix followed by 4FPmix, and 20% of the mice immunized only with 4FPmix, were protected. The induction of specific humoral and cellular immune responses directly correlated with this protection. In particular, higher anti-A27 antibodies and IFNγ-producing T lymphocytes were measured in the blood and spleen of the protected mice, as compared to controls. VVIHD-J neutralizing antibodies in sera from the protected mice suggest that the prime/boost vaccination regimen with 4DNAmix plus 4FPmix may be an effective and safe mode to induce protection against smallpox and poxvirus zoonotic infections. The electroporation/intranasal administration routes contributed to effective immune responses and mouse survival.

  8. Jeremy Rifkin challenges recombinant DNA research: A rhetoric of heresy

    SciTech Connect

    Futrell, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    One significant issue to come before the public in recent years is recombinant DNA research or genetic engineering and its applications. An important spokesman on this issue is Jeremy Rifkin. Rifkin is of rhetorical interest because of his strategies to sustain the dialogue and define the parameters in which it occurs. This dissertation analyzes a broad range of Rifkin's rhetorical artifacts and those of scientists engaged in recombinant DNA research. They are examined against criteria developed to identify and understand heresy. The five areas of analysis are: the nearness/remoteness phenomenon, the social construction of heresy, the social consequences of heresy, the doctrinal consequences of heresy, and the heresy-hunt ritual. The first two criteria focus on the rhetorical strategies of the heretic. The last three concentrate on the rhetorical strategies of the defenders of the institutional orthodoxy. This dissertation examines the rhetorical strategies of a heretical challenge to the scientific establishment and the consequences of that challenge. This dissertation also analyzes the rhetorical strategies employed by the defenders of the scientific orthodoxy. Although an understanding of the rhetorical strategies employed on both sides of this conflict is important, the implications for the role of rhetoric in highly controversial issues such as recombinant DNA are even more critical.

  9. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Northall, Sarah J.; Ivančić-Baće, Ivana; Soultanas, Panos; Bolt, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops), a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR), which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing. PMID:27548227

  10. Roles of RECQ helicases in recombination based DNA repair, genomic stability and aging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Ahn, Byungchan

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of the stability of genetic material is an essential feature of every living organism. Organisms across all kingdoms have evolved diverse and highly efficient repair mechanisms to protect the genome from deleterious consequences of various genotoxic factors that might tend to destabilize the integrity of the genome in each generation. One such group of proteins that is actively involved in genome surveillance is the RecQ helicase family. These proteins are highly conserved DNA helicases, which have diverse roles in multiple DNA metabolic processes such as DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. In humans, five RecQ helicases have been identified and three of them namely, WRN, BLM and RecQL4 have been linked to genetic diseases characterized by genome instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. This helicase family plays important roles in various DNA repair pathways including protecting the genome from illegitimate recombination during chromosome segregation in mitosis and assuring genome stability. This review mainly focuses on various roles of human RecQ helicases in the process of recombination-based DNA repair to maintain genome stability and physiological consequences of their defects in the development of cancer and premature aging. PMID:19083132

  11. Roles of RECQ helicases in recombination based DNA repair, genomic stability and aging.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Ahn, Byungchan; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-01

    The maintenance of the stability of genetic material is an essential feature of every living organism. Organisms across all kingdoms have evolved diverse and highly efficient repair mechanisms to protect the genome from deleterious consequences of various genotoxic factors that might tend to destabilize the integrity of the genome in each generation. One such group of proteins that is actively involved in genome surveillance is the RecQ helicase family. These proteins are highly conserved DNA helicases, which have diverse roles in multiple DNA metabolic processes such as DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. In humans, five RecQ helicases have been identified and three of them namely, WRN, BLM and RecQL4 have been linked to genetic diseases characterized by genome instability, premature aging and cancer predisposition. This helicase family plays important roles in various DNA repair pathways including protecting the genome from illegitimate recombination during chromosome segregation in mitosis and assuring genome stability. This review mainly focuses on various roles of human RecQ helicases in the process of recombination-based DNA repair to maintain genome stability and physiological consequences of their defects in the development of cancer and premature aging.

  12. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 49, Recombination at the DNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume contains full papers prepared by the participants to the 1984 Cold Springs Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. This year's theme is entitled Recombination at the DNA level. The volume consists of 93 articles grouped into subject areas entitled chromosome mechanics, yeast systems, mammalian homologous recombination, transposons, mu, plant transposons/T4 recombination, topoisomerase, resolvase and gyrase, Escherichia coli general recombination, RecA, repair, leukaryotic enzymes, integration and excision of bacteriophage, site-specific recombination, and recombination in vitro.

  13. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  14. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  15. Mismatch repair of heteroduplex DNA intermediates of extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    Previous work indicated that extrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells could be explained by the single-strand annealing (SSA) model. This model predicts that extrachromosomal recombination leads to nonconservative crossover products and that heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) is formed by annealing of complementary single strands. Mismatched bases in hDNA may subsequently be repaired to wild-type or mutant sequences, or they may remain unrepaired and segregate following DNA replication. We describe a system to examine the formation and mismatch repair of hDNA in recombination intermediates. Our results are consistent with extrachromosomal recombination occurring via SSA and producing crossover recombinant products. As predicted by the SSA model, hDNA was present in double-strand break-induced recombination intermediates. By placing either silent or frameshift mutations in the predicted hDNA region, we have shown that mismatches are efficiently repaired prior to DNA replication. Images PMID:8264607

  16. The Arabidopsis DNA mismatch repair gene PMS1 restricts somatic recombination between homeologous sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangliang; Dion, Eric; Richard, Gabriel; Domingue, Olivier; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François J

    2009-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system contributes to maintaining the fidelity of genetic information by correcting replication errors and preventing illegitimate recombination events. This study aimed to examine the function(s) of the Arabidopsis thaliana PMS1 gene (AtPMS1), one of three homologs of the bacterial MutL gene in plants. Two independent mutant alleles (Atpms1-1 and Atpms1-2) were obtained and one of these (Atpms1-1) was studied in detail. The mutant exhibited a reduction in seed set and a bias against the transmission of the mutant allele. Somatic recombination, both homologous and homeologous, was examined using a set of reporter constructs. Homologous recombination remained unchanged in the mutant while homeologous recombination was between 1.7- and 4.8-fold higher than in the wild type. This increase in homeologous recombination frequency was not correlated with the degree of sequence divergence. In RNAi lines, a range of increases in homeologous recombination were observed with two lines showing a 3.3-fold and a 3.6-fold increase. These results indicate that the AtPMS1 gene contributes to an antirecombination activity aimed at restricting recombination between diverged sequences.

  17. Choreography of recombination proteins during the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-09-02

    Genome integrity is frequently challenged by DNA lesions from both endogenous and exogenous sources. A single DNA double-strand break (DSB) is lethal if unrepaired and may lead to loss of heterozygosity, mutations, deletions, genomic rearrangements and chromosome loss if repaired improperly. Such genetic alterations are the main causes of cancer and other genetic diseases. Consequently, DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) is an important process in all living organisms. DSBR is also the driving mechanism in most strategies of gene targeting, which has applications in both genetic and clinical research. Here we review the cell biological response to DSBs in mitotically growing cells with an emphasis on homologous recombination pathways in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in mammalian cells.

  18. Recombinant covalently closed circular hepatitis B virus DNA induces prolonged viral persistence in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhihua; Li, Gaiyun; Hu, Hao; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leng, Qibin; Xie, Youhua; Yu, Demin; Zhang, Xinxin; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    It remains crucial to develop a laboratory model for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. We hereby produced a recombinant covalently closed circular DNA (rcccDNA) in view of the key role of cccDNA in HBV persistence. A loxP-chimeric intron was engineered into a monomeric HBV genome in a precursor plasmid (prcccDNA), which was excised using Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination into a 3.3-kb rcccDNA in the nuclei of hepatocytes. The chimeric intron was spliced from RNA transcripts without interrupting the HBV life cycle. In cultured hepatoma cells, cotransfection of prcccDNA and pCMV-Cre (encoding Cre recombinase) resulted in accumulation of nuclear rcccDNA that was heat stable and epigenetically organized as a minichromosome. A mouse model of HBV infection was developed by hydrodynamic injection of prcccDNA. In the presence of Cre recombinase, rcccDNA was induced in the mouse liver with effective viral replication and expression, triggering a compromised T-cell response against HBV. Significant T-cell hyporesponsiveness occurred in mice receiving 4 μg prcccDNA, resulting in prolonged HBV antigenemia for up to 9 weeks. Persistent liver injury was observed as elevated alanine transaminase activity in serum and sustained inflammatory infiltration in the liver. Although a T-cell dysfunction was induced similarly, mice injected with a plasmid containing a linear HBV replicon showed rapid viral clearance within 2 weeks. Collectively, our study provides an innovative approach for producing a cccDNA surrogate that established HBV persistence in immunocompetent mice. It also represents a useful model system in vitro and in vivo for evaluating antiviral treatments against HBV cccDNA. Importance: (i) Unlike plasmids that contain a linear HBV replicon, rcccDNA established HBV persistence with sustained liver injury in immunocompetent mice. This method could be a prototype for developing a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. (ii) An exogenous intron was

  19. Purification and Characterization of a DNA-Binding Recombinant PREP1:PBX1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Bruckmann, Chiara; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Human PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain transcriptional factors, whose biochemical and structural characterization has not yet been fully described. Expression of full-length recombinant PREP1 (47.6 kDa) and PBX1 (46.6 kDa) in E. coli is difficult because of poor yield, high instability and insufficient purity, in particular for structural studies. We cloned the cDNA of both proteins into a dicistronic vector containing an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and co-expressed and co-purified a stable PBX1:PREP1 complex. For structural studies, we produced two C-terminally truncated complexes that retain their ability to bind DNA and are more stable than the full-length proteins through various purification steps. Here we report the production of large amounts of soluble and pure recombinant human PBX1:PREP1 complex in an active form capable of binding DNA. PMID:25856340

  20. Purification and characterization of a DNA-binding recombinant PREP1:PBX1 complex.

    PubMed

    Mathiasen, Lisa; Bruckmann, Chiara; Pasqualato, Sebastiano; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Human PREP1 and PBX1 are homeodomain transcriptional factors, whose biochemical and structural characterization has not yet been fully described. Expression of full-length recombinant PREP1 (47.6 kDa) and PBX1 (46.6 kDa) in E. coli is difficult because of poor yield, high instability and insufficient purity, in particular for structural studies. We cloned the cDNA of both proteins into a dicistronic vector containing an N-terminal glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag and co-expressed and co-purified a stable PBX1:PREP1 complex. For structural studies, we produced two C-terminally truncated complexes that retain their ability to bind DNA and are more stable than the full-length proteins through various purification steps. Here we report the production of large amounts of soluble and pure recombinant human PBX1:PREP1 complex in an active form capable of binding DNA.

  1. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, A

    2001-07-17

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair.

  2. [An effective scheme to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli for PCR diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Dmitrochenko, A E; Turiianskaia, O M; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A; Iantsevich, A V

    2014-01-01

    An effective scheme has been developed to produce recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase of Escherichia coli K12 intended to be used for PCR diagnostics, making it possible to achieve a high yield of the end product using a two-stage purification. The gene encoding this enzyme was cloned into the pCWori vector within the same reading frame with six residues of histidine in the C-erminal sequence. Using this vector and the E. coli DH5alpha, a host-vector expression system has been developed and conditions for protein synthesis have been optimized. To purify the protein, metal affinity chromatography with further dialysis was used to remove imidazole. The enzyme yield was no less than 60 mg of the end protein per 1 L of the culture medium. The concordance between amino acid sequences of the recombinant and native enzymes was proved by peptide mass fingerprinting and mass spectrometry. A rapid test to determine the activity of the enzyme preparation was suggested. It was found that the activity of 1.0 mg of the recombinant protein is no less than 3 x 10(3) units. The recombinant enzyme was most stable at pH 8.0 and an ionic strength of the solution equal to 200 mM; it lost its activity completely for 10 min at 60 degrees C. Storage during 1 h at 20 degrees C resulted in the loss of no more than 30% of activity. In the enzyme preparation, the activity of DNase was absent. The free energy of the unfolding of the protein globule of the recombinant uracil-DNA glycosylase is 23.1 +/- 0.2 kJ/mol. The data obtained indicate that the recombinant enzyme may be recommended for use in PCR diagnostics to prevent the appearance of false positive results caused by pollution of the reaction mixture by products of the preceding reactions.

  3. Homologous recombination intermediates between two duplex DNA catalysed by human cell extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, B; Rousset, S; Coppey, J

    1987-01-01

    Using as substrates, 1: the replicative form (RF) of phage M13 mp8 in which the reading frame of the lac Z' gene was disrupted by insertion of an octonucleotide, and 2: a restriction fragment one kb long, containing the functional lac Z' gene (isolated from wild type M13 mp8), we show that nuclear extracts from human cells (3 lines tested) promote the targeted replacement of the altered sequence by the functional one. Following incubation with the extracts, the DNA's were introduced in JM 109 bacteria (rec A- and lac Z'-) which were grown in presence of a colorimetric indicator of beta-galactosidase activity. Homologous recombination gives rise to the genotypical modification: lac Z'+ instead of lac Z'- in the bacteriophage DNA. This is revealed by phenotypical expression of the lac Z' gene product in replicating bacteriophage, i.e. the formation of blue instead of white plaques. The frequency of recombination (blue/total plaques) is increased by a factor of 50-80 as a function of protein concentration and of incubation time. The maximal frequency observed is 5 X 10(-5). There is no increase over the background when extracts are boiled. Electrophoresis and electron microscopy of DNA's incubated with the extracts show the formation of recombination intermediates with single strand exchange. Restriction analysis of recombined DNA confirms that the process corresponds to targeted sequence exchange. These data allow to propose three steps for homologous recombination between two duplex DNA's: i) unpairing of the two duplexes; ii) single-strand exchange and synaptic pairing; iii) resolution of the cross-junctions. The three steps correspond to those predicted by the gene conversion model of Holliday. Images PMID:3302944

  4. Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein and DNA-dependent protein kinase have complementary V(D)J recombination functions.

    PubMed

    Zha, Shan; Jiang, Wenxia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Patel, Harin; Goff, Peter H; Brush, James W; Dubois, Richard L; Alt, Frederick W

    2011-02-01

    Antigen receptor variable region exons are assembled during lymphocyte development from variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments. Each germ-line gene segment is flanked by recombination signal sequences (RSs). Recombination-activating gene endonuclease initiates V(D)J recombination by cleaving a pair of gene segments at their junction with flanking RSs to generate covalently sealed (hairpinned) coding ends (CEs) and blunt 5'-phosphorylated RS ends (SEs). Subsequently, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) opens, processes, and fuses CEs to form coding joins (CJs) and precisely joins SEs to form signal joins (SJs). DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activates Artemis endonuclease to open and process hairpinned CEs before their fusion into CJs by other NHEJ factors. Although DNA-PKcs is absolutely required for CJs, SJs are formed to variable degrees and with variable fidelity in different DNA-PKcs-deficient cell types. Thus, other factors may compensate for DNA-PKcs function in SJ formation. DNA-PKcs and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase are members of the same family, and they share common substrates in the DNA damage response. Although ATM deficiency compromises chromosomal V(D)J CJ formation, it has no reported role in SJ formation in normal cells. Here, we report that DNA-PKcs and ATM have redundant functions in SJ formation. Thus, combined DNA-PKcs and ATM deficiency during V(D)J recombination leads to accumulation of unjoined SEs and lack of SJ fidelity. Moreover, treatment of DNA-PKcs- or ATM-deficient cells, respectively, with specific kinase inhibitors for ATM or DNA-PKcs recapitulates SJ defects, indicating that the overlapping V(D)J recombination functions of ATM and DNA-PKcs are mediated through their kinase activities.

  5. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  6. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is an... deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) technology. The device is intended for use in general soft tissue approximation...

  8. Analysis and optimization of recombinant DNA joining reactions.

    PubMed

    Legerski, R J; Robberson, D L

    1985-01-20

    The statistical segment length of duplex DNA was determined in phage T4 ligase (poly(deoxyribonucleotide): poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP forming), EC 6.5.1.1) buffer (50 mM-Tris . HCl (pH 7.8), 20 mM-dithiothreitol, 10 mM-MgCl2, 1 mM-ATP) at 12 degrees C to be 1030(+/- 116) A. This result was obtained by electron microscopic examination of the molecular distributions generated by T4 ligase-mediated joining of EcoRI-cleaved pBR322 DNA. This value of the statistical segment length was utilized in an extension of the Jacobson-Stockmayer theory on the probability of intramolecular cyclization in order to optimize DNA joining reactions that are of great utility in recombinant DNA experiments. Five cloning systems were analyzed: circular plasmid vectors that had been linearized with one or two restriction endonucleases, circular plasmids that had been tailed with deoxyhomopolymers before joining, lambda-type cloning vectors and cosmids. The results are tabulated for convenient use in molecular cloning experiments.

  9. Early days of DNA repair: discovery of nucleotide excision repair and homology-dependent recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Rupp, W Dean

    2013-12-13

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere.

  10. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Sandra K.; Sawitzke, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies. PMID:25002096

  11. Recombination promoted by DNA viruses: phage λ to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Weller, Sandra K; Sawitzke, James A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for understanding viral origins as well as the dynamic nature of viral-host interactions. Both bacteriophage λ and herpes simplex virus (HSV) display high rates of recombination, both utilizing their own proteins and commandeering cellular proteins to promote recombination reactions. We focus primarily on λ and HSV, as they have proven amenable to both genetic and biochemical analysis and have recently been shown to exhibit some surprising similarities that will guide future studies.

  12. DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting a chromatin signature permissive for meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Natasha; Barau, Joan; Teissandier, Aurélie; Walter, Marius; Borsos, Maté; Servant, Nicolas; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for protecting the mammalian germline against transposons. When DNA methylation-based transposon control is defective, meiotic chromosome pairing is consistently impaired during spermatogenesis: How and why meiosis is vulnerable to transposon activity is unknown. Using two DNA methylation-deficient backgrounds, the Dnmt3L and Miwi2 mutant mice, we reveal that DNA methylation is largely dispensable for silencing transposons before meiosis onset. After this, it becomes crucial to back up to a developmentally programmed H3K9me2 loss. Massive retrotransposition does not occur following transposon derepression, but the meiotic chromatin landscape is profoundly affected. Indeed, H3K4me3 marks gained over transcriptionally active transposons correlate with formation of SPO11-dependent double-strand breaks and recruitment of the DMC1 repair enzyme in Dnmt3L−/− meiotic cells, whereas these features are normally exclusive to meiotic recombination hot spots. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting chromatin characteristics amenable to meiotic recombination, which we propose prevents the occurrence of erratic chromosomal events. PMID:26109049

  13. DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting a chromatin signature permissive for meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, Natasha; Barau, Joan; Teissandier, Aurélie; Walter, Marius; Borsos, Maté; Servant, Nicolas; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation is essential for protecting the mammalian germline against transposons. When DNA methylation-based transposon control is defective, meiotic chromosome pairing is consistently impaired during spermatogenesis: How and why meiosis is vulnerable to transposon activity is unknown. Using two DNA methylation-deficient backgrounds, the Dnmt3L and Miwi2 mutant mice, we reveal that DNA methylation is largely dispensable for silencing transposons before meiosis onset. After this, it becomes crucial to back up to a developmentally programmed H3K9me2 loss. Massive retrotransposition does not occur following transposon derepression, but the meiotic chromatin landscape is profoundly affected. Indeed, H3K4me3 marks gained over transcriptionally active transposons correlate with formation of SPO11-dependent double-strand breaks and recruitment of the DMC1 repair enzyme in Dnmt3L(-/-) meiotic cells, whereas these features are normally exclusive to meiotic recombination hot spots. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting chromatin characteristics amenable to meiotic recombination, which we propose prevents the occurrence of erratic chromosomal events.

  14. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is affected. Here, we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a noncoding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of noncoding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction.

  15. Statistical Analysis on Detecting Recombination Sites in DNA-β Satellites Associated with Old World Geminiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kai; Yoshida, Ruriko

    2010-01-01

    Although exchange of genetic information by recombination plays an important role in the evolution of viruses, it is not clear how it generates diversity. Understanding recombination events helps with the study of the evolution of new virus strains or new viruses. Geminiviruses are plant viruses which have ambisense single-stranded circular DNA genomes and are one of the most economically important plant viruses in agricultural production. Small circular single-stranded DNA satellites, termed DNA-β, have recently been found to be associated with some geminivirus infections. In this paper we analyze several DNA-β sequences of geminiviruses for recombination events using phylogenetic and statistical analysis and we find that one strain from ToLCMaB has a recombination pattern and is a recombinant molecule between two strains from two species, PaLCuB-[IN:Chi:05] (major parent) and ToLCB-[IN:CP:04] (minor parent). We propose that this recombination event contributed to the evolution of the strain of ToLCMaB in South India. The Hidden Markov Chain (HMM) method developed by Webb et al. (2009) estimating phylogenetic tree through out the whole alignment provide us a recombination history of these DNA-β strains. It is the first time that this statistic method has been used on DNArecombination study and give a clear recombination history of DNArecombination. PMID:21423447

  16. Accessibility of chromosomal recombination breaks in nuclei of wild-type and DNA-PKcs-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Franco, Daniel; Chang, Yung

    2009-07-04

    V(D)J recombination is a highly regulated process, proceeding from a site-specific cleavage to an imprecise end joining. After the DNA excision catalyzed by the recombinase encoded by recombination activating genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2), newly generated recombination ends are believed held by a post-cleavage complex (PC) consisting of RAG1/2 proteins, and are subsequently resolved by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) machinery. The relay of these ends from PC to NHEJ remains elusive. It has been speculated that NHEJ factors modify the RAG1/2-PC to gain access to the ends or act on free ends after the disassembly of the PC. Thus, recombination ends may either be retained in a complex throughout the recombination process or left as unprotected free ends after cleavage, a condition that may permit an alternative, non-classical NHEJ end joining pathway. To directly test these scenarios on recombination induced chromosomal breaks, we have developed a recombination end protection assay to monitor the accessibility of recombination ends to exonuclease-V in intact nuclei. We demonstrate that these ends are well protected in the nuclei of wild-type cells, suggesting a seamless cleavage-joining reaction. However, divergent end protection of coding versus signal ends was found in cells derived from severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice that are defective in the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). While signal ends are resistant, opened coding ends are susceptible to enzymatic modification. Our data suggests a role of DNA-PKcs in protecting chromosomal coding ends. Furthermore, using recombination inducible scid cell lines, we demonstrate that conditional protection of coding ends is inversely correlated with the level of their resolution, i.e., the greater the accessibility of the coding ends, the higher level of coding joints formed. Taken together, our findings provide important insights into the resolution of recombination ends by error

  17. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  18. A DNA break– and phosphorylation-dependent positive feedback loop promotes immunoglobulin class-switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Bao Q; Ucher, Anna J; Donghia, Nina M; Gu, Xiwen; Nicolas, Laura; Nowak, Urszula; Rahman, Numa; Strout, Matthew P; Mills, Kevin D; Stavnezer, Janet; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    The ability of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to efficiently mediate class-switch recombination (CSR) is dependent on its phosphorylation at Ser38; however, the trigger that induces AID phosphorylation and the mechanism by which phosphorylated AID drives CSR have not been elucidated. Here we found that phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 was induced by DNA breaks. Conversely, in the absence of AID phosphorylation, DNA breaks were not efficiently generated at switch (S) regions in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (Igh), consistent with a failure of AID to interact with the endonuclease APE1. Additionally, deficiency in the DNA-damage sensor ATM impaired the phosphorylation of AID at Ser38 and the interaction of AID with APE1. Our results identify a positive feedback loop for the amplification of DNA breaks at S regions through the phosphorylation- and ATM-dependent interaction of AID with APE1. PMID:24097111

  19. The DnaE polymerase from Deinococcus radiodurans features RecA-dependent DNA polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randi, Lorenzo; Perrone, Alessandro; Maturi, Mirko; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Camerani, Michela; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We report in the present study on the catalytic properties of the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA polymerase III α subunit (αDr). The αDr enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, both in soluble form and as inclusion bodies. When purified from soluble protein extracts, αDr was found to be tightly associated with E. coli RNA polymerase, from which αDr could not be dissociated. On the contrary, when refolded from inclusion bodies, αDr was devoid of E. coli RNA polymerase and was purified to homogeneity. When assayed with different DNA substrates, αDr featured slower DNA extension rates when compared with the corresponding enzyme from E. coli (E. coli DNA Pol III, αEc), unless under high ionic strength conditions or in the presence of manganese. Further assays were performed using a ssDNA and a dsDNA, whose recombination yields a DNA substrate. Surprisingly, αDr was found to be incapable of recombination-dependent DNA polymerase activity, whereas αEc was competent in this action. However, in the presence of the RecA recombinase, αDr was able to efficiently extend the DNA substrate produced by recombination. Upon comparing the rates of RecA-dependent and RecA-independent DNA polymerase activities, we detected a significant activation of αDr by the recombinase. Conversely, the activity of αEc was found maximal under non-recombination conditions. Overall, our observations indicate a sharp contrast between the catalytic actions of αDr and αEc, with αDr more performing under recombination conditions, and αEc preferring DNA substrates whose extension does not require recombination events. PMID:27789781

  20. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric A.; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A.; Soria, Rebeca; Starnes, Linda M.; Krumpelbeck, Eric F.; Jegga, Anil G.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Guo, Haihong; Meetei, Amom R.; Andreassen, Paul R.; Kappes, Ferdinand; Vinnedge, Lisa M. Privette; Daniel, Jeremy A.; Scully, Ralph; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Wells, Susanne I.

    2017-01-01

    DEK is a highly conserved chromatin-bound protein whose upregulation across cancer types correlates with genotoxic therapy resistance. Loss of DEK induces genome instability and sensitizes cells to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), suggesting defects in DNA repair. While these DEK-deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK-deficient cells. To define responsible mechanisms, we tested the role of DEK in the HR repair cascade. DEK-deficient cells were impaired for γH2AX phosphorylation and attenuated for RAD51 filament formation. Additionally, DEK formed a complex with RAD51, but not BRCA1, suggesting a potential role regarding RAD51 filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition. PMID:28317934

  1. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A; Soria, Rebeca; Starnes, Linda M; Krumpelbeck, Eric F; Jegga, Anil G; Ali, Abdullah M; Guo, Haihong; Meetei, Amom R; Andreassen, Paul R; Kappes, Ferdinand; Vinnedge, Lisa M Privette; Daniel, Jeremy A; Scully, Ralph; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Wells, Susanne I

    2017-03-20

    DEK is a highly conserved chromatin-bound protein whose upregulation across cancer types correlates with genotoxic therapy resistance. Loss of DEK induces genome instability and sensitizes cells to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), suggesting defects in DNA repair. While these DEK-deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK-deficient cells. To define responsible mechanisms, we tested the role of DEK in the HR repair cascade. DEK-deficient cells were impaired for γH2AX phosphorylation and attenuated for RAD51 filament formation. Additionally, DEK formed a complex with RAD51, but not BRCA1, suggesting a potential role regarding RAD51 filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition.

  2. Selection of LNA-containing DNA aptamers against recombinant human CD73.

    PubMed

    Elle, Ida C; Karlsen, Kasper K; Terp, Mikkel G; Larsen, Niels; Nielsen, Ronni; Derbyshire, Nicola; Mandrup, Susanne; Ditzel, Henrik J; Wengel, Jesper

    2015-05-01

    LNA-containing DNA aptamers against CD73 (human ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a protein frequently overexpressed in solid tumours, were isolated by SELEX. A pre-defined stem-loop library, containing LNA in the forward primer region, was enriched with CD73 binding sequences through six rounds of SELEX with recombinant his-tagged CD73 immobilised on anti-his plates. Enriched pools isolated from rounds one, three and six were subjected to next-generation sequencing and analysed for enrichment using custom bioinformatics software. The software identified aptamer sequences via the primers and then performed several steps including sequence unification, clustering and alignment to identify enriched sequences. Three enriched sequences were synthesised for further analysis, two of which showed sequence similarities. These sequences exhibited binding to the recombinant CD73 with KD values of 10 nM and 3.5 nM when tested by surface plasmon resonance. Truncated variants of these aptamers and variants where the LNA nucleotides were substituted for the DNA equivalent also exhibited affinity for the recombinant CD73 in the low nanomolar range. In enzyme inhibition assays with recombinant CD73 the aptamer sequences were able to decrease the activity of the protein. However, the aptamers exhibited no binding to cellular CD73 by flow cytometry analysis likely since the epitope recognised by the aptamer was not available for binding on the cellular protein.

  3. Genetic controls of meiotic recombination and somatic DNA metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, B S; Boyd, J B; Carpenter, A T; Green, M M; Nguyen, T D; Ripoll, P; Smith, P D

    1976-01-01

    Recombination-defective meiotic mutants and mutagen-sensitive mutants of D. melanogaster have been examined for their effects on meiotic chromosome behavior, sensitivity to killing by mutagens, somatic chromosome integrity, and DNA repair processes. Several loci have been identified that specify functions that are necessary for both meiotic recombination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at combination and DNA repair processes, whereas mutants at other loci appear to be defective in only one pathway of DNA processing. PMID:825857

  4. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Siniša; Đermić, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB) resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step), and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system for human

  5. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  6. A DNA topoisomerase VI-like complex initiates meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Vrielynck, Nathalie; Chambon, Aurélie; Vezon, Daniel; Pereira, Lucie; Chelysheva, Liudmila; De Muyt, Arnaud; Mézard, Christine; Mayer, Claudine; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-02-26

    The SPO11 protein catalyzes the formation of meiotic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and is homologous to the A subunit of an archaeal topoisomerase (topo VI). Topo VI are heterotetrameric enzymes comprising two A and two B subunits; however, no topo VIB involved in meiotic recombination had been identified. We characterized a structural homolog of the archaeal topo VIB subunit [meiotic topoisomerase VIB-like (MTOPVIB)], which is essential for meiotic DSB formation. It forms a complex with the two Arabidopsis thaliana SPO11 orthologs required for meiotic DSB formation (SPO11-1 and SPO11-2) and is absolutely required for the formation of the SPO11-1/SPO11-2 heterodimer. These findings suggest that the catalytic core complex responsible for meiotic DSB formation in eukaryotes adopts a topo VI-like structure.

  7. Production of recombinant human DNA polymerase delta in a Bombyx mori bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yajing; Chen, Huiqing; Li, Xiao; Wang, Yujue; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Sufang; Meng, Xiao; Lee, Ernest Y C; Lee, Marietta Y W T

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA polymerase δ (pol δ) plays a crucial role in chromosomal DNA replication and various DNA repair processes. It is thought to consist of p125, p66 (p68), p50 and p12 subunits. However, rigorous isolation of mammalian pol δ from natural sources has usually yielded two-subunit preparations containing only p125 and p50 polypeptides. While recombinant pol δ isolated from infected insect cells have some problems of consistency in the quality of the preparations, and the yields are much lower. To address these deficiencies, we have constructed recombinant BmNPV baculoviruses using MultiBac system. This method makes the generation of recombinant forms of pol δ containing mutations in any one of the subunits or combinations thereof extremely facile. From about 350 infected larvae, we obtained as much as 4 mg of pol δ four-subunit complex. Highly purified enzyme behaved like the one of native form by rigorous characterization and comparison of its activities on poly(dA)/oligo(dT) template-primer and singly primed M13 DNA, and its homogeneity on FPLC gel filtration. In vitro base excision repair (BER) assays showed that pol δ plays a significant role in uracil-intiated BER and is more likely to mediate LP BER, while the trimer lacking p12 is more likely to mediate SN BER. It seems likely that loss of p12 modulates the rate of SN BER and LP BER during the repair process. Thus, this work provides a simple, fast, reliable and economic way for the large-scale production of human DNA polymerase δ with a high activity and purity, setting up a new platform for our further research on the biochemical properties of pol δ, its regulation and the integration of its functions, and how alterations in pol δ function could contribute to the etiology of human cancer or other diseases that can result from loss of genomic stability.

  8. Would Dissociative Recombination of DNA+ be a Possible Pathway of DNA Damage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H. C.; Chen, Z. P.; Strom, R. A.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-05-01

    It is known that dissociative recombination (DR) is one of the very efficient processes of destruction of molecular cations into neutral particles. During the past few years, the focus of DR has been expanded from small inorganic molecules to macromolecular cation. We are probing the possibility of the DR of DNA+ after ionization of DNA, for example due to ionizing radiation. Therefore we are investigating the existence of autoionization states within nucleotide bases (Guanine, Adenine, Cytosine, and Thymine). Our results from computational analysis using the modern electronic structure program ORCA will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate for their financial support.

  9. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4494 - Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture produced by recombinant DNA technology. 878.4494 Section 878.4494 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... recombinant DNA technology. (a) Identification. An absorbable poly(hydroxybutyrate) surgical suture is...

  12. RecBCD Enzyme "Chi Recognition" Mutants Recognize Chi Recombination Hotspots in the Right DNA Context.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, Susan K; Sharp, Jake W; Smith, Gerald R

    2016-09-01

    RecBCD enzyme is a complex, three-subunit protein machine essential for the major pathway of DNA double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli Upon encountering a Chi recombination-hotspot during DNA unwinding, RecBCD nicks DNA to produce a single-stranded DNA end onto which it loads RecA protein. Conformational changes that regulate RecBCD's helicase and nuclease activities are induced upon its interaction with Chi, defined historically as 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Chi is thought to be recognized as single-stranded DNA passing through a tunnel in RecC. To define the Chi recognition-domain in RecC and thus the mechanism of the RecBCD-Chi interaction, we altered by random mutagenesis eight RecC amino acids lining the tunnel. We screened for loss of Chi activity with Chi at one site in bacteriophage λ. The 25 recC mutants analyzed thoroughly had undetectable or strongly reduced Chi-hotspot activity with previously reported Chi sites. Remarkably, most of these mutants had readily detectable, and some nearly wild-type, activity with Chi at newly generated Chi sites. Like wild-type RecBCD, these mutants had Chi activity that responded dramatically (up to fivefold, equivalent to Chi's hotspot activity) to nucleotide changes flanking 5' GCTGGTGG 3'. Thus, these and previously published RecC mutants thought to be Chi-recognition mutants are actually Chi context-dependence mutants. Our results fundamentally alter the view that Chi is a simple 8-bp sequence recognized by the RecC tunnel. We propose that Chi hotspots have dual nucleotide sequence interactions, with both the RecC tunnel and the RecB nuclease domain.

  13. Persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally treated waste recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao H; Wang, Lei; Le, Yi Q; Hu, Jia J

    2012-01-01

    To validate the possibility of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from thermally denatured recombinant DNA discharged into the eco-system, a constructed plasmid was used to investigate the persistence and renaturation efficiency of thermally denatured recombinant DNA in defined aquatic microcosms. The results revealed that there was undecayed recombinant plasmid pMDLKJ material being discharged into the aquatic microcosms even after thermal treatment at either 100°C (using boiling water) or at 120°C (using an autoclave). The plasmid had a relatively long persistence time. At least 10(2) copies μL(-1) of a specific 245 bp fragment of the plasmid could be detected after 12 h and a specific 628 bp fragment could be detected up to 2 h. The thermally denatured recombinant DNA could efficiently renature and recover its functional double stranded structure in aquatic microcosms and the highest concentration of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) occurred around 1 h after the thermally denatured DNA was added to the system. These results imply that when thermally treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into aquatic environments, they have enough time to renature and possibly transfer to other organisms. In addition, the recombinant DNA added to aquatic microcosms could be absorbed by the seston particles in water, such as mineral, organic and colloids particles with a maximum absorption value of about 5.18 ng L(-1). This absorbed DNA could persist longer in aquatic environments than free recombinant DNA, thus further favoring HGT.

  14. RecQ helicase and RecJ nuclease provide complementary functions to resect DNA for homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Morimatsu, Katsumi; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2014-12-02

    Recombinational DNA repair by the RecF pathway of Escherichia coli requires the coordinated activities of RecA, RecFOR, RecQ, RecJ, and single-strand DNA binding (SSB) proteins. These proteins facilitate formation of homologously paired joint molecules between linear double-stranded (dsDNA) and supercoiled DNA. Repair starts with resection of the broken dsDNA by RecQ, a 3'→5' helicase, RecJ, a 5'→3' exonuclease, and SSB protein. The ends of a dsDNA break can be blunt-ended, or they may possess either 5'- or 3'-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs of undefined length. Here we show that RecJ nuclease alone can initiate nucleolytic resection of DNA with 5'-ssDNA overhangs, and that RecQ helicase can initiate resection of DNA with blunt-ends or 3'-ssDNA overhangs by DNA unwinding. We establish that in addition to its well-known ssDNA exonuclease activity, RecJ can display dsDNA exonuclease activity, degrading 100-200 nucleotides of the strand terminating with a 5'-ssDNA overhang. The dsDNA product, with a 3'-ssDNA overhang, is an optimal substrate for RecQ, which unwinds this intermediate to reveal the complementary DNA strand with a 5'-end that is degraded iteratively by RecJ. On the other hand, RecJ cannot resect duplex DNA that is either blunt-ended or terminated with 3'-ssDNA; however, such DNA is unwound by RecQ to create ssDNA for RecJ exonuclease. RecJ requires interaction with SSB for exonucleolytic degradation of ssDNA but not dsDNA. Thus, complementary action by RecJ and RecQ permits initiation of recombinational repair from all dsDNA ends: 5'-overhangs, blunt, or 3'-overhangs. Such helicase-nuclease coordination is a common mechanism underlying resection in all organisms.

  15. Recombination activity of copper in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, R.; Istratov, A. A.; Weber, E. R.

    2001-10-01

    The carrier recombination activity of copper in n-type and p-type silicon has been investigated. The minority carrier diffusion length has been found to decrease monotonically with increasing copper concentration in n Si and to exhibit a step-like behavior in p-type silicon at Cu concentrations above a certain critical level. It is suggested that the impact of copper on the minority carrier diffusion length is determined by the formation of copper precipitates. This process is retarded in perfect silicon due to the large lattice mismatch between Cu3Si and the silicon lattice and even more retarded in p Si, due to electrostatic repulsion effects between the positively charged copper precipitates and interstitial copper ions. Comparison of the impact of Cu on minority carrier diffusion length obtained with p-Si samples of different resistivity confirmed the electrostatic model. Studies of the impact of copper on minority carrier diffusion length in samples with internal gettering sites indicated that they provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for Cu precipitation at subcritical Cu concentration. Above a certain threshold of Cu concentration, the bulk recombination activity is dominated by quasihomogeneous formation of Cu precipitates, a process that is not detectably affected by the presence of oxide precipitates.

  16. Mechanism of homologous recombination and implications for aging-related deletions in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin Jie

    2013-09-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal process, conserved from bacteriophage to human, which is important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Recombination in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was documented more than 4 decades ago, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a Rad52-type recombination system of bacteriophage origin in mitochondria, which operates by a single-strand annealing mechanism independent of the canonical RecA/Rad51-type recombinases. Increasing evidence supports the notion that, like in bacteriophages, mtDNA inheritance is a coordinated interplay between recombination, repair, and replication. These findings could have profound implications for understanding the mechanism of mtDNA inheritance and the generation of mtDNA deletions in aging cells.

  17. High expression of functional adenovirus DNA polymerase and precursor terminal protein using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Stunnenberg, H G; Lange, H; Philipson, L; van Miltenburg, R T; van der Vliet, P C

    1988-01-01

    Initiation of Adenovirus (Ad) DNA replication occurs by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral precursor terminal protein (pTP) and DNA polymerase (pol) as well as two nuclear DNA-binding proteins from uninfected HeLa cells are required. Biochemical studies on the pTP and DNA polymerase proteins separately have been hampered due to their low abundance and their presence as a pTP-pol complex in Ad infected cells. We have constructed a genomic sequence containing the large open reading frame from the Ad5 pol gene to which 9 basepairs from a putative exon were ligated. When inserted behind a modified late promoter of vaccinia virus the resulting recombinant virus produced enzymatically active 140 kDa Ad DNA polymerase. The same strategy was applied to express the 80 kDa pTP gene in a functional form. Both proteins were overexpressed at least 30-fold compared to extracts from Adenovirus infected cells and, when combined, were fully active for initiation in an in vitro Adenovirus DNA replication system. Images PMID:3362670

  18. Homologous recombination between single-stranded DNA and chromosomal genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, J R; Moore, P D

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was examined by using the URA3 and TRP1 genes cloned into M13 vectors in the absence of sequences capable of promoting autonomous replication. These constructs transform S. cerevisiae cells to prototrophy by homologous recombination with the resident mutant gene. Single-stranded DNA was found to transform S. cerevisiae cells at efficiencies greater than that of double-stranded DNA. No conversion of single-stranded transforming DNA into duplex forms could be detected during the transformation process, and we conclude that single-stranded DNA may participate directly in recombination with chromosomal sequences. Transformation with single-stranded DNA gave rise to both gene conversion and reciprocal exchange events. Cotransformation with competing heterologous single-stranded DNA specifically inhibited transformation by single-stranded DNA, suggesting that one of the components in the transformation-recombination process has a preferential affinity for single-stranded DNA. Images PMID:3302673

  19. Shuttling along DNA and directed processing of D-loops by RecQ helicase support quality control of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Harami, Gábor M; Seol, Yeonee; In, Junghoon; Ferencziová, Veronika; Martina, Máté; Gyimesi, Máté; Sarlós, Kata; Kovács, Zoltán J; Nagy, Nikolett T; Sun, Yuze; Vellai, Tibor; Neuman, Keir C; Kovács, Mihály

    2017-01-24

    Cells must continuously repair inevitable DNA damage while avoiding the deleterious consequences of imprecise repair. Distinction between legitimate and illegitimate repair processes is thought to be achieved in part through differential recognition and processing of specific noncanonical DNA structures, although the mechanistic basis of discrimination remains poorly defined. Here, we show that Escherichia coli RecQ, a central DNA recombination and repair enzyme, exhibits differential processing of DNA substrates based on their geometry and structure. Through single-molecule and ensemble biophysical experiments, we elucidate how the conserved domain architecture of RecQ supports geometry-dependent shuttling and directed processing of recombination-intermediate [displacement loop (D-loop)] substrates. Our study shows that these activities together suppress illegitimate recombination in vivo, whereas unregulated duplex unwinding is detrimental for recombination precision. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism through which RecQ helicases achieve recombination precision and efficiency.

  20. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Edlarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  1. Induction of homologous recombination between sequence repeats by the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein.

    PubMed

    Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Lowndes, Noel; Schatz, David G

    2014-07-08

    The activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein is known to initiate somatic hypermutation, gene conversion or switch recombination by cytidine deamination within the immunoglobulin loci. Using chromosomally integrated fluorescence reporter transgenes, we demonstrate a new recombinogenic activity of AID leading to intra- and intergenic deletions via homologous recombination of sequence repeats. Repeat recombination occurs at high frequencies even when the homologous sequences are hundreds of bases away from the positions of AID-mediated cytidine deamination, suggesting DNA end resection before strand invasion. Analysis of recombinants between homeologous repeats yielded evidence for heteroduplex formation and preferential migration of the Holliday junctions to the boundaries of sequence homology. These findings broaden the target and off-target mutagenic potential of AID and establish a novel system to study induced homologous recombination in vertebrate cells.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03110.001.

  2. How Good Are Indirect Tests at Detecting Recombination in Human mtDNA?

    PubMed Central

    White, Daniel James; Bryant, David; Gemmell, Neil John

    2013-01-01

    Empirical proof of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination in somatic tissues was obtained in 2004; however, a lack of irrefutable evidence exists for recombination in human mtDNA at the population level. Our inability to demonstrate convincingly a signal of recombination in population data sets of human mtDNA sequence may be due, in part, to the ineffectiveness of current indirect tests. Previously, we tested some well-established indirect tests of recombination (linkage disequilibrium vs. distance using D′ and r2, Homoplasy Test, Pairwise Homoplasy Index, Neighborhood Similarity Score, and Max χ2) on sequence data derived from the only empirically confirmed case of human mtDNA recombination thus far and demonstrated that some methods were unable to detect recombination. Here, we assess the performance of these six well-established tests and explore what characteristics specific to human mtDNA sequence may affect their efficacy by simulating sequence under various parameters with levels of recombination (ρ) that vary around an empirically derived estimate for human mtDNA (population parameter ρ = 5.492). No test performed infallibly under any of our scenarios, and error rates varied across tests, whereas detection rates increased substantially with ρ values > 5.492. Under a model of evolution that incorporates parameters specific to human mtDNA, including rate heterogeneity, population expansion, and ρ = 5.492, successful detection rates are limited to a range of 7−70% across tests with an acceptable level of false-positive results: the neighborhood similarity score incompatibility test performed best overall under these parameters. Population growth seems to have the greatest impact on recombination detection probabilities across all models tested, likely due to its impact on sequence diversity. The implications of our findings on our current understanding of mtDNA recombination in humans are discussed. PMID:23665874

  3. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    PubMed

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  4. No recombination of mtDNA after heteroplasmy for 50 generations in the mouse maternal germline

    PubMed Central

    Hagström, Erik; Freyer, Christoph; Battersby, Brendan J.; Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are commonly used as markers to track human evolution because of the high sequence divergence and exclusive maternal inheritance. It is assumed that the inheritance is clonal, i.e. that mtDNA is transmitted between generations without germline recombination. In contrast to this assumption, a number of studies have reported the presence of recombinant mtDNA molecules in cell lines and animal tissues, including humans. If germline recombination of mtDNA is frequent, it would strongly impact phylogenetic and population studies by altering estimates of coalescent time and branch lengths in phylogenetic trees. Unfortunately, this whole area is controversial and the experimental approaches have been widely criticized as they often depend on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of mtDNA and/or involve studies of transformed cell lines. In this study, we used an in vivo mouse model that has had germline heteroplasmy for a defined set of mtDNA mutations for more than 50 generations. To assess recombination, we adapted and validated a method based on cloning of single mtDNA molecules in the λ phage, without prior PCR amplification, followed by subsequent mutation analysis. We screened 2922 mtDNA molecules and found no germline recombination after transmission of mtDNA under genetically and evolutionary relevant conditions in mammals. PMID:24163253

  5. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, D.; Savin, D. W.; Schnell, M.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2006-05-01

    Recent X-ray satelitte observations of active galactic nuclei point out shortcomings in our understanding of low temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) for iron M- shell ions. In order to resolve this issue and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for modeling astrophysical plasmas, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring at the Max- Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Storage rings are currently the only laboratory method capable of studying low temperature DR. We use our results to produce experimentally- derived DR rate coefficients. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we will report our recent DR results for selected Fe M-shell ions. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients.

  6. A genome-wide map of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Emilie S; Chabbert, Christophe D; Klaus, Bernd; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the production of cellular energy requires close interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The mitochondrial genome is essential in that it encodes several genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains several mitochondrial genome copies and mitochondrial DNA recombination is a widespread process occurring in plants, fungi, protists, and invertebrates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be an excellent model to dissect mitochondrial biology. Several studies have focused on DNA recombination in this organelle, yet mostly relied on reporter genes or artificial systems. However, no complete mitochondrial recombination map has been released for any eukaryote so far. In the present work, we sequenced pools of diploids originating from a cross between two different S. cerevisiae strains to detect recombination events. This strategy allowed us to generate the first genome-wide map of recombination for yeast mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that recombination events are enriched in specific hotspots preferentially localized in non-protein-coding regions. Additionally, comparison of the recombination profiles of two different crosses showed that the genetic background affects hotspot localization and recombination rates. Finally, to gain insights into the mechanisms involved in mitochondrial recombination, we assessed the impact of individual depletion of four genes previously associated with this process. Deletion of NTG1 and MGT1 did not substantially influence the recombination landscape, alluding to the potential presence of additional regulatory factors. Our findings also revealed the loss of large mitochondrial DNA regions in the absence of MHR1, suggesting a pivotal role for Mhr1 in mitochondrial genome maintenance during mating. This study provides a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial DNA recombination in yeast and thus paves the way for future mechanistic studies of mitochondrial recombination and genome

  7. Effects of DNA size on transformation and recombination efficiencies in Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Kung, Stephanie H; Retchless, Adam C; Kwan, Jessica Y; Almeida, Rodrigo P P

    2013-03-01

    Horizontally transferred DNA acquired through transformation and recombination has the potential to contribute to the diversity and evolution of naturally competent bacteria. However, many different factors affect the efficiency with which DNA can be transformed and recombined. In this study, we determined how the size of both homologous and nonhomologous regions affects transformation and recombination efficiencies in Xylella fastidiosa, a naturally competent generalist pathogen responsible for many emerging plant diseases. Our experimental data indicate that 96 bp of flanking homology is sufficient to initiate recombination, with recombination efficiencies increasing exponentially with the size of the homologous flanking region up to 1 kb. Recombination efficiencies also decreased with the size of the nonhomologous insert, with no recombination detected when 6 kb of nonhomologous DNA was flanked on either side by 1 kb of homologous sequences. Upon analyzing sequenced X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa genomes for evidence of allele conversion, we estimated the mean size of recombination events to be 1,906 bp, with each event modifying, on average, 1.79% of the nucleotides in the recombined region. There is increasing evidence that horizontally acquired genes significantly affect the genetic diversity of X. fastidiosa, and DNA acquired through natural transformation could be a prominent mode of this horizontal transfer.

  8. Transposon tools for recombinant DNA manipulation: characterization of transcriptional regulators from yeast, Xenopus, and mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, B A; Conlon, F L; Manzanares, M; Millar, J B; Kanuga, N; Sharpe, J; Krumlauf, R; Smith, J C; Sedgwick, S G

    1996-01-01

    Transposon Tn1000 has been adapted to deliver novel DNA sequences for manipulating recombinant DNA. The transposition procedure for these "tagged" Tn1000s is simple and applicable to most plasmids in current use. For yeast molecular biology, tagged Tn1000s introduce a variety of yeast selective markers and replication origins into plasmids and cosmids. In addition, the beta-globin minimal promoter and lacZ gene of Tn(beta)lac serve as a mobile reporter of eukaryotic enhancer activity. In this paper, Tn(beta)lac was used to localize a mouse HoxB-complex enhancer in transgenic mice. Other tagged transposons create Gal4 DNA-binding-domain fusions, in either Escherichia coli or yeast plasmids, for use in one- and two-hybrid tests of transcriptional activation and protein-protein interaction, respectively. With such fusions, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Swi6 G1/S-phase transcription factor and the Xenopus laevis Pintallavis developmental regulator are shown to activate transcription. Furthermore, the same transposon insertions also facilitated mapping of the Swi6 and Pintallavis domains responsible for transcriptional activation. Thus, as well as introducing novel sequences, tagged transposons share the numerous other applications of transposition such as producing insertional mutations, creating deletion series, or serving as mobile primer sites for DNA sequencing. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8610121

  9. Inhibition of pea chloroplast DNA helicase unwinding and ATPase activities by DNA-interacting ligands.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, N; Phan, T N

    1998-03-27

    DNA helicases unwind the duplex DNA in an ATP dependent manner and thus play an essential role in DNA replication, repair, recombination and transcription. Any DNA-interacting ligand which will modulate DNA helicase activity may interrupt practically all kinds of DNA transactions. There are no studies on the effect of various cytotoxic DNA-interacting ligands on organelle helicases. We have determined the effect of camptothecin, VP-16 (etoposide), ellipticine, genistein, novobiocin, m-AMSA, actinomycin C1, ethidium bromide, daunorubicin and nogalamycin on unwinding and ATPase activities of purified chloroplast DNA helicase from pea (Pisum sativum). Our study has shown that DNA-intercalating ligands actinomycin C1, ethidium bromide, daunorubicin and nogalamycin were inhibiting the DNA unwinding activity with an apparent Ki of 2.9 microM, 3.0 microM, 1.4 microM and 1.0 microM, respectively. These four inhibitors also inhibited the ATPase activity of pea chloroplast DNA helicase. These results indicate that the intercalation of the inhibitors into DNA generates a complex that impedes the translocation of chloroplast DNA helicase, resulting in both inhibition of unwinding activity and ATP hydrolysis. This study would be useful for understanding the mechanism of organelle DNA helicase unwinding and the mechanism by which these DNA-interacting ligands inhibit cellular function.

  10. Exploration of the Dissociative Recombination following DNA ionization to DNA+ due to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Richard A.; Zimmerly, Andrew T.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.

    2014-05-01

    It is known that ionizing radiation generates low-energy secondary electrons, which may interact with the surrounding area, including biomolecules, such as triggering DNA single strand and double strand breaks as demonstrated by Sanche and coworkers (Radiat. Res. 157, 227(2002)). The bio-effects of low-energy electrons are currently a topic of high interest. Most of the studies are dedicated to dissociative electron attachments; however, the area is still mostly unexplored and still not well understood. We are computationally investigating the effect of ionizing radiation on DNA, such as its ionization to DNA+. More specifically, we are exploring the possibility of the dissociative recombination of the temporary DNA+ with one of the low-energy secondary electrons, produced by the ionizing radiation, to be another process of DNA strand breaks. Our preliminary results, which are performed with the binaries of ORCA, will be presented. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  11. Homologous DNA strand exchange activity of the human mitochondrial DNA helicase TWINKLE

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Doyel; Patel, Gayatri; Patel, Smita S.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial component of the human mitochondrial DNA replisome is the ring-shaped helicase TWINKLE—a phage T7-gene 4-like protein expressed in the nucleus and localized in the human mitochondria. Our previous studies showed that despite being a helicase, TWINKLE has unique DNA annealing activity. At the time, the implications of DNA annealing by TWINKLE were unclear. Herein, we report that TWINKLE uses DNA annealing function to actively catalyze strand-exchange reaction between the unwinding substrate and a homologous single-stranded DNA. Using various biochemical experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanism of strand-exchange involves active coupling of unwinding and annealing reactions by the TWINKLE. Unlike strand-annealing, the strand-exchange reaction requires nucleotide hydrolysis and greatly stimulated by short region of homology between the recombining DNA strands that promote joint molecule formation to initiate strand-exchange. Furthermore, we show that TWINKLE catalyzes branch migration by resolving homologous four-way junction DNA. These four DNA modifying activities of TWINKLE: strand-separation, strand-annealing, strand-exchange and branch migration suggest a dual role of TWINKLE in mitochondrial DNA maintenance. In addition to playing a major role in fork progression during leading strand DNA synthesis, we propose that TWINKLE is involved in recombinational repair of the human mitochondrial DNA. PMID:26887820

  12. Homologous recombination in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: effects of DNA substrates and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Jananie; Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-09-01

    Although homologous recombination (HR) is known to influence the structure, stability, and evolution of microbial genomes, few of its functional properties have been measured in cells of hyperthermophilic archaea. The present study manipulated various properties of the parental DNAs in high-resolution assays of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius transformation, and measured the impact on the efficiency and pattern of marker transfer to the recipient chromosome. The relative orientation of homologous sequences, the type and position of chromosomal mutation being replaced, and the length of DNA flanking the marked region all affected the efficiency, linkage, tract continuity, and other parameters of marker transfer. Effects predicted specifically by the classical reciprocal-exchange model of HR were not observed. One analysis observed only 90 % linkage between markers defined by adjacent bases; in another series of experiments, sequence divergence up to 4 % had no detectable impact on overall efficiency of HR or on the co-transfer of a distal non-selected marker. The effects of introducing DNA via conjugation, rather than transformation, were more difficult to assess, but appeared to increase co-transfer (i.e. linkage) of relatively distant non-selected markers. The results indicate that HR events between gene-sized duplex DNAs and the S. acidocaldarius chromosome typically involve neither crossing over nor interference from a mismatch-activated anti-recombination system. Instead, the donor DNA may anneal to a transient chromosomal gap, as in the mechanism proposed for oligonucleotide-mediated transformation of Sulfolobus and other micro-organisms.

  13. The "Frankenplasmid" lab: an investigative exercise for teaching recombinant DNA methods.

    PubMed

    Dean, Derek M; Wilder, Jason A

    2011-01-01

    We describe an investigative laboratory module designed to give college undergraduates strong practical and theoretical experience with recombinant DNA methods within 3 weeks. After deducing restriction enzyme maps for two different plasmids, students ligate the plasmids together in the same reaction, transform E. coli with this mixture of ligated DNA, and plate the cells on media that specifically select for hybrid plasmids. The main goal of the assignment is for students to deduce the gene map of one hybrid "Frankenplasmid" using the LacZ phenotype of its transformants, PCR, and restriction mapping. Our protocol results in a number of possible outcomes, meaning that students are mapping truly unknown plasmids. The open-ended nature of this assignment results in an effective module that teaches recombinant DNA procedures while engaging students with its investigative approach, increasing complexity, and puzzle-like quality. Moreover, the modular design of the activity allows it to be adapted to a more limited schedule, introductory courses, or more advanced courses.

  14. Mgm101 is a Rad52-related protein required for mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Mbantenkhu, MacMillan; Wang, Xiaowen; Nardozzi, Jonathan D; Wilkens, Stephan; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Patel, Anamika; Cosgrove, Michael S; Chen, Xin Jie

    2011-12-09

    Homologous recombination is a conserved molecular process that has primarily evolved for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks. However, the recombination machinery in mitochondria is poorly understood. Here, we show that the yeast mitochondrial nucleoid protein, Mgm101, is related to the Rad52-type recombination proteins that are widespread in organisms from bacteriophage to humans. Mgm101 is required for repeat-mediated recombination and suppression of mtDNA fragmentation in vivo. It preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA and catalyzes the annealing of ssDNA precomplexed with the mitochondrial ssDNA-binding protein, Rim1. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Mgm101 forms large oligomeric rings of ∼14-fold symmetry and highly compressed helical filaments. Specific mutations affecting ring formation reduce protein stability in vitro. The data suggest that the ring structure may provide a scaffold for stabilization of Mgm101 by preventing the aggregation of the otherwise unstable monomeric conformation. Upon binding to ssDNA, Mgm101 is remobilized from the rings to form distinct nucleoprotein filaments. These studies reveal a recombination protein of likely bacteriophage origin in mitochondria and support the notion that recombination is indispensable for mtDNA integrity.

  15. Top3-Rmi1 DNA single-strand decatenase is integral to the formation and resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Hardeep; De Muyt, Arnaud; Lichten, Michael

    2015-02-19

    The topoisomerase III (Top3)-Rmi1 heterodimer, which catalyzes DNA single-strand passage, forms a conserved complex with the Bloom's helicase (BLM, Sgs1 in budding yeast). This complex has been proposed to regulate recombination by disassembling double Holliday junctions in a process called dissolution. Top3-Rmi1 has been suggested to act at the end of this process, resolving hemicatenanes produced by earlier BLM/Sgs1 activity. We show here that, to the contrary, Top3-Rmi1 acts in all meiotic recombination functions previously associated with Sgs1, most notably as an early recombination intermediate chaperone, promoting regulated crossover and noncrossover recombination and preventing aberrant recombination intermediate accumulation. In addition, we show that Top3-Rmi1 has important Sgs1-independent functions that ensure complete recombination intermediate resolution and chromosome segregation. These findings indicate that Top3-Rmi1 activity is important throughout recombination to resolve strand crossings that would otherwise impede progression through both early steps of pathway choice and late steps of intermediate resolution.

  16. Recombination spots prediction using DNA physical properties in the saccharomyces cerevisiae genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shou-Hui; Xu, Li-Qin; Chen, Wei; Liu, Guo-Qing; Lin, Hao

    2012-09-01

    The prediction of meiotic recombination is difficult and current available methods are limited. In this study, we propose a novel method for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots using support vector machine(SVM) with the DNA physical properties. Results of optimized pseudo-tetranucleotide show overall accuracy of 83.1% by using 5-fold cross-validation. High predictive successful rate exhibit that this model can be applied for discriminating between recombination hotspots and coldspots.

  17. 77 FR 54584 - Final Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... resistance into a microorganism must be reviewed by the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) and approved... changes also clarify the criteria for determining whether an experiment to introduce drug resistance into... NIH/OBA the authority [[Page 54585

  18. How-to-Do-It: Teaching Recombinant DNA Technology in High School Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the teaching of recombinant DNA technology in high school biology courses. Explains reactions of the public, students, and colleagues to the molecular genetics unit. Indicates equipment, curricular materials, training, workshops, and availability. (RT)

  19. Collaborative Learning in Biology: Debating the Ethics of Recombinant DNA Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Rodney P.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses applications of recombinant DNA technology and the controversies surrounding that technique. Provides a cooperative learning project idea that involves teams of students investigating and debating these issues. (DDR)

  20. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-09-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to replication centers. In addition, like SUMO E2 mutants, slx8Delta mutants exhibited clonal lethality, which was due to the overamplification of 2 microm, an extrachromosomal plasmid. Interestingly, in both SUMO E2 and slx8Delta mutants, clonal lethality was rescued by deleting genes required for Rad51-independent recombination but not those involved in Rad51-dependent events. These results suggest that sumoylation negatively regulates Rad51-independent recombination, and indeed, the Slx5-Slx8 complex affected the sumoylation of several enzymes involved in early steps of Rad51-independent recombination. We propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins.

  1. Senataxin plays an essential role with DNA damage response proteins in meiotic recombination and gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Becherel, Olivier J; Yeo, Abrey J; Stellati, Alissa; Heng, Evelyn Y H; Luff, John; Suraweera, Amila M; Woods, Rick; Fleming, Jean; Carrie, Dianne; McKinney, Kristine; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chuxia; Lavin, Martin F

    2013-04-01

    Senataxin, mutated in the human genetic disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 2 (AOA2), plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity by coordination of transcription, DNA replication, and the DNA damage response. We demonstrate that senataxin is essential for spermatogenesis and that it functions at two stages in meiosis during crossing-over in homologous recombination and in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Disruption of the Setx gene caused persistence of DNA double-strand breaks, a defect in disassembly of Rad51 filaments, accumulation of DNA:RNA hybrids (R-loops), and ultimately a failure of crossing-over. Senataxin localised to the XY body in a Brca1-dependent manner, and in its absence there was incomplete localisation of DNA damage response proteins to the XY chromosomes and ATR was retained on the axial elements of these chromosomes, failing to diffuse out into chromatin. Furthermore persistence of RNA polymerase II activity, altered ubH2A distribution, and abnormal XY-linked gene expression in Setx⁻/⁻ revealed an essential role for senataxin in MSCI. These data support key roles for senataxin in coordinating meiotic crossing-over with transcription and in gene silencing to protect the integrity of the genome.

  2. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    PubMed

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication.

  3. Structural Studies of DNA End Detection and Resection in Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Christian Bernd; Seifert, Florian Ulrich; Linke-Winnebeck, Christian; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are repaired by two major pathways, homologous recombination or nonhomologous end joining. The commitment to one or the other pathway proceeds via different steps of resection of the DNA ends, which is controlled and executed by a set of DNA double-strand break sensors, endo- and exonucleases, helicases, and DNA damage response factors. The molecular choreography of the underlying protein machinery is beginning to emerge. In this review, we discuss the early steps of genetic recombination and double-strand break sensing with an emphasis on structural and molecular studies. PMID:25081516

  4. Production of recombinant RNase Ba and its application in downstream processing of plasmid DNA for pharmaceutical use.

    PubMed

    Voss, Carsten; Lindau, Dennis; Flaschel, Erwin

    2006-01-01

    The demand for new strategies in downstream processing of biopharmaceutical plasmid DNA has increased in response to the importance of nucleic acids as active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in gene therapy and genetic vaccination. Led by the problematic usage of animal-derived proteins for producing reagents of clinical applications, we present an opportunity of removing RNA prior to chromatographic steps by using a recombinant RNase Ba (barnase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) as an alternative to bovine RNase A. An expression vector for RNase Ba production was constructed enabling periplasmic localization of the recombinant protein. Cultivation of the RNase-producing clone showed stable activity (3.6 kU mL(-1) during stationary phase) throughout the cultivation process. After purification the RNase activity was tested and compared to that of commercially available RNase A. RNase Ba showed no DNase activity even after prolonged incubation with plasmid DNA. Thus, it is a suitable substitute for bovine RNase A in pharmaceutical purification processes.

  5. Generation, characterization, and docking studies of DNA-hydrolyzing recombinant F(ab) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zein, Haggag S; El-Sehemy, Ahmed A; Fares, Mohamed O; ElHefnawi, Mahmoud; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    Previously we established a series of catalytic antibodies (catAbs) capable of hydrolyzing DNA prepared by hybridoma technology. A group of these catAbs exhibited high reactivity and substrate specificity. To determine the molecular basis for these catAbs, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed the variable regions of this group of antibodies as functional F(ab) fragments. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the expressed light chain (Vκ) germline gene assignments confidently belonged to germline family Vκ1A, gene bb1.1 and GenBank accession number EF672207 while heavy chain variable region V(H) genes belonged to V(H) 1/V(H) J558, gene V130.3 and GenBank accession number EF672221. A well-established expression system based on the pARA7 vector was examined for its ability to produce catalytically active antibodies. Recombinant F(ab) (rF(ab) ) fragments were purified and their hydrolyzing activity was analyzed against supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA (scDNA). The study of rF(ab) provides important information about the potential catalytic activities of antibodies whose structure allows us to understand their basis of catalysis. Molecular surface analysis and docking studies were performed on the molecular interactions between the antibodies and poly(dA9), poly(dG9), poly(dT9), and poly(dC9) oligomers. Surface analysis identified the important sequence motifs at the binding sites, and different effects exerted by arginine and tyrosine residues at different positions in the light and heavy chains. This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of the protein DNA surrogate in the investigation of the origin of anti-DNA antibodies. These studies may define important features of DNA catAbs.

  6. Involvement of a periplasmic protein kinase in DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Mangoli, Suhas H; Apte, Shree K; Misra, Hari S

    2007-07-01

    The involvement of signal transduction in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA has been known in eukaryotes but remains understudied in bacteria. This article for the first time demonstrates a role for the periplasmic lipoprotein (YfgL) with protein kinase activity transducing a signal for DNA strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Purified YfgL protein showed physical as well as functional interaction with pyrroloquinoline-quinone in solution and the protein kinase activity of YfgL was strongly stimulated in the presence of pyrroloquinoline-quinone. Transgenic E. coli cells producing Deinococcus radiodurans pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase showed nearly four log cycle improvement in UVC dark survival and 10-fold increases in gamma radiation resistance as compared with untransformed cells. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone enhanced the UV resistance of E. coli through the YfgL protein and required the active recombination repair proteins. The yfgL mutant showed higher sensitivity to UVC, mitomycin C and gamma radiation as compared with wild-type cells and showed a strong impairment in homologous DNA recombination. The mutant expressing an active YfgL in trans recovered the lost phenotypes to nearly wild-type levels. The results strongly suggest that the periplasmic phosphoquinolipoprotein kinase YfgL plays an important role in radiation-induced DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in E. coli.

  7. Solution structure and DNA-binding properties of the winged helix domain of the meiotic recombination HOP2 protein.

    PubMed

    Moktan, Hem; Guiraldelli, Michel F; Eyster, Craig A; Zhao, Weixing; Lee, Chih-Ying; Mather, Timothy; Camerini-Otero, R Daniel; Sung, Patrick; Zhou, Donghua H; Pezza, Roberto J

    2014-05-23

    The HOP2 protein is required for efficient double-strand break repair which ensures the proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes and normal meiotic progression. We previously showed that in vitro HOP2 shows two distinctive activities: when it is incorporated into a HOP2-MND1 heterodimer, it stimulates DMC1 and RAD51 recombination activities, and the purified HOP2 alone is proficient in promoting strand invasion. The structural and biochemical basis of HOP2 action in recombination are poorly understood; therefore, they are the focus of this work. Herein, we present the solution structure of the amino-terminal portion of mouse HOP2, which contains a typical winged helix DNA-binding domain. Together with NMR spectral changes in the presence of double-stranded DNA, protein docking on DNA, and mutation analysis to identify the amino acids involved in DNA coordination, our results on the three-dimensional structure of HOP2 provide key information on the fundamental structural and biochemical requirements directing the interaction of HOP2 with DNA. These results, in combination with mutational experiments showing the role of a coiled-coil structural feature involved in HOP2 self-association, allow us to explain important aspects of the function of HOP2 in recombination.

  8. Expression and activity of recombinant proaerolysin derived from Aeromonas hydrophila cultured from diseased channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proaerolysin-coding gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of A. hydrophila and heterologously expressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant proaerolysin was inactive and could be activated by treatment with proteases, furin and trypsin, and extra-cellular proteins (ECPs, the cell-free supernatant of...

  9. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Mueller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between approx. 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  10. Dielectronic Recombination In Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, D. V.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Sprenger, F.; Lestinsky, M.; Wolf, A.

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between ˜ 15-17 Å. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Fe XIV forming Fe XIII.

  11. Human insulin genome sequence map, biochemical structure of insulin for recombinant DNA insulin.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mungantiwar, Ashish A

    2003-08-01

    Insulin is a essential molecule for type I diabetes that is marketed by very few companies. It is the first molecule, which was made by recombinant technology; but the commercialization process is very difficult. Knowledge about biochemical structure of insulin and human insulin genome sequence map is pivotal to large scale manufacturing of recombinant DNA Insulin. This paper reviews human insulin genome sequence map, the amino acid sequence of porcine insulin, crystal structure of porcine insulin, insulin monomer, aggregation surfaces of insulin, conformational variation in the insulin monomer, insulin X-ray structures for recombinant DNA technology in the synthesis of human insulin in Escherichia coli.

  12. Stimulation of the DNA unwinding activity of human DNA helicase II/Ku by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ochem, Alexander E; Rechreche, Hocine; Skopac, Doris; Falaschi, Arturo

    2008-02-01

    The Ku autoantigen is a heterodimeric protein of 70- and 83-kDa subunits, endowed with duplex DNA end-binding capacity and DNA helicase activity (Human DNA Helicase II, HDH II). HDH II/Ku is well established as the DNA binding component, the regulatory subunit as well as a substrate for the DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PK, a complex involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks and in V(D)J recombination in eukaryotes. The effects of phosphorylation by this kinase on the helicase activity of Escherichia coli-produced HDH II/Ku were studied. The rate of DNA unwinding by recombinant HDH II/Ku heterodimer is stimulated at least fivefold upon phosphorylation by DNA-PK(cs). This stimulation is due to the effective transfer of phosphate residues to the helicase rather than the mere presence of the complex. In vitro dephosphorylation of HeLa cellular HDH II/Ku caused a significant decrease in the DNA helicase activity of this enzyme.

  13. Bacillus subtilis RecO and SsbA are crucial for RecA-mediated recombinational DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Begoña; Yadav, Tribhuwan; Serrano, Ester; Alonso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic data have revealed that the absence of Bacillus subtilis RecO and one of the end-processing avenues (AddAB or RecJ) renders cells as sensitive to DNA damaging agents as the null recA, suggesting that both end-resection pathways require RecO for recombination. RecA, in the rATP·Mg2+ bound form (RecA·ATP), is inactive to catalyze DNA recombination between linear double-stranded (ds) DNA and naked complementary circular single-stranded (ss) DNA. We showed that RecA·ATP could not nucleate and/or polymerize on SsbA·ssDNA or SsbB·ssDNA complexes. RecA·ATP nucleates and polymerizes on RecO·ssDNA·SsbA complexes more efficiently than on RecO·ssDNA·SsbB complexes. Limiting SsbA concentrations were sufficient to stimulate RecA·ATP assembly on the RecO·ssDNA·SsbB complexes. RecO and SsbA are necessary and sufficient to ‘activate’ RecA·ATP to catalyze DNA strand exchange, whereas the AddAB complex, RecO alone or in concert with SsbB was not sufficient. In presence of AddAB, RecO and SsbA are still necessary for efficient RecA·ATP-mediated three-strand exchange recombination. Based on genetic and biochemical data, we proposed that SsbA and RecO (or SsbA, RecO and RecR in vivo) are crucial for RecA activation for both, AddAB and RecJ–RecQ (RecS) recombinational repair pathways. PMID:26001966

  14. Two DNA repair and recombination genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, are induced during meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K. ); Schild, D. )

    1989-07-01

    The DNA repair and recombination genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RAD52 and RAD54, were transcriptionally induced approximately 10- to 15-fold in sporulating MATa/{alpha} cells. Congenic MATa/a cells, which did not sporulate, did not show similar increases. Assays of {beta}-galactosidase activity in strains harboring either a RAD52- or RAD54-lacZ gene fusion indicated that this induction occurred at a time concomitant with a commitment to meiotic recombination, as measured by prototroph formation from his1 heteroalleles.

  15. Quantification and persistence of recombinant DNA of Roundup Ready corn and soybean in rotation.

    PubMed

    Lerat, Sylvain; Gulden, Robert H; Hart, Miranda M; Powell, Jeff R; England, Laura S; Pauls, K Peter; Swanton, Clarence J; Klironomos, John N; Trevors, Jack T

    2007-12-12

    The presence of the recombinant cp4 epsps gene from Roundup Ready (RR) corn and RR soybean was quantified using real-time PCR in soil samples from a field experiment growing RR and conventional corn and soybean in rotation. RR corn and RR soybean cp4 epsps persisted in soil for up to 1 year after seeding. The concentration of recombinant DNA in soil peaked in July and August in RR corn and RR soybean plots, respectively. A small fraction of soil samples from plots seeded with conventional crops contained recombinant DNA, suggesting transgene dispersal by means of natural process or agricultural practices. This research will aid in the understanding of the persistence of recombinant DNA in agricultural cropping systems.

  16. Biparental inheritance of organelles in Pelargonium: evidence for intergenomic recombination of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Janina; Weihe, Andreas; Pohlheim, Frank; Börner, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    While uniparental transmission of mtDNA is widespread and dominating in eukaryotes leaving mutation as the major source of genotypic diversity, recently, biparental inheritance of mitochondrial genes has been demonstrated in reciprocal crosses of Pelargonium zonale and P. inquinans. The thereby arising heteroplasmy carries the potential for recombination between mtDNAs of different descent, i.e. between the parental mitochondrial genomes. We have analyzed these Pelargonium hybrids for mitochondrial intergenomic recombination events by examining differences in DNA blot hybridization patterns of the mitochondrial genes atp1 and cob. Further investigation of these genes and their flanking regions using nucleotide sequence polymorphisms and PCR revealed DNA segments in the progeny, which contained both P. zonale and P. inquinans sequences suggesting an intergenomic recombination in hybrids of Pelargonium. This turns Pelargonium into an interesting subject for studies of recombination and evolutionary dynamics of mitochondrial genomes.

  17. Self-regulation of recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nukaga, Yoshio; Saeki, Koji; Akabayashi, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant DNA technology was developed in the United States in the early 1970s. Leading scientists held an international Asilomar Conference in 1975 to examine the self regulation of recombinant DNA technology, followed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health drafting the Recombinant DNA Research Guidelines in 1976. The result of this conference significantly affected many nations, including Japan. However, there have been few historical studies on the self-regulation of recombinant technologies conducted by scientists and government officials in Japan. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the Science Council of Japan, the Ministry of Education, Science adn Culture, and the Science and Technology Agency developed self-regulation policies for recombinant DNA technology in Japan in the 1970s. Groups of molecular biologist and geneticists played a key role in establishing guidelines in cooperation with government officials. Our findings suggest that self-regulation policies on recombinant DNA technology have influenced safety management for the life sciences and establishment of institutions for review in Japan.

  18. Din7 and Mhr1 expression levels regulate double-strand-break-induced replication and recombination of mtDNA at ori5 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ling, Feng; Hori, Akiko; Yoshitani, Ayako; Niu, Rong; Yoshida, Minoru; Shibata, Takehiko

    2013-06-01

    The Ntg1 and Mhr1 proteins initiate rolling-circle mitochondrial (mt) DNA replication to achieve homoplasmy, and they also induce homologous recombination to maintain mitochondrial genome integrity. Although replication and recombination profoundly influence mitochondrial inheritance, the regulatory mechanisms that determine the choice between these pathways remain unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, double-strand breaks (DSBs) introduced by Ntg1 at the mitochondrial replication origin ori5 induce homologous DNA pairing by Mhr1, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) enhance production of DSBs. Here, we show that a mitochondrial nuclease encoded by the nuclear gene DIN7 (DNA damage inducible gene) has 5'-exodeoxyribonuclease activity. Using a small ρ(-) mtDNA bearing ori5 (hypersuppressive; HS) as a model mtDNA, we revealed that DIN7 is required for ROS-enhanced mtDNA replication and recombination that are both induced at ori5. Din7 overproduction enhanced Mhr1-dependent mtDNA replication and increased the number of residual DSBs at ori5 in HS-ρ(-) cells and increased deletion mutagenesis at the ori5 region in ρ(+) cells. However, simultaneous overproduction of Mhr1 suppressed all of these phenotypes and enhanced homologous recombination. Our results suggest that after homologous pairing, the relative activity levels of Din7 and Mhr1 modulate the preference for replication versus homologous recombination to repair DSBs at ori5.

  19. Recombinant DNA Paper Model Simulation: The Genetic Engineer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes a course for talented high school students that focuses on DNA science and technology. Employs Cold Spring Harbor's DNA Science laboratory manual. Engages students in performing sickle-cell anemia and thalassemia tests in rabbits. (DDR)

  20. Overproduction of single-stranded-DNA-binding protein specifically inhibits recombination of UV-irradiated bacteriophage DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, P L

    1988-01-01

    Overproduction of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein (SSB) in uvr Escherichia coli mutants results in a wide range of altered phenotypes. (i) Cell survival after UV irradiation is decreased; (ii) expression of the recA-lexA regulon is slightly reduced after UV irradiation, whereas it is increased without irradiation; and (iii) recombination of UV-damaged lambda DNA is inhibited, whereas recombination of nonirradiated DNA is unaffected. These results are consistent with the idea that in UV-damaged bacteria, SSB is first required to allow the formation of short complexes of RecA protein and ssDNA that mediate cleavage of the LexA protein. However, in a second stage, SSB should be displaced from ssDNA to permit the production of longer RecA-ssDNA nucleoprotein filaments that are required for strand pairing and, hence, recombinational repair. Since bacteria overproducing SSB appear identical in physiological respects to recF mutant bacteria, it is suggested that the RecF protein (alone or with other proteins of the RecF pathway) may help RecA protein to release SSB from ssDNA. PMID:2836358

  1. Pif1 helicase and Polδ promote recombination-coupled DNA synthesis via bubble migration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marenda A; Kwon, YoungHo; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Chi, Peter; Niu, Hengyao; Mayle, Ryan; Chen, Xuefeng; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-10-17

    During DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR), DNA synthesis copies information from a template DNA molecule. Multiple DNA polymerases have been implicated in repair-specific DNA synthesis, but it has remained unclear whether a DNA helicase is involved in this reaction. A good candidate DNA helicase is Pif1, an evolutionarily conserved helicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae important for break-induced replication (BIR) as well as HR-dependent telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase found in 10-15% of all cancers. Pif1 has a role in DNA synthesis across hard-to-replicate sites and in lagging-strand synthesis with polymerase δ (Polδ). Here we provide evidence that Pif1 stimulates DNA synthesis during BIR and crossover recombination. The initial steps of BIR occur normally in Pif1-deficient cells, but Polδ recruitment and DNA synthesis are decreased, resulting in premature resolution of DNA intermediates into half-crossovers. Purified Pif1 protein strongly stimulates Polδ-mediated DNA synthesis from a D-loop made by the Rad51 recombinase. Notably, Pif1 liberates the newly synthesized strand to prevent the accumulation of topological constraint and to facilitate extensive DNA synthesis via the establishment of a migrating D-loop structure. Our results uncover a novel function of Pif1 and provide insights into the mechanism of HR.

  2. Targeting human Rad51 by specific DNA aptamers induces inhibition of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Susan F; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Nomme, Julian; Eveillard, Damien; Fleury, Fabrice; Takahashi, Masayuki; Weigel, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Human Rad51 (HsRad51), a key element of the homologous recombination repair pathway, is related to the resistance of cancer cells to chemo- and radio-therapies. This protein is thus a good target for the development of anti-cancer treatments. We have searched for new inhibitors directed against HsRad51 using the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) approach. We have selected three aptamers displaying strong effects on strand exchange activity. Analysis by circular dichroism shows that they are highly structured DNA molecules. Our results also show that they affect the first step of the strand exchange reaction by promoting the dissociation of DNA from the ATP/HsRad51/DNA complex. Moreover, these inhibitors bind only weakly to RecA, a prokaryotic ortholog of HsRad51. Both the specificity and the efficiency of their inhibition of recombinase activity offer an analytical tool based on molecular recognition and the prospect of developing new therapeutic agents.

  3. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase 20 regulates Rad17 stability, checkpoint kinase 1 phosphorylation and DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Ilanchezhian; Abbas, Mohammad; Ayoub, Farhan; Mirabal, Susan; Bsaili, Manal; Caulder, Erin K; Weinstock, David M; Tomkinson, Alan E; Hromas, Robert; Shaheen, Monte

    2014-08-15

    Rad17 is a subunit of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 clamp loader complex, which is required for Chk1 activation after DNA damage. Rad17 has been shown to be regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We have identified a deubiquitylase, USP20 that is required for Rad17 protein stability in the steady-state and post DNA damage. We demonstrate that USP20 and Rad17 interact, and that this interaction is enhanced by UV exposure. We show that USP20 regulation of Rad17 is at the protein level in a proteasome-dependent manner. USP20 depletion results in poor activation of Chk1 protein by phosphorylation, consistent with Rad17 role in ATR-mediated phosphorylation of Chk1. Similar to other DNA repair proteins, USP20 is phosphorylated post DNA damage, and its depletion sensitizes cancer cells to damaging agents that form blocks ahead of the replication forks. Similar to Chk1 and Rad17, which enhance recombinational repair of collapsed replication forks, we demonstrate that USP20 depletion impairs DNA double strand break repair by homologous recombination. Together, our data establish a new function of USP20 in genome maintenance and DNA repair.

  4. A simplified mathematical model of directional DNA site-specific recombination by serine integrases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jia; Stark, W. Marshall; Colloms, Sean D.; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Serine integrases catalyse site-specific recombination to integrate and excise bacteriophage genomes into and out of their host's genome. These enzymes exhibit remarkable directionality; in the presence of the integrase alone, recombination between attP and attB DNA sites is efficient and irreversible, giving attL and attR products which do not recombine further. However, in the presence of the bacteriophage-encoded recombination directionality factor (RDF), integrase efficiently promotes recombination between attL and attR to re-form attP and attB. The DNA substrates and products of both reactions are approximately isoenergetic, and no cofactors (such as adenosine triphosphate) are required for recombination. The thermodynamic driving force for directionality of these reactions is thus enigmatic. Here, we present a minimal mathematical model which can explain the directionality and regulation of both ‘forward’ and ‘reverse’ reactions. In this model, the substrates of the ‘forbidden’ reactions (between attL and attR in the absence of RDF, attP and attB in the presence of RDF) are trapped as inactive protein–DNA complexes, ensuring that these ‘forbidden’ reactions are extremely slow. The model is in good agreement with the observed in vitro kinetics of recombination by ϕC31 integrase, and defines core features of the system necessary and sufficient for directionality. PMID:28077763

  5. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  6. Rad51 and Rad52 Are Involved in Homologous Recombination of Replicating Herpes Simplex Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells. PMID:25365323

  7. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  8. Structural characterization and biological activity of recombinant human epidermal growth factor proteins with different N-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Bauhofer, A; Schwind, P; Bade, E; Rasched, I; Przybylski, M

    1994-05-18

    The primary structures and molecular homogeneity of recombinant human epidermal growth factors from different suppliers were characterized and their biological activities evaluated by a standard DNA synthesis assay. Molecular weight determinations using 252Cf-plasma-desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry in combination with N- and C-terminal sequence analysis and determination of intramolecular disulfide bridges revealed that one recombinant protein had the correct human-identical structure (54 aa residues; 6347 Da). In contrast, a second recombinant protein (7020 Da) was found to contain a pentapeptide (KKYPR) insert following its N-terminal methionine. This structural variant showed a significant reduction in its capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis.

  9. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  10. A facile method for reversibly linking a recombinant protein to DNA.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Russell P; Erben, Christoph M; Malo, Jonathan; Ho, Wei M; McKee, Mireya L; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Turberfield, Andrew J

    2009-06-15

    We present a facile method for linking recombinant proteins to DNA. It is based on the nickel-mediated interaction between a hexahistidine tag (His(6)-tag) and DNA functionalized with three nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) groups. The resulting DNA-protein linkage is site-specific. It can be broken quickly and controllably by the addition of a chelating agent that binds nickel. We have used this new linker to bind proteins to a variety of DNA motifs commonly used in the fabrication of nanostructures by DNA self-assembly.

  11. The cell pole: the site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann B; Graumann, Peter L; Alonso, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as "guardians", protects ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the "mediators" overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by "modulators", catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or "resolver" cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the "rescuers" will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective.

  12. Connecting by breaking and repairing: mechanisms of DNA strand exchange in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Sansam, Christopher L; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-07-01

    During prophase of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes interact and undergo recombination. Successful completion of these processes is required in order for the homologous chromosomes to mount the meiotic spindle as a pair. The organization of the chromosomes into pairs ensures orderly segregation to opposite poles of the dividing cell, such that each gamete receives one copy of each chromosome. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of crossover products of recombination, physically connect the homologs in pairs, providing a linkage that facilitates their segregation. Consequently, mutations that reduce the level of recombination are invariably associated with increased errors in meiotic chromosome segregation. In this review, we focus on recent biochemical and genetic advances in elucidating the mechanisms of meiotic DNA strand exchange catalyzed by the Dmc1 protein. We also discuss the mode by which two recombination mediators, Hop2 and Mnd1, facilitate rate-limiting steps of DNA strand exchange catalyzed by Dmc1.

  13. Connecting by breaking and repairing: mechanisms of DNA strand exchange in meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sansam, Christopher L; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    During prophase of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes interact and undergo recombination. Successful completion of these processes is required in order for the homologous chromosomes to mount the meiotic spindle as a pair. The organization of the chromosomes into pairs ensures orderly segregation to opposite poles of the dividing cell, such that each gamete receives one copy of each chromosome. Chiasmata, the cytological manifestation of crossover products of recombination, physically connect the homologs in pairs, providing a linkage that facilitates their segregation. Consequently, mutations that reduce the level of recombination are invariably associated with increased errors in meiotic chromosome segregation. In this review, we focus on recent biochemical and genetic advances in elucidating the mechanisms of meiotic DNA strand exchange catalyzed by the Dmc1 protein. We also discuss the mode by which two recombination mediators, Hop2 and Mnd1, facilitate rate-limiting steps of DNA strand exchange catalyzed by Dmc1. PMID:25953379

  14. EXD2 promotes homologous recombination by facilitating DNA-end resection

    PubMed Central

    Baddock, Hannah T.; Deshpande, Rajashree; Gileadi, Opher; Paull, Tanya T.; McHugh, Peter J; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) is critical for survival and genome stability of individual cells and organisms, but also contributes to the genetic diversity of species. A critical step in HR is MRN/CtIP-dependent end-resection that generates the 3′ single-stranded DNA overhangs required for the subsequent strand exchange reaction. Here, we identify EXD2 (EXDL2) as an exonuclease essential for DSB resection and efficient HR. EXD2 is recruited to chromatin in a damage-dependent manner and confers resistance to DSB-inducing agents. EXD2 functionally interacts with the MRN-complex to accelerate resection via its 3′-5′ exonuclease activity that efficiently processes dsDNA substrates containing nicks. Finally, we establish that EXD2 stimulates both short and long-range DSB resection, and thus together with MRE11 is required for efficient HR. This establishes a key role for EXD2 in controlling the initial steps of chromosomal break repair. PMID:26807646

  15. Engineering cellulosic bioreactors by template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination (TADSir).

    PubMed

    Davis, Leroy K

    2014-10-01

    The current study focuses on development of a bioreactor engineering strategy based on exploitation of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Chimeric A. thaliana glycosyl hydrolase (GH) gene libraries were assembled using a novel directed evolution strategy (TADSir: template assisted DNA shuffling and in vitro recombination) that promotes DNA recombination by reassembly of DNA fragments on unique gene templates. TADSir was modeled using a set of algorithms designed to simulate DNA interactions based on nearest neighbor base stacking interactions and Gibb's free energy differences between helical coil and folded DNA states. The algorithms allow for target gene prediction and for in silica analysis of chimeric gene library composition. Further, the study investigated utilization of A. thaliana GH sequence space for bioreactor design by evolving 20 A. thaliana genes representing the GH1, GH3, GH5, GH9 and GH10 gene families. Notably, TADSir achieved streamlined engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and spinach mesophyll protoplast bioreactors capable of processing CM cellulose, Avicel and xylan.

  16. V(D)J recombination coding junction formation without DNA homology: processing of coding termini.

    PubMed Central

    Boubnov, N V; Wills, Z P; Weaver, D T

    1993-01-01

    Coding junction formation in V(D)J recombination generates diversity in the antigen recognition structures of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor molecules by combining processes of deletion of terminal coding sequences and addition of nucleotides prior to joining. We have examined the role of coding end DNA composition in junction formation with plasmid substrates containing defined homopolymers flanking the recombination signal sequence elements. We found that coding junctions formed efficiently with or without terminal DNA homology. The extent of junctional deletion was conserved independent of coding ends with increased, partial, or no DNA homology. Interestingly, G/C homopolymer coding ends showed reduced deletion regardless of DNA homology. Therefore, DNA homology cannot be the primary determinant that stabilizes coding end structures for processing and joining. PMID:8413286

  17. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. |; Eldarov, M. |; Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A.

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  18. High-frequency intermolecular homologous recombination during herpes simplex virus-mediated plasmid DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2002-06-01

    Homologous recombination is a prominent feature of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 DNA replication. This has been demonstrated and traditionally studied in experimental settings where repeated sequences are present or are being introduced into a single molecule for subsequent genome isomerization. In the present study, we have designed a pair of unique HSV amplicon plasmids to examine in detail intermolecular homologous recombination (IM-HR) between these amplicon plasmids during HSV-mediated DNA replication. Our data show that IM-HR occurred at a very high frequency: up to 60% of the amplicon concatemers retrieved from virion particles underwent intermolecular homologous recombination. Such a high frequency of IM-HR required that both plasmids be replicated by HSV-mediated replication, as IM-HR events were not detected when either one or both plasmids were replicated by simian virus 40-mediated DNA replication, even with the presence of HSV infection. In addition, the majority of the homologous recombination events resulted in sequence replacement or targeted gene repair, while the minority resulted in sequence insertion. These findings imply that frequent intermolecular homologous recombination may contribute directly to HSV genome isomerization. In addition, HSV-mediated amplicon replication may be an attractive model for studying intermolecular homologous recombination mechanisms in general in a mammalian system. In this regard, the knowledge obtained from such a study may facilitate the development of better strategies for targeted gene correction for gene therapy purposes.

  19. Scaffold functions of 14-3-3 adaptors in B cell immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tonika; Thomas, Lisa M; White, Clayton A; Li, Guideng; Pone, Egest J; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus crucially diversifies antibody biological effector functions. CSR involves the induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression and AID targeting to switch (S) regions by 14-3-3 adaptors. 14-3-3 adaptors specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats, which make up for the core of all IgH locus S regions. They selectively target the upstream and downstream S regions that are set to undergo S-S DNA recombination. We hypothesized that 14-3-3 adaptors function as scaffolds to stabilize CSR enzymatic elements on S regions. Here we demonstrate that all seven 14-3-3β, 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3γ, 14-3-3η, 14-3-3σ, 14-3-3τ and 14-3-3ζ adaptors directly interacted with AID, PKA-Cα (catalytic subunit) and PKA-RIα (regulatory inhibitory subunit) and uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung). 14-3-3 adaptors, however, did not interact with AID C-terminal truncation mutant AIDΔ(180-198) or AIDF193A and AIDL196A point-mutants (which have been shown not to bind to S region DNA and fail to mediate CSR). 14-3-3 adaptors colocalized with AID and replication protein A (RPA) in B cells undergoing CSR. 14-3-3 and AID binding to S region DNA was disrupted by viral protein R (Vpr), an accessory protein of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), which inhibited CSR without altering AID expression or germline IH-CH transcription. Accordingly, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 directly interact with Vpr, which in turn, also interact with AID, PKA-Cα and Ung. Altogether, our findings suggest that 14-3-3 adaptors play important scaffold functions and nucleate the assembly of multiple CSR factors on S regions. They also show that such assembly can be disrupted by a viral protein, thereby allowing us to hypothesize that small molecule compounds that specifically block 14-3-3 interactions with AID, PKA and/or Ung can be used to inhibit unwanted CSR.

  20. DNA intermediates of meiotic recombination in synchronous S. pombe at optimal temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Fowler, Kyle R.; Cipak, Lubos; Gregan, Juraj; Smith, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    Crossovers formed by recombination between homologous chromosomes are important for proper homolog segregation during meiosis and for generation of genetic diversity. Optimal molecular analysis of DNA intermediates of recombination requires synchronous cultures. We previously described a mutant, pat1-as2, of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe that undergoes synchronous meiosis at 25°C when an ATP analog is added to the culture. Here, we compare recombination intermediates in pat1-as2 at 25°C with those in the widely used pat1-114 temperature-sensitive mutant at 34°C, a temperature higher than optimal. DNA double-strand breaks at most hotspots are similarly abundant in the two conditions but, remarkably, a few hotspots are distinctly deficient at 25°C. In both conditions, Holliday junctions at DNA break hotspots form more frequently between sister chromatids than between homologs, but a novel species, perhaps arising from invasion by only one end of broken DNA, is more readily observed at 25°C. Our results confirm the validity of previous assays of recombination intermediates in S. pombe and provide new information on the mechanism of meiotic recombination. PMID:24089141

  1. [Characterization of recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein from Escherichia coli and its application in accurate pyrosequencing].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Zou, Bingjie; Chen, Zhiyao; Ma, Yinjiao; Xu, Shu; Zhou, Guohua

    2011-10-01

    We expressed recombinant single-stranded DNA-binding protein (r-SSBP) from Escherichia coli with the molecular weight of 24-kDa by using genetic engineering strategy, and demonstrated the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding activity of r-SSBP by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). To further characterize r-SSBP, we studied the effects of r-SSBP on melting temperature (T(m)) of DNA. The results showed that r-SSBP could bind to ssDNA, and lower the T(m) of DNA, especially for single-base mismatched DNA. Therefore, r-SSBP significantly increased the T(m) difference between single-base mismatched DNA and perfect matched DNA. These results are very beneficial for single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. Moreover, we applied r-SSBP in high sensitive pyrosequencing system developed by our group. The results suggest that the r-SSBP decreased non-specific signals, corrected the proportion of signal peak height and improved the performance of pyrosequencing.

  2. Immunogenicity analysis following human immunodeficiency virus recombinant DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus Tian Tan prime-boost immunization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cunxia; Du, Shouwen; Li, Chang; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Maopeng; Li, Yi; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Xiao; Ren, Dayong; Qin, Yanqing; Ren, Jingqiang; Jin, Ningyi

    2013-06-01

    This study assessed and compared the immunogenicity of various immunization strategies in mice using combinations of recombinant DNA (pCCMp24) and recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan (rddVTT-CCMp24). Intramuscular immunization was performed on days 0 (prime) and 21 (boost). The immunogenicity of the vaccine schedules was determined by measuring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific binding antibody levels and cytokine (interleukin-2 and interleukin-4) concentrations in peripheral blood, analyzing lymphocyte proliferation capacity against HIV epitopes and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cell ratio, and monitoring interferon-gamma levels at different times post-immunization. The results showed that pCCMp24, rddVTT-CCMp24 and their prime-boost immunization induced humoral and cellular immune responses. The pCCMp24/rddVTT-CCMp24 immunization strategy increased CD8(+) T cells and induced more IFN-γ-secreting cells compared with single-shot rDNA. The prime-boost immunization strategy also induced the generation of cellular immunological memory to HIV epitope peptides. These results demonstrated that prime-boost immunization with rDNA and rddVTT-CCMp24 had a tendency to induce greater cellular immune response than single-shot vaccinations, especially IFN-γ response, providing a basis for further studies.

  3. Overexpression of a Rrp1 transgene reduces the somatic mutation and recombination frequency induced by oxidative DNA damage in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Szakmary, A; Huang, S M; Chang, D T; Beachy, P A; Sander, M

    1996-02-20

    Recombination repair protein 1 (Rrp1) includes a C-terminal region homologous to several DNA repair proteins, including Escherichia coli exonuclease III and human APE, that repair oxidative and alkylation damage to DNA. The nuclease activities of Rrp1 include apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, 3'-phosphodiesterase, 3'-phosphatase, and 3'-exonuclease. As shown previously, the C-terminal nuclease region of Rrp1 is sufficient to repair oxidative- and alkylation-induced DNA damage in repair-deficient E. coli mutants. DNA strand-transfer and single-stranded DNA renaturation activities are associated with the unique N-terminal region of Rrp1, which suggests possible additional functions that include recombinational repair or homologous recombination. By using the Drosophila w/w+ mosaic eye system, which detects loss of heterozygosity as changes in eye pigmentation, somatic mutation and recombination frequencies were determined in transgenic flies overexpressing wild-type Rrp1 protein from a heat-shock-inducible transgene. A large decrease in mosaic clone frequency is observed when Rrp1 overexpression precedes treatment with gamma-rays, bleomycin, or paraquat. In contrast, Rrp1 overexpression does not alter the spot frequency after treatment with the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate or methyl nitrosourea. A reduction in mosaic clone frequency depends on the expression of the Rrp1 transgene and on the nature of the induced DNA damage. These data suggest a lesion-specific involvement of Rrp1 in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

  4. Loop L1 governs the DNA-binding specificity and order for RecA-catalyzed reactions in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Takeshi; Ikawa, Shukuko; Iwasaki, Wakana; Hiraki, Toshiki; Hikima, Takaaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Arai, Naoto; Kamiya, Nobuo; Shibata, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms, RecA-family recombinases catalyze homologous joint formation in homologous genetic recombination, which is essential for genome stability and diversification. In homologous joint formation, ATP-bound RecA/Rad51-recombinases first bind single-stranded DNA at its primary site and then interact with double-stranded DNA at another site. The underlying reason and the regulatory mechanism for this conserved binding order remain unknown. A comparison of the loop L1 structures in a DNA-free RecA crystal that we originally determined and in the reported DNA-bound active RecA crystals suggested that the aspartate at position 161 in loop L1 in DNA-free RecA prevented double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA-binding to the primary site. This was confirmed by the effects of the Ala-replacement of Asp-161 (D161A), analyzed directly by gel-mobility shift assays and indirectly by DNA-dependent ATPase activity and SOS repressor cleavage. When RecA/Rad51-recombinases interact with double-stranded DNA before single-stranded DNA, homologous joint-formation is suppressed, likely by forming a dead-end product. We found that the D161A-replacement reduced this suppression, probably by allowing double-stranded DNA to bind preferentially and reversibly to the primary site. Thus, Asp-161 in the flexible loop L1 of wild-type RecA determines the preference for single-stranded DNA-binding to the primary site and regulates the DNA-binding order in RecA-catalyzed recombinase reactions. PMID:25561575

  5. DNA endonuclease activities on psoralen plus ultraviolet light treated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, M.W.; Clark, M.

    1986-03-01

    Activities of nuclear DNA endonucleases (Endos) from normal human lymphoblastoid cells on DNA treated with the DNA interstrand cross-linking agents 4,5'8-trimethyl psoralen (TMP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (MOP) plus long-wavelength (320-400 nm) ultraviolet light (UVA) were examined. Chromatin-associated DNA Endos were isolated from both cell lines and subjected to isoelectric focusing (IF). Each IF fraction was assayed for DNA Endo activity. Peaks of activity were pooled and assayed for activity on undamaged PM2 bacteriophage DNA and on PM2 DNA that had been treated with 15 ..mu..g/ml TMP or MOP in the dark and then exposed to UVA light. Unbound psoralen was removed by dialysis and a second dose of UVA light was given in order to increase the number of DNA cross-links. Two Endo activities were found which were active on TMP- and MOP-DNA: a major one, pI 4.6, which is also active on intercalated DNA, and a second, lesser one, pI 7.6, which is active on UVC (254 nm) light irradiated DNA. These results indicate that there are two different DNA Endos which act on both TMP- and MOP-treated DNA and that the major activity recognizes the intercalation of, and/or the cross-link produced by interaction of, psoralen with DNA.

  6. The RecD subunit of the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme inhibits RecA loading, homologous recombination, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Taylor, Andrew F.; Smith, Gerald R.

    2000-01-01

    The RecBCD enzyme is required for homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli. The structure and function of RecBCD enzyme is altered on its interaction with the recombination hotspot Chi (5′-GCTGGTGG-3′). It has been hypothesized that the RecD subunit plays a role in Chi-dependent regulation of enzyme activity [Thaler, D. S., Sampson, E., Siddiqi, I., Rosenberg, S. M., Stahl, F. W. & Stahl, M. (1988) in Mechanisms and Consequences of DNA Damage Processing, eds. Friedberg, E. & Hanawalt, P. (Liss, New York), pp. 413–422; Churchill, J. J., Anderson, D. G. & Kowalczykowski, S. C. (1999) Genes Dev. 13, 901–911]. We tested the hypothesis that the RecD subunit inhibits recombination by deleting recD from the nuclease- and recombination-deficient mutant recBD1080ACD. We report here that the resulting strain, recBD1080AC, was proficient for recombination and DNA repair. Recombination proficiency was accompanied by a change in enzyme activity: RecBD1080AC enzyme loaded RecA protein onto DNA during DNA unwinding whereas RecBD1080ACD enzyme did not. Together, these genetic and biochemical results demonstrate that RecA loading by RecBCD enzyme is required for recombination in E. coli cells and suggest that RecD interferes with the enzyme domain required for its loading. A nuclease-dependent signal appears to be required for a change in RecD that allows RecA loading. Because RecA loading is not observed with wild-type RecBCD enzyme until it acts at a Chi site, our observations support the view that RecD inhibits recombination until the enzyme acts at Chi. PMID:10840065

  7. DNA methylation epigenetically silences crossover hot spots and controls chromosomal domains of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yelina, Nataliya E; Lambing, Christophe; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Santos, Bruno; Henderson, Ian R

    2015-10-15

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which is typically concentrated in narrow hot spots that are controlled by genetic and epigenetic information. Arabidopsis chromosomes are highly DNA methylated in the repetitive centromeres, which are also crossover-suppressed. Here we demonstrate that RNA-directed DNA methylation is sufficient to locally silence Arabidopsis euchromatic crossover hot spots and is associated with increased nucleosome density and H3K9me2. However, loss of CG DNA methylation maintenance in met1 triggers epigenetic crossover remodeling at the chromosome scale, with pericentromeric decreases and euchromatic increases in recombination. We used recombination mutants that alter interfering and noninterfering crossover repair pathways (fancm and zip4) to demonstrate that remodeling primarily involves redistribution of interfering crossovers. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show that crossover remodeling is driven by loss of CG methylation within the centromeric regions. Using cytogenetics, we profiled meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci in met1 and found them unchanged relative to wild type. We propose that met1 chromosome structure is altered, causing centromere-proximal DSBs to be inhibited from maturation into interfering crossovers. These data demonstrate that DNA methylation is sufficient to silence crossover hot spots and plays a key role in establishing domains of meiotic recombination along chromosomes.

  8. Role of AtMSH7 in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and recombination.

    PubMed

    Lario, Luciana Daniela; Botta, Pablo; Casati, Paula; Spampinato, Claudia Patricia

    2015-06-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) system maintains genome integrity by correcting replication-associated errors and inhibiting recombination between divergent DNA sequences. The basic features of the pathway have been highly conserved throughout evolution, although the nature and number of the proteins involved in this DNA repair system vary among organisms. Plants have an extra mismatch recognition protein, MutSγ, which is a heterodimer: MSH2-MSH7. To further understand the role of MSH7 in vivo, we present data from this protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. First, we generated transgenic plants that express β-glucuronidase (GUS) under the control of the MSH7 promoter. Histochemical staining of the transgenic plants indicated that MSH7 is preferentially expressed in proliferating tissues. Then, we identified msh7 T-DNA insertion mutants. Plants deficient in MSH7 show increased levels of UV-B-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers relative to wild-type (WT) plants. Consistent with the patterns of MSH7 expression, we next analysed the role of the protein during somatic and meiotic recombination. The frequency of somatic recombination between homologous or homeologous repeats (divergence level of 1.6%) was monitored using a previously described GUS recombination reporter assay. Disruption of MSH7 has no effect on the rates of somatic homologous or homeologous recombination under control conditions or after UV-B exposure. However, the rate of meiotic recombination between two genetically linked seed-specific fluorescent markers was 97% higher in msh7 than in WT plants. Taken together, these results suggest that MSH7 is involved in UV-B-induced DNA damage recognition and in controlling meiotic recombination.

  9. [Important points in virus research using recombinant DNA technology].

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Takahiko; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2007-06-01

    Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity seeks to protect biological diversity from potential risks posed by living modified organisms (LMOs) resulting from modern biotechnology. This protocol was ratified in Japan after establishing domestic law and regulations for the protocol. In the domestic law, use of LMOs is classified into type 1 use (use without containment measures) and type 2 use (use with containment measures). According to the domestic law, most of experiments using recombinant viruses are required for the approval of the Minister. In this article, we will explain Cartagena Protocol and the Japanese domestic low and indicate an example of application form for the approval of the Minister.

  10. Scaling-up recombinant plasmid DNA for clinical trial: current concern, solution and status.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Ruzila; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Lila, Mohd-Azmi Mohd

    2012-09-07

    Gene therapy and vaccines are rapidly developing field in which recombinant nucleic acids are introduced in mammalian cells for enhancement, restoration, initiation or silencing biochemical function. Beside simplicity in manipulation and rapid manufacture process, plasmid DNA-based vaccines have inherent features that make them promising vaccine candidates in a variety of diseases. This present review focuses on the safety concern of the genetic elements of plasmid such as propagation and expression units as well as their host genome for the production of recombinant plasmid DNA. The highlighted issues will be beneficial in characterizing and manufacturing plasmid DNA for save clinical use. Manipulation of regulatory units of plasmid will have impact towards addressing the safety concerns raised in human vaccine applications. The gene revolution with plasmid DNA by alteration of their plasmid and production host genetics will be promising for safe delivery and obtaining efficient outcomes.

  11. MET inhibition in tumor cells by PHA665752 impairs homologous recombination repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Zimmer, Yitzhak

    2012-02-01

    Abnormal activation of cellular DNA repair pathways by deregulated signaling of receptor tyrosine kinase systems has broad implications for both cancer biology and treatment. Recent studies suggest a potential link between DNA repair and aberrant activation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition (MET), an oncogene that is overexpressed in numerous types of human tumors and considered a prime target in clinical oncology. Using the homologous recombination (HR) direct-repeat direct-repeat green fluorescent protein ((DR)-GFP) system, we show that MET inhibition in tumor cells with deregulated MET activity by the small molecule PHA665752 significantly impairs in a dose-dependent manner HR. Using cells that express MET-mutated variants that respond differentially to PHA665752, we confirm that the observed HR inhibition is indeed MET-dependent. Furthermore, our data also suggest that decline in HR-dependent DNA repair activity is not a secondary effect due to cell cycle alterations caused by PHA665752. Mechanistically, we show that MET inhibition affects the formation of the RAD51-BRCA2 complex, which is crucial for error-free HR repair of double strand DNA lesions, presumably via downregulation and impaired translocation of RAD51 into the nucleus. Taken together, these findings assist to further support the role of MET in the cellular DNA damage response and highlight the potential future benefit of MET inhibitors for the sensitization of tumor cells to DNA damaging agents.

  12. Evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of the thermo-treatment process to dispose of recombinant DNA waste from biological research laboratories.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Nan; Zheng, Guang-Hong; Wang, Lei; Xiao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Hua; Le, Yi-Quan; Ren, Da-Ming

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of recombinant DNA waste from biological laboratories into the eco-system may be one of the pathways resulting in horizontal gene transfer or "gene pollution". Heating at 100 degrees C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating recombinant DNA waste in biological research laboratories in China. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and the safety of the thermo-treatment method in the disposal of recombinant DNA waste. Quantitative PCR, plasmid transformation and electrophoresis technology were used to evaluate the decay/denaturation efficiency during the thermo-treatment process of recombinant plasmid, pET-28b. Results showed that prolonging thermo-treatment time could improve decay efficiency of the plasmid, and its decay half-life was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment at 100 degrees C. However, after 30 min of thermo-treatment some transforming activity remained. Higher ionic strength could protect recombinant plasmid from decay during the treatment process. These results indicate that thermo-treatment at 100 degrees C cannot decay and inactivate pET-28b completely. In addition, preliminary results showed that thermo-treated recombinant plasmids were not degraded completely in a short period when they were discharged into an aquatic environment. This implies that when thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the eco-system, they may have enough time to re-nature and transform, thus resulting in gene diffusion.

  13. Development of a recombinant DNA assay system for the detection of genetic change in astronauts' cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atchley, S.V.; Chen, D.J.C.; Strniste, G.F.; Walters, R.A.; Moyzis, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    We are developing a new recombinant DNA system for the detection and measurement of genetic change in humans caused by exposure to low level ionizing radiation. A unique feature of the method is the use of cloned repetitive DNA probes to assay human DNA for structural changes during or after irradiation. Repetitive sequences exist in different families. Collectively they constitute over 25% of the DNA in a human cell. Repeat families have between 10 and 500,000 members. We have constructed repetitive DNA sequence libraries using recombinant DNA techniques. From these libraries we have isolated and characterized individual repeats comprising 75 to 90% of the mass of human repetitive DNA. Repeats used in our assay system exist in tandem arrays in the genome. Perturbation of these sequences in a cell, followed by detection with a repeat probe, produces a new, multimeric ''ladder'' pattern on an autoradiogram. The repeat probe used in our initial study is complementary to 1% of human DNA. Therefore, the sensitivity of this method is several orders of magnitude better than existing assays. Preliminary evidence from human skin cells exposed to acute, low-dose x-ray treatments indicates that DNA is affected at a dose as low as 5R. The radiation doses used in this system are well within the range of doses received by astronauts during spaceflight missions. Due to its small material requirements, this technique could easily be adapted for use in space. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  14. 53BP1 regulates DNA resection and the choice between classical and alternative end joining during class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Bothmer, Anne; Robbiani, Davide F; Feldhahn, Niklas; Gazumyan, Anna; Nussenzweig, Andre; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2010-04-12

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies by joining highly repetitive DNA elements, which are separated by 60-200 kbp. CSR is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, an enzyme that produces multiple DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in switch regions. Switch regions are joined by a mechanism that requires an intact DNA damage response and classical or alternative nonhomologous end joining (A-NHEJ). Among the DNA damage response factors, 53BP1 has the most profound effect on CSR. We explore the role of 53BP1 in intrachromosomal DNA repair using I-SceI to introduce paired DSBs in the IgH locus. We find that the absence of 53BP1 results in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent increase in DNA end resection and that resected DNA is preferentially repaired by microhomology-mediated A-NHEJ. We propose that 53BP1 favors long-range CSR in part by protecting DNA ends against resection, which prevents A-NHEJ-dependent short-range rejoining of intra-switch region DSBs.

  15. Distribution of Exchanges upon Homologous Recombination of Exogenous DNA in Xenopus Laevis Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, D.; Lehman, C. W.; Jeong-Yu, S.; Dohrmann, P.; Dawson, R. J.; Trautman, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination between DNA molecules injected into Xenopus oocyte nuclei was investigated by examining the recovery of information from differentially marked parental sequences. The injected recombination substrate was a linear DNA with terminal direct repeats of 1246 bp; one repeat differed from the other by eight single base-pair substitutions, distributed throughout the region of homology, each of which created or destroyed a restriction enzyme site. Recombination products were recovered and analyzed for their content of the diagnostic sites, either directly by Southern blot-hybridization or after cloning in bacteria. The majority (76%) of the cloned products appeared to be the result of simple exchanges-i.e., there was one sharp transition from sequences derived from one parent to sequences derived from the other. These simple exchanges were concentrated near the ends of the homologous interval and, thus, near the sites of the original molecular ends. Placing marked sites on only one side of the homologous overlap showed that marker recovery was governed largely by the positions of the molecular ends and not by the markers themselves. When a terminal nonhomology was present at one end of the substrate, the yield of recombinants was sharply decreased, but the pattern of exchanges was not affected, suggesting that products from end-blocked substrates arise by the same recombination pathway. Because of considerable evidence supporting a nonconservative, resection-annealing mechanism for recombination in oocytes, we interpret the distribution of exchanges as resulting from long-patch repair of extensive heteroduplex intermediates. PMID:7828826

  16. BRCA2 function in DNA binding and recombination from a BRCA2-DSS1-ssDNA structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haijuan; Jeffrey, Philip D; Miller, Julie; Kinnucan, Elspeth; Sun, Yutong; Thoma, Nicolas H; Zheng, Ning; Chen, Phang-Lang; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Pavletich, Nikola P

    2002-09-13

    Mutations in the BRCA2 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 2) tumor suppressor lead to chromosomal instability due to defects in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination, but BRCA2's role in this process has been unclear. Here, we present the 3.1 angstrom crystal structure of a approximately 90-kilodalton BRCA2 domain bound to DSS1, which reveals three oligonucleotide-binding (OB) folds and a helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. We also (i) demonstrate that this BRCA2 domain binds single-stranded DNA, (ii) present its 3.5 angstrom structure bound to oligo(dT)9, (iii) provide data that implicate the HTH motif in dsDNA binding, and (iv) show that BRCA2 stimulates RAD51-mediated recombination in vitro. These findings establish that BRCA2 functions directly in homologous recombination and provide a structural and biochemical basis for understanding the loss of recombination-mediated DSB repair in BRCA2-associated cancers.

  17. ATM and p53 are essential in the cell-cycle containment of DNA breaks during V(D)J recombination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dujka, M E; Puebla-Osorio, N; Tavana, O; Sang, M; Zhu, C

    2010-02-18

    V(D)J recombination is essential for the maturation of lymphocytes. Because of the involvement of cutting and joining DNA double strands, this recombination activity is strictly contained within the noncycling phases of the cell cycle. Such containment is crucial for the maintenance of genomic integrity. The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is known to have a central role in sensing general DNA damage and mediating cell-cycle checkpoint. In this study, we investigated the role of ATM and its downstream targets in the cell-cycle control of V(D)J recombination in vivo. Our results revealed the persistence of double-strand breaks (DSBs) throughout the cell cycle in ATM(-/-) and p53(-/-) thymocytes, but the cell-cycle regulation of a V(D)J recombinase, Rag-2, was normal. The histone variant H2AX, which is phosphorylated during normal V(D)J recombination, was dispensable for containing DSBs. H2AX was still phosphorylated at V(D)J loci in the absence of ATM. Therefore, V(D)J recombination, a physiological DNA rearrangement process, activates the ATM/p53 pathway to contain DNA breaks within the noncycling cells and surprisingly this pathway is not important for containing Rag-2 activity. This study shows the dynamic multiple functions of ATM in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis in developing lymphocytes.

  18. Activation of Xer-recombination at dif: structural basis of the FtsKγ–XerD interaction

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andrew N.; Xin, Yue; Boer, Stephanie; Reinhardt, Jonathan; Baker, Rachel; Arciszewska, Lidia K.; Lewis, Peter J.; Sherratt, David J.; Löwe, Jan; Grainge, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are most often circular DNA molecules. This can produce a topological problem; a genetic crossover from homologous recombination results in dimerization of the chromosome. A chromosome dimer is lethal unless resolved. A site-specific recombination system catalyses this dimer-resolution reaction at the chromosomal site dif. In Escherichia coli, two tyrosine-family recombinases, XerC and XerD, bind to dif and carry out two pairs of sequential strand exchange reactions. However, what makes the reaction unique among site-specific recombination reactions is that the first step, XerD-mediated strand exchange, relies on interaction with the very C-terminus of the FtsK DNA translocase. FtsK is a powerful molecular motor that functions in cell division, co-ordinating division with clearing chromosomal DNA from the site of septation and also acts to position the dif sites for recombination. This is a model system for unlinking, separating and segregating large DNA molecules. Here we describe the molecular detail of the interaction between XerD and FtsK that leads to activation of recombination as deduced from a co-crystal structure, biochemical and in vivo experiments. FtsKγ interacts with the C-terminal domain of XerD, above a cleft where XerC is thought to bind. We present a model for activation of recombination based on structural data. PMID:27708355

  19. Direct evaluation of a kinetic model for RecA-mediated DNA-strand exchange: the importance of nucleic acid dynamics and entropy during homologous genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Lee, Andrew M; Singleton, Scott F

    2006-08-01

    The Escherichia coli RecA protein is the prototype of a class of proteins that play central roles in genomic repair and recombination in all organisms. The unresolved mechanistic strategy by which RecA aligns a single strand of DNA with a duplex DNA and mediates a DNA strand switch is central to understanding homologous recombination. We explored the mechanism of RecA-mediated DNA-strand exchange using oligonucleotide substrates with the intrinsic fluorophore 6-methylisoxanthopterin. Pre-steady-state spectrofluorometric analysis elucidated the earliest transient intermediates formed during recombination and delineated the mechanistic strategy by which RecA facilitates this process. The structural features of the first detectable intermediate and the energetic characteristics of its formation were consistent with interactions between a few bases of the single-stranded DNA and the minor groove of a locally melted or stretched duplex DNA. Further analysis revealed RecA to be an unusual enzyme in that entropic rather than enthalpic contributions dominate its catalytic function, and no unambiguously active role for the protein was detected in the earliest molecular events of recombination. The data best support the conclusion that the mechanistic strategy of RecA likely relies on intrinsic DNA dynamics.

  20. Diversity and recombination of dispersed ribosomal DNA and protein coding genes in microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  1. Diversity and Recombination of Dispersed Ribosomal DNA and Protein Coding Genes in Microsporidia

    PubMed Central

    Ironside, Joseph Edward

    2013-01-01

    Microsporidian strains are usually classified on the basis of their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. Although rDNA occurs as multiple copies, in most non-microsporidian species copies within a genome occur as tandem arrays and are homogenised by concerted evolution. In contrast, microsporidian rDNA units are dispersed throughout the genome in some species, and on this basis are predicted to undergo reduced concerted evolution. Furthermore many microsporidian species appear to be asexual and should therefore exhibit reduced genetic diversity due to a lack of recombination. Here, DNA sequences are compared between microsporidia with different life cycles in order to determine the effects of concerted evolution and sexual reproduction upon the diversity of rDNA and protein coding genes. Comparisons of cloned rDNA sequences between microsporidia of the genus Nosema with different life cycles provide evidence of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection. This suggests a birth and death process of evolution. However, some concerted evolution is suggested by clustering of rDNA sequences within species. Variability of protein-coding sequences indicates that considerable intergenomic variation also occurs between microsporidian cells within a single host. Patterns of variation in microsporidian DNA sequences indicate that additional diversity is generated by intragenomic and/or intergenomic recombination between sequence variants. The discovery of intragenomic variability coupled with strong purifying selection in microsporidian rRNA sequences supports the hypothesis that concerted evolution is reduced when copies of a gene are dispersed rather than repeated tandemly. The presence of intragenomic variability also renders the use of rDNA sequences for barcoding microsporidia questionable. Evidence of recombination in the single-copy genes of putatively asexual microsporidia suggests that these species may undergo cryptic sexual reproduction, a

  2. A Citizen Court in the Recombinant DNA debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinsky, Sheldon

    1978-01-01

    Harvard scientists were planning DNA experiments which required special facilities. A citizen panel was formed to look into the adequacy of federal safety guidelines for the community. Describes the review process and discusses the concept of a citizen court to resolve such technical controversies. (GA)

  3. Production of biologically active recombinant goose FSH in a single chain form with a CTP linker sequence.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Huanxi; Qin, Qinming; Lei, Mingming; Shi, Zhendan

    2017-02-01

    FSH is a glycoprotein hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that is essential for gonadal development and reproductive function. In avian reproduction study, especially in avian reproduction hormone study, it is hindered by the lack of biologically active FSH. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we prepared recombinant goose FSH as a single chain molecule and tested its biological activities in the present study. Coding sequences for mature peptides of goose FSH α and β subunits were amplified from goose pituitary cDNA. A chimeric gene containing α and β subunit sequences linked by the hCG carboxyl terminal peptide coding sequence was constructed. The recombinant gene was inserted into the pcDNA3.1-Fc eukaryotic expression vector to form pcDNA-Fc-gFSHβ-CTP-α and then transfected into 293-F cells. A recombinant, single chain goose FSH was expressed and verified by SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis, and was purified using Protein A agarose affinity and gel filtration chromatography. Biological activity analysis results showed that the recombinant, chimeric goose FSH possesses the function of stimulating estradiol secretion and cell proliferation, in cultured chicken granulosa cells. These results indicated that bioactive, recombinant goose FSH has been successfully prepared in vitro. The recombinant goose FSH will have the potential of being used as a research tool for studying avian reproductive activities, and as a standard for developing avian FSH bioassays.

  4. Artificial restriction DNA cutters to promote homologous recombination in human cells.

    PubMed

    Katada, Hitoshi; Komiyama, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    Homologous recombination is almost the only way to modify the genome in a predetermined fashion, despite its quite low frequency in mammalian cells. It has been already reported that the frequency of this biological process can be notably increased by inducing a double strand break (DSB) at target site. This article presents completely chemistry-based artificial restriction DNA cutter (ARCUT) for the promotion of homologous recombination in human cells. This cutter is composed of Ce(IV)/EDTA complex (molecular scissors) and two strands of peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and contains no proteins. Its scission site in the genome is determined simply by Watson-Crick rule so that ARCUT for desired homologous recombination is easily and straightforwardly designed and synthesized. The site-specificity of the scission is high enough to cut human genome at one target site. The DSB induced by this cutter is satisfactorily recognized by the repair system in human cells and promotes the targeted homologous recombination.

  5. The "Frankenplasmid" Lab: An Investigative Exercise for Teaching Recombinant DNA Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Derek M.; Wilder, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe an investigative laboratory module designed to give college undergraduates strong practical and theoretical experience with recombinant DNA methods within 3 weeks. After deducing restriction enzyme maps for two different plasmids, students ligate the plasmids together in the same reaction, transform "E. coli" with this mixture of…

  6. Personal reflections on the origins and emergence of recombinant DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Berg, Paul; Mertz, Janet E

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of recombinant DNA technology occurred via the appropriation of known tools and procedures in novel ways that had broad applications for analyzing and modifying gene structure and organization of complex genomes. Although revolutionary in their impact, the tools and procedures per se were not revolutionary. Rather, the novel ways in which they were applied was what transformed biology.

  7. Government Regulation of the Pursuit of Knowledge: The Recombinant DNA Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Richard G.

    1978-01-01

    Government regulation of recombinant DNA research is addressed. Issues discussed include the potential of such research; National Institutes of Health guidelines; federal, state, and local regulation; the controversy over self-regulation; first amendment protection for scientific research; and problems in drafting legislation. (JMD)

  8. Are High School Students Ready for Recombinant DNA?: The UOP Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minch, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a three-week summer college honors course for talented high school juniors with three exams, lab six days a week, a research paper, field trips, and student panel discussions. Presents an overview of the course. Describes the lab which uses "E. coli" for DNA recombination. (MVL)

  9. Construction, Expression, and Characterization of Recombinant Pfu DNA Polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun; Wang, Qingsong; Bi, Qun

    2016-04-01

    Pfu DNA polymerase (Pfu) is a DNA polymerase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. With its excellent thermostability and high fidelity, Pfu is well known as one of the enzymes widely used in the polymerase chain reaction. In this study, the recombinant plasmid pLysS His6-tagged Pfu-pET28a was constructed. His-tagged Pfu was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) competent cells and then successfully purified with the ÄKTAprime plus compact one-step purification system by Ni(2+) chelating affinity chromatography after optimization of the purification conditions. The authenticity of the purified Pfu was further confirmed by peptide mass fingerprinting. A bio-assay indicated that its activity in the polymerase chain reaction was equivalent to that of commercial Pfu and its isoelectric point was found to be between 6.85 and 7.35. These results will be useful for further studies on Pfu and its wide application in the future.

  10. Preferential repair of UV damage in highly transcribed DNA diminishes UV-induced intrachromosomal recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, W P; Nickoloff, J A

    1994-01-01

    The relationships among transcription, recombination, DNA damage, and repair in mammalian cells were investigated. We monitored the effects of transcription on UV-induced intrachromosomal recombination between neomycin repeats including a promoterless allele and an inducible heteroallele regulated by the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. Although transcription and UV light separately stimulated recombination, increasing transcription levels reduced UV-induced recombination. Preferential repair of UV damage in transcribed strands was shown in highly transcribed DNA, suggesting that recombination is stimulated by unrepaired UV damage and that increased DNA repair in highly transcribed alleles removes recombinogenic lesions. This study indicates that the genetic consequences of DNA damage depend on transcriptional states and provides a basis for understanding tissue- and gene-specific responses to DNA-damaging agents. Images PMID:8264606

  11. Low recombination activity of R region located at both ends of the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, Anna; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Jankowska, Anna; Alejska, Magdalena; Figlerowicz, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Although two strand transfer events are indispensable for the synthesis of double-stranded DNA and establishing HIV-1 infection, the molecular basis of these phenomena is still unclear. The first obligatory template switching event occurs just at the beginning of the virus replication cycle and involves two copies of the 97-nucleotide long R region, located one each at the both ends of the HIV-1 genome (HIV-1 R). Thus, one can expect that the molecular mechanism of this process is similar to the mechanism of homologous recombination which operates in RNA viruses. To verify the above-mentioned hypothesis, we attempted to assess the recombination activity of HIV-1 R. To this end, we tested in vitro, how effectively it induces template switching by HIV-1 RT in comparison with another well-characterized sequence supporting frequent homologous crossovers in an unrelated virus (R region derived from Brome mosaic virus--BMV R). We also examined if the RNA sequences neighboring HIV-1 R influence its recombination activity. Finally, we tested if HIV-1 R could cause BMV polymerase complex to switch between RNA templates in vivo. Overall, our results have revealed a relatively low recombination activity of HIV-1 R as compared to BMV R. This observation suggests that different factors modulate the efficiency of the first obligatory strand transfer in HIV-1 and the homology-driven recombination in RNA viruses.

  12. The role of DNA repair genes in recombination between repeated sequences in yeast.

    PubMed

    Liefshitz, B; Parket, A; Maya, R; Kupiec, M

    1995-08-01

    The presence of repeated sequences in the genome represents a potential source of karyotypic instability. Genetic control of recombination is thus important to preserve the integrity of the genome. To investigate the genetic control of recombination between repeated sequences, we have created a series of isogenic strains in which we could assess the role of genes involved in DNA repair in two types of recombination: direct repeat recombination and ectopic gene conversion. Naturally occurring (Ty elements) and artificially constructed repeats could be compared in the same cell population. We have found that direct repeat recombination and gene conversion have different genetic requirements. The role of the RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, RAD55, and RAD57 genes, which are involved in recombinational repair, was investigated. Based on the phenotypes of single and double mutants, these genes can be divided into three functional subgroups: one composed of RAD52, a second one composed of RAD51 and RAD54, and a third one that includes the RAD55 and RAD57 genes. Among seven genes involved in excision repair tested, only RAD1 and RAD10 played a role in the types of recombination studied. We did not detect a differential effect of any rad mutation on Ty elements as compared to artificially constructed repeats.

  13. Absence of extensive recombination between inter- and intraspecies mitochondrial DNA in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, J; Tagashira, Y; Yoshida, M C

    1985-10-01

    Recombination of mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was examined using mouse X rat somatic cell hybrid clones and rat cybrid clones. The mouse X rat hybrids were isolated by fusion of chloramphenicol-sensitive (CAPs) mouse and CAP-resistant (CAPr) rat cells. The rat cybrids were isolated by fusion of rat cells with type B mtDNA and enucleated cells with type A mtDNA. Genetic and physical analyses showed that the mtDNAs of the hybrids and cybrids were simple mixtures of the two parental mtDNAs except in the following two cases: One was subclone H2-9 of mouse X rat hybrids, which was CAPr even though mtDNA from the CAPs mouse parent was predominantly retained. The other was rat cybrid subclones, Y12-24 and -61, which showed specific loss of one Hinf I fragment of type B mtDNA, B10. These observations suggest that, in contrast to the case with plant mtDNA, recombination of mammalian mtDNA occurs rarely, if at all.

  14. Quantitation of the residual DNA from rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Dai, Huixia; Liu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Liping; Pang, Jianlei; Ou, Jiquan; Yang, Daichang

    2014-04-01

    Residual DNA in recombinant protein pharmaceuticals can potentially cause safety issues in clinical applications; thus, maximum residual limit has been established by drug safety authorities. Assays for residual DNA in Escherichia coli, yeast, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell expression systems have been established, but no rice residual DNA assay for rice expression systems has been designed. To develop an assay for the quantification of residual DNA that is produced from rice seed, we established a sensitive assay using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) based on the 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. We found that a 40-cycle qPCR exhibited a linear response when the template concentration was in the range of 2×10(4) to 0.2pg of DNA per reaction in TaqMan and SYBR Green I assays. The amplification efficiency was 103 to 104%, and the amount of residual DNA from recombinant human serum albumin from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) was less than 3.8ng per dosage, which was lower than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Our results indicate that the current purification protocol could efficiently remove residual DNA during manufacturing and processing. Furthermore, this protocol could be viable in other cereal crop endosperm expression systems for developing a residual DNA quantitation assay using the highly conserved 5S rRNA gene of the crops.

  15. Neutralizing antibodies respond to a bivalent dengue DNA vaccine or/and a recombinant bivalent antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Weng, Yu-Wei; Huang, Hai-Long; Zhang, Jian-Ming; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    There is currently no effective vaccine to prevent dengue infection, despite the existence of multiple studies on potential methods of immunization. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of DNA and/or recombinant protein on levels of neutralizing antibodies. For this purpose, envelope domain IIIs of dengue serotypes 1 and 2 (DEN-1/2)were spliced by a linker (Gly‑Gly‑Ser‑Gly‑Ser)3 and cloned into the prokaryotic expression plasmid pET30a (+) and eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1 (+). The chimeric bivalent protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and one‑step purification by high‑performance liquid chromatography was conducted. Protein expression levels of the DNA plasmid were tested in BHK‑21 cells by indirect immunofluorescent assay. In order to explore a more effective immunization strategy and to develop neutralizing antibodies against the two serotypes, mice were inoculated with recombinant bivalent protein, the DNA vaccine, or the two given simultaneously. Presence of the specific antibodies was tested by ELISA and the presence of the neutralizing antibodies was determined by plaque reduction neutralization test. Results of the analysis indicated that the use of a combination of DNA and protein induced significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies against either DEN‑1 or DEN‑2 (1:64.0 and 1:76.1, respectively) compared with the DNA (1:24.7 and 1:26.9, DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively) or the recombinant protein (1:34.9 and 1:45.3 in DEN‑1 and DEN‑2, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the combination of recombinant protein and DNA as an immunization strategy may be an effective method for the development of a vaccine to prevent dengue virus infection.

  16. DNA End Resection: Nucleases Team Up with the Right Partners to Initiate Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Petr

    2015-09-18

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination commences by nucleolytic degradation of the 5'-terminated strand of the DNA break. This leads to the formation of 3'-tailed DNA, which serves as a substrate for the strand exchange protein Rad51. The nucleoprotein filament then invades homologous DNA to drive template-directed repair. In this review, I discuss mainly the mechanisms of DNA end resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which includes short-range resection by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2, as well as processive long-range resection by Sgs1-Dna2 or Exo1 pathways. Resection mechanisms are highly conserved between yeast and humans, and analogous machineries are found in prokaryotes as well.

  17. Endonuclease G plays a role in immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination by introducing double-strand breaks in switch regions.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Zhang, Jinsong; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Pone, Egest J; White, Clayton A; Lee, Derrik; Yel, Leman; Mai, Thach; Casali, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is the crucial mechanism diversifying the biological effector functions of antibodies. Generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), particularly staggered DSBs, in switch (S) regions of the upstream and downstream CH genes involved in the specific recombination process is an absolute requirement for CSR. Staggered DSBs would be generated through deamination of dCs on opposite DNA strands by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), subsequent dU deglycosylation by uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung) and abasic site nicking by apurinic/apyrimidic endonuclease. However, consistent with the findings that significant amounts of DSBs can be detected in the IgH locus in the absence of AID or Ung, we have shown in human and mouse B cells that AID generates staggered DSBs not only by cleaving intact double-strand DNA, but also by processing blunt DSB ends generated in an AID-independent fashion. How these AID-independent DSBs are generated is still unclear. It is possible that S region DNA may undergo AID-independent cleavage by structure-specific nucleases, such as endonuclease G (EndoG). EndoG is an abundant nuclease in eukaryotic cells. It cleaves single and double-strand DNA, primarily at dG/dC residues, the preferential sites of DSBs in S region DNA. We show here that EndoG can localize to the nucleus of B cells undergoing CSR and binds to S region DNA, as shown by specific chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Using knockout EndoG(-/-) mice and EndoG(-/-) B cells, we found that EndoG deficiency resulted in a two-fold reduction in CSR in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by reduced cell surface IgG1, IgG2a, IgG3 and IgA, reduced secreted IgG1, reduced circle Iγ1-Cμ, Iγ3-Cμ, Iɛ-Cμ, Iα-Cμ transcripts, post-recombination Iμ-Cγ1, Iμ-Cγ3, Iμ-Cɛ and Iμ-Cα transcripts. In addition to reduced CSR, EndoG(-/-) mice showed a significantly altered spectrum of mutations in IgH J(H)-iEμ DNA. Impaired CSR in

  18. The cell pole: The site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann; Graumann, Peter L.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as “guardians”, protect ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the “mediators” overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by “modulators”, catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or “resolver” cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the “rescuers” will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective. PMID:23046409

  19. Recombinational DNA repair in a cellular context: a search for the homology search.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Allon; Zauberman, Nathan; Minsky, Abraham

    2009-10-01

    Double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) are the most detrimental lesion that can be sustained by the genetic complement, and their inaccurate mending can be just as damaging. According to the consensual view, precise DSB repair relies on homologous recombination. Here, we review studies on DNA repair, chromatin diffusion and chromosome confinement, which collectively imply that a genome-wide search for a homologous template, generally thought to be a pivotal stage in all homologous DSB repair pathways, is improbable. The implications of this assertion for the scope and constraints of DSB repair pathways and for the ability of diverse organisms to cope with DNA damage are discussed.

  20. Oocyte shuttle, a recombinant protein transporting donor DNA into the Xenopus oocyte in situ.

    PubMed

    Rungger, Duri; Muster, Lisbeth; Georgiev, Oleg; Rungger-Brändle, Elisabeth

    2017-02-15

    The newly developed oocyte shuttle protein contains a streptavidin moiety that tightly binds biotinylated DNA. Injected intravenously into adult Xenopus females, the protein-DNA complex is rapidly transported through the bloodstream and, within the ovary, the vitellogenin ligand present in the protein binds to the receptors at the surface of the oocytes. The bound complex is internalized and translocates into the oocyte nucleus thanks to an SV40 nuclear localization signal, enhanced by an adjacent casein kinase phosphorylation site. Functioning of the shuttle protein is documented by transporting DNA molecules that, upon intramolecular homologous recombination within the oocyte nucleus, express easily traceable markers such as green fluorescence or tetracycline resistance.

  1. Conditional mutagenesis of the genome using site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki; Marth, Jamey D

    2007-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONAltering the genome of intact cells and organisms by site-specific DNA recombination has become an important gene-transfer methodology. DNA modifications produced by gene transfer and homologous recombination are typically static once integrated among target cell chromosomes. In contrast, the inclusion of exogenous recombinase target sequences within transferred DNA segments allows subsequent modifications to previously altered genomic structure that increase the utility of gene transfer and enhance experimental design. Creating tissue- and cell-type-specific genetic lesions in animal models, indelibly marking progenitors for cell fate mapping, inducing large-scale chromosomal rearrangements, and complementing gene defects in studies of phenotypic maintenance and reversion are all possible by directing recombinase expression using gene transfer among experimentally modified genomes. Moreover, this approach is effective in providing controlled data establishing genotype-phenotype relationships and allows for the excision of introduced marker genes that can affect neighboring chromatin structure and function. Although early work involved the yeast Flp recombinase, most studies in mammalian systems have used the Cre recombinase derived from bacteriophage P1. Both enzymes are members of the integrase family of recombinases but bind to distinct DNA target signals. Cre recombinase operates on the 34-bp loxP sequence and, like Flp, performs conservative recombination involving DNA segments positioned among these target sites.

  2. Cross-talk between nucleotide excision and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in the mechanism of action of antitumor trabectedin.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Ana B; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Marco, Esther; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Trabectedin (Yondelis) is a potent antitumor drug that has the unique characteristic of killing cells by poisoning the DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The basis for the NER-dependent toxicity has not yet been elucidated but it has been proposed as the major determinant for the drug's cytotoxicity. To study the in vivo mode of action of trabectedin and to explore the role of NER in its cytotoxicity, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. Treatment of S. pombe wild-type cells with trabectedin led to cell cycle delay and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, indicating that the drug causes DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage induced by the drug is mostly caused by the NER protein, Rad13 (the fission yeast orthologue to human XPG), and is mainly repaired by homologous recombination. By constructing different rad13 mutants, we show that the DNA damage induced by trabectedin depends on a 46-amino acid region of Rad13 that is homologous to a DNA-binding region of human nuclease FEN-1. More specifically, an arginine residue in Rad13 (Arg961), conserved in FEN1 (Arg314), was found to be crucial for the drug's cytotoxicity. These results lead us to propose a model for the action of trabectedin in eukaryotic cells in which the formation of a Rad13/DNA-trabectedin ternary complex, stabilized by Arg961, results in cell death.

  3. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  4. Effect of DNA Binding on Geminate CO Recombination Kinetics in CO-sensing Transcription Factor CooA*

    PubMed Central

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas L.; Champion, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide oxidation activator (CooA) proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding in two CooA homologues, Rhodospirillum rubrum (RrCooA) and Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans (ChCooA). The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA-binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were specifically investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes take place on ultrafast time scales but remain non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the time scale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in the CooA proteins relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Comparison of the CO rebinding kinetics of RrCooA, truncated RrCooA, and DNA-bound RrCooA proteins reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA-binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases, and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted. The kinetic studies also offer insights into how the architecture of the heme environment can tune entropic barriers in order to control the geminate recombination of CO in heme proteins, whereas spin selection rules play a minor or non-existent role. PMID:22544803

  5. Active DNA unwinding dynamics during processive DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Morin, José A; Cao, Francisco J; Lázaro, José M; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Valpuesta, José M; Carrascosa, José L; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2012-05-22

    Duplication of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) requires a fine-tuned coordination between the DNA replication and unwinding reactions. Using optical tweezers, we probed the coupling dynamics between these two activities when they are simultaneously carried out by individual Phi29 DNA polymerase molecules replicating a dsDNA hairpin. We used the wild-type and an unwinding deficient polymerase variant and found that mechanical tension applied on the DNA and the DNA sequence modulate in different ways the replication, unwinding rates, and pause kinetics of each polymerase. However, incorporation of pause kinetics in a model to quantify the unwinding reaction reveals that both polymerases destabilize the fork with the same active mechanism and offers insights into the topological strategies that could be used by the Phi29 DNA polymerase and other DNA replication systems to couple unwinding and replication reactions.

  6. Effects of suppressing the DNA mismatch repair system on homeologous recombination in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tam, Sheh May; Hays, John B; Chetelat, Roger T

    2011-12-01

    In plant breeding, the ability to manipulate genetic (meiotic) recombination would be beneficial for facilitating gene transfer from wild relatives of crop plants. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system helps maintain genetic integrity by correcting base mismatches that arise via DNA synthesis or damage, and antagonizes recombination between homeologous (divergent) DNA sequences. Previous studies have established that the genomes of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and the wild relative S. lycopersicoides are substantially diverged (homeologous) such that recombination between their chromosomes is strongly reduced. Here, we report the effects on homeologous recombination of suppressing endogenous MMR genes in S. lycopersicum via RNAi-induced silencing of SlMSH2 and SlMSH7 or overexpressing dominant negatives of Arabidopsis MSH2 (AtMSH2-DN) in an alien substitution line (SL-8) of S. lycopersicoides in tomato. We show that certain inhibitions of MMR (RNAi of SlMSH7, AtMSH2-DN) are associated with modest increases in homeologous recombination, ranging from 3.8 to 29.2% (average rate of 17.8%) compared to controls. Unexpectedly, only the AtMSH2-DN proteins but not RNAi-induced silencing of MSH2 was found to increase homeologous recombination. The ratio of single to double crossovers (SCO:DCO ratio) decreased by approximately 50% in progeny of the AtMSH2-DN parents. An increase in the frequency of heterozygous SL-8 plants was also observed in the progeny of the SlMSH7-RNAi parents. Our findings may contribute to acceleration of introgression in cultivated tomato.

  7. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Covo, Shay; Westmoreland, James W; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Resnick, Michael A

    2010-07-01

    Double-strand break (DSB) repair through homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin) is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2)/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2)/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2)/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  8. Safety and Efficacy of a Recombinant DNA Plasmodium Falciparum Sporozoite Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-06

    wells with serial dilutionsVolunteers were recruited under protocols approved by an of IgGI, lgG2, 1gG3, or IgG4 human myeloma proteins. IgE...measurement of antibodies directed s0 200 Dilution 60 0 3200 against the tets portion of R32tet, a related recombinant protein containing the identical CS... DISEASE IN PREGNANCY WITH A CLOSELY recombinant CS protein in FSV-1 consists of multiply LINKED DNA h &J2JE repeated units of only four aminoacids

  9. Replication factor A is required in vivo for DNA replication, repair, and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Longhese, M P; Plevani, P; Lucchini, G

    1994-01-01

    Replication factor A (RF-A) is a heterotrimeric single-stranded-DNA-binding protein which is conserved in all eukaryotes. Since the availability of conditional mutants is an essential step to define functions and interactions of RF-A in vivo, we have produced and characterized mutations in the RFA1 gene, encoding the p70 subunit of the complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This analysis provides the first in vivo evidence that RF-A function is critical not only for DNA replication but also for efficient DNA repair and recombination. Moreover, genetic evidence indicate that p70 interacts both with the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex and with DNA polymerase delta. Images PMID:7969128

  10. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    PubMed

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-03-04

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We had previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis for the delivery of newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, we outline the construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing Internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harbouring pPERDBY (LL InlA+ pPERDBY) to enhance the DNA delivery efficiency of L. lactis. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA+ pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around three fold increase in number of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein expressing Caco- cells. Thus, these findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis in delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens.

  11. DNA helicases in recombination and repair: construction of a delta uvrD delta helD delta recQ mutant deficient in recombination and repair.

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, V M; Klepin, H D; Matson, S W

    1995-01-01

    DNA helicases play pivotal roles in homologous recombination and recombinational DNA repair. They are involved in both the generation of recombinogenic single-stranded DNA ends and branch migration of synapsed Holliday junctions. Escherichia coli helicases II (uvrD), IV (helD), and RecQ (recQ) have all been implicated in the presynaptic stage of recombination in the RecF pathway. To probe for functional redundancy among these helicases, mutant strains containing single, double, and triple deletions in the helD, uvrD, and recQ genes were constructed and examined for conjugational recombination efficiency and DNA repair proficiency. We were unable to construct a strain harboring a delta recQ delta uvrD double deletion in a recBC sbcB(C) background (RecF pathway), suggesting that a delta recQ deletion mutation was lethal to the cell in a recBC sbcB(C) delta D background. However, we were able to construct a triple delta recQ delta uvrD Delta helD mutant in the recBC sbcB(C) background. This may be due to the increased mutator frequency in delta uvrD mutants which may have resulted in the fortuitous accumulation of a suppressor mutation(s). The triple helicase mutant recBC sbcB(C) delta uvrD delta recQ delta helD severely deficient in Hfr-mediated conjugational recombination and in the repair of methylmethane sulfonate-induced DNA damage. This suggests that the presence of at least one helicase--helicase II, RecQ helicase, or helicase IV--is essential for homologous recombination and recombinational DNA repair in a recBC sbcB(C) background. The triple helicase mutant was recombination and repair proficient in a rec+ background. Genetic analysis of the various double mutants unmasked additional functional redundancies with regard to conjugational recombination and DNA repair, suggesting that mechanisms of recombination depend both on the DNA substrates and on the genotype of the cell. PMID:7868608

  12. Comparative Genomics of DNA Recombination and Repair in Cyanobacteria: Biotechnological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Veaudor, Théo; Chauvat, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are fascinating photosynthetic prokaryotes that are regarded as the ancestors of the plant chloroplast; the purveyors of oxygen and biomass for the food chain; and promising cell factories for an environmentally friendly production of chemicals. In colonizing most waters and soils of our planet, cyanobacteria are inevitably challenged by environmental stresses that generate DNA damages. Furthermore, many strains engineered for biotechnological purposes can use DNA recombination to stop synthesizing the biotechnological product. Hence, it is important to study DNA recombination and repair in cyanobacteria for both basic and applied research. This review reports what is known in a few widely studied model cyanobacteria and what can be inferred by mining the sequenced genomes of morphologically and physiologically diverse strains. We show that cyanobacteria possess many E. coli-like DNA recombination and repair genes, and possibly other genes not yet identified. E. coli-homolog genes are unevenly distributed in cyanobacteria, in agreement with their wide genome diversity. Many genes are extremely well conserved in cyanobacteria (mutMS, radA, recA, recFO, recG, recN, ruvABC, ssb, and uvrABCD), even in small genomes, suggesting that they encode the core DNA repair process. In addition to these core genes, the marine Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains harbor recBCD (DNA recombination), umuCD (mutational DNA replication), as well as the key SOS genes lexA (regulation of the SOS system) and sulA (postponing of cell division until completion of DNA reparation). Hence, these strains could possess an E. coli-type SOS system. In contrast, several cyanobacteria endowed with larger genomes lack typical SOS genes. For examples, the two studied Gloeobacter strains lack alkB, lexA, and sulA; and Synechococcus PCC7942 has neither lexA nor recCD. Furthermore, the Synechocystis PCC6803 lexA product does not regulate DNA repair genes. Collectively, these findings

  13. Two recombination-dependent DNA replication pathways of bacteriophage T4, and their roles in mutagenesis and horizontal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mosig, Gisela; Gewin, John; Luder, Andreas; Colowick, Nancy; Vo, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Two major pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication, “join-copy” and “join-cut-copy,” can be distinguished in phage T4: join-copy requires only early and middle genes, but two late proteins, endonuclease VII and terminase, are uniquely important in the join-cut-copy pathway. In wild-type T4, timing of these pathways is integrated with the developmental program and related to transcription and packaging of DNA. In primase mutants, which are defective in origin-dependent lagging-strand DNA synthesis, the late pathway can bypass the lack of primers for lagging-strand DNA synthesis. The exquisitely regulated synthesis of endo VII, and of two proteins from its gene, explains the delay of recombination-dependent DNA replication in primase (as well as topoisomerase) mutants, and the temperature-dependence of the delay. Other proteins (e.g., the single-stranded DNA binding protein and the products of genes 46 and 47) are important in all recombination pathways, but they interact differently with other proteins in different pathways. These homologous recombination pathways contribute to evolution because they facilitate acquisition of any foreign DNA with limited sequence homology during horizontal gene transfer, without requiring transposition or site-specific recombination functions. Partial heteroduplex repair can generate what appears to be multiple mutations from a single recombinational intermediate. The resulting sequence divergence generates barriers to formation of viable recombinants. The multiple sequence changes can also lead to erroneous estimates in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11459968

  14. A general method to modify BACs to generate large recombinant DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Huang, Yue; Tang, Yi; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) has the capacity to clone DNA fragments in excess of 300 kb. It also has the considerable advantages of stable propagation and ease of purification. These features make BAC suitable in genetic research, such as library construction, transgenic mice production, and gene targeting constructs. Homologous recombination in Escherichia coli, a process named recombineering, has made the modification of BACs easy and reliable. We report here a modified recombineering method that can efficiently mediate the fusion of large DNA fragments from two or more different BACs. With the introduction of kanamycin-resistant gene and proposed rare-cutting restriction endonuclease (RCRE) sites into two BACs, a 82.6-kb DNA fragment containing the inverted human alpha-globin genes (theta, alpha1, alpha2, and zeta) from BAC191K2 and the locus control region (LCR) of human beta-globin gene locus (from the BAC186D7) was reconstructed. This approach for combining different BAC DNA fragments should facilitate many kinds of genomic experiments.

  15. A high-efficiency recombineering system with PCR-based ssDNA in Bacillus subtilis mediated by the native phage recombinase GP35.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaopeng; Deng, Aihua; Hu, Ting; Wu, Jie; Sun, Qinyun; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Guoqiang; Wen, Tingyi

    2015-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis and its closely related species are important strains for industry, agriculture, and medicine. However, it is difficult to perform genetic manipulations using the endogenous recombination machinery. In many bacteria, phage recombineering systems have been employed to improve recombineering frequencies. To date, an efficient phage recombineering system for B. subtilis has not been reported. Here, we, for the first time, identified that GP35 from the native phage SPP1 exhibited a high recombination activity in B. subtilis. On this basis, we developed a high-efficiency GP35-meditated recombineering system. Taking single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) as a recombineering substrate, ten recombinases from diverse sources were investigated in B. subtilis W168. GP35 showed the highest recombineering frequency (1.71 ± 0.15 × 10(-1)). Besides targeting the purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene (deoD), we also demonstrated the utility of GP35 and Beta from Escherichia coli lambda phage by deleting the alpha-amylase gene (amyE) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase gene (upp). In all three genetic loci, GP35 exhibited a higher frequency than Beta. Moreover, a phylogenetic tree comparing the kinship of different recombinase hosts with B. subtilis was constructed, and the relationship between the recombineering frequency and the kinship of the host was further analyzed. The results suggested that closer kinship to B. subtilis resulted in higher frequency in B. subtilis. In conclusion, the recombinase from native phage or prophage can significantly promote the genetic recombineering frequency in its host, providing an effective genetic tool for constructing genetically engineered strains and investigating bacterial physiology.

  16. How-to-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Made Easy II. Gene, Gene, Who's Got the Gene?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    Described is an activity in which students are able to determine that DNA can be transferred between bacteria and should be able to predict the type of DNA transferred. Methods, materials, and results are discussed. (CW)

  17. Recombination activity of interfaces in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peshcherova, S. M.; Yakimov, E. B.; Nepomnyashchikh, A. I.; Pavlova, L. A.; Feklisova, O. V.

    2015-06-15

    The electrical activity of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon grown from metallurgical silicon by the Bridgman method is investigated by the method of electron-beam induced current. The main tendencies of atypical manifestation of the local electrical activity of Σ3(111) and Σ9(110) special boundaries are revealed. The structural features of the grain boundaries after selective etching and the impurity-distribution characteristics in multicrystalline silicon are determined by the methods of electron backscattering diffraction and electron-probe microanalysis.

  18. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  19. H4K16 acetylation affects recombination and ncRNA transcription at rDNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cesarini, Elisa; D'Alfonso, Anna; Camilloni, Giorgio

    2012-07-01

    Transcription-associated recombination is an important process involved in several aspects of cell physiology. In the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RNA polymerase II transcription-dependent recombination has been demonstrated among the repeated units. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms controlling this process at the chromatin level. On the basis of a small biased screening, we found that mutants of histone deacetylases and chromatin architectural proteins alter both the amount of Pol II-dependent noncoding transcripts and recombination products at rDNA in a coordinated manner. Of interest, chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses in these mutants revealed a corresponding variation of the histone H4 acetylation along the rDNA repeat, particularly at Lys-16. Here we provide evidence that a single, rapid, and reversible posttranslational modification-the acetylation of the H4K16 residue-is involved in the coordination of transcription and recombination at rDNA.

  20. Robotics for recombinant DNA and human genetics research

    SciTech Connect

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In October of 1989, molecular biologists throughout the world formally embarked on ultimately determining the set of genetic instructions for a human being. Called by some the Manhattan Project'' a molecular biology, pursuit of this goal is projected to require approximately 3000 man years of effort over a 15-year period. The Humane Genome Initiative is a worldwide research effort that has the goal of analyzing the structure of human deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and determining the location of all human genes. The Department of Energy (DOE) has designated three of its national laboratories as centers for the Human Genome Project. These are Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). These laboratories are currently working on different, but complementary technology development areas in support of the Human Genome Project. The robotics group at LANL is currently working at developing the technologies that address the problems associated with physical mapping. This article describes some of these problems and discusses some of the robotics approaches and engineering tolls applicable to their solution. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. DNA damage during the G0/G1 phase triggers RNA-templated, Cockayne syndrome B-dependent homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Böhm, Stefanie; Bernstein, Kara A; Shen, Zhiyuan; Tsang, Michael; Levine, Arthur S; Lan, Li

    2015-07-07

    Damage repair mechanisms at transcriptionally active sites during the G0/G1 phase are largely unknown. To elucidate these mechanisms, we introduced genome site-specific oxidative DNA damage and determined the role of transcription in repair factor assembly. We find that KU and NBS1 are recruited to damage sites independent of transcription. However, assembly of RPA1, RAD51C, RAD51, and RAD52 at such sites is strictly governed by active transcription and requires both wild-type Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) function and the presence of RNA in the G0/G1 phase. We show that the ATPase activity of CSB is indispensable for loading and binding of the recombination factors. CSB counters radiation-induced DNA damage in both cells and zebrafish models. Taken together, our results have uncovered a novel, RNA-based recombination mechanism by which CSB protects genome stability from strand breaks at transcriptionally active sites and may provide insight into the clinical manifestations of Cockayne syndrome.

  2. DNA damage during the G0/G1 phase triggers RNA-templated, Cockayne syndrome B-dependent homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Leizhen; Nakajima, Satoshi; Böhm, Stefanie; Bernstein, Kara A.; Shen, Zhiyuan; Tsang, Michael; Levine, Arthur S.; Lan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Damage repair mechanisms at transcriptionally active sites during the G0/G1 phase are largely unknown. To elucidate these mechanisms, we introduced genome site-specific oxidative DNA damage and determined the role of transcription in repair factor assembly. We find that KU and NBS1 are recruited to damage sites independent of transcription. However, assembly of RPA1, RAD51C, RAD51, and RAD52 at such sites is strictly governed by active transcription and requires both wild-type Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSB) function and the presence of RNA in the G0/G1 phase. We show that the ATPase activity of CSB is indispensable for loading and binding of the recombination factors. CSB counters radiation-induced DNA damage in both cells and zebrafish models. Taken together, our results have uncovered a novel, RNA-based recombination mechanism by which CSB protects genome stability from strand breaks at transcriptionally active sites and may provide insight into the clinical manifestations of Cockayne syndrome. PMID:26100862

  3. Prdm9 controls activation of mammalian recombination hotspots.

    PubMed

    Parvanov, Emil D; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2010-02-12

    Mammalian meiotic recombination, which preferentially occurs at specialized sites called hotspots, ensures the orderly segregation of meiotic chromosomes and creates genetic variation among offspring. A locus on mouse chromosome 17, which controls activation of recombination at multiple distant hotspots, has been mapped within a 181-kilobase interval, three of whose genes can be eliminated as candidates. The remaining gene, Prdm9, codes for a zinc finger containing histone H3K4 trimethylase that is expressed in early meiosis and whose deficiency results in sterility in both sexes. Mus musculus exhibits five alleles of Prdm9; human populations exhibit two predominant alleles and multiple minor alleles. The identification of Prdm9 as a protein regulating mammalian recombination hotspots initiates molecular studies of this important biological control system.

  4. Designed construction of recombinant DNA at the ura3Δ0 locus in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Tomoaki; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Hirakawa, Yuki; Sakai, Ryota; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Nonklang, Sanom; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-06-01

    Recombinant DNAs are traditionally constructed using Escherichia coli plasmids. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromosomal gene targeting is a common technique, implying that the yeast homologous recombination system could be applied for recombinant DNA construction. In an attempt to use a S. cerevisiae chromosome for recombinant DNA construction, we selected the single ura3Δ0 locus as a gene targeting site. By selecting this single locus, repeated recombination using the surrounding URA3 sequences can be performed. The recombination system described here has several advantages over the conventional plasmid system, as it provides a method to confirm the selection of correct recombinants because transformation of the same locus replaces the pre-existing selection marker, resulting in the loss of the marker in successful recombinations. In addition, the constructed strains can serve as both PCR templates and hosts for preparing subsequent recombinant strains. Using this method, several yeast strains that contained selection markers, promoters, terminators and target genes at the ura3Δ0 locus were successfully generated. The system described here can potentially be applied for the construction of any recombinant DNA without the requirement for manipulations in E. coli. Interestingly, we unexpectedly found that several G/C-rich sequences used for fusion PCR lowered gene expression when located adjacent to the start codon.

  5. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations.

  6. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  7. Regulating infidelity: RNA-mediated recruitment of AID to DNA during class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    DiMenna, Lauren; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism by which the DNA deaminase AID is specifically recruited to repetitive switch region DNA during class switch recombination is still poorly understood. Work over the past decade has revealed a strong link between transcription and RNA polymerase-associated factors in AID recruitment, yet none of these processes satisfactorily explain how AID specificity is effected. Here we review a recent finding wherein AID is guided to switch regions not by a protein factor but by an RNA moiety, and especially one associated with a non-coding RNA that has been long thought of as being inert. This work explains the long-standing requirement of splicing of non-coding transcripts during class switching, and has implications in both B-cell-mediated immunity as well as the underlying pathological syndromes associated with the recombination reaction. PMID:26799454

  8. Approaches towards the development of a vaccine against tuberculosis: recombinant BCG and DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nor, Norazmi Mohd; Musa, Mustaffa

    2004-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed intense research on vaccine development against tuberculosis. This has been driven by the upsurge of tuberculosis cases globally, especially those caused by multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Various vaccine strategies are currently being developed which can be broadly divided into the so-called living and non-living vaccines. Examples are attenuated members of the M. tuberculosis complex, recombinant mycobacteria, subunit proteins and DNA vaccines. Given current developments, we anticipate that recombinant BCG and DNA vaccines are the most promising. Multiple epitopes of M. tuberculosis may need to be cloned in a vaccine construct for the desired efficacy to be achieved. The technique of assembly polymerase chain reaction could facilitate such a cloning procedure.

  9. Progress in recombinant DNA-derived vaccines for Lassa virus and filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Grant-Klein, Rebecca J; Altamura, Louis A; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2011-12-01

    Developing vaccines for highly pathogenic viruses such as those causing Lassa, Ebola, and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers is a daunting task due to both scientific and logistical constraints. Scientific hurdles to overcome include poorly defined relationships between pathogenicity and protective immune responses, genetic diversity of viruses, and safety in a target population that includes a large number of individuals with compromised immune systems. Logistical obstacles include the requirement for biosafety level-4 containment to study the authentic viruses, the poor public health infrastructure of the endemic disease areas, and the cost of developing these vaccines for use in non-lucrative markets. Recombinant DNA-based vaccine approaches offer promise of overcoming some of these issues. In this review, we consider the status of various recombinant DNA candidate vaccines against Lassa virus and filoviruses which have been tested in animals.

  10. Induction of homologous recombination following in utero exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2013-11-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures.

  11. Induction of Homologous Recombination Following in utero Exposure to DNA-Damaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J. R.

    2013-01-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. PMID:24029142

  12. In vitro excision of adeno-associated virus DNA from recombinant plasmids: Isolation of an enzyme fraction from HeLa cells that cleaves DNA at poly(G) sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, J.; Muzyczka, N.

    1988-06-01

    When circular recombinant plasmids containing adeno-associated virus (AAV) DNA sequences are transfected into human cells, the AAV provirus is rescued. Using these circular AAV plasmids as substrates, the authors isolated an enzyme fraction from HeLa cell nuclear extracts that excises intact AAV DNA in vitro from vector DNA and produces linear DNA products. The recognition signal for the enzyme is a polypurine-polypyrimidine sequence which is at least 9 residues long and rich in G . C base pairs. Such sequences are present in AAV recombinant plasmids as part of the first 15 base pairs of the AAV terminal repeat and in some cases as the result of cloning the AAV genome by G . C tailing. The isolated enzyme fraction does not have significant endonucleolytic activity on single-stranded or double-stranded DNA. Plasmid DNA that is transfected into tissue culture cells is cleaved in vivo to produce a pattern of DNA fragments similar to that seen with purified enzyme in vitro. The activity has been called endo R for rescue, and its behavior suggests that it may have a role in recombination of cellular chromosomes.

  13. Using Vaccinia's innate ability to introduce DNA into mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Jester, Brian C; Drillien, Robert; Ruff, Marc; Florentz, Catherine

    2011-12-10

    Production of recombinant protein in mammalian cells is time-consuming, labor-intensive and costly. While seeking to overcome these limitations, we discovered that Vaccinia virus has the innate ability to transfer exogenous plasmid DNA into mammalian cells during the infection process. Parameters influencing the efficiency of this event were characterized and a quick, simple and inexpensive way to produce eukaryotic proteins was established.

  14. The gene-splicing wars: Reflections on the recombinant DNA controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Zilinskas, R.A.; Zimmerman, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Controversial questions of safety and ethics have surrounded use of recombinant DNA techniques from the beginning. This book takes a historical perspective on the issue, examining the public policy, political, and international aspects of the debate and presenting the views of scientists, industry, and the press. It emphasizes how lessons learned from the experience can be used to cope with similar issues in the future.

  15. Assembly of recombinant nucleosomes on nanofabricated DNA curtains for single-molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Yil; Greene, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes are highly packed into chromatin, the basic unit of which is the nucleosome. The presence of nucleosomes and the resulting organization of the genome into higher-order chromatin structures has profound consequences for virtually all aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA transcription, repair, and chromosome segregation. We have developed novel approaches for nanofabricating "DNA curtains" for high-throughput single-molecule imaging, and we have begun adapting these new research tools in an effort to begin studying chromatin biology at the single-molecule level. In this protocol, we describe procedures for assembly and real-time single-molecule visualization of DNA curtains bound by reconstituted nucleosomes made from recombinant histones.

  16. Room temperature electrocompetent bacterial cells improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qiang; Yin, Jia; Fu, Jun; Herrmann, Jennifer; Li, Yuezhong; Yin, Yulong; Stewart, A. Francis; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial competent cells are essential for cloning, construction of DNA libraries, and mutagenesis in every molecular biology laboratory. Among various transformation methods, electroporation is found to own the best transformation efficiency. Previous electroporation methods are based on washing and electroporating the bacterial cells in ice-cold condition that make them fragile and prone to death. Here we present simple temperature shift based methods that improve DNA transformation and recombineering efficiency in E. coli and several other gram-negative bacteria thereby economizing time and cost. Increased transformation efficiency of large DNA molecules is a significant advantage that might facilitate the cloning of large fragments from genomic DNA preparations and metagenomics samples. PMID:27095488

  17. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of zinc-finger-nuclease induced double strand breaks in pig primary cells and facilitates recombination with exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Klymiuk, Nikolai; Fezert, Pauline; Wünsch, Annegret; Kurome, Mayuko; Kessler, Barbara; Wolf, Eckhard

    2014-05-10

    Site-specific nucleases have become powerful tools for genome editing by the introduction of end-joining-mediated mutations, but it is unclear to which extent induced double strand breaks will also facilitate homologous recombination with exogenous DNA. This question is, however, of particular importance for somatic cells, which have to be modified for the generation of large animal models, but, on the other hand, have also been described to be reluctant to recombination-based DNA repair. Here, we examined zinc-finger nucleases for their potential to introduce modifications in pig somatic cells via end-joining or recombination. We found that co-transfection with nuclease-encoding plasmids resulted in a dramatic boost of recombination with different targeting vectors, suggesting a much more prominent role of this repair pathway in somatic cells than was previously thought. Although recombination with any of the vectors even occurred on both alleles of the target gene, we found also evidence for distinct properties of the used vectors regarding their preference for mono-allelic or bi-allelic modification. Thus, we show that the combined usage of site-specific nucleases and targeting vectors does not only promote homologous recombination in somatic cells but might also resemble a promising tool for detailed examination of DNA repair pathways.

  18. Specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA using a recombinant DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sandetskaya, Natalia; Naumann, Andreas; Hennig, Katharina; Kuhlmeier, Dirk

    2014-06-01

    Targeted enrichment of DNA is often necessary for its detection and characterization in complex samples. We describe the development and application of the novel molecular tool for the specific enrichment of prokaryotic DNA. A fused protein comprising the DNA-binding subunit of the bacterial topoisomerase II, gyrase, was expressed, purified, and immobilized on magnetic particles. We demonstrated the specific affinity of the immobilized protein towards bacterial DNA and investigated its efficiency in the samples with high background of eukaryotic DNA. The reported approach allowed for the selective isolation and further detection of as few as 5 pg Staphylococcus aureus DNA from the sample with 4 × 10(6)-fold surplus of human DNA. This method is a promising approach for the preparation of such type of samples, for example in molecular diagnostics of sepsis.

  19. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  20. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  1. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  2. [An efficient genetic knockout system based on linear DNA fragment homologous recombination for halophilic archaea].

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Wang; Chuang, Jiang; Jianhua, Liu; Xipeng, Liu

    2015-04-01

    With the development of functional genomics, gene-knockout is becoming an important tool to elucidate gene functions in vivo. As a good model strain for archaeal genetics, Haloferax volcanii has received more attention. Although several genetic manipulation systems have been developed for some halophilic archaea, it is time-consuming because of the low percentage of positive clones during the second-recombination selection. These classical gene knockout methods are based on DNA recombination between the genomic homologous sequence and the circular suicide plasmid, which carries a pyrE selection marker and two DNA fragments homologous to the upstream and downstream fragments of the target gene. Many wild-type clones are obtained through a reverse recombination between the plasmid and genome in the classic gene knockout method. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient gene knockout system to increase the positive clone percentage. Here we report an improved gene knockout method using a linear DNA cassette consisting of upstream and downstream homologous fragments, and the pyrE marker. Gene deletions were subsequently detected by colony PCR analysis. We determined the efficiency of our knockout method by deleting the xpb2 gene from the H. volcanii genome, with the percentage of positive clones higher than 50%. Our method provides an efficient gene knockout strategy for halophilic archaea.

  3. Isolation and characterization of recombinant DNAs containing repeated elements of barley genome: identification of individual actively transcribed families of repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Kartel', N.A.; Ryskov, A.P.

    1986-05-01

    A bank of Escherichia coli clones containing fragments of barley nuclear DNA was obtained using plasmid pBR 322. Clones carrying repeated sequences of the plant genome were selected by means of colony and blot hybridization. Clones with actively transcribed sequences were selected by hybridization to complementary DNA synthesized by means of reverse transcription on a template of total barley poly(A)-containing RNA. Individual families of repeats, two of which contained transcriptionally active sequences of the barley genome, were identified by blot hybridization of recombinant plasmids containing labeled DNA fragments of the inserts of three different clones.

  4. A role for XLF in DNA repair and recombination in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Fattah, Farjana Jahan; Kweon, Junghun; Wang, Yongbao; Lee, Eu Han; Kan, Yinan; Lichter, Natalie; Weisensel, Natalie; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    Classic non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) is required for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells and plays a critical role in lymphoid V(D)J recombination. A core C-NHEJ component is the DNA ligase IV co-factor, Cernunnos/XLF (hereafter XLF). In patients, mutations in XLF cause predicted increases in radiosensitivity and deficits in immune function, but also cause other less well-understood pathologies including neural disorders. To characterize XLF function(s) in a defined genetic system, we used a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene targeting strategy to inactivate both copies of the XLF locus in the human HCT116 cell line. Analyses of XLF-null cells (which were viable) showed that they were highly sensitive to ionizing radiation and a radiomimetic DNA damaging agent, etoposide. XLF-null cells had profound DNA DSB repair defects as measured by in vivo plasmid end-joining assays and were also dramatically impaired in their ability to form either V(D)J coding or signal joints on extrachromosomal substrates. Thus, our somatic XLF-null cell line recapitulates many of the phenotypes expected from XLF patient cell lines. Subsequent structure:function experiments utilizing the expression of wild-type and mutant XLF cDNAs demonstrated that all of the phenotypes of an XLF deficiency could be rescued by the overexpression of a wild-type XLF cDNA. Unexpectedly, mutant forms of XLF bearing point mutations at amino acid positions L115 and L179, also completely complemented the null phenotype suggesting, in contrast to predictions to the contrary, that these mutations do not abrogate XLF function. Finally, we demonstrate that the absence of XLF causes a small, but significant, increase in homologous recombination, implicating XLF in DSB pathway choice regulation. We conclude that human XLF is a non-essential, but critical, C-NHEJ-repair factor.

  5. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  6. Artemis C-terminal region facilitates V(D)J recombination through its interactions with DNA Ligase IV and DNA-PKcs

    PubMed Central

    Malu, Shruti; De Ioannes, Pablo; Kozlov, Mikhail; Greene, Marsha; Francis, Dailia; Hanna, Mary; Pena, Jesse; Escalante, Carlos R.; Kurosawa, Aya; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Adachi, Noritaka; Vezzoni, Paolo; Villa, Anna; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2012-01-01

    Artemis is an endonuclease that opens coding hairpin ends during V(D)J recombination and has critical roles in postirradiation cell survival. A direct role for the C-terminal region of Artemis in V(D)J recombination has not been defined, despite the presence of immunodeficiency and lymphoma development in patients with deletions in this region. Here, we report that the Artemis C-terminal region directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Ligase IV, a DNA Ligase which plays essential roles in DNA repair and V(D)J recombination. The Artemis–Ligase IV interaction is specific and occurs independently of the presence of DNA and DNA–protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), another protein known to interact with the Artemis C-terminal region. Point mutations in Artemis that disrupt its interaction with Ligase IV or DNA-PKcs reduce V(D)J recombination, and Artemis mutations that affect interactions with Ligase IV and DNA-PKcs show additive detrimental effects on coding joint formation. Signal joint formation remains unaffected. Our data reveal that the C-terminal region of Artemis influences V(D)J recombination through its interaction with both Ligase IV and DNA-PKcs. PMID:22529269

  7. Recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as novel carrier for oral DNA vaccines in Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nana; Xu, Kun; Li, Xinyi; Liu, Yuwan; Bai, Yichun; Zhang, Xiaohan; Han, Baoquan; Chen, Zhilong; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-12-01

    Oral delivery of DNA vaccines represents a promising vaccinating method for fish. Recombinant yeast has been proved to be a safe carrier for delivering antigen proteins and DNAs to some species in vivo. However, whether recombinant yeast can be used to deliver functional DNAs for vaccination to fish is still unknown. In this study, red crucian carp (Carassius auratus) was orally administrated with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae harboring CMV-EGFP expression cassette. On day 5 post the first vaccination, EGFP expression in the hindgut was detected under fluorescence microscope. To further study whether the delivered gene could induce specific immune responses, the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) was used as immunogen, and oral administrations were conducted with recombinant S. cerevisiae harboring pCMV-OVA mammalian gene expression cassette as gene delivery or pADH1-OVA yeast gene expression cassette as protein delivery. Each administration was performed with three different doses, and the OVA-specific serum antibody was detected in all the experimental groups by western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ELISA assay also revealed that pCMV-OVA group with lower dose (pCMV-OVA-L) and pADH1-OVA group with moderate dose (pADH1-OVA-M) triggered relatively stronger antibody response than the other two doses. Moreover, the antibody level induced by pCMV-OVA-L group was significantly higher than pADH1-OVA-M group at the same serum dilutions. All the results suggested that recombinant yeast can be used as a potential carrier for oral DNA vaccines and would help to develop more practical strategies to control infectious diseases in aquaculture.

  8. Molecular characterization of the thi3 gene involved in thiamine biosynthesis in Zea mays: cDNA sequence and enzymatic and structural properties of the recombinant bifunctional protein with 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (phosphate) kinase and thiamine monophosphate synthase activities.

    PubMed

    Rapala-Kozik, Maria; Olczak, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Katarzyna; Starosta, Agata; Kozik, Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    A thiamine biosynthesis gene, thi3, from maize Zea mays has been identified through cloning and sequencing of cDNA and heterologous overexpression of the encoded protein, THI3, in Escherichia coli. The recombinant THI3 protein was purified to homogeneity and shown to possess two essentially different enzymatic activities of HMP(-P) [4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (phosphate)] kinase and TMP (thiamine monophosphate) synthase. Both activities were characterized in terms of basic kinetic constants, with interesting findings that TMP synthase is uncompetitively inhibited by excess of one of the substrates [HMP-PP (HMP diphosphate)] and ATP. A bioinformatic analysis of the THI3 sequence suggested that these activities were located in two distinct, N-terminal kinase and C-terminal synthase, domains. Models of the overall folds of THI3 domains and the arrangements of active centre residues were obtained with the SWISS-MODEL protein modelling server, on the basis of the known three-dimensional structures of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium HMP(-P) kinase and Bacillus subtilis TMP synthase. The essential roles of Gln98 and Met134 residues for HMP kinase activity and of Ser444 for TMP synthase activity were experimentally confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis.

  9. Illegitimate recombination induced by DNA double-strand breaks in a mammalian chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J W; Morgan, W F

    1994-01-01

    We examined DNA double-strand-break-induced mutations in the endogenous adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) gene in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells after exposure to restriction endonucleases. PvuII, EcoRV, and StuI, all of which produce blunt-end DNA double-strand breaks, were electroporated into CHO-AT3-2 cells hemizygous at the APRT locus. Colonies of viable cells containing mutations at APRT were expanded, and the mutations that occurred during break repair were analyzed at the DNA sequence level. Restriction enzyme-induced mutations consisted of small deletions of 1 to 36 bp, insertions, and combinations of insertions and deletions at the cleavage sites. Most of the small deletions involved overlaps of one to four complementary bases at the recombination junctions. Southern blot analysis revealed more complex mutations, suggesting translocation, inversion, or insertion of larger chromosomal fragments. These results indicate that blunt-end DNA double-strand breaks can induce illegitimate (nonhomologous) recombination in mammalian chromosomes and that they play an important role in mutagenesis. Images PMID:8065314

  10. Recombinant bovine dihydrofolate reductase produced by mutagenesis and nested PCR of murine dihydrofolate reductase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Cody, Vivian; Mao, Qilong; Queener, Sherry F

    2008-11-01

    Recent reports of the slow-tight binding inhibition of bovine liver dihydrofolate reductase (bDHFR) in the presence of polyphenols isolated from green tea leaves has spurred renewed interest in the biochemical properties of bDHFR. Earlier studies were done with native bDHFR but in order to validate models of polyphenol binding to bDHFR, larger quantities of bDHFR are necessary to support structural studies. Bovine DHFR differs from its closest sequence homologue, murine DHFR, by 19 amino acids. To obtain the bDHFR cDNA, murineDHFR cDNA was transformed by a series of nested PCRs to reproduce the amino acid coding sequence for bovine DHFR. The bovine liver DHFR cDNA has an open reading frame of 561 base pairs encoding a protein of 187 amino acids that has a high level of conservation at the primary sequence level with other DHFR enzymes, and more so for the amino acid residues in the active site of the mammalian DHFR enzymes. Expression of the bovine DHFR cDNA in bacterial cells produced a stable recombinant protein with high enzymatic activity and kinetic properties similar to those previously reported for the native protein.

  11. Detection of recombinant and cellular MALT1 paracaspase activity.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue protein 1) is a key regulator of antigen-induced NF-κB activation in the adaptive immune response. Activation of proteolytic activity of the MALT1 paracaspase was shown to boost the immune response. Additionally, MALT1 proteolytic activity is essential for the survival of MALT1-dependent lymphoma, such as the activated B-cell type (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or MALT lymphoma. The functional impact of MALT1 paracaspase on T-cell activation and lymphomagenesis suggests that MALT1 is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and distinct lymphoma entities. To evaluate the requirement of MALT1 in further detail, direct measurement of its activity status is of great importance. We have established a fluorogenic cleavage assay which can be used to measure activity of recombinant and cellular MALT1. Here we describe the basis of the cleavage assay and include a detailed protocol for recombinant production of MALT1 and also the cellular immunoprecipitation of endogenous MALT1 to determine its proteolytic activity.

  12. Homologous Recombination and Translesion DNA Synthesis Play Critical Roles on Tolerating DNA Damage Caused by Trace Levels of Hexavalent Chromium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Youjun; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Neo, Dayna; Clement, Jean; Takata, Minoru; Takeda, Shunichi; Sale, Julian; Wright, Fred A.; Swenberg, James A.; Nakamura, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of potentially carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in the drinking water is a major public health concern worldwide. However, little information is available regarding the biological effects of a nanomoler amount of Cr(VI). Here, we investigated the genotoxic effects of Cr(VI) at nanomoler levels and their repair pathways. We found that DNA damage response analyzed based on differential toxicity of isogenic cells deficient in various DNA repair proteins is observed after a three-day incubation with K2CrO4 in REV1-deficient DT40 cells at 19.2 μg/L or higher as well as in TK6 cells deficient in polymerase delta subunit 3 (POLD3) at 9.8 μg/L or higher. The genotoxicity of Cr(VI) decreased ~3000 times when the incubation time was reduced from three days to ten minutes. TK mutation rate also significantly decreased from 6 day to 1 day exposure to Cr(VI). The DNA damage response analysis suggest that DNA repair pathways, including the homologous recombination and REV1- and POLD3-mediated error-prone translesion synthesis pathways, are critical for the cells to tolerate to DNA damage caused by trace amount of Cr(VI). PMID:27907204

  13. Oocyte shuttle, a recombinant protein transporting donor DNA into the Xenopus oocyte in situ

    PubMed Central

    Muster, Lisbeth; Georgiev, Oleg; Rungger-Brändle, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The newly developed oocyte shuttle protein contains a streptavidin moiety that tightly binds biotinylated DNA. Injected intravenously into adult Xenopus females, the protein-DNA complex is rapidly transported through the bloodstream and, within the ovary, the vitellogenin ligand present in the protein binds to the receptors at the surface of the oocytes. The bound complex is internalized and translocates into the oocyte nucleus thanks to an SV40 nuclear localization signal, enhanced by an adjacent casein kinase phosphorylation site. Functioning of the shuttle protein is documented by transporting DNA molecules that, upon intramolecular homologous recombination within the oocyte nucleus, express easily traceable markers such as green fluorescence or tetracycline resistance. PMID:28202471

  14. Assembly of nucleosomal arrays from recombinant core histones and nucleosome positioning DNA.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Ryan A; Kalashnikova, Anna A; Muthurajan, Uma M; Porter-Goff, Mary E; Luger, Karolin; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2013-09-10

    Core histone octamers that are repetitively spaced along a DNA molecule are called nucleosomal arrays. Nucleosomal arrays are obtained in one of two ways: purification from in vivo sources, or reconstitution in vitro from recombinant core histones and tandemly repeated nucleosome positioning DNA. The latter method has the benefit of allowing for the assembly of a more compositionally uniform and precisely positioned nucleosomal array. Sedimentation velocity experiments in the analytical ultracentrifuge yield information about the size and shape of macromolecules by analyzing the rate at which they migrate through solution under centrifugal force. This technique, along with atomic force microscopy, can be used for quality control, ensuring that the majority of DNA templates are saturated with nucleosomes after reconstitution. Here we describe the protocols necessary to reconstitute milligram quantities of length and compositionally defined nucleosomal arrays suitable for biochemical and biophysical studies of chromatin structure and function.

  15. HMG Proteins and DNA Flexibility in Transcription Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Eric D.; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Maher, L. James

    2001-01-01

    The relative stiffness of naked DNA is evident from measured values of longitudinal persistence length (∼150 bp) and torsional persistence length (∼180 bp). These parameters predict that certain arrangements of eukaryotic transcription activator proteins in gene promoters should be much more effective than others in fostering protein-protein interactions with the basal RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus. Thus, if such interactions require some kind of DNA looping, DNA loop energies should depend sensitively on helical phasing of protein binding sites, loop size, and intrinsic DNA curvature within the loop. Using families of artificial transcription templates where these parameters were varied, we were surprised to find that the degree of transcription activation by arrays of Gal4-VP1 transcription activators in HeLa cell nuclear extract was sensitive only to the linear distance separating a basal promoter from an array of bound activators on DNA templates. We now examine the hypothesis that this unexpected result is due to factors in the extract that act to enhance apparent DNA flexibility. We demonstrate that HeLa cell nuclear extract is rich in a heat-resistant activity that dramatically enhances apparent DNA longitudinal and torsional flexibility. Recombinant mammalian high-mobility group 2 (HMG-2) protein can substitute for this activity. We propose that the abundance of HMG proteins in eukaryotic nuclei provides an environment in which DNA is made sufficiently flexible to remove many constraints on protein binding site arrangements that would otherwise limit efficient transcription activation to certain promoter geometries. PMID:11533247

  16. A tale of two HSV-1 helicases: roles of phage and animal virus helicases in DNA replication and recombination.

    PubMed

    Marintcheva, B; Weller, S K

    2001-01-01

    Helicases play essential roles in many important biological processes such as DNA replication, repair, recombination, transcription, splicing, and translation. Many bacteriophages and plant and animal viruses encode one or more helicases, and these enzymes have been shown to play many roles in their respective viral life cycles. In this review we concentrate primarily on the roles of helicases in DNA replication and recombination with special emphasis on the bacteriophages T4, T7, and A as model systems. We explore comparisons between these model systems and the herpesviruses--primarily herpes simplex virus. Bacteriophage utilize various pathways of recombination-dependent DNA replication during the replication of their genomes. In fact the study of recombination in the phage systems has greatly enhanced our understanding of the importance of recombination in the replication strategies of bacteria, yeast, and higher eukaryotes. The ability to "restart" the replication process after a replication fork has stalled or has become disrupted for other reasons is a critical feature in the replication of all organisms studied. Phage helicases and other recombination proteins play critical roles in the "restart" process. Parallels between DNA replication and recombination in phage and in the herpesviruses is explored. We and others have proposed that recombination plays an important role in the life cycle of the herpesviruses, and in this review, we discuss models for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA replication. HSV-1 encodes two helicases. UL9 binds specifically to the origins of replication and is believed to initiate HSV DNA replication by unwinding at the origin; the heterotrimeric helicase-primase complex, encoded by UL5, UL8, and UL52 genes, is believed to unwind duplex viral DNA at replication forks. Structure-function analyses of UL9 and the helicase-primase are discussed with attention to the roles these proteins might play during HSV replication.

  17. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  18. Drosophila bloom helicase maintains genome integrity by inhibiting recombination between divergent DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kappeler, Michael; Kranz, Elisabeth; Woolcock, Katrina; Georgiev, Oleg; Schaffner, Walter

    2008-12-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) can be repaired either via a sequence independent joining of DNA ends or via homologous recombination. We established a detection system in Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the impact of sequence constraints on the usage of the homology based DSB repair via single strand annealing (SSA), which leads to recombination between direct repeats with concomitant loss of one repeat copy. First of all, we find the SSA frequency to be inversely proportional to the spacer length between the repeats, for spacers up to 2.4 kb in length. We further show that SSA between divergent repeats (homeologous SSA) is suppressed in cell cultures and in vivo in a sensitive manner, recognizing sequence divergences smaller than 0.5%. Finally, we demonstrate that the suppression of homeologous SSA depends on the Bloom helicase (Blm), encoded by the Drosophila gene mus309. Suppression of homeologous recombination is a novel function of Blm in ensuring genomic integrity, not described to date in mammalian systems. Unexpectedly, distinct from its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mismatch repair factor Msh2 encoded by spel1 does not suppress homeologous SSA in Drosophila.

  19. Discovery of an Active RAG Transposon Illuminates the Origins of V(D)J Recombination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengfeng; Tao, Xin; Yuan, Shaochun; Zhang, Yuhang; Li, Peiyi; Beilinson, Helen A; Zhang, Ya; Yu, Wenjuan; Pontarotti, Pierre; Escriva, Hector; Le Petillon, Yann; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Shangwu; Schatz, David G; Xu, Anlong

    2016-06-30

    Co-option of RAG1 and RAG2 for antigen receptor gene assembly by V(D)J recombination was a crucial event in the evolution of jawed vertebrate adaptive immunity. RAG1/2 are proposed to have arisen from a transposable element, but definitive evidence for this is lacking. Here, we report the discovery of ProtoRAG, a DNA transposon family from lancelets, the most basal extant chordates. A typical ProtoRAG is flanked by 5-bp target site duplications and a pair of terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) resembling V(D)J recombination signal sequences. Between the TIRs reside tail-to-tail-oriented, intron-containing RAG1-like and RAG2-like genes. We demonstrate that ProtoRAG was recently active in the lancelet germline and that the lancelet RAG1/2-like proteins can mediate TIR-dependent transposon excision, host DNA recombination, transposition, and low-efficiency TIR rejoining using reaction mechanisms similar to those used by vertebrate RAGs. We propose that ProtoRAG represents a molecular "living fossil" of the long-sought RAG transposon.

  20. Isolation of high molecular weight plant nuclear DNA suitable for use in recombinant DNA technology.

    PubMed

    Kiss, T; Solymosy, F

    1987-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from leaf cells of broad bean (Vicia faba L) by a newly developed method based on the use of citric acid in the isolation medium and flotation on a Percoll cushion yielded high molecular weight plant nuclear DNA which was suitable for (i) analysis by restriction endonucleases, (ii) molecular cloning and (iii) genomic blot hybridization. Starting from nuclear preparations obtained by this method, U2 small nuclear RNA-specific DNA sequences were detected in Vicia faba L. This is the first report on the demonstration of small nuclear RNA-specific DNA sequences in plant material.

  1. Homologous recombination of exogenous DNA with the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius genome: properties and uses.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Norio; Grogan, Dennis W

    2005-12-01

    In order to quantify recombination between exogenous DNA and the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius chromosome, we electroporated pyrE (uracil-auxtotrophic) recipient strains with functional pyrE sequences and counted Pyr+ transformants by direct plating. Certain culture and post-electroporation conditions increased the yield of Pyr+ recombinants from non-replicating pyrE plasmid, whereas cognate methylation of SuaI restriction sites in the plasmid decreased it. Recombination of linear DNAs with the S. acidocaldarius genome was proportional to the length of a limiting overlap, but even synthetic oligonucleotides produced reasonable numbers of recombinants with appropriate recipient strains. To investigate uses of this latter property, we electroporated an 18-bp pyrE deletion mutant with mixtures of synthetic oligonucleotides altering glycine-55 of the orotate phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by pyrE. Pyr+ transformants were recovered in which this codon was converted to each of the alternatives encoded by the oligonucleotide mixtures, thereby identifying five amino acid substitutions tolerated at this position of the thermostable enzyme.

  2. A basic motif in the N-terminal region of RAG1 enhances V(D)J recombination activity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, C J; Difilippantonio, M J; Rao, N; Spanopoulou, E; Schatz, D G

    1997-01-01

    The variable portions of antigen receptor genes are assembled from component gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins are the critical lymphoid cell-specific components of the recombination enzymatic machinery and are responsible for site-specific DNA recognition and cleavage. Previous studies had defined a minimal, recombinationally active core region of murine RAG1 consisting of amino acids 384 to 1008 of the 1,040-residue RAG1 protein. No recombination function has heretofore been ascribed to any portion of the 383-amino-acid N-terminal region that is missing from the core, but it seems likely to be of functional significance, based on its evolutionary conservation. Using extrachromosomal recombination substrates, we demonstrate here that the N-terminal region enhances the recombination activity of RAG1 by up to an order of magnitude in a variety of cell lines. Deletion analysis localized a region of the N terminus critical for this effect to amino acids 216 to 238, and further mutagenesis demonstrated that a small basic amino acid motif (BIIa) in this region is essential for enhancing the activity of RAG1. Despite the fact that BIIa is important for the interaction of RAG1 with the nuclear localization factor Srp-1, it does not appear to enhance recombination by facilitating nuclear transport of RAG1. A variety of models for how this region stimulates the recombination activity of RAG1 are considered. PMID:9234712

  3. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2013-12-01

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a `handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the `handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing

  4. Regulation of immunoglobulin class-switch recombination: choreography of noncoding transcription, targeted DNA deamination, and long-range DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Allysia J; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as "Ch genes", e.g., Cγ, Cɛ, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming.

  5. Regulation of Immunoglobulin Class-Switch Recombination: Choreography of Noncoding Transcription, Targeted DNA Deamination, and Long-Range DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Allysia J.; Zheng, Simin; DiMenna, Lauren J.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-01-01

    Upon encountering antigens, mature IgM-positive B lymphocytes undergo class-switch recombination (CSR) wherein exons encoding the default Cμ constant coding gene segment of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain (Igh) locus are excised and replaced with a new constant gene segment (referred to as “Ch genes”, e.g., Cγ, Cε, or Cα). The B cell thereby changes from expressing IgM to one producing IgG, IgE, or IgA, with each antibody isotype having a different effector function during an immune reaction. CSR is a DNA deletional-recombination reaction that proceeds through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in repetitive switch (S) sequences preceding each Ch gene and is completed by end-joining between donor Sμ and acceptor S regions. CSR is a multistep reaction requiring transcription through S regions, the DNA cytidine deaminase AID, and the participation of several general DNA repair pathways including base excision repair, mismatch repair, and classical nonhomologous end-joining. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how transcription through S regions generates substrates for AID-mediated deamination and how AID participates not only in the initiation of CSR but also in the conversion of deaminated residues into DSBs. Additionally, we review the multiple processes that regulate AID expression and facilitate its recruitment specifically to the Ig loci, and how deregulation of AID specificity leads to oncogenic translocations. Finally, we summarize recent data on the potential role of AID in the maintenance of the pluripotent stem cell state during epigenetic reprogramming. PMID:24507154

  6. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3′ single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks. PMID:26957021

  7. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  8. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    PubMed

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments.

  9. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems.

  10. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  11. Effect of DNA binding on geminate CO recombination kinetics in CooA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Karunakaran, Venugopal; Youn, Hwan; Poulos, Thomas; Champion, Paul

    2012-02-01

    CooA proteins are heme-based CO-sensing transcription factors. Here we study the ultrafast dynamics of geminate CO rebinding to RrCooA. The effects of DNA binding and the truncation of the DNA binding domain on the CO geminate recombination kinetics were investigated. The CO rebinding kinetics in these CooA complexes takes place on ultrafast timescales but remains non-exponential over many decades in time. We show that this non-exponential kinetic response is due to a quenched enthalpic barrier distribution resulting from a distribution of heme geometries that is frozen or slowly evolving on the timescale of CO rebinding. We also show that, upon CO binding, the distal pocket of the heme in RrCooA relaxes to form a very efficient hydrophobic trap for CO. DNA binding further tightens the narrow distal pocket and slightly weakens the iron-proximal histidine bond. Analysis of our data reveals that the uncomplexed and inherently flexible DNA binding domain adds additional structural heterogeneity to the heme doming coordinate. When CooA forms a complex with DNA, the flexibility of the DNA-binding domain decreases and the distribution of the conformations available in the heme domain becomes restricted.

  12. Recombinant antibody mediated delivery of organelle-specific DNA pH sensors along endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Modi, Souvik; Halder, Saheli; Nizak, Clément; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-01-21

    DNA has been used to build nanomachines with potential in cellulo and in vivo applications. However their different in cellulo applications are limited by the lack of generalizable strategies to deliver them to precise intracellular locations. Here we describe a new molecular design of DNA pH sensors with response times that are nearly 20 fold faster. Further, by changing the sequence of the pH sensitive domain of the DNA sensor, we have been able to tune their pH sensitive regimes and create a family of DNA sensors spanning ranges from pH 4 to 7.6. To enable a generalizable targeting methodology, this new sensor design also incorporates a 'handle' domain. We have identified, using a phage display screen, a set of three recombinant antibodies (scFv) that bind sequence specifically to the handle domain. Sequence analysis of these antibodies revealed several conserved residues that mediate specific interactions with the cognate DNA duplex. We also found that all three scFvs clustered into different branches indicating that their specificity arises from mutations in key residues. When one of these scFvs is fused to a membrane protein (furin) that traffics via the cell surface, the scFv-furin chimera binds the 'handle' and ferries a family of DNA pH sensors along the furin endocytic pathway. Post endocytosis, all DNA nanodevices retain their functionality in cellulo and provide spatiotemporal pH maps of retrogradely trafficking furin inside living cells. This new molecular technology of DNA-scFv-protein chimeras can be used to site-specifically complex DNA nanostructures for bioanalytical applications.

  13. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  14. The DNA structure and sequence preferences of WRN underlie its function in telomeric recombination events

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Deanna N.; Machwe, Amrita; Chen, Li; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Orren, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeric abnormalities caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN are linked to the multiple premature ageing phenotypes that characterize Werner syndrome. Here we examine WRN's role in telomeric maintenance, by comparing its action on a variety of DNA structures without or with telomeric sequences. Our results show that WRN clearly prefers to act on strand invasion intermediates in a manner that favours strand invasion and exchange. Moreover, WRN unwinding of these recombination structures is further enhanced when the invading strand contains at least three G-rich single-stranded telomeric repeats. These selectivities are most pronounced at NaCl concentrations within the reported intranuclear monovalent cation concentration range, and are partly conferred by WRN's C-terminal region. Importantly, WRN's specificity for the G-rich telomeric sequence within this precise structural context is particularly relevant to telomere metabolism and strongly suggests a physiological role in telomeric recombination processes, including T-loop dynamics. PMID:26420422

  15. Using recombinant DNA technology for the development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Butler, Michael; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2012-07-15

    Dramatic increases in dengue (DEN) incidence and disease severity have been reported, in great part due to the geographic expansion of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. One result is the expanded co-circulation of all dengue 1-4 serotype viruses (DENV) in urban areas worldwide, especially in South and South-East Asia, and South America. DEN disease severity ranges from asymptomatic infections to febrile dengue fevers (DF) to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). There is an urgent need for a safe and effective tetravalent DEN vaccine. Several live attenuated, tetravalent DEN vaccine candidates have been generated by recombinant DNA technology; these candidates are capable of providing immunity to all four DENV serotypes. In this paper we review (a) recombinant live-attenuated DEN vaccine candidates in terms of deletion, antigen chimerization, and the introduction of adaptive mutations; (b) strategies for improving tetravalent vaccine attenuation; and (c) live-attenuated DENV vaccine development.

  16. The DNA structure and sequence preferences of WRN underlie its function in telomeric recombination events.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Deanna N; Machwe, Amrita; Chen, Li; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Orren, David K

    2015-09-30

    Telomeric abnormalities caused by loss of function of the RecQ helicase WRN are linked to the multiple premature ageing phenotypes that characterize Werner syndrome. Here we examine WRN's role in telomeric maintenance, by comparing its action on a variety of DNA structures without or with telomeric sequences. Our results show that WRN clearly prefers to act on strand invasion intermediates in a manner that favours strand invasion and exchange. Moreover, WRN unwinding of these recombination structures is further enhanced when the invading strand contains at least three G-rich single-stranded telomeric repeats. These selectivities are most pronounced at NaCl concentrations within the reported intranuclear monovalent cation concentration range, and are partly conferred by WRN's C-terminal region. Importantly, WRN's specificity for the G-rich telomeric sequence within this precise structural context is particularly relevant to telomere metabolism and strongly suggests a physiological role in telomeric recombination processes, including T-loop dynamics.

  17. RB localizes to DNA double-strand breaks and promotes DNA end resection and homologous recombination through the recruitment of BRG1.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cruz, Renier; Manickavinayaham, Swarnalatha; Biswas, Anup K; Clary, Regina Weaks; Premkumar, Tolkappiyan; Cole, Francesca; Johnson, David G

    2016-11-15

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor is recognized as a master regulator that controls entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. Its loss leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation and is a hallmark of cancer. RB works by binding to members of the E2F family of transcription factors and recruiting chromatin modifiers to the promoters of E2F target genes. Here we show that RB also localizes to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) dependent on E2F1 and ATM kinase activity and promotes DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR), and its loss results in genome instability. RB is necessary for the recruitment of the BRG1 ATPase to DSBs, which stimulates DNA end resection and HR. A knock-in mutation of the ATM phosphorylation site on E2F1 (S29A) prevents the interaction between E2F1 and TopBP1 and recruitment of RB, E2F1, and BRG1 to DSBs. This knock-in mutation also impairs DNA repair, increases genomic instability, and renders mice hypersensitive to IR. Importantly, depletion of RB in osteosarcoma and breast cancer cell lines results in sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs, which is further exacerbated by poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. We uncovered a novel, nontranscriptional function for RB in HR, which could contribute to genome instability associated with RB loss.

  18. CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly) method of constructing megabase-sized DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianting; Wu, Ronghai; Xue, Xiaoli; Qin, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Current DNA assembly methods for preparing highly purified linear subassemblies require complex and time-consuming in vitro manipulations that hinder their ability to construct megabase-sized DNAs (e.g. synthetic genomes). We have developed a new method designated ‘CasHRA (Cas9-facilitated Homologous Recombination Assembly)’ that directly uses large circular DNAs in a one-step in vivo assembly process. The large circular DNAs are co-introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protoplast fusion, and they are cleaved by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease to release the linear DNA segments for subsequent assembly by the endogenous homologous recombination system. The CasHRA method allows efficient assembly of multiple large DNA segments in vivo; thus, this approach should be useful in the last stage of genome construction. As a proof of concept, we combined CasHRA with an upstream assembly method (Gibson procedure of genome assembly) and successfully constructed a 1.03 Mb MGE-syn1.0 (Minimal Genome of Escherichia coli) that contained 449 essential genes and 267 important growth genes. We expect that CasHRA will be widely used in megabase-sized genome constructions. PMID:27220470

  19. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  20. Locus-specific control of DNA resection and suppression of subtelomeric VSG recombination by HAT3 in the African trypanosome.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Horn, David

    2014-11-10

    The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, is a parasitic protozoan that achieves antigenic variation through DNA-repair processes involving Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) gene rearrangements at subtelomeres. Subtelomeric suppression of DNA repair operates in eukaryotes but little is known about these controls in trypanosomes. Here, we identify a trypanosome histone acetyltransferase (HAT3) and a deacetylase (SIR2rp1) required for efficient RAD51-dependent homologous recombination. HAT3 and SIR2rp1 were required for RAD51-focus assembly and disassembly, respectively, at a chromosome-internal locus and a synthetic defect indicated distinct contributions to DNA repair. Although HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal recombination, it suppressed subtelomeric VSG recombination, and these locus-specific effects were mediated through differential production of ssDNA by DNA resection; HAT3 promoted chromosome-internal resection but suppressed subtelomeric resection. Consistent with the resection defect, HAT3 was specifically required for the G2-checkpoint response at a chromosome-internal locus. HAT3 also promoted resection at a second chromosome-internal locus comprising tandem-duplicated genes. We conclude that HAT3 and SIR2rp1 can facilitate temporally distinct steps in DNA repair. HAT3 promotes ssDNA formation and recombination at chromosome-internal sites but has the opposite effect at a subtelomeric VSG. These locus-specific controls reveal compartmentalization of the T. brucei genome in terms of the DNA-damage response and suppression of antigenic variation by HAT3.

  1. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  2. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Brian H.; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J.; Engelke, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant “CelTag” DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies. PMID:26715090

  3. A Novel Recombinant DNA System for High Efficiency Affinity Purification of Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Brian H; Hao, Linxuan; Smaldino, Philip J; Engelke, David R

    2015-12-29

    Isolation of endogenous proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been facilitated by inserting encoding polypeptide affinity tags at the C-termini of chromosomal open reading frames (ORFs) using homologous recombination of DNA fragments. Tagged protein isolation is limited by a number of factors, including high cost of affinity resins for bulk isolation and low concentration of ligands on the resin surface, leading to low isolation efficiencies and trapping of contaminants. To address this, we have created a recombinant "CelTag" DNA construct from which PCR fragments can be created to easily tag C-termini of S. cerevisiae ORFs using selection for a nat1 marker. The tag has a C-terminal cellulose binding module to be used in the first affinity step. Microgranular cellulose is very inexpensive and has an effectively continuous ligand on its surface, allowing rapid, highly efficient purification with minimal background. Cellulose-bound proteins are released by specific cleavage of an included site for TEV protease, giving nearly pure product. The tag can be lifted from the recombinant DNA construct either with or without a 13x myc epitope tag between the target ORF and the TEV protease site. Binding of CelTag protein fusions to cellulose is stable to high salt, nonionic detergents, and 1 M urea, allowing stringent washing conditions to remove loosely associated components, as needed, before specific elution. It is anticipated that this reagent could allow isolation of protein complexes from large quantities of yeast extract, including soluble, membrane-bound, or nucleic acid-associated assemblies.

  4. Transformation and isolation of allelic exchange mutants of Chlamydia psittaci using recombinant DNA introduced by electroporation.

    PubMed

    Binet, Rachel; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2009-01-06

    To facilitate genetic investigations in the obligate intracellular pathogens Chlamydia, the ability to construct variants by homologous recombination was investigated in C. psittaci 6BC. The single rRNA operon was targeted with a synthetic 16S rRNA allele, harboring three nucleotide substitutions over 398 bp, which imparts resistance to kasugamycin (Ksm) and spectinomycin (Spc) and causes loss of one HpaI restriction site. A fourth, silent mutation was introduced 654 bp downstream in the beginning of the 23S rRNA gene. C. psittaci 6BC infectious particles were electroporated with various concentrations of circular or linearized plasmids containing different lengths of the rRNA region homologous to the chromosomal copy except for the four nucleotide substitutions. Ksm and Spc were added 18 h after inoculation onto confluent cell monolayers in the plaque assay. Resistant plaques were picked and expanded with selection 10 days later before collecting DNA for analysis by PCR, restriction mapping, sequencing, or Southern. Spontaneous resistance to Ksm and Spc was never observed in mock electroporated bacteria (frequency <6.2 x 10(-9)). Conversely, double resistance and replacement of the 16S rRNA gene were observed when C. psittaci was electroporated with the recombination substrates. Highest efficiency was obtained with 10 microg of circular vector prepared in a DNA methylase-deficient Escherichia coli (1.9 +/- 1.1 x 10(-6), n = 7). Coinheritance of the silent 23S rRNA mutation was seen in 46 of 67 recombinants analyzed, illustrating DNA exchange of up to 1,052 bp in length. These findings provide the first step toward genetic manipulation of Chlamydia.

  5. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing the A and B subunits of cholera toxin and preparations containing so-obtained subunit or subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Harford, N.; De Wilde, M.

    1987-05-19

    A recombinant DNA molecule is described comprising at least a portion coding for subunits A and B of cholera toxin, or a fragment or derivative of the portion wherein the fragment or derivative codes for a polypeptide have an activity which can induce an immune response to subunit A; can induce an immune response to subunit A and cause epithelial cell penetration and the enzymatic effect leading to net loss of fluid into the gut lumen; can bind to the membrane receptor for the B subunit of cholera toxin; can induce an immune response to subunit B; can induce an immune response to subunit B and bind to the membrane receptor; or has a combination of the activities.

  6. Opinion: uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG) plays distinct and non-canonical roles in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ashraf S; Stanlie, Andre; Begum, Nasim A; Honjo, Tasuku

    2014-10-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential to class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a member of the base excision repair complex, is required for CSR. The role of UNG in CSR and SHM is extremely controversial. AID deficiency in mice abolishes both CSR and SHM, while UNG-deficient mice have drastically reduced CSR but augmented SHM raising a possibility of differential functions of UNG in CSR and SHM. Interestingly, UNG has been associated with a CSR-specific repair adapter protein Brd4, which interacts with acetyl histone 4, γH2AX and 53BP1 to promote non-homologous end joining during CSR. A non-canonical scaffold function of UNG, but not the catalytic activity, can be attributed to the recruitment of essential repair proteins associated with the error-free repair during SHM, and the end joining during CSR.

  7. DNA-PK inhibition causes a low level of H2AX phosphorylation and homologous recombination repair in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Urushihara, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Junya; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Komatsu, Kenshi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2012-12-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of DNA-PK inhibition on DSB repair using fish cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A radiation sensitive mutant RIC1 strain showed a low level of DNA-PK activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads defects in HR repair and DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads a slight increase in the number of 53BP1 foci after DSBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PK dysfunction leads an alternative NHEJ that depends on 53BP1. -- Abstract: Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are known as DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. It has been reported that DNA-PK, a member of PI3 kinase family, promotes NHEJ and aberrant DNA-PK causes NHEJ deficiency. However, in this study, we demonstrate that a wild-type cell line treated with DNA-PK inhibitor and a mutant cell line with dysfunctional DNA-PK showed decreased HR efficiency in fish cells (Medaka, Oryzias latipes). Previously, we reported that the radiation-sensitive mutant RIC1 strain has a defect in the Histone H2AX phosphorylation after {gamma}-irradiation. Here, we showed that a DNA-PK inhibitor, NU7026, treatment resulted in significant reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci after {gamma}-irradiation in wild-type cells, but had no significant effect in RIC1 cells. In addition, RIC1 cells showed significantly lower levels of DNA-PK kinase activity compared with wild-type cells. We investigated NHEJ and HR efficiency after induction of DSBs. Wild-type cells treated with NU7026 and RIC1 cells showed decreased HR efficiency. These results indicated that aberrant DNA-PK causes the reduction in the number of {gamma}H2AX foci and HR efficiency in RIC1 cells. We performed phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (Thr2609) and 53BP1 focus assay after {gamma}-irradiation. RIC1 cells showed significant reduction in the number of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs foci and no deference in the

  8. Expression of soluble, biologically active recombinant human endostatin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Han-Mei; Zhang, Guo-Yuan; Ji, Xiao-Dan; Cao, Lin; Shu, Luan; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2005-06-01

    Endostatin, a 20kDa C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is a potent anti-angiogenic protein and inhibitor of tumor growth. Recombinant endostatin was prepared from Escherichia coli deposited as insoluble, inactive inclusion bodies. In the present study, we produced soluble and biologically active recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) in E. coli by employing both co-expression of the molecular chaperones and lower temperature fermentation. Two groups of chaperones Trigger factor and GroEL-GroES (GroEL/ES), DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL/ES, were co-expressed, respectively, with rhEndostatin at different temperatures (37, 25, and 16 degrees C). It revealed that low temperature or molecular chaperones alone could enhance the production of active rhEndostatin; meanwhile, combinational employment of low temperature cultivation (16 degrees C) together with co-expression of DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroEL/ES was more effective to prevent aggregation of rhEndostatin. The production of soluble rhEndostatin was about 36 mg/L, and at least 16 mg of rhEndostatin was purified from 1L flask culture. The purified rhEndostatin specifically inhibited the proliferation of endothelial cell-bovine capillary endothelial cell in a dose-dependent manner, and it showed potent anti-angiogenic capability on the chorioallantoic membrane of chick embryo in vivo. Our study provides a feasible and convenient approach to produce soluble and biologically active rhEndostatin.

  9. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombinant pox boosted CTL responses decayed rapidly and were comparable to those of the DNA-alone-vaccinated monkeys by the time of viral challenge. Consistent with these comparable memory T cell responses, the clinical protection seen in all groups of experimentally vaccinated monkeys was similar. This study, therefore, indicates that the steady-state memory, rather than the peak effector vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses, may be the critical immune correlate of protection for a CTL-based HIV vaccine.

  10. Mdt1 Facilitates Efficient Repair of Blocked DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Recombinational Maintenance of Telomeres▿

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Brietta L.; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    DNA recombination plays critical roles in DNA repair and alternative telomere maintenance. Here we show that absence of the SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein Mdt1 (Ybl051c) renders Saccharomyces cerevisiae particularly hypersensitive to bleomycin, a drug that causes 3′-phospho-glycolate-blocked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). mdt1Δ also hypersensitizes partially recombination-defective cells to camptothecin-induced 3′-phospho-tyrosyl protein-blocked DSBs. Remarkably, whereas mdt1Δ cells are unable to restore broken chromosomes after bleomycin treatment, they efficiently repair “clean” endonuclease-generated DSBs. Epistasis analyses indicate that MDT1 acts in the repair of bleomycin-induced DSBs by regulating the efficiency of the homologous recombination pathway as well as telomere-related functions of the KU complex. Moreover, mdt1Δ leads to severe synthetic growth defects with a deletion of the recombination facilitator and telomere-positioning factor gene CTF18 already in the absence of exogenous DNA damage. Importantly, mdt1Δ causes a dramatic shift from the usually prevalent type II to the less-efficient type I pathway of recombinational telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase in liquid senescence assays. As telomeres resemble protein-blocked DSBs, the results indicate that Mdt1 acts in a novel blocked-end-specific recombination pathway that is required for the efficiency of both drug-induced DSB repair and telomerase-independent telomere maintenance. PMID:17636027

  11. Emerging roles for centromere-associated proteins in DNA repair and genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Centromere proteins CENP-S and CENP-X are members of the constitutive centromere-associated network, which is a conserved group of proteins that are needed for the assembly and function of kinetochores at centromeres. Intriguingly CENP-S and CENP-X have alter egos going by the names of MHF1 (FANCM-associated histone-fold protein 1) and MHF2 respectively. In this guise they function with a DNA translocase called FANCM (Fanconi's anemia complementation group M) to promote DNA repair and homologous recombination. In the present review we discuss current knowledge of the biological roles of CENP-S and CENP-X and how their dual existence may be a common feature of CCAN (constitutive centromere-associated network) proteins.

  12. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    PubMed

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  13. DNA vaccination by electroporation and boosting with recombinant proteins enhances the efficacy of DNA vaccines for Schistosomiasis japonica.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yang; Zhu, Yinchang; Harn, Donald A; Wang, Xiaoting; Tang, Jianxia; Zhao, Song; Lu, Fei; Guan, Xiaohong

    2009-12-01

    Schistosomiasis japonica is an endemic, zoonotic disease of major public health importance in China. Control programs combining chemotherapy and snail killing have not been able to block transmission of infection in lakes and marsh regions. Vaccination is needed as a complementary approach to the ongoing control programs. In the present study, we wanted to determine if the efficacies of DNA vaccines encoding the 23-kDa tetraspanin membrane protein (SjC23), triose phosphate isomerase (SjCTPI), and sixfold-repeated genes of the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) in the H chain of NP30 could be enhanced by boosting via electroporation in vivo and/or with cocktail protein vaccines. Mice vaccinated with cocktail DNA vaccines showed a significant worm reduction of 32.88% (P < 0.01) and egg reduction of 36.20% (P < 0.01). Vaccine efficacy was enhanced when animals were boosted with cocktail protein vaccines; adult worm and liver egg burdens were reduced 45.35% and 48.54%, respectively. Nearly identical results were obtained in mice boosted by electroporation in vivo, with adult worm and egg burdens reduced by 45.00% and 50.88%, respectively. The addition of a protein vaccine boost to this regimen further elevated efficacy to approximately 60% for adult worm burden and greater than 60% for liver egg reduction. The levels of interleukin-2, gamma interferon, and the ratios of immunoglobulin G2a (IgG2a)/IgG1 clearly showed that cocktail DNA vaccines induced CD4(+) Th1-type responses. Boosting via either electroporation or with recombinant proteins significantly increased associated immune responses over those seen in mice vaccinated solely with DNA vaccines. Thus, schistosome DNA vaccine efficacy was significantly enhanced via boosting by electroporation in vivo and/or cocktail protein vaccines.

  14. DNA double-strand break repair in Penaeus monodon is predominantly dependent on homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shikha; Dahal, Sumedha; Naidu, Sharanya J; Anand, Deepika; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Kooloth Valappil, Rajendran; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2017-01-24

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) in higher eukaryotes. In contrast, HR-mediated DSB repair is the major double-strand break repair pathway in lower order organisms such as bacteria and yeast. Penaeus monodon, commonly known as black tiger shrimp, is one of the economically important crustaceans facing large-scale mortality due to exposure to infectious diseases. The animals can also get exposed to chemical mutagens under the culture conditions as well as in wild. Although DSB repair mechanisms have been described in mammals and some invertebrates, its mechanism is unknown in the shrimp species. In the present study, we show that HR-mediated DSB repair is the predominant mode of repair in P. monodon Robust repair was observed at a temperature of 30 °C, when 2 µg of cell-free extract derived from hepatopancreas was used for the study. Although HR occurred through both reciprocal recombination and gene conversion, the latter was predominant when the bacterial colonies containing recombinants were evaluated. Unlike mammals, NHEJ-mediated DSB repair was undetectable in P. monodon However, we could detect evidence for an alternative mode of NHEJ that uses microhomology, termed as microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ). Interestingly, unlike HR, MMEJ was predominant at lower temperatures. Therefore, the results suggest that, while HR is major DSB repair pathway in shrimp, MMEJ also plays a role in ensuring the continuity and stability of the genome.

  15. Bi-allelic alterations in DNA repair genes underpin homologous recombination DNA repair defects in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mutter, Robert W; Riaz, Nadeem; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Delsite, Rob; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Edelweiss, Marcia; Martelotto, Luciano G; Sakr, Rita A; King, Tari A; Giri, Dilip D; Drobnjak, Maria; Brogi, Edi; Bindra, Ranjit; Bernheim, Giana; Lim, Raymond S; Blecua, Pedro; Desrichard, Alexis; Higginson, Dan; Towers, Russell; Jiang, Ruomu; Lee, William; Weigelt, Britta; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Powell, Simon N

    2017-03-15

    Homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair deficient (HRD) breast cancers have been shown to be sensitive to DNA repair targeted therapies. Burgeoning evidence suggests that sporadic breast cancers, lacking germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, may also be HRD. We developed a functional ex vivo RAD51-based test to identify HRD primary breast cancers. An integrated approach examining methylation, gene expression and whole-exome sequencing was employed to ascertain the etiology of HRD. Functional HRD breast cancers displayed genomic features of lack of competent HR, including large-scale state transitions and specific mutational signatures. Somatic and/or germline genetic alterations resulting in bi-allelic loss-of-function of HR genes underpinned functional HRD in 89% of cases, and were observed in only one of the 15 HR-proficient samples tested. These findings indicate the importance of a comprehensive genetic assessment of bi-allelic alterations in the HR pathway to deliver a precision medicine-based approach to select patients for therapies targeting tumor-specific DNA repair defects.

  16. A DNA binding motif of meiotic recombinase Rec12 (Spo11) defined by essential glycine-202, and persistence of Rec12 protein after completion of recombination.

    PubMed

    DeWall, K Mark; Davidson, Mari K; Sharif, Wallace D; Wiley, Charla A; Wahls, Wayne P

    2005-08-15

    The Rec12 (Spo11) protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a meiosis-specific ortholog of the catalytic subunit of type VI topoisomerases and is thought to catalyze double-strand DNA breaks that initiate recombination. We tested the hypothesis that the rec12-117 allele affects the choice of pathways by which recombination is resolved. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single missense mutation in the coding region (rec12-G202E). The corresponding glycine-202 residue of Rec12 protein is strictly conserved in proteins of the Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family. It maps to the base of the DNA binding pocket in the crystal structure of the archaeal ortholog, Top6A. The rec12-G202E mutants lacked crossover and non-crossover recombination, demonstrating that rec12-G202E does not affect choice of resolution pathway. Like rec12-D15 null mutants, the rec12-G202E mutants suffered chromosome segregation errors in meiosis I. The Rec12-G202E protein was as stable as wild-type Rec12, demonstrating that glycine-202 is essential for a biochemical activity of Rec12 protein, rather than for its stability. These findings suggest that Rec12 facilitates binding of the meiotic recombinase to its substrate, DNA. Interestingly, the bulk of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase I, and a portion of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase II, after which it was undetectable. This suggests that Rec12 protein has additional meiotic functions after completion of recombination in prophase, as inferred previously from genetic studies [Sharif, W.D., Glick, G.G., Davidson, M.K., Wahls, W.P., 2002. Distinct functions of S. pombe Rec12 (Spo11) protein and Rec12-dependent crossover recombination (chiasmata) in meiosis I; and a requirement for Rec12 in meiosis II. Cell Chromo. 1, 1].

  17. Construction of a recombinant bacterial plasmid containing DNA sequences for a mouse embryonic globin chain.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, A; Bozzoni, I; Ullu, E; Farace, M G

    1979-08-10

    Messenger RNAs for mouse embryonic globins were purified from yolk sac derived eyrthroid cells in mouse fetuses. Double stranded DNAs complementary to these messengers were synthesized and blunt end ligated to a EcoRI digested and DNA polymerase I repaired pBR322 plasmid. Of the ampicillin resistant transformants, one contained a plasmid with globin-specific cDNA. The inserted sequence is about 350 base pairs long. It contains one restriction site for EcoRI and one restriction site for HinfI about 170 and 80 base pairs from one end. The insert is not cleaved by HindIII, HindII, BamHI, PstI, SalI, AvaI, TaqI, HpaII, BglI. A mixture of purified messengers coding for alpha chains and for x, y and z embryonic chains was incubated with the recombinant plasmid and the hybridized messenger was translated in a mRNA depleted reticulocyte lysate protein synthesizing system. The product of translation was identified as a z chain by carboxymethylcellulose cromatography. The recombinant plasmid is named "pBR322-egz" after embryonic globin z.

  18. Resolvase OsGEN1 Mediates DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pingli

    2017-01-01

    Yen1/GEN1 are canonical Holliday junction resolvases that belong to the RAD2/XPG family. In eukaryotes, such as budding yeast, mice, worms, and humans, Yen1/GEN1 work together with Mus81-Mms4/MUS81-EME1 and Slx1-Slx4/SLX1-SLX4 in DNA repair by homologous recombination to maintain genome stability. In plants, the biological function of Yen1/GEN1 remains largely unclear. In this study, we characterized the loss of function mutants of OsGEN1 and OsSEND1, a pair of paralogs of Yen1/GEN1 in rice (Oryza sativa). We first investigated the role of OsGEN1 during meiosis and found a reduction in chiasma frequency by ∼6% in osgen1 mutants, compared to the wild type, suggesting a possible involvement of OsGEN1 in the formation of crossovers. Postmeiosis, OsGEN1 foci were detected in wild-type microspore nuclei, but not in the osgen1 mutant concomitant with an increase in double-strand breaks. Persistent double-strand breaks led to programmed cell death of the male gametes and complete male sterility. In contrast, depletion of OsSEND1 had no effects on plant development and did not enhance osgen1 defects. Our results indicate that OsGEN1 is essential for homologous recombinational DNA repair at two stages of microsporogenesis in rice. PMID:28049740

  19. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes.

  20. Structure and regulation of the Escherichia coli ruv operon involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Shinagawa, H; Makino, K; Amemura, M; Kimura, S; Iwasaki, H; Nakata, A

    1988-01-01

    The ruv gene of Escherichia coli, which is involved in DNA repair and recombination, was cloned on a plasmid vector. The DNA of the ruv region was sequenced; it had two open reading frames in tandem that could code for 22- and 37-kilodalton proteins. The proteins encoded by these open reading frames were identified by the maxicell method. The two genes were aligned in the same orientation and regulated by the SOS system, so the two genes probably constitute an operon. The distal one complemented the ruv mutations. Transcription of the operon was studied both in vivo and in vitro. Two transcription initiation sites were identified upstream of the coding frames, and the transcription from both sites was repressed by the LexA repressor. A DNA sequence that is homologous to the SOS box and bound by LexA protein was found in the regulatory region of the operon. The amino acid sequence of Ruv protein deduced from the DNA sequence shows a high degree of homology to the consensus sequence shared by ATP-binding proteins. Images PMID:2842314

  1. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lisha; Zhao, Tiancen; Cai, Jing; Su, You; Wang, Zehua; Dong, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX) in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63) but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela) after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR) repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. PMID:27895503

  2. Roles of DNA helicases in the mediation and regulation of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Daley, James M; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an evolutionarily conserved process that eliminates DNA double-strand breaks from chromosomes, repairs injured DNA replication forks, and helps orchestrate meiotic chromosome segregation. Recent studies have shown that DNA helicases play multifaceted roles in HR mediation and regulation. In particular, the S. cerevisiae Sgs1 helicase and its human ortholog BLM helicase are involved in not only the resection of the primary lesion to generate single-stranded DNA to prompt the assembly of the HR machinery, but they also function in somatic cells to suppress the formation of chromosome arm crossovers during HR. On the other hand, the S. cerevisiae Mph1 and Srs2 helicases, and their respective functional equivalents in other eukaryotes, suppress spurious HR events and favor the formation of noncrossovers via distinct mechanisms. Thus, the functional integrity of the HR process and HR outcomes are dependent upon these helicase enzymes. Since mutations in some of these helicases lead to cancer predisposition in humans and mice, studies on them have clear relevance to human health and disease.

  3. Deformation of DNA during site-specific recombination of bacteriophage lambda: replacement of IHF protein by HU protein or sequence-directed bends.

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, S D; Nicholson, S C; Nash, H A

    1992-01-01

    Escherichia coli IHF protein is a prominent component of bacteriophage lambda integration and excision that binds specifically to DNA. We find that the homologous protein HU, a nonspecific DNA binding protein, can substitute for IHF during excisive recombination of a plasmid containing the prophage attachment sites attL and attR but not during integrative recombination between attP and attB. We have examined whether IHF and HU function in excisive recombination is mediated through DNA bending. Our strategy has been to construct chimeric attachment sites in which IHF binding sites are replaced by an alternative source of DNA deformation. Previously, we demonstrated that properly phased bends can substitute for the binding of IHF at one site in attP. Although this result is highly suggestive of a critical role of IHF-promoted bending in lambda integration, its interpretation is obscured by the continued need for IHF binding to the remaining IHF sites of these constructs. In the present work, we engineered a population of sequence-directed bends in the vicinity of the two essential IHF sites found in attR and attL. Even in the absence of IHF or HU, pairs of these attachment sites with properly phased bends are active for both in vitro and in vivo excision. This success, although tempered by the limited efficiency of these systems, reinforces our interpretation that IHF functions primarily as an architectural element. Images PMID:1465417

  4. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  5. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  6. Yeast Recombination Enhancer Is Stimulated by Transcription Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinc; Reese, Joseph C.; Workman, Jerry L.; Simpson, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating type switching is a gene conversion event that exhibits donor preference. MATa cells choose HMLα for recombination, and MATα cells choose HMRa. Donor preference is controlled by the recombination enhancer (RE), located between HMLα and MATa on the left arm of chromosome III. A number of a-cell specific noncoding RNAs are transcribed from the RE locus. Mcm1 and Fkh1 regulate RE activity in a cells. Here we show that Mcm1 binding is required for both the transcription of the noncoding RNAs and Fkh1 binding. This requirement can be bypassed by inserting another promoter into the RE. Moreover, the insertion of this promoter increases donor preference and opens the chromatin structure around the conserved domains of RE. Additionally, we determined that the level of Fkh1 binding positively correlates with the level of donor preference. We conclude that the role of Mcm1 in RE is to open chromatin around the conserved domains and activate transcription; this facilitates Fkh1 binding and the level of this binding determines the level of donor preference. PMID:16135790

  7. Chi hotspots trigger a conformational change in the helicase-like domain of AddAB to activate homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Gilhooly, Neville S.; Carrasco, Carolina; Gollnick, Benjamin; Wilkinson, Martin; Wigley, Dale B.; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks is modulated by Chi sequences. These are recognised by helicase-nuclease complexes that process DNA ends for homologous recombination. Chi activates recombination by changing the biochemical properties of the helicase-nuclease, transforming it from a destructive exonuclease into a recombination-promoting repair enzyme. This transition is thought to be controlled by the Chi-dependent opening of a molecular latch, which enables part of the DNA substrate to evade degradation beyond Chi. Here, we show that disruption of the latch improves Chi recognition efficiency and stabilizes the interaction of AddAB with Chi, even in mutants that are impaired for Chi binding. Chi recognition elicits a structural change in AddAB that maps to a region of AddB which resembles a helicase domain, and which harbours both the Chi recognition locus and the latch. Mutation of the latch potentiates the change and moderately reduces the duration of a translocation pause at Chi. However, this mutant displays properties of Chi-modified AddAB even in the complete absence of bona fide hotspot sequences. The results are used to develop a model for AddAB regulation in which allosteric communication between Chi binding and latch opening ensures quality control during recombination hotspot recognition. PMID:26762979

  8. 78 FR 66751 - Office of Science Policy, Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Activities; Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecule Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) AGENCY: NIH, Public... containment for research involving recombinant or synthetic nucleic acid molecules. Section II-A,...

  9. Real-time analysis of RAG complex activity in V(D)J recombination.

    PubMed

    Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Shimazaki, Noriko; Esguerra, Zitadel Anne; Watanabe, Go; Lieber, Michael R; Rothenberg, Eli

    2016-10-18

    Single-molecule FRET (smFRET) and single-molecule colocalization (smCL) assays have allowed us to observe the recombination-activating gene (RAG) complex reaction mechanism in real time. Our smFRET data have revealed distinct bending modes at recombination signal sequence (RSS)-conserved regions before nicking and synapsis. We show that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as a cofactor in stabilizing conformational changes at the 12RSS heptamer and increasing RAG1/2 binding affinity for 23RSS. Using smCL analysis, we have quantitatively measured RAG1/2 dwell time on 12RSS, 23RSS, and non-RSS DNA, confirming a strict RSS molecular specificity that was enhanced in the presence of a partner RSS in solution. Our studies also provide single-molecule determination of rate constants that were previously only possible by indirect methods, allowing us to conclude that RAG binding, bending, and synapsis precede catalysis. Our real-time analysis offers insight into the requirements for RSS-RSS pairing, architecture of the synaptic complex, and dynamics of the paired RSS substrates. We show that the synaptic complex is extremely stable and that heptamer regions of the 12RSS and 23RSS substrates in the synaptic complex are closely associated in a stable conformational state, whereas nonamer regions are perpendicular. Our data provide an enhanced and comprehensive mechanistic description of the structural dynamics and associated enzyme kinetics of variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] recombination.

  10. Rad3-Cds1 mediates coupling of initiation of meiotic recombination with DNA replication. Mei4-dependent transcription as a potential target of meiotic checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Keiko; Masai, Hisao

    2006-01-20

    Premeiotic S-phase and meiotic recombination are known to be strictly coupled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the checkpoint pathway regulating this coupling has been largely unknown. In fission yeast, Rad3 is known to play an essential role in coordination of DNA replication and cell division during both mitotic growth and meiosis. Here we have examined whether the Rad3 pathway also regulates the coupling of DNA synthesis and recombination. Inhibition of premeiotic S-phase with hydroxyurea completely abrogates the progression of meiosis, including the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB formation is restored in rad3 mutant even in the presence of hydroxyurea, although repair of DSBs does not take place or is significantly delayed, indicating that the subsequent recombination steps may be still inhibited. Examination of the roles of downstream checkpoint kinases reveals that Cds1, but not Chk1 or Mek1, is required for suppression of DSB in the presence of hydroxyurea. Transcriptional induction of some rec+ genes essential for DSB occurs at a normal timing and to a normal level in the absence of DNA synthesis in both the wild-type and cds1delta cells. On the other hand, the transcriptional induction of the mei4+ transcription factor and cdc25+ phosphatase, which is significantly suppressed by hydroxyurea in the wild-type cells, occurs almost to a normal level in cds1delta cells even in the presence of hydroxyurea. These results show that the Rad3-Cds1 checkpoint pathway coordinates initiation of meiotic recombination and meiotic cell divisions with premeiotic DNA synthesis. Because mei4+ is known to be required for DSB formation and cdc25+ is required for activation of meiotic cell divisions, we propose an intriguing possibility that the Rad3-Cds1 meiotic checkpoint pathway may target transcription of these factors.

  11. Molecular cloning, recombinant gene expression, and antifungal activity of cystatin from taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Kaosiung no. 1).

    PubMed

    Yang, A H; Yeh, K W

    2005-06-01

    A cDNA clone, designated CeCPI, encoding a novel phytocystatin was isolated from taro corms (Colocasia esculenta) using both degenerated primers/RT-PCR amplification and 5'-/3'-RACE extension. The full-length cDNA gene is 1,008 bp in size, encodes 206 amino acid residues, with a deduced molecular weight of 29 kDa. It contains a conserved reactive site motif Gln-Val-Val-Ser-Gly of cysteine protease inhibitors, and another consensus ARFAV sequence for phytocystatin. Sequence analysis revealed that CeCPI is phylogenetically closely related to Eudicots rather than to Monocots, despite taro belonging to Monocot. Recombinant GST-CeCPI fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and its inhibitory activity against papain was identified on gelatin/SDS-PAGE. These results confirmed that recombinant CeCPI protein exhibited strong cysteine protease inhibitory activity. Investigation of its antifungal activity clearly revealed a toxic effect on the mycelium growth of phytopathogenic fungi, such as Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc. etc., at a concentration of 80 microg recombinant CeCPI/ ml. Moreover, mycelium growth was completely inhibited and the sclerotia lysed at a concentration of 150-200 microg/ml. Further studies have demonstrated that recombinant CeCPI is capable of acting against the endogenous cysteine proteinase in the fungal mycelium.

  12. Recombination of 4p16 DNA markers in an unusual family with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Catrin; Zhu, Ning; Zuo, Jian; Bull, Laura; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Roses, Allen D.; Milatovich, Athena; Francke, Uta; Cox, David R.; Myers, Richard M.

    1992-01-01

    The Huntington disease (HD) mutation has been localized to human chromosome 4p16, in a 6-Mb region between the D4S10 locus and the 4p telomere. In a report by Robbins et al., a family was identified in which an affected individual failed to inherit three alleles within the 6-Mb region originating from the parental HD chromosome. To explain these results, it was suggested that the HD locus (HD) lies close to the telomere and that a recombination event took place between HD and the most telomeric marker examined, D4S90. As a test of this telomere hypothesis, we examined six members of this family, five of whom are affected with HD, for the segregation of 12 polymorphic markers from 4p16, including D4S169, which lies within 80 kb of the 4p telomere. We separated, in somatic cell hybrids, the chromosomes 4 from each family member, to determine the phase of marker alleles on each chromosome. We excluded nonpaternity by performing DNA fingerprint analyses on all six family members, and we found no evidence for chromosomal rearrangements when we used high-resolution karyotype analysis. We found that two affected siblings, including one of the patients originally described by Robbins et al., inherited alleles from the non-HD chromosome 4 of their affected parents, throughout the 6-Mb region. We found that a third affected sibling, also studied by Robbins et al., inherited alleles from the HD chromosome 4 of the affected parent, throughout the 6-Mb region. Finally, we found that a fourth sibling, who is likely affected with HD, has both a recombination event within the 6-Mb region and an additional recombination event in a more centromeric region of the short arm of chromosome 4. Our results argue against a telomeric location for HD and suggest that the HD mutation in this family is either associated with DNA predisposed to double recombination and/or gene conversion within the 6-Mb region or is in a gene that is outside this region and that is different from that mutated

  13. Active DNA Demethylation in Plants and Animals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.; Zhu, J.-K.

    2013-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation regulates many vital biological processes, including early development and locus-specific gene expression in plants and animals. In Arabidopsis, bifunctional DNA glycosylases directly excise the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site. Recent evidence suggests that mammals utilize DNA glycosylases after 5-methylcytosine is oxidized and/or deaminated. In both cases, the resultant single-nucleotide gap is subsequently filled with an unmodified cytosine through the DNA base excision repair pathway. The enzymatic removal of 5-methylcytosine is tightly integrated with histone modifications and possibly noncoding RNAs. Future research will increase our understanding of the mechanisms and critical roles of active DNA demethylation in various cellular processes as well as inspire novel genetic and chemical therapies for epigenetic disorders. PMID:23197304

  14. A requirement for recombinational repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is caused by DNA replication defects of mec1 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, B J; Holm, C

    1999-01-01

    To examine the role of the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway in compensating for DNA replication defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a genetic screen to identify mutants that require Rad52p for viability. We isolated 10 mec1 mutations that display synthetic lethality with rad52. These mutations (designated mec1-srf for synthetic lethality with rad-fifty-two) simultaneously cause two types of phenotypes: defects in the checkpoint function of Mec1p and defects in the essential function of Mec1p. Velocity sedimentation in alkaline sucrose gradients revealed that mec1-srf mutants accumulate small single-stranded DNA synthesis intermediates, suggesting that Mec1p is required for the normal progression of DNA synthesis. sml1 suppressor mutations suppress both the accumulation of DNA synthesis intermediates and the requirement for Rad52p in mec1-srf mutants, but they do not suppress the checkpoint defect in mec1-srf mutants. Thus, it appears to be the DNA replication defects in mec1-srf mutants that cause the requirement for Rad52p. By using hydroxyurea to introduce similar DNA replication defects, we found that single-stranded DNA breaks frequently lead to double-stranded DNA breaks that are not rapidly repaired in rad52 mutants. Taken together, these data suggest that the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway is required to prevent or repair double-stranded DNA breaks caused by defective DNA replication in mec1-srf mutants. PMID:10511542

  15. Process and product monitoring of recombinant DNA-derived biopharmaceuticals with high-performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Brooks R; Sydor, Wasyl; Guariglia, Lawrence M; Obara, Julie; Mengisen, Roland

    2003-01-01

    High-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) has emerged over the past 20 years as a powerful multidimensional separation tool that is orthogonal to HPLC and comparable to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) slab gel methods. HPCE is most frequently applied in the QC release testing of recombinant DNA-derived protein and monoclonal antibody (MAb) biopharmaceuticals. HPCE is a rugged and robust separation tool that can be used like HPLC to monitor the purification process, as well as to analyze bulk drug and drug substances. Examples of the practical applications of the predominant free-solution capillary electrophoresis (FSCE) and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) formats of HPCE, applied for process monitoring and product monitoring of recombinant protein and MAb biotherapeutics, are presented. HPCE has been applied in FSCE mode to monitor the purification of the rDNA-derived protein, recombinant human interleukin-4 (rhIL4). FSCE is demonstrated to be a robust method that can be used to monitor multiple column chromatographic purification processes, such as immobiilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC), ion exchange chromatography (IEC), and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) columns. The FSCE data are used to pool fractions to carry forward for further purification. The FSCE method is compared to the corresponding RP-HPLC method for rhIL4. HPCE has been applied in the CGE mode to monitor the purification of an rDNA-derived IgG4 MAb. CGE is demonstrated to be a convenient and rapid method to profile the purification process, compare purification processes, and provide a fingerprint of the MAb bulk drug that is useful for determining purity and lot-to-lot consistency. The practical advantages and limitations of CGE for process monitoring and product monitoring of MAbs are presented. The CGE method is compared to the high-performance SEC separation of the MAb under nondenaturing (HP-SEC) and denaturing (HP

  16. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and gamma-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  17. Asilomar moments: formative framings in recombinant DNA and solar climate engineering research.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Stefan; Low, Sean

    2014-12-28

    We examine the claim that in governance for solar climate engineering research, and especially field tests, there is no need for external governance beyond existing mechanisms such as peer review and environmental impact assessments that aim to assess technically defined risks to the physical environment. By drawing on the historical debate on recombinant DNA research, we show that defining risks is not a technical question but a complex process of narrative formation. Governance emerges from within, and as a response to, narratives of what is at stake in a debate. In applying this finding to the case of climate engineering, we find that the emerging narrative differs starkly from the narrative that gave meaning to rDNA technology during its formative period, with important implications for governance. While the narrative of rDNA technology was closed down to narrowly focus on technical risks, that of climate engineering continues to open up and includes social, political and ethical issues. This suggests that, in order to be legitimate, governance must take into account this broad perception of what constitutes the relevant issues and risks of climate engineering, requiring governance that goes beyond existing mechanisms that focus on technical risks. Even small-scale field tests with negligible impacts on the physical environment warrant additional governance as they raise broader concerns that go beyond the immediate impacts of individual experiments.

  18. Sulforaphane induces DNA double strand breaks predominantly repaired by homologous recombination pathway in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine-Suzuki, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Kubota, Nobuo; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-12-12

    Cytotoxicity and DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) were studied in HeLa cells treated with sulforaphane (SFN), a well-known chemo-preventive agent. Cell survival was impaired by SFN in a concentration and treatment time-dependent manner. Both constant field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and {gamma}-H2AX assay unambiguously indicated formation of DSBs by SFN, reflecting the cell survival data. These DSBs were predominantly processed by homologous recombination repair (HRR), judging from the SFN concentration-dependent manner of Rad51 foci formation. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, a key non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) protein, was not observed by SFN treatment, suggesting that NHEJ may not be involved in DSBs induced by this chemical. G2/M arrest by SFN, a typical response for cells exposed to ionizing radiation was also observed. Our new data indicate the clear induction of DSBs by SFN and a useful anti-tumor aspect of SFN through the induction of DNA DSBs.

  19. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage.

  20. Isolation and purification of recombinant proteins, antibodies and plasmid DNA with hydroxyapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hilbrig, Frank; Freitag, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite and related stationary phases increasingly play a role in the downstream processing of high-value biological materials, such as recombinant proteins, therapeutic antibodies and pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. Chromatographic hydroxyapatite is an inorganic, ceramic material identical in composition, if not in structure, to calcium phosphate found in human bones and teeth. The interaction of hydroxyapatite with biomacromolecules is complex and highly dynamic, which can make predicting performance difficult, but also allows the design of very selective isolation processes. This review discusses the currently commercially available chromatographic materials, different retention mechanisms supported by these materials and differential exploitation for the design of highly specific isolation procedures. The state of the art of antibody purification by hydroxy- and fluoroapatite is reviewed together with tested routines for method development and implementation. Finally, the isolation of plasmid DNA is discussed, since the purification of DNA therapeutics at a sufficiently large scale is an emerging need in bioprocess development and perhaps the area in bioseparation where apatite chromatography can make its most important contribution to date.

  1. Monitoring the spread of recombinant DNA from field plots with transgenic sugar beet plants by PCR and natural transformation of Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Meier, Petra; Wackernagel, Wilfried

    2003-06-01

    Previous studies had shown that recombinant DNA can be detected for several months in soil after the deposition of litter from transgenic (tg) plants. Here we show by PCR monitoring of field releases of tg sugar beet plants that during the growth of the plants the soil close to the plants and also plant material contains recombinant DNA, in the form of extracellular molecules. Surprisingly, the monitoring also revealed the presence of tg DNA in many field plots (30-70%) in which tg plants were never grown. These studies and the further monitoring during other tg sugar beet release experiments by PCR and a novel bioassay (measuring the transforming potential of recombinant DNA for Pseudomonas stutzeri) indicated that recombinant DNA was only detectable in the surface soil of field plots and their vicinity where flowering of the tg beet plants was allowed. Recombinant DNA was found in soil at a distance of 50 m from pollen-producing plants surrounded by a strip with hemp plants as a containment regime. It is concluded that recombinant DNA is deposited in soil during the growth of tg sugar beets and that a major mechanism of recombinant DNA spread in the environment is the dispersal of pollen which allows recombinant DNA to persist in the field plot for at least a year.

  2. SV40 host-substituted variants: a new look at the monkey DNA inserts and recombinant junctions.

    PubMed

    Singer, Maxine; Winocour, Ernest

    2011-04-10

    The available monkey genomic data banks were examined in order to determine the chromosomal locations of the host DNA inserts in 8 host-substituted SV40 variant DNAs. Five of the 8 variants contained more than one linked monkey DNA insert per tandem repeat unit and in all cases but one, the 19 monkey DNA inserts in the 8 variants mapped to different locations in the monkey genome. The 50 parental DNAs (32 monkey and 18 SV40 DNA segments) which spanned the crossover and flanking regions that participated in monkey/monkey and monkey/SV40 recombinations were characterized by substantial levels of microhomology of up to 8 nucleotides in length; the parental DNAs also exhibited direct and inverted repeats at or adjacent to the crossover sequences. We discuss how the host-substituted SV40 variants arose and the nature of the recombination mechanisms involved.

  3. Changes to DNA methylation and homologous recombination frequency in the progeny of stressed plants.

    PubMed

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-02-01

    Plants undergo changes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses that help them adjust and survive. Some of these changes may even be passed on to progeny and eventually lead to adaptive evolution. Transgenerational changes in response to stress include alterations in DNA methylation and changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of plants that were stressed often show elevated HRF as well as genomic hypermethylation, although specific loci that are beneficial in times of stress may be hypomethylated. One of the possible mechanisms responsible for passing the memory to the progeny involves small interfering RNAs; Dicer-like proteins, DCL2 and DCL3, are in part required for this process. However, while epigenetic modifications are often present in the untreated progeny of stressed plants, they are not usually sustained for multiple unexposed generations. Still, transgenerational inheritance of such changes has already begun to provide evidence for an important role of epigenetics in enhancing stress resistance.

  4. A simple DNA recombination screening method by RT-PCR as an alternative to Southern blot.

    PubMed

    Albers, Eliene; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Martin-Gonzalez, Javier; Avram, Alexandra; Munk, Stephanie; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J

    2017-01-19

    The generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), including knock-out (KO) and knock-in (KI) models, often requires genomic screening of many mouse ES cell (mESC) clones by Southern blot. The use of large targeting constructs facilitates the recombination of exogenous DNA in a specific genomic locus, but limits the detection of its correct genomic integration by standard PCR methods. Genomic Long Range PCR (LR-PCR), using primers adjacent to the homology arms, has been used as an alternative to radioactive-based Southern blot screenings. However, LR-PCRs are often difficult and render many false positive and false negative results. Here, we propose an alternative screening method based on the detection of a genetic modification at the mRNA level, which we successfully optimized in two mouse models. This screening method consists of a reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using primers that match exons flanking the targeting construct. The detection of the expected modification in this PCR product confirms the integration at the correct genomic location and shows that the mutant mRNA is expressed. This is a simple and sensitive strategy to screen locus-specific recombination of targeting constructs which can also be useful to screen KO and KI mutant mice or cell lines including those generated by CRISPR/Cas9.

  5. Effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines in blood donors: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kupek, Emil; de Souza, Denise ER; Petry, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various studies have demonstrated efficacy of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines, their effectiveness in health care settings has not been researched adequately. This gap is particularly visible for blood donors, a group of significant importance in the reduction of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B. Methods This is a double cohort study of 1411 repeat blood donors during the period 1998–2002, involving a vaccinated and an unvaccinated cohort, with matching of the two in terms of sex, age and residence. Average follow-up was 3.17 person-years. The outcome measure was infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), defined by testing positive on serologic markers HBsAg or anti-HBC. All blood donors were from the blood bank in Joaçaba, federal state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Results The cohorts did not differ significantly regarding sex, age and marital status but the vaccinated cohort had higher mean number of blood donations and higher proportion of those residing in the county capital Joaçaba. Hepatitis B incidences per 1000 person-years were zero among vaccinated and 2,33 among non-vaccinated, resulting in 100% vaccine effectiveness with 95% confidence interval from 30,1% to 100%. The number of vaccinated persons necessary to avoid one HBV infection in blood donors was estimated at 429 with 95% confidence interval from 217 to 21422. Conclusion The results showed very high effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-HBV vaccines in blood donors. Its considerable variation in this study is likely due to the limited follow-up and the influence of confounding factors normally balanced out in efficacy clinical trials. PMID:17986330

  6. Therapeutic targeting of liver cancer with a recombinant DNA vaccine containing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus via apoptotic-dependent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Gang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Zheng, Tang-Hui; Chen, Xu; Li, Ping; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2016-01-01

    A total of ~38.6 million mortalities occur due to liver cancer annually, worldwide. Although a variety of therapeutic methods are available, the efficacy of treatment at present is extremely limited due to an increased risk of malignancy and inherently poor prognosis of liver cancer. Gene therapy is considered a promising option, and has shown notable potential for the comprehensive therapy of liver cancer, in keeping with advances that have been made in the development of cancer molecular biology. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of the abilities of the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the pro-apoptotic factor apoptin from chicken anaemia virus, and the interferon-γ inducer interleukin-18 (IL-18) in antagonizing liver cancer. Therefore, a recombinant DNA plasmid expressing the three exogenous genes, VP3, IL-18 and hemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN), was constructed. Flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and analysis of caspase-3 activity were performed in H22 cell lines transfected with the recombinant DNA plasmid. In addition, 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used to establish a H22 hepatoma-bearing mouse model. Mice tumor tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the recombinant DNA vaccine containing the VP3, IL-18 and HN genes inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy via the mitochondrial pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27900002

  7. NIH oversight of human gene transfer research involving retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated virus vectors and the role of the NIH recombinant DNA advisory committee.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Marina; Shipp, Allan; Rosenthal, Eugene; Jambou, Robert; Shih, Tom; Montgomery, Maureen; Gargiulo, Linda; Patterson, Amy; Corrigan-Curay, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    In response to public and scientific concerns regarding human gene transfer research, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a transparent oversight system that extends to human gene transfer protocols that are either conducted with NIH funding or conducted at institutions that receive NIH funding for recombinant DNA research. The NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) has been the primary advisory body to NIH regarding the conduct of this research. Human gene transfer research proposals that are subject to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules (NIH Guidelines) must be submitted to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA), and protocols that raise novel scientific, safety, medical, ethical, or social issues are publicly discussed at the RAC's quarterly public meetings. OBA also convenes gene transfer safety symposia and policy conferences to provide a public forum for scientific experts to discuss emerging issues in the field. This transparent system of review promotes the rapid exchange of important scientific information and dissemination of data. The goal is to optimize the conduct of individual research protocols and to advance gene transfer research generally. This process has fostered the development of retroviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vector mediated gene delivery.

  8. Therapeutic targeting of liver cancer with a recombinant DNA vaccine containing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of Newcastle disease virus via apoptotic-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Gang; Liu, Yuan-Sheng; Zheng, Tang-Hui; Chen, Xu; Li, Ping; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2016-11-01

    A total of ~38.6 million mortalities occur due to liver cancer annually, worldwide. Although a variety of therapeutic methods are available, the efficacy of treatment at present is extremely limited due to an increased risk of malignancy and inherently poor prognosis of liver cancer. Gene therapy is considered a promising option, and has shown notable potential for the comprehensive therapy of liver cancer, in keeping with advances that have been made in the development of cancer molecular biology. The present study aimed to investigate the synergistic effects of the abilities of the hemagglutinin neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the pro-apoptotic factor apoptin from chicken anaemia virus, and the interferon-γ inducer interleukin-18 (IL-18) in antagonizing liver cancer. Therefore, a recombinant DNA plasmid expressing the three exogenous genes, VP3, IL-18 and hemagglutinin neuraminidase (HN), was constructed. Flow cytometry, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and analysis of caspase-3 activity were performed in H22 cell lines transfected with the recombinant DNA plasmid. In addition, 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used to establish a H22 hepatoma-bearing mouse model. Mice tumor tissue was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the present study revealed that the recombinant DNA vaccine containing the VP3, IL-18 and HN genes inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy via the mitochondrial pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  9. [Improvement of thermal adaptability and fermentation of industrial ethanologenic yeast by genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuying; He, Xiuping; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Borun

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol is an attractive alternative to fossil fuels. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most important ethanol producer. However, in the process of industrial production of ethanol, both cell growth and fermentation of ethanologenic S. cerevisiae are dramatically affected by environmental stresses, such as thermal stress. In this study, we improved both the thermotolerance and fermentation performance of industrial ethanologenic S. cerevisiae by combined usage of chemical mutagenesis and genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination method. The recombinant S. cerevisiae strain T44-2 could grow at 44 degrees C, 3 degrees C higher than that of the original strain CE6. The survival rate of T44-2 was 1.84 and 1.87-fold of that of CE6 when heat shock at 48 degrees C and 52 degrees C for 1 h respectively. At temperature higher than 37 degrees C, recombinant strain T44-2 always gave higher cell growth and ethanol production than those of strain CE6. Meanwhile, from 30 degrees C to 40 degrees C, recombinant strain T44-2 produces 91.2-83.8 g/L of ethanol from 200 g/L of glucose, which indicated that the recombinant strain T44-2 had both thermotolerance and broad thermal adaptability. The work offers a novel method, called genomic DNA mutagenesis-based genetic recombination, to improve the physiological functions of S. cerevisiae.

  10. A DNA binding motif of meiotic recombinase Rec12 (Spo11) defined by essential glycine-202, and persistence of Rec12 protein after completion of recombination

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, K. Mark; Davidson, Mari K.; Sharif, Wallace D.; Wiley, Charla A.; Wahls, Wayne P.

    2011-01-01

    The Rec12 (Spo11) protein of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a meiosis-specific ortholog of the catalytic subunit of type VI topoisomerases and is thought to catalyze double-strand DNA breaks that initiate recombination. We tested the hypothesis that the rec12-117 allele affects the choice of pathways by which recombination is resolved. DNA sequence analysis revealed a single missense mutation in the coding region (rec12-G202E). The corresponding glycine-202 residue of Rec12 protein is strictly conserved in proteins of the Rec12/Spo11/Top6A family. It maps to the base of the DNA binding pocket in the crystal structure of the archaeal ortholog, Top6A. The rec12-G202E mutants lacked crossover and non-crossover recombination, demonstrating that rec12-G202E does not affect choice of resolution pathway. Like rec12-D15 null mutants, the rec12-G202E mutants suffered chromosome segregation errors in meiosis I. The Rec12-G202E protein was as stable as wild-type Rec12, demonstrating that glycine-202 is essential for a biochemical activity of Rec12 protein, rather than for its stability. These findings suggest that Rec12 facilitates binding of the meiotic recombinase to its substrate, DNA. Interestingly, the bulk of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase I, and a portion of Rec12 protein persisted until the time of anaphase II, after which it was undetectable. This suggests that Rec12 protein has additional meiotic functions after completion of recombination in prophase, as inferred previously from genetic studies. PMID:16009511

  11. Conformation and activity of recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta.

    PubMed

    Boublik, M; Moschera, J A; Wei, C; Kung, H F

    1990-04-01

    Conformation of highly purified recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta) was correlated with its biological activity. The extent of ordered secondary structure was determined by circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy in various buffer conditions to establish conditions of protein stability and its potential for helix formation. The highest "helicity" (about 50 +/- 5% of alpha-helices) and the highest antiviral activities (4-10 x 10(7) units/mg) were found in 50% ethylene glycol, 1 M NaCl and 0.05 M Na3PO4, pH 7.2 (Buffer I); 80 mM citric acid, 20 mM Na2HPO4, pH 2.9 (Buffer II); and 25 mM NH4OAc, 125 mM NaCl, pH 5.1 (Buffer III). Both helicity and antiviral activity of the IFN-beta decrease in parallel with denaturation by urea, heat, and/or by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. Low pH (pH 2.9 Buffer II) exhibits a distinct stabilizing effect on the structure and antiviral activity of IFN-beta against heat denaturation.

  12. The role of DNA helicases and their interaction partners in genome stability and meiotic recombination in plants.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2011-03-01

    DNA helicases are enzymes that are able to unwind DNA by the use of the energy-equivalent ATP. They play essential roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination in all organisms. As homologous recombination occurs in somatic and meiotic cells, the same proteins may participate in both processes, albeit not necessarily with identical functions. DNA helicases involved in genome stability and meiotic recombination are the focus of this review. The role of these enzymes and their characterized interaction partners in plants will be summarized. Although most factors are conserved in eukaryotes, plant-specific features are becoming apparent. In the RecQ helicase family, Arabidopsis thaliana RECQ4A has been shown before to be the functional homologue of the well-researched baker's yeast Sgs1 and human BLM proteins. It was surprising to find that its interaction partners AtRMI1 and AtTOP3α are absolutely essential for meiotic recombination in plants, where they are central factors of a formerly underappreciated dissolution step of recombination intermediates. In the expanding group of anti-recombinases, future analysis of plant helicases is especially promising. While no FBH1 homologue is present, the Arabidopsis genome contains homologues of both SRS2 and RTEL1. Yeast and mammals, on the other hand. only possess homologues of either one or the other of these helicases. Plants also contain several other classes of helicases that are known from other organisms to be involved in the preservation of genome stability: FANCM is conserved with parts of the human Fanconi anaemia proteins, as are homologues of the Swi2/Snf2 family and of PIF1.

  13. Exploiting the homologous recombination DNA repair network for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2011-02-10

    Genomic instability is a characteristic of cancer cells. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells have evolved a complex DNA repair system to detect, signal and repair a diversity of DNA lesions. Homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair represents an error-free repair mechanism to maintain genomic integrity and ensure high-fidelity transmission of genetic information. Deficiencies in HR repair are of tremendous importance in the etiology of human cancers and at the same time offer great opportunities for designing targeted therapeutic strategies. The increase in the number of proteins identified as being involved in HR repair has dramatically shifted our concept of the proteins involved in this process: traditionally viewed as existing in a linear and simple pathway, today they are viewed as existing in a dynamic and interconnected network. Moreover, exploration of the targets within this network that can be modulated by small molecule drugs has led to the discovery of many effective kinase inhibitors, such as ATM, ATR, DNA-PK, CHK1, and CHK2 inhibitors. In preclinical studies, these inhibitors have been shown to sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The most exciting discovery in the field of HR repair is the identification of the synthetic lethality relationship between poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and HR deficiency. The promises of clinical applications of PARP inhibitors and the concept of synthetic lethality also bring challenges into focus. Future research directions in the area of HR repair include determining how to identify the patients most likely to benefit from PARP inhibitors and developing strategies to overcome resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Replication Checkpoint Activation

    PubMed Central

    Recolin, Bénédicte; van der Laan, Siem; Tsanov, Nikolay; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge of the cell cycle is to deliver an intact, and fully duplicated, genetic material to the daughter cells. To this end, progression of DNA synthesis is monitored by a feedback mechanism known as replication checkpoint that is untimely linked to DNA replication. This signaling pathway ensures coordination of DNA synthesis with cell cycle progression. Failure to activate this checkpoint in response to perturbation of DNA synthesis (replication stress) results in forced cell division leading to chromosome fragmentation, aneuploidy, and genomic instability. In this review, we will describe current knowledge of the molecular determinants of the DNA replication checkpoint in eukaryotic cells and discuss a model of activation of this signaling pathway crucial for maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:24705291

  15. Helicobacter pylori AddAB helicase-nuclease and RecA promote recombination-related DNA repair and survival during stomach colonization

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, Susan K.; Fero, Jutta; Hansen, Lori M.; Cromie, Gareth A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Smith, Gerald R.; Salama, Nina R.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Helicobacter pylori colonization of the human stomach is characterized by profound disease-causing inflammation. Bacterial proteins that detoxify reactive oxygen species or recognize damaged DNA adducts promote infection, suggesting that H. pylori requires DNA damage-repair for successful in vivo colonization. The molecular mechanisms of repair remain unknown. We identified homologs of the AddAB class of helicase-nuclease enzymes, related to the Escherichia coli RecBCD enzyme, which, with RecA, is required for repair of DNA breaks and homologous recombination. H. pylori mutants lacking addA or addB genes lack detectable ATP-dependent nuclease activity, and the cloned H. pylori addAB genes restore both nuclease and helicase activities to an E. coli recBCD deletion mutant. H. pylori addAB and recA mutants have a reduced capacity for stomach colonization. These mutants are sensitive to DNA damaging agents and have reduced frequencies of apparent gene conversion between homologous genes encoding outer membrane proteins. Our results reveal requirements for double-strand break repair and recombination during both acute and chronic phases of H. pylori stomach infection. PMID:18573180

  16. Cancer genes: rare recombinants instead of activated oncogenes (a review).

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1987-01-01

    The 20 known transforming (onc) genes of retroviruses are defined by sequences that are transduced from cellular genes termed protooncogenes or cellular oncogenes. Based on these sequences, viral onc genes have been postulated to be transduced cellular cancer genes, and proto-onc genes have been postulated to be latent cancer genes that can be activated from within the cell to cause virus-negative tumors. The hypothesis is popular because it promises direct access to cellular cancer genes. However, the existence of latent cancer genes presents a paradox, since such genes are clearly undesirable. The hypothesis predicts that viral onc genes and proto-onc genes are isogenic; that expression of proto-onc genes induces tumors; that activated proto-onc genes transform diploid cells upon transfection, like viral onc genes; and that diploid tumors exist. As yet, none of these predictions is confirmed. Instead: Structural comparisons between viral onc genes, essential retroviral genes, and proto-onc genes show that all viral onc genes are indeed new genes, rather than transduced cellular cancer genes. They are recombinants put together from truncated viral and truncated proto-onc genes. Proto-onc genes are frequently expressed in normal cells. To date, not one activated proto-onc gene has been isolated that transforms diploid cells. Above all, no diploid tumors with activated proto-onc genes have been found. Moreover, the probability of spontaneous transformation in vivo is at least 10(9) times lower than predicted from the mechanisms thought to activate proto-onc genes. Therefore, the hypothesis that proto-onc genes are latent cellular oncogenes appears to be an overinterpretation of sequence homology to structural and functional homology with viral onc genes. Here it is proposed that only rare truncations and illegitimate recombinations that alter the germ-line configuration of cellular genes generate viral and possibly cellular cancer genes. The clonal chromosome

  17. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis.

    PubMed

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia; Altmannova, Veronika; Sebesta, Marek; Pacesa, Martin; Fugger, Kasper; Sorensen, Claus Storgaard; Lee, Marietta Y W T; Haracska, Lajos; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-20

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during recombination events in a PCNA interaction-dependent way but independently of its UvrD-like helicase domain. In accordance, we demonstrate that PARI inhibits HR in vivo, and its knockdown suppresses the UV sensitivity of RAD18-depleted cells. Our data reveal a novel human regulatory mechanism that limits the extent of HR and represents a new potential target for anticancer therapy.

  18. Mus81-Mms4 Functions as a Single Heterodimer To Cleave Nicked Intermediates in Recombinational DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erin K.; Wright, William D.; Ehmsen, Kirk T.; Evans, James E.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The formation of crossovers is a fundamental genetic process. The XPF-family endonuclease Mus81-Mms4 (Eme1) contributes significantly to crossing over in eukaryotes. A key question is whether Mus81-Mms4 can process Holliday junctions that contain four uninterrupted strands. Holliday junction cleavage requires the coordination of two active sites, necessitating the assembly of two Mus81-Mms4 heterodimers. Contrary to this expectation, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4 exists as a single heterodimer both in solution and when bound to DNA substrates in vitro. Consistently, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that Mus81-Mms4 does not multimerize in vivo. Moreover, chromatin-bound Mus81-Mms4 does not detectably form higher-order multimers. We show that Cdc5 kinase activates Mus81-Mms4 nuclease activity on 3′ flaps and Holliday junctions in vitro but that activation does not induce a preference for Holliday junctions and does not induce multimerization of the Mus81-Mms4 heterodimer. These data support a model in which Mus81-Mms4 cleaves nicked recombination intermediates such as displacement loops (D-loops), nicked Holliday junctions, or 3′ flaps but not intact Holliday junctions with four uninterrupted strands. We infer that Mus81-dependent crossing over occurs in a noncanonical manner that does not involve the coordinated cleavage of classic Holliday junctions. PMID:22645308

  19. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  20. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  1. Halibut mitochondrial genomes contain extensive heteroplasmic tandem repeat arrays involved in DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Mjelle, Kenneth A; Karlsen, Bård O; Jørgensen, Tor E; Moum, Truls; Johansen, Steinar D

    2008-01-01

    Background Halibuts are commercially important flatfish species confined to the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. We have determined the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of four specimens each of Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Pacific halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis) and Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides), and assessed the nucleotide variability within and between species. Results About 100 variable positions were identified within the four specimens in each halibut species, with the control regions as the most variable parts of the genomes (10 times that of the mitochondrial ribosomal DNA). Due to tandem repeat arrays, the control regions have unusually large sizes compared to most vertebrate mtDNAs. The arrays are highly heteroplasmic in size and consist mainly of different variants of a 61-bp motif. Halibut mitochondrial genomes lacking arrays were also detected. Conclusion The complexity, distribution, and biological role of the heteroplasmic tandem repeat arrays in halibut mitochondrial control regions are discussed. We conclude that the most plausible explanation for array maintenance includes both the slipped-strand mispairing and DNA recombination mechanisms. PMID:18186947

  2. Transcription of telomeric DNA leads to high levels of homologous recombination and t-loops

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Anirban; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of DNA loops at chromosome ends (t-loops) and the transcription of telomeres producing G-rich RNA (TERRA) represent two central features of telomeres. To explore a possible link between them we employed artificial human telomeres containing long arrays of TTAGGG repeats flanked by the T7 or T3 promoters. Transcription of these DNAs generates a high frequency of t-loops within individual molecules and homologous recombination events between different DNAs at their telomeric sequences. T-loop formation does not require a single strand overhang, arguing that both terminal strands insert into the preceding duplex. The loops are very stable and some RNase H resistant TERRA remains at the t-loop, likely adding to their stability. Transcription of DNAs containing TTAGTG or TGAGTG repeats showed greatly reduced loop formation. While in the cell multiple pathways may lead to t-loop formation, the pathway revealed here does not depend on the shelterins but rather on the unique character of telomeric DNA when it is opened for transcription. Hence, telomeric sequences may have evolved to facilitate their ability to loop back on themselves. PMID:27608724

  3. Evolutionarily diverse determinants of meiotic DNA break and recombination landscapes across the genome

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Kyle R.; Sasaki, Mariko; Milman, Neta

    2014-01-01

    Fission yeast Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) initiates meiotic recombination by forming developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB distributions influence patterns of heredity and genome evolution, but the basis of the highly nonrandom choice of Rec12 cleavage sites is poorly understood, largely because available maps are of relatively low resolution and sensitivity. Here, we determined DSBs genome-wide at near-nucleotide resolution by sequencing the oligonucleotides attached to Rec12 following DNA cleavage. The single oligonucleotide size class allowed us to deeply sample all break events. We find strong evidence across the genome for differential DSB repair accounting for crossover invariance (constant cM/kb in spite of DSB hotspots). Surprisingly, about half of all crossovers occur in regions where DSBs occur at low frequency and are widely dispersed in location from cell to cell. These previously undetected, low-level DSBs thus play an outsized and crucial role in meiosis. We further find that the influence of underlying nucleotide sequence and chromosomal architecture differs in multiple ways from that in budding yeast. DSBs are not strongly restricted to nucleosome-depleted regions, as they are in budding yeast, but are nevertheless spatially influenced by chromatin structure. Our analyses demonstrate that evolutionarily fluid factors contribute to crossover initiation and regulation. PMID:25024163

  4. DNA repair and recombination in higher plants: insights from comparative genomics of arabidopsis and rice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DNA repair and recombination (DRR) proteins protect organisms against genetic damage, caused by environmental agents and other genotoxic agents, by removal of DNA lesions or helping to abide them. Results We identified genes potentially involved in DRR mechanisms in Arabidopsis and rice using similarity searches and conserved domain analysis against proteins known to be involved in DRR in human, yeast and E. coli. As expected, many of DRR genes are very similar to those found in other eukaryotes. Beside these eukaryotes specific genes, several prokaryotes specific genes were also found to be well conserved in plants. In Arabidopsis, several functionally important DRR gene duplications are present, which do not occur in rice. Among DRR proteins, we found that proteins belonging to the nucleotide excision repair pathway were relatively more conserved than proteins needed for the other DRR pathways. Sub-cellular localization studies of DRR gene suggests that these proteins are mostly reside in nucleus while gene drain in between nucleus and cell organelles were also found in some cases. Conclusions The similarities and dissimilarities in between plants and other organisms' DRR pathways are discussed. The observed differences broaden our knowledge about DRR in the plants world, and raises the potential question of whether differentiated functions have evolved in some cases. These results, altogether, provide a useful framework for further experimental studies in these organisms. PMID:20646326

  5. Real-time analysis of double-strand DNA break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Wade M; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Haber, James E

    2011-02-22

    The ability to induce synchronously a single site-specific double-strand break (DSB) in a budding yeast chromosome has made it possible to monitor the kinetics and genetic requirements of many molecular steps during DSB repair. Special attention has been paid to the switching of mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a process initiated by the HO endonuclease by cleaving the MAT locus. A DSB in MATa is repaired by homologous recombination--specifically, by gene conversion--using a heterochromatic donor, HMLα. Repair results in the replacement of the a-specific sequences (Ya) by Yα and switching from MATa to MATα. We report that MAT switching requires the DNA replication factor Dpb11, although it does not require the Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or the Mcm and Cdc45 helicase components. Using Southern blot, PCR, and ChIP analysis of samples collected every 10 min, we extend previous studies of this process to identify the times for the loading of Rad51 recombinase protein onto the DSB ends at MAT, the subsequent strand invasion by the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament into the donor sequences, the initiation of new DNA synthesis, and the removal of the nonhomologous Y sequences. In addition we report evidence for the transient displacement of well-positioned nucleosomes in the HML donor locus during strand invasion.

  6. The pH optimum of native uracil-DNA glycosylase of Archaeoglobus fulgidus compared to recombinant enzyme indicates adaption to cytosolic pH.

    PubMed

    Knævelsrud, Ingeborg; Kazazic, Sabina; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Bjelland, Svein

    2014-01-01

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase of Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Afung) in cell extracts exhibited maximal activity around pH 6.2 as compared to pH 4.8 for the purified recombinant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli. Native Afung thus seems to be adapted to the intracellular pH of A. fulgidus, determined to be 7.0±0.1. Both recombinant and native Afung exhibited a broad temperature optimum for activity around 80°C, reflecting the A. fulgidus optimal growth temperature of 83°C. Adaption to the neutral conditions in the A. fulgidus cytoplasm might be due to covalent modifications or accessory factors, or due to a different folding when expressed in the native host.

  7. Permanent Genetic Access to Transiently Active Neurons via TRAP: Targeted Recombination in Active Populations

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Casey J.; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Yang, Helen H.; Heller, H. Craig; Luo, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting genetically encoded tools for neural circuit dissection to relevant cellular populations is a major challenge in neurobiology. We developed a new approach, Targeted Recombination in Active Populations (TRAP), to obtain genetic access to neurons that were activated by defined stimuli. This method utilizes mice in which the tamoxifen-dependent recombinase CreERT2 is expressed in an activity-dependent manner from the loci of the immediate early genes Arc and Fos. Active cells that express CreERT2 can undergo recombination only when tamoxifen is present, allowing genetic access to neurons that are active during a time window of less than 12 h. We show that TRAP can selectively provide access to neurons activated by specific somatosensory, visual, and auditory stimuli, and by experience in a novel environment. When combined with tools for labeling, tracing, recording, and manipulating neurons, TRAP offers a powerful new approach for understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior. PMID:23764283

  8. The Meiotic Recombination Activator PRDM9 Trimethylates Both H3K36 and H3K4 at Recombination Hotspots In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Powers, Natalie R; Parvanov, Emil D; Baker, Christopher L; Walker, Michael; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    In many mammals, including humans and mice, the zinc finger histone methyltransferase PRDM9 performs the first step in meiotic recombination by specifying the locations of hotspots, the sites of genetic recombination. PRDM9 binds to DNA at hotspots through its zinc finger domain and activates recombination by trimethylating histone H3K4 on adjacent nucleosomes through its PR/SET domain. Recently, the isolated PR/SET domain of PRDM9 was shown capable of also trimethylating H3K36 in vitro, raising the question of whether this reaction occurs in vivo during meiosis, and if so, what its function might be. Here, we show that full-length PRDM9 does trimethylate H3K36 in vivo in mouse spermatocytes. Levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 are highly correlated at hotspots, but mutually exclusive elsewhere. In vitro, we find that although PRDM9 trimethylates H3K36 much more slowly than it does H3K4, PRDM9 is capable of placing both marks on the same histone molecules. In accord with these results, we also show that PRDM9 can trimethylate both K4 and K36 on the same nucleosomes in vivo, but the ratio of K4me3/K36me3 is much higher for the pair of nucleosomes adjacent to the PRDM9 binding site compared to the next pair further away. Importantly, H3K4me3/H3K36me3-double-positive nucleosomes occur only in regions of recombination: hotspots and the pseudoautosomal (PAR) region of the sex chromosomes. These double-positive nucleosomes are dramatically reduced when PRDM9 is absent, showing that this signature is PRDM9-dependent at hotspots; the residual double-positive nucleosomes most likely come from the PRDM9-independent PAR. These results, together with the fact that PRDM9 is the only known mammalian histone methyltransferase with both H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation activity, suggest that trimethylation of H3K36 plays an important role in the recombination process. Given the known requirement of H3K36me3 for double strand break repair by homologous recombination in somatic cells, we

  9. The Meiotic Recombination Activator PRDM9 Trimethylates Both H3K36 and H3K4 at Recombination Hotspots In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Natalie R.; Parvanov, Emil D.; Baker, Christopher L.; Walker, Michael; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In many mammals, including humans and mice, the zinc finger histone methyltransferase PRDM9 performs the first step in meiotic recombination by specifying the locations of hotspots, the sites of genetic recombination. PRDM9 binds to DNA at hotspots through its zinc finger domain and activates recombination by trimethylating histone H3K4 on adjacent nucleosomes through its PR/SET domain. Recently, the isolated PR/SET domain of PRDM9 was shown capable of also trimethylating H3K36 in vitro, raising the question of whether this reaction occurs in vivo during meiosis, and if so, what its function might be. Here, we show that full-length PRDM9 does trimethylate H3K36 in vivo in mouse spermatocytes. Levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 are highly correlated at hotspots, but mutually exclusive elsewhere. In vitro, we find that although PRDM9 trimethylates H3K36 much more slowly than it does H3K4, PRDM9 is capable of placing both marks on the same histone molecules. In accord with these results, we also show that PRDM9 can trimethylate both K4 and K36 on the same nucleosomes in vivo, but the ratio of K4me3/K36me3 is much higher for the pair of nucleosomes adjacent to the PRDM9 binding site compared to the next pair further away. Importantly, H3K4me3/H3K36me3-double-positive nucleosomes occur only in regions of recombination: hotspots and the pseudoautosomal (PAR) region of the sex chromosomes. These double-positive nucleosomes are dramatically reduced when PRDM9 is absent, showing that this signature is PRDM9-dependent at hotspots; the residual double-positive nucleosomes most likely come from the PRDM9-independent PAR. These results, together with the fact that PRDM9 is the only known mammalian histone methyltransferase with both H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation activity, suggest that trimethylation of H3K36 plays an important role in the recombination process. Given the known requirement of H3K36me3 for double strand break repair by homologous recombination in somatic cells, we

  10. Homologous recombinational repair factors are recruited and loaded onto the viral DNA genome in Epstein-Barr virus replication compartments.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Ayumi; Iwahori, Satoko; Sato, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Sanae; Isomura, Hiroki; Murata, Takayuki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2009-07-01

    Homologous recombination is an important biological process that facilitates genome rearrangement and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The induction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic replication induces ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)-dependent DNA damage checkpoint signaling, leading to the clustering of phosphorylated ATM and Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complexes to sites of viral genome synthesis in nuclei. Here we report that homologous recombinational repair (HRR) factors such as replication protein A (RPA), Rad51, and Rad52 as well as MRN complexes are recruited and loaded onto the newly synthesized viral genome in replication compartments. The 32-kDa subunit of RPA is extensively phosphorylated at sites in accordance with those with ATM. The hyperphosphorylation of RPA32 causes a change in RPA conformation, resulting in a switch from the catalysis of DNA replication to the participation in DNA repair. The levels of Rad51 and phosphorylated RPA were found to increase with the progression of viral productive replication, while that of Rad52 proved constant. Furthermore, biochemical fractionation revealed increases in levels of DNA-bound forms of these HRRs. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled chromatin immunoprecipitation and PCR analyses confirmed the loading of RPA, Rad 51, Rad52, and Mre11 onto newly synthesized viral DNA, and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling analysis demonstrated DSBs in the EBV replication compartments. HRR factors might be recruited to repair DSBs on the viral genome in viral replication compartments. RNA interference knockdown of RPA32 and Rad51 prevented viral DNA synthesis remarkably, suggesting that homologous recombination and/or repair of viral DNA genome might occur, coupled with DNA replication to facilitate viral genome synthesis.

  11. Real-time polymerase chain reaction monitoring of recombinant DNA entry into soil from decomposing roundup ready leaf biomass.

    PubMed

    Levy-Booth, David J; Campbell, Rachel G; Gulden, Robert H; Hart, Miranda M; Powell, Jeff R; Klironomos, John N; Pauls, K Peter; Swanton, Clarence J; Trevors, Jack T; Dunfield, Kari E

    2008-08-13

    Glyphosate-tolerant, Roundup Ready (RR) soybeans account for about 57% of all genetically modified (GM) crops grown worldwide. The entry of recombinant DNA into soil from GM crops has been identified as an environmental concern due to the possibility of their horizontal transfer to soil microorganisms. RR soybeans contain recombinant gene sequences that can be differentiated from wild-type plant and microbial genes in soil by using a sequence-specific molecular beacon and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A molecular beacon-based real-time PCR system to quantify a wild-type soybean lectin ( le1) gene was designed to compare amounts of endogenous soybean genes to recombinant DNA in soil. Microcosm studies were carried out to develop methodologies for the detection of recombinant DNA from RR soybeans in soil. RR soybean leaf litterbags were imbedded in the soil under controlled environmental conditions (60% water holding capacity, 10/15 degrees C, and 8/16 h day/night) for 30 days. The soybean biomass decomposition was described using a single-phase exponential equation, and the DNA concentration in planta and in soil was quantified using real-time PCR using sequence-specific molecular beacons for the recombinant cp4 epsps and endogenous soybean lectin ( le1) genes. The biomass of RR soybean leaves was 8.6% less than nontransgenic (NT) soybean leaves after 30 days. The pooled half-disappearance time for cp4 epsps and le1 in RR and of le1 in NT soybean leaves was 1.4 days. All genes from leaves were detected in soil after 30 days. This study provides a methodology for monitoring the entry of RR and NT soybean DNA into soil from decomposing plant residues.

  12. Mixed infection of Sida jamaicensis in Jamaica reveals the presence of three recombinant begomovirus DNA A components.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Kon, Tatsuya; Rojas, Maria; Graham, André; Martin, Darren; Gilbertson, Robert; Roye, Marcia

    2014-09-01

    Begomoviruses impose serious constraints on agriculture throughout the temperate, tropical and subtropical regions. Previously, we characterised a sida golden yellow vein virus isolate, SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] (HQ009519-20) from a symptomatic Sida jamaicensis plant. With the aim of establishing whether it was hosting a mixed infection that could facilitate recombination, PCR-RFLP was done on DNA extracted from this plant, and the results suggested the presence of two additional genetically distinct DNA-A molecules. Sequence analysis of these two DNA-A molecules (relying on BLAST searches and the CLUSTAL V algorithm within the DNASTAR MegAlign module) revealed that they belonged to novel species, and we have tentatively named these viruses sida golden mosaic Braco virus-[Jamaica:Liguanea:2008] and sida golden mosaic Liguanea virus-[Jamaica:1:2008]. Using RDP4 (recombination detection program), we determined that all three viruses were recombinant, with bases ~10 to ~440 of both SiGMLigV-[JM:Lig:08] and SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] having been derived from a relative of SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] (P<2.070×10(-7) for all seven of the recombination detection methods). SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] was itself a product of recombination, deriving bases ~490-1195 from a virus that was ~92% similar to malvastrum yellow mosaic Helshire virus. Phylogenetically, these DNA-A components are most closely related to those of malvaceous weed-infecting begomoviruses from Jamaica, Cuba, Florida and Mexico. The SiGMBV DNA-A was able to elicit symptomatic infection in N. benthamiana.

  13. Dialysis purification of integrase-DNA complexes provides high-resolution atomic force microscopy images: dimeric recombinant HIV-1 integrase binding and specific looping on DNA.

    PubMed

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Nakai, Tonau; Ohmori, Rei; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-01-01

    It remains difficult to obtain high-resolution atomic force microscopy images of HIV-1 integrase bound to DNA in a dimeric or tetrameric fashion. We therefore constructed specific target DNAs to assess HIV-1 integrase binding and purified the complex by dialysis prior to analysis. Our resulting atomic force microscopy analyses indicated precise size of binding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombinant integrase in a tetrameric manner, inducing formation of a loop-like or figure-eight-like secondary structure in the target DNA. Our findings regarding the target DNA secondary structure provide new insights into the intermediate states of retroviral integration.

  14. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  15. How-To-Do-It: Recombinant DNA Technology in the High School Biology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a basic biotechnology investigation that includes restriction and ligation of plasmid DNA, transformation of bacteria and cloning of these bacterial cells. Discusses laboratory procedures and another activity in the identification of unknown plasmids by studying agarose gel electrophoresis photographs. (CW)

  16. Concurrent V(D)J recombination and DNA end instability increase interchromosomal trans-rearrangements in ATM-deficient thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Steven; Wangsa, Darawalee; Ried, Thomas; Livak, Ferenc; Hodes, Richard J

    2013-04-01

    During the CD4(-)CD8(-) (DN) stage of T-cell development, RAG-dependent DNA breaks and V(D)J recombination occur at three T-cell receptor (TCR) loci: TCRβ, TCRγ and TCRδ. During this stage, abnormal trans-rearrangements also take place between TCR loci, occurring at increased frequency in absence of the DNA damage response mediator ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Here, we use this model of physiologic trans-rearrangement to study factors that predispose to rearrangement and the role of ATM in preventing chromosomal translocations. The frequency of DN thymocytes with DNA damage foci at multiple TCR loci simultaneously is increased 2- to 3-fold in the absence of ATM. However, trans-rearrangement is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold, indicating that ATM function extends beyond timely resolution of DNA breaks. RAG-mediated synaptic complex formation occurs between recombination signal sequences with unequal 12 and 23 base spacer sequences (12/23 rule). TCR trans-rearrangements violate this rule, as we observed similar frequencies of 12/23 and aberrant 12/12 or 23/23 recombination products. This suggests that trans-rearrangements are not the result of trans-synaptic complex formation, but they are instead because of unstable cis synaptic complexes that form simultaneously at distinct TCR loci. Thus, ATM suppresses trans-rearrangement primarily through stabilization of DNA breaks at TCR loci.

  17. Meiotic recombination involving heterozygous large insertions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: formation and repair of large, unpaired DNA loops.

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, H M; Kirkpatrick, D T; Gerton, J L; Petes, T D

    2001-01-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves the formation of heteroduplexes, duplexes containing DNA strands derived from two different homologues. If the two strands of DNA differ by an insertion or deletion, the heteroduplex will contain an unpaired DNA loop. We found that unpaired loops as large as 5.6 kb can be accommodated within a heteroduplex. Repair of these loops involved the nucleotide excision repair (NER) enzymes Rad1p and Rad10p and the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins Msh2p and Msh3p, but not several other NER (Rad2p and Rad14p) and MMR (Msh4p, Msh6p, Mlh1p, Pms1p, Mlh2p, Mlh3p) proteins. Heteroduplexes were also formed with DNA strands derived from alleles containing two different large insertions, creating a large "bubble"; repair of this substrate was dependent on Rad1p. Although meiotic recombination events in yeast are initiated by double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), we showed that DSBs occurring within heterozygous insertions do not stimulate interhomologue recombination. PMID:11514439

  18. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  19. Immune responses of mice to prime-boost vaccination with the recombinant DNA and Fowlpox virus both expressing HIV-2 Gag-gp105.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Zhang, L S; Wang, H; Jin, H; Li, Ch; Jin, N

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2 (HIV-1, 2) present a public health problem for which there is neither an effective antiviral therapy nor a preventive vaccine. In this study, the immune responses of mice to prime-boost vaccination with the recombinant DNA (rDNA) and recombinant Fowlpox virus (rFPV) both expressing HIV-2 Gag-gp105 chimeric protein, were compared to those elicited by each vector alone. Mice primed with the rDNA and boosted with the rFPV showed HIV-2-specific antibody levels, splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers, and Gag-gp105-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) activity increased by 20-30% as compared with those elicited by these vaccines alone. These findings suggested that the prime-boost strategy combining rDNA and rFPV elicited significant Gag-gp105 - specific cellular and humoral immune responses, thus supporting this novel approach to the immunization against HIV infections.

  20. Evaluation on the efficacy and immunogenicity of recombinant DNA plasmids expressing spike genes from porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fandan; Ren, Yudong; Suo, Siqingaowa; Sun, Xuejiao; Li, Xunliang; Li, Pengchong; Yang, Wei; Li, Guangxing; Li, Lu; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PDEV) can cause severe diarrhea in pigs. Development of effective vaccines against TGEV and PEDV is one of important prevention measures. The spike (S) protein is the surface glycoprotein of TGEV and PEDV, which can induce specific neutralization antibodies and is a candidate antigen for vaccination attempts. In this study, the open reading frames of the TGEV S1 protein and in addition of the S or S1 proteins of PEDV were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector, pIRES, resulting in recombinant plasmids, pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S1) and pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S). Subsequently, 6-8 weeks old Kunming mice were inoculated with both DNA plasmids. Lymphocyte proliferation assay, virus neutralization assay, IFN-γ assay and CTL activity assay were performed. TGEV/PEDV specific antibody responses as well as kinetic changes of T lymphocyte subgroups of the immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that the recombinant DNA plasmids increased the proliferation of T lymphocytes and the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subgroups. In addition, the DNA vaccines induced a high level of IFN-γ in the immunized mice. The specific CTL activity in the pIRES-(TGEV-S1-PEDV-S) group became significant at 42 days post-immunization. At 35 days post-immunization, the recombinant DNA plasmids bearing full-length S genes of TGEV and PEDV stimulated higher levels of specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice.

  1. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms.

  2. Recombinant DNA technology for melanoma immunotherapy: anti-Id DNA vaccines targeting high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Barucca, A; Capitani, M; Cesca, M; Tomassoni, D; Kazmi, U; Concetti, F; Vincenzetti, L; Concetti, A; Venanzi, F M

    2014-11-01

    Anti-idiotypic MK2-23 monoclonal antibody (anti-Id MK2-23 mAb), which mimics the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), has been used to implement active immunotherapy against melanoma. However, due to safety and standardization issues, this approach never entered extensive clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the usage of DNA vaccines as an alternative to MK2-23 mAb immunization. MK2-23 DNA plasmids coding for single chain (scFv) MK2-23 antibody were constructed via the insertion of variable heavy (V H) and light (V L) chains of MK2-23 into the pVAC-1mcs plasmids. Two alternative MK2-23 plasmids format V H/V L, and V L/V H were assembled. We demonstrate that both polypeptides expressed by scFv plasmids in vitro retained the ability to mimic HMW-MAA antigen, and to elicit specific anti-HMW-MAA humoral and cellular immunoresponses in immunized mice. Notably, MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines impaired the onset and growth of transplantable B16 melanoma cells not engineered to express HMW-MAA. This pilot study suggests that optimized MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines could potentially provide a safer and cost-effective alternative to anti-Id antibody immunization, for melanoma immunotherapy.

  3. Efficient detection of unpaired DNA requires a member of the rad54-like family of homologous recombination proteins.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Dilini A; Sauls, Pegan A; Sharp, Kevin J; Smith, Zachary J; Xiao, Hua; Groskreutz, Katie M; Malone, Tyler L; Boone, Erin C; Edwards, Kevin A; Shiu, Patrick K T; Larson, Erik D; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-11-01

    Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD) is a process that detects unpaired regions between homologous chromosomes and silences them for the duration of sexual development. While the phenomenon of MSUD is well recognized, the process that detects unpaired DNA is poorly understood. In this report, we provide two lines of evidence linking unpaired DNA detection to a physical search for DNA homology. First, we have found that a putative SNF2-family protein (SAD-6) is required for efficient MSUD in Neurospora crassa. SAD-6 is closely related to Rad54, a protein known to facilitate key steps in the repair of double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. Second, we have successfully masked unpaired DNA by placing identical transgenes at slightly different locations on homologous chromosomes. This masking falls apart when the distance between the transgenes is increased. We propose a model where unpaired DNA detection during MSUD is achieved through a spatially constrained search for DNA homology. The identity of SAD-6 as a Rad54 paralog suggests that this process may be similar to the searching mechanism used during homologous recombination.

  4. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    PubMed

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  5. Insights into native epitopes of proliferating cell nuclear antigen using recombinant DNA protein products

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding full-length human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was used to generate a panel of in vitro translated labeled protein products with COOH-terminal deletions and to construct a set of fusion proteins with COOH- and NH2-terminal deletions. A rabbit antiserum raised against an NH2-terminal peptide, a well- characterized murine monoclonal antibody (mAb), and 14 human lupus sera with autoantibody to PCNA were analyzed for their reactivity with the constructs using both immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting techniques. The rabbit antiserum reacted in immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with constructs containing the appropriate NH2-terminal sequence and mAb reacted with a sequence from the midregion of PCNA. These experimentally induced antibodies also reacted with 15-mer synthetic peptides in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In contrast, none of the lupus sera reacted with synthetic peptides in ELISA. 9 of the 14 lupus sera also failed to react in Western immunoblotting with any recombinant fusion protein, although they all immunoprecipitated in vitro translated full-length protein. Four of the nine had variable patterns of immunoprecipitation with shorter constructs. The remaining five lupus sera were able to immunoprecipitate translation products as well as Western blot recombinant fusion proteins. From analysis of the patterns of reactivity of human lupus sera, it was deduced that the apparent heterogeneity of human autoantibodies to PCNA could be explained by immune response to highly conformational epitopes. These observations demonstrate that there might be special features in "native" epitopes of intranuclear antigens that are recognized by autoantibodies, and that these special features of native epitopes might not be present in prepared antigen used for experimental immunization. These features may be related to protein folding or to association of the antigen with other intranuclear proteins or nucleic acids, as

  6. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167–250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25–400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24–72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted. PMID:23690681

  7. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167-250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25-400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24-72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted.

  8. Stable antigen is most effective for eliciting CD8+ T-cell responses after DNA vaccination and infection with recombinant vaccinia virus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schliehe, Christopher; Bitzer, Annegret; van den Broek, Maries; Groettrup, Marcus

    2012-09-01

    The induction of strong CD8(+) T-cell responses against infectious diseases and cancer has remained a major challenge. Depending on the source of antigen and the infectious agent, priming of CD8(+) T cells requires direct and/or cross-presentation of antigenic peptides on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules by professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs). However, both pathways show distinct preferences concerning antigen stability. Whereas direct presentation was shown to efficiently present peptides derived from rapidly degraded proteins, cross-presentation is dependent on long-lived antigen species. In this report, we analyzed the role of antigen stability on DNA vaccination and recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) infection using altered versions of the same antigen. The long-lived nucleoprotein (NP) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can be targeted for degradation by N-terminal fusion to ubiquitin or, as we show here, to the ubiquitin-like modifier FAT10. Direct presentation by cells either transfected with NP-encoding plasmids or infected with recombinant VV in vitro was enhanced in the presence of short-lived antigens. In vivo, however, the highest induction of NP-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses was achieved in the presence of long-lived NP. Our experiments provide evidence that targeting antigens for proteasomal degradation does not improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines and recombinant VVs. Rather, it is the long-lived antigen that is superior for the efficient activation of MHC class I-restricted immune responses in vivo. Hence, our results suggest a dominant role for antigen cross-priming in DNA vaccination and recombinant VV infection.

  9. Visualization of recombinant DNA and protein complexes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Shannon, Morgan; Goertz, John

    2011-07-18

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the visualizing of individual proteins, DNA molecules, protein-protein complexes, and DNA-protein complexes. On the end of the microscope's cantilever is a nano-scale probe, which traverses image areas ranging from nanometers to micrometers, measuring the elevation of macromolecules resting on the substrate surface at any given point. Electrostatic forces cause proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids to loosely attach to the substrate in random orientations and permit imaging. The generated data resemble a topographical map, where the macromolecules resolve as three-dimensional particles of discrete sizes (Figure 1). Tapping mode AFM involves the repeated oscillation of the cantilever, which permits imaging of relatively soft biomaterials such as DNA and proteins. One of the notable benefits of AFM over other nanoscale microscopy techniques is its relative adaptability to visualize individual proteins and macromolecular complexes in aqueous buffers, including near-physiologic buffered conditions, in real-time, and without staining or coating the sample to be imaged. The method presented here describes the imaging of DNA and an immunoadsorbed transcription factor (i.e. the glucocorticoid receptor, GR) in buffered solution (Figure 2). Immunoadsorbed proteins and protein complexes can be separated from the immunoadsorbing antibody-bead pellet by competition with the antibody epitope and then imaged (Figure 2A). This allows for biochemical manipulation of the biomolecules of interest prior to imaging. Once purified, DNA and proteins can be mixed and the resultant interacting complex can be imaged as well. Binding of DNA to mica requires a divalent cation, such as Ni(2+) or Mg(2+), which can be added to sample buffers yet maintain protein activity. Using a similar approach, AFM has been utilized to visualize individual enzymes, including RNA polymerase and a repair enzyme, bound to individual DNA strands. These experiments provide

  10. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  11. Full mitochondrial genome sequences of two endemic Philippine hornbill species (Aves: Bucerotidae) provide evidence for pervasive mitochondrial DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although nowaday it is broadly accepted that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may undergo recombination, the frequency of such recombination remains controversial. Its estimation is not straightforward, as recombination under homoplasmy (i.e., among identical mt genomes) is likely to be overlooked. In species with tandem duplications of large mtDNA fragments the detection of recombination can be facilitated, as it can lead to gene conversion among duplicates. Although the mechanisms for concerted evolution in mtDNA are not fully understood yet, recombination rates have been estimated from "one per speciation event" down to 850 years or even "during every replication cycle". Results Here we present the first complete mt genome of the avian family Bucerotidae, i.e., that of two Philippine hornbills, Aceros waldeni and Penelopides panini. The mt genomes are characterized by a tandemly duplicated region encompassing part of cytochrome b, 3 tRNAs, NADH6, and the control region. The duplicated fragments are identical to each other except for a short section in domain I and for the length of repeat motifs in domain III of the control region. Due to the heteroplasmy with regard to the number of these repeat motifs, there is some size variation in both genomes; with around 21,657 bp (A. waldeni) and 22,737 bp (P. panini), they significantly exceed the hitherto longest known avian mt genomes, that of the albatrosses. We discovered concerted evolution between the duplicated fragments within individuals. The existence of differences between individuals in coding genes as well as in the control region, which are maintained between duplicates, indicates that recombination apparently occurs frequently, i.e., in every generation. Conclusions The homogenised duplicates are interspersed by a short fragment which shows no sign of recombination. We hypothesize that this region corresponds to the so-called Replication Fork Barrier (RFB), which has been described from the chicken

  12. Meiotic recombination breakpoints are associated with open chromatin and enriched with repetitive DNA elements in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiotic recombination provides the framework for the genetic variation in natural and artificial populations of eukaryotes through the creation of novel haplotypes. Thus, determining the molecular characteristics of meiotic recombination remains essential for future plant breeding efforts, which hea...

  13. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  14. Growth hormone from striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus): genomic organization, recombinant expression and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Poen, Sinothai; Pornbanlualap, Somchai

    2013-04-15

    Growth hormone is an essential polypeptide required for normal growth and development of vertebrates. In this report, striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) growth hormone gene and cDNA were isolated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The striped catfish growth hormone (scGH) encoding gene contains 5 exons and 4 introns. The cDNA sequence of the scGH gene contains a 603bp open reading frame and encodes for a 200-aa protein consisting of a putative 22-aa signal peptide and the mature 178-aa protein. The recombinant histidine-tagged scGH protein which expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies was unfolded, refolded and purified to near-homogeneity by Ni(2+)-NTA chromatography. Analysis of the secondary structure content by CD spectroscopy showed that the α-helical content of the refolded scGH is 55%. Elucidation of the folding pathway of scGH by fluorescence spectroscopy showed that denaturation transition of scGH is coincident and cooperative, consistent with the two-state denaturation mechanism. The purified scGH was biologically active and exhibited growth-promoting activity in striped catfish, but not tilapia.

  15. An adventure in biotechnology: the development of haemophilia A therapeutics -- from whole-blood transfusion to recombinant DNA to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kingdon, Henry S; Lundblad, Roger L

    2002-04-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion in the number of therapeutic proteins available for a wide spectrum of diseases. Some of these proteins are obtained from human plasma. Examples of these therapeutic proteins are albumin, intravenous immunoglobulins and prothrombin complex concentrates. The majority of new therapeutic proteins are, however, derived via recombinant DNA technology. There are other examples where the first therapeutic preparation was a crude preparation derived from plasma or tissue and where subsequent development has resulted in a recombinant form of the therapeutic protein. This article focuses on the development of therapeutics for the treatment of haemophilia A (deficiency of Factor VIII activity). The progression from crude plasma fractions to monoclonal-purified preparations to the more recent development of therapeutic concentrates via recombinant DNA technology is described in some detail. Finally, the current status of gene therapy for haemophilia A is evaluated. Both technical issues as well as market forces are described, as both have had significant impact on the product-development process.

  16. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  17. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved.

  18. DNA polymerase activity of tomato fruit chromoplasts.

    PubMed

    Serra, E C; Carrillo, N

    1990-11-26

    DNA polymerase activity was measured in chromoplasts of ripening tomato fruits. Plastids isolated from young leaves or mature red fruits showed similar DNA polymerase activities. The same enzyme species was present in either chloroplasts or chromoplasts as judged by pH and temperature profiles, sensitivities towards different inhibitors and relative molecular mass (Mr 88 kDa). The activities analyzed showed the typical behaviour of plastid-type polymerases. The results presented here suggest that chromoplast maintain their DNA synthesis potential in fruit tissue at chloroplast levels. Consequently, the sharp decrease of the plastid chromosome transcription observed at the onset of fruit ripening could not be due to limitations in the availability of template molecules. Other mechanisms must be involved in the inhibition of chromoplast RNA synthesis.

  19. Effect of dietary phytase transgenic corn on physiological characteristics and the fate of recombinant plant DNA in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunqi; Ma, Qiugang; Zhao, Lihong; Zhang, Jianyun; Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the potential effects of feeding with phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on organ weight, serum biochemical parameters and nutrient digestibility, and to determine the fate of the transgenic DNA in laying hens. A total of 144 50-week-old laying hens were grouped randomly into 2 treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 9 hens per replicate. Each treatment group of hens was fed with diets containing 62.4% non-transgenic conventional corn (CC) or PTC for 16 weeks. The phytase activity for CC was 37 FTU/kg of DM, whereas the phytase activity for PTC was 8,980 FTU/kg of DM. We observed that feeding PTC to laying hens had no adverse effect on organ weight or serum biochemical parameters (p>0.05). A fragment of a poultry-specific ovalbumin gene (ov) was amplified from all tissues of hens showing that the DNA preparations were amenable to PCR amplification. Neither the corn-specific invertase gene (ivr) nor the transgenic phyA2 gene was detected in the breast muscle, leg muscle, ovary, oviduct and eggs. The digestibility data revealed no significant differences between the hens that received the CC- and PTC-based diets in the digestibility of DM, energy, nitrogen and calcium (p>0.05). Phosphorus digestibility of hens fed the PTC-based diet was greater than that of hens fed the CC-based diet (58.03% vs 47.42%, p<0.01). Based on these results, it was concluded that the PTC had no deleterious effects on the organ weight or serum biochemical parameters of the laying hens. No recombinant phyA2 gene was detected in muscle tissues and reproductive organs of laying hens. The novel plant phytase was efficacious in improving the phosphorus digestibility of laying hens.

  20. Effect of Dietary Phytase Transgenic Corn on Physiological Characteristics and the Fate of Recombinant Plant DNA in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunqi; Ma, Qiugang; Zhao, Lihong; Zhang, Jianyun; Ji, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the potential effects of feeding with phytase transgenic corn (PTC) on organ weight, serum biochemical parameters and nutrient digestibility, and to determine the fate of the transgenic DNA in laying hens. A total of 144 50-week-old laying hens were grouped randomly into 2 treatments, with 8 replicates per treatment and 9 hens per replicate. Each treatment group of hens was fed with diets containing 62.4% non-transgenic conventional corn (CC) or PTC for 16 weeks. The phytase activity for CC was 37 FTU/kg of DM, whereas the phytase activity for PTC was 8,980 FTU/kg of DM. We observed that feeding PTC to laying hens had no adverse effect on organ weight or serum biochemical parameters (p>0.05). A fragment of a poultry-specific ovalbumin gene (ov) was amplified from all tissues of hens showing that the DNA preparations were amenable to PCR amplification. Neither the corn-specific invertase gene (ivr) nor the transgenic phyA2 gene was detected in the breast muscle, leg muscle, ovary, oviduct and eggs. The digestibility data revealed no significant differences between the hens that received the CC- and PTC-based diets in the digestibility of DM, energy, nitrogen and calcium (p>0.05). Phosphorus digestibility of hens fed the PTC-based diet was greater than that of hens fed the CC-based diet (58.03% vs 47.42%, p<0.01). Based on these results, it was concluded that the PTC had no deleterious effects on the organ weight or serum biochemical parameters of the laying hens. No recombinant phyA2 gene was detected in muscle tissues and reproductive organs of laying hens. The novel plant phytase was efficacious in improving the phosphorus digestibility of laying hens. PMID:25049929

  1. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Schneider, M.; Keller, J.; Ruscetti, F.; Longo, D.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Tribble, H.

    1989-05-01

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy.

  2. Cancer, viruses, and mass migration: Paul Berg's venture into eukaryotic biology and the advent of recombinant DNA research and technology, 1967-1980.

    PubMed

    Yi, Doogab

    2008-01-01

    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention in the history of recombinant DNA technology, investigates the development of recombinant DNA technology in its full scientific context. I do so by focusing on Stanford biochemist Berg's research on the genetic regulation of higher organisms. As I hope to demonstrate, Berg's new venture reflected a mass migration of biomedical researchers as they shifted from studying prokaryotic organisms like bacteria to studying eukaryotic organisms like mammalian and human cells. It was out of this boundary crossing from prokaryotic to eukaryotic systems through virus model systems that recombinant DNA technology and other significant new research techniques and agendas emerged. Indeed, in their attempt to reconstitute 'life' as a research technology, Stanford biochemists' recombinant DNA research recast genes as a sequence that could be rewritten thorough biochemical operations. The last part of this paper shifts focus from recombinant DNA technology's academic origins to its transformation into a genetic engineering technology by examining the wide range of experimental hybridizations which occurred as techniques and knowledge circulated between Stanford biochemists and the Bay Area's experimentalists. Situating their interchange in a dense research network based at Stanford's biochemistry department, this paper helps to revise the canonized history of genetic engineering's origins that emerged during

  3. Human RecQ helicases in DNA repair, recombination, and replication.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Deborah L; Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Opresko, Patricia L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-01-01

    RecQ helicases are an important family of genome surveillance proteins conserved from bacteria to humans. Each of the five human RecQ helicases plays critical roles in genome maintenance and stability, and the RecQ protein family members are often referred to as guardians of the genome. The importance of these proteins in cellular homeostasis is underscored by the fact that defects in BLM, WRN, and RECQL4 are linked to distinct heritable human disease syndromes. Each human RecQ helicase has a unique set of protein-interacting partners, and these interactions dictate its specialized functions in genome maintenance, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. Human RecQ helicases also interact with each other, and these interactions have significant impact on enzyme function. Future research goals in this field include a better understanding of the division of labor among the human RecQ helicases and learning how human RecQ helicases collaborate and cooperate to enhance genome stability.

  4. Position- and orientation-independent activity of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe meiotic recombination hot spot M26

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Mary E.; Virgin, Jeffrey B.; Metzger, Jens; Smith, Gerald R.

    1997-01-01

    The activity of the M26 meiotic recombination hot spot of Schizosaccharomyces pombe depends on the presence of the heptamer 5′-ATGACGT-3′. Transplacement of DNA fragments containing the ade6-M26 gene to other chromosomal loci has previously demonstrated that the heptamer functions in some, but not all, transplacements, suggesting that hot spot activity depends on chromosomal context. In this study, hot spot activity was tested in the absence of gross DNA changes by using site-directed mutagenesis to create the heptamer sequence at novel locations in the genome. When created by mutagenesis of 1–4 bp in the ade6 and ura4 genes, the heptamer was active as a recombination hot spot, in an orientation-independent manner, at all locations tested. Thus, the heptamer sequence can create an active hot spot in other chromosomal contexts, provided that the gross chromosomal structure is not altered; this result is consistent with the hypothesis that a specific higher-order chromatin structure is required for M26 hot spot activity. PMID:9207111

  5. Novel recombinant DNA vaccine candidates for human respiratory syncytial virus: Preclinical evaluation of immunogenicity and protection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Farrag, Mohamed A; Amer, Haitham M; Öhlschläger, Peter; Hamad, Maaweya E; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2017-03-08

    The development of safe and potent vaccines for human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is still a challenge for researchers worldwide. DNA-based immunization is currently a promising approach that has been used to generate human vaccines for different age groups. In this study, novel HRSV DNA vaccine candidates were generated and preclinically tested in BALB/c mice. Three different versions of the codon-optimized HRSV fusion (F) gene were individually cloned into the pPOE vector. The new recombinant vectors either express full-length (pPOE-F), secretory (pPOE-TF), or M282-90 linked (pPOE-FM2) forms of the F protein. Distinctive expression of the F protein was identified in HEp-2 cells transfected with the different recombinant vectors using ELISA and immunofluorescence. Mice immunization verified the potential for recombinant vectors to elicit significant levels of neutralizing antibodies and CD8(+) T-cell lymphocytes. pPOE-TF showed higher levels of gene expression in cell culture and better induction of the humoral and cellular immune responses. Following virus challenge, mice that had been immunized with the recombinant vectors were able to control virus replication and displayed lower inflammation compared with mice immunized with empty pPOE vector or formalin-inactivated HRSV vaccine. Moreover, pulmonary cytokine profiles of mice immunized with the 3 recombinant vectors were similar to those of the mock infected group. In conclusion, recombinant pPOE vectors are promising HRSV vaccine candidates in terms of their safety, immunogenicity and protective efficiency. These data encourage further evaluation in phase I clinical trials.

  6. Base pair switching by interconversion of sugar puckers in DNA extended by proteins of RecA-family: A model for homology search in homologous genetic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Nishinaka, Taro; Shinohara, Akira; Ito, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Shibata, Takehiko

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli RecA is a representative of proteins from the RecA family, which promote homologous pairing and strand exchange between double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA. These reactions are essential for homologous genetic recombination in various organisms. From NMR studies, we previously reported a novel deoxyribose-base stacking interaction between adjacent residues on the extended single-stranded DNA bound to RecA protein. In this study, we found that the same DNA structure was induced by the binding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 protein, indicating that the unique DNA structure induced by the binding to RecA-homologs was conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. On the basis of this structure, we have formulated the structure of duplex DNA within filaments formed by RecA protein and its homologs. Two types of molecular structures are presented. One is the duplex structure that has the N-type sugar pucker. Its helical pitch is ≈95 Å (18.6 bp/turn), corresponding to that of an active, or ATP-form of the RecA filament. The other is one that has the S-type sugar pucker. Its helical pitch is ≈64 Å (12.5 bp/turn), corresponding to that of an inactive, or ADP-form of the RecA filament. During this modeling, we found that the interconversion of sugar puckers between the N-type and the S-type rotates bases horizontally, while maintaining the deoxyribose-base stacking interaction. We propose that this base rotation enables base pair switching between double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA to take place, facilitating homologous pairing and strand exchange. A possible mechanism for strand exchange involving DNA rotation also is discussed. PMID:9736691

  7. DNA vaccines expressing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniela M; Miyaji, Eliane N; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Darrieux, Michelle; Arêas, Ana Paula M; Ho, Paulo L; Leite, Luciana C C

    2006-04-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) is a promising candidate for the development of cost-effective vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In the present study, BALB/c mice were immunized with DNA vaccine vectors expressing the N-terminal region of PspA. Animals immunized with a vector expressing secreted PspA developed higher levels of antibody than mice immunized with the vector expressing the antigen in the cytosol. However, both immunogens elicited similar levels of protection against intraperitoneal challenge. Furthermore, immunization with exactly the same fragment in the form of a recombinant protein, with aluminium hydroxide as an adjuvant, elicited even higher antibody levels, but this increased humoral response did not correlate with enhanced protection. These results show that DNA vaccines expressing PspA are able to elicit protection levels comparable to recombinant protein, even though total anti-PspA IgG response is considerably lower.

  8. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  9. The autolytic activity of the recombinant amidase of Staphylococcus saprophyticus is inhibited by its own recombinant GW repeats.

    PubMed

    Hell, Wolfgang; Reichl, Sylvia; Anders, Agnes; Gatermann, Sören

    2003-10-10

    The Aas (autolysin/adhesin of Staphylococcus saprophyticus) is a multifunctional surface protein containing two enzymatic domains an N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanine amidase, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, and two different regions of repetitive sequences, an N-terminal and a C-terminal repetitive domain. The C-terminal repetitive domain is built up by the repeats R1, R2 and R3, which interconnect the putative active centers of the amidase and glucosaminidase. To investigate the influence of the C-terminal repeats and the N-terminal repeats on the amidase activity, the repetitive domains and fragments of them were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The influence of the different fragments on the activity of the recombinant amidase of the Aas, consisting of the active center of the enzyme and repeat R1, was investigated in a turbidimetric microassay. The different fragments derived from the C-terminal repeats inhibited the amidase activity, while the N-terminal repeats did not influence the activity of the enzyme. The inhibiting activity increased with the number of GW repeats the recombinant fragment contained. Thus we conclude, that the C-terminal GW repeats and not the N-terminal repeats are necessary for the cell wall targeting and the autolytic function of the amidase.

  10. Genetic recombination induced by DNA double-strand break in bacteriophage T4: nature of the left/right bias.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Plugina, Lidiya; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena; Granovsky, Igor

    2008-06-01

    The experimental system combining double-strand breaks (DSBs), produced site-specifically by SegC endonuclease, with the famous advantages of the bacteriophage T4 rII mutant recombination analysis was used here to elucidate the origin of the recombination bias on two sides of the DSB, especially pronounced in gene 39 (topoisomerase II) and gene 59 (41-helicase loader) mutants. Three sources were found to contribute to the bias: (1) the SegC endonuclease may remain bound to the end of the broken DNA and thus protect it from exonuclease degradation; (2) in heteroduplex heterozygotes (HHs), arising as the recombinant products in the left-hand crosses, the transcribed strands are of rII mutant phenotype, so they, in contrast to the right-hand HHs, do not produce plaques on the lawn of the lambda-lysogenic host; and (3) the intrinsic polarity of T4 chromosome, reflected in transcription, may be a cause for discrimination of promoter-proximal and promoter-distal DNA sequences. It is shown that the apparent recombination bias does not imply one-sidedness of the DSB repair but just reflects a different depth of the end processing. It is inferred that the cause, underlying the "intrinsic" bias, might be interference between strand exchange and transcription. Topoisomerase and helicase functions are necessary to turn the process in favor of strand exchange. The idea is substantiated that the double-stranded to single-stranded DNA transition edge (not ss-DNA tip) serves as an actual recombinogenic element.

  11. [DNA vaccines and recombinant antigens in prevention of Toxoplasma gondii infections--current status of the studies].

    PubMed

    Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elzbieta; Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2009-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis caused by an intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii is still one of major medical and veterinary problems and there is still need for a vaccine for human toxoplasmosis. Despite years of research much remains to be done to develop effective vaccine. The article presents the current status of vaccine strategies against toxoplasmosis with focus on the most developed approaches using naked DNA and recombinant antigens.

  12. Mg-chelatase of tobacco: identification of a Chl D cDNA sequence encoding a third subunit, analysis of the interaction of the three subunits with the yeast two-hybrid system, and reconstitution of the enzyme activity by co-expression of recombinant CHL D, CHL H and CHL I.

    PubMed

    Papenbrock, J; Gräfe, S; Kruse, E; Hänel, F; Grimm, B

    1997-11-01

    Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase catalyzes insertion of the magnesium ion into protoporphyrin IX, the last common intermediate precursor in chlorophyll and heme biosynthesis, to form Mg-protoporphyrin IX. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Synechocystis, the three open reading frames bchD/chID, bchH/chIH and bchI/chII encode proteins which are required for in vitro Mg-chelatase activity. In higher plants also, three proteins are necessary for the Mg chelation, and genes homologous to bchH and bchI have been isolated previously. In this study, a novel tobacco cDNA sequence homologous to bchD is isolated and initially characterized. Together with the tobacco clones encoding the other two subunits, full-length cDNAs are now available for the first time for all three subunits of one plant species. The CHL D polypeptide deduced from the open reading frame encodes a protein of 758 aa (82.9 kDa) with an amino terminal extension that resembles a plastid transit peptide. Sequence comparison of tobacco CHL D revealed similarities to the D subunit of Rhodobacter and Synechocystis of 44% and 75%. The amino terminal half of CHL D shows significant similarity (46%) to the entire CHL I peptide sequence, indicating a gene duplication from an ancestral gene. The carboxy terminal half seemed to be unique. Both parts of CHL D are linked with a glutamine/asparagine/proline-rich region flanked by a highly acid-rich segment. Protein-protein interaction among the three subunits CHL D, H and I was studied using the yeast two-hybrid system. Physical interaction was demonstrated between CHL D and CHL I indicating that CHL D is part of the Mg-chelatase. Heterodimer formation of CHL H with CHL I or CHL D could not be demonstrated by transactivation of the lacZ reporter gene. Homodimerization of the CHL D subunit was indicated in the more sensitive assay on X-Gal-containing agar plates. In vitro Mg2+ insertion into protoporphyrin IX was demonstrated in protein extracts of yeast strains expressing

  13. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Koji; Narita, Takeo; Thanh Van, Pham; Iijima, Junko; Hirota, Kouji; Keka, Islam Shamima; Mohiuddin; Okawa, Katsuya; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Whitby, Matthew C.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Taniguchi, Yoshihito; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids, and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intact sister chromatid. HR hence plays pivotal roles in cellular proliferation and cellular tolerance to camptothecin. Mammalian cells carry several structure-specific endonucleases, such as Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1, in which Xpf and Mus81 are the essential subunits for enzymatic activity. Here we show the functional overlap between Xpf and Mus81 by conditionally inactivating Xpf in the chicken DT40 cell line, which has no Mus81 ortholog. Although mammalian cells deficient in either Xpf or Mus81 are viable, Xpf inactivation in DT40 cells was lethal, resulting in a marked increase in the number of spontaneous chromosome breaks. Similarly, inactivation of both Xpf and Mus81 in human HeLa cells and murine embryonic stem cells caused numerous spontaneous chromosome breaks. Furthermore, the phenotype of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells was reversed by ectopic expression of human Mus81-Eme1 or human Xpf-Ercc1 heterodimers. These observations indicate the functional overlap of Xpf-Ercc1 and Mus81-Eme1 in the maintenance of genomic DNA. Both Mus81-Eme1 and Xpf-Ercc1 contribute to the completion of HR as evidenced by the following data that the expression of Mus81-Eme1 or Xpf-Ercc1 diminished the number of camptothecin-induced chromosome breaks in Xpf-deficient DT40 cells, and preventing early steps in HR by deleting XRCC3 suppressed the inviability of Xpf-deficient DT40 cells. In summary, Xpf and Mus81 have a substantially overlapping function in completion of HR. PMID:23576554

  14. Polymorphism and recombination for rDNA in the putatively asexual microsporidian Nosema ceranae, a pathogen of honeybees.

    PubMed

    Sagastume, Soledad; del Aguila, Carmen; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Henriques-Gil, Nuno

    2011-01-01

    Nosema ceranae is currently one of the major pathogens of honeybees, related to the worldwide colony losses phenomenon. The genotyping of strains based on ribosomal DNA (rDNA) can be misleading if the repeated units are not identical. The analysis of cloned rDNA fragments containing the intergenic spacer (IGS) and part of the rDNA small-subunit (SSU) gene, from N. ceranae isolates from different European and Central Asia populations, revealed a high diversity of sequences. The variability involved single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertion/deletions, resulting in 79 different haplotypes. Two sequences from the same isolate could be as different as any pair of sequences from different samples; in contrast, identical haplotypes were also found in very different geographical origins. Consequently, haplotypes cannot be organized in a consistent phylogenetic tree, clearly indicating that rDNA is not a reliable marker for the differentiation of N. ceranae strains. The results indicate that recombination between different sequences may produce new variants, which is quite surprising in microsporidia, usually considered to have an asexual mode of reproduction. The diversity of sequences and their geographical distribution indicate that haplotypes of different lineages may occasionally be present in a same cell and undergo homologue recombination, therefore suggesting a sexual haplo-diploid cycle.

  15. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    PubMed

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  16. Redundant function of DNA ligase 1 and 3 in alternative end-joining during immunoglobulin class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Masani, Shahnaz; Han, Li; Meek, Katheryn; Yu, Kefei

    2016-02-02

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway in mammals and resolves the DSBs generated during both V(D)J recombination in developing lymphocytes and class switch recombination (CSR) in antigen-stimulated B cells. In contrast to the absolute requirement for NHEJ to resolve DSBs associated with V(D)J recombination, DSBs associated with CSR can be resolved in NHEJ-deficient cells (albeit at a reduced level) by a poorly defined alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway. Deletion of DNA ligase IV (Lig4), a core component of the NHEJ pathway, reduces CSR efficiency in a mouse B-cell line capable of robust cytokine-stimulated CSR in cell culture. Here, we report that CSR levels are not further reduced by deletion of either of the two remaining DNA ligases (Lig1 and nuclear Lig3) in Lig4(-/-) cells. We conclude that in the absence of Lig4, Lig1, and Lig3 function in a redundant manner in resolving switch region DSBs during CSR.

  17. Replication intermediates that escape Dna2 activity are processed by Holliday junction resolvase Yen1

    PubMed Central

    Ölmezer, Gizem; Levikova, Maryna; Klein, Dominique; Falquet, Benoît; Fontana, Gabriele Alessandro; Cejka, Petr; Rass, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved mechanisms to protect, restart and repair perturbed replication forks, allowing full genome duplication, even under replication stress. Interrogating the interplay between nuclease-helicase Dna2 and Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase Yen1, we find the Dna2 helicase activity acts parallel to homologous recombination (HR) in promoting DNA replication and chromosome detachment at mitosis after replication fork stalling. Yen1, but not the HJ resolvases Slx1-Slx4 and Mus81-Mms4, safeguards chromosome segregation by removing replication intermediates that escape Dna2. Post-replicative DNA damage checkpoint activation in Dna2 helicase-defective cells causes terminal G2/M arrest by precluding Yen1-dependent repair, whose activation requires progression into anaphase. These findings explain the exquisite replication stress sensitivity of Dna2 helicase-defective cells, and identify a non-canonical role for Yen1 in the processing of replication intermediates that is distinct from HJ resolution. The involvement of Dna2 helicase activity in completing replication may have implications for DNA2-associated pathologies, including cancer and Seckel syndrome. PMID:27779184

  18. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  19. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  20. Expression and enzymatic activity of recombinant cytochrome P450 17 alpha-hydroxylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, H J; Arlotto, M P; Waterman, M R

    1991-01-01

    When the cDNA encoding bovine microsomal 17 alpha-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 (P45017 alpha) containing modifications within the first seven codons which favor expression in Escherichia coli is placed in a highly regulated tac promoter expression plasmid, as much as 16 mg of spectrally detectable P45017 alpha per liter of culture can be synthesized and integrated into E. coli membranes. The known enzymatic activities of bovine P45017 alpha can be reconstituted by addition of purified rat liver NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase to isolated E. coli membrane fractions containing the recombinant P45017 alpha enzyme. Surprisingly, it is found that E. coli contain an electron-transport system that can substitute for the mammalian microsomal NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase in supporting both the 17 alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of P45017 alpha. Thus, not only can E. coli express this eukaryotic membrane protein at relatively high levels, but as evidenced by metabolism of steroids added directly to the cells, the enzyme is catalytically active in vivo. These studies establish E. coli as an efficacious heterologous expression system for structure-function analysis of the cytochrome P450 system. Images PMID:1829523

  1. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR. PMID:28101376

  2. Enzymatic vitreolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for vitreomacular traction

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Lipowski, Paweł; Zorena, Katarzyna; Skorek, Andrzej; Glasner, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of our research was to gain data about the efficacy of intravitreal injections of a recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) in dissolving vitreoretinal tractions (VRTs). Materials and methods The study group consisted of patients of our Ophthalmology Clinic who had received an injection of rTPA (TPA Group) for an existent vitreomacular traction confirmed by optical coherence tomography and stereoscopic examinations. The control group consisted of patients who had declined treatment despite the existence of a vitreomacular traction confirmed by the same diagnostic methods. Each group consisted of 30 people (30 eyes). The observation period was 6 months. Conclusion In both groups some of the VRTs had dissolved. In the TPA group the traction dissolved in 10 patients (33.33%) and in the control group only in 5 (16.67%). It is also important to point out that the mean baseline membrane thickness was higher in the TPA group than in the control group. Observing patients in both groups we noticed that the dissolution of vitreoretinal membrane occurred most frequently in those cases where the membrane was thin. In the TPA group, the mean membrane thickness after 6 months decreased considerably. At the same time, no significant change in the membrane thickness could be observed in the control group. Observation of the retinal thickness allows us to draw the following conclusion: in the TPA group, the retinal thickness in the macular area (edema) had decreased over the study period, whereas in the control group it had increased. In those cases where the traction had dissolved, the edema of the retina decreased by the end of the 6-month period in both groups. In the TPA group, the dissolution of the membrane occurred most often within 3 months from the primary injection. Based on statistics, we can confirm that in the control group there was a decrease in visual acuity during the 6 months of the study period. At the same time, visual acuity in the TPA

  3. Intrinsic ssDNA annealing activity in the C-terminal region of WRN.

    PubMed

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Beck, Gad; Lee, Jae Wan; Piotrowski, Jason; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2008-09-30

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder in humans characterized by premature aging and genetic instability. WS is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Cellular and biochemical studies suggest that WRN plays roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, telomere maintenance, and homologous recombination and that WRN has multiple enzymatic activities including 3' to 5' exonuclease, 3' to 5' helicase, and ssDNA annealing. The goal of this study was to map and further characterize the ssDNA annealing activity of WRN. Enzymatic studies using truncated forms of WRN identified a C-terminal 79 amino acid region between the RQC and the HRDC domains (aa1072-1150) that is required for ssDNA annealing activity. Deletion of the region reduced or eliminated ssDNA annealing activity of the WRN protein. Furthermore, the activity appears to correlate with DNA binding and oligomerization status of the protein.

  4. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR), a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  5. Mechanical constraints on Hin subunit rotation imposed by the Fis-enhancer system and DNA supercoiling during site-specific recombination

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Heiss, John K.; Johnson, Reid C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Hin, a member of the serine family of site-specific recombinases, regulates gene expression by inverting a DNA segment. DNA inversion requires assembly of an invertasome complex in which a recombinational enhancer DNA segment bound by the Fis protein associates with the Hin synaptic complex at the base of a supercoiled DNA branch. Each of the four Hin subunits becomes covalently joined to the cleaved DNA ends, and DNA exchange occurs by translocation of a Hin subunit pair within the tetramer. We show here that although the Hin tetramer forms a bidirectional molecular swivel, the Fis/enhancer system determines both the direction and number of subunit rotations. The chirality of supercoiling directs rotational direction, and the short DNA loop stabilized by Fis-Hin contacts limit rotational processivity, thereby ensuring that the DNA strands re-ligate in the recombinant configuration. We identify multiple rotational conformers that are formed under different supercoiling and solution conditions. PMID:19560425

  6. Non-canonical uracil processing in DNA gives rise to double-strand breaks and deletions: relevance to class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Bregenhorn, Stephanie; Kallenberger, Lia; Artola-Borán, Mariela; Peña-Diaz, Javier; Jiricny, Josef

    2016-01-01

    During class switch recombination (CSR), antigen-stimulated B-cells rearrange their immunoglobulin constant heavy chain (CH) loci to generate antibodies with different effector functions. CSR is initiated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines in switch (S) regions, repetitive sequences flanking the CH loci, to uracils. Although U/G mispairs arising in this way are generally efficiently repaired to C/Gs by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG)-initiated base excision repair (BER), uracil processing in S-regions of activated B-cells occasionally gives rise to double strand breaks (DSBs), which trigger CSR. Surprisingly, genetic experiments revealed that CSR is dependent not only on AID and UNG, but also on mismatch repair (MMR). To elucidate the role of MMR in CSR, we studied the processing of uracil-containing DNA substrates in extracts of MMR-proficient and –deficient human cells, as well as in a system reconstituted from recombinant BER and MMR proteins. Here, we show that the interplay of these repair systems gives rise to DSBs in vitro and to genomic deletions and mutations in vivo, particularly in an S-region sequence. Our findings further suggest that MMR affects pathway choice in DSB repair. Given its amenability to manipulation, our system represents a powerful tool for the molecular dissection of CSR. PMID:26743004

  7. Enhancement of antibody class switch recombination by the cumulative activity of four separate elements1

    PubMed Central

    Dunnick, Wesley A.; Shi, Jian; Zerbato, Jennifer M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Collins, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Class switch recombination of antibody isotype is mediated by a recombinational DNA deletion event, and must be robustly upregulated during antigen-driven differentiation of B cells. The enhancer region 3′ of the Cα gene is important for the upregulation of switch recombination. Using a transgene of the entire heavy chain constant region locus, we now demonstrate that it is the four 3′ enhancer elements themselves (a total of 4.7 kb) that are responsible for the upregulation, rather than the 24 kb of DNA in between them. Neither allelic exclusion nor transgenic μ expression is reduced by deletion of the four 3′ enhancers. We also test deletions of two or three of the 3′ enhancers, and show that deletion of more 3′ enhancers results in a progressive reduction in both switch recombination and germline transcription of all heavy chain genes. Nevertheless, we find evidence for special roles for some 3′ enhancers--different heavy chain genes are affected by different 3′ enhancer deletions. Thus, we find that the dramatic induction of class switch recombination during antigen-driven differentiation is the result of an interaction among four separated regulatory elements. PMID:21949022

  8. Cloning of the rat ErbB3 cDNA and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hellyer, N J; Kim, H H; Greaves, C H; Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1995-11-20

    Three cDNA fragments that encoded all but the extreme N terminus of the rat ErbB3 protein were cloned by low-stringency screening of a rat liver cDNA library with a human ERBB3 probe. The remaining 5'-end of the cDNA was generated by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method, and a single full-length rat ErbB3 cDNA was assembled. A comparison of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequences of human and rat ErbB3 was made, and the effects of certain aa substitutions in the putative protein tyrosine kinase domain were considered. The rat ErbB3 cDNA was subsequently expressed in cultured NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts, in which a high level of approx. 180-kDa recombinant ErbB3 (re-ErbB3) was generated. The rat re-ErbB3 produced in transfected fibroblasts was responsive to the polypeptide, heregulin, a known ligand for ErbB3. Challenge of transfected fibroblasts with heregulin stimulated the phosphorylation of rat re-ErbB3 on Tyr residues and promoted its association with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Together, these results indicate that a fully functional rat ErbB3 cDNA has been isolated, and that fibroblast cells expressing this cDNA will be suitable for investigations of the signal transduction mechanism of ErbB3.

  9. Selective utilization of nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways during nervous system development.

    PubMed

    Orii, Kenji E; Lee, Youngsoo; Kondo, Naomi; McKinnon, Peter J

    2006-06-27

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occurs via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). These mechanistically distinct pathways are critical for maintenance of genomic integrity and organismal survival. Although inactivation of either pathway leads to embryonic lethality, here we show selective requirements for each DNA DSB repair pathway at different stages of mammalian nervous system development. DNA damage-induced apoptosis resulting from inactivation of HR (Xrcc2 deficiency) only occurred in proliferating neural precursor cells, whereas disruption of NHEJ (DNA ligase IV deficiency) mainly affected differentiating cells at later developmental stages. Therefore, these data suggest that NHEJ is dispensable for a substantial portion of early development because DSB repair during this period utilizes HR. Moreover, DNA damage-induced apoptosis required the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) kinase after disruption of NHEJ, but not HR, during neurogenesis. However, embryonic lethality arising from disruption of either repair pathway was rescued by loss of p53 and resulted in specific tumor types reflective of the particular DSB repair pathway inactivated. Thus, these data reveal distinct tissue- and cell-type requirements for each DNA DSB repair pathway during neural development and provide insights for understanding the contributions of DNA DSB responses to disease.

  10. DNA and heparin chaperone the refolding of purified recombinant replication protein A subunit 1 from Leishmania amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Lira, C B B; Gui, K E; Perez, A M; da Silveira, R C V; Gava, L M; Ramos, C H I; Cano, M I N

    2009-02-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has been implicated in DNA metabolism and telomere maintenance. Subunit 1 of RPA from Leishmania amazonensis (LaRPA-1) has previously been affinity-purified on a column containing a G-rich telomeric DNA. LaRPA-1 binds and co-localizes with parasite telomeres in vivo. Here we describe the purification and characterization of native recombinant LaRPA-1 (rLaRPA-1). The protein was initially re-solubilized from inclusion bodies by using urea. After dialysis, rLaRPA-1 was soluble but contaminated with DNA, which was removed by an anion-exchange chromatography of the protein solubilized in urea. However, rLaRPA-1 precipitated after dialysis to remove urea. To investigate whether the contaminating DNA was involved in chaperoning the refolding of rLaRPA-1, salmon sperm DNA or heparin was added to the solution before dialysis. The addition of either of these substances prevented the precipitation of rLaRPA-1. The resulting rLaRPA-1 was soluble, correctly folded, and able to bind telomeric DNA. This is the first report showing the characterization of rLaRPA1 and of the importance of additives in chaperoning the refolding of this protein. The availability of rLaRPA-1 should be helpful in assessing the importance of this protein as a potential drug target.

  11. Permanent genetic access to transiently active neurons via TRAP: targeted recombination in active populations.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Casey J; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Yang, Helen H; Heller, H Craig; Luo, Liqun

    2013-06-05

    Targeting genetically encoded tools for neural circuit dissection to relevant cellular populations is a major challenge in neurobiology. We developed an approach, targeted recombination in active populations (TRAP), to obtain genetic access to neurons that were activated by defined stimuli. This method utilizes mice in which the tamoxifen-dependent recombinase CreER(T2) is expressed in an activity-dependent manner from the loci of the immediate early genes Arc and Fos. Active cells that express CreER(T2) can only undergo recombination when tamoxifen is present, allowing genetic access to neurons that are active during a time window of less than 12 hr. We show that TRAP can provide selective access to neurons activated by specific somatosensory, visual, and auditory stimuli and by experience in a novel environment. When combined with tools for labeling, tracing, recording, and manipulating neurons, TRAP offers a powerful approach for understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.